WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-resolution germanium detector

  1. A high resolution germanium detector array for hypernuclear studies at PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleser, Sebastian; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Steinen, Marcell [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Gerl, Juergen; Kojouharov, Ivan [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Iazzi, Felice [Politecnico, Torino, Turin (Italy); INFN, Torino, Turin (Italy); Pochodzalla, Josef; Rittgen, Kai; Sahin, Cihan [Institute for Nuclear Physics, JGU Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The PANDA experiment, planned at the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, aims at the high resolution γ-spectroscopy of double Λ hypernuclei. For this purpose a devoted detector setup is required, consisting of a primary nuclear target, an active secondary target and a germanium detector array for the γ-spectroscopy. Due to the limited space within the PANDA detector a compact design is required. In particular the conventional LN{sub 2} cooling system must be replaced by an electro-mechanical device and a new arrangement of the crystals is needed. This poster shows the ongoing development of the germanium detectors. Test measurements of a single crystal prototype with an improved cooling concept are shown. Thermal simulations for a triple crystal detector are presented. Aditionally studies of the optimization of the detector arrangement inside the PANDA barrel spectrometer are shown. Finally the status on digital pulse shape analysis is presented which will be necessary to deal with high counting rates and to recover the high original energy resolution in case of neutron damage.

  2. A high resolution germanium detector array for hypernuclear studies at PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleser, Sebastian; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Steinen, Marcell [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Gerl, Juergen; Kojouharova, Jasmina; Kojouharov, Ivan [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Iazzi, Felice [Politecnico, Torino (Italy); INFN, Torino (Italy); Pochodzalla, Josef; Rittgen, Kai; Sahin, Cihan [Institute for Nuclear Physics, JGU Mainz (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The PANDA experiment, planned at the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, aims at the high resolution γ-spectroscopy of double Λ hypernuclei. For this purpose a devoted detector setup is required, consisting of a primary nuclear target, an active secondary target and a germanium detector array for the γ-spectroscopy. Due to the limited space within the PANDA detector a compact design is required. In particular the conventional LN{sub 2} cooling system must be replaced by an electro mechanical device and a new arrangement of the crystals is needed. This presentation shows the progress in the development of the germanium detectors. First results of in-beam measurements at COSY with a new electro mechanically cooled single crystal prototype are presented. Digital pulse shape analysis is used to disentangle pile up events due to the high event rate. This analysis technique also allows to recover the high original energy resolution in case of neutron damage. Finally the status of the new triple crystal detector prototype is given.

  3. High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Imaging Measurements Using Externally Segmented Germanium Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callas, J.; Mahoney, W.; Skelton, R.; Varnell, L.; Wheaton, W.

    1994-01-01

    Fully two-dimensional gamma-ray imaging with simultaneous high-resolution spectroscopy has been demonstrated using an externally segmented germanium sensor. The system employs a single high-purity coaxial detector with its outer electrode segmented into 5 distinct charge collection regions and a lead coded aperture with a uniformly redundant array (URA) pattern. A series of one-dimensional responses was collected around 511 keV while the system was rotated in steps through 180 degrees. A non-negative, linear least-squares algorithm was then employed to reconstruct a 2-dimensional image. Corrections for multiple scattering in the detector, and the finite distance of source and detector are made in the reconstruction process.

  4. High-resolution imaging gamma-ray spectroscopy with externally segmented germanium detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callas, J. L.; Mahoney, W. A.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. An angular resolution of 0.2 deg becomes practical by combining position-sensitive germanium detectors having a segment thickness of a few millimeters with a one-dimensional coded aperture located about a meter from the detectors. Correspondingly higher angular resolutions are possible with larger separations between the detectors and the coded aperture. Two-dimensional images can be obtained by rotating the instrument. Although the basic concept is similar to optical or X-ray coded-aperture imaging techniques, several complicating effects arise because of the penetrating nature of gamma rays. The complications include partial transmission through the coded aperture elements, Compton scattering in the germanium detectors, and high background count rates. Extensive electron-photon Monte Carlo modeling of a realistic detector/coded-aperture/collimator system has been performed. Results show that these complicating effects can be characterized and accounted for with no significant loss in instrument sensitivity.

  5. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at high count rates with a prototype High Purity Germanium detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R. J.; Amman, M.; Vetter, K.

    2018-04-01

    High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers are required for applications in nuclear safeguards, emergency response, and fundamental nuclear physics. To overcome one of the shortcomings of conventional High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors, we have developed a prototype device capable of achieving high event throughput and high energy resolution at very high count rates. This device, the design of which we have previously reported on, features a planar HPGe crystal with a reduced-capacitance strip electrode geometry. This design is intended to provide good energy resolution at the short shaping or digital filter times that are required for high rate operation and which are enabled by the fast charge collection afforded by the planar geometry crystal. In this work, we report on the initial performance of the system at count rates up to and including two million counts per second.

  6. Fission-product yields for thermal-neutron fission of 243Cm determined from measurements with a high-resolution low-energy germanium gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriman, L.D.

    1984-04-01

    Cumulative fission-product yields have been determined for 13 gamma rays emitted during the decay of 12 fission products created by thermal-neutron fission of 243 Cm. A high-resolution low-energy germanium detector was used to measure the pulse-height spectra of gamma rays emitted from a 77-nanogram sample of 243 Cm after the sample had been irradiated by thermal neutrons. Analysis of the data resulted in the identification and matching of gamma-ray energies and half-lives to individual radioisotopes. From these results, 12 cumulative fission product yields were deduced for radionuclides with half-lives between 4.2 min and 84.2 min. 7 references

  7. Calibration of germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debertin, K.

    1983-01-01

    The process of determining the energy-dependent detection probability with measurements using Ge (Li) and high-grade germanium detectors is described. The paper explains which standards are best for a given purpose and given requirements as to accuracy, and how to assess measuring geometry variations and summation corrections. (DG) [de

  8. Calibration of germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjurman, B.; Erlandsson, B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes problems concerning the calibration of germanium detectors for the measurement of gamma-radiation from environmental samples. It also contains a brief description of some ways of reducing the uncertainties concerning the activity determination. These uncertainties have many sources, such as counting statistics, full energy peak efficiency determination, density correction and radionuclide specific-coincidence effects, when environmental samples are investigated at close source-to-detector distances

  9. Requirements on high resolution detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    For a number of microtomography applications X-ray detectors with a spatial resolution of 1 {mu}m are required. This high spatial resolution will influence and degrade other parameters of secondary importance like detective quantum efficiency (DQE), dynamic range, linearity and frame rate. This note summarizes the most important arguments, for and against those detector systems which could be considered. This article discusses the mutual dependencies between the various figures which characterize a detector, and tries to give some ideas on how to proceed in order to improve present technology.

  10. Array of germanium detectors for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Bernard, W.; Dowdy, E.J.; Garcia, C.; Lucas, M.C.; Pratt, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Our gamma-ray spectrometer system, designed for field use, offers high efficiency and high resolution for safeguards applications. The system consists of three 40% high-purity germanium detectors and a LeCroy 3500 data-acquisition system that calculates a composite spectrum for the three detectors. The LeCroy 3500 mainframe can be operated remotely from the detector array with control exercised through moderns and the telephone system. System performance with a mixed source of 125 Sb, 154 Eu, and 155 Eu confirms the expected efficiency of 120% with an overall resolution that is between the resolution of the best detector and that of the worst

  11. High-resolution gamma-ray measurement systems using a compact electro- mechanically cooled detector system and intelligent software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Neufeld, K.W.

    1995-01-01

    Obtaining high-resolution gamma-ray measurements using high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in the field has been of limited practicality due to the need to use and maintain a supply of liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ). This same constraint limits high-resolution gamma measurements in unattended safeguards or treaty Verification applications. We are developing detectors and software to greatly extend the applicability of high-resolution germanium-based measurements for these situations

  12. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karp, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface

  13. Lithium germanium detectors reactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolai, J.A.; Marti, G.V.; Riso, J.M.; Gimenez, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    A convenient method to regenerate the characteristics of damaged Ge(li) detectors, that has been applied in the authors' laboratory, is described. The procedure consists in warming-up the crystal in its cryostat to temperatures between 10 deg C and 30 deg C above room temperature, in order to clean its surface. Subsequent cooling down to liquid nitrogen temperature, followed by one or more clean-up drifting processes, are applied to the crystals. This paper summarizes the results obtained with several detectors; this method was applied successfully to 15 detectors more. (author) [es

  14. Assessment of ambient-temperature, high-resolution detectors for nuclear safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, W.D.; McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution, gamma- and x-ray spectrometry are used routinely in nuclear safeguards verification measurements of plutonium and uranium in the field. These measurements are now performed with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors that require cooling liquid-nitrogen temperatures, thus limiting their utility in field and unattended safeguards measurement applications. Ambient temperature semiconductor detectors may complement HPGe detectors for certain safeguards verification applications. Their potential will be determined by criteria such as their performance, commercial availability, stage of development, and costs. We have conducted as assessment of ambient temperature detectors for safeguards measurement applications with these criteria in mind

  15. Germanium detectors for nuclear spectroscopy: Current research and development activity at LNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napoli, D. R., E-mail: daniel.r.napoli@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Maggioni, G., E-mail: maggioni@lnl.infn.it; Carturan, S.; Gelain, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy “G. Galilei”, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35121 Padova (Italy); Eberth, J. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Straße 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Grimaldi, M. G.; Tatí, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania (Italy); Riccetto, S. [University of Camerino and INFN of Perugia (Italy); Mea, G. Della [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); University of Trento (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    High-purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors have reached an unprecedented level of sophistication and are still the best solution for high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. In the present work, we will show the results of the characterization of new surface treatments for the production of these detectors, studied in the framework of our multidisciplinary research program in HPGe detector technologies.

  16. Ultra high resolution X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, U.; Buehler, M.; Hentig, R. von; Hertrich, T.; Phelan, K.; Wernicke, D.; Hoehne, J.

    2001-01-01

    CSP Cryogenic Spectrometers GmbH is developing cryogenic energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers based on superconducting detector technology. Superconducting sensors exhibit at least a 10-fold improvement in energy resolution due to their low energy gap compared to conventional Si(Li) or Ge detectors. These capabilities are extremely valuable for the analysis of light elements and in general for the analysis of the low energy range of the X-ray spectrum. The spectrometer is based on a mechanical cooler needing no liquid coolants and an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) stage which supplies the operating temperature of below 100 mK for the superconducting sensor. Applications include surface analysis in semiconductor industry as well material analysis for material composition e.g. in ceramics or automobile industry

  17. High resolution imaging detectors and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Swapan K

    2015-01-01

    Interferometric observations need snapshots of very high time resolution of the order of (i) frame integration of about 100 Hz or (ii) photon-recording rates of several megahertz (MHz). Detectors play a key role in astronomical observations, and since the explanation of the photoelectric effect by Albert Einstein, the technology has evolved rather fast. The present-day technology has made it possible to develop large-format complementary metal oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled device (CCD) array mosaics, orthogonal transfer CCDs, electron-multiplication CCDs, electron-avalanche photodiode arrays, and quantum-well infrared (IR) photon detectors. The requirements to develop artifact-free photon shot noise-limited images are higher sensitivity and quantum efficiency, reduced noise that includes dark current, read-out and amplifier noise, smaller point-spread functions, and higher spectral bandwidth. This book aims to address such systems, technologies and design, evaluation and calibration, control...

  18. A high resolution β-detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charon, Y.; Cuzon, J.C.; Tricoire, H.; Valentin, L.

    1987-01-01

    We present a detector which associates a charge coupled device to a light amplifier. This image sensor must detect weak β-activity, with a 10 μm resolution and should replace the autoradiographic films used for molecular hybridization. The best results are obtained with the 35 S emittor, for which the resolution and the efficiency are respectively 20 μm and 100% (relative to the measured standard source)

  19. Imaging of gamma rays with the WINKLER high-resolution germanium spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, T.R.; Hamilton, T.W.; Hawley, J.D.; Kilner, J.R.; Murphy, M.J.; Nakano, G.H. (Luckheed Palo Alto Research Lab., Palo Alto, CA (US))

    1990-06-01

    The WINKLER spectrometer is a matrix of nine high-purity {ital n}-type germanium detectors developed for astrophysical observations and terrestrial radiation monitoring. The spectrometer has been fitted with a set of modulation collimator grids designed for imaging hard x-ray and gamma-ray sources by the Mertz, Nakano, and Kilner method. This technique employs a pair of gridded collimators in front of each detector with the number of grid bars varying from one to {ital N}, where {ital N} is the number of detectors. When the collimator pairs are rotated through a full 360-degree angular range, the detector signals provide the information for a two-dimensional band-limited Fourier reconstruction of order {ital N}. Tests of the spectrometer with single and multiple point sources as well as continuous source distributions are reported.

  20. Modeling an array of encapsulated germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, R

    2012-01-01

    A probability model has been presented for understanding the operation of an array of encapsulated germanium detectors generally known as composite detector. The addback mode of operation of a composite detector has been described considering the absorption and scattering of γ-rays. Considering up to triple detector hit events, we have obtained expressions for peak-to-total and peak-to-background ratios of the cluster detector, which consists of seven hexagonal closely packed encapsulated HPGe detectors. Results have been obtained for the miniball detectors comprising of three and four seven hexagonal closely packed encapsulated HPGe detectors. The formalism has been extended to the SPI spectrometer which is a telescope of the INTEGRAL satellite and consists of nineteen hexagonal closely packed encapsulated HPGe detectors. This spectrometer comprises of twelve detector modules surrounding the cluster detector. For comparison, we have considered a spectrometer comprising of nine detector modules surrounding the three detector configuration of miniball detector. In the present formalism, the operation of these sophisticated detectors could be described in terms of six probability amplitudes only. Using experimental data on relative efficiency and fold distribution of cluster detector as input, the fold distribution and the peak-to-total, peak-to-background ratios have been calculated for the SPI spectrometer and other composite detectors at 1332 keV. Remarkable agreement between experimental data and results from the present formalism has been observed for the SPI spectrometer.

  1. Electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Joseph Mauger, G.; Anderson, Eric H.

    1999-01-01

    We have successfully developed and fielded an electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector (EMC-HPGe) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This detector system was designed to provide optimum energy resolution, long lifetime, and extremely reliable operation for unattended and portable applications. For most analytical applications, high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are the standard detectors of choice, providing an unsurpassed combination of high energy resolution performance and exceptional detection efficiency. Logistical difficulties associated with providing the required liquid nitrogen (LN) for cooling is the primary reason that these systems are found mainly in laboratories. The EMC-HPGe detector system described in this paper successfully provides HPGe detector performance in a portable instrument that allows for isotopic analysis in the field. It incorporates a unique active vibration control system that allows the use of a Sunpower Stirling cycle cryocooler unit without significant spectral degradation from microphonics. All standard isotopic analysis codes, including MGA and MGA++, GAMANL, GRPANL and MGAU, typically used with HPGe detectors can be used with this system with excellent results. Several national and international Safeguards organisations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have expressed interest in this system. The detector was combined with custom software and demonstrated as a rapid Field Radiometric Identification System (FRIS) for the U.S. Customs Service . The European Communities' Safeguards Directorate (EURATOM) is field-testing the first Safeguards prototype in their applications. The EMC-HPGe detector system design, recent applications, and results will be highlighted

  2. Detector materials: germanium and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, E.E.

    1981-11-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1981 Nuclear Science Symposium. The basic physical properties of elemental semiconductors are reviewed. The interaction of energetic radiation with matter is discussed in order to develop a feeling for the appropriate semiconductor detector dimensions. The extremely low net dopant concentrations which are required are derived directly from the detector dimensions. A survey of the more recent techniques which have been developed for the analysis of detector grade semiconductor single crystals is presented

  3. Experience from operating germanium detectors in GERDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palioselitis, Dimitrios; GERDA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, searching for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge, was completed in September 2013. The most competitive half-life lower limit for the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set (T-0ν1/2 > 2.1 · 1025 yr at 90% C.L.). GERDA operates bare Ge diodes immersed in liquid argon. During Phase I, mainly refurbished semi-coaxial high purity Ge detectors from previous experiments were used. The experience gained with handling and operating bare Ge diodes in liquid argon, as well as the stability and performance of the detectors during GERDA Phase I are presented. Thirty additional new enriched BEGe-type detectors were produced and will be used in Phase II. A subgroup of these detectors has already been used successfully in GERDA Phase I. The present paper gives an overview of the production chain of the new germanium detectors, the steps taken to minimise the exposure to cosmic radiation during manufacturing, and the first results of characterisation measurements in vacuum cryostats.

  4. Experience from operating germanium detectors in GERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palioselitis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, searching for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76 Ge, was completed in September 2013. The most competitive half-life lower limit for the 0νββ decay of 76 Ge was set (T- 0ν 1/2 > 2.1 · 10 25 yr at 90% C.L.). GERDA operates bare Ge diodes immersed in liquid argon. During Phase I, mainly refurbished semi-coaxial high purity Ge detectors from previous experiments were used. The experience gained with handling and operating bare Ge diodes in liquid argon, as well as the stability and performance of the detectors during GERDA Phase I are presented. Thirty additional new enriched BEGe-type detectors were produced and will be used in Phase II. A subgroup of these detectors has already been used successfully in GERDA Phase I. The present paper gives an overview of the production chain of the new germanium detectors, the steps taken to minimise the exposure to cosmic radiation during manufacturing, and the first results of characterisation measurements in vacuum cryostats. (paper)

  5. Cryogenic readout techniques for germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benato, G. [University of Zurich, (Switzerland); Cattadori, C. [INFN - Milano Bicocca, (Italy); Di Vacri, A. [INFN LNGS, (Italy); Ferri, E. [Universita Milano Bicocca/INFN Milano Bicocca, (Italy); D' Andrea, V.; Macolino, C. [GSSI/INFN LNGS, (Italy); Riboldi, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano/INFN Milano, (Italy); Salamida, F. [Universita Milano Bicocca/INFN Milano Bicocca, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    High Purity Germanium detectors are used in many applications, from nuclear and astro-particle physics, to homeland security or environment protection. Although quite standard configurations are often used, with cryostats, charge sensitive amplifiers and analog or digital acquisition systems all commercially available, it might be the case that a few specific applications, e.g. satellites, portable devices, cryogenic physics experiments, etc. also require the development of a few additional or complementary techniques. An interesting case is for sure GERDA, the Germanium Detector Array experiment, searching for neutrino-less double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN - Italy. In GERDA the entire detector array, composed of semi-coaxial and BEGe naked crystals, is operated suspended inside a cryostat filled with liquid argon, that acts not only as cooling medium and but also as an active shield, thanks to its scintillation properties. These peculiar circumstances, together with the additional requirement of a very low radioactive background from all the materials adjacent to the detectors, clearly introduce significant constraints on the design of the Ge front-end readout electronics. All the Ge readout solutions developed within the framework of the GERDA collaboration, for both Phase I and Phase II, will be briefly reviewed, with their relative strength and weakness compared together and with respect to ideal Ge readout. Finally, the digital processing techniques developed by the GERDA collaboration for energy estimation of Ge detector signals will be recalled. (authors)

  6. New detector developments for high resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, S.I.; Pichler, B.; Lorenz, E.

    1998-01-01

    The strength of quantitative, functional imaging using positron emission tomography, specially in small animals, is limited due to the spatial resolution. Therefore, various tomograph designs employing new scintillators, light sensors, or coincidence electronic are investigated to improve resolution without losses in sensitivity. Luminous scintillators with short light decay time in combination with novel readout schemes using photomultipliers or semiconductor detectors are currently tested by several groups and are implemented in tomographs for small animals. This review summarises the state of development in high resolution positron emission tomography with a detailed description of a system incorporating avalanche photodiode arrays and small scintillation crystals. (orig.) [de

  7. Germanium detectors and natural radioactivity in food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbini, Lucia [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GeDet-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Potassium is a very important mineral for many physiological processes, like fluid balance, protein synthesis and signal transmission in nerves. Many aliments like raisins, bananas or chocolate contain potassium. Natural potassium contains 0.012% of the radioactive isotope Potassium 40. This isotope decays via β{sup +} decay into a metastable state of Argon 40, which reaches its ground state emitting a gamma of 1460 keV. A commercially produced Germanium detector has been used to measure the energy spectra of different selected food samples. It was calibrated with KCl and potassium contents were extracted. Results verify the high potassium content of commonly recommended food samples. However, the measurement quantitatively differ from the expectations in several cases. One of the most interesting results concerns chocolate bars with different percentages of cacao.

  8. Development of revitalisation technique for impaired lithium doped germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.S.B.; Rafi Ahmed, A.G.; Balasubramanian, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    Semiconductor detectors play very significant role in photon detection and are important tools in the field of gamma spectroscopy. Lithium doped germanium detectors belong to this category. The development of revitalisation technique for these impaired detectors are discussed in this report

  9. Pulse shapes and surface effects in segmented germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    It is well established that at least two neutrinos are massive. The absolute neutrino mass scale and the neutrino hierarchy are still unknown. In addition, it is not known whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) will be used to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 76 Ge. The discovery of this decay could help to answer the open questions. In the GERDA experiment, germanium detectors enriched in the isotope 76 Ge are used as source and detector at the same time. The experiment is planned in two phases. In the first, phase existing detectors are deployed. In the second phase, additional detectors will be added. These detectors can be segmented. A low background index around the Q value of the decay is important to maximize the sensitivity of the experiment. This can be achieved through anti-coincidences between segments and through pulse shape analysis. The background index due to radioactive decays in the detector strings and the detectors themselves was estimated, using Monte Carlo simulations for a nominal GERDA Phase II array with 18-fold segmented germanium detectors. A pulse shape simulation package was developed for segmented high-purity germanium detectors. The pulse shape simulation was validated with data taken with an 19-fold segmented high-purity germanium detector. The main part of the detector is 18-fold segmented, 6-fold in the azimuthal angle and 3-fold in the height. A 19th segment of 5mm thickness was created on the top surface of the detector. The detector was characterized and events with energy deposited in the top segment were studied in detail. It was found that the metalization close to the end of the detector is very important with respect to the length of the of the pulses observed. In addition indications for n-type and p-type surface channels were found. (orig.)

  10. Pulse shapes and surface effects in segmented germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Daniel

    2010-03-24

    It is well established that at least two neutrinos are massive. The absolute neutrino mass scale and the neutrino hierarchy are still unknown. In addition, it is not known whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) will be used to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. The discovery of this decay could help to answer the open questions. In the GERDA experiment, germanium detectors enriched in the isotope {sup 76}Ge are used as source and detector at the same time. The experiment is planned in two phases. In the first, phase existing detectors are deployed. In the second phase, additional detectors will be added. These detectors can be segmented. A low background index around the Q value of the decay is important to maximize the sensitivity of the experiment. This can be achieved through anti-coincidences between segments and through pulse shape analysis. The background index due to radioactive decays in the detector strings and the detectors themselves was estimated, using Monte Carlo simulations for a nominal GERDA Phase II array with 18-fold segmented germanium detectors. A pulse shape simulation package was developed for segmented high-purity germanium detectors. The pulse shape simulation was validated with data taken with an 19-fold segmented high-purity germanium detector. The main part of the detector is 18-fold segmented, 6-fold in the azimuthal angle and 3-fold in the height. A 19th segment of 5mm thickness was created on the top surface of the detector. The detector was characterized and events with energy deposited in the top segment were studied in detail. It was found that the metalization close to the end of the detector is very important with respect to the length of the of the pulses observed. In addition indications for n-type and p-type surface channels were found. (orig.)

  11. NanoComposite Polymers for High Resolution Near Infrared Detectors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop nanocomposite materials with tuned refractive index in the near infra red spectral range as an index-matched immersion lens for high resolution infra-red...

  12. Program LEPS to addition of gamma spectra from germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, L.

    1986-01-01

    The LEP program, written in FORTRAN IV, performs the addition of two spectra, collected with different detectors, from the same sample. This application, adds the two gamma spectra obtained from two opposite LEPS Germanium Detectors (Low Energy Photon Spectrometer), correcting the differences (channel/energy) between both two spectra, and fitting them before adding. The total-spectrum is recorded at the computer memory as a single spectrum. The necessary equipment, to run this program is: - Two opposite germanium detectors, with their associate electronics. - Multichannel analyzer (2048 memory channel minimum) - Computer on-line interfacing to multichannel analyzer. (Author) 4 refs

  13. Detectors for high resolution dynamic positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Tomography is the technique of producing a photographic image of an opaque specimen by transmitting a beam of x-rays or gamma rays through the specimen onto an adjacent photographic film. The image results from variations in thickness, density, and chemical composition, of the specimen. This technique is used to study the metabolism of the human brain. This article examines the design of equipment used for high resolution dynamic positron emission tomography. 27 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  14. High resolution, position sensitive detector for energetic particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, E.P.; Strathman, M.D.; Reed, D.A.; Odom, R.W.; Morse, D.H.; Pontau, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    The performance and design of an imaging position sensitive, particle beam detector will be presented. The detector is minimally invasive, operates a wide dynamic range (>10 10 ), and exhibits high spatial resolution. The secondary electrons produced when a particle beam passes through a thin foil are imaged using stigmatic ion optics onto a two-dimensional imaging detector. Due to the low scattering cross section of the 6 nm carbon foil the detector is a minimal perturbation on the primary beam. A prototype detector with an image resolution of approximately 5 μm for a field of view of 1 mm has been reported. A higher resolution detector for imaging small beams (<50 μm) with an image resolution of better than 0.5 μm has since been developed and its design is presented. (orig.)

  15. High resolution, position sensitive detector for energetic particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, E P [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Strathman, M D [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Reed, D A [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Odom, R W [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Morse, D H [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Pontau, A E [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The performance and design of an imaging position sensitive, particle beam detector will be presented. The detector is minimally invasive, operates a wide dynamic range (>10[sup 10]), and exhibits high spatial resolution. The secondary electrons produced when a particle beam passes through a thin foil are imaged using stigmatic ion optics onto a two-dimensional imaging detector. Due to the low scattering cross section of the 6 nm carbon foil the detector is a minimal perturbation on the primary beam. A prototype detector with an image resolution of approximately 5 [mu]m for a field of view of 1 mm has been reported. A higher resolution detector for imaging small beams (<50 [mu]m) with an image resolution of better than 0.5 [mu]m has since been developed and its design is presented. (orig.)

  16. High-Resolution Detector For X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Withrow, William K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Yost, Vaughn H.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed x-ray-sensitive imaging detector offers superior spatial resolution, counting-rate capacity, and dynamic range. Instrument based on laser-stimulated luminescence and reusable x-ray-sensitive film. Detector scans x-ray film line by line. Extracts latent image in film and simultaneously erases film for reuse. Used primarily for protein crystallography. Principle adapted to imaging detectors for electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy and general use in astronomy, engineering, and medicine.

  17. Prototype of high resolution PET using resistive electrode position sensitive CdTe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yohei; Ishii, Keizo; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Yamazaki, Hiromichi

    2008-01-01

    Downsizing detector elements makes it possible that spatial resolutions of positron emission tomography (PET) cameras are improved very much. From this point of view, semiconductor detectors are preferable. To obtain high resolution, the pixel type or the multi strip type of semiconductor detectors can be used. However, in this case, there is a low packing ratio problem, because a dead area between detector arrays cannot be neglected. Here, we propose the use of position sensitive semiconductor detectors with resistive electrode. The CdTe detector is promising as a detector for PET camera because of its high sensitivity. In this paper, we report development of prototype of high resolution PET using resistive electrode position sensitive CdTe detectors. We made 1-dimensional position sensitive CdTe detectors experimentally by changing the electrode thickness. We obtained 750 A as an appropriate thickness of position sensitive detectors, and evaluated the performance of the detector using a collimated 241 Am source. A good position resolution of 1.2 mm full width half maximum (FWHM) was obtained. On the basis of the fundamental development of resistive electrode position sensitive detectors, we constructed a prototype of high resolution PET which was a dual head type and was consisted of thirty-two 1-dimensional position sensitive detectors. In conclusion, we obtained high resolutions which are 0.75 mm (FWHM) in transaxial, and 1.5 mm (FWHM) in axial. (author)

  18. High resolution silicon detectors for colliding beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendolia, S.R.; Bedeschi, F.; Bertolucci, E.; Bettoni, D.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Dell'Orso, M.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Raso, G.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Stefanini, A.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.

    1984-01-01

    Resolution and linearity of the position measurement of Pisa multi-electrode silicon detectors are presented. The detectors are operated in slightly underdepleted mode and take advantage of their intrinsic resistivity for resistive charge partition between adjacent strips. 22 μm resolution is achieved with readout lines spaced 300 μm. Possible applications in colliding beam experiments for the detection of secondary vertices are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Event timing in high purity germanium coaxial detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ibiary, M.Y.

    1979-08-01

    The timing of gamma ray radiation in systems using high purity coaxial germanium detectors is analyzed and compared to that of systems using Ge(Li) detectors. The analysis takes into account the effect of the residual impurities on the electric field distribution, and hence on the rate of rise of the electrical pulses delivered to the timing module. Conditions under which the electric field distribution could lead to an improvement in timing performance, are identified. The results of the analysis confirm the experimental results published elsewhere and when compared with those for Ge(Li) detectors, which usually operate under conditions of charge carrier velocity saturation, confirm that high purity germanium detectors need not have inferior timing characteristics. A chart is given to provide a quantitative basis on which the trade off between the radius of the detector and its time resolution may be made

  20. A 3D CZT high resolution detector for x- and gamma-ray astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Zappettini, A.

    2014-01-01

    At DTU Space we have developed a high resolution three dimensional (3D) position sensitive CZT detector for high energy astronomy. The design of the 3D CZT detector is based on the CZT Drift Strip detector principle. The position determination perpendicular to the anode strips is performed using...

  1. High-resolution ion-implanted silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Borany, J.; Schmidt, B.

    1985-01-01

    An account is given of the properties of silicon detectors developed at the Central Institute of Nuclear Research of the Academy of Sciences of the German Democratic Republic (Rossendorf) and made by a special planar technology using ion implantation, anodic oxidation, thermal oxidation in an oxygen atmosphere containing HCl, and annealing by pulses of 10--20 msec duration. The resolution for α particles of 5.5 MeV energy was 11.2 keV (active area A 2 ). The detectors were characterized by a low intrinsic noise (< or =5 keV), so that they could be used for spectrometry of low-energy electrons (E/sub e/< or =250 keV). In a certain range of energies (E/sub x/ = 15--60 keV) it was possible to use these detectors for spectrometry of x rays at room temperature. Examples and results of applications of detectors in radiation chemistry (investigations of backscattering of particles and nuclear reaction spectroscopy) are given. The feasibility of annealing of radiation defects in such detectors after irradiation with a large dose of charged particles is considered

  2. Photon-Counting Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) for High Resolution Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are developing ultrasensitive Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) for high resolution far-infrared spectroscopy applications, with a long-term goal of...

  3. Proposal for a semiconductor high resolution tracking detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    A 'new' concept for detection and tracking of charged particles in high energy physics experiments is proposed. It combines a well known high purity semiconductor diode detector (HPSDD) with a heterojunction structure (HJ) and a negative electron affinity (NEA) surface. The detector should be capable of providing a two dimensional view (few cm 2 ) of multi-track events with the following properties: a) position resolution down to a few μm (10 8 position elements); b) high density of information (10 2 -10 3 dots per mm of minimum ionizing track); c) high rate capabilities (few MHz); d) live operation with options to be triggered and/or the information from the detector can be used as an input for the decision to record an event. (orig.)

  4. High resolution X radiography imaging detector-micro gap chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Huqiang; Wang Yun; Xu Dong; Xie Kuanzhong; Bian Jianjiang

    2007-01-01

    Micro gap chamber (MGC) is a new type of Two-Dimensional position sensitive detector having excellent properties on the space and time resolution, counting rate, 2D compact structure and the flexible of application. It will become a candidate of a new tracking detector for high energy physics experiment. The basic structure and properties of MGC as well as its main research subjects are presented in this paper. Furthermore, the feasibility and validity of utilizing diamond films as the MGC gap material were also discussed in detail. So, a potential radiography imaging detector is provided in order to realize X image and X ray diffraction experiment having very good spatial and time resolution in the 3rd Generation of Synchrotron Radiation Facility. (authors)

  5. High resolution radiography of ambers with pixel detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Beneš, J.; Sopko, V.; Jandejsek, I.; Pflegerová, Jitka

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2013), C03024 ISSN 1748-0221. [Conference: International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors /14./. Figueira da Foz, 01.07.2012-05.07.2012] Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA103/09/2101; GA Mšk(CZ) LA08032 Program:GA; LA Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : X-ray detectors * Inspection with x-rays * X-ray radiography and digital radiography (DR) Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.526, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-0221/8/03/C03024/

  6. Germanium detector studies in the framework of the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budjas, Dusan

    2009-05-06

    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) is an ultra-low background experiment under construction at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. GERDA will search for {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double beta decay with an aim for 100-fold reduction in background compared to predecessor experiments. This ambition necessitates innovative design approaches, strict selection of low-radioactivity materials, and novel techniques for active background suppression. The core feature of GERDA is its array of germanium detectors for ionizing radiation, which are enriched in {sup 76}Ge. Germanium detectors are the central theme of this dissertation. The first part describes the implementation, testing, and optimisation of Monte Carlo simulations of germanium spectrometers, intensively involved in the selection of low-radioactivity materials. The simulations are essential for evaluations of the gamma ray measurements. The second part concerns the development and validation of an active background suppression technique based on germanium detector signal shape analysis. This was performed for the first time using a BEGe-type detector, which features a small read-out electrode. As a result of this work, BEGe is now one of the two detector technologies included in research and development for the second phase of the GERDA experiment. A suppression of major GERDA backgrounds is demonstrated, with (0.93{+-}0.08)% survival probability for events from {sup 60}Co, (21{+-}3)% for {sup 226}Ra, and (40{+-}2)% for {sup 228}Th. The acceptance of {sup 228}Th double escape events, which are analogous to double beta decay, was kept at (89{+-}1)%. (orig.)

  7. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  8. Digital signal processors for cryogenic high-resolution x-ray detector readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Stephan; Drury, Owen B.; Bechstein, Sylke; Hennig, Wolfgang; Momayezi, Michael

    2003-01-01

    We are developing fast digital signal processors (DSPs) to read out superconducting high-resolution X-ray detectors with on-line pulse processing. For superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector read-out, the DSPs offer online filtering, rise time discrimination and pile-up rejection. Compared to analog pulse processing, DSP readout somewhat degrades the detector resolution, but improves the spectral purity of the detector response. We discuss DSP performance with our 9-channel STJ array for synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  9. Mechanically-cooled germanium detector using two stirling refrigerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yoshii; Takahashi, Koji

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we present a developed mechanically-cooled germanium gamma-ray detector using Stirling refrigerators. Two Stirling refrigerators having cooling faculty of 1.5W at 80K were used to cool down a germanium detector element to 77K instead of a dewar containing liquid nitrogen. An 145cm 3 (56.0mmf x 59.1 mml) closed-end Ge(I) detector having relative detection efficiency of 29.4% was attached at the refrigerators. The size of the detector was 60cml x 15cmh x 15cmw. The lowest cooling temperature, 70K was obtained after 8 hours operation. The energy resolutions for 1.33MeV gamma-rays and for pulser signals were 2.43keV and 1.84keV at an amplifier shaping time of 2μsec, respectively

  10. The germanium wall of the GEM detector system GEM Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betigeri, M.; Biakowski, E.; Bojowald, H.; Budzanowski, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Drochner, M.; Ernst, J.; Foertsch, S.; Freindl, L.; Frekers, D.; Garske, W.; Grewer, K.; Hamacher, A.; Igel, S.; Ilieva, J.; Jarczyk, L.; Jochmann, M.; Kemmerling, G.; Kilian, K.; Kliczewski, S.; Klimala, W.; Kolev, D.; Kutsarova, T.; Lieb, J.; Lippert, G.; Machner, H.; Magiera, A.; Nann, H.; Pentchev, L.; Plendl, H.S.; Protic, D.; Razen, B.; Rossen, P. von; Roy, B.J.; Siudak, R.; Smyrski, J.; Srikantiah, R.V.; Strzakowski, A.; Tsenov, R.; Zolnierczuk, P.A.; Zwoll, K.

    1999-01-01

    A stack of annular detectors made of high-purity germanium was developed. The detectors are position sensitive with radial structures. The first one ('Quirl') is double-sided position sensitive defining 40,000 pixels, the following three (E1, E2 and E3) have 32 wedges each. The Quirl acts as tracker while the other three act as calorimeter. The stack was successfully operated in meson production reactions close to threshold

  11. Lifetime measurements of charmed mesons with high resolution silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijk, G.A.F. de.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis an experiment is described to measure the lifetimes of pseudoscalar charmed mesons. The experiment uses a negatively charged unseparated hadron beam of 200 GeV. The experiment is carried out with a magnetic spectrometer preceded by a beam telescope, an active target and a vertex telescope, all consisting of Si microstrip detectors. The spectrometer consists of two spectrometer magnets, 48 planes of drift chambers and 3 Cerenkov hodoscopes for the determination and identification of charged secondaries. The lifetimes of the charmed mesons are determined by measuring the length of their flight path, their momentum and their mass. The results, which are described in the thesis, are based on the analysis of part of the collected data. The production rates in the K - beam and in the π - beam are found to be in the same order of magnitude within the x F range covered. Previous experimental data on the lifetimes of charmed particles are reviewed. A theoretical interpretation is presented of the measured decay properties. (Auth.)

  12. New DOI identification approach for high-resolution PET detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choghadi, Amin; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Shimazoe, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) Identification in positron emission tomography (PET) detectors is getting importance as it improves spatial resolution in both conventional and time-of-flight (TOF) PET, and coincidence time resolution (CTR) in TOF-PET. In both prototypes, spatial resolution is affected by parallax error caused by length of scintillator crystals. This long length also contributes substantial timing uncertainty to the time resolution of TOF-PET. Through DOI identification, both parallax error and the timing uncertainty caused by the length of crystal can be resolved. In this work, a novel approach to estimate DOI was investigated, enjoying the interference of absorbance spectrum of scintillator crystals with their emission spectrum. Because the absorption length is close to zero for shorter wavelengths of crystal emission spectrum, the counts in this range of spectrum highly depend on DOI; that is, higher counts corresponds to deeper interactions. The ratio of counts in this range to the total counts is a good measure to estimate DOI. In order to extract such ratio, two photodetectors for each crystal are used and an optical filter is mounted only on top of one of them. The ratio of filtered output to non-filtered output can be utilized as DOI estimator. For a 2×2×20 mm 3 GAGG:Ce scintillator, 8-mm DOI resolution achieved in our simulations. (author)

  13. Performance of a Small Anode Germanium Well detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adekola, A.S.; Colaresi, J.; Douwen, J.; Mueller, W.F.; Yocum, K.M.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Small Anode Germanium (SAGe) Well detector [1] has been evaluated for a range of sample sizes and geometries counted inside the well, on the end cap or in Marinelli beakers. The SAGe Well is a new type of low capacitance germanium well detector manufactured using small anode technology. The detector has similar energy resolution performance to semi-planar detectors, and offers significant improvement over the Coaxial and existing Well detectors. Resolution performance of 0.75 keV Full Width at Half Maxiumum (FWHM) at 122 keV γ-ray energy and resolution of 2.0–2.3 keV FWHM at 1332 keV γ-ray energy are guaranteed. Such outstanding resolution performance will benefit environmental applications in revealing the detailed radionuclide content of samples, particularly at low energy, and will enhance the detection sensitivity resulting in reduced counting time. This paper reports the counting performance of SAGe Well detector for range of sample sizes and geometries and how it compares to other detector types

  14. Performance of a Small Anode Germanium Well detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adekola, A.S., E-mail: aderemi.adekola@canberra.com; Colaresi, J.; Douwen, J.; Mueller, W.F.; Yocum, K.M.

    2015-06-01

    The performance of Small Anode Germanium (SAGe) Well detector [1] has been evaluated for a range of sample sizes and geometries counted inside the well, on the end cap or in Marinelli beakers. The SAGe Well is a new type of low capacitance germanium well detector manufactured using small anode technology. The detector has similar energy resolution performance to semi-planar detectors, and offers significant improvement over the Coaxial and existing Well detectors. Resolution performance of 0.75 keV Full Width at Half Maxiumum (FWHM) at 122 keV γ-ray energy and resolution of 2.0–2.3 keV FWHM at 1332 keV γ-ray energy are guaranteed. Such outstanding resolution performance will benefit environmental applications in revealing the detailed radionuclide content of samples, particularly at low energy, and will enhance the detection sensitivity resulting in reduced counting time. This paper reports the counting performance of SAGe Well detector for range of sample sizes and geometries and how it compares to other detector types.

  15. Characterisation of the SmartPET planar Germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, H.C. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: H.C.Boston@liverpool.ac.uk; Boston, A.J.; Cooper, R.J.; Cresswell, J.; Grint, A.N.; Mather, A.R.; Nolan, P.J.; Scraggs, D.P.; Turk, G. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Hall, C.J.; Lazarus, I. [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Berry, A.; Beveridge, T.; Gillam, J.; Lewis, R. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2007-08-21

    Small Animal Reconstruction PET (SmartPET) is a project funded by the UK medical research council (MRC) to demonstrate proof of principle that Germanium can be utilised in Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The SmartPET demonstrator consists of two orthogonal strip High Purity Germanium (HPGe) planar detectors manufactured by ORTEC. The aim of the project is to produce images of an internal source with sub mm{sup 3} spatial resolution. Before this image can be achieved the detectors have to be fully characterised to understand the response at any given location to a {gamma}-ray interaction. This has been achieved by probing the two detectors at a number of specified points with collimated sources of various energies and strengths. A 1 mm diameter collimated beam of photons was raster scanned in 1 mm steps across the detector. Digital pulse shape data were recorded from all the detector channels and the performance of the detector for energy and position determination has been assessed. Data will be presented for the first SmartPET detector.

  16. Modeling the Efficiency of a Germanium Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayton, Keith; Prewitt, Michelle; Quarles, C. A.

    2006-10-01

    We are using the Monte Carlo Program PENELOPE and the cylindrical geometry program PENCYL to develop a model of the detector efficiency of a planar Ge detector. The detector is used for x-ray measurements in an ongoing experiment to measure electron bremsstrahlung. While we are mainly interested in the efficiency up to 60 keV, the model ranges from 10.1 keV (below the Ge absorption edge at 11.1 keV) to 800 keV. Measurements of the detector efficiency have been made in a well-defined geometry with calibrated radioactive sources: Co-57, Se-75, Ba-133, Am-241 and Bi-207. The model is compared with the experimental measurements and is expected to provide a better interpolation formula for the detector efficiency than simply using x-ray absorption coefficients for the major constituents of the detector. Using PENELOPE, we will discuss several factors, such as Ge dead layer, surface ice layer and angular divergence of the source, that influence the efficiency of the detector.

  17. Special Cryostats for Lithium Compensated Germanium Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauber, A; Malmsten, B; Rosencrantz, B

    1968-05-15

    In many applications of Ge(Li) detectors an extreme design of the cryostat is desirable. One example is a coincidence or anticoincidence setup where the Ge(Li) detector is surrounded by one or several other detectors, usually Nal(Tl) crystals or plastic scintillators. To be usable in this arrangement the part of the cryostat containing the Ge(Li) detector should have the form of a long hood, with the detector placed at its very end. The diameter of the hood should be as small as detector dimensions permit. Excellent energy resolution and reasonably low liquid nitrogen consumption must be retained. Two cryostats fulfilling these conditions will be described. For the first cryostat emphasis lay on the reduction of the hood diameter to an absolute minimum; for the other incorporation of a device regulating the temperature of the cryostat surface was required. The difficulties encountered will be discussed; they were primarily connected with the necessity of combining minimum temperature loss at the detector position with extreme cryostat compactness and cold finger length. The incorporation of a cooled FET transistor in the cryostat will also be described. The gamma spectrometers using the cryostats gave resolutions down to 2.8 keV FWHM for the 1173 keV gamma line from Co 60 and 1.2 keV FWHM for the 122 keV line from Co 57.

  18. Environmental applications for an intrinsic germanium well detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegnar, P.; Eldridge, J.S.; Teasley, N.A.; Oakes, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    The overall performance of an intrinsic germanium well detector for 125 I measurements was investigated in a program of environmental surveillance. Concentrations of 125 I and 131 I were determined in thyroids of road-killed deer showing the highest activities of 125 I in the animals from the near vicinity of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This demonstrates the utility of road-killed deer as a bioindicator for radioiodine around nuclear facilities

  19. Environmental applications for an intrinsic germanium well detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegnar, P.; Eldridge, J.S.; Teasley, N.A.; Oakes, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    The overall performance of an intrinsic germanium well detector for 125 I measurements was investigated in a program of environmental surveillance. Concentrations of 125 I and 131 I were determined in thyroids of road-killed deer showing the highest activities of 125 I in the animals from the near vicinity of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This demonstrates the utility of road-killed deer as a bionindicator for radioiodine around nuclear facilities. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Environmental applications for an intrinsic germanium well detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegnar, P.; Eldridge, J.S.; Teasley, N.A.; Oakes, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    The overall performance of an intrinsic germanium well detector for 125 I measurements was investigated in a program of environmental surveillance. Concentrations of 125 I and 131 I were determined in thyroids of road-killed deer showing the highest activities of 125 I in the animals from the near vicinity of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This demonstrates the utility of road-killed deer as a bioindicator for radioiodine around nuclear facilities. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Preliminary report on the development of a high resolution PET camera using semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yohei; Ishii, Keizo; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Sato, Takemi; Aoki, Yasushi; Aoki, Kenichi

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a PET camera using small semiconductor detectors, whose resolution is equivalent to the physical limit of spatial resolution. First, a coincidence system of 16 Schottky CdTe detectors of 0.5 mm width obtained a resolution of <1 mm and it was confirmed that the Schottky CdTe detector is suitable for high resolution PET. Next, the performance of a pair of 32 channel CdTe arrays (1.2 mm width per channel) was investigated for the development of the prototype of high resolution PET. The time resolution between opposing detector pair was 13 ns (FWHM) when high voltage (700 V) was applied. The image of a 0.6 mm diameter point source was obtained in an experiment with opposing detector arrays using four channels, indicating that, a higher resolution can be achieved with the 32 channel CdTe array

  2. Germanium blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossington, C.S.

    1988-04-01

    The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been of interest to scientist since the eighteenth century when Sir William Herschel discovered the infrared as he measured temperatures in the sun's spectrum and found that there was energy beyond the red. In the late nineteenth century, Thomas Edison established himself as the first infrared astronomer to look beyond the solar system when he observed the star Arcturus in the infrared. Significant advances in infrared technology and physics, long since Edison's time, have resulted in many scientific developments, such as the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) which was launched in 1983, semiconductor infrared detectors for materials characterization, military equipment such as night-vision goggles and infrared surveillance equipment. It is now planned that cooled semiconductor infrared detectors will play a major role in the ''Star Wars'' nuclear defense scheme proposed by the Reagan administration

  3. Fast neutron damage in germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraner, H.W.

    1979-10-01

    The effects of fast neutron radiation damage on the performance of both Ge(Li) and Ge(HP) detectors have been studied during the past decade and will be summarized. A review of the interaction processes leading to the defect structures causing trapping will be made. The neutron energy dependence of observable damage effects will be considered in terms of interaction and defect production cross sections

  4. High Resolution PET with 250 micrometer LSO Detectors and Adaptive Zoom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, Simon R.; Qi, Jinyi

    2012-01-01

    There have been impressive improvements in the performance of small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) systems since their first development in the mid 1990s, both in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which have directly contributed to the increasing adoption of this technology for a wide range of biomedical applications. Nonetheless, current systems still are largely dominated by the size of the scintillator elements used in the detector. Our research predicts that developing scintillator arrays with an element size of 250 (micro)m or smaller will lead to an image resolution of 500 (micro)m when using 18F- or 64Cu-labeled radiotracers, giving a factor of 4-8 improvement in volumetric resolution over the highest resolution research systems currently in existence. This proposal had two main objectives: (i) To develop and evaluate much higher resolution and efficiency scintillator arrays that can be used in the future as the basis for detectors in a small-animal PET scanner where the spatial resolution is dominated by decay and interaction physics rather than detector size. (ii) To optimize one such high resolution, high sensitivity detector and adaptively integrate it into the existing microPET II small animal PET scanner as a 'zoom-in' detector that provides higher spatial resolution and sensitivity in a limited region close to the detector face. The knowledge gained from this project will provide valuable information for building future PET systems with a complete ring of very high-resolution detector arrays and also lay the foundations for utilizing high-resolution detectors in combination with existing PET systems for localized high-resolution imaging.

  5. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  6. The Future of Low Temperature Germanium as Dark Matter Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    The Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs) represent one of the most attractive candidates for the dark matter in the universe. With the combination of experiments attempting to detect WIMP scattering in the laboratory, of searches for their annihilation in the cosmos and of their potential production at the LHC, the next five years promise to be transformative. I will review the role played so far by low temperature germanium detectors in the direct detection of WIMPs. Because of its high signal to noise ratio, the simultaneous measurement of athermal phonons and ionization is so far the only demonstrated approach with zero-background. I will argue that this technology can be extrapolated to a target mass of the order of a tonne at reasonable cost and can keep playing a leading role, complementary to noble liquid technologies. I will describe in particular GEODM, the proposed Germanium Observatory for Dark Matter at the US Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL).

  7. CeBr3 as a room-temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guss, Paul; Reed, Michael; Yuan Ding; Reed, Alexis; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2009-01-01

    Cerium bromide (CeBr 3 ) has become a material of interest in the race for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at room temperature. This investigation quantified the potential of CeBr 3 as a room-temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector. The performance of CeBr 3 crystals was compared to other scintillation crystals of similar dimensions and detection environments. Comparison of self-activity of CeBr 3 to cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr 3 :Ce) was performed. Energy resolution and relative intrinsic efficiency were measured and are presented.

  8. A high-resolution multiwire area detector for X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faruqi, A R; Andrews, H [Medical Research Council, Cambridge (UK). Lab. of Molecular Biology

    1989-11-10

    A high-resolution multiwire area detector has been developed for recording X-ray scattering from biological specimens. The detector is 100x100 mm{sup 2} and, under the present operating conditions, has a spatial resolution of about 250 {mu}m in both directions. The detector is set up on a double-mirror focusing camera on a rotating anode X-ray generator and has been used in a number of small-angle experiments, two of which are described in this paper. (orig.).

  9. Motivation for an SSC detector with ultra-high resolution photon detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunion, J.F.; Kane, G.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that incorporating ultra-high resolution photon detection into a general purpose detector for the SSC will be extremely difficult. The authors will argue that the physics signals that could be missed without such resolution are of such importance that a special purpose detector designed specifically for photon final state modes should be constructed, if sufficient resolution cannot be achieved with general purpose detectors. The potentially great value of these signals as a probe of extremely high mass scales is stressed

  10. Gamma ray polarimetry using a position sensitive germanium detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kroeger, R A; Kurfess, J D; Phlips, B F

    1999-01-01

    Imaging gamma-ray detectors make sensitive polarimeters in the Compton energy regime by measuring the scatter direction of gamma rays. The principle is to capitalize on the angular dependence of the Compton scattering cross section to polarized gamma rays and measure the distribution of scatter directions within the detector. This technique is effective in a double-sided germanium detector between roughly 50 keV and 1 MeV. This paper reviews device characteristics important to the optimization of a Compton polarimeter, and summarizes measurements we have made using a device with a 5x5 cm active area, 1 cm thickness, and strip-electrodes on a 2 mm pitch.

  11. Self-absorption corrections for well-type germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleby, P.G.; Richardson, N.; Nolan, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Corrections for self-absorption are of vital importance to accurate determination by gamma spectrometry of radionuclides such as 210 Pb, 241 Am and 234 Th which emit low energy gamma radiation. A simple theoretical model for determining the necessary corrections for well-type germanium detectors is presented. In this model, self-absorption factors are expressed in terms of the mass attenuation coefficient of the sample and a parameter characterising the well geometry. Experimental measurements of self-absorption are used to evaluate the model and to determine a semi-empirical algorithm for improved estimates of the geometrical parameter. (orig.)

  12. Automation of the Characterization of High Purity Germanium Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, Charles ``Chip''

    2014-09-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of the detectors must be characterized. A robotic arm is being tested for future calibration of HPGe detectors. The arm will hold a source at locations relative to the crystal while data is acquired. Several radioactive sources of varying energy levels will be used to determine the characteristics of the crystal. In this poster, I will present our work with the robot, as well as the characterization of data we took with an underground HPGe detector at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, NM (2013). Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of

  13. Gas scintillation glass GEM detector for high-resolution X-ray imaging and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, T., E-mail: fujiwara-t@aist.go.jp [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Mitsuya, Y. [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Fushie, T. [Radiment Lab. Inc., Setagaya, Tokyo 156-0044 (Japan); Murata, K.; Kawamura, A.; Koishikawa, A. [XIT Co., Naruse, Machida, Tokyo 194-0045 (Japan); Toyokawa, H. [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    A high-spatial-resolution X-ray-imaging gaseous detector has been developed with a single high-gas-gain glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), scintillation gas, and optical camera. High-resolution X-ray imaging of soft elements is performed with a spatial resolution of 281 µm rms and an effective area of 100×100 mm. In addition, high-resolution X-ray 3D computed tomography (CT) is successfully demonstrated with the gaseous detector. It shows high sensitivity to low-energy X-rays, which results in high-contrast radiographs of objects containing elements with low atomic numbers. In addition, the high yield of scintillation light enables fast X-ray imaging, which is an advantage for constructing CT images with low-energy X-rays.

  14. Performance of a 6x6 segmented germanium detector for {gamma}-ray tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiente-Dobon, J.J. E-mail: j.valiente-dobon@surrey.ac.uk; Pearson, C.J.; Regan, P.H.; Sellin, P.J.; Gelletly, W.; Morton, E.; Boston, A.; Descovich, M.; Nolan, P.J.; Simpson, J.; Lazarus, I.; Warner, D

    2003-06-01

    A 36 fold segmented germanium coaxial detector has been supplied by EURISYS MESURES. The outer contact is segmented both radially and longitudinally. The signals from the fast preamplifiers have been digitised by 12 bit, 40 MHz ADCs. In this article we report preliminary results obtained using this detector and their relevance for future germanium {gamma}-ray tracking arrays.

  15. Charge Spreading and Position Sensitivity in a Segmented Planar Germanium Detector (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kroeger, R. A; Gehrels, N; Johnson, W. N; Kurfess, J. D; Phlips, B. P; Tueller, J

    1998-01-01

    The size of the charge cloud collected in a segmented germanium detector is limited by the size of the initial cloud, uniformity of the electric field, and the diffusion of electrons and holes through the detector...

  16. Germanium microstrip detectors with 50 and 100 μm pitch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendolia, S.R.; Bedeschi, F.; Bertolucci, E.; Bettoni, D.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Dell'Orso, M.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Raso, G.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Stefanini, A.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Haller, E.E.; Hansen, W.L.; Luke, P.N.

    1984-01-01

    Multi-electrode germanium detectors are being used as an active target for decay path measurements of charmed mesons. The procedure used to fabricate such detectors is described and a brief analysis of their performance is given. (orig.)

  17. Induced Radioactivity Measured in a Germanium Detector After a Long Duration Balloon Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, R.; Evans, L. G.; Floyed, S. R.; Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Squyres, S. W.; Rester, A. C.

    1997-01-01

    A 13-day long duration balloon flight carrying a germanium detector was flown from Williams Field, Antartica in December 1992. After recovery of the payload the activity induced in the detector was measured.

  18. Digital approach to high-resolution pulse processing for semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, A.; Buchner, A.; Gast, W.; Lieder, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new design philosophy for processing signals produced by high resolution, large volume semiconductor detectors is described. These detectors, to be used in the next generation of spectrometer arrays for nuclear research (i.e. EUROBALL, etc.), present a set of problems like resolution degradation due to charge trapping and ballistic defect effects, low resolution at a high count rate, poor long term stability, etc. To solve these problems, a new design approach has been developed, including reconstruction of the event charge, providing a pure triangular residual function, and suppressing low frequency noise. 5 refs., 4 figs

  19. Digital approach to high-resolution pulse processing for semiconductor detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiev, A [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria); Buchner, A [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (Germany); Gast, W; Lieder, R M [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Stein, J [Target System Electronic GmbH, Solingen, (Germany)

    1992-08-01

    A new design philosophy for processing signals produced by high resolution, large volume semiconductor detectors is described. These detectors, to be used in the next generation of spectrometer arrays for nuclear research (i.e. EUROBALL, etc.), present a set of problems like resolution degradation due to charge trapping and ballistic defect effects, low resolution at a high count rate, poor long term stability, etc. To solve these problems, a new design approach has been developed, including reconstruction of the event charge, providing a pure triangular residual function, and suppressing low frequency noise. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  20. A superconducting detector endstation for high-resolution energy-dispersive SR-XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, S.; Niedermayr, T.; Drury, O.; Cunningham, M.F.; Berg, M.L. van den; Ullom, J.N.; Loshak, A.; Funk, T.; Cramer, S.P.; Batteux, J.D.; See, E.; Frank, M.; Labov, S.E.

    2001-01-01

    We have built a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate cryogenic high-resolution X-ray detectors in synchrotron-based fluorescence applications. The detector is held at the end of a 40 cm cold finger that extends into a UHV sample chamber. The ADR attains a base temperature below 100 mK with about 20 h hold time below 400 mK, and does not require pumping on the liquid He bath. We will discuss cryostat design and performance

  1. A superconducting detector endstation for high-resolution energy-dispersive SR-XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, S.; Drury, O.; Niedermayr, T.; Cunningham, M.F.; Van den Berg, M.L.; Ullom, J.N.; Loshak, A.; Cramer, S.P.; Batteux, J.D.; See, E.; Frank, M.; Labov, S.E.

    2000-01-01

    We have built a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate cryogenic high-resolution x-ray detectors in synchrotron-based fluorescence applications. The detector is held at the end of a 40 cm cold finger that extends into a UHV sample chamber. The ADR attains a base temperature below 100 mK with about 24 hours hold time below 400 mK, and does not require pumping on the liquid He bath. We will discuss cryostat design and performance

  2. A superconducting detector endstation for high-resolution energy-dispersive SR-XRF

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O B; Cunningham, M F; Berg, M L; Ullom, J N; Loshak, A; Funk, T; Cramer, S P; Batteux, J D; See, E; Frank, M; Labov, S E

    2001-01-01

    We have built a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate cryogenic high-resolution X-ray detectors in synchrotron-based fluorescence applications. The detector is held at the end of a 40 cm cold finger that extends into a UHV sample chamber. The ADR attains a base temperature below 100 mK with about 20 h hold time below 400 mK, and does not require pumping on the liquid He bath. We will discuss cryostat design and performance.

  3. A superconducting detector endstation for high-resolution energy-dispersive SR-XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, S. E-mail: friedrich1@llnl.gov; Niedermayr, T.; Drury, O.; Cunningham, M.F.; Berg, M.L. van den; Ullom, J.N.; Loshak, A.; Funk, T.; Cramer, S.P.; Batteux, J.D.; See, E.; Frank, M.; Labov, S.E

    2001-07-21

    We have built a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate cryogenic high-resolution X-ray detectors in synchrotron-based fluorescence applications. The detector is held at the end of a 40 cm cold finger that extends into a UHV sample chamber. The ADR attains a base temperature below 100 mK with about 20 h hold time below 400 mK, and does not require pumping on the liquid He bath. We will discuss cryostat design and performance.

  4. Strip interpolation in silicon and germanium strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulf, E. A.; Phlips, B. F.; Johnson, W. N.; Kurfess, J. D.; Lister, C. J.; Kondev, F.; Physics; Naval Research Lab.

    2004-01-01

    The position resolution of double-sided strip detectors is limited by the strip pitch and a reduction in strip pitch necessitates more electronics. Improved position resolution would improve the imaging capabilities of Compton telescopes and PET detectors. Digitizing the preamplifier waveform yields more information than can be extracted with regular shaping electronics. In addition to the energy, depth of interaction, and which strip was hit, the digitized preamplifier signals can locate the interaction position to less than the strip pitch of the detector by looking at induced signals in neighboring strips. This allows the position of the interaction to be interpolated in three dimensions and improve the imaging capabilities of the system. In a 2 mm thick silicon strip detector with a strip pitch of 0.891 mm, strip interpolation located the interaction of 356 keV gamma rays to 0.3 mm FWHM. In a 2 cm thick germanium detector with a strip pitch of 5 mm, strip interpolation of 356 keV gamma rays yielded a position resolution of 1.5 mm FWHM

  5. Performance of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors developed for storage-ring decay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Suzaki, F.; Izumikawa, T.; Miyazawa, S.; Morimoto, K.; Suzuki, T.; Tokanai, F.; Furuki, H.; Ichihashi, N.; Ichikawa, C.; Kitagawa, A.; Kuboki, T.; Momota, S.; Nagae, D.; Nagashima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Ozawa, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Position-sensitive detectors were developed for storage-ring decay spectroscopy. • Fiber scintillation and silicon strip detectors were tested with heavy ion beams. • A new fiber scintillation detector showed an excellent position resolution. • Position and energy detection by silicon strip detectors enable full identification. -- Abstract: As next generation spectroscopic tools, heavy-ion cooler storage rings will be a unique application of highly charged RI beam experiments. Decay spectroscopy of highly charged rare isotopes provides us important information relevant to the stellar conditions, such as for the s- and r-process nucleosynthesis. In-ring decay products of highly charged RI will be momentum-analyzed and reach a position-sensitive detector set-up located outside of the storage orbit. To realize such in-ring decay experiments, we have developed and tested two types of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors: silicon strips and scintillating fibers. The beam test experiments resulted in excellent position resolutions for both detectors, which will be available for future storage-ring experiments

  6. HEROICA: A fast screening facility for the characterization of germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreotti, Erica [Universität Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    In the course of 2012, a facility for the fast screening of germanium detectors called HEROICA (Hades Experimental Research Of Intrinsic Crystal Appliances) has been installed at the HADES underground laboratory in the premises of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK•CEN, in Mol (Belgium). The facility allows performing a complete characterization of the critical germanium detectors' operational parameters with a rate of about two detectors per week.

  7. TIGRESS highly-segmented high-purity germanium clover detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scraggs, H. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Hackman, G.; Smith, M. B.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Boston, A. J.; Bricault, P.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Churchman, R.; Cowan, N.; Cronkhite, G.; Cunningham, E. S.; Drake, T. E.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hyland, B.; Jones, B.; Leslie, J. R.; Martin, J.-P.; Morris, D.; Morton, A. C.; Phillips, A. A.; Sarazin, F.; Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Waddington, J. C.; Watters, L. M.; Zimmerman, L.

    2005-05-01

    The TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS) will consist of twelve units of four high-purity germanium (HPGe) crystals in a common cryostat. The outer contacts of each crystal will be divided into four quadrants and two lateral segments for a total of eight outer contacts. The performance of a prototype HPGe four-crystal unit has been investigated. Integrated noise spectra for all contacts were measured. Energy resolutions, relative efficiencies for both individual crystals and for the entire unit, and peak-to-total ratios were measured with point-like sources. Position-dependent performance was measured by moving a collimated source across the face of the detector.

  8. HPGe detectors long time behaviour in high-resolution γ spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo-Bohus, L.; Rosso, D.; Sajo Castelli, A.M.; Napoli, D.R.; Fioretto, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Barros, H.; Ur, C.A.; Palacios, D.; Liendo, J.

    2011-01-01

    A large set of data on long term performance of n-type HPGe detectors used in GASP, EUROBALL and CLARA γ spectrometers, as well as environmental measurements have been collected over two decades. In this paper a detailed statistical analysis of this data is given and detector long term behaviour is provided to the scientific community. We include failure, failure mode, repair frequency, repair outcome and its influence in the energy efficiency and energy resolution. A remarkable result is that the life span distribution is exponential. A detector's failure is a memory-less process, where a previous failure does not influence the upcoming one. Repaired spectrometers result in high reliability with deep implications in the management of large scale high-resolution gamma spectrometry related projects. Findings show that on average, detectors initial counting efficiency is slightly lower (∼2%) than that reported by the manufacturers and the repair process (including annealing) does not affect significantly the energy efficiency, even after a long period of use. Repaired detector energy resolution statistics show that the probability, that a repaired detector will be at least as good as it was originally, is more than 3/4.

  9. A time resolving data acquisition system for multiple high-resolution position sensitive detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimmler, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced time resolving data collection system for use in neutron and x-ray spectrometry has been implemented and put into routine operation. The system collects data from high-resolution position-sensitive area detectors with a maximum cumulative rate of 10/sup 6/ events per second. The events are sorted, in real-time, into many time-slice arrays. A programmable timing control unit allows for a wide choice of time sequences and time-slice array sizes. The shortest dwell time on a slice may be below 1 ms and the delay to switch between slices is zero

  10. Bayesian reconstruction of photon interaction sequences for high-resolution PET detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratx, Guillem; Levin, Craig S [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)], E-mail: cslevin@stanford.edu

    2009-09-07

    Realizing the full potential of high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems involves accurately positioning events in which the annihilation photon deposits all its energy across multiple detector elements. Reconstructing the complete sequence of interactions of each photon provides a reliable way to select the earliest interaction because it ensures that all the interactions are consistent with one another. Bayesian estimation forms a natural framework to maximize the consistency of the sequence with the measurements while taking into account the physics of {gamma}-ray transport. An inherently statistical method, it accounts for the uncertainty in the measured energy and position of each interaction. An algorithm based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) was evaluated for computer simulations. For a high-resolution PET system based on cadmium zinc telluride detectors, 93.8% of the recorded coincidences involved at least one photon multiple-interactions event (PMIE). The MAP estimate of the first interaction was accurate for 85.2% of the single photons. This represents a two-fold reduction in the number of mispositioned events compared to minimum pair distance, a simpler yet efficient positioning method. The point-spread function of the system presented lower tails and higher peak value when MAP was used. This translated into improved image quality, which we quantified by studying contrast and spatial resolution gains.

  11. Molecular imaging: High-resolution detectors for early diagnosis and therapy monitoring of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibaldi, F. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN-gr. Sanita-Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: Franco.garibaldi@iss.infn.it; Cisbani, E. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN-gr. Sanita-Rome (Italy); Colilli, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN-gr. Sanita-Rome (Italy); Cusanno, F. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN-gr. Sanita-Rome (Italy); Fratoni, R. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN-gr. Sanita-Rome (Italy); Giuliani, F. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN-gr. Sanita-Rome (Italy); Gricia, M. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN-gr. Sanita-Rome (Italy); Lucentini, M. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN-gr. Sanita-Rome (Italy); Fratoni, R. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN-gr. Sanita-Rome (Italy); Lo Meo, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN-gr. Sanita-Rome (Italy); Magliozzi, M.L. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN-gr. Sanita-Rome (Italy); Santanvenere, F. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN-gr. Sanita-Rome (Italy); Cinti, M.N. [University La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Pani, R. [University La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Pellegrini, R. [University La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Simonetti, G. [University Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Schillaci, O. [University Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Del Vecchio, S. [CNR Napoli, Naples (Italy); Salvatore, M. [CNR Napoli, Naples (Italy); Majewski, S. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Lanza, R.C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); De Vincentis, G. [University La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [University La Sapienza, Rome (Italy)

    2006-12-20

    Dedicated high-resolution detectors are required for detection of small cancerous breast tumours by molecular imaging with radionuclides. Absorptive collimation is normally applied in imaging single photon emitters, but it results in a strong reduction in detection efficiency. Systems based on electronic collimation are complex and expensive. For these reasons simulations and measurements have been performed to design optimised dedicated high-resolution mini gamma camera. Critical parameters are contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Intrinsic performance (spatial resolution, pixel identification, and response linearity and uniformity) were first optimised. Pixellated scintillator arrays (NaI(Tl)) of different pixel size were coupled to arrays of PSPMTs with different anode pad dimensions (6x6 mm{sup 2} and 3x3 mm{sup 2}). Detectors having a field of view (FOV) of 100x100 mm{sup 2} and 150x200 mm{sup 2} were designed and built. The electronic system allows read out of all the anode pad signals. The collimation technique was then considered and limits of coded aperture option were studied. Preliminary results are presented.

  12. Timing of gamma rays in coaxial germanium detector systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ibiary, M.Y.

    1979-01-01

    A study is reported on the timing uncertainty in gamma ray coaxial germanium detector systems. The work deals with the zero cross over method which is widely used to reduce the dependence of the instant of timing on the radiation energy absorbed and on the position within the detector at which absorption takes place. It is found that the amplitude risetime compensated (ARC) method gives, under normal conditions, the best resolution at a specific energy. For higher energies, the resolution improves and there is no shift of the mean instant of timing. The method is therefore well suited for wide energy coverage. The parameters involved in implementing an ARC system for optimum performance at a specific energy are identified in terms of the preamplifier noise level and risetime. A trade off can be made between the resolutions at high and at low energies. The time resolution attained is given by means of a series of charts which use normalized dimensionless variables for ready application to any given case. Lithium compensated Ge detectors which normally operate under conditions of velocity saturation of the charge carriers by applying sufficient bias voltage create an electric field in excess of 1 kV/cm throughout the depleted region. High purity Ge detectors where velocity saturation may not be reached within certain parts of the depleted region are studied. Special attention is given to the probability of pulses being incorrectly timed because of their slow rise or small magnitude. Such incorrect timing is energy-dependent and results in a noticeable distortion of the timing spectrum that relates to a wide energy range. Limitations on system parameters to keep the probability of incorrect timing below a specified fraction are given

  13. An Implant-Passivated Blocked Impurity Band Germanium Detector for the Far Infrared, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to investigate the feasibility of fabricating a germanium blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector using a novel process which will enable us to: 1- fabricate...

  14. An Implant-Passivated Blocked Impurity Band Germanium Detector for the Far Infrared, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to fabricate a germanium blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector using a novel process which will enable us to: 1- fabricate a suitably-doped active layer...

  15. Study of a high-resolution, 3-D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3-D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06±0.39% at 511 keV throughout most the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44±0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78±0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes – as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system. PMID:21335649

  16. Study of a high-resolution, 3D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-03-21

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06 ± 0.39% at 511 keV throughout most of the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44 ± 0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78 ± 0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes-as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system.

  17. Development of continuous detectors for a high resolution animal PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, S.; Cherry, S.R.; Ricci, A.R.; Shao, Y.; Phelps, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    The authors propose a design for a high resolution, gamma-camera style detector that is suitable for use in a positron emission tomograph dedicated to small animal research. Through Monte Carlo simulation the authors modeled the performance of a detector composed of one 76.2 x 76.2 x 8 mm thick LSO crystal coupled to a 3 in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT). The authors investigated the effect of optical coupling compounds, surface treatment and dept of interaction on the quantity (efficiency) and distribution (spread) of scintillation photons reaching the photocathode. They also investigated linearization of the position response. The authors propose a PET system consisting of fourteen of these detectors in 2 rings, yielding a 16 cm diameter by 15 cm long tomograph. It would operate in 3-D mode subtending a 68% solid angle to the center. The expected spatial resolution is (≤2 mm), with a system efficiency of ∼ 10% at the center (200 keV lower threshold) and a singles count rate capability of approximately 10 6 cps per detector

  18. PREFACE: 2nd Workshop on Germanium Detectors and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, I.; Majorovits, B.; Keller, C.; Mei, D.; Wang, G.; Wei, W.

    2015-05-01

    The 2nd workshop on Germanium (Ge) detectors and technology was held at the University of South Dakota on September 14-17th 2014, with more than 113 participants from 8 countries, 22 institutions, 15 national laboratories, and 8 companies. The participants represented the following big projects: (1) GERDA and Majorana for the search of neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ) (2) SuperCDMS, EDELWEISS, CDEX, and CoGeNT for search of dark matter; (3) TEXONO for sub-keV neutrino physics; (4) AGATA and GRETINA for gamma tracking; (5) AARM and others for low background radiation counting; (5) as well as PNNL and LBNL for applications of Ge detectors in homeland security. All participants have expressed a strong desire on having better understanding of Ge detector performance and advancing Ge technology for large-scale applications. The purpose of this workshop was to leverage the unique aspects of the underground laboratories in the world and the germanium (Ge) crystal growing infrastructure at the University of South Dakota (USD) by brining researchers from several institutions taking part in the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) together with key leaders from international laboratories and prestigious universities, working on the forefront of the intensity to advance underground physics focusing on the searches for dark matter, neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ), and neutrino properties. The goal of the workshop was to develop opportunities for EPSCoR institutions to play key roles in the planned world-class research experiments. The workshop was to integrate individual talents and existing research capabilities, from multiple disciplines and multiple institutions, to develop research collaborations, which includes EPSCor institutions from South Dakota, North Dakota, Alabama, Iowa, and South Carolina to support multi-ton scale experiments for future. The topic areas covered in the workshop were: 1) science related to Ge

  19. A new PET detector concept for compact preclinical high-resolution hybrid MR-PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneking, Arne; Gola, Alberto; Ferri, Alessandro; Finster, Felix; Rucatti, Daniele; Paternoster, Giovanni; Jon Shah, N.; Piemonte, Claudio; Lerche, Christoph

    2018-04-01

    This work presents a new PET detector concept for compact preclinical hybrid MR-PET. The detector concept is based on Linearly-Graded SiPM produced with current FBK RGB-HD technology. One 7.75 mm x 7.75 mm large sensor chip is coupled with optical grease to a black coated 8 mm x 8 mm large and 3 mm thick monolithic LYSO crystal. The readout is obtained from four readout channels with the linear encoding based on integrated resistors and the Center of Gravity approach. To characterize the new detector concept, the spatial and energy resolutions were measured. Therefore, the measurement setup was prepared to radiate a collimated beam to 25 different points perpendicular to the monolithic scintillator crystal. Starting in the center point of the crystal at 0 mm / 0 mm and sampling a grid with a pitch of 1.75 mm, all significant points of the detector were covered by the collimator beam. The measured intrinsic spatial resolution (FWHM) was 0.74 +/- 0.01 mm in x- and 0.69 +/- 0.01 mm in the y-direction at the center of the detector. At the same point, the measured energy resolution (FWHM) was 13.01 +/- 0.05 %. The mean intrinsic spatial resolution (FWHM) over the whole detector was 0.80 +/- 0.28 mm in x- and 0.72 +/- 0.19 mm in y-direction. The energy resolution (FWHM) of the detector was between 13 and 17.3 % with an average energy resolution of 15.7 +/- 1.0 %. Due to the reduced thickness, the sensitivity of this gamma detector is low but still higher than pixelated designs with the same thickness due to the monolithic crystals. Combining compact design, high spatial resolution, and high sensitivity, the detector concept is particularly suitable for applications where the scanner bore size is limited and high resolution is required - as is the case in small animal hybrid MR-PET.

  20. Segmentation of the Outer Contact on P-Type Coaxial Germanium Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Ethan L.; Pehl, Richard H.; Lathrop, James R.; Martin, Gregory N.; Mashburn, R. B.; Miley, Harry S.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hossbach, Todd W.

    2006-09-21

    Germanium detector arrays are needed for low-level counting facilities. The practical applications of such user facilities include characterization of low-level radioactive samples. In addition, the same detector arrays can also perform important fundamental physics measurements including the search for rare events like neutrino-less double-beta decay. Coaxial germanium detectors having segmented outer contacts will provide the next level of sensitivity improvement in low background measurements. The segmented outer detector contact allows performance of advanced pulse shape analysis measurements that provide additional background reduction. Currently, n-type (reverse electrode) germanium coaxial detectors are used whenever a segmented coaxial detector is needed because the outer boron (electron barrier) contact is thin and can be segmented. Coaxial detectors fabricated from p-type germanium cost less, have better resolution, and are larger than n-type coaxial detectors. However, it is difficult to reliably segment p-type coaxial detectors because thick (~1 mm) lithium-diffused (hole barrier) contacts are the standard outside contact for p-type coaxial detectors. During this Phase 1 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) we have researched the possibility of using amorphous germanium contacts as a thin outer contact of p-type coaxial detectors that can be segmented. We have developed amorphous germanium contacts that provide a very high hole barrier on small planar detectors. These easily segmented amorphous germanium contacts have been demonstrated to withstand several thousand volts/cm electric fields with no measurable leakage current (<1 pA) from charge injection over the hole barrier. We have also demonstrated that the contact can be sputter deposited around and over the curved outside surface of a small p-type coaxial detector. The amorphous contact has shown good rectification properties on the outside of a small p-type coaxial detector. These encouraging

  1. Overview of multi-element monolithic germanium detectors for XAFS experiments at diamond light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterji, S.; Dennis, G. J.; Dent, A.; Diaz-Moreno, S.; Cibin, G.; Tartoni, N.; Helsby, W. I.

    2016-01-01

    An overview of multi-element monolithic germanium detectors being used at the X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beam lines at Diamond Light Source (DLS) is being reported. The hardware details and a summary of the performance of these detectors have also been provided. Recent updates about various ongoing projects being worked on to improve the performance of these detectors are summarized.

  2. Overview of multi-element monolithic germanium detectors for XAFS experiments at diamond light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterji, S.; Dennis, G. J.; Dent, A.; Diaz-Moreno, S.; Cibin, G.; Tartoni, N. [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Helsby, W. I. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    An overview of multi-element monolithic germanium detectors being used at the X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beam lines at Diamond Light Source (DLS) is being reported. The hardware details and a summary of the performance of these detectors have also been provided. Recent updates about various ongoing projects being worked on to improve the performance of these detectors are summarized.

  3. EUV high resolution imager on-board solar orbiter: optical design and detector performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halain, J. P.; Mazzoli, A.; Rochus, P.; Renotte, E.; Stockman, Y.; Berghmans, D.; BenMoussa, A.; Auchère, F.

    2017-11-01

    The EUV high resolution imager (HRI) channel of the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI) on-board Solar Orbiter will observe the solar atmospheric layers at 17.4 nm wavelength with a 200 km resolution. The HRI channel is based on a compact two mirrors off-axis design. The spectral selection is obtained by a multilayer coating deposited on the mirrors and by redundant Aluminum filters rejecting the visible and infrared light. The detector is a 2k x 2k array back-thinned silicon CMOS-APS with 10 μm pixel pitch, sensitive in the EUV wavelength range. Due to the instrument compactness and the constraints on the optical design, the channel performance is very sensitive to the manufacturing, alignments and settling errors. A trade-off between two optical layouts was therefore performed to select the final optical design and to improve the mirror mounts. The effect of diffraction by the filter mesh support and by the mirror diffusion has been included in the overall error budget. Manufacturing of mirror and mounts has started and will result in thermo-mechanical validation on the EUI instrument structural and thermal model (STM). Because of the limited channel entrance aperture and consequently the low input flux, the channel performance also relies on the detector EUV sensitivity, readout noise and dynamic range. Based on the characterization of a CMOS-APS back-side detector prototype, showing promising results, the EUI detector has been specified and is under development. These detectors will undergo a qualification program before being tested and integrated on the EUI instrument.

  4. Development of high-resolution detector module with depth of interaction identification for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niknejad, Tahereh; Pizzichemi, Marco; Stringhini, Gianluca; Auffray, Etiennette; Bugalho, Ricardo; Da Silva, Jose Carlos; Di Francesco, Agostino; Ferramacho, Luis; Lecoq, Paul; Leong, Carlos; Paganoni, Marco; Rolo, Manuel; Silva, Rui; Silveira, Miguel; Tavernier, Stefaan; Varela, Joao; Zorraquino, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a Time-of-flight high resolution and commercially viable detector module for the application in small PET scanners. A new approach to depth of interaction (DOI) encoding with low complexity for a pixelated crystal array using a single side readout and 4-to-1 coupling between scintillators and photodetectors was investigated. In this method the DOI information is estimated using the light sharing technique. The detector module is a 1.53×1.53×15 mm"3 matrix of 8×8 LYSO scintillator with lateral surfaces optically depolished separated by reflective foils. The crystal array is optically coupled to 4×4 silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) array and readout by a high performance front-end ASIC with TDC capability (50 ps time binning). The results show an excellent crystal identification for all the scintillators in the matrix, a timing resolution of 530 ps, an average DOI resolution of 5.17 mm FWHM and an average energy resolution of 18.29% FWHM. - Highlights: • A new method for DOI encoding for PET detectors based on light sharing is proposed. • A prototype module with LYSO scintillator matrix coupled to SiPMs array is produced. • The module has one side readout and 4-to-1 coupling between scintillators and SiPMs. • A compact TOF front-end ASIC is used. • Excellent performances are shown by the prototype module.

  5. Development of high-resolution detector module with depth of interaction identification for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknejad, Tahereh, E-mail: tniknejad@lip.pt [Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); Pizzichemi, Marco [University of Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Stringhini, Gianluca [University of Milano-Bicocca (Italy); CERN, Geneve (Switzerland); Auffray, Etiennette [CERN, Geneve (Switzerland); Bugalho, Ricardo; Da Silva, Jose Carlos; Di Francesco, Agostino [Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); Ferramacho, Luis [PETsys Electronics, Oeiras (Portugal); Lecoq, Paul [CERN, Geneve (Switzerland); Leong, Carlos [PETsys Electronics, Oeiras (Portugal); Paganoni, Marco [University of Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Rolo, Manuel [Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); INFN, Turin (Italy); Silva, Rui [Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); Silveira, Miguel [PETsys Electronics, Oeiras (Portugal); Tavernier, Stefaan [PETsys Electronics, Oeiras (Portugal); Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium); Varela, Joao [Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); CERN, Geneve (Switzerland); Zorraquino, Carlos [Biomedical Image Technologies Lab, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain); CIBER-BBN, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-11

    We have developed a Time-of-flight high resolution and commercially viable detector module for the application in small PET scanners. A new approach to depth of interaction (DOI) encoding with low complexity for a pixelated crystal array using a single side readout and 4-to-1 coupling between scintillators and photodetectors was investigated. In this method the DOI information is estimated using the light sharing technique. The detector module is a 1.53×1.53×15 mm{sup 3} matrix of 8×8 LYSO scintillator with lateral surfaces optically depolished separated by reflective foils. The crystal array is optically coupled to 4×4 silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) array and readout by a high performance front-end ASIC with TDC capability (50 ps time binning). The results show an excellent crystal identification for all the scintillators in the matrix, a timing resolution of 530 ps, an average DOI resolution of 5.17 mm FWHM and an average energy resolution of 18.29% FWHM. - Highlights: • A new method for DOI encoding for PET detectors based on light sharing is proposed. • A prototype module with LYSO scintillator matrix coupled to SiPMs array is produced. • The module has one side readout and 4-to-1 coupling between scintillators and SiPMs. • A compact TOF front-end ASIC is used. • Excellent performances are shown by the prototype module.

  6. Applications of molecules as high-resolution, high-sensitivity threshold electron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutjian, A.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the work under the contract entitled ''Applications of Molecules as High-Resolution, High-Sensitivity Threshold Electron Detectors'' (DoE IAA No. DE-AI01-83ER13093 Mod. A006) was to explore the electron attachment properties of a variety of molecules at electron energies not accessible by other experimental techniques. As a result of this work, not only was a large body of basic data measured on attachment cross sections and rate constants; but also extensive theoretical calculations were carried out to verify the underlying phenomenon of s-wave attachment. Important outgrowths of this week were also realized in other areas of research. The basic data have applications in fields such as combustion, soot reduction, rocket-exhaust modification, threshold photoelectron spectroscopy, and trace species detection

  7. A large acceptance, high-resolution detector for rare K sup + -decay experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Appel, R; Bassalleck, B; Battiste, E; Bergman, D R; Boesiger, K; Brown, D N; Castillo, V; Cheung, N; Dhawan, S; Do, H; Egger, J; Eilerts, S W; Felder, C; Fischer, H; Gach, H M; Giles, R; Gninenko, S N; Herold, W D; Hotmer, J E; Issakov, V V; Karavichev, O V; Kaspar, H; Kraus, D E; Lazarus, D M; Lebedev, V A; Leipuner, L; Lichard, P; Lowe, J; Lozano, J; Lu, T; Ma, H; Magurno, B; Majid, W; Menzel, W; Miller, C S; Nickelson, M; Ober, I; Pile, P H; Pislak, S; Poblaguev, A A; Pomianowski, P A; Postoev, V E; Proskurjakov, A L; Rehak, P; Robmann, P; Schmid, B; Sher, A; Sher, A; Shunko, E; Steiner, S; Stever, T L; Stotzer, R W; Suhov, V V; Thompson, J A; Truöl, P; Valine, C M; Weyer, H; Wolfe, D M; Zeller, M E

    2002-01-01

    The detector of the E865-collaboration at the Brookhaven-AGS described here combines a magnetic spectrometer for the charged decay products of 6 GeV/c K sup + with excellent electromagnetic calorimetry and efficient particle identification for electrons and muons. Its high-resolution, large acceptance and high rate capability made it well suited for the study of extremely rare or forbidden decays with multi-leptonic final states such as K sup +-> pi sup +mu sup + e sup - , K sup +-> pi sup + l sup + l sup - , K sup +->l sup +nu sub l e sup - e sup + and K sup +-> pi sup +pi sup - e sup +nu sub e down to branching ratios below 10 sup - sup 1 sup 1 in an intense K sup + beam (approx 10 sup 8 per AGS spill).

  8. A large acceptance, high-resolution detector for rare K+-decay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, R.; Atoyan, G.S.; Bassalleck, B.; Battiste, E.; Bergman, D.R.; Boesiger, K.; Brown, D.N.; Castillo, V.; Cheung, N.; Dhawan, S.; Do, H.; Egger, J.; Eilerts, S.W.; Felder, C.; Fischer, H.; Gach, H.M.; Giles, R.; Gninenko, S.N.; Herold, W.D.; Hotmer, J.E.; Issakov, V.V.; Karavichev, O.V.; Kaspar, H.; Kraus, D.E.; Lazarus, D.M.; Lebedev, V.A.; Leipuner, L.; Lichard, P.; Lowe, J.; Lozano, J.; Lu, T.; Ma, H.; Magurno, B.; Majid, W.; Menzel, W.; Miller, C.S.; Nickelson, M.; Ober, I.; Pile, P.H.; Pislak, S.; Poblaguev, A.A.; Pomianowski, P.; Postoev, V.E.; Proskurjakov, A.L.; Rehak, P.; Robmann, P.; Schmid, B.; Sher, A.; Sher, Aleksey; Shunko, E.; Steiner, S.; Stever, T.L.; Stotzer, R.W.; Suhov, V.V.; Thompson, J.A.; Truoel, P.; Valine, C.; Weyer, H.; Wolfe, D.M.; Zeller, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    The detector of the E865-collaboration at the Brookhaven-AGS described here combines a magnetic spectrometer for the charged decay products of 6 GeV/c K + with excellent electromagnetic calorimetry and efficient particle identification for electrons and muons. Its high-resolution, large acceptance and high rate capability made it well suited for the study of extremely rare or forbidden decays with multi-leptonic final states such as K + →π + μ + e - , K + →π + l + l - , K + →l + ν l e - e + and K + →π + π - e + ν e down to branching ratios below 10 -11 in an intense K + beam (∼10 8 per AGS spill)

  9. A large acceptance, high-resolution detector for rare K{sup +}-decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, R.; Atoyan, G.S.; Bassalleck, B.; Battiste, E.; Bergman, D.R.; Boesiger, K.; Brown, D.N.; Castillo, V.; Cheung, N.; Dhawan, S.; Do, H.; Egger, J.; Eilerts, S.W.; Felder, C.; Fischer, H.; Gach, H.M.; Giles, R.; Gninenko, S.N.; Herold, W.D.; Hotmer, J.E.; Issakov, V.V.; Karavichev, O.V.; Kaspar, H.; Kraus, D.E.; Lazarus, D.M. E-mail: lazarus@bnl.gov; Lebedev, V.A.; Leipuner, L.; Lichard, P.; Lowe, J.; Lozano, J.; Lu, T.; Ma, H.; Magurno, B.; Majid, W.; Menzel, W.; Miller, C.S.; Nickelson, M.; Ober, I.; Pile, P.H.; Pislak, S.; Poblaguev, A.A.; Pomianowski, P.; Postoev, V.E.; Proskurjakov, A.L.; Rehak, P.; Robmann, P.; Schmid, B.; Sher, A.; Sher, Aleksey; Shunko, E.; Steiner, S.; Stever, T.L.; Stotzer, R.W.; Suhov, V.V.; Thompson, J.A.; Truoel, P. E-mail: truoel@phyzik.unizh.ch; Valine, C.; Weyer, H.; Wolfe, D.M.; Zeller, M.E

    2002-03-01

    The detector of the E865-collaboration at the Brookhaven-AGS described here combines a magnetic spectrometer for the charged decay products of 6 GeV/c K{sup +} with excellent electromagnetic calorimetry and efficient particle identification for electrons and muons. Its high-resolution, large acceptance and high rate capability made it well suited for the study of extremely rare or forbidden decays with multi-leptonic final states such as K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}e{sup -}, K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup -}, K{sup +}{yields}l{sup +}{nu}{sub l}e{sup -}e{sup +} and K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} down to branching ratios below 10{sup -11} in an intense K{sup +} beam ({approx}10{sup 8} per AGS spill)

  10. Using of germanium detectors in nuclear experiments with photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitonov, I.M.; Tutin, I.A.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: The study of atomic nuclei with real photons is very important source of the information about nuclear structure. In such experiments the basic electromagnetic interaction between the photon and the target nuclei is well known. Experiments with photon beams become especially valuable when outcoming particles are also photons. In these cases completely model-independent information on nuclear structure can be extracted. The use of semiconductor Ge-spectrometers with excellent resolution and large sensitive volumes for recording outcoming photons gives us such an additional important advantage as possibility to observe individual closely spaced levels of the final nuclei. In the report an experience of using Ge-detectors in two types of nuclear experiments is described. Both of them - nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) and nuclear photodisintegration - are carried out in beams of bremsstrahlung gamma radiation. The central element of the setup recording gamma quanta in these experiments is germanium detector. NRF is unique method for studying low-lying excited nuclear states. The spins of the states can be determined easily from the measured angular distributions of scattered photons. Model independent parity assignments in NRF can be achieved by measuring polarization observables. There are two experimental possibilities: the use of linearly polarized photons (off-axis bremsstrahlung) in the entrance channel and the measurement of the linear polarization of the scattered photons using Compton polarimeters. For both methods several germanium detectors (3-5) must be used simultaneously. Nowadays Compton polarimeter can also be done from single large Ge-crystal by segmenting the outer electrode. Advantages and drawbacks of the methods and background conditions are discussed and requirements to Ge-crystals are formulated. The importance of using a new generation of electron accelerators with continuous wave (cw) beams for NRF-measurements is stressed. The

  11. A high resolution animal PET scanner using compact PS-PMT detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, M.; Okada, H.; Shimizu, K.; Omura, T.

    1996-01-01

    A new high resolution PET scanner dedicated to animal studies has been designed, built and tested. The system utilizes 240 block detectors, each of which consists of a new compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT) and an 8 x 4 BGO array. A total number of 7,680 crystals (480 per ring) are positioned to form a 508 mm diameter of 16 detector rings with 7.2 mm pitch and 114 mm axial field of view (FOV). The system is designed to perform activation studies using a monkey in a sitting position. The data can be acquired in either 2D or 3D mode, where the slice collimators are retracted in 3D mode. The transaxial resolution is 2.6 mm FWHM at the center of the FOV, and the average axial resolution on the axis of the ring is 3.3 mm FWHM in the direct slice and 3.2 mm FWHM in the cross slice. The scatter fraction, sensitivity and count rate performance were evaluated for a 10 cm diameter cylindrical phantom. The total system sensitivity is 2.3 kcps/kBq/ml in 2D mode and 22.8 kcps/kBq/ml in 3D mode. The noise equivalent count rate with 3D mode is equivalent to that with 2D mode at five times higher radioactivity level. The applicable imaging capabilities of the scanner was demonstrated by animal studies with a monkey

  12. A novel high resolution, high sensitivity SPECT detector for molecular imaging of cardiovascular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusanno, F.; Argentieri, A.; Baiocchi, M.; Colilli, S.; Cisbani, E.; De Vincentis, G.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Majewski, S.; Marano, G.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Vitelli, L.; Wang, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in western countries. Understanding the rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and monitoring the effect of innovative therapies of heart failure is of fundamental importance. A flexible, high resolution, high sensitivity detector system for molecular imaging with radionuclides on small animal models has been designed for this aim. A prototype has been built using tungsten pinhole and LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to Hamamatsu Flat Panel PMTs. Compact individual-channel readout has been designed, built and tested. Measurements with phantoms as well as pilot studies on mice have been performed, the results show that the myocardial perfusion in mice can be determined with sufficient precision. The detector will be improved replacing the Hamamatsu Flat Panel with Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) to allow integration of the system with MRI scanners. Application of LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to photosensor with high photon detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution will allow dual-label imaging to monitor simultaneously the cardiac perfusion and the molecular targets under investigation during the heart therapy.

  13. High-resolution Compton cameras based on Si/CdTe double-sided strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odaka, Hirokazu; Ichinohe, Yuto; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Fukuyama, Taro; Hagino, Koichi; Saito, Shinya; Sato, Tamotsu; Sato, Goro; Watanabe, Shin; Kokubun, Motohide; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new Compton camera based on silicon (Si) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor double-sided strip detectors (DSDs). The camera consists of a 500-μm-thick Si-DSD and four layers of 750-μm-thick CdTe-DSDs all of which have common electrode configuration segmented into 128 strips on each side with pitches of 250μm. In order to realize high angular resolution and to reduce size of the detector system, a stack of DSDs with short stack pitches of 4 mm is utilized to make the camera. Taking advantage of the excellent energy and position resolutions of the semiconductor devices, the camera achieves high angular resolutions of 4.5° at 356 keV and 3.5° at 662 keV. To obtain such high resolutions together with an acceptable detection efficiency, we demonstrate data reduction methods including energy calibration using Compton scattering continuum and depth sensing in the CdTe-DSD. We also discuss imaging capability of the camera and show simultaneous multi-energy imaging.

  14. High resolution time-of-flight (TOF) detector for particle identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Merlin; Lehmann, Albert; Pfaffinger, Markus; Uhlig, Fred [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Several prototype tests were performed with the PANDA DIRC detectors at the CERN T9 beam line. A mixed hadron beam with pions, kaons and protons was used at momenta from 2 to 10 GeV/c. For these tests a good particle identification was mandatory. We report about a high resolution TOF detector built especially for this purpose. It consists of two stations each consisting of a Cherenkov radiator read out by a Microchannel-Plate Photomultiplier (MCP-PMT) and a Scintillating Tile (SciTil) counter read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). With a flight path of 29 m a pion/kaon separation up to 5 GeV/c and a pion/proton separation up to 10 GeV/c was obtained. From the TOF resolutions of different counter combinations the time resolution (sigma) of the individual MCP-PMTs and SciTils was determined. The best counter reached a time resolution of 50 ps.

  15. High bit rate germanium single photon detectors for 1310nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamons, J. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2008-04-01

    There is increasing interest in development of high speed, low noise and readily fieldable near infrared (NIR) single photon detectors. InGaAs/InP Avalanche photodiodes (APD) operated in Geiger mode (GM) are a leading choice for NIR due to their preeminence in optical networking. After-pulsing is, however, a primary challenge to operating InGaAs/InP single photon detectors at high frequencies1. After-pulsing is the effect of charge being released from traps that trigger false ("dark") counts. To overcome this problem, hold-off times between detection windows are used to allow the traps to discharge to suppress after-pulsing. The hold-off time represents, however, an upper limit on detection frequency that shows degradation beginning at frequencies of ~100 kHz in InGaAs/InP. Alternatively, germanium (Ge) single photon avalanche photodiodes (SPAD) have been reported to have more than an order of magnitude smaller charge trap densities than InGaAs/InP SPADs2, which allowed them to be successfully operated with passive quenching2 (i.e., no gated hold off times necessary), which is not possible with InGaAs/InP SPADs, indicating a much weaker dark count dependence on hold-off time consistent with fewer charge traps. Despite these encouraging results suggesting a possible higher operating frequency limit for Ge SPADs, little has been reported on Ge SPAD performance at high frequencies presumably because previous work with Ge SPADs has been discouraged by a strong demand to work at 1550 nm. NIR SPADs require cooling, which in the case of Ge SPADs dramatically reduces the quantum efficiency of the Ge at 1550 nm. Recently, however, advantages to working at 1310 nm have been suggested which combined with a need to increase quantum bit rates for quantum key distribution (QKD) motivates examination of Ge detectors performance at very high detection rates where InGaAs/InP does not perform as well. Presented in this paper are measurements of a commercially available Ge APD

  16. Techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events using segmented germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeninger, K.

    2007-01-01

    Two techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events in germanium detectors were studied: (1) anti-coincidence requirements between the segments of segmented germanium detectors and (2) the analysis of the time structure of the detector response. An 18-fold segmented germanium prototype detector for the GERDA neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment was characterized. The rejection of photon induced events was measured for the strongest lines in 60 Co, 152 Eu and 228 Th. An accompanying Monte Carlo simulation was performed and the results were compared to data. An overall agreement with deviations of the order of 5-10% was obtained. The expected background index of the GERDA experiment was estimated. The sensitivity of the GERDA experiment was determined. Special statistical tools were developed to correctly treat the small number of events expected. The GERDA experiment uses a cryogenic liquid as the operational medium for the germanium detectors. It was shown that germanium detectors can be reliably operated through several cooling cycles. (orig.)

  17. Techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events using segmented germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeninger, K.

    2007-06-05

    Two techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events in germanium detectors were studied: (1) anti-coincidence requirements between the segments of segmented germanium detectors and (2) the analysis of the time structure of the detector response. An 18-fold segmented germanium prototype detector for the GERDA neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment was characterized. The rejection of photon induced events was measured for the strongest lines in {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu and {sup 228}Th. An accompanying Monte Carlo simulation was performed and the results were compared to data. An overall agreement with deviations of the order of 5-10% was obtained. The expected background index of the GERDA experiment was estimated. The sensitivity of the GERDA experiment was determined. Special statistical tools were developed to correctly treat the small number of events expected. The GERDA experiment uses a cryogenic liquid as the operational medium for the germanium detectors. It was shown that germanium detectors can be reliably operated through several cooling cycles. (orig.)

  18. Depth of interaction resolution measurements for a high resolution PET detector using position sensitive avalanche photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yongfeng; Dokhale, Purushottam A; Silverman, Robert W; Shah, Kanai S; McClish, Mickel A; Farrell, Richard; Entine, Gerald; Cherry, Simon R

    2006-01-01

    We explore dual-ended read out of LSO arrays with two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) as a high resolution, high efficiency depth-encoding detector for PET applications. Flood histograms, energy resolution and depth of interaction (DOI) resolution were measured for unpolished LSO arrays with individual crystal sizes of 1.0, 1.3 and 1.5 mm, and for a polished LSO array with 1.3 mm pixels. The thickness of the crystal arrays was 20 mm. Good flood histograms were obtained for all four arrays, and crystals in all four arrays can be clearly resolved. Although the amplitude of each PSAPD signal decreases as the interaction depth moves further from the PSAPD, the sum of the two PSAPD signals is essentially constant with irradiation depth for all four arrays. The energy resolutions were similar for all four arrays, ranging from 14.7% to 15.4%. A DOI resolution of 3-4 mm (including the width of the irradiation band which is ∼2 mm) was obtained for all the unpolished arrays. The best DOI resolution was achieved with the unpolished 1 mm array (average 3.5 mm). The DOI resolution for the 1.3 mm and 1.5 mm unpolished arrays was 3.7 and 4.0 mm respectively. For the polished array, the DOI resolution was only 16.5 mm. Summing the DOI profiles across all crystals for the 1 mm array only degraded the DOI resolution from 3.5 mm to 3.9 mm, indicating that it may not be necessary to calibrate the DOI response separately for each crystal within an array. The DOI response of individual crystals in the array confirms this finding. These results provide a detailed characterization of the DOI response of these PSAPD-based PET detectors which will be important in the design and calibration of a PET scanner making use of this detector approach

  19. Amorphous germanium as an electron or hole blocking contact on high-purity germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

    1976-10-01

    Experiments were performed in an attempt to make thin n + contacts on high-purity germanium by the solid phase/sup 1)/ epitaxial regrowth of arsenic doped amorphous germanium. After cleaning the crystal surface with argon sputtering and trying many combinations of layers, it was not found possible to induce recrystallization below 400 0 C. However, it was found that simple thermally evaporated amorphous Ge made fairly good electron or hole blocking contacts. Excellent spectrometers have been made with amorphous Ge replacing the n + contact. As presently produced, the amorphous Ge contact diodes show a large variation in high-voltage leakage current

  20. Trace radioactive measurement in foodstuffs using high purity germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morco, Ryan P.; Racho, Joseph Michael D.; Castaneda, Soledad S.; Almoneda, Rosalina V.; Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon B.; Sucgang, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Trace radioactivity in food has been seriously considered sources of potential harm after the accidental radioactive releases in the last decades which led to contamination of the food chain. Countermeasures are being used to reduce the radiological health risk to the population and to ensure that public safety and international commitments are met. Investigation of radioactive traces in foods was carried out by gamma-ray spectrometry. The radionuclides being measured were fission products 1 37Cs and 1 34Cs and naturally occurring 4 0Κ. Gamma-ray measurements were performed using a hybrid gamma-ray counting system with coaxial p-type Tennelec High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector with relative efficiency of 18.4%. Channels were calibrated to energies using a standard check source with 1 37Cs and 6 0Co present. Self-shielding within samples was taken into account by comparing directly with reference standards of similar matrix and geometry. Efficiencies of radionuclides of interests were accounted in calculating the activity concentrations in the samples. Efficiency calibration curve was generated using an in-house validated program called FINDPEAK, a least-square method that fits a polynomial up to sixth-order of equation. Lower Limits of Detection (LLD) obtained for both 1 37Cs and 1 34Cs ranges from 1-6 Bq/Kg depending on the sample matrix. In the last five years, there have been no foodstuffs analyzed exceeded the local and international regulatory limit of 1000Bq/Kg for the summed activities of 1 37Cs and 1 34Cs. (author)

  1. Renal stone characterization using high resolution imaging mode on a photon counting detector CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, A.; Gutjahr, R.; Henning, A.; Kappler, S.; Halaweish, A.; Abdurakhimova, D.; Peterson, Z.; Montoya, J.; Leng, S.; McCollough, C.

    2017-03-01

    In addition to the standard-resolution (SR) acquisition mode, a high-resolution (HR) mode is available on a research photon-counting-detector (PCD) whole-body CT system. In the HR mode each detector consists of a 2x2 array of 0.225 mm x 0.225 mm subpixel elements. This is in contrast to the SR mode that consists of a 4x4 array of the same subelements, and results in 0.25 mm isotropic resolution at iso-center for the HR mode. In this study, we quantified ex vivo the capabilities of the HR mode to characterize renal stones in terms of morphology and mineral composition. Forty pure stones - 10 uric acid (UA), 10 cystine (CYS), 10 calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and 10 apatite (APA) - and 14 mixed stones were placed in a 20 cm water phantom and scanned in HR mode, at radiation dose matched to that of routine dual-energy stone exams. Data from micro CT provided a reference for the quantification of morphology and mineral composition of the mixed stones. The area under the ROC curve was 1.0 for discriminating UA from CYS, 0.89 for CYS vs COM and 0.84 for COM vs APA. The root mean square error (RMSE) of the percent UA in mixed stones was 11.0% with a medium-sharp kernel and 15.6% with the sharpest kernel. The HR showed qualitatively accurate characterization of stone morphology relative to micro CT.

  2. Digital pulse processing techniques for high resolution amplitude measurement of radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhai, P.; Roy, A.; Dhara, P.; Chatterjee, S.

    2012-01-01

    The digital pulse processing techniques for high resolution amplitude measurement of radiation detector pulse is an effective replacement of expensive and bulky analog processing as the digital domain offers higher channel density and at the same time it is cheaper. We have demonstrated a prototype digital setup with highspeed sampling ADC with sampling frequency of 80-125 MHz followed by series of IIR filters for pulse shaping in a trigger-less acquisition mode. The IIR filters, peak detection algorithm and the data write-out logic was written on VHDL and implemented on FPGA. We used CAMAC as the read out platform. In conjunction with the full hardware implementation we also used a mixed platform with VME digitizer card with raw-sample read out using C code. The rationale behind this mixed platform is to test out various filter algorithms quickly on C and also to benchmark the performance of the chip level ADCs against the standard commercial digitizer in terms of noise or resolution. The paper describes implementation of both the methods with performance obtained in both the methods. (author)

  3. High resolution X-ray detector for synchrotron-based microtomography

    CERN Document Server

    Stampanoni, M; Wyss, P; Abela, R; Patterson, B; Hunt, S; Vermeulen, D; Rueegsegger, P

    2002-01-01

    Synchrotron-based microtomographic devices are powerful, non-destructive, high-resolution research tools. Highly brilliant and coherent X-rays extend the traditional absorption imaging techniques and enable edge-enhanced and phase-sensitive measurements. At the Materials Science Beamline MS of the Swiss Light Source (SLS), the X-ray microtomographic device is now operative. A high performance detector based on a scintillating screen optically coupled to a CCD camera has been developed and tested. Different configurations are available, covering a field of view ranging from 715x715 mu m sup 2 to 7.15x7.15 mm sup 2 with magnifications from 4x to 40x. With the highest magnification 480 lp/mm had been achieved at 10% modulation transfer function which corresponds to a spatial resolution of 1.04 mu m. A low-noise fast-readout CCD camera transfers 2048x2048 pixels within 100-250 ms at a dynamic range of 12-14 bit to the file server. A user-friendly graphical interface gives access to the main parameters needed for ...

  4. Analysis of the dead layer of a detector of germanium with code ultrapure Monte Carlo SWORD-GEANT; Analisis del dead layer de un detector de germanio ultrapuro con el codigo de Monte Carlo SWORDS-GEANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Ortiz, J.; Rodenas, J.; Verdu, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper the use of Monte Carlo code SWORD-GEANT is proposed to simulate an ultra pure germanium detector High Purity Germanium detector (HPGe) detector ORTEC specifically GMX40P4, coaxial geometry. (Author)

  5. X-ray radiometric analysis of lead and zinc concentrates using germanium radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajgachev, A.A.; Mamysh, V.A.; Mil'chakov, V.I.; Shchekin, K.I.; Berezkin, V.V.

    1975-01-01

    The results of determination of lead, zinc and iron in lead and zinc concentrates by the X-ray-radiometric method with the use of germanium semiconductor detector are presented. In the experiments the 57 Co source and tritium-zirconium target were used. The activity of 57 Co was 2 mc. The area of the germanium detector employed was 5g mm 2 , its thickness - 2.3 mm. In lead concentrates zinc and iron were determined from the direct intensity of K-series radiation. In the analysis of zinc concentrates the same conditions of recording and excitation were used as in the case of lead concentrates, but the measurements were conducted in saturated layers. It is demonstrated that the use of germanium semiconductor detectors in combination with the suggested methods of measurements makes it possible to perform determination of iron, zinc and lead in zinc and lead concentrates with permissible error

  6. Reconstruction of high resolution MLC leaf positions using a low resolution detector for accurate 3D dose reconstruction in IMRT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, R; Godart, J; Wauben, D J L; Langendijk, J A; Van't Veld, A A; Korevaar, E W

    2016-01-01

    In pre-treatment dose verification, low resolution detector systems are unable to identify shifts of individual leafs of high resolution multi leaf collimator (MLC) systems from detected changes in the dose deposition. The goal of this study was to introduce an alternative approach (the shutter

  7. Segmented Monolithic Germanium Detector Arrays for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, Ethan L.

    2011-01-01

    The experimental results from the Phase I effort were extremely encouraging. During Phase I PHDs Co. made the first strides toward a new detector technology that could have great impact on synchrotron x-ray absorption (XAS) measurements, and x-ray detector technology in general. Detector hardware that allowed critical demonstration measurements of our technology was designed and fabricated. This new technology allows good charge collection from many pixels on a single side of a multi-element monolithic germanium planar detector. The detector technology provides 'dot-like' collection electrodes having very low capacitance. The detector technology appears to perform as anticipated in the Phase I proposal. In particular, the 7-pixel detector studied showed remarkable properties; making it an interesting example of detector physics. The technology is enabled by the use of amorphous germanium contact technology on germanium planar detectors. Because of the scalability associated with the fabrication of these technologies at PHDs Co., we anticipate being able to supply larger detector systems at significantly lower cost than systems made in the conventional manner.

  8. Focusing of a new germanium counter type : the composite detector. Uses of the TREFLE detector in the EUROGAM multidetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, L.

    1995-05-01

    The aim of this thesis is the development of new types of germanium detectors: the composite detectors. Two types of prototypes are then conceived: the stacked planar detector (EDP) and the assembly of coaxial diodes (TREFLE). They are designed for the multidetector EUROGAM destined to the research of nuclear structure at high angular momentum. The four planar diodes of EDP detector were of 7 cm diameter and of 15 to 20 mm thick. The difference between the calculated and measured photopic efficiency is observed. The importance of surface channel induces a weak resistance of neutron damages. The sputtering method for the surface treatment reducing the germanium dead layer as well as a rule of selection concerning the impurity concentration and the thickness of crystal is helpful for the later production of germanium detector. The CLOVER detector consist of for mean size crystals in the same cryostat. The photopic efficiency is much larger than that of the greatest monocrystal detector. And the granulation of composite detector allowed the Doppler broadening correction of gamma ray observed in the nuclear reaction where the recoil velocity is very high. This new type of detector enable the linear polarization measurement of gamma ray. Twenty-four CLOVER detector are actually mounted in the EUROGAM array. The characteristics measured in source as well as in beam, reported in this thesis, meet exactly the charge account. (author). 47 refs., 61 figs., 18 tabs

  9. Position resolution simulations for the inverted-coaxial germanium detector, SIGMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J. P.; Harkness-Brennan, L. J.; Boston, A. J.; Judson, D. S.; Labiche, M.; Nolan, P. J.; Page, R. D.; Pearce, F.; Radford, D. C.; Simpson, J.; Unsworth, C.

    2018-06-01

    The SIGMA Germanium detector has the potential to revolutionise γ-ray spectroscopy, providing superior energy and position resolving capabilities compared with current large volume state-of-the-art Germanium detectors. The theoretical position resolution of the detector as a function of γ-ray interaction position has been studied using simulated detector signals. A study of the effects of RMS noise at various energies has been presented with the position resolution ranging from 0.33 mm FWHM at Eγ = 1 MeV, to 0.41 mm at Eγ = 150 keV. An additional investigation into the effects pulse alignment have on pulse shape analysis and in turn, position resolution has been performed. The theoretical performance of SIGMA operating in an experimental setting is presented for use as a standalone detector and as part of an ancillary system.

  10. A novel high resolution and high efficiency dual head detector for molecular breast imaging: New results from clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibaldi, F., E-mail: franco.garibaldi@iss.infn.i [ISS and INFN Roma, gr. Sanita, Rome (Italy); Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M.L.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S. [ISS and INFN Roma, gr. Sanita, Rome (Italy); Musico, P. [INFN Genova, Genova (Italy); Argentieri, A. [INFN Bari, Bari (Italy); Cossu, E.; Padovano, F.; Simonetti, G. [ISS and INFN Roma, gr. Sanita, Rome (Italy); Schillaci, O. [University of Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Majewski, S. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia (United States)

    2010-05-21

    Detecting small breast tumors is a challenging task. Molecular Breast Imaging with radionuclides has a central role to play in this respect. Our group has recently designed and implemented a dual detector setup that allows spot compression and improves significantly the performance of the system. The single head detector has been successfully used for clinical trials with 10 patients in comparison with a commercial high resolution detector. Then the dual head system has been showed to have significant advantages for the detection of small tumors.

  11. A variable temperature cryostat that produces in situ clean-up germanium detector surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehl, R.H.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.; Cork, C.P.; Landis, D.A.; Xing, J.S.; Friesel, D.L.

    1988-11-01

    Variable temperature cryostats that can maintain germanium detectors at temperatures from 82 K to about 400 K while the thermal shield surrounding the detectors remains much colder when the detectors are warmed have been developed. Cryostats such as these offer the possibility of cryopumping material from the surface of detectors to the colder thermal shield. The diode characteristics of several detectors have shown very significant improvement following thermal cycles up to about 150 K in these cryostats. Important applications for cryostats having this attribute are many. 4 figs

  12. Dark Matter Search with sub-keV Germanium Detectors at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Qian; Wong, Henry T

    2012-01-01

    Germanium detectors with sub-keV sensitivities open a window to search for low-mass WIMP dark matter. The CDEX-TEXONO Collaboration is conducting the first research program at the new China Jinping Underground Laboratory with this approach. The status and plans of the laboratory and the experiment are discussed.

  13. Neutrino and dark matter physics with sub-keV germanium detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... Germanium detectors with sub-keV sensitivities open a window to study neutrino physics to search for light weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. We summarize the recent results on spin-independent couplings of light WIMPs from the TEXONO experiment at the Kuo-Sheng Reactor ...

  14. Fabrication and research of high purity germanium detectors with abrupt and thin diffusion layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Cabal, A. E.; Diaz Garcia, A.

    1997-01-01

    A different high purity germanium detector's fabrication method is described. A very thin diffusion film with an abrupt change of the type of conductivity is obtained. The fine diffusion layer thickness makes possibly their utilization in experimental systems in which all the data are elaborated directly on the computer. (author) [es

  15. Calibration of Single High Purity Germanium Detector for Whole Body Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, T.M.; Morsi, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    A new Accuscan II single germanium detector for whole body counter was installed in NRC (Egypt). The current paper concerned on calibration of single high purity germanium detector for whole body counter. Physical parameters affecting on performance of whole body counter such as linearity, minimum detectable activity and source detector distance, SDD were investigated. Counting efficiencies for the detector have been investigated in rear wall, fixed diagnostic position in air. Counting efficiencies for organ compartments such as thyroid, lung, upper and lower gastrointestinal tract have been investigated using transfer phantom in fixed diagnostic and screening positions respectively. The organ compartment efficiencies in screening geometry were higher than that value of diagnostic geometry by a factor of three. The committed dose equivalents of I-131 in thyroid were ranged from 0.073 ± 0.004 to 1.73±0.09 mSv and in lung was 0.02±0.001 mSv

  16. Bibliographical study on the high-purity germanium radiation detectors used in gamma and X spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornand, Bernard; Friant, Alain

    1979-03-01

    The germanium or silicon lithium-drifted detectors, Ge(Li) or Si(Li), and high-purity germanium detectors, HP Ge (impurity concentration approximately 10 10 cm -3 ), are the most commonly used at the present time as gamma and X-ray spectrometers. The HP Ge detectors for which room temperature storage is the main characteristic can be obtained with a large volume and a thin window, and are used as the Ge(Li) in γ ray spectrometry or the Si(Li) in X-ray spectrometry. This publication reviews issues from 1974 to 1978 on the state of the art and applications of the HP Ge semiconductor detectors. 101 bibliographical notices with French summaries are presented. An index for authors, documents and periodicals, and subjects is included [fr

  17. Perfomance of a high purity germanium multi-detector telescope for long range particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riepe, G.; Protic, D.; Suekoesd, C.; Didelez, J.P.; Frascaria, N.; Gerlic, E.; Hourani, E.; Morlet, M.

    1980-01-01

    A telescope of stacked high purity germanium detectors designed for long range charged particles was tested using medium energy protons. Particle identification and the rejection of the low energy tail could be accomplished on-line allowing the measurement of complex spectra. The efficiency of the detector stack for protons was measured up to 156 MeV incoming energy. The various factors affecting the energy resolution are discussed and their estimated contributions are compared with the experimental results

  18. Charge collection performance of a segmented planar high-purity germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J. [Department of Physics, The University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: R.Cooper@liverpool.ac.uk; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Grint, A.N.; Harkness, L.J.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C.; Scraggs, D.P. [Department of Physics, The University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Dobson, J. [Rosemere Cancer Centre, Royal Preston Hospital, Preston PR2 9HT (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-01

    High-precision scans of a segmented planar high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector have been performed with a range of finely collimated gamma ray beams allowing the response as a function of gamma ray interaction position to be quantified. This has allowed the development of parametric pulse shape analysis (PSA) techniques and algorithms for the correction of imperfections in performance. In this paper we report on the performance of this detector, designed for use in a positron emission tomography (PET) development system.

  19. On the timing properties of germanium detectors: The centroid diagrams of prompt photopeaks and Compton events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penev, I.; Andrejtscheff, W.; Protochristov, Ch.; Zhelev, Zh.

    1987-01-01

    In the applications of the generalized centroid shift method with germanium detectors, the energy dependence of the time centroids of prompt photopeaks (zero-time line) and of Compton background events reveal a peculiar behavior crossing each other at about 100 keV. The effect is plausibly explained as associated with the ratio of γ-quanta causing the photoeffect and Compton scattering, respectively, at the boundaries of the detector. (orig.)

  20. Development of Charge Sensitive Preamplifier and Readout Integrate Circuit Board for High Resolution Detector using ASIC Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Park, J. M.; Yang, J. Y.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, Y. S. [RadTek Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    - Design of discrete type charge sensitive amplifier for high resolution semi-conductor sensor - Design and develop the test board for the performance of charge sensitive amplifier with sensor - Performance of electrical test for the sensor and charge sensitive amplifier - Development of prototype 8 x 8 array type detector module - Noise equivalent charge test for the charge sensitive amplifier - Design and development of Micro SMD discrete type amplifier applying ASIC procedure - Development of Hybrid type charge sensitive amplifier including shape

  1. Development of segmented germanium detectors for neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jing

    2009-01-01

    The results from neutrino oscillation experiments indicate that at least two neutrinos have mass. However, the value of the masses and whether neutrinos and anti-neutrinos are identical, i.e., Majorana particles, remain unknown. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments can help to improve our understanding in both cases and are the only method currently possible to tackle the second question. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, which will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76 Ge, is currently under construction in Hall A of the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. In order to achieve an extremely low background level, segmented germanium detectors are considered to be operated directly in liquid argon which serves simultaneously as cooling and shielding medium. Several test cryostats were built at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik in Muenchen to operate segmented germanium detectors both in vacuum and submerged in cryogenic liquid. The performance and the background discrimination power of segmented germanium detectors were studied in detail. It was proven for the first time that segmented germanium detectors can be operated stably over long periods submerged in a cryogenic liquid. It was confirmed that the segmentation scheme employed does well in the identification of photon induced background and demonstrated for the first time that also neutron interactions can be identified. The C++ Monte Carlo framework, MaGe (Majorana-GERDA), is a joint development of the Majorana and GERDA collaborations. It is based on GEANT4, but tailored especially to simulate the response of ultra-low background detectors to ionizing radiation. The predictions of the simulation were veri ed to be accurate for a wide range of conditions. Some shortcomings were found and corrected. Pulse shape analysis is complementary to segmentation in identifying background events. Its efficiency can only be correctly determined using reliable pulse shape

  2. Development of segmented germanium detectors for neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing

    2009-06-09

    The results from neutrino oscillation experiments indicate that at least two neutrinos have mass. However, the value of the masses and whether neutrinos and anti-neutrinos are identical, i.e., Majorana particles, remain unknown. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments can help to improve our understanding in both cases and are the only method currently possible to tackle the second question. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, which will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge, is currently under construction in Hall A of the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. In order to achieve an extremely low background level, segmented germanium detectors are considered to be operated directly in liquid argon which serves simultaneously as cooling and shielding medium. Several test cryostats were built at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik in Muenchen to operate segmented germanium detectors both in vacuum and submerged in cryogenic liquid. The performance and the background discrimination power of segmented germanium detectors were studied in detail. It was proven for the first time that segmented germanium detectors can be operated stably over long periods submerged in a cryogenic liquid. It was confirmed that the segmentation scheme employed does well in the identification of photon induced background and demonstrated for the first time that also neutron interactions can be identified. The C++ Monte Carlo framework, MaGe (Majorana-GERDA), is a joint development of the Majorana and GERDA collaborations. It is based on GEANT4, but tailored especially to simulate the response of ultra-low background detectors to ionizing radiation. The predictions of the simulation were veri ed to be accurate for a wide range of conditions. Some shortcomings were found and corrected. Pulse shape analysis is complementary to segmentation in identifying background events. Its efficiency can only be correctly determined using reliable pulse

  3. Germanium nitride and oxynitride films for surface passivation of Ge radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggioni, G., E-mail: maggioni@lnl.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Carturan, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Fiorese, L. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e delle Tecnologie Industriali, Università di Trento, Via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Pinto, N.; Caproli, F. [Scuola di Scienze e Tecnologie, Sezione di Fisica, Università di Camerino, Via Madonna delle Carceri 9, Camerino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Napoli, D.R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Giarola, M.; Mariotto, G. [Dipartimento di Informatica—Università di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, I-37134 Verona (Italy)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • A surface passivation method for HPGe radiation detectors is proposed. • Highly insulating GeNx- and GeOxNy-based layers are deposited at room temperature. • Deposition parameters affect composition and electrical properties of the layers. • The improved performance of a GeNx-coated HPGe diode is assessed. - Abstract: This work reports a detailed investigation of the properties of germanium nitride and oxynitride films to be applied as passivation layers to Ge radiation detectors. All the samples were deposited at room temperature by reactive RF magnetron sputtering. A strong correlation was found between the deposition parameters, such as deposition rate, substrate bias and atmosphere composition, and the oxygen and nitrogen content in the film matrix. We found that all the films were very poorly crystallized, consisting of very small Ge nitride and oxynitride nanocrystallites, and electrically insulating, with the resistivity changing from three to six orders of magnitude as a function of temperature. A preliminary test of these films as passivation layers was successfully performed by depositing a germanium nitride film on the intrinsic surface of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) diode and measuring the improved performance, in terms of leakage current, with respect to a reference passivated diode. All these interesting results allow us to envisage the application of this coating technology to the surface passivation of germanium-based radiation detectors.

  4. SU-E-I-40: New Method for Measurement of Task-Specific, High-Resolution Detector System Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughran, B; Singh, V; Jain, A; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although generalized linear system analytic metrics such as GMTF and GDQE can evaluate performance of the whole imaging system including detector, scatter and focal-spot, a simplified task-specific measured metric may help to better compare detector systems. Methods: Low quantum-noise images of a neuro-vascular stent with a modified ANSI head phantom were obtained from the average of many exposures taken with the high-resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and with a Flat Panel Detector (FPD). The square of the Fourier Transform of each averaged image, equivalent to the measured product of the system GMTF and the object function in spatial-frequency space, was then divided by the normalized noise power spectra (NNPS) for each respective system to obtain a task-specific generalized signal-to-noise ratio. A generalized measured relative object detectability (GM-ROD) was obtained by taking the ratio of the integral of the resulting expressions for each detector system to give an overall metric that enables a realistic systems comparison for the given detection task. Results: The GM-ROD provides comparison of relative performance of detector systems from actual measurements of the object function as imaged by those detector systems. This metric includes noise correlations and spatial frequencies relevant to the specific object. Additionally, the integration bounds for the GM-ROD can be selected to emphasis the higher frequency band of each detector if high-resolution image details are to be evaluated. Examples of this new metric are discussed with a comparison of the MAF to the FPD for neuro-vascular interventional imaging. Conclusion: The GM-ROD is a new direct-measured task-specific metric that can provide clinically relevant comparison of the relative performance of imaging systems. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  5. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O'Sullivan, Andrew W; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-11

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4 × 4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16 × 16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92 × 0.92 × 3 mm 3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8 × 16.8 mm 2 . Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4 × 8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm × 14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with Ge-68 source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, +/-0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  6. A tilted fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector for high resolution neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongyul; Cho, Gyuseong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongyul; Hwy, Limchang; Kim, Taejoo; Lee, Kyehong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seungwook [Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    One of these efforts is that a tilted scintillator geometry and lens coupled CCD detector for neutron imaging system were used to improve spatial resolution in one dimension. The increased spatial resolution in one dimension was applied to fuel cell study. However, a lens coupled CCD detector has lower sensitivity than a fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector due to light loss. In this research, a tilted detector using fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector was developed to improve resolution and sensitivity. In addition, a tilted detector can prevent an image sensor from direct radiation damage. Neutron imaging has been used for fuel cell study, lithium ion battery study, and many scientific applications. High quality neutron imaging is demanded for more detailed studies of applications, and spatial resolution should be considered to get high quality neutron imaging. Therefore, there were many efforts to improve spatial resolution.

  7. High-precision efficiency calibration of a high-purity co-axial germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, B., E-mail: blank@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Centre d' Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Souin, J.; Ascher, P.; Audirac, L.; Canchel, G.; Gerbaux, M.; Grévy, S.; Giovinazzo, J.; Guérin, H.; Nieto, T. Kurtukian; Matea, I. [Centre d' Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Bouzomita, H.; Delahaye, P.; Grinyer, G.F.; Thomas, J.C. [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 CAEN Cedex 5 (France)

    2015-03-11

    A high-purity co-axial germanium detector has been calibrated in efficiency to a precision of about 0.15% over a wide energy range. High-precision scans of the detector crystal and γ-ray source measurements have been compared to Monte-Carlo simulations to adjust the dimensions of a detector model. For this purpose, standard calibration sources and short-lived online sources have been used. The resulting efficiency calibration reaches the precision needed e.g. for branching ratio measurements of super-allowed β decays for tests of the weak-interaction standard model.

  8. Comparison of Response Characteristics of High-Purity Germanium Detectors using Analog Versus Digital Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, S J; Raschke, K

    2004-01-01

    In this article we will discuss some of the results of the response characteristics of High Purity germanium detectors using analog versus digital processing of the signals that are outputted from the detector. The discussion will focus on whether or not there is a significant difference in the response of the detector with digital electronics that it limits the ability of the detection system to get reasonable gamma ray spectrometric results. Particularly, whether or not the performance of the analysis code Pu600 is compromised

  9. Dual germanium detector system for the routine assay of low level transuranics in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowell, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    As an outgrowth of previous on soil radioassay, we have developed an automated assay system for determining the transuranic radionuclide content of soils, with particular interest in Pu. The system utilizes two commercial planar intrinsic germanium detectors in opposition. The large area of the detectors (2100 mm 2 ) and the thinness of the detector crystals (7 mm) permit sensitive analysis of the L x ray emission region of the transuranics (13 to 21 keV). With counting times of 5 hours, we obtain detection limits of 241 Am

  10. CDEX-1 1 kg point-contact germanium detector for low mass dark matter searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Kejun; Yue Qian; Wu Yucheng

    2013-01-01

    The CDEX collaboration has been established for direct detection of light dark matter particles, using ultra-low energy threshold point-contact p-type germanium detectors, in China JinPing underground Laboratory (CJPL). The first 1 kg point-contact germanium detector with a sub-keV energy threshold has been tested in a passive shielding system located in CJPL. The outputs from both the point-contact P + electrode and the outside N + electrode make it possible to scan the lower energy range of less than 1 keV and at the same time to detect the higher energy range up to 3 MeV. The outputs from both P + and N + electrode may also provide a more powerful method for signal discrimination for dark matter experiment. Some key parameters, including energy resolution, dead time, decay times of internal X-rays, and system stability, have been tested and measured. The results show that the 1 kg point-contact germanium detector, together with its shielding system and electronics, can run smoothly with good performances. This detector system will be deployed for dark matter search experiments. (authors)

  11. The GALATEA test facility and a first study of α-induced surface events in a germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irlbeck, Sabine

    2014-01-30

    Germanium detectors are a choice technology in fundamental research. They are suitable for the search for rare events due to their high sensitivity and excellent energy resolution. As an example, the GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment searching for neutrinoless double beta decay is described. The observation of this decay would resolve the fundamental question whether the neutrino is its own antiparticle. Especially adapted detector technologies and low background rates needed to detect very rare events such as neutrinoless double beta decays are discussed. The identification of backgrounds originating from the interaction of radiation, especially α-particles, is a focus of this thesis. Low background experiments face problems from α-particles due to unavoidable surface contaminations of the germanium detectors. The segmentation of detectors is used to obtain information about the special characteristics of selected events. The high precision test stand GALATEA was especially designed for surface scans of germanium detectors. As part of this work, GALATEA was completed and commissioned. The final commissioning required major upgrades of the original design which are described in detail. Collimator studies with two commercial germanium detectors are presented. Different collimation levels for a β-source were investigated and crystal axis effects were examined. The first scan with an α-source of the passivated end-plate of a special 19-fold segmented prototype detector mounted in GALATEA is described. The α-induced surface events were studied and characterized. Crosstalk and mirror pulses seen in the segments of the germanium detector were analyzed. The detector studies presented in this thesis will help to further improve the design of germanium detectors for low background experiments.

  12. The GALATEA test facility and a first study of α-induced surface events in a germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irlbeck, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Germanium detectors are a choice technology in fundamental research. They are suitable for the search for rare events due to their high sensitivity and excellent energy resolution. As an example, the GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment searching for neutrinoless double beta decay is described. The observation of this decay would resolve the fundamental question whether the neutrino is its own antiparticle. Especially adapted detector technologies and low background rates needed to detect very rare events such as neutrinoless double beta decays are discussed. The identification of backgrounds originating from the interaction of radiation, especially α-particles, is a focus of this thesis. Low background experiments face problems from α-particles due to unavoidable surface contaminations of the germanium detectors. The segmentation of detectors is used to obtain information about the special characteristics of selected events. The high precision test stand GALATEA was especially designed for surface scans of germanium detectors. As part of this work, GALATEA was completed and commissioned. The final commissioning required major upgrades of the original design which are described in detail. Collimator studies with two commercial germanium detectors are presented. Different collimation levels for a β-source were investigated and crystal axis effects were examined. The first scan with an α-source of the passivated end-plate of a special 19-fold segmented prototype detector mounted in GALATEA is described. The α-induced surface events were studied and characterized. Crosstalk and mirror pulses seen in the segments of the germanium detector were analyzed. The detector studies presented in this thesis will help to further improve the design of germanium detectors for low background experiments.

  13. New generation of efficient high resolution detector for 30-100 keV photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund

    between pores. The potential of the structured scintillator is explored through Monte Carlo simulations. A spatial resolution of 1 µm is obtainable and for scintillators with a resolution between 1 µm and 8 µm the efficiency could be more than 15 times higher than a regular scintillator with corresponding...... detector. This establishes an inverse correlation between the spatial resolution and the detection efficiency which limits the performance of existing x-ray detectors. The purpose of this Ph.D. project is to explore alternative paths of research, to develop x-ray detectors for the 30-100 keV energy range...... with single micrometre resolution without compromising efficiency. A number of detector types have been evaluated for this purpose. Structured scintillators are found to exhibit a high potential in terms of performance and also in terms of realizing an actual detector. The structured scintillator consists...

  14. Germanium cryogenic detectors: Alpha surface events rejection capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorucci, S.; Broniatowski, A.; Chardin, G.; Censier, B.; Lesquen, A. de; Deschamps, H.; Fesquet, M.; Jin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Alpha surface events and multiple compton gamma interactions are the two major background components in Ge detectors for double-beta decay investigations. Two different methods have been studied to identify such type of events, using cryogenic Ge detectors developed primarily for dark matter search: (i) combined heat and ionization measurements, and (ii) pulse-shape analysis of the charge collection signals. Both methods show strong separation between electron recoil events and surface alphas. Cryogenic heat-ionization detectors therefore appear able to reject virtually all surface alpha interactions

  15. High resolution micro-CT of low attenuating organic materials using large area photon-counting detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpová, I.; Jandejsek, I.; Jakůbek, J.; Vopálenský, M.; Vavřík, D.; Fíla, T.; Koudelka, P.; Kytýř, D.; Zlámal, P.; Gantar, A.

    2016-01-01

    To overcome certain limitations of contemporary materials used for bone tissue engineering, such as inflammatory response after implantation, a whole new class of materials based on polysaccharide compounds is being developed. Here, nanoparticulate bioactive glass reinforced gelan-gum (GG-BAG) has recently been proposed for the production of bone scaffolds. This material offers promising biocompatibility properties, including bioactivity and biodegradability, with the possibility of producing scaffolds with directly controlled microgeometry. However, to utilize such a scaffold with application-optimized properties, large sets of complex numerical simulations using the real microgeometry of the material have to be carried out during the development process. Because the GG-BAG is a material with intrinsically very low attenuation to X-rays, its radiographical imaging, including tomographical scanning and reconstructions, with resolution required by numerical simulations might be a very challenging task. In this paper, we present a study on X-ray imaging of GG-BAG samples. High-resolution volumetric images of investigated specimens were generated on the basis of micro-CT measurements using a large area flat-panel detector and a large area photon-counting detector. The photon-counting detector was composed of a 010× 1 matrix of Timepix edgeless silicon pixelated detectors with tiling based on overlaying rows (i.e. assembled so that no gap is present between individual rows of detectors). We compare the results from both detectors with the scanning electron microscopy on selected slices in transversal plane. It has been shown that the photon counting detector can provide approx. 3× better resolution of the details in low-attenuating materials than the integrating flat panel detectors. We demonstrate that employment of a large area photon counting detector is a good choice for imaging of low attenuating materials with the resolution sufficient for numerical

  16. High resolution micro-CT of low attenuating organic materials using large area photon-counting detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpová, I.; Vavřík, D.; Fíla, T.; Koudelka, P.; Jandejsek, I.; Jakůbek, J.; Kytýř, D.; Zlámal, P.; Vopálenský, M.; Gantar, A.

    2016-02-01

    To overcome certain limitations of contemporary materials used for bone tissue engineering, such as inflammatory response after implantation, a whole new class of materials based on polysaccharide compounds is being developed. Here, nanoparticulate bioactive glass reinforced gelan-gum (GG-BAG) has recently been proposed for the production of bone scaffolds. This material offers promising biocompatibility properties, including bioactivity and biodegradability, with the possibility of producing scaffolds with directly controlled microgeometry. However, to utilize such a scaffold with application-optimized properties, large sets of complex numerical simulations using the real microgeometry of the material have to be carried out during the development process. Because the GG-BAG is a material with intrinsically very low attenuation to X-rays, its radiographical imaging, including tomographical scanning and reconstructions, with resolution required by numerical simulations might be a very challenging task. In this paper, we present a study on X-ray imaging of GG-BAG samples. High-resolution volumetric images of investigated specimens were generated on the basis of micro-CT measurements using a large area flat-panel detector and a large area photon-counting detector. The photon-counting detector was composed of a 010× 1 matrix of Timepix edgeless silicon pixelated detectors with tiling based on overlaying rows (i.e. assembled so that no gap is present between individual rows of detectors). We compare the results from both detectors with the scanning electron microscopy on selected slices in transversal plane. It has been shown that the photon counting detector can provide approx. 3× better resolution of the details in low-attenuating materials than the integrating flat panel detectors. We demonstrate that employment of a large area photon counting detector is a good choice for imaging of low attenuating materials with the resolution sufficient for numerical simulations.

  17. Performance evaluation of a high-resolution brain PET scanner using four-layer MPPC DOI detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mitsuo; Saito, Akinori; Isobe, Takashi; Ote, Kibo; Yamada, Ryoko; Moriya, Takahiro; Omura, Tomohide

    2017-09-01

    A high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner, dedicated to brain studies, was developed and its performance was evaluated. A four-layer depth of interaction detector was designed containing five detector units axially lined up per layer board. Each of the detector units consists of a finely segmented (1.2 mm) LYSO scintillator array and an 8  ×  8 array of multi-pixel photon counters. Each detector layer has independent front-end and signal processing circuits, and the four detector layers are assembled as a detector module. The new scanner was designed to form a detector ring of 430 mm diameter with 32 detector modules and 168 detector rings with a 1.2 mm pitch. The total crystal number is 655 360. The transaxial and axial field of views (FOVs) are 330 mm in diameter and 201.6 mm, respectively, which are sufficient to measure a whole human brain. The single-event data generated at each detector module were transferred to the data acquisition servers through optical fiber cables. The single-event data from all detector modules were merged and processed to create coincidence event data in on-the-fly software in the data acquisition servers. For image reconstruction, the high-resolution mode (HR-mode) used a 1.2 mm2 crystal segment size and the high-speed mode (HS-mode) used a 4.8 mm2 size by collecting 16 crystal segments of 1.2 mm each to reduce the computational cost. The performance of the brain PET scanner was evaluated. For the intrinsic spatial resolution of the detector module, coincidence response functions of the detector module pair, which faced each other at various angles, were measured by scanning a 0.25 mm diameter 22Na point source. The intrinsic resolutions were obtained with 1.08 mm full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and 1.25 mm FWHM on average at 0 and 22.5 degrees in the first layer pair, respectively. The system spatial resolutions were less than 1.0 mm FWHM throughout the whole FOV, using a

  18. Detector response restoration in image reconstruction of high resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Z.

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical method was studied to model the detector response of high spatial-resolution positron emission tomography systems consisting of close-packed small crystals, and to restore the resolution deteriorated due to crystal penetration and/or nonuniform sampling across the field-of-view (FOV). The simulated detector system had 600 bismuth germanate crystals of 3.14 mm width and 30 mm length packed on a single ring of 60 cm diameter. The space between crystal was filled up with lead. Each crystal was in coincidence with 200 opposite crystals so that the FOV had a radius of 30 cm. The detector response was modeled based on the attenuating properties of the crystals and the septa, as well as the geometry of the detector system. The modeled detector-response function was used to restore the projections from the sinogram of the ring-detector system. The restored projections had a uniform sampling of 1.57 mm across the FOV. The crystal penetration and/or the nonuniform sampling were compensated in the projections. A penalized maximum-likelihood algorithm was employed to accomplish the restoration. The restored projections were then filtered and backprojected to reconstruct the image. A chest phantom with a few small circular ''cold'' objects located at the center and near the periphery of FOV was computer generated and used to test the restoration. The reconstructed images from the restored projections demonstrated resolution improvement off the FOV center, while preserving the resolution near the center

  19. A High Resolution Monolithic Crystal, DOI, MR Compatible, PET Detector. Final-Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaoka, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    The principle objective of this proposal is to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) detector with depth-of-interaction (DOI) positioning capability that will achieve state of the art spatial resolution and sensitivity performance for small animal PET imaging. When arranged in a ring or box detector geometry, the proposed detector module will support 15% absolute detection efficiency. The detector will also be compatible with operation in a MR scanner to support simultaneous multi-modality imaging. The detector design will utilize a thick, monolithic crystal scintillator readout by a two-dimensional array of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) devices using a novel sensor on the entrance surface (SES) design. Our hypothesis is that our single-ended readout SES design will provide an effective DOI positioning performance equivalent to more expensive dual-ended readout techniques and at a significantly lower cost. Our monolithic crystal design will also lead to a significantly lower cost system. It is our goal to design a detector with state of the art performance but at a price point that is affordable so the technology can be disseminated to many laboratories. A second hypothesis is that using SiPM arrays, the detector will be able to operate in a MR scanner without any degradation in performance to support simultaneous PET/MR imaging. Having a co-registered MR image will assist in radiotracer localization and may also be used for partial volume corrections to improve radiotracer uptake quantitation. The far reaching goal of this research is to develop technology for medical research that will lead to improvements in human health care.

  20. High-resolution brain SPECT imaging by combination of parallel and tilted detector heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Atsuro; Takeuchi, Wataru; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Morimoto, Yuichi; Kobashi, Keiji; Ueno, Yuichiro

    2015-10-01

    To improve the spatial resolution of brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), we propose a new brain SPECT system in which the detector heads are tilted towards the rotation axis so that they are closer to the brain. In addition, parallel detector heads are used to obtain the complete projection data set. We evaluated this parallel and tilted detector head system (PT-SPECT) in simulations. In the simulation study, the tilt angle of the detector heads relative to the axis was 45°. The distance from the collimator surface of the parallel detector heads to the axis was 130 mm. The distance from the collimator surface of the tilted detector heads to the origin on the axis was 110 mm. A CdTe semiconductor panel with a 1.4 mm detector pitch and a parallel-hole collimator were employed in both types of detector head. A line source phantom, cold-rod brain-shaped phantom, and cerebral blood flow phantom were evaluated. The projection data were generated by forward-projection of the phantom images using physics models, and Poisson noise at clinical levels was applied to the projection data. The ordered-subsets expectation maximization algorithm with physics models was used. We also evaluated conventional SPECT using four parallel detector heads for the sake of comparison. The evaluation of the line source phantom showed that the transaxial FWHM in the central slice for conventional SPECT ranged from 6.1 to 8.5 mm, while that for PT-SPECT ranged from 5.3 to 6.9 mm. The cold-rod brain-shaped phantom image showed that conventional SPECT could visualize up to 8-mm-diameter rods. By contrast, PT-SPECT could visualize up to 6-mm-diameter rods in upper slices of a cerebrum. The cerebral blood flow phantom image showed that the PT-SPECT system provided higher resolution at the thalamus and caudate nucleus as well as at the longitudinal fissure of the cerebrum compared with conventional SPECT. PT-SPECT provides improved image resolution at not only upper but also at

  1. Ultra low energy-ultra low background high purity germanium detectors for studies on dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soma, A.K.; Singh, V.; Singh, L.; Singh, M.K.; Wong, H.T.

    2009-01-01

    Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) are the leading DM candidates. Super symmetric particles (SUSY) are one of the leading WIMP candidates. To probe this least explored region Taiwan EXperiments On NeutrinO collaboration is pursuing research and development program by using High Purity Germanium detectors (HPGe). These detectors offer a matured technology to scale up the detectors and achieve sub-keV level threshold i.e. few hundreds of eV, economically. The various detectors developed by the collaboration is shown in the below figure. The current goal of the collaboration is to develop detectors of kg-scale target mass, ∼100 eV threshold and low-background specification for the studies on WIMPs, μ v and neutrino - nucleus coherent scattering

  2. Gamma-ray escape peak characteristics of radiation-damaged reverse-electrode germanium coaxial detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehl, R.H.; Hull, E.L.; Madden, N.W.; Xing Jingshu; Friesel, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    A comparison of the characteristics of full-energy gamma-ray peaks and their corresponding escape peaks when high energy photons interact in radiation damaged reverse-electrode (n-type) germanium coaxial detectors is presented. Coaxial detector geometry is the dominant factor, causing charge collection to be dramatically better for interactions occurring near the outer periphery of the detector as well as increasing of the probability of escape events occurring in this region. It follows that the resolution of escape peaks is better than that of ordinary gamma-ray peaks. This is experimentally verified. A nearly identical but undamaged detector exhibited significant Doppler broadening of single escape peaks. Because double escape events preferentially occur at outer radii, energy shifts of double escape reflect extremely small amounts of charge trapping in undamaged detectors. (orig.)

  3. Calorimetric low - temperature detectors for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy on stored highly stripped heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleile, A.; Egelhof, P.; Kraft, S.; Meier, H.J.; Shrivastava, A.; Weber, M.; McCammon, D.; Stahle, C.K.

    2001-09-01

    The accurate determination of the Lamb shift in heavy hydrogen-like ions provides a sensitive test of quantum electrodynamics in very strong Coulomb fields, not accessible otherwise. For the investigation of the Lyman-α transitions in 208 Pb 81+ or 238 U 91+ with sufficient accuracy, a high resolution calorimetric detector for hard X-rays (E ≤ 100 keV) is presently being developed. The detector modules consist of arrays of silicon thermistors and of X-ray absorbers made of high-Z material to optimize the absorption efficiency. The detectors are housed in a specially designed 3 He/ 4 He dilution refrigerator with a side arm which fits to the internal target geometry of the storage ring ESR at GSI Darmstadt. The detector performance presently achieved is already close to fulfill the demands of the Lamb shift experiment. For a prototype detector pixel with a 0.2 mm 2 x 47 μm Pb absorber an energy resolution of ΔE FWHM = 65 eV is obtained for 60 keV X-rays. (orig.)

  4. First measurements with new high-resolution gadolinium-GEM neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Birch, Jens; Etxegarai, Maddi; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Höglund, Carina; Hultman, Lars; Llamas-Jansa, Isabel; Oliveri, Eraldo; Oksanen, Esko; Robinson, Linda; Ropelewski, Leszek; Schmidt, Susann; Streli, Christina; Thuiner, Patrik

    2016-05-17

    European Spallation Source instruments like the macromolecular diffractometer, NMX, require an excellent neutron detection efficiency, high-rate capabilities, time resolution, and an unprecedented spatial resolution in the order of a few hundred micrometers over a wide angular range of the incoming neutrons. For these instruments solid converters in combination with Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) are a promising option. A GEM detector with gadolinium converter was tested on a cold neutron beam at the IFE research reactor in Norway. The {\\mu}TPC analysis, proven to improve the spatial resolution in the case of $^{10}$B converters, is extended to gadolinium based detectors. For the first time, a Gd-GEM was successfully operated to detect neutrons with an estimated efficiency of 10% at a wavelength of 2 {\\AA} and a position resolution better than 350 {\\mu}m.

  5. Development of high-resolution gamma detector using sub-mm GAGG crystals coupled to TSV-MPPC array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipovec, A.; Shimazoe, K.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-01-01

    In this study a high-resolution gamma detector based on an array of sub-millimeter Ce:GAGG (Cerium doped Gd 3 Al 2 Ga 3 O 12 ) crystals read out by an array of surface-mount type of TSV-MPPC was developed. MPPC sensor from Hamamatsu which has a 26 by 26 mm 2 detector area with 64 channels was used. One channel has a 3 by 3 mm 2 photosensitive area with 50 μ m pitch micro cells. MPPC sensor provides 576 mm 2 sensing area and was used to decode 48 by 48 array with 0.4 by 0.4 by 20 mm 3 Ce:GAGG crystals of 500 μ m pitch. The base of the detector with the crystal module was mounted to a read out board which consists of charge division circuit, thus allowing for a read out of four channels to identify the position of the incident event on the board. The read out signals were amplified using charge sensitive amplifiers. The four amplified signals were digitized and analyzed to produce a position sensitive event. For the performance analysis a 137 Cs source was used. The produced events were used for flood histogram and energy analysis. The effects of the glass thickness between the Ce:GAGG and MPPC were analyzed using the experimental flood diagrams and Geant4 simulations. The glass between the scintillator and the detector allows the spread of the light over different channels and is necessary if the channel's sensitive area is bigger than the scintillator's area. The initial results demonstrate that this detector module is promising and could be used for applications requiring compact and high-resolution detectors. Experimental results show that the detectors precision increases using glass guide thickness of 1.35 mm and 1.85 mm; however the precision using 2.5 mm are practically the same as if using 0.8 mm or 1.0 mm glass guide thicknesses. In addition, simulations using Geant4 indicate that the light becomes scarcer if thicker glass is used, thus reducing the ability to indicate which crystal was targeted. When 2.5 mm glass thickness is used, the scarce

  6. First Test Of A New High Resolution Positron Camera With Four Area Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laethem, E.; Kuijk, M.; Deconinck, Frank; van Miert, M.; Defrise, Michel; Townsend, D.; Wensveen, M.

    1989-10-01

    A PET camera consisting of two pairs of parallel area detectors has been installed at the cyclotron unit of VUB. The detectors are High Density Avalanche Chambers (HIDAC) wire-chambers with a stack of 4 or 6 lead gamma-electron converters, the sensitive area being 30 by 30 cm. The detectors are mounted on a commercial gantry allowing a 180 degree rotation during acquisition, as needed for a fully 3D image reconstruction. The camera has been interfaced to a token-ring computer network consisting of 5 workstations among which the various tasks (acquisition, reconstruction, display) can be distributed. Each coincident event is coded in 48 bits and is transmitted to the computer bus via a 512 kbytes dual ported buffer memory allowing data rates of up to 50 kHz. Fully 3D image reconstruction software has been developed, and includes new reconstruction algorithms allowing a better utilization of the available projection data. Preliminary measurements and imaging of phantoms and small animals (with 18FDG) have been performed with two of the four detectors mounted on the gantry. They indicate the expected 3D isotropic spatial resolution of 3.5 mm (FWHM, line source in air) and a sensitivity of 4 cps/μCi for a centred point source in air, corresponding to typical data rates of a few kHz. This latter figure is expected to improve by a factor of 4 after coupling of the second detector pair, since the coincidence sensitivity of this second detector pair is a factor 3 higher than that of the first one.

  7. Performance of a high-resolution CsI(Tl)-PIN readout detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudenko, Yu.G.; Imazato, J.

    1992-10-01

    A study of a large-volume CsI(Tl) detector with a PIN diode readout was carried out. Our results show a light output of ≤20000 photoelectrons/MeV, an equivalent noise charge (rms) of about 900 electrons, and an equivalent noise level of ≤ 60 keV. We obtained an energy resolution of 11.2% (fwhm) for 1275 keV gamma rays from a 22 Na source. The characteristics of the PIN - preamplifier system as well as the parameters of a small CsI(Tl) - PIN detector with a direct and wavelength shifter readout are also reported. (author)

  8. Bulk and surface event identification in p-type germanium detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. T.; Li, H. B.; Wong, H. T.; Agartioglu, M.; Chen, J. H.; Jia, L. P.; Jiang, H.; Li, J.; Lin, F. K.; Lin, S. T.; Liu, S. K.; Ma, J. L.; Sevda, B.; Sharma, V.; Singh, L.; Singh, M. K.; Singh, M. K.; Soma, A. K.; Sonay, A.; Yang, S. W.; Wang, L.; Wang, Q.; Yue, Q.; Zhao, W.

    2018-04-01

    The p-type point-contact germanium detectors have been adopted for light dark matter WIMP searches and the studies of low energy neutrino physics. These detectors exhibit anomalous behavior to events located at the surface layer. The previous spectral shape method to identify these surface events from the bulk signals relies on spectral shape assumptions and the use of external calibration sources. We report an improved method in separating them by taking the ratios among different categories of in situ event samples as calibration sources. Data from CDEX-1 and TEXONO experiments are re-examined using the ratio method. Results are shown to be consistent with the spectral shape method.

  9. In-beam measurement of the position resolution of a highly segmented coaxial germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descovich, M.; Lee, I.Y.; Fallon, P.; Cromaz, M.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Radford, D.C.; Vetter, K.; Clark, R.M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Stephens, F.S.; Ward, D.

    2005-01-01

    The position resolution of a highly segmented coaxial germanium detector was determined by analyzing the 2055keV γ-ray transition of Zr90 excited in a fusion-evaporation reaction. The high velocity of the Zr90 nuclei imparted large Doppler shifts. Digital analysis of the detector signals recovered the energy and position of individual γ-ray interactions. The location of the first interaction in the crystal was used to correct the Doppler energy shift. Comparison of the measured energy resolution with simulations implied a position resolution (root mean square) of 2mm in three-dimensions

  10. Measuring Pu in a glove box using portable NaI and germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankins, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    A NaI crystal or germanium detector inside a portable lead shield can determine the amount of plutonium in a glove box. The number of counts required are defined and the locations outside the box where the detector needs to be positioned are given. The calculated accuracy for measuring the Pu when these locations are used is within +/-30% for most glove boxes. Other factors that may affect this accuracy, such as γ-ray absorption by glove-box materials, self-absorption by Pu, absorption by equipment in the glove box, and the limits of the counting equipment are also discussed

  11. A novel iterative energy calibration method for composite germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattabiraman, N.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.; Ghugre, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    An automatic method for energy calibration of the observed experimental spectrum has been developed. The method presented is based on an iterative algorithm and presents an efficient way to perform energy calibrations after establishing the weights of the calibration data. An application of this novel technique for data acquired using composite detectors in an in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy experiment is presented

  12. A novel iterative energy calibration method for composite germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattabiraman, N.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.; Ghugre, S.S. E-mail: ssg@alpha.iuc.res.in

    2004-07-01

    An automatic method for energy calibration of the observed experimental spectrum has been developed. The method presented is based on an iterative algorithm and presents an efficient way to perform energy calibrations after establishing the weights of the calibration data. An application of this novel technique for data acquired using composite detectors in an in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy experiment is presented.

  13. A high resolution detector for H0 → γγ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atiya, M.S.; Kycia, T.F.

    1991-01-01

    SSC detectors represent a challenging departure, both in size and precision, from currently operating detectors. In this note we enumerate some of the benefits of using high magnetic fields both to simplify the detector and improve its resolution and sensitivity. We have chosen an arrangement optimized to search for the reaction H 0 → γγ. The arrangement also has the excellent momentum resolution for muons and electrons considered critical for the discovery of such processes as H 0 → Z 0 Z 0 → ell + ell - ell + ell - , H 0 → Z 0 Z 0 → ell + ell - ell + ell - , new and narrow vector bosons, and bound states of extra generational quarks. This detection scheme represents an improvement in the H 0 → γγ mass resolution of at least a factor of 7 beyond the best currently proposed detectors. In addition, we have a significantly improved rejection of common H 0 → γγ backgrounds. As indeed most experiments do not exceed their initial projections, this extra factor could insure the unambiguous discovery of this decay should it indeed occur. As no reasonably realistic detector can achieve excellent detection for all physics signatures we chose to give tip on excellent hadron calorimetry. For Higgs masses between 80 and 150 GeV/c 2 the Higgs decay into two photons is an excellent signature. To date, all attempts to search for this decay mode have centered on the use of electromagnetic calorimetry. We are proposing a different approach. We will convert the two photons close to the production point and measure the momenta of the electron pairs

  14. Methods to improve and understand the sensitivity of high purity germanium detectors for searches of rare events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volynets, Oleksandr

    2012-01-01

    Observation of neutrinoless double beta-decay could answer fundamental questions on the nature of neutrinos. High purity germanium detectors are well suited to search for this rare process in germanium. Successful operation of such experiments requires a good understanding of the detectors and the sources of background. Possible background sources not considered before in the presently running GERDA high purity germanium detector experiment were studied. Pulse shape analysis using artificial neural networks was used to distinguish between signal-like and background-like events. Pulse shape simulation was used to investigate systematic effects influencing the efficiency of the method. Possibilities to localize the origin of unwanted radiation using Compton back-tracking in a granular detector system were examined. Systematic effects in high purity germanium detectors influencing their performance have been further investigated using segmented detectors. The behavior of the detector response at different operational temperatures was studied. The anisotropy effects due to the crystallographic structure of germanium were facilitated in a novel way to determine the orientation of the crystallographic axes.

  15. Methods to improve and understand the sensitivity of high purity germanium detectors for searches of rare events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volynets, Oleksandr

    2012-07-27

    Observation of neutrinoless double beta-decay could answer fundamental questions on the nature of neutrinos. High purity germanium detectors are well suited to search for this rare process in germanium. Successful operation of such experiments requires a good understanding of the detectors and the sources of background. Possible background sources not considered before in the presently running GERDA high purity germanium detector experiment were studied. Pulse shape analysis using artificial neural networks was used to distinguish between signal-like and background-like events. Pulse shape simulation was used to investigate systematic effects influencing the efficiency of the method. Possibilities to localize the origin of unwanted radiation using Compton back-tracking in a granular detector system were examined. Systematic effects in high purity germanium detectors influencing their performance have been further investigated using segmented detectors. The behavior of the detector response at different operational temperatures was studied. The anisotropy effects due to the crystallographic structure of germanium were facilitated in a novel way to determine the orientation of the crystallographic axes.

  16. Quantitative comparison using Generalized Relative Object Detectability (G-ROD) metrics of an amorphous selenium detector with high resolution Microangiographic Fluoroscopes (MAF) and standard flat panel detectors (FPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, M; Shankar, A; Jain, A; Setlur Nagesh, S V; Ionita, C N; Scott, C; Karim, K S; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2016-02-27

    A novel amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detector with CMOS readout has been designed, and relative detector performance investigated. The detector features include a 25 μ m pixel pitch, and 1000 μ m thick a-Se layer operating at 10V/ μ m bias field. A simulated detector DQE was determined, and used in comparative calculations of the Relative Object Detectability (ROD) family of prewhitening matched-filter (PWMF) observer and non-prewhitening matched filter (NPWMF) observer model metrics to gauge a-Se detector performance against existing high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscopic (MAF) detectors and a standard flat panel detector (FPD). The PWMF-ROD or ROD metric compares two x-ray imaging detectors in their relative abilities in imaging a given object by taking the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier transform of the detector DQE weighted by an object function, divided by the comparable integral for a different detector. The generalized-ROD (G-ROD) metric incorporates clinically relevant parameters (focal-spot size, magnification, and scatter) to show the degradation in imaging performance for detectors that are part of an imaging chain. Preliminary ROD calculations using simulated spheres as the object predicted superior imaging performance by the a-Se detector as compared to existing detectors. New PWMF-G-ROD and NPWMF-G-ROD results still indicate better performance by the a-Se detector in an imaging chain over all sphere sizes for various focal spot sizes and magnifications, although a-Se performance advantages were degraded by focal spot blurring. Nevertheless, the a-Se technology has great potential to provide breakthrough abilities such as visualization of fine details including of neuro-vascular perforator vessels and of small vascular devices.

  17. Experimental test of the background rejection, through imaging capability, of a highly segmented AGATA germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doncel, M.; Recchia, F.; Quintana, B.; Gadea, A.; Farnea, E.

    2010-01-01

    The development of highly segmented germanium detectors as well as the algorithms to identify the position of the interaction within the crystal opens the possibility to locate the γ-ray source using Compton imaging algorithms. While the Compton-suppression shield, coupled to the germanium detector in conventional arrays, works also as an active filter against the γ rays originated outside the target, the new generation of position sensitive γ-ray detector arrays has to fully rely on tracking capabilities for this purpose. In specific experimental conditions, as the ones foreseen at radioactive beam facilities, the ability to discriminate background radiation improves the sensitivity of the gamma spectrometer. In this work we present the results of a measurement performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) aiming the evaluation of the AGATA detector capabilities to discriminate the origin of the γ rays on an event-by-event basis. It will be shown that, exploiting the Compton scattering formula, it is possible to track back γ rays coming from different positions, assigning them to specific emitting locations. These imaging capabilities are quantified for a single crystal AGATA detector.

  18. Self-triggered image intensifier tube for high-resolution UHECR imaging detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, M; Jobashi, M

    2003-01-01

    The authors have developed a self-triggered image intensifier tube with high-resolution imaging capability. An image detected by a first image intensifier tube as an electrostatic lens with a photocathode diameter of 100 mm is separated by a half-mirror into a path for CCD readout (768x494 pixels) and a fast control to recognize and trigger the image. The proposed system provides both a high signal-to-noise ratio to improve single photoelectron detection and excellent spatial resolution between 207 and 240 mu m rendering this device a potentially essential tool for high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments, as well as high-speed photography. When combined with a 1-arcmin resolution optical system with 50 deg. field-of-view proposed by the present authors, the observation of ultra high-energy cosmic rays and high-energy neutrinos using this device is expected, leading to revolutionary progress in particle astrophysics as a complementary technique to traditional astronomical observations at multiple wave...

  19. Characterization of segmented large volume, high purity germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruyneel, B. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2006-07-01

    {gamma}-ray tracking in future HPGe arrays like AGATA will rely on pulse shape analysis (PSA) of multiple {gamma}-interactions. For this purpose, a simple and fast procedure was developed which enabled the first full characterization of a segmented large volume HPGe detector. An analytical model for the hole mobility in a Ge crystal lattice was developed to describe the hole drift anisotropy with experimental velocity values along the crystal axis as parameters. The new model is based on the drifted Maxwellian hole distribution in Ge. It is verified by reproducing successfully experimental longitudinal hole anisotropy data. A comparison between electron and hole mobility shows large differences for the longitudinal and tangential velocity anisotropy as a function of the electrical field orientation. Measurements on a 12 fold segmented, n-type, large volume, irregular shaped HPGe detector were performed in order to determine the parameters of anisotropic mobility for electrons and holes as charge carriers created by {gamma}-ray interactions. To characterize the electron mobility the complete outer detector surface was scanned in small steps employing photopeak interactions at 60 keV. A precise measurement of the hole drift anisotropy was performed with 356 keV rays. The drift velocity anisotropy and crystal geometry cause considerable rise time differences in pulse shapes depending on the position of the spatial charge carrier creation. Pulse shapes of direct and transient signals are reproduced by weighting potential calculations with high precision. The measured angular dependence of rise times is caused by the anisotropic mobility, crystal geometry, changing field strength and space charge effects. Preamplified signals were processed employing digital spectroscopy electronics. Response functions, crosstalk contributions and averaging procedures were taken into account implying novel methods due to the segmentation of the Ge-crystal and the digital electronics

  20. Characterization of segmented large volume, high purity germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruyneel, B.

    2006-01-01

    γ-ray tracking in future HPGe arrays like AGATA will rely on pulse shape analysis (PSA) of multiple γ-interactions. For this purpose, a simple and fast procedure was developed which enabled the first full characterization of a segmented large volume HPGe detector. An analytical model for the hole mobility in a Ge crystal lattice was developed to describe the hole drift anisotropy with experimental velocity values along the crystal axis as parameters. The new model is based on the drifted Maxwellian hole distribution in Ge. It is verified by reproducing successfully experimental longitudinal hole anisotropy data. A comparison between electron and hole mobility shows large differences for the longitudinal and tangential velocity anisotropy as a function of the electrical field orientation. Measurements on a 12 fold segmented, n-type, large volume, irregular shaped HPGe detector were performed in order to determine the parameters of anisotropic mobility for electrons and holes as charge carriers created by γ-ray interactions. To characterize the electron mobility the complete outer detector surface was scanned in small steps employing photopeak interactions at 60 keV. A precise measurement of the hole drift anisotropy was performed with 356 keV rays. The drift velocity anisotropy and crystal geometry cause considerable rise time differences in pulse shapes depending on the position of the spatial charge carrier creation. Pulse shapes of direct and transient signals are reproduced by weighting potential calculations with high precision. The measured angular dependence of rise times is caused by the anisotropic mobility, crystal geometry, changing field strength and space charge effects. Preamplified signals were processed employing digital spectroscopy electronics. Response functions, crosstalk contributions and averaging procedures were taken into account implying novel methods due to the segmentation of the Ge-crystal and the digital electronics. The results are

  1. Design and test of a high resolution plastic scintillating fiber detector with intensified CCD readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebourgeard, P.

    1991-01-01

    We present the design of a particle detector involving a coherent array of 100 000 plastic scintillating microfibers, with an individual core diameter around 50 micrometers, and an intensified bidimensional CCD array. We investigate both theoretically and experimentally the use of polystyrene based scintillators in optical multimodal fibers. The isotropic excitation of modes and the characteristics of energy transfers between the polystyrene matrix and the added fluorescent dyes are of particular interest. An experimental approach is proposed and applied to the development of a new binary scintillator. In order to study the transmission of the signal from the interaction area to the output face, we specify the loss factors, the resolution and the signal to noise ratio within the fiber array. The low light level at the output face of the detector leads us to use image intensifiers in photon counting mode. This requires a detailed analysis of resolutions, gain, noise and detectivity concepts. We propose to describe these strongly correlated notions by the moment generation formalism. Thus, a previous modelisation of the photoelectronic devices allows us to evaluate the performance of the readout chain. A complete detector has been assembled and tested on a high energy hadron beam; the measurements are in good agreement with the modelisation [fr

  2. Initial characterization of a BGO-photodiode detector for high resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.

    1983-11-01

    Spatial resolution in positron emission tomography is currently limited by the resolution of the detectors. This work presents the initial characterization of a detector design using small bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals individually coupled to silicon photodiodes (SPDs) for crystal identification, and coupled in groups to phototubes (PMTs) for coincidence timing. A 3 mm x 3 mm x 3 mm BGO crystal coupled only to an SPD can achieve a 511 keV photopeak resolution of 8.7% FWHM at -150 0 C, using a pulse peaking time of 10 μs. When two 3 mm x 3 mm x 15 mm BGO crystals are coupled individually to SPDs and also coupled to a common 14 mm diam PMT, the SPDs detect the 511 keV photopeak with a resolution of 30% FWHM at -76 0 C. In coincidence with an opposing 3 mm wide BGO crystal, the SPDs are able to identify the crystal of interaction with good signal-to-noise ratio, and the detector pair resolution is 2 mm FWHM. 32 references, 7 figures, 3 tables

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH RATE HIGH RESOLUTION DETECTOR FOR EXAFS EXPERIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE GERONIMO,G.; O CONNOR,P.; BEUTTENMULLER,R.H.; LI,Z.; KUCZEWSKI,A.J.; SIDDONS,D.P.

    2002-11-10

    A new detector for EXAFS experiments is being developed. It is based on a multi-element Si sensor and dedicated readout ASICs. The sensor is composed of 384 pixels, each having 1 mm{sup 2} area, arranged in four quadrants of 12 x 8 elements, and wire-bonded to 32-channel front-end ASICs. Each channel implements low noise preamplification with self-adaptive continuous reset, high order shaper, band-gap referenced baseline stabilizer, one threshold comparator and two DAC adjustable window comparators, each followed by a 24-bit counter. Fabricated in 0.35{micro}m CMOS dissipates about 8mW per channel. First measurements show at room temperature a resolution of 14 rms electrons without the detector and of 40 rms electrons (340eV) with the detector connected and biased. Cooling at -35C a FWHM of 205eV (167eV from electronics) was measured at the Mn-K{alpha} line. A resolution of about 300eV was measured for rates approaching 100kcps/cm{sup 2} per channel, corresponding to an overall rate in excess of 10MHz/cm{sup 2}. A channel-to-channel threshold dispersion after DACs adjustment of 2.5 rms electrons was also measured.

  4. PHAROS A pluri-detector, high-resolution, analyser of radiometric properties of soil

    CERN Document Server

    Rigollet, C

    2002-01-01

    PHAROS is a new type of core logger, designed to measure activity concentrations of sup 4 sup 0 K, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th and sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs in sediment and rock cores with a spatial resolution of a few centimetres along the core. PHAROS has been developed as a non-destructive alternative to the traditional slicing of cores into sub-samples and their analysis on an HPGe detector. The core is scanned at fixed increments by three BGO scintillation detectors and the spectra analysed by the full spectrum analysis method. The core logger is also equipped with a collimated lead castle and a sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs source for transmission measurements. In this paper, we report on the properties of the core logger and its detectors, and on the analysis techniques used for the determination of the radionuclides activity concentrations. Results from initial measurements are presented and discussed.

  5. A segmented, enriched N-type germanium detector for neutrinoless double beta-decay experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviner, L. E.; Aalseth, C. E.; Ahmed, M. W.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, H. O.; Barabash, A. S.; Boswell, M.; De Braeckeleer, L.; Brudanin, V. B.; Chan, Y.-D.; Egorov, V. G.; Elliott, S. R.; Gehman, V. M.; Hossbach, T. W.; Kephart, J. D.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S. I.; Lesko, K. T.; Li, Jingyi; Mei, D.-M.; Mikhailov, S.; Miley, H.; Radford, D. C.; Reeves, J.; Sandukovsky, V. G.; Umatov, V. I.; Underwood, T. A.; Tornow, W.; Wu, Y. K.; Young, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We present data characterizing the performance of the first segmented, N-type Ge detector, isotopically enriched to 85% 76Ge. This detector, based on the Ortec PT6×2 design and referred to as SEGA (Segmented, Enriched Germanium Assembly), was developed as a possible prototype for neutrinoless double beta-decay measurements by the MAJORANA collaboration. We present some of the general characteristics (including bias potential, efficiency, leakage current, and integral cross-talk) for this detector in its temporary cryostat. We also present an analysis of the resolution of the detector, and demonstrate that for all but two segments there is at least one channel that reaches the MAJORANA resolution goal below 4 keV FWHM at 2039 keV, and all channels are below 4.5 keV FWHM.

  6. Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Films with Embedded Nanocrystals for Thermal Detectors with Very High Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Calleja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have optimized the deposition conditions of amorphous silicon-germanium films with embedded nanocrystals in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD reactor, working at a standard frequency of 13.56 MHz. The objective was to produce films with very large Temperature Coefficient of Resistance (TCR, which is a signature of the sensitivity in thermal detectors (microbolometers. Morphological, electrical, and optical characterization were performed in the films, and we found optimal conditions for obtaining films with very high values of thermal coefficient of resistance (TCR = 7.9% K−1. Our results show that amorphous silicon-germanium films with embedded nanocrystals can be used as thermosensitive films in high performance infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs used in commercial thermal cameras.

  7. Characterization of a high-purity germanium detector for small-animal SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Campbell, Desmond L; Hull, Ethan L; Peterson, Todd E

    2011-09-21

    We present an initial evaluation of a mechanically cooled, high-purity germanium double-sided strip detector as a potential gamma camera for small-animal SPECT. It is 90 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with two sets of 16 orthogonal strips that have a 4.5 mm width with a 5 mm pitch. We found an energy resolution of 0.96% at 140 keV, an intrinsic efficiency of 43.3% at 122 keV and a FWHM spatial resolution of approximately 1.5 mm. We demonstrated depth-of-interaction estimation capability through comparison of pinhole acquisitions with a point source on and off axes. Finally, a flood-corrected flood image exhibited a strip-level uniformity of less than 1%. This high-purity germanium offers many desirable properties for small-animal SPECT.

  8. Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Films with Embedded Nano crystals for Thermal Detectors with Very High Sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleja, C.; Torres, A.; Rosales-Quintero, P.; Moreno, M.

    2016-01-01

    We have optimized the deposition conditions of amorphous silicon-germanium films with embedded nano crystals in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) reactor, working at a standard frequency of 13.56 MHz. The objective was to produce films with very large Temperature Coefficient of Resistance (TCR), which is a signature of the sensitivity in thermal detectors (micro bolometers). Morphological, electrical, and optical characterization were performed in the films, and we found optimal conditions for obtaining films with very high values of thermal coefficient of resistance (TCR = 7.9%K -1 ). Our results show that amorphous silicon-germanium films with embedded nano crystals can be used as thermo sensitive films in high performance infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs) used in commercial thermal cameras.

  9. Bismuth Passivation Technique for High-Resolution X-Ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, James; Hess, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The Athena-plus team requires X-ray sensors with energy resolution of better than one part in 3,000 at 6 keV X-rays. While bismuth is an excellent material for high X-ray stopping power and low heat capacity (for large signal when an X-ray is stopped by the absorber), oxidation of the bismuth surface can lead to electron traps and other effects that degrade the energy resolution. Bismuth oxide reduction and nitride passivation techniques analogous to those used in indium passivation are being applied in a new technique. The technique will enable improved energy resolution and resistance to aging in bismuth-absorber-coupled X-ray sensors. Elemental bismuth is lithographically integrated into X-ray detector circuits. It encounters several steps where the Bi oxidizes. The technology discussed here will remove oxide from the surface of the Bi and replace it with nitridized surface. Removal of the native oxide and passivating to prevent the growth of the oxide will improve detector performance and insulate the detector against future degradation from oxide growth. Placing the Bi coated sensor in a vacuum system, a reduction chemistry in a plasma (nitrogen/hydrogen (N2/H2) + argon) is used to remove the oxide and promote nitridization of the cleaned Bi surface. Once passivated, the Bi will perform as a better X-ray thermalizer since energy will not be trapped in the bismuth oxides on the surface. A simple additional step, which can be added at various stages of the current fabrication process, can then be applied to encapsulate the Bi film. After plasma passivation, the Bi can be capped with a non-diffusive layer of metal or dielectric. A non-superconducting layer is required such as tungsten or tungsten nitride (WNx).

  10. High resolution detectors based on continuous crystals and SiPMs for small animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabello, J.; Barrillon, P.; Barrio, J.; Bisogni, M.G.; Del Guerra, A.; Lacasta, C.; Rafecas, M.; Saikouk, H.; Solaz, C.; Solevi, P.; La Taille, C. de; Llosá, G.

    2013-01-01

    Sensitivity and spatial resolution are the two main factors to maximize in emission imaging. The improvement of one factor deteriorates the other with pixelated crystals. In this work we combine SiPM matrices with monolithic crystals, using an accurate γ-ray interaction position determination algorithm that provides depth of interaction. Continuous crystals provide higher sensitivity than pixelated crystals, while an accurate interaction position determination does not degrade the spatial resolution. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data show good agreement both demonstrating sub-millimetre intrinsic spatial resolution. A system consisting in two rotating detectors in coincidence is currently under operation already producing tomographic images

  11. Pulse shape analysis for germanium detectors used in DM searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagdeev, I.R.; Drukier, A.K.; Welsh, D.J.; Klimenko, A.A.; Osetrov, S.B.; Smolnikov, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    Progress in Ge detector technology has resulted in ultralow backgrounds of less than 0.3 countskeV -1 kg -1 d -1 at energies between 6 and 9keV and from 12 to 20keV. Between 4 and 6keV it is less than 2 countskeV -1 kg -1 d -1 . Coupled with good energy resolution, 0.4keV FWHM at 10keV, this allows searches for DM particles with m≥qslant8GeV/c 2 .Electromagnetic interference (EMI) and acoustical pick-up are the main sources of background in the best Ge detectors. A PC-based on-line pulse shape analysis system is presented which permits rejection of large fraction of the EMI/acoustical background. The hardware uses a low cost, commercially available digital storage oscilloscope (DSO). The software consists of about 40000 lines of code in Pascal and assembly language. We tested this system using a low radioactive background Ge-system at the Baksan observatory. For low energy events (<100keV) this system permits improvement in the background by about 20-30%. ((orig.))

  12. Online readout and control unit for high-speed/high resolution readout of silicon tracking detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, J.; Hansen, K.; Lange, W.; Nowak, T.; Prell, S.; Zimmermann, W.

    1997-01-01

    We are describing a high speed VME readout and control module developed and presently working at the H1 experiment at DESY in Hamburg. It has the capability to read out 4 x 2048 analogue data channels at sampling rates up to 10 MHz with a dynamic input range of 1 V. The nominal resolution of the A/D converters can be adjusted between 8 and 12 bit. At the latter resolution we obtain signal-to-noise ratio better than 61.4 dB at a conversion rate of 5 MSps. At this data rate all 8192 detector channels can be read out to the internal raw data memory and VME interface within about 410 μs and 510 μs, respectively. The pedestal subtracted signals can be analyzed on-line. At a raw data hit occupation of 10%, the VME readout time is 50 μs per module. Each module provides four complementary CMOS signals to control the front-end electronics and four independent sets of power supplies for analogue and digital voltages (10 V, 100 mA) to drive the front-end electronics and for the bias voltage (100 V, 1.2 mA) to assure the full functionality of the detectors and the readout. (orig.)

  13. Online readout and control unit for high-speed/high resolution readout of silicon tracking detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, J.; Hansen, K.; Lange, W.; Nowak, T.; Prell, S.; Zimmermann, W.

    1997-02-01

    We are describing a high speed VME readout and control module developed and presently working at the H1 experiment at DESY in Hamburg. It has the capability to read out 4 × 2048 analogue data channels at sampling rates up to 10 MHz with a dynamic input range of 1 V. The nominal resolution of the A/D converters can be adjusted between 8 and 12 bit. At the latter resolution we obtain signal-to-noise ratio better than 61.4 dB at a conversion rate of 5 MSps. At this data rate all 8192 detector channels can be read out to the internal raw data memory and VME interface within about 410 μs and 510 μs, respectively. The pedestal subtracted signals can be analyzed on-line. At a raw data hit occupation of 10%, the VME readout time is 50 μs per module. Each module provides four complementary CMOS signals to control the front-end electronics and four independent sets of power supplies for analogue and digital voltages (10 V, 100 mA) to drive the front-end electronics and for the bias voltage (100 V, 1.2 mA) to assure the full functionality of the detectors and the readout.

  14. Silicon drift detectors for high resolution room temperature X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechner, P.; Eckbauer, S.; Hauff, D.; Strueder, L.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.

    1996-01-01

    New cylindrical silicon drift detectors have been designed, fabricated and tested. They comprise an integrated on-chip amplifier system with continuous reset, on-chip voltage divider, electron accumulation layer stabilizer, large area, homogeneous radiation entrance window and a drain for surface generated leakage current. The test of the 3.5 mm 2 large individual devices, which have also been grouped together to form a sensitive area up to 21 mm 2 have shown the following spectroscopic results: at room temperature (300 K) the devices have shown a full width at half maximum at the Mn Kα line of a radioactive 55 Fe source of 225 eV with shaping times of 250 to 500 ns. At -20 C the resolution improves to 152 eV at 2 μs Gaussian shaping. At temperatures below 200 K the energy resolution is below 140 eV. With the implementation of a digital filtering system the resolution approaches 130 eV. The system was operated with count rates up to 800 000 counts per second and per readout node, still conserving the spectroscopic qualities of the detector system. (orig.)

  15. Online readout and control unit for high-speed / high resolution readout of silicon tracking detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, J.; Hansen, K.; Lange, W.; Nowak, T.; Prell, S.; Zimmermann, W.

    1996-09-01

    We are describing a high speed VME readout and control module developed and presently working at the H1 experiment at DESY in Hamburg. It has the capability to read out 4 x 2048 analogue data channels at sampling rates up to 10 MHz with a dynamic input range of 1 V. The nominal resolution of the A/D converters can be adjusted between 8 and 12 bit. At the latter resolution we obtain signal-to-noise ratio better than 61.4 dB at a conversion rate of 5 MSps. At this data rate all 8192 detector channels can be read out to the internal raw data memory and VME interface within about 410 μs and 510 μs, respectively. The pedestal subtracted signals can be analyzed on-line. At a raw data hit occupation of 10%, the VME readout time is 50 μs per module. Each module provides four complementary CMOS signals to control the front-end electronics and four independent sets of power supplies for analogue and digital voltages (10 V, 100 mA) to drive the front-end electronics and for the bias voltage (100 V, 1.2 mA) to assure the full functionality of the detectors and the readout. (orig.)

  16. Development of Fast High-Resolution Muon Drift-Tube Detectors for High Counting Rates

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00287945; Dubbert, J.; Horvat, S.; Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Legger, F.; Richter, R.; Adomeit, S.; Biebel, O.; Engl, A.; Hertenberger, R.; Rauscher, F.; Zibell, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pressurized drift-tube chambers are e?cient detectors for high-precision tracking over large areas. The Monitored Drift-Tube (MDT) chambers of the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) reach a spatial resolution of 35 micons and almost 100% tracking e?ciency with 6 layers of 30 mm diameter drift tubes operated with Ar:CO2 (93:7) gas mixture at 3 bar and a gas gain of 20000. The ATLAS MDT chambers are designed to cope with background counting rates due to neutrons and gamma-rays of up to about 300 kHz per tube which will be exceeded for LHC luminosities larger than the design value of 10-34 per square cm and second. Decreasing the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm while keeping the other parameters, including the gas gain, unchanged reduces the maximum drift time from about 700 ns to 200 ns and the drift-tube occupancy by a factor of 7. New drift-tube chambers for the endcap regions of the ATLAS muon spectrometer have been designed. A prototype chamber consisting of 12 times 8 l...

  17. Consistency check of pulse shape discrimination for broad energy germanium detectors using double beta decay data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Heng-Ye [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The Gerda (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment was built to study fundamental neutrino properties via neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ). 0νββ events are single-site events (SSE) confined to a scale about millimeter. However, most of backgrounds are multi-site events (MSE). Broad Energy Germanium detectors (BEGes) offer the potential merits of improved pulse shape recognition efficiencies of SSE/MSE. They allow us to reach the goal of Phase II with a background index of 10{sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr) in the ROI. BEGe detectors with a total target mass of 3.63 kg have been installed to the Gerda setup in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in July 2012 and are collecting data since. A consistency check of the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) efficiencies by comparison of calibration data and 2νββ data will be presented. The PSD power of these detectors is demonstrated.

  18. Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy Germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fujikawa, Brian; Fuller, Erin S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Qian, J.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof P.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, S.

    2011-10-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is building the Majorana Demonstrator, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The Majorana Demonstrator will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c² mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the Majorana Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

  19. Evaluation of Segmented Amorphous-Contact Planar Germanium Detectors for Heavy-Element Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Emily G.

    The challenge of improving our understanding of the very heaviest nuclei is at the forefront of contemporary low-energy nuclear physics. In the last two decades, "in-beam" spectroscopy experiments have advanced from Z=98 to Z=104, Rutherfordium, allowing insights into the dynamics of the fission barrier, high-order deformations, and pairing correlations. However, new detector technologies are needed to advance to even heavier nuclei. This dissertation is aimed at evaluating one promising new technology; large segmented planar germanium wafers for this area of research. The current frontier in gamma-ray spectroscopy involves large-volume (>9 cm thick) coaxial detectors that are position sensitive and employ gamma-ray "tracking". In contrast, the detectors assessed in this dissertation are relatively thin (~1 cm) segmented planar wafers with amorphous-germanium strip contacts that can tolerate extremely high gamma-ray count rates, and can accommodate hostile neutron fluxes. They may be the only path to heavier "in-beam" spectroscopy with production rates below 1 nanobarn. The resiliency of these detectors against neutron-induced damage is examined. Two detectors were deliberately subjected to a non-uniform neutron fluence leading to considerable degradation of performance. The neutrons were produced using the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction at the UMass Lowell Van-de-Graaff accelerator with a 3.7-MeV proton beam incident on a natural Li target. The energy of the neutrons emitted at zero degrees was 2.0 MeV, close to the mean energy of the fission neutron spectrum, and each detector was exposed to a fluence >3.6 x109 n/cm2. A 3-D software "trap-corrector" gain-matching algorithm considerably restored the overall performance. Other neutron damage mitigation tactics were explored including over biasing the detector and flooding the detector with a high gamma-ray count rate. Various annealing processes to remove neutron damage were investigated. An array of very large diameter

  20. Performance of a high-resolution depth-encoding PET detector module using linearly-graded SiPM arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Junwei; Bai, Xiaowei; Gola, Alberto; Acerbi, Fabio; Ferri, Alessandro; Piemonte, Claudio; Yang, Yongfeng; Cherry, Simon R.

    2018-02-01

    The goal of this study was to exploit the excellent spatial resolution characteristics of a position-sensitive silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) and develop a high-resolution depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding positron emission tomography (PET) detector module. The detector consists of a 30  ×  30 array of 0.445  ×  0.445  ×  20 mm3 polished LYSO crystals coupled to two 15.5  ×  15.5 mm2 linearly-graded SiPM (LG-SiPM) arrays at both ends. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the LYSO array can be resolved. The energy resolution, the coincidence timing resolution and the DOI resolution were 21.8  ±  5.8%, 1.23  ±  0.10 ns and 3.8  ±  1.2 mm, respectively, at a temperature of -10 °C and a bias voltage of 35.0 V. The performance did not degrade significantly for event rates of up to 130 000 counts s-1. This detector represents an attractive option for small-bore PET scanner designs that simultaneously emphasize high spatial resolution and high detection efficiency, important, for example, in preclinical imaging of the rodent brain with neuroreceptor ligands.

  1. High-resolution coded-aperture design for compressive X-ray tomography using low resolution detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Edson; Pertuz, Said; Arguello, Henry

    2017-12-01

    One of the main challenges in Computed Tomography (CT) is obtaining accurate reconstructions of the imaged object while keeping a low radiation dose in the acquisition process. In order to solve this problem, several researchers have proposed the use of compressed sensing for reducing the amount of measurements required to perform CT. This paper tackles the problem of designing high-resolution coded apertures for compressed sensing computed tomography. In contrast to previous approaches, we aim at designing apertures to be used with low-resolution detectors in order to achieve super-resolution. The proposed method iteratively improves random coded apertures using a gradient descent algorithm subject to constraints in the coherence and homogeneity of the compressive sensing matrix induced by the coded aperture. Experiments with different test sets show consistent results for different transmittances, number of shots and super-resolution factors.

  2. Online detector response calculations for high-resolution PET image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratx, Guillem [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Levin, Craig, E-mail: cslevin@stanford.edu [Departments of Radiology, Physics and Electrical Engineering, and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2011-07-07

    Positron emission tomography systems are best described by a linear shift-varying model. However, image reconstruction often assumes simplified shift-invariant models to the detriment of image quality and quantitative accuracy. We investigated a shift-varying model of the geometrical system response based on an analytical formulation. The model was incorporated within a list-mode, fully 3D iterative reconstruction process in which the system response coefficients are calculated online on a graphics processing unit (GPU). The implementation requires less than 512 Mb of GPU memory and can process two million events per minute (forward and backprojection). For small detector volume elements, the analytical model compared well to reference calculations. Images reconstructed with the shift-varying model achieved higher quality and quantitative accuracy than those that used a simpler shift-invariant model. For an 8 mm sphere in a warm background, the contrast recovery was 95.8% for the shift-varying model versus 85.9% for the shift-invariant model. In addition, the spatial resolution was more uniform across the field-of-view: for an array of 1.75 mm hot spheres in air, the variation in reconstructed sphere size was 0.5 mm RMS for the shift-invariant model, compared to 0.07 mm RMS for the shift-varying model.

  3. Feasibility study for use of a germanium detector in the LOFT gamma-ray densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swierkowski, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The primary aim of this study is to predict the performance of a gamma-ray densitometer system using computer modeling techniques. The system consists of a collimated 137 Cs source, a pipe containing a variable amount of water absorber, and a shielded and collimated germanium detector system. The gamma-ray energy spectrum (number of photon counts as a function of energy) has been computed for several sources at the detector. The response for combined sourceconfigurations has been obtained by linear superposition. The signal essentially consists of the counts in an energy window centered on the 137 Cs source at 662 keV that originate from this source. The noise is the background counts in the signal energy window that originate from 16 N scatter radiation and direct and shield tank activation gammas. The detector signal has been computed for 0, 50, and 100 percent water in the pipe

  4. Direct measurement of homogeneously distributed radioactive air contamination with germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, W.

    1990-01-01

    Air contamination by γ emitting radionuclides was measured with a vertically arranged germanium detector, laterally shielded by a lead ring, and calibration factors and detection limits of a number of fission products determined. The possibility of measuring simultaneously existing air and soil contamination by measurements with and without lead shield is described. The change of detection limit of air contamination is presented for different soil contamination levels by the same radionuclide. Calibration factors are given to determine the dose rate on the ground due to air contamination by different radionuclides. (author)

  5. Determination of surface recombination velocity and bulk lifetime in detector grade silicon and germanium crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derhacobian, N.; Fine, P.; Walton, J.T.; Wong, Y.K.; Rossington, C.S.; Luke, P.N.

    1993-10-01

    Utility of a noncontact photoconductive decay (PCD) technique is demonstrated in measuring bulk lifetime, τ B , and surface recombination velocity, S, in detector grade silicon and germanium crystals. We show that the simple analytical equations which relate the observed effective lifetimes in PCD transients to τ B and S have a limited range of applicability. The noncontact PCD technique is used to determine the effect of several surface treatments on the observed effective lifetimes in Si and Ge. A degradation of the effective lifetime in Si is reported as result of the growth of a thin layer of native oxide at room temperature under atmospheric conditions

  6. Evaluations of the commercial spectrometer systems for safeguards applications using the germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, D.T.

    1998-01-01

    Safeguards applications require the best spectrometer systems with excellent resolution, stability, and throughput. Instruments must perform well in all the situations and environments. Data communication to the computer should be convenient, fast, and reliable. The software should have all the necessary tools and be ease to use. Portable systems should be small in size, lightweight, and have a long battery life. Nine commercially available spectrometer systems are tested with both the planar and coaxial germanium detectors. Considering the performance of the Digital Signal Processors (DSP), digital-based spectroscopy may be the future of gamma-ray spectroscopy

  7. High-resolution high-efficiency X-ray imaging system based on the in-line Bragg magnifier and the Medipix detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vagovič, P.; Korytár, D.; Cecilia, A.; Hamann, E.; Švéda, L.; Pelliccia, D.; Hartwig, J.; Zápražný, Z.; Oberta, Peter; Dolbnya, I.; Shawney, K.; Flechsig, U.; Fiederle, M.; Baumbach, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2013), s. 153-159 ISSN 0909-0495. [International Workshop on X-Ray Damage to Biological Crystalline Samples /7./. Oxfordshire, 14.03.2012-16.03.2012] R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/412 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Bragg magnifie * germanium * holography * high resolution * in-line * X-ray imaging Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.022, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1107/S0909049512044366/pdf

  8. CDMS Detector Fabrication Improvements and Low Energy Nuclear Recoil Measurements in Germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jastram, Andrew [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-12-01

    As the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) experiment is scaled up to tackle new dark matter parameter spaces (lower masses and cross-sections), detector production efficiency and repeatability becomes ever more important. A dedicated facility has been commissioned for SuperCDMS detector fabrication at Texas A&M University (TAMU). The fabrication process has been carefully tuned using this facility and its equipment. Production of successfully tested detectors has been demonstrated. Significant improvements in detector performance have been made using new fabrication methods, equipment, and tuning of process parameters. This work has demonstrated the capability for production of next generation CDMS SNOLAB detectors. Additionally, as the dark matter parameter space is probed further, careful calibrations of detector response to nuclear recoil interactions must be performed in order to extract useful information (in relation to dark matter particle characterzations) from experimental results. A neutron beam of tunable energy is used in conjunction with a commercial radiation detector to characterize ionization energy losses in germanium during nuclear recoil events. Data indicates agreement with values predicted by the Lindhard equation, providing a best-t k-value of 0.146.

  9. Program LEP to addition of gamma spectra from germanium detectors; Programa LEPS para suma de espectros gammas de detectores de germanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, L

    1986-07-01

    The LEP program, written in FORTRAN IV, performs the addition of two spectra, collected with different detectors, from the same sample. This application, adds the two gamma spectra obtained from two opposite LEPS Germanium Detectors (Low Energy Photon Spectrometer), correcting the differences (channel/energy) between both two spectra, and fitting them before adding. The total-spectrum is recorded at the computer memory as a single spectrum. The necessary equipment, to run this program is: - Two opposite germanium detectors, with their associate electronics. - Multichannel analyzer (2048 memory channel minimum) - Computer on-line interfacing to multichannel analyzer. (Author) 4 refs.

  10. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  11. High resolution X-ray imaging of bone-implant interface by large area flat-panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kytyr, D; Jirousek, O; Dammer, J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the cemented bone-implant interface behavior (cement layer degradation and bone-cement interface debonding) with emphasis on imaging techniques suitable to detect the early defects in the cement layer. To simulate in vivo conditions a human pelvic bone was implanted with polyurethane acetabular cup using commercial acrylic bone cement. The implanted cup was then loaded in a custom hip simulator to initiate fatigue crack propagation in the bone cement. The pelvic bone was then repetitively scanned in a micro-tomography device. Reconstructed tomography images showed failure processes that occurred in the cement layer during the first 250,000 cycles. A failure in cemented acetabular implant - debonding, crumbling and smeared cracks - has been found to be at the bone-cement interface. Use of micro-focus source and high resolution flat panel detector of large physical dimensions allowed to reconstruct the micro-structural models suitable for investigation of migration, micro-motions and consecutive loosening of the implant. The large area flat panel detector with physical dimensions 120 x 120mm with 50μm pixel size provided a superior image quality compared to clinical CT systems with 300-150μm pixel size.

  12. Surface passivation of high-purity germanium gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexiev, D.; Butcher, K.S.A.; Edmondson, M.; Lawson, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental work consists of two parts. The first involves fabrication of hyper-pure germanium gamma ray detectors using standard surface treatment, chemical etchings and containment in a suitable cryostat. Then, after cooling the detectors to 77 K, γ-ray emissions from radioisotopes are resolved, resolution, depletion depth, V R versus I R characteristics and /N A -N D / of the germanium are measured. The second part of the work involves investigation of surface states in an effort to achieve long-term stability of operating characteristics. Several methods are used: plasma hydrogenation, a-Si and a-Ge pinch-off effect and simple oxidation. A-Ge and a-Si thicknesses were measured using Rutherford backscattering techniques; surface states were measured with deep level transient spectroscopy and diode reverse current versus reverse voltage plots. Some scanning electron microscope measurements were used in determining major film contaminants during backscattering of a-Si and a-Ge films. Surface passivation studies revealed unexpected hole trapping defects generated when a-Ge:H film is applied. The a-Si:H films were found to be mechanically strong, no defect traps were found and preliminary results suggest that such films will be good passivants. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs., 13 ills

  13. An Experimental Study of the Accuracy of Compensation in Lithium Drifted Germanium Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauber, A; Malmsten, B

    1969-10-15

    The nature and magnitude of the space charge existing in the compensated layer of lithium drifted germanium detectors has been studied as a function of drifted depth and of the electric field applied during drift. Experimental values were obtained from the dependence of detector capacitance on applied bias. In most cases there was a linear space charge gradient in the compensated layer. When small electric fields were applied to deep compensated layers, the space charge became constant throughout a large part of the compensated layer. There is some evidence for a strong decrease of mobile carrier recombination lifetime with increasing drifted depth, possibly down to a few microseconds for drifted depths of the order of 7 mm. The experimental results of the investigation are to a large extent in good agreement with theory.

  14. The position response of a large-volume segmented germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descovich, M.; Nolan, P.J.; Boston, A.J.; Dobson, J.; Gros, S.; Cresswell, J.R.; Simpson, J.; Lazarus, I.; Regan, P.H.; Valiente-Dobon, J.J.; Sellin, P.; Pearson, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    The position response of a large-volume segmented coaxial germanium detector is reported. The detector has 24-fold segmentation on its outer contact. The output from each contact was sampled with fast digital signal processing electronics in order to determine the position of the γ-ray interaction from the signal pulse shape. The interaction position was reconstructed in a polar coordinate system by combining the radial information, contained in the rise-time of the pulse leading edge, with the azimuthal information, obtained from the magnitude of the transient charge signals induced on the neighbouring segments. With this method, a position resolution of 3-7mm is achieved in both the radial and the azimuthal directions

  15. The position response of a large-volume segmented germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descovich, M. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mdescovich@lbl.gov; Nolan, P.J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Boston, A.J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Dobson, J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Gros, S. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Cresswell, J.R. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Simpson, J. [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I. [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Regan, P.H. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Valiente-Dobon, J.J. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Sellin, P. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Pearson, C.J. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-21

    The position response of a large-volume segmented coaxial germanium detector is reported. The detector has 24-fold segmentation on its outer contact. The output from each contact was sampled with fast digital signal processing electronics in order to determine the position of the {gamma}-ray interaction from the signal pulse shape. The interaction position was reconstructed in a polar coordinate system by combining the radial information, contained in the rise-time of the pulse leading edge, with the azimuthal information, obtained from the magnitude of the transient charge signals induced on the neighbouring segments. With this method, a position resolution of 3-7mm is achieved in both the radial and the azimuthal directions.

  16. Modeling and evaluation of a high-resolution CMOS detector for cone-beam CT of the extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qian; Sisniega, Alejandro; Brehler, Michael; Stayman, J Webster; Yorkston, John; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Zbijewski, Wojciech

    2018-01-01

    , compared to ~0.14 mm for an a-Si:H FPD. For this fine pixel pitch, detectability of fine features could be improved by using a thinner scintillator to reduce light spread blur. A 22% increase in detectability of 0.06 mm features was found for the C400 configuration compared to C700. An improvement in the frequency at 50% modulation (f 50 ) of MTF was measured, increasing from 1.8 lp/mm for C700 to 2.5 lp/mm for C400. The C400 configuration also achieved equivalent or better DQE as C700 for frequencies above ~2 mm -1 . Images of cadaver specimens confirmed improved visualization of trabeculae with the C400 sensor. The small pixel size of CMOS detectors yields improved performance in high-resolution extremity CBCT compared to a-Si:H FPDs, particularly when coupled with a custom 0.4 mm thick scintillator. The results indicate that adoption of a CMOS detector in extremity CBCT can benefit applications in quantitative imaging of trabecular microstructure in humans. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. High-resolution integrated germanium Compton polarimeter for the γ-ray energy range 80 keV-1 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, R. A.; Urban, W.; Barnett, A. R.; Varley, B. J.

    1995-06-01

    Parameters which govern the choice of a detection system to measure the linear polarization of γ rays at low energies are discussed. An integrated polarimeter is described which is constructed from a single crystal of germanium. It is a compact planar device with the sectors defined electrically, and which gives an energy resolution in the add-back mode of 1 keV at 300 keV. Its performance is demonstrated in a series of calibration measurements using both unpolarized radiation from radioactive sources and polarized γ rays from the 168Er(α,2n)170Yb reaction at Eα=25 MeV. Polarization measurements at energies as low as 84 keV have been achieved, where the sensitivity was 0.32±0.09. The sensitivity, efficiency, and energy resolution are reported. Our results indicate that energy resolution should be included in the definition of the figure of merit and we relate the new definition to earlier work. The comparisons show the advantages of the present design in the energy range below 300 keV and its competitiveness up to 1500 keV.

  18. High-resolution integrated germanium Compton polarimeter for the γ-ray energy range 80 keV--1 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sareen, R.A.; Urban, W.; Barnett, A.R.; Varley, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    Parameters which govern the choice of a detection system to measure the linear polarization of γ rays at low energies are discussed. An integrated polarimeter is described which is constructed from a single crystal of germanium. It is a compact planar device with the sectors defined electrically, and which gives an energy resolution in the add-back mode of 1 keV at 300 keV. Its performance is demonstrated in a series of calibration measurements using both unpolarized radiation from radioactive sources and polarized γ rays from the 168 Er(α,2n) 170 Yb reaction at E α =25 MeV. Polarization measurements at energies as low as 84 keV have been achieved, where the sensitivity was 0.32±0.09. The sensitivity, efficiency, and energy resolution are reported. Our results indicate that energy resolution should be included in the definition of the figure of merit and we relate the new definition to earlier work. The comparisons show the advantages of the present design in the energy range below 300 keV and its competitiveness up to 1500 keV. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  19. First 10 kg of naked Germanium detectors in liquid nitrogen installed in the GENIUS-Test-Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V.; Chkvorets, O.; Krivosheina, I.V.; Strecker, H.; Tomei, C.

    2003-01-01

    The first four naked high-purity Germanium detectors were installed successfully in liquid nitrogen in the GENIUS-Test-Facility in the GRAN SASSO Underground Laboratory on May 5, 2003. This is the first time ever that this novel technique aiming at extreme background reduction in search for rare decays is going to be tested underground. First operational parameters are presented

  20. Background intercomparison with escape-suppressed germanium detectors in underground mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szuecs, Tamas; Bemmerer, Daniel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    A key requirement for underground nuclear astrophysics experiments is the very low background level in germanium detectors underground. The reference for these purposes is the world's so far only underground accelerator laboratory for nuclear astrophysics, LUNA. LUNA is located deep underground in the Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy, shielded from cosmic rays by 1400 m of rock. The background at LUNA was studied in detail using an escape-suppressed Clover-type HPGe detector. Exactly the same detector was subsequently transported to the Felsenkeller underground laboratory in Dresden, shielded by 45 m of rock, and the background was shown to be only a factor of three higher than at LUNA when comparing the escape-suppressed spectra, with interesting consequences for underground nuclear astrophysics. As the next step of a systematic study of the effects of a combination of active and passive shielding on the cosmic ray induced background, this detector is now being brought to the ''Reiche Zeche'' mine in Freiberg/Sachsen, shielded by 150 m of rock. The data from the Freiberg measurement are shown and discussed.

  1. High Purity Germanium Detector as part of Health Canada's Mobile Nuclear Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocki, Trevor J.; Bouchard, Claude; Rollings, John; Boudreau, Marc-Oliver; McCutcheon- Wickham, Rory; Bergman, Lauren [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, AL6302D, 775 Brookfield Road, Ottawa, K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    In the event of a nuclear emergency on Canadian soil, Health Canada has designed and equipped two Mobile Nuclear Labs (MNLs) which can be deployed near a radiological accident site to provide radiological measurement capabilities. These measurements would help public authorities to make informed decisions for radiation protection recommendations. One of the MNLs has been outfitted with a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector within a lead castle, which can be used for identification as well as quantification of gamma emitting radioisotopes in contaminated soil, water, and other samples. By spring 2014, Health Canada's second MNL will be equipped with a similar detector to increase sample analysis capacity and also provide redundancy if one of the detectors requires maintenance. The Mobile Nuclear Lab (MNL) with the HPGe detector has been successfully deployed in the field for various exercises. One of these field exercises was a dirty bomb scenario where an unknown radioisotope required identification. A second exercise was an inter-comparison between the measurements of spiked soil and water samples, by two field teams and a certified laboratory. A third exercise was the deployment of the MNL as part of a full scale nuclear exercise simulating an emergency at a Canadian nuclear power plant. The lessons learned from these experiences will be discussed. (authors)

  2. Design study of a high-resolution breast-dedicated PET system built from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2010-01-01

    roughly 7 min imaging time. Furthermore, we observe that the degree of spatial resolution degradation along the direction orthogonal to the two panels that is typical of a limited angle tomography configuration is mitigated by having high-resolution DOI capabilities that enable more accurate positioning of oblique response lines.

  3. First results of neutrinoless double beta decay search with the GERmanium Detector Array "GERDA"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicskó Csáthy, József

    2014-06-01

    The study of neutrinoless double beta decay is the most powerful approach to the fundamental question if the neutrino is a Majorana particle, i.e. its own anti-particle. The observation of the lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta decay would establish the Majorana nature of the neutrino. Until now neutrinoless double beta decay was not observed. The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA is a double beta decay experiment located at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. GERDA operates bare Ge diodes enriched in 76Ge in liquid argon supplemented by a water shield. The exposure accumulated adds up to 21.6 kg· yr with a background level of 1.8 · 10-2 cts/(keV·kg·yr). The results of the Phase I of the experiment are presented and the preparation of the Phase II is briefly discussed.

  4. Characterization system for Germanium detectors dedicated to gamma spectroscopy applied to nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roccaz, J.; Portella, C.; Saurel, N. [CEA, DAM, VALDUC, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-07-01

    CEA-Valduc produces some radioactive waste (mainly alpha emitters). Legislation requires producers to sort their waste by activity and type of isotopes, and to package them in order to forward them to the appropriate reprocessing or storage facility. Our lab LMDE (laboratory for measurements on nuclear wastes and valuation) is in charge of the characterization of the majority of waste produced by CEA-Valduc. Among non-destructive methods to characterize a radioactive object, gamma-spectroscopy is one of the most efficient. We present to this conference the method we use to characterize nuclear waste and the system we developed to characterize our germanium detectors. The goal of this system is to obtain reliable numerical models of our detectors and calculate their efficiency curves. Measurements are necessary to checks models and improve them. These measurements are made on a bench using pinpoint sources ({sup 133}Ba, {sup 152}Eu) from 60 keV to 1500 keV, with distances from 'on contact' to a few meters from the diode and variable angles between the source and the detector axis. We have demonstrated that we are able to obtain efficiency curves

  5. The Influence Of Dead Layer Effect On The Characteristics Of The High Purity Germanium P-Type Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo Quang Huy

    2011-01-01

    The present work aims at reviewing the studies of the influence of dead layer effect on the characteristics of a high purity germanium (HPGe) p-type detector, obtained by the author and his colleagues in the recent years. The object for study was the HPGe GC1518 detector-based gamma spectrometer of the Center for Nuclear Techniques, Ho Chi Minh City. The studying problems were: The modeling of an HPGe detector-based gamma spectrometer with using the MCNP code; the method of determining the thickness of dead layer by experimental measurements of gamma spectra and the calculations using MCNP code; the influence of material parameters and dead layer on detector efficiency; the increase of dead layer thickness over the operating time of the GC1518 detector; the influence of dead layer thickness increase on the decrease of detector efficiency; the dead layer effect for the gamma spectra measured in the GC1518 detector. (author)

  6. Performance and stability tests of bare high purity germanium detectors in liquid argon for the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnabe Heider, Marik

    2009-05-27

    GERDA will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge by using a novel approach of bare germanium detectors in liquid argon (LAr). Enriched germanium detectors from the previous Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments have been reprocessed and will be deployed in GERDA Phase-I. At the center of this thesis project is the study of the performance of bare germanium detectors in cryogenic liquids. Identical detector performance as in vacuum cryostats (2.2 keV FWHM at 1.3 MeV) was achieved in cryogenic liquids with a new low-mass detector assembly and contacts. One major result is the discovery of a radiation induced leakage current (LC) increase when operating bare detectors with standard passivation layers in LAr. Charge collection and build-up on the passivation layer were identified as the origin of the LC increase. It was found that diodes without passivation do not exhibit this feature. Three month-long stable operation in LAr at {proportional_to} 5 pA LC under periodic gamma irradiation demonstrated the suitability of the modi ed detector design. Based on these results, all Phase-I detectors were reprocessed without passivation layer and subsequently successfully characterized in LAr in the GERDA underground Detector Laboratory. The mass loss during the reprocessing was {proportional_to}300 g out of 17.9 kg and the exposure above ground {proportional_to} 5 days. This results in a negligible cosmogenic background increase of {proportional_to} 5.10{sup -4} cts/(keV.kg.y) at {sup 76}Ge Q{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} for {sup 60}Co and {sup 68}Ge. (orig.)

  7. Characterization and performance of germanium detectors with sub-keV sensitivities for neutrino and dark matter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soma, A.K.; Singh, M.K.; Singh, L.; Kumar, G. Kiran; Lin, F.K.; Du, Q.; Jiang, H.; Liu, S.K.; Ma, J.L.; Sharma, V.; Wang, L.; Wu, Y.C.; Yang, L.T.; Zhao, W.; Agartioglu, M.; Asryan, G.; Chang, Y.Y.; Chen, J.H.; Chuang, Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    Germanium ionization detectors with sensitivities as low as 100 eV_e_e (electron-equivalent energy) open new windows for studies on neutrino and dark matter physics. The relevant physics subjects are summarized. The detectors have to measure physics signals whose amplitude is comparable to that of pedestal electronic noise. To fully exploit this new detector technique, various experimental issues including quenching factors, energy reconstruction and calibration, signal triggering and selection as well as evaluation of their associated efficiencies have to be attended. The efforts and results of a research program to address these challenges are presented.

  8. Experimental measurement of a high resolution CMOS detector coupled to CsI scintillators under X-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michail, C.; Valais, I.; Seferis, I.; Kalyvas, N.; Fountos, G.; Kandarakis, I.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the information content of structured CsI:Tl scintillating screens, specially treated to be compatible to a CMOS digital imaging optical sensor, in terms of the information capacity (IC), based on Shannon's mathematical communication theory. IC was assessed after the experimental determination of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) and the Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) in the mammography and general radiography energy range. The CMOS sensor was coupled to three columnar CsI:Tl scintillator screens obtained from the same manufacturer with thicknesses of 130, 140 and 170 μm respectively, which were placed in direct contact with the optical sensor. The MTF was measured using the slanted-edge method while NNPS was determined by 2D Fourier transforming of uniformly exposed images. Both parameters were assessed by irradiation under the mammographic W/Rh (130, 140 and 170 μm CsI screens) and the RQA-5 (140 and 170 μm CsI screens) (IEC 62220-1) beam qualities. The detector response function was linear for the exposure range under investigation. At 70 kVp, under the RQA-5 conditions IC values were found to range between 2229 and 2340 bits/mm 2 . At 28 kVp the corresponding IC values were found to range between 2262 and 2968 bits/mm 2 . The information content of CsI:Tl scintillating screens in combination to the high resolution CMOS sensor, investigated in the present study, where found optimized for use in digital mammography imaging systems. - Highlights: • Three structured CsI:Tl screens (130,140 & 170 um) were coupled to a CMOS sensor. • MTF of the CsI/CMOS was higher than GOS:Tb and CsI based digital imaging systems. • IC of CsI:Tl/CMOS was found optimized for use in digital mammography systems

  9. Gamma-ray spectrometer system with high efficiency and high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Bernard, W.; Dowdy, E.J.; Garcia, C.; Lucas, M.C.; Pratt, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Our gamma-ray spectrometer system, designed for field use, offers high efficiency and high resolution for safeguards applications. The system consists of three 40% high-purity germanium detectors and a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system that calculates a composite spectrum for the three detectors. The LeCroy 3500 mainframe can be operated remotely from the detector array with control exercised through modems and the telephone system. System performance with a mixed source of 125 Sb, 154 Eu, and 155 Eu confirms the expected efficiency of 120% with the overall resolution showing little degradation over that of the worst detector

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of the X-ray response of a germanium microstrip detector with energy and position resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, G; Fajardo, P; Morse, J

    1999-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo computer simulations of the X-ray response of a micro-strip germanium detector over the energy range 30-100 keV. The detector consists of a linear array of lithographically defined 150 mu m wide strips on a high purity monolithic germanium crystal of 6 mm thickness. The simulation code is divided into two parts. We first consider a 10 mu m wide X-ray beam striking the detector surface at normal incidence and compute the interaction processes possible for each photon. Photon scattering and absorption inside the detector crystal are simulated using the EGS4 code with the LSCAT extension for low energies. A history of events is created of the deposited energies which is read by the second part of the code which computes the energy histogram for each detector strip. Appropriate algorithms are introduced to account for lateral charge spreading occurring during charge carrier drift to the detector surface, and Fano and preamplifier electronic noise contributions. Computed spectra for differen...

  11. Efficiency for close geometries and extended sources of a p-type germanium detector with low-energy sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyser, R.M.; Twomey, T.R.

    2007-01-01

    Typically, germanium detectors designed to have good sensitivity to low-energy photons and good efficiency at high energies are constructed from n-type crystals with a boron-implanted outer contact. These detectors usually exhibit inferior resolution and peak shape compared to ones made from p-type crystals. To overcome the resolution and peak-shape deficiencies, a new method of construction of a germanium detector element was developed. This has resulted in a gamma-ray detector with high sensitivity to photon energies from 14 keV to 2 MeV, while maintaining good resolution and peak shape over this energy range. Efficiency measurements, done according to the draft IEEE 325-2004 standard, show efficiencies typical of a GMX or n-type detector at low energies. The detectors are of large diameter suitable for counting extended samples such as filter papers. The Gaussian peak shape and good resolution typical of a GEM or p-type are maintained for the high count rates and peak separation needed for activation analysis. (author)

  12. Performance of A Compact Multi-crystal High-purity Germanium Detector Array for Measuring Coincident Gamma-ray Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Chris [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Daigle, Stephen [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Buckner, Matt [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Erikson, Luke E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stave, Sean C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Champagne, Art [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Cooper, Andrew [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Downen, Lori [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kelly, Keegan [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Sallaska, Anne [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-02-18

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center of mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the segmented nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within the uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance will be presented.

  13. Performance of a compact multi-crystal high-purity germanium detector array for measuring coincident gamma-ray emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Stave, Sean C., E-mail: Sean.Stave@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Champagne, Arthur E.; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the {sup 14}N(p,γ){sup 15}O{sup ⁎} reaction for several transition energies at an effective center-of-mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the granular nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within their uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance are presented.

  14. Improvements in Applied Gamma-Ray Spectrometry with Germanium Semiconductor Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, D; Hellstroem, S [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden); Dubois, J [Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1965-01-15

    A germanium semi-conductor detector has in the present investigation been used in four cases of applied gamma-ray spectrometry. In one case the weak-activity contribution of Cs{sup 134} in Cs{sup 137} standard sources has been determined. The second case concerns the determination of K{sup 42} in samples of biological origin containing strong Na{sup 24} activities. In the third case the Nb{sup 94} and Nb{sup 95} activities from neutron-irradiated niobium foils used in the dosimetry of high neutron fluxes with long exposure times have been completely resolved and it has been possible to determine the ratio of the two activities with a high degree of accuracy. Finally, a Zr{sup 95} - Nb{sup 95} source has been analysed in a similar way with respect to its radiochemical composition. The resolution obtained also made possible a determination of the branching ratio of the two gamma-transitions in Zr{sup 95} and of the energies of the gamma-transitions of both nuclides.

  15. Transistor reset preamplifier for high-rate high-resolution spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landis, D.A.; Cork, C.P.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.S.

    1981-10-01

    Pulsed transistor reset of high resolution charge sensitive preamplifiers used in cooled semiconductor spectrometers can sometimes have an advantage over pulsed light reset systems. Several versions of transistor reset spectrometers using both silicon and germanium detectors have been built. This paper discusses the advantages of the transistor reset system and illustrates several configurations of the packages used for the FET and reset transistor. It also describes the preamplifer circuit and shows the performance of the spectrometer at high rates

  16. TU-E-217BCD-06: Cone Beam Breast CT with a High Resolution Flat Panel Detector-Improvement of Calcification Visibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y; Zhong, Y; Lai, C; Wang, T; Shaw, C

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the advantage of a high resolution flat panel detector for improving the visibility of microcalcifications (MCs) in cone beam breast CT Methods: A paraffin cylinder was used to simulate a 100% adipose breast. Calcium carbonate grains, ranging from 125-140 μm to 224 - 250 μm in size, were used to simulate the MCs. Groups of 25 same size MCs were embedded at the phantom center. The phantom was scanned with a bench-top CBCT system at various exposure levels. A 75μm pitch flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer) with 500μm thick CsI scintillator plate was used as the high resolution detector. A 194 μm pitch detector (Paxscan 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems) was used for reference. 300 projection images were acquired over 360° and reconstructed. The images were reviewed by 6 readers. The MC visibility was quantified as the fraction of visible MCs and averaged for comparison. The visibility was plotted as a function of the estimated dose level for various MC sizes and detectors. The MTFs and DQEs were measured and compared. For imaging small (200 μm and smaller) MCs, the visibility achieved with the 75μm pitch detector was found to be significantly higher than those achieved with the 194μm pitch detector. For imaging larger MCs, there was little advantage in using the 75μm pitch detector. Using the 75μm pitch detector, MCs as small as 180 μm could be imaged to achieve a visibility of 78% with an isocenter tissue dose of ∼20 mGys versus 62% achieved with the 194 μm pitch detector at the same dose level. It was found that a high pitch flat panel detector had the advantages of extending its imaging capability to higher frequencies thus helping improve the visibility when used to image small MCs. This work was supported in part by grants CA104759, CA13852 and CA124585 from NIH-NCI, a grant EB00117 from NIH-NIBIB, and a subcontract from NIST-ATP. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Development and characterization of high-resolution neutron pixel detectors based on Timepix read-out chips

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, F.; Žemlička, J.; Jakoubek, J.; Dudák, J.; Vavřík, D.; Koster, U.; Atkins, D.; Kaestner, A.; Šoltéš, J.; Viererbl, L.; Vacík, Jiří; Tomandl, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, DEC (2016), č. článku C12026. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010237 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : neutron detector s * Pixalated detector s and associated VLSI electronics Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  18. A silicon microstrip detector in a magnetic spectrometer for high-resolution electron scattering experiments at the S-DALINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenhardt, A.W.; Bonnes, U.; Burda, O.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Platz, M.; Richter, A.; Watzlawik, S.

    2006-01-01

    A silicon microstrip detector was developed as focal plane detector of the 169.7 deg. magic angle double-focussing spectrometer at the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (S-DALINAC). It allows experiments with minimum ionizing electrons at data rates up to 100 kHz, utilizing the maximum resolution of the spectrometer achievable in dispersion-matching mode

  19. Measurement of energy transitions for the decay radiations of 75Ge and 69Ge in a high purity germanium detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Güral; Usta, Metin; Oktay, Adem

    2018-06-01

    Photoactivation experiments have a wide range of application areas in nuclear, particle physics, and medical physics such as measuring energy levels and half-lifes of nuclei, experiments for understanding imaging methods in medicine, isotope production for patient treatment, radiation security and transportation, radiation therapy, and astrophysics processes. In this study, some energy transition values of the decay radiations of 75Ge and 69Ge, which are the products of photonuclear reactions (γ, n) with germanium isotopes (75Ge and 69Ge), were measured. The gamma spectrum as a result of atomic transitions were analysed by using a high purity semiconductor germanium detector and the energy transition values which are presented here were compared with the ones which are the best in literature. It was observed that the results presented are in agreement with literature in error range and some results have better precisions.

  20. Field-portable high-resolution EDXRF analysis with HgI2-detector-based instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, P.F.; Little, S.R.; Voots, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis is well known for its efficient use of x-ray detector technology for simultaneous multielement determination. Low-intensity excitation, such as from a radioisotope source, can thus be employed and has enabled the design of many types of truly portable EDXRF instrumentation. Portable design, however, has not been without significant compromise in analytical performance because of the limited x-ray resolving power of prior detection methods, except by the use of a cryogenically operated detector. The developments we refer to stem from the use of a comparatively new x-ray detection device fabricated from mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ). For this detector, only a modest degree of cooling is required to achieve an energy resolution of > 300 eV. Two field-portable instrument designs of different hand-held measurement probe configurations are available that have applications for industrial quality assurance and environmental screening

  1. Development of Small-Pixel CZT Detectors for Future High-Resolution Hard X-ray Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilicke, Matthias

    Owing to recent breakthroughs in grazing incidence mirror technology, next-generation hard X-ray telescopes will achieve angular resolutions of between 5 and 10 arc seconds - about an order of magnitude better than that of the NuSTAR hard X-ray telescope. As a consequence, the next generation of hard X-ray telescopes will require pixelated hard X- ray detectors with pixels on a grid with a lattice constant of between 120 and 240 um. Additional detector requirements include a low energy threshold of less than 5 keV and an energy resolution of less than 1 keV. The science drivers for a high angular-resolution hard X-ray mission include studies and measurements of black hole spins, the cosmic evolution of super-massive black holes, AGN feedback, and the behavior of matter at very high densities. We propose a R&D research program to develop, optimize and study the performance of 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors of 1-2 mm thickness. Our program aims at a comparison of the performance achieved with CdTe and CZT detectors, and the optimization of the pixel, steering grid, and guard ring anode patterns. Although these studies will use existing ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits), our program also includes modest funds for the development of an ultra-low noise ASIC with a 2-D grid of readout pads that can be directly bonded to the 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and CZT detectors. The team includes the Washington University group (Prof. M. Beilicke and Co-I Prof. H.S.W. Krawczynski et al.), and co-investigator G. De Geronimo at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Washington University group has a 10 year track record of innovative CZT detector R&D sponsored by the NASA Astronomy and Physics Research and Analysis (APRA) program. The accomplishments to date include the development of CZT detectors with pixel pitches between 350 um and 2.5 mm for the ProtoExist, EXIST, and X-Calibur hard X-ray missions with some of the best

  2. Execution of a cooperative test by means of 'in-situ-gamma spectrometry' using HP-germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, F.; Lovranich, E.; Urbanich, E.; Streit, S.

    1995-06-01

    A cooperative test was carried out in Salzburg, Austria, in order to determine the activity of Cs-137 and other radio nuclides from the Tschernobyl fallout 1986 and from tests of nuclear weapons in the 1960s. 24 groups from 9 countries of Europe took part. The measurements were performed by means of gamma spectrometry using HP-germanium detectors. Most of the groups had excellent results. The groups became acquainted with each other. The personal contact makes it possible to get information quickly in case of accidents of nuclear power stations in the neighbourhood of Austria

  3. Development of large-volume, high-resolution tracking detectors based on capillaries filled with liquid scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buontempo, S.; Fabre, J.P.; Frenkel, A.; Gregoire, G.; Hoepfner, K.; Konijn, J.; Kozarenko, E.; Kreslo, I.; Kushnirenko, A.; Martellotti, G.; Michel, L.; Mondardini, M.R.; Penso, G.; Siegmund, W.P.; Strack, R.; Tyukov, V.; Vasilchenko, V.; Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G.; Winter, K.; Wong, H.; Zymin, K.

    1995-01-01

    Searches for the decay of short-lived particles require real time, high-resolution tracking in active targets, which in the case of neutrino physics should be of large volume. The possibility of achieving this by using glass capillaries filled with organic liquid scintillator is being investigated in the framework of the CHORUS experiment at CERN. In this paper, after outlining the application foreseen, advances in the tracking technique are discussed and results from tests are reported. An active target of dimensions 180x2x2 cm 3 has been assembled from capillaries with 20 μm diameter pores. The readout scheme currently in operation allows the reading of similar 5x10 5 channels using a single chain of image intensifiers having a resolution of σ similar 20 μm. Following the development of new liquid scintillators and purification methods an attenuation length of similar 3 m has been obtained. This translates into a hit density of 3.5 per mm for a minimum-ionizing particle that crosses the active target at a distance of 1 m from the readout end. (orig.)

  4. A High Resolution Phoswich Detector: LaBr3(Ce) Coupled With LaCl3(Ce)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Briz, J. A.; Gugliermina, V.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O.; Turrión, M.

    2010-04-01

    An innovative solution for the forward end-cap CALIFA calorimeter of R3B is under investigation consisting of two scintillation crystals, LaBr3 and LaCl3, stacked together in a phoswich configuration with one readout only. This dispositive should be capable of a good determination of the energy of protons and gamma radiation. This composite detector allows to deduce the initial energy of charged particles by ΔE1+ΔE2 identification. For gammas, the simulations show that there is a high probability that the first interaction occurs inside the scintillator at few centimeters, with a second layer, the rest of the energy is absorbed, or it can be used as veto event in case of no deposition in the first layer. One such a detector has been tested at the Centro de MicroAnálisis de Materiales (CMAM) in Madrid. Good resolution and time signal separation have been achieved.

  5. A high resolution, high counting rate bidimensional, MWPC imaging detector for small angle X-ray diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.; Sawyer, E.C.; Stephenson, R.

    1981-07-01

    The performance is reported of a 200 mm x 200 mm X-ray imaging MWPC aimed at applications in small angle X-ray diffraction and scattering. With quantum energies of approximately 8 keV high spatial resolution (+- 0.5 mm x +- 0.14 mm) with a capability for data taking at >approximately 350 kHz is reported. The detection efficiency is approximately 75% and the detector operates as a sealed unit with a long lifetime. (author)

  6. High resolution imaging of 2D distribution of lithium in thin samples measured with multipixel detectors in sandwich geometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomandl, Ivo; Vacík, Jiří; Sierra, Y. M.; Granja, C.; Kraus, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 023706. ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Li * detectors * thermal neutrons Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.515, year: 2016

  7. High resolution micro-CT of low attenuating organic materials using large area photon-counting detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumpová, Ivana; Vavřík, Daniel; Fíla, Tomáš; Koudelka_ml., Petr; Jandejsek, Ivan; Jakůbek, Jan; Kytýř, Daniel; Zlámal, Petr; Vopálenský, Michal; Gantar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2016), č. článku C02003. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : computerized tomography (CT) * computed radiography (CR) * pixelated detectors and associated VLSI electronics Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-0221/11/02/C02003

  8. Berkeley High-Resolution Ball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    Criteria for a high-resolution γ-ray system are discussed. Desirable properties are high resolution, good response function, and moderate solid angle so as to achieve not only double- but triple-coincidences with good statistics. The Berkeley High-Resolution Ball involved the first use of bismuth germanate (BGO) for anti-Compton shield for Ge detectors. The resulting compact shield permitted rather close packing of 21 detectors around a target. In addition, a small central BGO ball gives the total γ-ray energy and multiplicity, as well as the angular pattern of the γ rays. The 21-detector array is nearly complete, and the central ball has been designed, but not yet constructed. First results taken with 9 detector modules are shown for the nucleus 156 Er. The complex decay scheme indicates a transition from collective rotation (prolate shape) to single- particle states (possibly oblate) near spin 30 h, and has other interesting features

  9. GIOVE: a new detector setup for high sensitivity germanium spectroscopy at shallow depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heusser, G.; Weber, M.; Hakenmüller, J.; Laubenstein, M.; Lindner, M.; Maneschg, W.; Simgen, H.; Stolzenburg, D.; Strecker, H.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the development and construction of the high-purity germanium spectrometer setup GIOVE (Germanium Inner Outer VEto), recently built and now operated at the shallow underground laboratory of the Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg. Particular attention was paid to the design of a novel passive and active shield, aiming at efficient rejection of environmental and muon induced radiation backgrounds. The achieved sensitivity level of ≤100 μBq kg -1 for primordial radionuclides from U and Th in typical γ ray sample screening measurements is unique among instruments located at comparably shallow depths and can compete with instruments at far deeper underground sites

  10. GIOVE: a new detector setup for high sensitivity germanium spectroscopy at shallow depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heusser, G.; Weber, M.; Hakenmueller, J.; Lindner, M.; Maneschg, W.; Simgen, H.; Stolzenburg, D.; Strecker, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Laubenstein, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    We report on the development and construction of the high-purity germanium spectrometer setup GIOVE (Germanium Inner Outer VEto), recently built and now operated at the shallow underground laboratory of the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg. Particular attention was paid to the design of a novel passive and active shield, aiming at efficient rejection of environmental and muon induced radiation backgrounds. The achieved sensitivity level of ≤ 100μBq kg{sup -1} for primordial radionuclides from U and Th in typical γ ray sample screening measurements is unique among instruments located at comparably shallow depths and can compete with instruments at far deeper underground sites. (orig.)

  11. Characteristics of an intrinsic germanium detector for measurement of soft x-rays from high-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Katsuaki; Matoba, Tohru; Funahashi, Akimasa; Kawakami, Tomohide

    1976-09-01

    An intrinsic germanium (Ge(I)) detector has been prepared for measurement of soft X-ray spectra from high-temperature tokamak plasmas. Its characteristics of photo-peak efficiency, escape-peak and Compton scattering were calibrated with standard radioisotopes and soft X-rays from the JFT-2a plasma, and compared with those of a lithium-drifted silicon (Si(Li)) detector. Features of the Ge(I) detector are as follows: (i) high detection efficiency in the high energy range, (ii) wide energy range for measurement of soft X-ray spectra, and (iii) low Compton scattering effect in measurement of continuous spectra. Its dead-layer depth is about 0.06μm, and the minimum detectable energies in the Ge(I) detector are similar to those in the Si(Li) detector. The Ge(I) detector is effective for measuring soft X-ray spectra from high-temperature tokamak plasmas. (auth.)

  12. Novel Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detector Developments for Future Large Area and High Resolution X-ray Astronomy Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Abe

    In the coming years, X-ray astronomy will require new soft X-ray detectors that can be read very quickly with low noise and can achieve small pixel sizes over a moderately large focal plane area. These requirements will be present for a variety of X-ray missions that will attempt to address science that was highly ranked by the 2010 Decadal Survey, including missions with science that overlaps with that of IXO and Athena, as well as other missions addressing science topics beyond those of IXO and Athena. An X-ray Surveyor mission was recently chosen by NASA for study by a Science & Technology Definition Team (STDT) so it can be considered as an option for an upcom-ing flagship mission. A mission such as this was endorsed by the NASA long term planning document entitled "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions," and a detailed description of one possible reali-zation of such a mission has been referred to as SMART-X, which was described in a recent NASA RFI response. This provides an example of a future mission concept with these requirements since it has high X-ray throughput and excellent spatial resolution. We propose to continue to modify current active pixel sensor designs, in particular the hybrid CMOS detectors that we have been working with for several years, and implement new in-pixel technologies that will allow us to achieve these ambitious and realistic requirements on a timeline that will make them available to upcoming X-ray missions. This proposal is a continuation of our program that has been work-ing on these developments for the past several years. The first 3 years of the program led to the development of a new circuit design for each pixel, which has now been shown to be suitable for a larger detector array. The proposed activity for the next four years will be to incorporate this pixel design into a new design of a full detector array (2k×2k pixels with digital output) and to fabricate this full-sized device so it can be thoroughly tested and

  13. A hybrid, broadband, low noise charge preamplifier for simultaneous high resolution energy and time information with large capacitance semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyot, M.

    1975-05-01

    A broadband and low noise charge preamplifier was developed in hybrid form, for a recoil spectrometer requiring large capacitance semiconductor detectors. This new hybrid and low cost preamplifier permits good timing information without compromising energy resolution. With a 500 pF external input capacity, it provides two simultaneous outputs: (i) the faster, current sensitive, with a rise time of 9 nsec and 2 mV/MeV on 50 ohms load, (ii) the lower, charge sensitive, with an energy resolution of 14 keV (FWHM Si) using a RC-CR ungated filter of 2 μsec and a FET input protection [fr

  14. GERDA, a GERmanium Detector Array for the search for neutrinoless ββ decay in 76Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandola, L.; Tomei, C.

    2006-01-01

    The GERDA project, searching for neutrinoless double beta-decay of 76Ge with enriched germanium detectors submerged in a cryogenic bath, has been approved for installation at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. The GERDA technique is aiming at a dramatic reduction of the background due to radioactive contaminations of the materials surrounding the detectors. This will lead to a sensitivity of about 1026 years on the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay. Already in the first phase of the experiment, GERDA will be able to investigate with high statistical significance the claimed evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge based on the data of the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment

  15. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-04: Automatic Skin-Dose Mapping for An Angiographic System with a Region-Of-Interest, High-Resolution Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayan, S; Rana, V [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center (United States); Setlur Nagesh, S [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center (United States); Ionita, C [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University at Buffalo (State University of New York), Buffalo, NY (United States); Rudin, S [Department of Radiology, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University at Buffalo (State University of New York), Buffalo, NY (United States); Bednarek, D [Department of Radiology, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Our real-time skin dose tracking system (DTS) has been upgraded to monitor dose for the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF), a high-resolution, small field-of-view x-ray detector. Methods: The MAF has been mounted on a changer on a clinical C-Arm gantry so it can be used interchangeably with the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) during neuro-interventional procedures when high resolution is needed in a region-of-interest. To monitor patient skin dose when using the MAF, our DTS has been modified to automatically account for the change in scatter for the very small MAF FOV and to provide separated dose distributions for each detector. The DTS is able to provide a color-coded mapping of the cumulative skin dose on a 3D graphic model of the patient. To determine the correct entrance skin exposure to be applied by the DTS, a correction factor was determined by measuring the exposure at the entrance surface of a skull phantom with an ionization chamber as a function of entrance beam size for various beam filters and kVps. Entrance exposure measurements included primary radiation, patient backscatter and table forward scatter. To allow separation of the dose from each detector, a parameter log is kept that allows a replay of the procedure exposure events and recalculation of the dose components.The graphic display can then be constructed showing the dose distribution from the MAF and FPD separately or together. Results: The DTS is able to provide separate displays of dose for the MAF and FPD with field-size specific scatter corrections. These measured corrections change from about 49% down to 10% when changing from the FPD to the MAF. Conclusion: The upgraded DTS allows identification of the patient skin dose delivered when using each detector in order to achieve improved dose management as well as to facilitate peak skin-dose reduction through dose spreading. Research supported in part by Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation and NIH Grants R43FD0158401, R44FD

  16. Identifying the most infectious lesions in pulmonary tuberculosis by high-resolution multi-detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Jun Jun; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Teng, Wen-Bao; Chou, Chun-Hsiung; Hsieh, Shih-Peng; Lee, Tsung-Lung; Wu, Ming-Ting

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether characteristics detected by multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) were predictive of highly infectious, smear-positive, active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Among 124 patients with active PTB, 84 had positive (group 1) and 40 had negative (group 2) smear results for acid-fast bacilli. Multiplanar MDCT, axial conventional CT and chest X-ray images were analysed retrospectively for morphology, number, and segmental (lobe) distribution of lesions. By multivariate analysis, consolidation over any segment of the upper, middle, or lingual lobes, cavitations, and clusters of nodules were associated with group 1, while centrilobular nodules were predictive of group 2. Using five independent variables associated with risk in group 1, a prediction model was created to distinguish between group 1 and group 2. ROC curve analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.951 ± 0.021 for this prediction model. With the ideal cutoff point score of 1, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were 84.5%, 97.5%, and 98.0%, respectively. A model to predict smear-positive active PTB on the basis of findings from MDCT may be a useful tool for clinical decisions about isolating patients pending sputum smear results. (orig.)

  17. Identifying the most infectious lesions in pulmonary tuberculosis by high-resolution multi-detector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Jun Jun [Pingtung Christian Hospital, Pingtung (China); Mei-Ho Institute of Technology, Pingtung (China); China Medical University, Taichung (China); Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng [Pingtung Christian Hospital, Pingtung (China); National Taiwan University, Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, Taipei (China); Teng, Wen-Bao; Chou, Chun-Hsiung; Hsieh, Shih-Peng; Lee, Tsung-Lung [Pingtung Christian Hospital, Pingtung (China); Wu, Ming-Ting [National Yang Ming University, Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Section of Thoracic and Circulation Imaging, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (China)

    2010-09-15

    This study aimed to determine whether characteristics detected by multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) were predictive of highly infectious, smear-positive, active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Among 124 patients with active PTB, 84 had positive (group 1) and 40 had negative (group 2) smear results for acid-fast bacilli. Multiplanar MDCT, axial conventional CT and chest X-ray images were analysed retrospectively for morphology, number, and segmental (lobe) distribution of lesions. By multivariate analysis, consolidation over any segment of the upper, middle, or lingual lobes, cavitations, and clusters of nodules were associated with group 1, while centrilobular nodules were predictive of group 2. Using five independent variables associated with risk in group 1, a prediction model was created to distinguish between group 1 and group 2. ROC curve analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.951 {+-} 0.021 for this prediction model. With the ideal cutoff point score of 1, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were 84.5%, 97.5%, and 98.0%, respectively. A model to predict smear-positive active PTB on the basis of findings from MDCT may be a useful tool for clinical decisions about isolating patients pending sputum smear results. (orig.)

  18. GIOVE: a new detector setup for high sensitivity germanium spectroscopy at shallow depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heusser, G., E-mail: gerd.heusser@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Weber, M., E-mail: marc.weber@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Hakenmüller, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Laubenstein, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Via G. Acitelli 22, 67100, Assergi, AQ (Italy); Lindner, M.; Maneschg, W.; Simgen, H.; Stolzenburg, D.; Strecker, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-11-09

    We report on the development and construction of the high-purity germanium spectrometer setup GIOVE (Germanium Inner Outer VEto), recently built and now operated at the shallow underground laboratory of the Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg. Particular attention was paid to the design of a novel passive and active shield, aiming at efficient rejection of environmental and muon induced radiation backgrounds. The achieved sensitivity level of ≤100 μBq kg{sup -1} for primordial radionuclides from U and Th in typical γ ray sample screening measurements is unique among instruments located at comparably shallow depths and can compete with instruments at far deeper underground sites.

  19. Utilization of concurrently gathered pulser data for complete spectral validation of gamma-ray spectra from germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.O.; Killian, E.W.; Helmer, R.G.; Coates, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the capabilities and limitations of using concurrently gathered pulser data for energy calibration, dead time correction, and pile-up loss correction of gamma ray spectra from germanium detectors have been investigated. This report deals with the pulser, charge injection into the charge sensitive preamplifier, hardware separation of gamma and pulser events, and analysis techniques to improve the accuracy of gamma peak area corrections from pulser data. Data are presented indicating achievable short and long term energy calibration stability of better than .01% and accuracy and rate dependent peak area loss corrections of +-1% up to 50,000 pulses per second (pps) and +-2.5% up to 100,000 pps, energy independent

  20. Machine-operated low temperature system for cooling a germanium detector at great depths of the sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruederle, F.; Hain, K.; Huebener, J.; Schloss, F.

    1978-07-01

    The report outlines the conceptual design and technical implementation phases of a very reliable low temperature system for long-time cooling of a germanium detector at great depths of the sea. The approach chosen as the solution involves the choise of a proven commercial small-scale refrigeration unit operation by the Gifford-Mc Mahon process, which is modified so as to suit special requirements. Testing for the severe conditions of use is carried out on a jarring table for the critical components and on a rolling test rig for the whole low temperature machine so as to simulate the stresses imposed by ships and high seas. The cooling system designed in this way has demonstrated its full functioning capability in a test conducted at sea. (orig.) 891 HP [de

  1. Compton scatter and X-ray crosstalk and the use of very thin intercrystal septa in high-resolution PET detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, C.S.; Tornai, M.P.; Cherry, S.R.; MacDonald, L.R.; Hoffman, E.J.

    1997-01-01

    To improve spatial resolution, positron emission tomography (PET) systems are being developed with finer detector elements. Unfortunately, using a smaller crystal size increases intercrystal Compton scatter and X-ray escape crosstalk, causing positioning errors that can lead to degradation of image contrast. The authors investigated the use of extremely thin lead strips for passive shielding of this intercrystal crosstalk. Using annihilation gamma rays and small Bismuth Germanate (BGO) crystal detectors in coincidence, crosstalk studies were performed with either two small adjacent crystals [(one-dimensional) (1-D)] or one crystal inside a volume of BGO [(two-dimensional) (2-D)]. The fraction of Compton scattered events from one crystal into an adjacent one was reduced, on average, by a factor of 3.2 (2.2) in the 1-D experiment and by a factor of 3.0 (2.1) in 2-D one, with a 300 (150)-microm-thick lead strip in between the crystals and a 300--700-keV energy window in both crystals. The authors could not measure a reduction in bismuth X-ray crosstalk with the sue of lead septa due to the production of lead X-rays of similar energy. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the coincident point-spread function (CPSF) was not significantly different for the 1- and 2-D studies, with or without the different septa in place. However, the FWTM was roughly 20% smaller with the 300-microm lead shielding in place. These results indicate that intercrystal crosstalk does not affect the positioning resolution at FWHM, but does affect the tails of the CPSF. Thus, without introducing any additional dead area, an insertion of very thin lead strips can reduce the extent of positioning errors. Reducing the intercrystal crosstalk in a high-resolution PET detector array could potentially improve tomographic image contrast in situations where intercrystal crosstalk plays a significant role in event mispositioning

  2. Focusing of a new germanium counter type : the composite detector. Uses of the TREFLE detector in the EUROGAM multidetector; Mise au point d`un nouveau type de compteur germanium: le detecteur composite. Utilisation du detecteur TREFLE dans le multidetecteur EUROGAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, L

    1995-05-01

    The aim of this thesis is the development of new types of germanium detectors: the composite detectors. Two types of prototypes are then conceived: the stacked planar detector (EDP) and the assembly of coaxial diodes (TREFLE). They are designed for the multidetector EUROGAM destined to the research of nuclear structure at high angular momentum. The four planar diodes of EDP detector were of 7 cm diameter and of 15 to 20 mm thick. The difference between the calculated and measured photopic efficiency is observed. The importance of surface channel induces a weak resistance of neutron damages. The sputtering method for the surface treatment reducing the germanium dead layer as well as a rule of selection concerning the impurity concentration and the thickness of crystal is helpful for the later production of germanium detector. The CLOVER detector consist of for mean size crystals in the same cryostat. The photopic efficiency is much larger than that of the greatest monocrystal detector. And the granulation of composite detector allowed the Doppler broadening correction of gamma ray observed in the nuclear reaction where the recoil velocity is very high. This new type of detector enable the linear polarization measurement of gamma ray. Twenty-four CLOVER detector are actually mounted in the EUROGAM array. The characteristics measured in source as well as in beam, reported in this thesis, meet exactly the charge account. (author). 47 refs., 61 figs., 18 tabs.

  3. Focal spot size reduction using asymmetric collimation to enable reduced anode angles with a conventional angiographic x-ray tube for use with high resolution detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, M.; Shankar, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Ionita, C. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2017-03-01

    The high-resolution requirements for neuro-endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) necessitate the use of a small focal-spot size; however, the maximum tube output limits for such small focal-spot sizes may not enable sufficient x-ray fluence after attenuation through the human head to support the desired image quality. This may necessitate the use of a larger focal spot, thus contributing to the overall reduction in resolution. A method for creating a higher-output small effective focal spot based on the line-focus principle has been demonstrated and characterized. By tilting the C-arm gantry, the anode-side of the x-ray field-of-view is accessible using a detector placed off-axis. This tilted central axis diminishes the resultant focal spot size in the anode-cathode direction by the tangent of the effective anode angle, allowing a medium focal spot to be used in place of a small focal spot with minimal losses in resolution but with increased tube output. Images were acquired of two different objects at the central axis, and with the C-arm tilted away from the central axis at 1° increments from 0°-7°. With standard collimation settings, only 6° was accessible, but using asymmetric extended collimation a maximum of 7° was accessed for enhanced comparisons. All objects were positioned perpendicular to the anode-cathode direction and images were compared qualitatively. The increasing advantage of the off-axis focal spots was quantitatively evidenced at each subsequent angle using the Generalized Measured-Relative Object Detectability metric (GM-ROD). This anode-tilt method is a simple and robust way of increasing tube output for a small field-of-view detector without diminishing the overall apparent resolution for neuro-EIGIs.

  4. Study of $ \\bar{p} $ and $ \\bar{n} $ annihilations at LEAR with OBELIX, a large acceptance and high resolution detector based on the Open Axial Field Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS201 Study of $\\bar{p}$ and $\\bar{n}$ annihilations at LEAR with OBELIX, a large acceptance and high resolution detector based on the Open Axial Field Spectrometer \\\\ \\\\OBELIX is designed to study exclusive final states of antiproton and antineutron annihilations at low energies with protons and nuclei. \\\\ \\\\The physics motivations of the experiment are:\\\\ \\\\\\begin{itemize} \\item (gg, ggg), hybrids ($ q \\bar{q} g $), multiquarks ($ q q \\bar{q} \\bar{q} $) and light mesons ($ q \\bar{q} $) produced in $ N \\bar{N} $ annihilations and study of their spectroscopy and decays. Also broad structures will be searched for by comparing identical decay modes in exclusive final states of the same type occuring from initial states with different angular momentum or isospin. \\item Study of the dynamics of $ N \\bar{N} $ interactions and of the dependence of the final and intermediate resonant states of annihilation upon the quantum numbers of the initial $ N \\bar{N} $ state (angular momentum: S and P-wave in $\\bar{p}p $ at...

  5. Cochlear Implant Electrode Localization Using an Ultra-High Resolution Scan Mode on Conventional 64-Slice and New Generation 192-Slice Multi-Detector Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Matthew L; Leng, Shuai; Diehn, Felix E; Witte, Robert J; Krecke, Karl N; Grimes, Josh; Koeller, Kelly K; Bruesewitz, Michael R; McCollough, Cynthia H; Lane, John I

    2017-08-01

    A new generation 192-slice multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) clinical scanner provides enhanced image quality and superior electrode localization over conventional MDCT. Currently, accurate and reliable cochlear implant electrode localization using conventional MDCT scanners remains elusive. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric temporal bones were implanted with full-length cochlear implant electrodes. Specimens were subsequently scanned with conventional 64-slice and new generation 192-slice MDCT scanners utilizing ultra-high resolution modes. Additionally, all specimens were scanned with micro-CT to provide a reference criterion for electrode position. Images were reconstructed according to routine temporal bone clinical protocols. Three neuroradiologists, blinded to scanner type, reviewed images independently to assess resolution of individual electrodes, scalar localization, and severity of image artifact. Serving as the reference standard, micro-CT identified scalar crossover in one specimen; imaging of all remaining cochleae demonstrated complete scala tympani insertions. The 192-slice MDCT scanner exhibited improved resolution of individual electrodes (p implant imaging compared with conventional MDCT. This technology provides important feedback regarding electrode position and course, which may help in future optimization of surgical technique and electrode design.

  6. Position sensitivity of the proposed segmented germanium detectors for the DESPEC project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaplanov, A.; Tashenov, S.; Cederwall, B.

    2009-01-01

    The DESPEC HPGe array is a part of the NuSTAR project at FAIR, Germany. It is aimed at the spectroscopy of the stopped decaying exotic nuclei. Segmented γ-ray tracking detectors are proposed for this array in order to maximize detection efficiency and background suppression when searching for very rare events. Two types of detector modules-stacks of three 16-fold segmented planar crystals and 12- and 16-fold segmented clover detectors-have been investigated and compared from the point of view of the achievable position resolution using pulse shape analysis (PSA). To this end, detector signals from realistic γ-ray interactions have been calculated. These signals were treated by PSA in order to reconstruct the photon interaction locations. Comparing the initial interaction locations to the reconstructed ones, it was found that the double-sided strip planar detector yielded position reconstruction errors at least a factor 2 lower than the other detectors considered.

  7. Status report on the International Germanium Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Avignone, F.T.; Collar, J.I.; Courant, H.; Garcia, E.; Guerard, C.K.; Hensley, W.K.; Kirpichnikov, I.V.; Miley, H.S.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Nunez-Lagos, R.; Osetrov, S.B.; Pogosov, V.S.; Pomansky, A.A.; Puimedon, J.; Reeves, J.H.; Ruddick, K.; Saenz, C.; Salinas, A.; Sarsa, M.L.; Smolnikov, A.A.; Starostin, A.S.; Tamanyan, A.G.; Vasiliev, S.I.; Villar, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Phase II detector fabrication for the International Germanium Experiment is in progress. Sources of background observed during Phase I are discussed. Cosmogenic 7 Be is measured in germanium. Radium contamination, presumably in electroformed copper, is reported. (orig.)

  8. Status report on the International Germanium Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodzinski, R L; Avignone, F.T.; Collar, J I; Courant, H; Garcia, E; Guerard, C K; Hensley, W K; Kirpichnikov, I V; Miley, H S; Morales, A; Morales, J; Nunez-Lagos, R; Osetrov, S B; Pogosov, V S; Pomansky, A A; Puimedon, J; Reeves, J H; Ruddick, K; Saenz, C; Salinas, A; Sarsa, M L; Smolnikov, A A; Starostin, A S; Tamanyan, A G; Vasiliev, S I; Villar, J A [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States) Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States) Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States) Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain) Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation) Inst. for Nuclear Research, Baksan Neutrino Observatory (Russian Federation) Yerevan Physical Inst., Yerevan (Armenia)

    1993-04-01

    Phase II detector fabrication for the International Germanium Experiment is in progress. Sources of background observed during Phase I are discussed. Cosmogenic [sup 7]Be is measured in germanium. Radium contamination, presumably in electroformed copper, is reported. (orig.)

  9. Search for Pauli exclusion principle violating atomic transitions and electron decay with a p-type point contact germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, N.; Bradley, A.W.; Chan, Y.D.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A.W.P. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Arnquist, I.J.; Hoppe, E.W.; Kouzes, R.T.; LaFerriere, B.D.; Orrell, J.L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Barabash, A.S.; Konovalov, S.I.; Yumatov, V. [National Research Center ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bertrand, F.E.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Radford, D.C.; Varner, R.L.; White, B.R.; Yu, C.H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brudanin, V.; Shirchenko, M.; Vasilyev, S.; Yakushev, E.; Zhitnikov, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Busch, M. [Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Buuck, M.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J.A.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I.S.; Leon, J.; Robertson, R.G.H. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, Seattle, WA (United States); Caldwell, A.S.; Christofferson, C.D.; Dunagan, C.; Howard, S.; Suriano, A.M. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Chu, P.H.; Elliott, S.R.; Goett, J.; Massarczyk, R.; Rielage, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Efremenko, Yu. [University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ejiri, H. [Osaka University, Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan); Finnerty, P.S.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G.K.; Henning, R.; Howe, M.A.; MacMullin, J.; Meijer, S.J.; O' Shaughnessy, C.; Rager, J.; Shanks, B.; Trimble, J.E.; Vorren, K.; Xu, W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); University of North Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Green, M.P. [North Carolina State University, Department of Physics, Raleigh, NC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Guiseppe, V.E.; Tedeschi, D.; Wiseman, C. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Jasinski, B.R. [University of South Dakota, Department of Physics, Vermillion, SD (United States); Keeter, K.J. [Black Hills State University, Department of Physics, Spearfish, SD (United States); Kidd, M.F. [Tennessee Tech University, Cookeville, TN (United States); Martin, R.D. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Romero-Romero, E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Vetter, K. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wilkerson, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); University of North Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A search for Pauli-exclusion-principle-violating K{sub α} electron transitions was performed using 89.5 kg-d of data collected with a p-type point contact high-purity germanium detector operated at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility. A lower limit on the transition lifetime of 5.8 x 10{sup 30} s at 90% C.L. was set by looking for a peak at 10.6 keV resulting from the X-ray and Auger electrons present following the transition. A similar analysis was done to look for the decay of atomic K-shell electrons into neutrinos, resulting in a lower limit of 6.8 x 10{sup 30} s at 90% C.L. It is estimated that the Majorana Demonstrator, a 44 kg array of p-type point contact detectors that will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 76}Ge, could improve upon these exclusion limits by an order of magnitude after three years of operation. (orig.)

  10. Germanium junction detectors. Theoretical and practical factors governing their use in radiation spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hors, M.; Philis, C.

    1967-01-01

    Semi-conductor detectors have recently greatly increased the possibilities available to nuclear spectroscopists for the study of α, β and γ radiations. Their use in radio-chemistry has encouraged us to study their principle, their mechanism and also the conditions under which they can be used. The first part, which is theoretical, consists of a summary of what should be known concerning the best use of junction detectors, in particular Ge (Li) detectors. The second part, which is experimental, summarizes the laboratory work carried out over a period of one year on Ge (Li) detectors. Stress is laid on the possibilities presented by the use of these detectors as photo-electric spectrometers, and also on the precautions required. Amongst the numerous results presented, the resolution of 2.52 keV obtained for the γ radiation of 145.5 keV for 141 Ce may be particularly noted. (authors) [fr

  11. Multi-detector CT-colonography in inflammatory bowel disease: Prospective analysis of CT-findings to high-resolution video colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Kjel; Vogt, Christoph; Blondin, Dirk; Beck, Andreas; Heinen, Wolfram; Aurich, Volker; Haeussinger, Dieter; Moedder, Ulrich; Cohnen, Mathias

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Prospective analysis of multi-detector CT-colonography (MDCTC) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to high-resolution video-endoscopy (HRVC). Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients (mean age 49.6 years) with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis underwent MDCTC (Somatom Volume Zoom, Siemens, Erlangen; 1 mm collimation, Pitch 8, 100 mAs, 120 kVp). HRVC was performed within 2 h after MDCTC. MDCTC was analyzed by two blinded readers. MDCTC-findings including bowel wall alterations and extraintestinal changes were compared to results of HRVC. Results: Over-all-sensitivity was 100% for endoluminal lesions with correct diagnosis of two cancers. Acute and chronic IBD were correctly identified by MDCTC in 63.6%, and 100%, respectively, with a specificity of 75%, and 100%. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of MDCTC for diagnosis of acute and chronic disease were best for chronic disease. Sensitivity was worst for acute ulcerative colitis and specificity was worst for acute Crohn's disease. Haustral loss was seen only in ulcerative colitis. Pseudopolyps and fistulae were findings exclusive to Crohn's disease. Particularly extraintestinal findings as increased vascularization and local lymphadenopathy correlated well with endoscopic definition of acute disease. Because of the possibly more vulnerable colonic wall in acute inflammatory bowel disease, the air inflation for MDCTC should be performed most carefully to avoid any risk of colonic perforation. Conclusion: MDCTC may help to distinguish between patients with acute and chronic IBD. Especially extraintestinal complications, tumorous as well as pseudo-tumorous lesions can be detected with high sensitivity and specificity

  12. Advanced far infrared blocked impurity band detectors based on germanium liquid phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Christopher Sean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    This research has shown that epilayers with residual impurity concentrations of 5 x 1013 cm-3 can be grown by producing the purest Pb available in the world. These epilayers have extremely low minority acceptor concentrations, which is ideal for fabrication of IR absorbing layers. The Pb LPE growth of Ge also has the advantageous property of gettering Cu from the epilayer and the substrate. Epilayers have been grown with intentional Sb doping for IR absorption on lightly doped substrates. This research has proven that properly working Ge BIB detectors can be fabricated from the liquid phase as long as pure enough solvents are available. The detectors have responded at proper wavelengths when reversed biased even though the response did not quite reach minimum wavenumbers. Optimization of the Sb doping concentration should further decrease the photoionization energy of these detectors. Ge BIB detectors have been fabricated that respond to 60 cm-1 with low responsivity. Through reduction of the minority residual impurities, detector performance has reached responsivities of 1 A/W. These detectors have exhibited quantum efficiency and NEP values that rival conventional photoconductors and are expected to provide a much more sensitive tool for new scientific discoveries in a number of fields, including solid state studies, astronomy, and cosmology.

  13. Improving axion detection sensitivity in high purity germanium detector based experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenqin; Elliott, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Thanks to their excellent energy resolution and low energy threshold, high purity germanium (HPGe) crystals are widely used in low background experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay, e.g. the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and the GERDA experiments, and low mass dark matter, e.g. the CDMS and the EDELWEISS experiments. A particularly interesting candidate for low mass dark matter is the axion, which arises from the Peccei-Quinn solution to the strong CP problem and has been searched for in many experiments. Due to axion-photon coupling, the postulated solar axions could coherently convert to photons via the Primakeoff effect in periodic crystal lattices, such as those found in HPGe crystals. The conversion rate depends on the angle between axions and crystal lattices, so the knowledge of HPGe crystal axis is important. In this talk, we will present our efforts to improve the HPGe experimental sensitivity to axions by considering the axis orientations in multiple HPGe crystals simultaneously. We acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  14. Gamma-ray observations of SN 1987A with an array of high-purity germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandie, W.G.; Nakano, G.H.; Chase, L.F. Jr.; Fishman, G.J.; Meegan, C.A.; Wilson, R.B.; Paciesas, W.

    1988-01-01

    A balloon borne gamma-ray spectrometer comprising an array of high-purity n-type germanium (HPGe) detectors having geometric area 119 cm 2 , resolution 2.5 keV at 1.0 MeV, surrounded by an active NaI (Tl) collimator and Compton suppressing anticoincidence shield nominally 10 cm thick, was flown from Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia, on May 29--30, 1987, 96 days after the observed neutrino pulse. The average column depth of residual atmosphere in the direction of SN 1987A at float altitude was 6.3 g cm-2 during the observation. SN 1987A was within the 22-deg full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) field of view for about 3300 s during May 29.9--30.3 UT. No excess gamma rays were observed at energies appropriate to the Ni(56)-Co(56) decay chain or from other lines in the energy region from 0.1 to 3.0 MeV. With 80% of the data analyzed, the 3-sigma upper limit obtained for the 1238-keV line from Co(56) at the instrument resolution (about 3 keV) is 1.3 x 10-3 photons cm-2 s-1

  15. Charge Division Readout of a Two-Dimensional Germanium Strip Detector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kroeger, R. A; Inderhees, S. E; Johnson, W. N; Kinzer, R. L; Kurfess, J. D; Gehrels, N

    1993-01-01

    .... The four data channels are stored as an event list for subsequent processing. We form a response map over the detector surface in order to locate the position of each interaction with the spatial resolution of the strip pitch, in our case 9 mm...

  16. Cryogenic germanium detectors for dark matter search: Surface events rejection by charge measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broniatowski, A.; Censier, B.; Juillard, A.; Berge, L.

    2006-01-01

    Test experiments have been performed on a Ge detector of the Edelweiss collaboration, combining time-resolved acquisition of the ionization signals with heat measurements. Pulse-shape analysis of the charge signals demonstrates the capability to reject surface events of poor charge collection with energies larger than 50 keV in ionization

  17. High-resolution spectrometer at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, J.M.; HRS Collaboration.

    1982-01-01

    A description is presented of the High Resolution Spectrometer experiment (PEP-12) now running at PEP. The advanced capabilities of the detector are demonstrated with first physics results expected in the coming months

  18. SU-D-204-05: Quantitative Comparison of a High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detector with a Standard Flat Panel Detector (FPD) Using the New Metric of Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, M; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In endovascular image-guided neuro-interventions, visualization of fine detail is paramount. For example, the ability of the interventionist to visualize the stent struts depends heavily on the x-ray imaging detector performance. Methods: A study to examine the relative performance of the high resolution MAF-CMOS (pixel size 75µm, Nyquist frequency 6.6 cycles/mm) and a standard Flat Panel Detector (pixel size 194µm, Nyquist frequency 2.5 cycles/mm) detectors in imaging a neuro stent was done using the Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD) metric. Low quantum noise images of a deployed stent were obtained by averaging 95 frames obtained by both detectors without changing other exposure or geometric parameters. The square of the Fourier transform of each image is taken and divided by the generalized normalized noise power spectrum to give an effective measured task-specific signal-to-noise ratio. This expression is then integrated from 0 to each of the detector’s Nyquist frequencies, and the GM-ROD value is determined by taking a ratio of the integrals for the MAF-CMOS to that of the FPD. The lower bound of integration can be varied to emphasize high frequencies in the detector comparisons. Results: The MAF-CMOS detector exhibits vastly superior performance over the FPD when integrating over all frequencies, yielding a GM-ROD value of 63.1. The lower bound of integration was stepped up in increments of 0.5 cycles/mm for higher frequency comparisons. As the lower bound increased, the GM-ROD value was augmented, reflecting the superior performance of the MAF-CMOS in the high frequency regime. Conclusion: GM-ROD is a versatile metric that can provide quantitative detector and task dependent comparisons that can be used as a basis for detector selection. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  19. Temperature cycling test of planar hyper-pure germanium radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Eiji

    1976-01-01

    If a Ge (Li) detector is left at the normal temperature, generally it does not recover its original performance even when it is cooled again with liquid nitrogen, as Li ions in the compensated i zone precipitate by Li drift and it returns to p type which is the state before drift. One of the devices that overcomes this shortcoming is the p-n junction Ge detector, which required the production of high purity Ge single crystals to obtain the thick depletion layer. The planar or coaxial type detectors were produced using the Ge single crystals with impurity concentration of 10 10 /cm 3 and it was recognized that they showed the gamma detecting characteristic nearly equal to Ge (Li) detectors. They are now commercially available from a few companies. The author carried out the temperature-cycling test of the planar type hyperpure Ge detector sold by Nuclear Radiation Developments, Canada. First, applying liquid nitrogen, the leakage current, static capacity, gamma ray-detecting efficiency and energy resolution were measured. Then it was returned to room temperature. Since then, irregular cycling tests were carried out 15 times. The results didn't show any significant change in the gamma ray-detecting efficiency, energy resolution and static capacity. Though leakage current changed between 9.3 and 33 pA, it does not influence on the energy resolution because of small absolute values. It may be said that it is sufficiently stable in the temperature cycling from room temperature to 77 K. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  20. Investigation of the operational quality of germanium gamma detectors. Estimation of Ge:Li detector survival rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbib, J.-C.

    1980-01-01

    A working group has produced tables of information on gamma semiconductor Ge detectors: Ge(Li) or intrinsic Ge. The information was obtained as a result of enquirres addressed to various laboratories, and concerns 228-sources in France and Belgium [fr

  1. Results of monte Carlo calibrations of a low energy germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brettner-Messler, R.; Brettner-Messler, R.; Maringer, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    Normally, measurements of the peak efficiency of a gamma ray detector are performed with calibrated samples which are prepared to match the measured ones in all important characteristics like its volume, chemical composition and density. Another way to determine the peak efficiency is to calculate it with special monte Carlo programs. In principle the program 'Pencyl' from the source code 'P.E.N.E.L.O.P.E. 2003' can be used for peak efficiency calibration of a cylinder symmetric detector however exact data for the geometries and the materials is needed. The interpretation of the simulation results is not clear but we found a way to convert the data into values which can be compared to our measurement results. It is possible to find other simulation parameters which perform the same or better results. Further improvements can be expected by longer simulation times and more simulations in the questionable ranges of densities and filling heights. (N.C.)

  2. Gamma ray spectrum of Am 241 in a backscattering geometry using a high purity germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong Chon Sing; Ibrahim Salih Elyaseery; Ahmad Shukri Mustapa Kamal; Abdul Aziz Tajuddin

    1997-01-01

    In back scattering geometry using an annular Am-241 source and a HPGE detector has been set up to study both the coherent and incoherent scattering of photon emissions of Am-241 from medium-Z and high-Z elements. Besides the coherent and incoherent scattered peaks of the emissions from the source, the gamma ray spectrum from the different target elements obtained using a microcomputer based multichannel analyser showed the presence of several other peaks. These peaks have been identified to arise from the fluorescence of the targets, the fluorescence of the shielding material Pb, and also as fluorescence sum peaks and X-ray escape peaks of the detector material Ge. The spectra are presented for three target elements viz. Mo, Zn and W

  3. Low background germanium detectors: From environmental laboratory to underground counting facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceuppens, M [Canberra Semiconductor N.V., Geel (Belgium); [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden (United States); Verplancke, J [Canberra Semiconductor N.V., Geel (Belgium); [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden (United States); Tench, O [Canberra Semiconductor N.V., Geel (Belgium); [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Presentation and overview of different Low Level measuring systems ranging from the environmental lab to low-background detection systems and to the deep underground counting facility. Examples and performances for each of these will be given. Attention will be given to the standardised ultra low-background detectors and shields which provide excellent performance without the high cost in time and money associated with custom designed systems. (orig./DG)

  4. Low background germanium detectors: From environmental laboratory to underground counting facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceuppens, M.; Verplancke, J.; Tench, O.

    1997-01-01

    Presentation and overview of different Low Level measuring systems ranging from the environmental lab to low-background detection systems and to the deep underground counting facility. Examples and performances for each of these will be given. Attention will be given to the standardised ultra low-background detectors and shields which provide excellent performance without the high cost in time and money associated with custom designed systems. (orig./DG)

  5. A liquid-nitrogen monitor for lithium-drifted germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andeweg, A.H.

    1977-11-01

    An instrument has been developed that makes use of a load cell to monitor the liquid nitrogen in the Dewar flask of a lithium-drifted germaniun detector. The contents are recorded on a chart recorder, and an alarm is sounded when the previously set content has been reached. A signal switches off the high-voltage power supply 30 minutes after the alarm is triggered. The calibration of the load-cell monitor is described in an appendix [af

  6. 18F half-life measurement using a high-purity germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jubong; Lee, K.B.; Park, T.S.; Lee, J.M.; Oh, P.J.; Lee, S.H.; Kang, Y.S.; Ahn, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    The half-life of 18 F has been measured using HPGe detectors with a 137 Cs reference source. The counting ratio of 511 keV γ-rays from 18 F to 622 keV γ-rays from 137 Cs was fitted for the half-life with a weighted least-square method. Uncertainties due to the systematic effects arising from the measurement of a high activity 18 F source were studied in detail. The half-life of 18 F was found to be (109.72±0.19) min. The result is in a good agreement with the recommended value of (109.728±0.019) min evaluated at the Laborotaire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB). - Highlights: ► The 18 F half-life was measured with a reference source and without it using HPGe detectors. ► We found the systematic effect ‘activity dynamic range effect’ by monitoring the counts of the reference source. ► This activity dynamic range effect was corrected by using the reference source method. ► The 18 F half-life using the reference source method was in a good agreement with the recommended value of LNHB.

  7. Development of ultra pure germanium epi layers for blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, M.P.

    1991-05-01

    The main goals of this paper are: (1) To develop a low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) process that allows epitaxial growth at lower temperatures. Lower temperatures will allow the achievement of a sharp dopant profile at the substrate/epi-layer interface. Less out-diffusion from the substrate would allow the use of thinner epitaxial layers, which would lead to a larger depletion width in the photoactive region. LPCVD also avoids, to a great extent, gas-phase nucleation, which would cause Ge particulates to fall onto the wafer surface during growth. (2) To reduce high levels of oxygen and copper present at the wafer interface, as observed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). In order to achieve high-quality epitaxial layers, it is imperative that the substrate surface be of excellent quality. (3) To make and test detectors, after satisfactory epitaxial layers have been made

  8. High Resolution Elevation Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset contains contours generated from high resolution data sources such as LiDAR. Generally speaking this data is 2 foot or less contour interval.

  9. A Trigger-less Acquisition System for the EXILL Large Germanium Detectors Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutti, Paolo; Blanc, Aurelian; Jentschel, Michael; Koester, Ulli; Ruiz Martinez, Emilio; Soldner, Torsten; France, Gilles de; Simpson, Gary; Ur, Calin A.; Urban, Waldemar

    2013-06-01

    The combination of the intense cold neutron beam available at the PF1b beam position of the Institute Laue- Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, together with the high detection efficiency of a large array of high purity Ge detectors (HPGe) has offered a unique opportunity for a set of experiments devoted to nuclear spectroscopy on stable isotopes as well as on exotic nuclei produced in the fission process of uranium and plutonium samples. The emitted γ -rays from neutron capture on stable targets as well as from the decay of fission fragments have been acquired in a trigger-less mode to preserve a maximum of information for further off-line treatment. A dedicated fully digital acquisition system using a combination of a 14-bit 100 MS/s digitizers with a Power PC-based VME single board computer has been developed to ensure data collection and real-time processing capabilities. The present article will describe the experimental setup as well as the specific electronic configuration used during the EXILL campaign of measurements with particular emphasis on the technical achievements as well as on the preliminary results obtained in the various experiments. (authors)

  10. Search for neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76 with the GERmanium Detector Array '' GERDA ''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugnera, R.

    2009-01-01

    The study of neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD) is the most powerful approach to the fundamental question if the neutrino is a Majorana particle, i.e. its own anti-particle. The observation of neutrinoless DBD would not only establish the Majorana nature of the neutrino but also represent a determination of its effective mass if the nuclear matrix element is given. So far, the most sensitive results have been obtained with Ge-76, and the group of Klapdor-Kleingrothaus has made a claim of discovery. Future experiments have to reduce radioactive backgrounds to increase the sensitivity. '' GERDA '' is a new double beta-decay experiment which is currently under construction in the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. It is implementing a new shielding concept by operating bare Ge diodes - enriched in Ge-76 - in high purity liquid argon supplemented by a water shield. The aim of '' GERDA '' is to verify or refute the recent claim of discovery, and, in a second phase, to achieve a two orders of magnitude lower background index than recent experiments, increasing the sensitive mass and reaching exposure of 100 kg yr. It be will discuss design, physics reach, and status of construction of '' GERDA '', and present results from various R efforts including long term stability of bare Ge diodes in cryogenic liquids, material screening, cryostat performance, detector segmentation, cryogenic precision electronics, safety aspects, and Monte Carlo simulations. (author)

  11. Germanium detector calibration according to the standard NF M 60-810 without using radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duda, J. M.; Garell, I.; Losset, Y.; Vichot, L. [CEA de Valduc, Service de Protection Contre Les Rayonnements, 21110 Is sur Tille (France); Chazalet, J.; Tauvel, Y.; Poulet, F. [IUP Genie des Systemes Industriels, Universite Blaise Pascal, Departement de Physique, 24 avenue des Landais, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2009-07-01

    In-situ gamma ray spectrometry is used to determine the specific activities of natural and artificial radioactive nuclides in the soil with a good accuracy. This method is very interesting for environmental measurements and leads to soil determination activity. It is a cheaper method than analysis of great amounts of soil samples in the laboratory. As there is no standard soil, detection efficiency can be estimated using either statistical tools or combination of radioactive point sources calibration thanks to mathematical models of NF-M-60-810 standard representing the radionuclide distribution in soil. Experimental determination of detection efficiency requires a large number of operations involving the handling of radioactive standards in the energy range from 0.06 - 2 MeV. For these reasons, detection efficiency model has been determined without using radioactive sources. In order to reduce analytical time and to simplify the efficiency detector calibration, it is possible to associate numerical and deterministic methods and to get a relative accuracy below 25 per cent

  12. Application of the Broad Energy Germanium detector: A technique for elucidating β-decay schemes which involve daughter nuclei with very low energy excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhart, M., E-mail: martin.venhart@savba.sk [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Wood, J.L. [Department of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta GA 30332 (United States); Boston, A.J. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Cocolios, T.E. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern, en Stralingsfysica, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Harkness-Brennan, L.J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Joss, D.T.; Judson, D.S. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Kliman, J.; Matoušek, V. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Motyčák, Š. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, SK-812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Page, R.D.; Patel, A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Petrík, K.; Sedlák, M.; Veselský, M. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-03-21

    A technique for elucidating β-decay schemes of isotopes with a large density of states at low excitation energy has been developed, in which a Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector is used in conjunction with coaxial hyper-pure germanium detectors. The power of this technique is demonstrated using the example of {sup 183}Hg decay. Mass-separated samples of {sup 183}Hg were produced by a deposition of the low-energy radioactive-ion beam delivered by the ISOLDE facility at CERN. The excellent energy resolution of the BEGe detector allowed γ-ray energies to be determined with a precision of a few tens of eV, which was sufficient for the analysis of the Rydberg-Ritz combinations (in conjunction with γ-γ coincidences) in the level scheme. The timestamped structure of the data was used for unambiguous separation of γ rays arising from the decay of {sup 183}Hg from those due to the daughter decays.

  13. Heavy ion radiative capture. A study of the 12C(12C,γ) reaction using a large germanium detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, D.G.; Lister, C.J.; Carpenter, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    A new technique has been developed to investigate the little-explored phenomenon of heavy ion radiative capture. Employing a state-of-the-art germanium detector array (GAMMASPHERE) in a novel fashion as a sum energy calorimeter it is possible to separate the radiative capture channel from overwhelming competition from particle emission channels with exquisite sensitivity. By studying in detail the decay pathways and the intermediate states populated in the decay, it is possible to learn information relevant to the hypothesis of nuclear molecular states. (author)

  14. Monte Carlo modelling of Germanium detectors for the measurement of low energy photons in internal dosimetry: Results of an international comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Ros, J.M. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jm.gomezros@ciemat.es; Carlan, L. de [CEA DRT/LIST/DETECS/LNHB/LMD, Bat 534, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette, Cedex (France); IRSN DRPH/SDI/LEDI, BP6, F-92262, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Cedex (France); Franck, D. [IRSN DRPH/SDI/LEDI, BP6, F-92262, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Cedex (France); Gualdrini, G. [ENEA ION-IRP, Via dei Colli 16, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Lis, M.; Lopez, M.A.; Moraleda, M. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Zankl, M. [GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Badal, A. [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, UPC, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Capello, K. [Human Monitoring Laboratory (Canada); Cowan, P. [Serco Assurance, Bld. A32, Winfrith Tech. Centre Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset DT2 8DH (United Kingdom); Ferrari, P. [ENEA ION-IRP, Via dei Colli 16, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Heide, B. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Henniger, J. [Technical University of Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Hooley, V. [Serco Assurance, Bld. A32, Winfrith Tech. Centre Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset DT2 8DH (United Kingdom); Hunt, J. [IRD, Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, Recreio, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Kinase, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Kramer, G.H. [Human Monitoring Laboratory (Canada); Loehnert, D. [Technical University of Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lucas, S. [LARN Laboratory, University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)] (and others)

    2008-02-15

    This communication summarizes the results concerning the Monte Carlo (MC) modelling of Germanium detectors for the measurement of low energy photons arising from the 'International comparison on MC modelling for in vivo measurement of Americium in a knee phantom' organized within the EU Coordination Action CONRAD (Coordinated Network for Radiation Dosimetry) as a joint initiative of EURADOS working groups 6 (computational dosimetry) and 7 (internal dosimetry). MC simulations proved to be an applicable way to obtain the calibration factor that needs to be used for in vivo measurements.

  15. Sensitive method for the determination of rare earth elements by radioisotope-excited XRF employing a high purity germanium detector in optimized geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, M.; Joseph, D.; Patra, P.K.; Bajpal, H.N.

    1993-01-01

    A close-coupled side-source geometrical configuration is proposed for obtaining a high detection sensitivity for rare earth elements (57 ≤ Z ≤ 69) by radioisotope-excited energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. In this configuration a disc source of 241 Am (100 mCi), a high-purity germanium detector and thin samples of rare earth elements on a Mylar backing are employed in an optimized geometry to achieve detection limits in the range 20-50 ng for these elements in a counting time of 1 h. (author)

  16. High resolution solar observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Title, A.

    1985-01-01

    Currently there is a world-wide effort to develop optical technology required for large diffraction limited telescopes that must operate with high optical fluxes. These developments can be used to significantly improve high resolution solar telescopes both on the ground and in space. When looking at the problem of high resolution observations it is essential to keep in mind that a diffraction limited telescope is an interferometer. Even a 30 cm aperture telescope, which is small for high resolution observations, is a big interferometer. Meter class and above diffraction limited telescopes can be expected to be very unforgiving of inattention to details. Unfortunately, even when an earth based telescope has perfect optics there are still problems with the quality of its optical path. The optical path includes not only the interior of the telescope, but also the immediate interface between the telescope and the atmosphere, and finally the atmosphere itself

  17. Four-layer depth-of-interaction PET detector for high resolution PET using a multi-pixel S8550 avalanche photodiode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Oda, Ichiro; Shibuya, Kengo; Yoshida, Eiji; Yamaya, Taiga; Kitamura, Keishi; Murayama, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are being used as photodetectors in positron emission tomography (PET) because they have many advantages over photomultipliers (PMTs) typically used in PET detectors. We have developed a PET detector that consists of a multi-pixel APD and a 6x6x4 array of 1.46x1.46 mm 2 x4.5 m LYSO crystals for a small animal PET scanner. The detector can identify four-layer depth of interaction (DOI) with a position-sensitive APD coupled to the backside of a crystal array by just an optimized reflector arrangement. Since scintillation lights are shared among many pixels by the method, weaker signals in APD pixels far from the interacting crystals are affected by noise. To evaluate the performance of the four-layer DOI detector with the APD and the influence of electrical noise on our method, we constructed a prototype DOI detector and tested its performance. We found, except for crystal elements on the edge of the crystal array, all crystal elements could be identified from the 2D position histogram. An energy resolution of 16.9% was obtained for the whole crystal array of the APD detector. The results of noise dependence of detector performances indicated that the DOI detector using the APD could achieve sufficient performance even when using application-specific integrated circuits.

  18. Four-layer depth-of-interaction PET detector for high resolution PET using a multi-pixel S8550 avalanche photodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko, E-mail: funis@nirs.go.j [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Inadama, Naoko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Oda, Ichiro [Shimadzu Corporation, Nishinokyo Kuwabaracho 1 Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Shibuya, Kengo; Yoshida, Eiji; Yamaya, Taiga [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kitamura, Keishi [Shimadzu Corporation, Nishinokyo Kuwabaracho 1 Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Murayama, Hideo [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-21

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are being used as photodetectors in positron emission tomography (PET) because they have many advantages over photomultipliers (PMTs) typically used in PET detectors. We have developed a PET detector that consists of a multi-pixel APD and a 6x6x4 array of 1.46x1.46 mm{sup 2}x4.5 m LYSO crystals for a small animal PET scanner. The detector can identify four-layer depth of interaction (DOI) with a position-sensitive APD coupled to the backside of a crystal array by just an optimized reflector arrangement. Since scintillation lights are shared among many pixels by the method, weaker signals in APD pixels far from the interacting crystals are affected by noise. To evaluate the performance of the four-layer DOI detector with the APD and the influence of electrical noise on our method, we constructed a prototype DOI detector and tested its performance. We found, except for crystal elements on the edge of the crystal array, all crystal elements could be identified from the 2D position histogram. An energy resolution of 16.9% was obtained for the whole crystal array of the APD detector. The results of noise dependence of detector performances indicated that the DOI detector using the APD could achieve sufficient performance even when using application-specific integrated circuits.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of gamma-ray interactions in an over-square high-purity germanium detector for in-vivo measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saizu, Mirela Angela

    2016-09-01

    The developments of high-purity germanium detectors match very well the requirements of the in-vivo human body measurements regarding the gamma energy ranges of the radionuclides intended to be measured, the shape of the extended radioactive sources, and the measurement geometries. The Whole Body Counter (WBC) from IFIN-HH is based on an “over-square” high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) to perform accurate measurements of the incorporated radionuclides emitting X and gamma rays in the energy range of 10 keV-1500 keV, under conditions of good shielding, suitable collimation, and calibration. As an alternative to the experimental efficiency calibration method consisting of using reference calibration sources with gamma energy lines that cover all the considered energy range, it is proposed to use the Monte Carlo method for the efficiency calibration of the WBC using the radiation transport code MCNP5. The HPGe detector was modelled and the gamma energy lines of 241Am, 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 60Co, and 152Eu were simulated in order to obtain the virtual efficiency calibration curve of the WBC. The Monte Carlo method was validated by comparing the simulated results with the experimental measurements using point-like sources. For their optimum matching, the impact of the variation of the front dead layer thickness and of the detector photon absorbing layers materials on the HPGe detector efficiency was studied, and the detector’s model was refined. In order to perform the WBC efficiency calibration for realistic people monitoring, more numerical calculations were generated simulating extended sources of specific shape according to the standard man characteristics.

  20. Position-sensitive detector system OBI for High Resolution X-Ray Powder Diffraction using on-site readable image plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, M.; Joco, V.; Baehtz, C.; Brecht, H.H.; Berghaeuser, A.; Ehrenberg, H.; Seggern, H. von; Fuess, H.

    2004-01-01

    A one-dimensional detector system has been developed using image plates. The detector is working in transmission mode or Debye-Scherrer geometry and is on-site readable which reduces the effort for calibration. It covers a wide angular range up to 110 deg. and shows narrow reflection half-widths depending on the capillary diameter. The acquisition time is in the range of minutes and the data quality allows for reliable Rietveld refinement of complicated structures, even in multi-phase samples. The detector opens a wide field of new applications in kinetics and temperature resolved measurements

  1. A simulation study of high-resolution x-ray computed tomography imaging using irregular sampling with a photon-counting detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seungwan; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the spatial resolution for the x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging with a photon-counting detector using an irregular sampling method. The geometric shift-model of detector was proposed to produce the irregular sampling pattern and increase the number of samplings in the radial direction. The conventional micro-x-ray CT system and the novel system with the geometric shift-model of detector were simulated using analytic and Monte Carlo simulations. The projections were reconstructed using filtered back-projection (FBP), algebraic reconstruction technique (ART), and total variation (TV) minimization algorithms, and the reconstructed images were compared in terms of normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE), full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), and coefficient-of-variation (COV). The results showed that the image quality improved in the novel system with the geometric shift-model of detector, and the NRMSE, FWHM, and COV were lower for the images reconstructed using the TV minimization technique in the novel system with the geometric shift-model of detector. The irregular sampling method produced by the geometric shift-model of detector can improve the spatial resolution and reduce artifacts and noise for reconstructed images obtained from an x-ray CT system with a photon-counting detector. -- Highlights: • We proposed a novel sampling method based on a spiral pattern to improve the spatial resolution. • The novel sampling method increased the number of samplings in the radial direction. • The spatial resolution was improved by the novel sampling method

  2. Ultra-high-resolution C-arm flat-detector CT angiography evaluation reveals 3-fold higher association rate for sporadic intracranial cavernous malformations and developmental venous anomalies: a retrospective study in consecutive 58 patients with 60 cavernous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocak, Burak [Aksaray State Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aksaray (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Osman; Kocer, Naci; Islak, Civan [Istanbul University, Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Oz, Buge; Bakkaloglu, Dogu Vuralli [Istanbul University, Department of Pathology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Isler, Cihan [Istanbul University, Department of Neurosurgery, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2017-06-15

    The imaging and surgical literature has confusing association rates for the association between sporadic intracranial cavernous malformations (CMs) and developmental venous anomalies (DVAs). In this study, our purpose was to determine the association rate using ultra-high-resolution C-arm flat-detector CT angiography (FDCTA) and compare it with literature. Fifty-eight patients with 60 sporadic intracranial CMs that underwent an FDCTA study were included in our retrospective study. Re-evaluation of radiological data was performed based on the criteria defined by authors. Isotropic volumetric reconstructions with ultra-high resolution (voxel size of 102 μm{sup 3} for initial; 67 μm{sup 3} and 32 μm{sup 3} for further evaluation) were used for assessment. Sixteen patients underwent surgery for excision of their CMs. Fifty-one of all patients (87.9 %) were associated with a DVA. Undefined local venous structures (UD-LVSs) were observed in the remaining 7 patients (12.1 %). The strength of interobserver agreement was excellent [kappa(k) coefficient = 0.923]. Ultra-high-resolution FDCTA evaluation of CMs and DVAs reveals 3-fold higher association rate compared to the literature. FDCTA for patients with sporadic CMs could help identify the associated DVAs that remained undetected or unclear with other imaging modalities, which can be useful in decision-making processes, planning surgery, and during operation. (orig.)

  3. Developing fine-pixel CdTe detectors for the next generation of high-resolution hard x-ray telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, Steven

    Over the past decade, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been improving the angular resolution of hard X-ray (HXR; 20 "70 keV) optics to the point that we now routinely manufacture optics modules with an angular resolution of 20 arcsec Half Power Diameter (HDP), almost three times the performance of NuSTAR optics (Ramsey et al. 2013; Gubarev et al. 2013a; Atkins et al. 2013). New techniques are currently being developed to provide even higher angular resolution. High angular resolution HXR optics require detectors with a large number of fine pixels in order to adequately sample the telescope point spread function (PSF) over the entire field of view. Excessively over-sampling the PSF will increase readout noise and require more processing with no appreciable increase in image quality. An appropriate level of over-sampling is to have 3 pixels within the HPD. For the HERO mirrors, where the HPD is 26 arcsec over a 6-m focal length converts to 750 μm, the optimum pixel size is around 250 μm. At a 10-m focal length these detectors can support a 16 arcsec HPD. Of course, the detectors must also have high efficiency in the HXR region, good energy resolution, low background, low power requirements, and low sensitivity to radiation damage (Ramsey 2001). The ability to handle high counting rates is also desirable for efficient calibration. A collaboration between Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), MSFC, and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK is developing precisely such detectors under an ongoing, funded APRA program (FY2015 to FY2017). The detectors use the RALdeveloped Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) dubbed HEXITEC, for High Energy X-Ray Imaging Technology. These HEXITEC ASICs can be bonded to 1- or 2- mm-thick Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) or Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) to create a fine (250 μm pitch) HXR detector (Jones et al. 2009; Seller et al. 2011). The objectives of this funded effort are to develop and test a HEXITEC

  4. SiliPET: Design of an ultra-high resolution small animal PET scanner based on stacks of semi-conductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesca, N.; Auricchio, N.; Di Domenico, G.; Zavattini, G.; Malaguti, R.; Andritschke, R.; Kanbach, G.; Schopper, F.

    2007-01-01

    We studied with Monte Carlo simulations, using the EGSnrc code, a new scanner for small animal positron emission tomography (PET), based on stacks of double-sided semiconductor detectors. Each stack is composed of planar detectors with dimension 70x60x1 mm 3 and orthogonal strips on both sides with 500 μm pitch to read the two interaction coordinates, the third being the detector number in the stack. Multiple interactions in a stack are discarded. In this way, we achieve a precise determination of the first interaction point of the two 511 keV photons. The reduced dimensions of the scanner also improve the solid angle coverage resulting in a high sensitivity. Preliminary results of scanners based on Si planar detectors are presented and the initial tomographic reconstructions demonstrate very good spatial resolution limited only by the positron range. This suggests that, this is a promising new approach for small animal PET imaging. We are testing some double-sided silicon detectors, equipped with 128 orthogonal p and n strips on opposite sides using VATAGP3 ASIC by IDEAS

  5. TU-H-CAMPUS-TeP2-03: High Sensitivity and High Resolution Fiber Based Micro-Detector for Sub-Millimeter Preclinical Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izaguirre, E; Pokhrel, S; Knewtson, T; Hedrick, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Current precision of small animal and cell micro-irradiators has continuously increased during the past years. Currently, preclinical irradiators can deliver sub-millimeter fields with micrometric precision but there are no water equivalent dosimeters to determine small field profiles and dose in the orthovoltage range of energies with micrometric resolution and precision. We have developed a fiber based micro-dosimeter with the resolution and dosimetric accuracy required for radiobiological research. Methods: We constructed two prototypes of micro-dosimeters based on different compositions of fiber scintillators to study the spatial resolution and dosimetric precision of small animal and cell micro-irradiators. The first has green output and the second has blue output. The blue output dosimeter has the highest sensitivity because it matches the spectral sensitivity of silicon photomultipliers. A blue detector with 500um cross section was built and tested respect to a CC01 ion chamber, film, and the 1500um green output detector. Orthovoltage fields from 1×1mm2 to 5×5mm2 were used for detector characteristics comparison. Results: The blue fiber dosimeter shows great agreement with films and matches dose measurements with the gold-standard ion chamber for 5×5mm2 fields. The detector has the appropriate sensitivity to measure fields from 1×1mm2 to larger sizes with a 1% dosimetric accuracy. The spatial resolution is in the sub-millimeter range and the spectral matching with the photomultiplier allows reducing the sensor cross section even further than the presented prototype. These results suggest that scintillating fibers combined with silicon photomultipliers is the appropriate technology to pursue micro-dosimetry for small animals and disperse cell samples. Conclusion: The constructed detectors establish a new landmark for the resolution and sensitivity of fiber based microdetectors. The validation of the detector in our small animal and cell

  6. High resolution data acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Glenn W.; Fuller, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  7. SiliPET: An ultra high resolution design of a small animal PET scanner based on double sided silicon strip detector stacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavattini, G.; Cesca, N.; Di Domenico, G.; Moretti, E.; Sabba, N.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the capabilities of a small animal PET scanner, named SiliPET, based on four stacks of double sided silicon strips detectors. Each stack consists of 40 silicon detectors with dimension 60x60x1mm 3 . These are arranged to form a box 5x5x6cm 3 with minor sides opened; the box represents the maximal FOV of the scanner. The performance parameters of SiliPET scanner have been estimated, giving an intrinsic spatial resolution of 0.52mm and a sensitivity of 5.1% at the center of the system

  8. ANL high resolution injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, E.; Kutschera, W.; Hartog, P.D.; Billquist, P.

    1985-01-01

    The ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) high-resolution injector has been installed to obtain higher mass resolution and higher preacceleration, and to utilize effectively the full mass range of ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System). Preliminary results of the first beam test are reported briefly. The design and performance, in particular a high-mass-resolution magnet with aberration compensation, are discussed. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Ultra high resolution tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  10. High resolution (transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Souto, Jose A; Lamela-Rivera, Horacio

    2006-10-16

    A novel fiber-optic interferometric sensor is presented for vibrations measurements and analysis. In this approach, it is shown applied to the vibrations of electrical structures within power transformers. A main feature of the sensor is that an unambiguous optical phase measurement is performed using the direct detection of the interferometer output, without external modulation, for a more compact and stable implementation. High resolution of the interferometric measurement is obtained with this technique (transformers are also highlighted.

  11. IDeF-X ECLAIRs: A CMOS ASIC for the Readout of CdTe and CdZnTe Detectors for High Resolution Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevin, O.; Baron, P.; Coppolani, X.; Delagnes, E.; Lugiez, F.; Daly, F.; Limousin, O.; Meuris, A.; Pinsard, F.; Renaud, D.

    2009-01-01

    The very last member of the IDeF-X ASIC family is presented: IDeF-X ECLAIRs is a 32-channel front end ASIC designed for the readout of Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) Detectors. Thanks to its noise performance (Equivalent Noise Charge floor of 33 e - rms) and to its radiation hardened design (Single Event Latch-up Linear Energy Transfer threshold of 56 MeV.cm 2 .mg -1 ), the chip is well suited for soft X-rays energy discrimination and high energy resolution, 'space proof', hard X-ray spectroscopy. We measured an energy low threshold of less than 4 keV with a 10 pF input capacitor and a minimal reachable sensitivity of the Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) to input capacitance of less than 7e - /pF obtained with a 6 μs peak time. IDeF-X ECLAIRs will be used for the readout of 6400 CdTe Schottky mono-pixel detectors of the 2D coded mask imaging telescope ECLAIRs aboard the SVOM satellite. IDeF-X ECLAIRs (or IDeF-X V2) has also been designed for the readout of a pixelated CdTe detector in the miniature spectro-imager prototype Caliste 256 that is currently foreseen for the high energy detector module of the Simbol-X mission. (authors)

  12. IDeF-X ECLAIRs: A CMOS ASIC for the Readout of CdTe and CdZnTe Detectors for High Resolution Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevin, Olivier; Baron, Pascal; Coppolani, Xavier; Daly, FranÇois; Delagnes, Eric; Limousin, Olivier; Lugiez, Francis; Meuris, Aline; Pinsard, FrÉdÉric; Renaud, Diana

    2009-08-01

    The very last member of the IDeF-X ASIC family is presented: IDeF-X ECLAIRs is a 32-channel front end ASIC designed for the readout of Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) Detectors. Thanks to its noise performance (Equivalent Noise Charge floor of 33 e- rms) and to its radiation hardened design (Single Event Latchup Linear Energy Transfer threshold of 56 MeV.cm2.mg-1), the chip is well suited for soft X-rays energy discrimination and high energy resolution, ldquospace proof,rdquo hard X-ray spectroscopy. We measured an energy low threshold of less than 4 keV with a 10 pF input capacitor and a minimal reachable sensitivity of the Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) to input capacitance of less than 7 e-/pF obtained with a 6 mus peak time. IDeF-X ECLAIRs will be used for the readout of 6400 CdTe Schottky monopixel detectors of the 2D coded mask imaging telescope ECLAIRs aboard the SVOM satellite. IDeF-X ECLAIRs (or IDeF-X V2) has also been designed for the readout of a pixelated CdTe detector in the miniature spectro-imager prototype Caliste 256 that is currently foreseen for the high energy detector module of the Simbol-X mission.

  13. Development and test of a high-resolution detector for synchrotron radiation imaging; Entwicklung und Test eines hochaufloesenden Detektors zur Bildgebung mit Synchrotronstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruebsamen, Oliver

    2011-07-01

    For medical imaging with x-rays, especially coronary angiography in vivo, high position resolution detectors are needed, thereby being able to deliver a contrast better than 1% and a readout speed faster than milliseconds. Since coronary angiography uses a contrast agent like iodine or gadolinium, high energy photons up to 51 keV are needed for imaging. The k-edge subtraction method allows visualizing small vessels because of the sharp jump of absorption at the k-edge of the contrast agent and the almost constant absorption of the surrounding tissue and bone, as well as the measurement of the concentration of the contrast agent to explore heart dynamics. Various detectors and detector materials are in use or development to match these conditions. Solid state Si-, Ge-, CdZnTe-, CdMnTe- or CdTe-seminconductor detectors are used or tested for imaging, each of them having different physical and/or technical problems which prevent to meet the required specifications. These problems are low absorption efficiency (Si) and reduced position resolution if scintillators are used, cooling and poor resolution (Ge) and charge spread along many pixels and technical problems to manufacture a detector chip (CdZnTe, CdMnTe, CdTe). The approach made in this work is a gas filled ionization chamber, built as a integrating line detector. In general, ionization chambers always suffer from poor absorption efficiency, but this can be overcome using the noble Gases Ar, Kr or Xe at very high gas pressures around 50 bar and relatively long (in the range of cm) anode strips. This design is critical for parallax effects, so an x-ray beam with a very small beam divergence is needed. This requirement in combination with the desired contrast and timing resolution can only be achieved by synchrotron light sources of the third generation, like the DORIS ring at DESY, Hamburg or the ESR in Grenoble. A different problem of ionization chambers is fluorescence photons, which produce a background signal

  14. SiliPET: An ultra-high resolution design of a small animal PET scanner based on stacks of double-sided silicon strip detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Domenico, Giovanni; Zavattini, Guido; Cesca, Nicola; Auricchio, Natalia; Andritschke, Robert; Schopper, Florian; Kanbach, Gottfried

    2007-01-01

    We investigated with Monte Carlo simulations, using the EGSNrcMP code, the capabilities of a small animal PET scanner based on four stacks of double-sided silicon strip detectors. Each stack consists of 40 silicon detectors with dimension of 60x60x1 mm 3 and 128 orthogonal strips on each side. Two coordinates of the interaction are given by the strips, whereas the third coordinate is given by the detector number in the stack. The stacks are arranged to form a box of 5x5x6 cm 3 with minor sides opened; the box represents the minimal FOV of the scanner. The performance parameters of the SiliPET scanner have been estimated giving a (positron range limited) spatial resolution of 0.52 mm FWHM, and an absolute sensitivity of 5.1% at the center of system. Preliminary results of a proof of principle measurement done with the MEGA advanced Compton imager using a ∼1 mm diameter 22 Na source, showed a focal ray tracing FWHM of 1 mm

  15. A high resolution portable spectroscopy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, C.P.; Vaidya, P.P.; Paulson, M.; Bhatnagar, P.V.; Pande, S.S.; Padmini, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: This paper describes the system details of a High Resolution Portable Spectroscopy System (HRPSS) developed at Electronics Division, BARC. The system can be used for laboratory class, high-resolution nuclear spectroscopy applications. The HRPSS consists of a specially designed compact NIM bin, with built-in power supplies, accommodating a low power, high resolution MCA, and on-board embedded computer for spectrum building and communication. A NIM based spectroscopy amplifier and a HV module for detector bias are integrated (plug-in) in the bin. The system communicates with a host PC via a serial link. Along-with a laptop PC, and a portable HP-Ge detector, the HRPSS offers a laboratory class performance for portable applications

  16. WE-AB-207A-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): High-Resolution Cone-Beam CT of the Extremities and Cancellous Bone Architecture with a CMOS Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Q; Brehler, M; Sisniega, A; Marinetto, E; Stayman, J; Siewerdsen, J; Zbijewski, W [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zyazin, A; Peters, I [Teledyne DALSA, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Yorkston, J [Carestream Health, Inc, Penfield, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Extremity cone-beam CT (CBCT) with an amorphous silicon (aSi) flat-panel detector (FPD) provides low-dose volumetric imaging with high spatial resolution. We investigate the performance of the newer complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors to enhance resolution of extremities CBCT to ∼0.1 mm, enabling morphological analysis of trabecular bone. Quantitative in-vivo imaging of bone microarchitecture could present an important advance for osteoporosis and osteoarthritis diagnosis and therapy assessment. Methods: Cascaded systems models of CMOS- and FPD-based extremities CBCT were implemented. Performance was compared for a range of pixel sizes (0.05–0.4 mm), focal spot sizes (0.3–0.6 FS), and x-ray techniques (0.05–0.8 mAs/projection) using detectability of high-, low-, and all-frequency tasks for a nonprewhitening observer. Test-bench implementation of CMOS-based extremity CBCT involved a Teledyne DALSA Xineos3030HR detector with 0.099 mm pixels and a compact rotating anode x-ray source with 0.3 FS (IMD RTM37). Metrics of bone morphology obtained using CMOS-based CBCT were compared in cadaveric specimens to FPD-based system using a Varian PaxScan4030 (0.194 mm pixels). Results: Finer pixel size and reduced electronic noise for CMOS (136 e compared to 2000 e for FPD) resulted in ∼1.9× increase in detectability for high-frequency tasks and ∼1.1× increase for all-frequency tasks. Incorporation of the new x-ray source with reduced focal spot size (0.3 FS vs. 0.5 FS used on current extremities CBCT) improved detectability for CMOS-based CBCT by ∼1.7× for high-frequency tasks. Compared to FPD CBCT, the CMOS detector yielded improved agreement with micro-CT in measurements of trabecular thickness (∼1.7× reduction in relative error), bone volume (∼1.5× reduction), and trabecular spacing (∼3.5× reduction). Conclusion: Imaging performance modelling and experimentation indicate substantial improvements for high

  17. WE-AB-207A-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): High-Resolution Cone-Beam CT of the Extremities and Cancellous Bone Architecture with a CMOS Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Q; Brehler, M; Sisniega, A; Marinetto, E; Stayman, J; Siewerdsen, J; Zbijewski, W; Zyazin, A; Peters, I; Yorkston, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Extremity cone-beam CT (CBCT) with an amorphous silicon (aSi) flat-panel detector (FPD) provides low-dose volumetric imaging with high spatial resolution. We investigate the performance of the newer complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors to enhance resolution of extremities CBCT to ∼0.1 mm, enabling morphological analysis of trabecular bone. Quantitative in-vivo imaging of bone microarchitecture could present an important advance for osteoporosis and osteoarthritis diagnosis and therapy assessment. Methods: Cascaded systems models of CMOS- and FPD-based extremities CBCT were implemented. Performance was compared for a range of pixel sizes (0.05–0.4 mm), focal spot sizes (0.3–0.6 FS), and x-ray techniques (0.05–0.8 mAs/projection) using detectability of high-, low-, and all-frequency tasks for a nonprewhitening observer. Test-bench implementation of CMOS-based extremity CBCT involved a Teledyne DALSA Xineos3030HR detector with 0.099 mm pixels and a compact rotating anode x-ray source with 0.3 FS (IMD RTM37). Metrics of bone morphology obtained using CMOS-based CBCT were compared in cadaveric specimens to FPD-based system using a Varian PaxScan4030 (0.194 mm pixels). Results: Finer pixel size and reduced electronic noise for CMOS (136 e compared to 2000 e for FPD) resulted in ∼1.9× increase in detectability for high-frequency tasks and ∼1.1× increase for all-frequency tasks. Incorporation of the new x-ray source with reduced focal spot size (0.3 FS vs. 0.5 FS used on current extremities CBCT) improved detectability for CMOS-based CBCT by ∼1.7× for high-frequency tasks. Compared to FPD CBCT, the CMOS detector yielded improved agreement with micro-CT in measurements of trabecular thickness (∼1.7× reduction in relative error), bone volume (∼1.5× reduction), and trabecular spacing (∼3.5× reduction). Conclusion: Imaging performance modelling and experimentation indicate substantial improvements for high

  18. WE-G-204-05: Relative Object Detectability Evaluation of a New High Resolution A-Se Direct Detection System Compared to Indirect Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russ, M; Nagesh, S Setlur; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S; Scott, C; Karim, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the task specific imaging performance of a new 25µm pixel pitch, 1000µm thick amorphous selenium direct detection system with CMOS readout for typical angiographic exposure parameters using the relative object detectability (ROD) metric. Methods: The ROD metric uses a simulated object function weighted at each spatial frequency by the detectors’ detective quantum efficiency (DQE), which is an intrinsic performance metric. For this study, the simulated objects were aluminum spheres of varying diameter (0.05–0.6mm). The weighted object function is then integrated over the full range of detectable frequencies inherent to each detector, and a ratio is taken of the resulting value for two detectors. The DQE for the 25µm detector was obtained from a simulation of a proposed a-Se detector using an exposure of 200µR for a 50keV x-ray beam. This a-Se detector was compared to two microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) detectors [the MAF-CCD with pixel size of 35µm and Nyquist frequency of 14.2 cycles/mm and the MAF-CMOS with pixel size of 75µm and Nyquist frequency of 6.6 cycles/mm] and a standard flat-panel detector (FPD with pixel size of 194µm and Nyquist frequency of 2.5cycles/mm). Results: ROD calculations indicated vastly superior performance by the a-Se detector in imaging small aluminum spheres. For the 50µm diameter sphere, the ROD values for the a-Se detector compared to the MAF-CCD, the MAF-CMOS, and the FPD were 7.3, 9.3 and 58, respectively. Detector performance in the low frequency regime was dictated by each detector’s DQE(0) value. Conclusion: The a-Se with CMOS readout is unique and appears to have distinctive advantages of incomparable high resolution, low noise, no readout lag, and expandable design. The a-Se direct detection system will be a powerful imaging tool in angiography, with potential break-through applications in diagnosis and treatment of neuro-vascular disease. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an

  19. WE-G-204-05: Relative Object Detectability Evaluation of a New High Resolution A-Se Direct Detection System Compared to Indirect Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, M; Nagesh, S Setlur; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY (United States); Scott, C; Karim, K [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the task specific imaging performance of a new 25µm pixel pitch, 1000µm thick amorphous selenium direct detection system with CMOS readout for typical angiographic exposure parameters using the relative object detectability (ROD) metric. Methods: The ROD metric uses a simulated object function weighted at each spatial frequency by the detectors’ detective quantum efficiency (DQE), which is an intrinsic performance metric. For this study, the simulated objects were aluminum spheres of varying diameter (0.05–0.6mm). The weighted object function is then integrated over the full range of detectable frequencies inherent to each detector, and a ratio is taken of the resulting value for two detectors. The DQE for the 25µm detector was obtained from a simulation of a proposed a-Se detector using an exposure of 200µR for a 50keV x-ray beam. This a-Se detector was compared to two microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) detectors [the MAF-CCD with pixel size of 35µm and Nyquist frequency of 14.2 cycles/mm and the MAF-CMOS with pixel size of 75µm and Nyquist frequency of 6.6 cycles/mm] and a standard flat-panel detector (FPD with pixel size of 194µm and Nyquist frequency of 2.5cycles/mm). Results: ROD calculations indicated vastly superior performance by the a-Se detector in imaging small aluminum spheres. For the 50µm diameter sphere, the ROD values for the a-Se detector compared to the MAF-CCD, the MAF-CMOS, and the FPD were 7.3, 9.3 and 58, respectively. Detector performance in the low frequency regime was dictated by each detector’s DQE(0) value. Conclusion: The a-Se with CMOS readout is unique and appears to have distinctive advantages of incomparable high resolution, low noise, no readout lag, and expandable design. The a-Se direct detection system will be a powerful imaging tool in angiography, with potential break-through applications in diagnosis and treatment of neuro-vascular disease. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an

  20. Highly segmented CVD diamond detectors and high-resolution momentum measurements in knockout reactions; Hochsegmentierte CVD Diamant Detektoren und hochaufloesende Impulsmessungen in Knockout Reaktionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwertel, Sabine

    2009-11-26

    In recent years knockout reactions have proven to be important tools for investigations of the structure of light exotic nuclei. In spring 2006 an experiment was performed with the fragment separator at GSI in Darmstadt to extend this method to medium-mass nuclei with energies of about 400 AMeV. An experiment with a stable and well-known {sup 48}Ca primary beam was performed as a reference. The FRS was set for the reaction {sup 56}Ti{yields}{sup 55}Ti. Because of the high acceptance of the FRS, mother and daughter nuclei of one-neutron knockout reactions in the Sc isotopes {sup 51,52,53,54,55}Sc were also transported with high efficiency. These are investigated in the first part of this thesis. Inclusive cross sections of 77(10) mbarn for one-neutron knockout from {sup 48}Ca and 78(12) mbarn, 99(15) mbarn, 101(15) mbarn, 113(17) mbarn and 72(14) mbarn for knockout from {sup 51,52,53,54,55}Sc, respectively, were measured for the first time. For the Sc isotopes the reduction factors are close to 1. For the one-neutron knockout reactions in {sup 48}Ca and the Sc isotopes, respectively, the momentum distributions could be measured with a relative resolution of 0.17-0.27 %. From the momentum distributions spectroscopic factors of the involved orbitals could be extracted. In the future, further knockout experiments should be performed using the R{sup 3}B setup at FAIR. The available beam intensity will be up to four orders of magnitude higher. As the beam has to be tracked from the dispersive plane of the Super-FRS up to the R{sup 3}B target, radiation hard detectors are needed. In the framework of this thesis extensive measurements were performed at the tandem accelerator in Munich with numerous small (10 x 10 mm{sup 2}) test detectors. Samples using new manufacturing methods were characterized. A dose of some 10{sup 11} ions/mm{sup 2} was determined as a limit for the exposure of the material with heavy ions of high ionisation density. It could be shown that even

  1. Very high resolution detection of gamma radiation at room-temperature using P-I-N detectors of CdZnTe and HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W. J.; Rhiger, D. R.; Sen, S.; Kalisher, M. H.; James, K.; Reid, C. P.; Gerrish, V.; Baccash, C. O.

    1994-08-01

    High-energy photon detectors have been constructed by engineering and fabricating p-i-n diode structures consisting of bulk CdZnTe and epitaxial HgCdTe. The p-i-n structure was obtained by liquid-phase epitaxial growth of p and n doped HgCdTe layers on 'intrinsic' CdZnTe material about 1mm thick and approximately 25mm square. Curve tracing shows I-V curves with diode characteristics having resistivity above 1011 Omega -cm and leakage current of less than 400 pA to about - 60V reverse bias on a typical test piece approximately 5 x 8 x 1 mm. Spectra of similar test pieces have been obtained at room temperature with various nuclear isotopic sources over the range of 22 keV to 662 keV which show exceptionally high energy resolution. Resolution as good as 1.82% FWHM was obtained for the 356 keV line of 133Ba with a P/V = 3.4. The performance of these detectors combined with contemporary infrared technology capable of fabricating 2D arrays of these II-VI materials opens up manifold exciting applications in astrophysics, medical, industrial, environmental, and defense spectroscopy and imaging.

  2. DCT Trigger in a High-Resolution Test Platform for the Detection of Very Inclined Showers in Pierre Auger Surface Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szadkowski, Zbigniew; Wiedeński, Michał

    2017-06-01

    We present first results from a trigger based on the discrete cosine transform (DCT) operating in new front-end boards with a Cyclone V E field-programmable gate array (FPGA) deployed in seven test surface detectors in the Pierre Auger Test Array. The patterns of the ADC traces generated by very inclined showers (arriving at 70° to 90° from the vertical) were obtained from the Auger database and from the CORSIKA simulation package supported by the Auger OffLine event reconstruction platform that gives predicted digitized signal profiles. Simulations for many values of the initial cosmic ray angle of arrival, the shower initialization depth in the atmosphere, the type of particle, and its initial energy gave a boundary on the DCT coefficients used for the online pattern recognition in the FPGA. Preliminary results validated the approach used. We recorded several showers triggered by the DCT for 120 Msamples/s and 160 Msamples/s.

  3. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks

  4. Summarizing report on results obtained by institutions in Germany and Switzerland applying high-resolution detectors for health physics monitoring; Zusammenfassender Bericht ueber die Inkorporationsmessstellen mit hochaufloesenden Detektoren in Deutschland und der Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahre, P. [Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    In order to gather as much information as possible about the performance of high-resolution detectors in whole-body and partial-body counters, a questionnaire was distributed to those health physics monitoring institutions in Germany and Switzerland known to apply such instruments. The inquiry also covered institutions in Prague, Budapest, and Seibersdorf which participate in activities of the AKI. The results of the inquiry are given in tabulated form. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Um moeglichst viele Informationen ueber Ganz- und Teilkoerperzaehler, die mit hochaufloesenden Detektoren arbeiten, zu erfassen, wurde an alle in Deutschland und in der Schweiz arbeitenden Inkorporationsmessstellen ein Formular zur Erfassung von Erfahrungen mit hochaufloesenden Detektoren gesendet. In die Abfrage einbezogen wurden auch Messstellen aus Prag, Budapest und Seibersdorf, die im AKI involviert sind. Die Ergebnisse der Umfrage fuer Ganzkoerperzaehler und fuer Teilkoerperzaehler werden tabellarisch zusammengefasst. (orig./SR)

  5. Evaluation and Comparison of High-Resolution (HR) and High-Light (HL) Phosphors in the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) using Generalized Linear Systems Analyses (GMTF, GDQE) that include the Effect of Scatter, Magnification and Detector Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandesh K; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the imaging characteristics of the high-resolution, high-sensitivity micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) with 35-micron pixel-pitch when used with different commercially-available 300 micron thick phosphors: the high resolution (HR) and high light (HL) from Hamamatsu. The purpose of this evaluation was to see if the HL phosphor with its higher screen efficiency could be replaced with the HR phosphor to achieve improved resolution without an increase in noise resulting from the HR's decreased light-photon yield. We designated the detectors MAF-HR and MAF-HL and compared them with a standard flat panel detector (FPD) (194 micron pixel pitch and 600 micron thick CsI(Tl)). For this comparison, we used the generalized linear-system metrics of GMTF, GNNPS and GDQE which are more realistic measures of total system performance since they include the effect of scattered radiation, focal spot distribution, and geometric un-sharpness. Magnifications (1.05-1.15) and scatter fractions (0.28 and 0.33) characteristic of a standard head phantom were used. The MAF-HR performed significantly better than the MAF-HL at high spatial frequencies. The ratio of GMTF and GDQE of the MAF-HR compared to the MAF-HL at 3(6) cycles/mm was 1.45(2.42) and 1.23(2.89), respectively. Despite significant degradation by inclusion of scatter and object magnification, both MAF-HR and MAF-HL provide superior performance over the FPD at higher spatial frequencies with similar performance up to the FPD's Nyquist frequency of 2.5 cycles/mm. Both substantially higher resolution and improved GDQE can be achieved with the MAF using the HR phosphor instead of the HL phosphor.

  6. An ultralow background germanium gamma-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, R.H.; Brodzinski, R.L.; Hensley, W.K.; Ryge, P.

    1984-01-01

    The monitoring of minimum detectable activity is becoming increasingly important as environmental concerns and regulations require more sensitive measurement of the radioactivity levels in the workplace and the home. In measuring this activity, however, the background becomes one of the limiting factors. Anticoincidence systems utilizing both NaI(T1) and plastic scintillators have proven effective in reducing some components of the background, but radiocontaminants in the various regions of these systems have limited their effectiveness, and their cost is often prohibitive. In order to obtain a genuinely low background detector system, all components must be free of detectable radioactivity, and the cosmic ray produced contribution must be significantly reduced. Current efforts by the authors to measure the double beta decay of Germanium 76 as predicted by Grand Unified Theories have resulted in the development of a high resolution germanium diode gamma spectrometer with an exceptionally low background. This paper describes the development of this system, outlines the configuration and operation of its preamplifier, linear amplifier, analog-to-digital converter, 4096-channel analyzer, shielding consisting of lead-sandwiched plastic scintillators wrapped in cadmium foil, photomultiplier, and its pulse generator and discriminator, and then discusses how the system can be utilized to significantly reduce the background in high resolution photon spectrometers at only moderate cost

  7. High-resolution multi-slice PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasillo, N.J.; Chintu Chen; Ordonez, C.E.; Kapp, O.H.; Sosnowski, J.; Beck, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    This report evaluates the progress to test the feasibility and to initiate the design of a high resolution multi-slice PET system. The following specific areas were evaluated: detector development and testing; electronics configuration and design; mechanical design; and system simulation. The design and construction of a multiple-slice, high-resolution positron tomograph will provide substantial improvements in the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements of the distribution of activity concentrations in the brain. The range of functional brain research and our understanding of local brain function will be greatly extended when the development of this instrumentation is completed

  8. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational

  9. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  10. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  11. A high-resolution detector based on liquid-core scintillating fibres with readout via an electron-bombarded charge-coupled device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cianfarani, C.; Duane, A.; Fabre, J.P.; Frenkel, A.; Golovkin, S.V.; Gorin, A.M.; Harrison, K.; Kozarenko, E.N.; Kushnirenko, A.E.; Ladygin, E.A.; Martellotti, G.; Medvedkov, A.M.; Nass, P.A.; Obudovski, V.P.; Penso, G.; Petukhov, Yu.P.; Siegmund, W.P.; Tyukov, V.E.; Vasilchenko, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a presentation of results from tests in a 5 GeV/c hadron beam of detectors based on liquid-core scintillating fibres, each fibre consisting of a glass capillary filled with organic liquid scintillator. Fibre readout was performed via an Electron-Bombarded Charge-Coupled Device (EBCCD) image tube, a novel instrument that combines the functions of a high-gain, gated image intensifier and a Charge-Coupled Device. Using 1-methylnaphthalene doped with 3 g/l of R45 as liquid scintillator, the attenuation lengths obtained for light propagation over distances greater than 16 cm were 1.5 m in fibres of 20 μm core and 1.0 m in fibres of 16 μm core. For particles that crossed the fibres of 20 μm core at distances of ∼1.8 cm and ∼95 cm from the fibres' readout ends, the recorded hit densities were 5.3 mm -1 and 2.5 mm -1 respectively. Using 1-methylnaphthalene doped with 3.6 g/l of R39 as liquid scintillator and fibres of 75 μm core, the hit density obtained for particles that crossed the fibres at a distance of ∼1.8 cm from their readout ends was 8.5 mm -1 . With a specially designed bundle of tapered fibres, having core diameters that smoothly increase from 16 μm to 75 μm, a spatial precision of 6 μm was measured. (orig.)

  12. High resolution positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, G.L.; Burnham, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The limits of spatial resolution in practical positron tomography are examined. The four factors that limit spatial resolution are: positron range; small angle deviation; detector dimensions and properties; statistics. Of these factors, positron range may be considered the fundamental physical limitation since it is independent of instrument properties. The other factors are to a greater or lesser extent dependent on the design of the tomograph

  13. Germanium soup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Troy A.; Alexay, Christopher C.

    2006-05-01

    This paper addresses the variety and impact of dispersive model variations for infrared materials and, in particular, the level to which certain optical designs are affected by this potential variation in germanium. This work offers a method for anticipating and/or minimizing the pitfalls such potential model variations may have on a candidate optical design.

  14. High resolution tomography using analog coding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, G.L.; Burnham, C.A.; Chesler, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a 30-year program in the development of positron instrumentation, the authors have developed a high resolution bismuth germanate (BGO) ring tomography (PCR) employing 360 detectors and 90 photomultiplier tubes for one plane. The detectors are shaped as trapezoid and are 4 mm wide at the front end. When assembled, they form an essentially continuous cylindrical detector. Light from a scintillation in the detector is viewed through a cylindrical light pipe by the photomultiplier tubes. By use of an analog coding scheme, the detector emitting light is identified from the phototube signals. In effect, each phototube can identify four crystals. PCR is designed as a static device and does not use interpolative motion. This results in considerable advantage when performing dynamic studies. PCR is the positron tomography analog of the γ-camera widely used in nuclear medicine

  15. High resolution backscattering instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coldea, R.

    2001-01-01

    The principle of operation of indirect-geometry time-of-flight spectrometers are presented, including the IRIS at the ISIS spallation neutron source. The key features that make those types of spectrometers ideally suited for low-energy spectroscopy are: high energy resolution over a wide dynamic range, and simultaneous measurement over a large momentum transfer range provided by the wide angular detector coverage. To exemplify these features are discussed of single-crystal experiments of the spin dynamics in the two-dimensional frustrated quantum magnet Cs 2 CuCl 4 . (R.P.)

  16. Compton scatter in germanium and its effect on imaging with gamma-ray position-sensitive detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, I.S.; Strauss, M.G.; Brenner, R.

    1978-01-01

    The spatial spread due to Compton scatter in Ge was measured to study the reduction in image contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) resulting from erroneous readout in Ge position-sensitive detectors. The step response revealing this spread was obtained by scanning with a 122 keV γ-ray beam across a boundary of two sectors of a slotted coaxial Ge(Li) detector that is 40 mm diameter by 22 mm long. The derived line-spread function at 140 keV (/sup 99m/Tc) exhibits much shorter but thicker tails than those due to scatter in tissue as observed with a NaI detector through 5.5 cm of scattering material. Convolutions of rectangular profiles of voids with the Ge(Li) line-spread function show marked deterioration in contrast for voids less than 10 mm across, which in turn results in even greater deterioration of the S/N. As a result, the contrast for voids in Ge images is only 20 to 30 percent higher than that in NaI and the S/N is only comparable for equal detector areas. The degradation in image contrast due to scatter in Ge detectors can be greatly reduced by either using thin detectors (approximately 5 mm), where scatter virtually does not exist, or by using thicker detectors and rejecting scatter electronically. To reduce the effects of scatter on the S/N as well as on contrast, the erroneous position readouts must actually be corrected. A more realizable approach to achieving the ultimate potential of Ge detectors may be a scanning array of discrete detectors (not position sensitive) in which readout is not affected by scatter

  17. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogburn, Reuben Walter IV

    2008-01-01

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single

  18. Detectors for high resolution dynamic pet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1983-05-01

    This report reviews the motivation for high spatial resolution in dynamic positron emission tomography of the head and the technical problems in realizing this objective. We present recent progress in using small silicon photodiodes to measure the energy deposited by 511 keV photons in small BGO crystals with an energy resolution of 9.4% full-width at half-maximum. In conjunction with a suitable phototube coupled to a group of crystals, the photodiode signal to noise ratio is sufficient for the identification of individual crystals both for conventional and time-of-flight positron tomography

  19. Capillary detectors for high resolution tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annis, P.; Bay, A.; Bonekaemper, D.; Buontempo, S.; Ereditato, A.; Fabre, J.P.; Fiorillo, G.; Frekers, D.; Frenkel, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Garufi, F.; Goldberg, J.; Golovkin, S.; Hoepfner, K.; Konijn, J.; Kozarenko, E.; Kreslo, I.; Liberti, B.; Martellotti, G.; Medvedkov, A.; Mommaert, C.; Panman, J.; Penso, G.; Petukhov, Yu.; Rondeshagen, D.; Tyukov, V.; Vasilchenko, V.; Vilain, P.; Vischers, J.L.; Wilquet, G.; Winter, K.; Wolff, T.; Wong, H.

    1997-01-01

    We present a new tracking device based on glass capillary bundles or layers filled with highly purified liquid scintillator and read out at one end by means of image intensifiers and CCD devices. A large-volume prototype consisting of 5 x 10 5 capillaries with a diameter of 20 μm and a length of 180 cm and read out by a megapixel CCD has been tested with muon and neutrino beams at CERN. With this prototype a two track resolution of 33 μm was achieved with passing through muons. Images of neutrino interactions in a capillary bundle have also been acquired and analysed. Read-out chains based on electron bombarded CCD (EBCCD) and image pipeline devices are also investigated. Preliminary results obtained with a capillary bundle read out by an EBCCD are presented. (orig.)

  20. Capillary detectors for high resolution tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Annis, P

    1997-01-01

    We present a new tracking device based on glass capillary bundles or layers filled with highly purified liquid scintillator and read out at one end by means of image intensifiers and CCD devices. A large-volume prototype consisting of 5 × 105 capillaries with a diameter of 20 μm and a length of 180 cm and read out by a megapixel CCD has been tested with muon and neutrino beams at CERN. With this prototype a two track resolution of 33 μm was achieved with passing through muons. Images of neutrino interactions in a capillary bundle have also been acquired and analysed. Read-out chains based on Electron Bombarded CCD (EBCCD) and image pipeline devices are also investigated. Preliminary results obtained with a capillary bundle read out by an EBCCD are presented.

  1. Final results of the EDELWEISS-II WIMP search using a 4-kg array of cryogenic germanium detectors with interleaved electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armengaud, E.; Augier, C.; Benoit, A.; Berge, L.; Bluemer, J.; Broniatowski, A.; Brudanin, V.; Censier, B.; Chardin, G.; Chapellier, M.; Charlieux, F.; Coulter, P.; Cox, G.A.; Defay, X.; De Jesus, M.; Dolgorouki, Y.; Domange, J.; Dumoulin, L.

    2011-01-01

    The EDELWEISS-II Collaboration has completed a direct search for WIMP dark matter with an array of ten 400-g cryogenic germanium detectors in operation at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane. The combined use of thermal phonon sensors and charge collection electrodes with an interleaved geometry enables the efficient rejection of γ-induced radioactivity as well as near-surface interactions. A total effective exposure of 384 kg d has been achieved, mostly coming from fourteen months of continuous operation. Five nuclear recoil candidates are observed above 20 keV, while the estimated background is 3.0 events. The result is interpreted in terms of limits on the cross-section of spin-independent interactions of WIMPs and nucleons. A cross-section of 4.4x10 -8 pb is excluded at 90%CL for a WIMP mass of 85 GeV. New constraints are also set on models where the WIMP-nucleon scattering is inelastic.

  2. Hard X-ray polarimetry with position sensitve germanium detectors. Studies of the recombination transitions into highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashenov, Stanislav

    2005-07-01

    In this work a first study of the photon polarization for the process of radiative recombination has been performed. This was done at the ESR storage ring at GSI for uranium ions colliding with N2 at various collision energies. For this measurement a high purity Ge Pixel Detector with a 4 x 4 segmentation matrix was applied. The investigation was performed at the Gas-jet target of the ESR. The detector was placed at 60 and 90 observation angles. The sensitivity of the Compton scattering effect to the linear polarization of the X-Ray radiation was employed for the polarization measurement. Detailed investigations of the scattering and geometrical effects inside the detector were performed in order to develop a method to interpret the experimental data and extract the degree of the linear polarization in the hard X-Ray regime with a high precision. A special emphasis was given to the geometry of the detector and it's influence on the measured pixel-to-pixel Compton scattering intensities. The developed method enabled to achieve a precision of the order of 10% with the Pixel Detector which is dominated by the statistical uncertainties. The obtained results show a good agreement with the theoretical values derived from the exact relativistic calculations. For the case of the linear polarization of the K-REC photons, the measured data con rm the theoretical prediction that strong depolarization effects occur for high projectile charges in the forward hemisphere. The latter is in disagreement with the nonrelativistic theory which predicts a 100 % polarization regardless of the emission angle. (orig.)

  3. Hard X-ray polarimetry with position sensitve germanium detectors. Studies of the recombination transitions into highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashenov, Stanislav

    2005-01-01

    In this work a first study of the photon polarization for the process of radiative recombination has been performed. This was done at the ESR storage ring at GSI for uranium ions colliding with N2 at various collision energies. For this measurement a high purity Ge Pixel Detector with a 4 x 4 segmentation matrix was applied. The investigation was performed at the Gas-jet target of the ESR. The detector was placed at 60 and 90 observation angles. The sensitivity of the Compton scattering effect to the linear polarization of the X-Ray radiation was employed for the polarization measurement. Detailed investigations of the scattering and geometrical effects inside the detector were performed in order to develop a method to interpret the experimental data and extract the degree of the linear polarization in the hard X-Ray regime with a high precision. A special emphasis was given to the geometry of the detector and it's influence on the measured pixel-to-pixel Compton scattering intensities. The developed method enabled to achieve a precision of the order of 10% with the Pixel Detector which is dominated by the statistical uncertainties. The obtained results show a good agreement with the theoretical values derived from the exact relativistic calculations. For the case of the linear polarization of the K-REC photons, the measured data con rm the theoretical prediction that strong depolarization effects occur for high projectile charges in the forward hemisphere. The latter is in disagreement with the nonrelativistic theory which predicts a 100 % polarization regardless of the emission angle. (orig.)

  4. A simple methodology for characterization of germanium coaxial detectors by using Monte Carlo simulation and evolutionary algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, J.G.; Rubiano, J.G.; Winter, G.; Guerra, A.G.; Alonso, H.; Arnedo, M.A.; Tejera, A.; Gil, J.M.; Rodríguez, R.; Martel, P.; Bolivar, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    The determination in a sample of the activity concentration of a specific radionuclide by gamma spectrometry needs to know the full energy peak efficiency (FEPE) for the energy of interest. The difficulties related to the experimental calibration make it advisable to have alternative methods for FEPE determination, such as the simulation of the transport of photons in the crystal by the Monte Carlo method, which requires an accurate knowledge of the characteristics and geometry of the detector. The characterization process is mainly carried out by Canberra Industries Inc. using proprietary techniques and methodologies developed by that company. It is a costly procedure (due to shipping and to the cost of the process itself) and for some research laboratories an alternative in situ procedure can be very useful. The main goal of this paper is to find an alternative to this costly characterization process, by establishing a method for optimizing the parameters of characterizing the detector, through a computational procedure which could be reproduced at a standard research lab. This method consists in the determination of the detector geometric parameters by using Monte Carlo simulation in parallel with an optimization process, based on evolutionary algorithms, starting from a set of reference FEPEs determined experimentally or computationally. The proposed method has proven to be effective and simple to implement. It provides a set of characterization parameters which it has been successfully validated for different source-detector geometries, and also for a wide range of environmental samples and certified materials. - Highlights: • A computational method for characterizing an HPGe spectrometer has been developed. • Detector characterized using as reference photopeak efficiencies obtained experimentally or by Monte Carlo calibration. • The characterization obtained has been validated for samples with different geometries and composition. • Good agreement

  5. Cosmogenically-produced isotopes in natural and enriched high-purity germanium detectors for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliss, Thomas; MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR advances toward measurements of the neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge. Detectors employed in the DEMONSTRATOR are subject to cosmogenic spallation during production and processing, resulting in activation of certain long-lived radioisotopes. Activation of these cosmogenic isotopes is mitigated by shielded storage of detectors and through underground operation of the DEMONSTRATOR at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility. In this work, we explore the appearance and reduction of cosmogenic contributions to the DEMONSTRATOR background spectrum. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  6. Fast neutron detection with germanium detectors: computation of response functions for the 692 keV inelastic scattering peak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehrenbacher, G.; Meckbach, R.; Paretzke, H.G.

    1996-01-01

    The dependence of the shape of the right-sided broadening of the inelastic scattering peak at 692 keV in the pulse-height distribution measured with a Ge detector in fast neutron fields on the energy of the incident neutrons has been analyzed. A model incorporating the process contributing to the energy deposition that engender the peak, including the partitioning of the energy deposition by the Ge recoils, was developed. With a Monte Carlo code based on this model, the detector response associated with this peak was computed and compared with results of measurements with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons for energies between 0.88 and 2.1 MeV. A set of 80 response functions for neutron energies in the range from the reaction threshold at 0.7 to 6 MeV was computed, which will serve as a starting point for methods, which aim at obtaining information on the spectral distribution of fast neutron fields for this energy range from measurements with a Ge detector. (orig.)

  7. First 10 kg of naked germanium detectors installed in liquid nitrogen in GENIUS Test-Facility in GRAN-SASSO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The GENIUS Test Facility has come into operation in Gran Sasso on May 5, 2003 with its first ten kg of naked Ge detectors in liquid nitrogen. This is the first time that this novel technique for extreme background reduction in search for rare decays is applied under the background conditions of an underground laboratory. GENIUS-TF has the potential to check the DAMA evidence for cold dark matter by modulation, and possibly, to improve the accuracy of the recently observed first signal for neutrinoless double beta decay. (orig.)

  8. First 10 kg of naked germanium detectors installed in liquid nitrogen in GENIUS Test-Facility in GRAN-SASSO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V.

    2004-01-01

    The GENIUS Test Facility has come into operation in Gran Sasso on May 5, 2003 with its first ten kg of naked Ge detectors in liquid nitrogen. This is the first time that this novel technique for extreme background reduction in search for rare decays is applied under the background conditions of an underground laboratory. GENIUS-TF has the potential to check the DAMA evidence for cold dark matter by modulation, and possibly, to improve the accuracy of the recently observed first signal for neutrinoless double beta decay. (orig.)

  9. Determination of the germanium detector efficiency for measurements of the radionuclide activity contained in a radioactive waste drum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenas, J.; Gallardo, S.; Ballester, S.; Hoyler, F.

    2006-01-01

    One of the features in the characterization of a drum containing radioactive wastes is to verify the activity of radionuclides contained in the drum. An H.P. Ge detector can be used for this measurement. However, it is necessary to perform an efficiency calibration for all geometries involved. In the framework of a joint project between the Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear (Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Spain) and the Fachbereich Angewandte Naturwissenschaften und Technik (Fachhochschule Aachen, Abteilung Julich, Germany), different configurations for a drum containing radioactive sources have been implemented in the laboratory. A cylindrical drum of 850 mm height, a diameter equal to 560 mm and 3 mm of steel thickness has been used in the experimental measurements. The drum contains a clay ceramic matrix whose chemical composition is 55% SiO 2 , 40% of Al 2 O 3 and 5% of TiO 2 . Several vertical PVC tubes having a diameter of 30 mm are inserted in the drum at different distances from the central axis. In the experiment, a pack of point sources with 133 Ba, 60 Co and 137 Cs is introduced into each one of the tubes. A ring-shape distributed source is generated by rotating the drum around its axis during the measurement. The detector efficiency is determined experimentally for these configurations. On the other hand, a Monte Carlo model, using the M.C.N.P. code, has been developed to simulate the drum, the clay matrix and the PVC tubes. The effect of the drum spinning has been reproduced simulating a ring source with different diameters. The model also includes detailed detector geometry. Using this Monte Carlo model, the detector efficiency is calculated for each configuration implemented in the laboratory. Comparison of results from Monte Carlo simulation and experimental measurements should permit the validation of the M.C.N.P. model. Consequently it will be possible to obtain efficiency curves without experimental measurements. Therefore, these

  10. Gamma-line intensity difference method for sup 1 sup 1 sup 7 sup m Sn at high resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Remeikis, V; Mazeika, K

    1998-01-01

    The method for detection of small differences in the gamma-spectrum line intensity for the radionuclide in different environments has been developed for measurements at high resolution. The experiments were realized with the pure germanium planar detector. Solution of the methodical problems allowed to measure the relative difference DELTA IOTA subgamma/IOTA subgamma=(3.4+-1.5)*10 sup - sup 4 of the sup 1 sup 1 sup 7 sup m Sn 156.02 keV gamma-line intensity for the radionuclide in SnO sub 2 with respect to SnS from the difference in the gamma-spectra. The error of the result is caused mainly by the statistical accuracy. It is limited by the highest counting rate at sufficiently high energy resolution and relatively short half-life of sup 1 sup 1 sup 7 sup m Sn. (author)

  11. Prepared for the thirtieth annual conference on bioassay analytical and environmental chemistry. Reliable analysis of high resolution gamma spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, H.B.; Buschbom, R.; Rieksts, G.A.; Palmer, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    A new method has been developed to reliably analyze pulse height-energy spectra obtained from measurements employing high resolution germanium detectors. The method employs a simple data transformation and smoothing function to calculate background and identify photopeaks and isotopic analysis. This technique is elegant in its simplicity because it avoids dependence upon complex spectrum deconvolution, stripping, or other least-square-fitting techniques which complicate the assessment of measurement reliability. A moving median was chosen for data smoothing because, unlike moving averages, medians are not dominated by extreme data points. Finally, peaks are identified whenever the difference between the background spectrum and the transformed spectrum exceeds a pre-determined number of standard deviations

  12. A method for analyzing low statistics high resolution spectra from 210Pb in underground coal miners from Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, A.L.A.; Dantas, B.M.; Lipsztein, J.L.; Spitz, H.B.

    2006-01-01

    A survey conducted by the IRD-CNEN determined that some workers from an underground coal mine in the south of Brazil were exposed to elevated airborne concentrations of 222 Rn. Because inhalation of high airborne concentrations of 222 Rn can lead to an increase of 210 Pb in bone, in vivo measurements of 210 Pb in the skeleton were performed in selected underground workers from this mine. Measurements were performed using an array of high-resolution germanium detectors positioned around the head and knee to detect the low abundant 46.5 keV photon emitted by 210 Pb. The gamma-ray spectra were analyzed using a moving median smoothing function to detect the presence of a photopeak at 46.5 keV. The minimum detectable activity of 210 Pb in the skeleton using this methodology was 50 Bq. (author)

  13. Comparison of experimental pulse-height distributions in germanium detectors with integrated-tiger-series-code predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutler, D.E.; Halbleib, J.A.; Knott, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports pulse-height distributions in two different types of Ge detectors measured for a variety of medium-energy x-ray bremsstrahlung spectra. These measurements have been compared to predictions using the integrated tiger series (ITS) Monte Carlo electron/photon transport code. In general, the authors find excellent agreement between experiments and predictions using no free parameters. These results demonstrate that the ITS codes can predict the combined bremsstrahlung production and energy deposition with good precision (within measurement uncertainties). The one region of disagreement observed occurs for low-energy (<50 keV) photons using low-energy bremsstrahlung spectra. In this case the ITS codes appear to underestimate the produced and/or absorbed radiation by almost an order of magnitude

  14. Dynamic high resolution imaging of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaoka, R.S.; Lewellen, T.K.; Bice, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    A positron emission tomography with the sensitivity and resolution to do dynamic imaging of rats would be an invaluable tool for biological researchers. In this paper, the authors determine the biological criteria for dynamic positron emission imaging of rats. To be useful, 3 mm isotropic resolution and 2-3 second time binning were necessary characteristics for such a dedicated tomograph. A single plane in which two objects of interest could be imaged simultaneously was considered acceptable. Multi-layered detector designs were evaluated as a possible solution to the dynamic imaging and high resolution imaging requirements. The University of Washington photon history generator was used to generate data to investigate a tomograph's sensitivity to true, scattered and random coincidences for varying detector ring diameters. Intrinsic spatial uniformity advantages of multi-layered detector designs over conventional detector designs were investigated using a Monte Carlo program. As a result, a modular three layered detector prototype is being developed. A module will consist of a layer of five 3.5 mm wide crystals and two layers of six 2.5 mm wide crystals. The authors believe adequate sampling can be achieved with a stationary detector system using these modules. Economical crystal decoding strategies have been investigated and simulations have been run to investigate optimum light channeling methods for block decoding strategies. An analog block decoding method has been proposed and will be experimentally evaluated to determine whether it can provide the desired performance

  15. High-resolution intravital microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Andresen

    Full Text Available Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy--the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and

  16. High-Resolution Intravital Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Volker; Pollok, Karolin; Rinnenthal, Jan-Leo; Oehme, Laura; Günther, Robert; Spiecker, Heinrich; Radbruch, Helena; Gerhard, Jenny; Sporbert, Anje; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Hauser, Anja E.; Niesner, Raluca

    2012-01-01

    Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy - the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning) while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs) of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and developmental biology

  17. High-resolution studies of momentum distributions using perfect crystal gamma diffractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krexner, G.; Bischof, G.; Jentschel, M.; Boerner, H.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Positron annihilation spectroscopy has turned out to be highly successful in the investigation of Fermi surfaces, electronic structures and various kinds of defects. On the other hand, algorithms based on density functional theory have made enormous progress in recent years and calculations for the contributions of both delocalized and core electrons in a rapidly increasing number of systems is either already feasible today or to be expected in the near future. By comparison, over the last decades there has been little improvement in the experimental limitations which are still set by the energy resolution of germanium detectors (slightly above 1 keV for annihilation photons close to 500 keV) and the angular resolution in ACAR studies (superior by about one order of magnitude). In addition, coincidence techniques are hampered by low count rates. An alternative is suggested by the fact that, in principle, Bragg diffraction techniques using perfect single crystals provide a way for the precise determination of wavelengths corresponding to energies in the MeV range. The single crystal analyzer instrument PN3 at the Institute Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France) offers the unique possibility to determine the energy of annihilation photons with an accuracy close to about 1 eV, i.e. an improvement of up to three orders of magnitude in comparison to conventional semiconductor detectors. We discuss possible applications of this spectrometer in high-resolution studies of momentum distributions for both delocalized and core electrons. (author)

  18. High resolution solar soft X-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fei; Wang Huanyu; Peng Wenxi; Liang Xiaohua; Zhang Chunlei; Cao Xuelei; Jiang Weichun; Zhang Jiayu; Cui Xingzhu

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution solar soft X-ray spectrometer (SOX) payload onboard a satellite is developed. A silicon drift detector (SDD) is adopted as the detector of the SOX spectrometer. The spectrometer consists of the detectors and their readout electronics, a data acquisition unit and a payload data handling unit. A ground test system is also developed to test SOX. The test results show that the design goals of the spectrometer system have been achieved. (authors)

  19. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombaba, Jackson M.

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The device exhibits a stable signal because the plasma is self-seeding and reignites itself every half cycle. A tesla coil is not required to commence generation of the plasma if the ac voltage applied is greater than the breakdown voltage of the plasma-supporting gas. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (Mvutilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienyl manganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer (common room humidifier) was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were also considered. Figures of merits of selected elements both in absorption and emission modes are reported. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using

  20. [Controlled evaluation of a high-resolution three-dimensional magnetic detector system (3D-MAGMA) as a proof of concept - examination of healthy volunteers before and after application of Metoclopramide (MCP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, V Y P; Stallmach, A; Felber, J

    2016-06-01

    Changes in gastric and small bowel motility are a common clinical problem. Currently diagnostic options are limited because each method harbors certain disadvantages. It has been shown that the high-resolution three-dimensional magnetic detector system 3D-MAGMA is capable of reliably measuring gastric and small intestine motor activity. This system allows precise localization of a small magnetic marker and determination of its three-dimensional orientation inside a human body. The aim of the current study was to determine if 3D-MAGMA is reliably able to detect changes in gastric and small bowel motility under controlled conditions. MCP was used as a well known prokinetic agent to shorten the gastric and small bowel passage. 8 healthy volunteers (fasting) underwent motility testing of the stomach and small bowel by 3D-MAGMA with and without administration of MCP (10 mg orally). Among other data the time the capsule needed to pass through the stomach and the duodenum and the time the capsule needed to pass through the first 50 cm of the jejunum were recorded. The retention time of the capsule in the stomach under physiological conditions was 49.1 minutes (median; min. 18 min; max. 88.8 min). The median time the capsule needed to pass through the duodenum was 13.8 minutes (median; min. 1.7 min; max. 24.8 min). The time the capsule needed to pass through the first 50 cm of the jejunum under physiological conditions was 33.0 minutes (median; min. 20.2 min; max. 67.2 min). The retention time of the capsule in the stomach decreased significantly after administration of MCP to 20.9 minutes (median; min. 1.7 min; max. 62.8 min; p = 0.008). The time the capsule needed to pass through the duodenum was also reduced to 7.1 minutes (median; min. 3.1 min; max. 18.3 min; p = 0.055). The time the capsule needed to pass through the first 50 cm of the jejunum was also reduced to 21.7 minutes (median; min. 10.7 min; max. 31.2 min; p = 0.069). 3D-MAGMA is able

  1. High resolution metric imaging payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delclaud, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Alcatel Space Industries has become Europe's leader in the field of high and very high resolution optical payloads, in the frame work of earth observation system able to provide military government with metric images from space. This leadership allowed ALCATEL to propose for the export market, within a French collaboration frame, a complete space based system for metric observation.

  2. Liquid argon as active shielding and coolant for bare germanium detectors. A novel background suppression method for the GERDA 0νββ experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peiffer, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    Two of the most important open questions in particle physics are whether neutrinos are their own anti-particles (Majorana particles) as required by most extensions of the StandardModel and the absolute values of the neutrino masses. The neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay, which can be investigated using 76 Ge (a double beta isotope), is the most sensitive probe for these properties. There is a claim for an evidence for the 0νββ decay in the Heidelberg-Moscow (HdM) 76 Ge experiment by a part of the HdM collaboration. The new 76 Ge experiment Gerda aims to check this claim within one year with 15 kg.y of statistics in Phase I at a background level of ≤10 -2 events/(kg.keV.y) and to go to higher sensitivity with 100 kg.y of statistics in Phase II at a background level of ≤10 -3 events/(kg.keV.y). In Gerda bare germanium semiconductor detectors (enriched in 76 Ge) will be operated in liquid argon (LAr). LAr serves as cryogenic coolant and as high purity shielding against external background. To reach the background level for Phase II, new methods are required to suppress the cosmogenic background of the diodes. The background from cosmogenically produced 60 Co is expected to be ∝2.5.10 -3 events/(kg.keV.y). LAr scintillates in UV (λ=128 nm) and a novel concept is to use this scintillation light as anti-coincidence signal for background suppression. In this work the efficiency of such a LAr scintillation veto was investigated for the first time. In a setup with 19 kg active LAr mass a suppression of a factor 3 has been achieved for 60 Co and a factor 17 for 232 Th around Q ββ = 2039 keV. This suppression will further increase for a one ton active volume (factor O(100) for 232 Th and 60 Co). LAr scintillation can also be used as a powerful tool for background diagnostics. For this purpose a new, very stable and robust wavelength shifter/reflector combination for the light detection has been developed, leading to a photo electron (pe) yield of as much as

  3. Liquid argon as active shielding and coolant for bare germanium detectors. A novel background suppression method for the GERDA 0{nu}{beta}{beta} experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiffer, J.P.

    2007-07-25

    Two of the most important open questions in particle physics are whether neutrinos are their own anti-particles (Majorana particles) as required by most extensions of the StandardModel and the absolute values of the neutrino masses. The neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay, which can be investigated using {sup 76}Ge (a double beta isotope), is the most sensitive probe for these properties. There is a claim for an evidence for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay in the Heidelberg-Moscow (HdM) {sup 76}Ge experiment by a part of the HdM collaboration. The new {sup 76}Ge experiment Gerda aims to check this claim within one year with 15 kg.y of statistics in Phase I at a background level of {<=}10{sup -2} events/(kg.keV.y) and to go to higher sensitivity with 100 kg.y of statistics in Phase II at a background level of {<=}10{sup -3} events/(kg.keV.y). In Gerda bare germanium semiconductor detectors (enriched in {sup 76}Ge) will be operated in liquid argon (LAr). LAr serves as cryogenic coolant and as high purity shielding against external background. To reach the background level for Phase II, new methods are required to suppress the cosmogenic background of the diodes. The background from cosmogenically produced {sup 60}Co is expected to be {proportional_to}2.5.10{sup -3} events/(kg.keV.y). LAr scintillates in UV ({lambda}=128 nm) and a novel concept is to use this scintillation light as anti-coincidence signal for background suppression. In this work the efficiency of such a LAr scintillation veto was investigated for the first time. In a setup with 19 kg active LAr mass a suppression of a factor 3 has been achieved for {sup 60}Co and a factor 17 for {sup 232}Th around Q{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} = 2039 keV. This suppression will further increase for a one ton active volume (factor O(100) for {sup 232}Th and {sup 60}Co). LAr scintillation can also be used as a powerful tool for background diagnostics. For this purpose a new, very stable and robust wavelength

  4. Manufacturing P-N junctions in germanium bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    A method of producing p-n junctions in Ge so as to facilitate their use as radiation detectors involves forming a body of high purity p-type germanium, diffusing lithium deep into the body, in the absence of electrolytic processes, to form a junction between n-type and p-type germanium greater than 1 mm depth. (UK)

  5. Status report on the International Germanium Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Hensley, W.K.; Miley, H.S.; Reeves, J.H.; Avignone, F.T.; Collar, J.I.; Guerard, C.K.; Courant, H.; Ruddick, K.; Kirpichnikov, I.V.; Starostin, A.S.; Osetrov, S.B.; Pomansky, A.A.; Smolnikov, A.A.; Vasiliev, S.I.

    1992-06-01

    Phase II detector fabrication for the International Germanium Experiment is awaiting resolution of technical details observed during Phase I. Measurements of fiducial volume, configuration of the tansistor-reset preamplifier stage, and sources of background are discussed. Cosmogenic 7 Be is measured in germanium. Radium contamination in electroformed copper reported. The 2ν double- beta decay half-life of 76 Ge measured with a Phase I detector is in reasonable agreement with previously reported values. No events are observed in the vicinity of the Oν double-beta decay energy

  6. High-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Yujin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a brief overview of the development of high-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging. A pinhole collimator has been used for high-resolution animal SPECT to provide better spatial resolution and detection efficiency in comparison with a parallel-hole collimator. The theory of imaging characteristics of the pinhole collimator is presented and the designs of the pinhole aperture are discussed. The detector technologies used for the development of small-animal SPECT and the recent advances are presented. The evolving trend of small-animal SPECT is toward a multi-pinhole and a multi-detector system to obtain a high resolution and also a high detection efficiency. (authors)

  7. High resolution crystal calorimetry at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneegans, M.; Ferrere, D.; Lebeau, M.; Vivargent, M.

    1991-01-01

    The search for Higgs bosons above Lep200 reach could be one of the main tasks of the future pp and ee colliders. In the intermediate mass region, and in particular in the range 80-140 GeV/c 2 , only the 2-photon decay mode of a Higgs produced inclusively or in association with a W, gives a good chance of observation. A 'dedicated' very high resolution calorimeter with photon angle reconstruction and pion identification capability should detect a Higgs signal with high probability. A crystal calorimeter can be considered as a conservative approach to such a detector, since a large design and operation experience already exists. The extensive R and D needed for finding a dense, fast and radiation hard crystal, is under way. Guide-lines for designing an optimum calorimeter for LHC are discussed and preliminary configurations are given. (author) 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  8. In-situ high-resolution gamma-spectrometric survey of burial ground-monitoring wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, W.W.

    1981-09-01

    In situ high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry with an intrinsic germanium detector assembly of special design surveyed the burial ground monitoring wells to locate and identify gamma emitters that may have migrated from the burial trenches toward the water table. Gamma-ray spectra were acquired as a function of depth in each well and recorded on magnetic tape. These spectra were reduced by a series of computer programs to produce count rate versus depth profiles for natural and man-made activities. The original spectra and the profiles have been archived on magnetic tape for comparison with similar future surveys. Large amounts of man-made activities were observed in some of the burial trenches; however, below the trench bottoms, only very low but detectable amounts of 60 Co and 137 Cs were observed in eleven wells. The highest level of man-made gamma activity observed below the trench bottoms has a count rate roughly equal to that observed for uranium daughter activities which are natural to the subsoil

  9. High resolution and high speed positron emission tomography data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgiss, S.G.; Byars, L.G.; Jones, W.F.; Casey, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    High resolution positron emission tomography (PET) requires many detectors. Thus, data collection systems for PET must have high data rates, wide data paths, and large memories to histogram the events. This design uses the VMEbus to cost effectively provide these features. It provides for several modes of operation including real time sorting, list mode data storage, and replay of stored list mode data

  10. Semiconductor crystal high resolution imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Craig S. (Inventor); Matteson, James (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A radiation imaging device (10). The radiation image device (10) comprises a subject radiation station (12) producing photon emissions (14), and at least one semiconductor crystal detector (16) arranged in an edge-on orientation with respect to the emitted photons (14) to directly receive the emitted photons (14) and produce a signal. The semiconductor crystal detector (16) comprises at least one anode and at least one cathode that produces the signal in response to the emitted photons (14).

  11. Characterization and first experimental application of space-resolving, energy-dispersive germanium detectors for the precision spectroscopy on heavy ions; Charakterisierung und erster experimenteller Einsatz von ortsaufloesenden, energiedispersiven Germanium-Detektoren zur Praezisionsspektroskopie an schweren Ionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spillmann, Uwe

    2009-02-15

    First the actual status of the research for the 1s Lamb shift on heaviest systems as well as studies on the polarization of the radiative recombination radiation into the K shell of uranium are presented. On this base future precision experiments at storage rings are discussed. then follows a survey presentation of the GSI accelerator facility. Especially the experimental storage ring ESR is described, at which the experiments mentioned above were performed. Then an introduction to the fundamental understanding of the physical processes in the detection of X-radiation in semiconductor detectors is given. The following chapter discusses the detection technique of the Compton polarimetry and some experimental concepts for this. Then by means of a 4 x 4 pixel Ge(i) detector system, by which for the first time the K-REC radiation from uranium was measured at the ESR, an overview about the Monte-Carlo software EGS4 is given, which was applied to the efficiency correction in the evaluation phase and for the estimation of the detector behaviour during the planning phase of the new detectors. A presentation of the 1D and 2D microstrip detector system as well as the performed laboratory measurements follows. The results for the characterization of the 2D microstrip detector system at the synchrotron-radiation source ESRF in view of its application with the FOCAL spectrometer are thereafter described. The results of first test measurement on the Compton polarimetry, which were also performed at the ESRF, are then presented. Finally first experimental results, which wer obtained by the novel planar structured Ge(i) detectors, are shown.

  12. Gamma radiation detectors for safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carchon, R.; Moeslinger, M.; Bourva, L.; Bass, C.; Zendel, M.

    2007-01-01

    The IAEA uses extensively a variety of gamma radiation detectors to verify nuclear material. These detectors are part of standardized spectrometry systems: germanium detectors for High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (HRGS); Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for Room Temperature Gamma Spectrometry (RTGS); and NaI(Tl) detectors for Low Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (LRGS). HRGS with high-purity Germanium (HpGe) detectors cooled by liquid nitrogen is widely used in nuclear safeguards to verify the isotopic composition of plutonium or uranium in non-irradiated material. Alternative cooling systems have been evaluated and electrically cooled HpGe detectors show a potential added value, especially for unattended measurements. The spectrometric performance of CZT detectors, their robustness and simplicity are key to the successful verification of irradiated materials. Further development, such as limiting the charge trapping effects in CZT to provide improved sensitivity and energy resolution are discussed. NaI(Tl) detectors have many applications-specifically in hand-held radioisotope identification devices (RID) which are used to detect the presence of radioactive material where a lower resolution is sufficient, as they benefit from a generally higher sensitivity. The Agency is also continuously involved in the review and evaluation of new and emerging technologies in the field of radiation detection such as: Peltier-cooled CdTe detectors; semiconductor detectors operating at room temperature such as HgI 2 and GaAs; and, scintillator detectors using glass fibres or LaBr 3 . A final conclusion, proposing recommendations for future action, is made

  13. MSM-Metal Semiconductor Metal Photo-detector Using Black Silicon Germanium (SiGe) for Extended Wavelength Near Infrared Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    its effect on the optical beam. Computer Tunable optical source Detectors Test MSM detector Lock-in- amplifier Multiplexer Transimpedance ... amplifier Three-way beam splitter L3 sample L1 Light source L4 L2 Reference Detector Reflectance Detector

  14. High-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Buckin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy (HR-US is an analytical technique for direct and non-destructive monitoring of molecular and micro-structural transformations in liquids and semi-solid materials. It is based on precision measurements of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation in analysed samples. The application areas of HR-US in research, product development, and quality and process control include analysis of conformational transitions of polymers, ligand binding, molecular self-assembly and aggregation, crystallisation, gelation, characterisation of phase transitions and phase diagrams, and monitoring of chemical and biochemical reactions. The technique does not require optical markers or optical transparency. The HR-US measurements can be performed in small sample volumes (down to droplet size, over broad temperature range, at ambient and elevated pressures, and in various measuring regimes such as automatic temperature ramps, titrations and measurements in flow.

  15. High Resolution Thermometry for EXACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, J. S.; Nash, A. E.; Larson, M.; Mulders, N.

    2000-01-01

    High Resolution Thermometers (HRTs) based on SQUID detection of the magnetization of a paramagnetic salt or a metal alloy has been commonly used for sub-nano Kelvin temperature resolution in low temperature physics experiments. The main applications to date have been for temperature ranges near the lambda point of He-4 (2.177 K). These thermometers made use of materials such as Cu(NH4)2Br4 *2H2O, GdCl3, or PdFe. None of these materials are suitable for EXACT, which will explore the region of the He-3/He-4 tricritical point at 0.87 K. The experiment requirements and properties of several candidate paramagnetic materials will be presented, as well as preliminary test results.

  16. GeMini: The Next Generation Mechanically-Cooled Germanium Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burks, M.

    2008-01-01

    The next-generation mechanically-cooled germanium spectrometer has been developed. GeMini (GErmanium MINIature spectrometer) has been designed to bring high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy to a range of demanding field environments. Intended applications include short-notice and surprise inspections where positive nuclide identification of radioactive materials is required. GeMini weighs 2.75 kg (6 lbs) total including the detector, cryostat, cryocooler, batteries, electronics and readout. It is very low power allowing it to operate for 10 hours on a single set of rechargeable batteries. This instrument employs technology adapted from the gamma-ray spectrometer currently flying on NASA's Mercury MESSENGER spacecraft. Specifically, infrared shielding techniques allow for a vast reduction of thermal load. This in turn allows for a smaller, lighter-weight design, well-suited for a hand-held instrument. Two working prototypes have been built and tested in the lab. The target energy resolution is 3 keV fwhm or better for 1332 keV gamma-rays. The detectors currently achieve around 4.5 keV resolution, which is slightly higher than our goal due to microphonic noise. Our present work focuses on improving the resolution through mechanical and electronic means of reducing the microphonic noise. This paper will focus on the performance of the instrument and its applicability for inspectors in the field

  17. Toward high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of microscopic liquid samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Mark C.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Chen, Ying; Reardon, Patrick N.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Khbeis, Michael; Irish, Duane; Mueller, Karl T.

    2017-01-01

    A longstanding limitation of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is the requirement for samples to have macroscopic dimensions. Commercial probes, for example, are designed for volumes of at least 5 mL, in spite of decades of work directed toward the goal of miniaturization. Progress in miniaturizing inductive detectors has been limited by a perceived need to meet two technical requirements: (1) minimal separation between the sample and the detector, which is essential for sensitivity, and (2) near-perfect magnetic-field homogeneity at the sample, which is typically needed for spectral resolution. The first of these requirements is real, but the second can be relaxed, as we demonstrate here. By using pulse sequences that yield high-resolution spectra in an inhomogeneous field, we eliminate the need for near-perfect field homogeneity and the accompanying requirement for susceptibility matching of microfabricated detector components. With this requirement removed, typical imperfections in microfabricated components can be tolerated, and detector dimensions can be matched to those of the sample, even for samples of volume << 5 uL. Pulse sequences that are robust to field inhomogeneity thus enable small-volume detection with optimal sensitivity. We illustrate the potential of this approach to miniaturization by presenting spectra acquired with a flat-wire detector that can easily be scaled to subnanoliter volumes. In particular, we report high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of an alanine sample of volume 500 pL.

  18. Germanium junction detectors. Theoretical and practical factors governing their use in radiation spectrometry; Detecteurs a jonction au germanium. Elements theoriques et pratiques pour l'utilisation en spectrometrie de rayonnements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hors, M; Philis, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    Semi-conductor detectors have recently greatly increased the possibilities available to nuclear spectroscopists for the study of {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} radiations. Their use in radio-chemistry has encouraged us to study their principle, their mechanism and also the conditions under which they can be used. The first part, which is theoretical, consists of a summary of what should be known concerning the best use of junction detectors, in particular Ge (Li) detectors. The second part, which is experimental, summarizes the laboratory work carried out over a period of one year on Ge (Li) detectors. Stress is laid on the possibilities presented by the use of these detectors as photo-electric spectrometers, and also on the precautions required. Amongst the numerous results presented, the resolution of 2.52 keV obtained for the {gamma} radiation of 145.5 keV for {sup 141}Ce may be particularly noted. (authors) [French] Les detecteurs a semi-conducteurs ont recemment accru les possibilites offertes aux spectroscopistes nucleaires pour l'etude des radiations {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}. Leurs utilisations en radiochimie nous ont incite a en etudier le principe, le mecanisme et d'autre part les conditions d'emploi. La premiere partie, theorique, rappelle l'essentiel de ce qu'il est utile de connaitre pour une utilisation optimale des detecteurs a jonctions et en particulier des detecteurs Ge (Li). La deuxieme partie, experimentale, resume les travaux realises au laboratoire pendant un an avec des detecteurs Ge (Li). Nous insistons sur les possibilites offertes et les precautions a prendre dans l'utilisation de ces detecteurs comme spectrometres photoelectriques. Parmi les nombreux resultats presentes, citons la resolution de 2,52 keV obtenue pour le rayonnement {gamma} de 145 f5 keV du {sup 141}Ce. (auteurs)

  19. High Resolution Powder Diffraction and Structure Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    It is clear that high-resolution synchrotrons X-ray powder diffraction is a very powerful and convenient tool for material characterization and structure determination. Most investigations to date have been carried out under ambient conditions and have focused on structure solution and refinement. The application of high-resolution techniques to increasingly complex structures will certainly represent an important part of future studies, and it has been seen how ab initio solution of structures with perhaps 100 atoms in the asymmetric unit is within the realms of possibility. However, the ease with which temperature-dependence measurements can be made combined with improvements in the technology of position-sensitive detectors will undoubtedly stimulate precise in situ structural studies of phase transitions and related phenomena. One challenge in this area will be to develop high-resolution techniques for ultra-high pressure investigations in diamond anvil cells. This will require highly focused beams and very precise collimation in front of the cell down to dimensions of 50 (micro)m or less. Anomalous scattering offers many interesting possibilities as well. As a means of enhancing scattering contrast it has applications not only to the determination of cation distribution in mixed systems such as the superconducting oxides discussed in Section 9.5.3, but also to the location of specific cations in partially occupied sites, such as the extra-framework positions in zeolites, for example. Another possible application is to provide phasing information for ab initio structure solution. Finally, the precise determination of f as a function of energy through an absorption edge can provide useful information about cation oxidation states, particularly in conjunction with XANES data. In contrast to many experiments at a synchrotron facility, powder diffraction is a relatively simple and user-friendly technique, and most of the procedures and software for data analysis

  20. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Alan G.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometry has been revolutionized by access to instruments of increasingly high mass-resolving power. For small molecules up to ˜400 Da (e.g., drugs, metabolites, and various natural organic mixtures ranging from foods to petroleum), it is possible to determine elemental compositions (CcHhNnOoSsPp…) of thousands of chemical components simultaneously from accurate mass measurements (the same can be done up to 1000 Da if additional information is included). At higher mass, it becomes possible to identify proteins (including posttranslational modifications) from proteolytic peptides, as well as lipids, glycoconjugates, and other biological components. At even higher mass (˜100,000 Da or higher), it is possible to characterize posttranslational modifications of intact proteins and to map the binding surfaces of large biomolecule complexes. Here we review the principles and techniques of the highest-resolution analytical mass spectrometers (time-of-flight and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass analyzers) and describe some representative high-resolution applications.

  1. High voltage/high resolution studies of metal and semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westmacott, K.H.; Dahmen, U.

    1989-11-01

    The application of high resolution transmission electron microscopy to the study of homo- or hetero-phase interface structures requires specimens that meet stringent criteria. In some systems the necessary geometric imaging conditions are established naturally, thus greatly simplifying the analysis. This is illustrated for a diamond-hexagonal/diamond-cubic interface in deformed silicon, a Σ99 tilt boundary in a pure aluminum bicrystal, and a germanium precipitate in an aluminum matrix. 13 refs., 5 figs

  2. A polychromator-type near-infrared spectrometer with a high-sensitivity and high-resolution photodiode array detector for pharmaceutical process monitoring on the millisecond time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Kodai; Genkawa, Takuma; Ishikawa, Daitaro; Komiyama, Makoto; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2013-02-01

    In the fine chemicals industry, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry, advanced sensing technologies have recently begun being incorporated into the process line in order to improve safety and quality in accordance with process analytical technology. For estimating the quality of powders without preparation during drug formulation, near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been considered the most promising sensing approach. In this study, we have developed a compact polychromator-type NIR spectrometer equipped with a photodiode (PD) array detector. This detector is consisting of 640 InGaAs-PD elements with 20-μm pitch. Some high-specification spectrometers, which use InGaAs-PD with 512 elements, have a wavelength resolution of about 1.56 nm when covering 900-1700 nm range. On the other hand, the newly developed detector, having the PD with one of the world's highest density, enables wavelength resolution of below 1.25 nm. Moreover, thanks to the combination with a highly integrated charge amplifier array circuit, measurement speed of the detector is higher by two orders than that of existing PD array detectors. The developed spectrometer is small (120 mm × 220 mm × 200 mm) and light (6 kg), and it contains various key devices including the high-density and high-sensitivity PD array detector, NIR technology, and spectroscopy technology for a spectroscopic analyzer that has the required detection mechanism and high sensitivity for powder measurement, as well as a high-speed measuring function for blenders. Moreover, we have evaluated the characteristics of the developed NIR spectrometer, and the measurement of powder samples confirmed that it has high functionality.

  3. A polychromator-type near-infrared spectrometer with a high-sensitivity and high-resolution photodiode array detector for pharmaceutical process monitoring on the millisecond time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Kodai; Genkawa, Takuma; Ishikawa, Daitaro; Komiyama, Makoto; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2013-02-01

    In the fine chemicals industry, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry, advanced sensing technologies have recently begun being incorporated into the process line in order to improve safety and quality in accordance with process analytical technology. For estimating the quality of powders without preparation during drug formulation, near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been considered the most promising sensing approach. In this study, we have developed a compact polychromator-type NIR spectrometer equipped with a photodiode (PD) array detector. This detector is consisting of 640 InGaAs-PD elements with 20-μm pitch. Some high-specification spectrometers, which use InGaAs-PD with 512 elements, have a wavelength resolution of about 1.56 nm when covering 900-1700 nm range. On the other hand, the newly developed detector, having the PD with one of the world's highest density, enables wavelength resolution of below 1.25 nm. Moreover, thanks to the combination with a highly integrated charge amplifier array circuit, measurement speed of the detector is higher by two orders than that of existing PD array detectors. The developed spectrometer is small (120 mm × 220 mm × 200 mm) and light (6 kg), and it contains various key devices including the high-density and high-sensitivity PD array detector, NIR technology, and spectroscopy technology for a spectroscopic analyzer that has the required detection mechanism and high sensitivity for powder measurement, as well as a high-speed measuring function for blenders. Moreover, we have evaluated the characteristics of the developed NIR spectrometer, and the measurement of powder samples confirmed that it has high functionality.

  4. Ring artifact correction for high-resolution micro CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Prell, Daniel; Kalender, Willi A

    2009-01-01

    In high-resolution micro CT using flat detectors (FD), imperfect or defect detector elements may cause concentric-ring artifacts due to their continuous over- or underestimation of attenuation values, which often disturb image quality. We here present a dedicated image-based ring artifact correction method for high-resolution micro CT, based on median filtering of the reconstructed image and working on a transformed version of the reconstructed images in polar coordinates. This post-processing method reduced ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and improved image quality for phantom and in in vivo scans. Noise and artifacts were reduced both in transversal and in multi-planar reformations along the longitudinal axis. (note)

  5. Towards high-resolution positron emission tomography for small volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, B.T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Some arguments are made regarding the medical usefulness of high spatial resolution in positron imaging, even if limited to small imaged volumes. Then the intrinsic limitations to spatial resolution in positron imaging are discussed. The project to build a small-volume, high resolution animal research prototype (SHARP) positron imaging system is described. The components of the system, particularly the detectors, are presented and brief mention is made of data acquisition and image reconstruction methods. Finally, some preliminary imaging results are presented; a pair of isolated point sources and 18 F in the bones of a rabbit. Although the detector system is not fully completed, these first results indicate that the goals of high sensitivity and high resolution (4 mm) have been realized. (Auth.)

  6. High resolution simultaneous measurements of airborne radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, T.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Komura, K.

    2006-01-01

    High resolution (2-3 hrs) simultaneous measurements of airborne radionuclides, 212 Pb, 210 Pb and 7 Be, have been performed by using extremely low background Ge detectors at Ogoya Underground Laboratory. We have measured above radionuclides at three monitoring points viz, 1) Low Level Radioactivity Laboratory (LLRL) Kanazawa University, 2) Shishiku Plateau (640 m MSL) located about 8 km from LLRL to investigate vertical difference of activity levels, and 3) Hegura Island (10 m MSL) located about 50 km from Noto Peninsula in the Sea of Japan to evaluate the influences of Asian continent or mainland of Japan on the variation to the activity levels. Variations of short-lived 212 Pb concentration showed noticeable time lags between at LLRL and at Shishiku Plateau. These time lags might be caused by change of height of a planetary boundary layer. On the contrary, variations of long-lived 210 Pb and 7 Be showed simultaneity at three locations because of homogeneity of these concentrations all over the area. (author)

  7. Silicon germanium mask for deep silicon etching

    KAUST Repository

    Serry, Mohamed

    2014-07-29

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium (SiGe) can offer excellent etch selectivity to silicon during cryogenic deep reactive ion etching in an SF.sub.6/O.sub.2 plasma. Etch selectivity of over 800:1 (Si:SiGe) may be achieved at etch temperatures from -80 degrees Celsius to -140 degrees Celsius. High aspect ratio structures with high resolution may be patterned into Si substrates using SiGe as a hard mask layer for construction of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and semiconductor devices.

  8. Silicon germanium mask for deep silicon etching

    KAUST Repository

    Serry, Mohamed; Rubin, Andrew; Refaat, Mohamed; Sedky, Sherif; Abdo, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium (SiGe) can offer excellent etch selectivity to silicon during cryogenic deep reactive ion etching in an SF.sub.6/O.sub.2 plasma. Etch selectivity of over 800:1 (Si:SiGe) may be achieved at etch temperatures from -80 degrees Celsius to -140 degrees Celsius. High aspect ratio structures with high resolution may be patterned into Si substrates using SiGe as a hard mask layer for construction of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and semiconductor devices.

  9. Bulk Crystal Growth, and High-Resolution X-ray Diffraction Results of LiZnAs Semiconductor Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Benjamin W.; Reichenberger, Michael A.; Sunder, Madhana; Ugorowski, Philip B.; Nelson, Kyle A.; Henson, Luke C.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2017-08-01

    LiZnAs is being explored as a candidate for solid-state neutron detectors. The compact form, solid-state device would have greater efficiency than present day gas-filled 3He and 10BF3 detectors. Devices fabricated from LiZnAs having either natural Li (nominally 7.5% 6Li) or enriched 6Li (usually 95% 6Li) as constituent atoms may provide a material for compact high efficiency neutron detectors. The 6Li( n, t)4He reaction yields a total Q-value of 4.78 MeV, an energy larger than that of the 10B reaction, which can easily be identified above background radiations. LiZnAs material was synthesized by preparing equimolar portions of Li, Zn, and As sealed under vacuum (10-6 Torr) in quartz ampoules lined with boron nitride and subsequently reacted in a compounding furnace (Montag et al. in J Cryst Growth 412:103, 2015). The raw synthesized LiZnAs was purified by a static vacuum sublimation in quartz (Montag et al. in J Cryst Growth 438:99, 2016). Bulk crystalline LiZnAs ingots were grown from the purified material with a high-temperature Bridgman-style growth process described here. One of the largest LiZnAs ingots harvested was 9.6 mm in diameter and 4.2 mm in length. Samples were harvested from the ingot and were characterized for crystallinity using a Bruker AXS Inc. D8 AXS Inc. D2 CRYSO, energy dispersive x-ray diffractometer, and a Bruker AXS Inc. D8 DISCOVER, high-resolution x-ray diffractometer equipped with molybdenum radiation, Gobel mirror, four bounce germanium monochromator and a scintillation detector. The primary beam divergence was determined to be 0.004°, using a single crystal Si standard. The x-ray based characterization revealed that the samples nucleated in the (110) direction and a high-resolution open detector rocking curve recorded on the (220) LiZnAs yielded a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.235°. Sectional pole figures using off-axis reflections of the (211) LiZnAs confirmed in-plane ordering, and also indicated the presence of multiple

  10. Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI) develops novel technologies for studying biological processes at unprecedented speed and resolution. Research...

  11. Development of a metallic magnetic calorimeter for high resolution spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linck, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis the development of a metallic magnetic calorimeter for high resolution detection of single x-ray quanta is described. The detector consists of an X-ray absorber and a paramagnetic temperature sensor. The raise in temperature of the paramagnetic sensor due to the absorption of a single X-ray is measured by the change in magnetization of the sensor using a low-noise SQUID magnetometer. The thermodynamic properties of the detector can be described by a theoretical model based on a mean field approximation. This allows for an optimization of the detector design with respect to signal size. The maximal archivable energy resolution is limited by thermodynamic energy fluctuations between absorber, heat bath and thermometer. An interesting field of application for a metallic magnetic calorimeter is X-ray astronomy and the investigation of X-ray emitting objects. Through high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy it is possible to obtain information about physical processes of even far distant objects. The magnetic calorimeter that was developed in this thesis has a metallic absorber with a quantum efficiency of 98% at 6 keV. The energy resolution of the magnetic calorimeter is EFWHM=2.7 eV at 5.9 keV. The deviation of the detector response from a linear behavior of the detector is only 0.8% at 5.9 keV. (orig.)

  12. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We propose to design and build the first imaging hard X-ray detector system that incorporates 3D stacking of closely packed detector readouts in finely-spaced imaging arrays with their required data processing and control electronics. In virtually all imaging astronomical detectors, detector readout is done with flex connectors or connections that are not vertical but rather horizontal , requiring loss of focal plane area. For high resolution pixel detectors needed for high speed event-based X-ray imaging, from low energy applications (CMOS) with focusing X-ray telescopes, to hard X-ray applications with pixelated CZT for large area coded aperture telescopes, this new detector development offers great promise. We propose to extend our previous and current APRA supported ProtoEXIST program that has developed the first large area imaging CZT detectors and demonstrated their astrophysical capabilities on two successful balloon flight to a next generation High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI), which would incorporate microvia technology for the first time to connect the readout ASIC on each CZT crystal directly to its control and data processing system. This 3-dimensional stacking of detector and readout/control system means that large area (>2m2) imaging detector planes for a High Resolution Wide-field hard X-ray telescope can be built with initially greatly reduced detector gaps and ultimately with no gaps. This increases detector area, efficiency, and simplicity of detector integration. Thus higher sensitivity wide-field imagers will be possible at lower cost. HREXI will enable a post-Swift NASA mission such as the EREXS concept proposed to PCOS to be conducted as a future MIDEX mission. This mission would conduct a high resolution (<2 arcmin) , broad band (5 200 keV) hard X-ray survey of black holes on all scales with ~10X higher sensitivity than Swift. In the current era of Time Domain Astrophysics, such a survey capability, in conjunction with a n

  13. The germination of germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Shawn C.; Thornton, Brett F.

    2018-02-01

    Shawn C. Burdette and Brett F. Thornton explore how germanium developed from a missing element in Mendeleev's periodic table to an enabler for the information age, while retaining a nomenclature oddity.

  14. Development of AMS high resolution injector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Yiwen; Guan Xialing; Hu Yueming

    2008-01-01

    The Beijing HI-13 tandem accelerator AMS high resolution injector system was developed. The high resolution energy achromatic system consists of an electrostatic analyzer and a magnetic analyzer, which mass resolution can reach 600 and transmission is better than 80%. (authors)

  15. Radiation detectors: needs and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armantrout, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Important applications for x- and γ-ray spectroscopy are found in prospecting, materials characterization, environmental monitoring, the life sciences, and nuclear physics. The specific requirements vary for each application with varying degrees of emphasis on either spectrometer resolution, detection efficiency, or both. Since no one spectrometer is ideally suited to this wide range of needs, compromises are usually required. Gas and scintillation spectrometers have reached a level of maturity, and recent interest has concentrated on semiconductor spectrometers. Germanium detectors are showing continuing refinement and are the spectrometers of choice for high resolution applications. The new high-Z semiconductors, such as CdTe and HgI 2 , have shown steady improvement but are limited in both resolution and size and will likely be used only in applications which require their unique properties

  16. Characterization and first experimental application of space-resolving, energy-dispersive germanium detectors for the precision spectroscopy on heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spillmann, Uwe

    2009-02-01

    First the actual status of the research for the 1s Lamb shift on heaviest systems as well as studies on the polarization of the radiative recombination radiation into the K shell of uranium are presented. On this base future precision experiments at storage rings are discussed. then follows a survey presentation of the GSI accelerator facility. Especially the experimental storage ring ESR is described, at which the experiments mentioned above were performed. Then an introduction to the fundamental understanding of the physical processes in the detection of X-radiation in semiconductor detectors is given. The following chapter discusses the detection technique of the Compton polarimetry and some experimental concepts for this. Then by means of a 4 x 4 pixel Ge(i) detector system, by which for the first time the K-REC radiation from uranium was measured at the ESR, an overview about the Monte-Carlo software EGS4 is given, which was applied to the efficiency correction in the evaluation phase and for the estimation of the detector behaviour during the planning phase of the new detectors. A presentation of the 1D and 2D microstrip detector system as well as the performed laboratory measurements follows. The results for the characterization of the 2D microstrip detector system at the synchrotron-radiation source ESRF in view of its application with the FOCAL spectrometer are thereafter described. The results of first test measurement on the Compton polarimetry, which were also performed at the ESRF, are then presented. Finally first experimental results, which wer obtained by the novel planar structured Ge(i) detectors, are shown

  17. Preliminary Determination of Natural Radioactivity Levels of the State of Qatar using High-Resolution Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sulaiti, H.A.; Regan, P.H.; Bradley, D.A.; Matthews, M.; Santawamaitre, T.; Malain, D.

    2009-01-01

    The State of Qatar is a peninsula with a total area of 11,437 km 2 which lies over a geological formation comprising a sequence of limestone, chalk, clay and gypsum. Establishing a baseline for the radioactivity concentration in Qatar's soil is the main purpose behind the present study. The project is focused on obtaining measurements of representative soil samples from various areas in Qatar to establish concentrations of the 235 U, 238 U and 232 Th natural decay chains and also the long-lived naturally occurring radionuclide 40 K. The 235 U, 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K concentrations have been measured via high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry using a hyper-pure germanium detector situated in a low-background environment with a copper inner-plated passive lead shield. A wide range of different gamma-ray energy transitions lines arising from the multiple decay products from the 235 U, 238 U and 232 Th decay chains have been analyzed separately to obtain more statistically significant overall results

  18. Precipitation of lithium in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaik, M.; Furgolle, B.

    1969-01-01

    The precipitation of Lithium in Germanium was studied. Taking account of the interactions Ga LI, LiO, we calculated the oxygen content in germanium samples from the resistivity measurements. (authors)

  19. High resolution sequence stratigraphy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shangfeng; Zhang Changmin; Yin Yanshi; Yin Taiju

    2008-01-01

    Since high resolution sequence stratigraphy was introduced into China by DENG Hong-wen in 1995, it has been experienced two development stages in China which are the beginning stage of theory research and development of theory research and application, and the stage of theoretical maturity and widely application that is going into. It is proved by practices that high resolution sequence stratigraphy plays more and more important roles in the exploration and development of oil and gas in Chinese continental oil-bearing basin and the research field spreads to the exploration of coal mine, uranium mine and other strata deposits. However, the theory of high resolution sequence stratigraphy still has some shortages, it should be improved in many aspects. The authors point out that high resolution sequence stratigraphy should be characterized quantitatively and modelized by computer techniques. (authors)

  20. High resolution CT of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barneveld Binkhuysen, F H [Eemland Hospital (Netherlands), Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    Compared to conventional CT high resolution CT (HRCT) shows several extra anatomical structures which might effect both diagnosis and therapy. The extra anatomical structures were discussed briefly in this article. (18 refs.).

  1. Precision Lifetime Measurements Using LaBr3 Detectors With Stable and Radioactive Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regan P.H.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A range of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements have been carried out using arrays which include a number of Cerium-doped Lanthanum-Tribromide (LrBr3(Ce scintillation detectors used in conjunction with high-resolution hyper-pure germanium detectors. Examples of the spectral and temporal responses of such set-ups, using both standard point radioactive sources 152Eu and 56Co, and in-beam fusionevaporation reaction experiments for precision measurements of nuclear excited states in 34P and 138Ce are presented. The current and future use of such arrays at existing (EURICA at RIKEN and future (NUSTAR at FAIR secondary radioactive beam facilities for precision measurements of excited nuclear state lifetimes in the 10 ps to 10 ns regime are also discussed.

  2. Structure of high-resolution NMR spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Corio, PL

    2012-01-01

    Structure of High-Resolution NMR Spectra provides the principles, theories, and mathematical and physical concepts of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.The book presents the elementary theory of magnetic resonance; the quantum mechanical theory of angular momentum; the general theory of steady state spectra; and multiple quantum transitions, double resonance and spin echo experiments.Physicists, chemists, and researchers will find the book a valuable reference text.

  3. Mesostructured metal germanium sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLachlan, M.J.; Coombs, N.; Bedard, R.L.; White, S.; Thompson, L.K.; Ozin, G.A.

    1999-12-29

    A new class of mesostructured metal germanium sulfide materials has been prepared and characterized. The synthesis, via supramolecular assembly of well-defined germanium sulfide anionic cluster precursors and transition-metal cations in formamide, represents a new strategy for the formation of this class of solids. A variety of techniques were employed to examine the structure and composition of the materials. Structurally, the material is best described as a periodic mesostructured metal sulfide-based coordination framework akin to periodic hexagonal mesoporous silica, MCM-41. At the molecular scale, the materials strongly resemble microstructured metal germanium sulfides, in which the structure of the [Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10}]{sup 4{minus}} cluster building-blocks are intact and linked via {mu}-S-M-S bonds. Evidence for a metal-metal bond in mesostructured Cu/Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10} is also provided.

  4. Characterisation of two AGATA asymmetric high purity germanium capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colosimo, S.J.; Moon, S.; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Harkness-Brennan, L.; Judson, D.S.; Lazarus, I.H.; Nolan, P.J.; Simpson, J.; Unsworth, C.

    2015-01-01

    The AGATA spectrometer is an array of highly segmented high purity germanium detectors. The spectrometer uses pulse shape analysis in order to track Compton scattered γ-rays to increase the efficiency of nuclear spectroscopy studies. The characterisation of two high purity germanium detector capsules for AGATA of the same A-type has been performed at the University of Liverpool. This work will examine the uniformity of performance of the two capsules, including a comparison of the resolution and efficiency as well as a study of charge collection. The performance of the capsules shows good agreement, which is essential for the efficient operation of the γ-ray tracking array

  5. Characterisation of two AGATA asymmetric high purity germanium capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colosimo, S.J., E-mail: sjc@ns.ph.liv.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Moon, S.; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Harkness-Brennan, L.; Judson, D.S. [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.H. [STFC Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Nolan, P.J. [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Unsworth, C. [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-11

    The AGATA spectrometer is an array of highly segmented high purity germanium detectors. The spectrometer uses pulse shape analysis in order to track Compton scattered γ-rays to increase the efficiency of nuclear spectroscopy studies. The characterisation of two high purity germanium detector capsules for AGATA of the same A-type has been performed at the University of Liverpool. This work will examine the uniformity of performance of the two capsules, including a comparison of the resolution and efficiency as well as a study of charge collection. The performance of the capsules shows good agreement, which is essential for the efficient operation of the γ-ray tracking array.

  6. Performance characteristics of high resolution semiconductor gamma ray spectrometry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko Ko Naing

    1994-05-01

    A high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray detector has been used in Nuclear Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yangon University for over fourteen years. Now it is still being used and it is coupled to new peripheral devices, such as spectroscopy amplifier, analog to digital converter and computer fit-in S-100 multichannel analyser. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the important parameters: energy resolution, detecting efficiency and relative efficiency of the system. In the present work, these parameters were obtained by using mixed calibrated source. The results were compared to the data given by the manufacturer. Moreover, the parameters of another γ-ray detecting system NaI(T1) were also determined. In conclusion the results obtained from the above two measurements were compared and discussed

  7. Performance characteristics of high resolution semiconductor gamma ray spectrometry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naing, Ko Ko

    1994-05-01

    A high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray detector has been used in Nuclear Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yangon University for over fourteen years. Now it is still being used and it is coupled to new peripheral devices, such as spectroscopy amplifier, analog to digital converter and computer fit-in S-100 multichannel analyser. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the important parameters: energy resolution, detecting efficiency and relative efficiency of the system. In the present work, these parameters were obtained by using mixed calibrated source. The results were compared to the data given by the manufacturer. Moreover, the parameters of another {gamma}-ray detecting system NaI(T1) were also determined. In conclusion the results obtained from the above two measurements were compared and discussed

  8. High-resolution neutron-diffraction measurements to 8 kbar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, C. L.; Fortes, A. D.; Ridley, C. J.; Wood, I. G.; Dobson, D. P.; Funnell, N. P.; Gibbs, A. S.; Goodway, C. M.; Sadykov, R.; Knight, K. S.

    2017-10-01

    We describe the capability to measure high-resolution neutron powder diffraction data to a pressure of at least 8 kbar. We have used the HRPD instrument at the ISIS neutron source and a piston-cylinder design of pressure cell machined from a null-scattering titanium zirconium alloy. Data were collected under hydrostatic conditions from an elpasolite perovskite La?NiMnO?; by virtue of a thinner cell wall on the incident-beam side of the cell, it was possible to obtain data in the instrument's highest resolution back-scattering detector banks up to a maximum pressure of 8.5 kbar.

  9. Determination of soil, sand and ore primordial radionuclide concentrations by full-spectrum analyses of high-purity germanium detector spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.T.; Lindsay, R.; Maphoto, K.P.; Mlwilo, N.A.; Mohanty, A.K.; Roux, D.G.; Meijer, R.J. de; Hlatshwayo, I.N.

    2008-01-01

    The full-spectrum analysis (FSA) method was used to determine primordial activity concentrations (ACs) in soil, sand and ore samples, in conjunction with a HPGe detector. FSA involves the least-squares fitting of sample spectra by linear combinations of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K standard spectra. The differences between the FSA results and those from traditional windows analyses (using regions-of-interest around selected photopeaks) are less than 10% for all samples except zircon ore, where FSA yielded an unphysical 40 K AC

  10. Ultralow background germanium gamma-ray spectrometer using superclean materials and cosmic-ray anticoincidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, J.H.; Hensley, W.K.; Brodzinski, R.L.; Ryge, P.

    1983-10-01

    Efforts to measure the double beta decay of 76 Ge as predicted by Grand Unified Theories have resulted in the development of a high resolution germanium diode gamma-ray spectrometer with an exceptionally low background. This paper describes the development of this system and how these techniques can be utilized to significantly reduce the background in high resolution photon spectrometers at only a moderate cost

  11. modern utilization of accurate methods for gamma-ray spectral analysis detected by high pure germanium (HPGE) detectors through different applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    this thesis presents a novel way for application of wavelet transform theory in gamma-ray spectroscopy . this technique was applied for searching real and weak peaks, solving problem of multiplets, smoothing and de-noising gamma-ray spectra, and using artificial neural network for identifying peaks. a brief description about gamma-ray spectrum analysis is presented. we discussed the necessary formulas and algorithms of wavelet theory to solve these main problems in gamma -ray spectrum analysis. the algorithm of peak search was applied on different types of spectra, IAEA spectra and other sources of gamma spectra. the algorithm of multiplets algorithm was applied successfully on different types of multiplets. the algorithm of de noising was applied successfully on different sources of spectra.finally, a database for neutron activation laboratory is created. this data base consists of five routines, wavelet gamma spectrum analysis, peak identification, elemental concentration , neutron flux determination,and detector efficiency calculation

  12. Performance of an AGATA asymmetric detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, A.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ajboston@liv.ac.uk; Dimmock, M.R.; Unsworth, C.; Boston, H.C.; Cooper, R.J.; Grint, A.N.; Harkness, L.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.H. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Jones, M.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Slee, M. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-01

    High-resolution gamma-ray detectors based on high-purity germanium crystals (HPGe) are one of the key workhorses of experimental nuclear science. The technical development of such detector technology has been dramatic in recent years. Large volume, high-granularity, electrically segmented HPGe detectors have been realised and a methodology to improve position sensitivity using pulse-shape analysis coupled with the novel technique of gamma-ray tracking has been developed. Collaborations have been established in Europe (Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA)) [J. Simpson, Acta Phys. Pol. B 36 (2005) 1383] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA) [C.W. Beausang, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 204 (2003)] to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the first AGATA asymmetric detector that has been tested at the University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well-defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector.

  13. Application of the Oslo method to high resolution gamma spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Beausang, C. W.; Humby, P.

    2015-10-01

    Hauser-Feshbach statistical model is a widely used tool for calculation of the reaction cross section, in particular for astrophysical processes. The HF model requires as an input an optical potential, gamma-strength function (GSF) and level density (LD) to properly model the statistical properties of the nucleus. The Oslo method is a well established technique to extract GSFs and LDs from experimental data, typically used for gamma-spectra obtained with scintillation detectors. Here, the first application of the Oslo method to high-resolution data obtained using the Ge detectors of the STARLITER setup at TAMU is discussed. The GSFs and LDs extracted from (p,d) and (p,t) reactions on 152154 ,Sm targets will be presented.

  14. Feasibility tests of a high resolution sampling radial drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huth, J.

    1985-01-01

    The design concept and results of feasibility tests for a vertex detector intended for use in the TPC-PEP4/9 experiment are presented. The detector is based on a slow radial drift in dimethyl ether. High resolution localization of the avalanches at the sense wire is accomplished with nearby pickup wires and the utilization of waveform sampling electronics. The avalanche angular coordinate measurements, combined with knowledge of the electric field distribution and drift velocity permit reconstruction of the trajectory using essentially all track information. Measurements with a test chamber constructed to study characteristics of avalanche localization indicate that the recoverable track information in one centimeter of dimethyl ether at 1.5 atm is equivalent to 30 measurements of 40 μm accuracy. (orig.)

  15. Germanium and indium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Kimball, Bryn E.; Tolcin, Amy C.; Guberman, David E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Germanium and indium are two important elements used in electronics devices, flat-panel display screens, light-emitting diodes, night vision devices, optical fiber, optical lens systems, and solar power arrays. Germanium and indium are treated together in this chapter because they have similar technological uses and because both are recovered as byproducts, mainly from copper and zinc sulfides.The world’s total production of germanium in 2011 was estimated to be 118 metric tons. This total comprised germanium recovered from zinc concentrates, from fly ash residues from coal burning, and from recycled material. Worldwide, primary germanium was recovered in Canada from zinc concentrates shipped from the United States; in China from zinc residues and coal from multiple sources in China and elsewhere; in Finland from zinc concentrates from the Democratic Republic of the Congo; and in Russia from coal.World production of indium metal was estimated to be about 723 metric tons in 2011; more than one-half of the total was produced in China. Other leading producers included Belgium, Canada, Japan, and the Republic of Korea. These five countries accounted for nearly 95 percent of primary indium production.Deposit types that contain significant amounts of germanium include volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits, sedimentary exhalative (SEDEX) deposits, Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) lead-zinc deposits (including Irish-type zinc-lead deposits), Kipushi-type zinc-lead-copper replacement bodies in carbonate rocks, and coal deposits.More than one-half of the byproduct indium in the world is produced in southern China from VMS and SEDEX deposits, and much of the remainder is produced from zinc concentrates from MVT deposits. The Laochang deposit in Yunnan Province, China, and the VMS deposits of the Murchison greenstone belt in Limpopo Province, South Africa, provide excellent examples of indium-enriched deposits. The SEDEX deposits at Bainiuchang, China (located in

  16. The development of high resolution silicon x-ray microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, F. S.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.

    2005-12-01

    Recently we have produced x-ray microcalorimeters with resolving powers approaching 2000 at 5.9 keV using a spare XRS microcalorimeter array. We attached 400 um square, 8 um thick HgTe absorbers using a variety of attachment methods to an XRS array and ran the detector array at temperatures between 40 and 60 mK. The best results were for absorbers attached using the standard XRS absorber-pixel thermal isolation scheme utilizing SU8 polymer tubes. In this scenario we achieved a resolution of 3.2 eV FWHM at 5.9 keV. Substituting a silicon spacer for the SU8 tubes also yielded sub-4eV results. In contrast, absorbers attached directly to the thermistor produced significant position dependence and thus degraded resolution. Finally, we tested standard 640um-square XRS detectors at reduced bias power at 50mK and achieved a resolution of 3.7eV, a 50% improvement over the XRS flight instrument. Implanted silicon microcalorimeters are a mature flight-qualified technology that still has a substantial phase space for future development. We will discuss these new high resolution results, the various absorber attachment schemes, planned future improvements, and, finally, their relevance to future high resolution x-ray spectrometers including Constellation-X.

  17. High resolution Neutron and Synchrotron Powder Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewat, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    The use of high-resolution powder diffraction has grown rapidly in the past years, with the development of Rietveld (1967) methods of data analysis and new high-resolution diffractometers and multidetectors. The number of publications in this area has increased from a handful per year until 1973 to 150 per year in 1984, with a ten-year total of over 1000. These papers cover a wide area of solid state-chemistry, physics and materials science, and have been grouped under 20 subject headings, ranging from catalysts to zeolites, and from battery electrode materials to pre-stressed superconducting wires. In 1985 two new high-resolution diffractometers are being commissioned, one at the SNS laboratory near Oxford, and one at the ILL in Grenoble. In different ways these machines represent perhaps the ultimate that can be achieved with neutrons and will permit refinement of complex structures with about 250 parameters and unit cell volumes of about 2500 Angstrom/sp3/. The new European Synchotron Facility will complement the Grenoble neutron diffractometers, and extend the role of high-resolution powder diffraction to the direct solution of crystal structures, pioneered in Sweden

  18. High resolution CT in diffuse lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    High resolution CT (computerized tomography) was discussed in detail. The conclusions were HRCT is able to define lung anatomy at the secondary lobular level and define a variety of abnormalities in patients with diffuse lung diseases. Evidence from numerous studies indicates that HRCT can play a major role in the assessment of diffuse infiltrative lung disease and is indicate clinically (95 refs.)

  19. Classification of high resolution satellite images

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Anders

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis the Support Vector Machine (SVM)is applied on classification of high resolution satellite images. Sveral different measures for classification, including texture mesasures, 1st order statistics, and simple contextual information were evaluated. Additionnally, the image was segmented, using an enhanced watershed method, in order to improve the classification accuracy.

  20. High resolution CT in diffuse lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, W R [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    High resolution CT (computerized tomography) was discussed in detail. The conclusions were HRCT is able to define lung anatomy at the secondary lobular level and define a variety of abnormalities in patients with diffuse lung diseases. Evidence from numerous studies indicates that HRCT can play a major role in the assessment of diffuse infiltrative lung disease and is indicate clinically (95 refs.).

  1. High-resolution clean-sc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsma, P.; Snellen, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a high-resolution extension of CLEAN-SC is proposed: HR-CLEAN-SC. Where CLEAN-SC uses peak sources in “dirty maps” to define so-called source components, HR-CLEAN-SC takes advantage of the fact that source components can likewise be derived from points at some distance from the peak,

  2. A High-Resolution Stopwatch for Cents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingl, Z.; Kopasz, K.

    2011-01-01

    A very low-cost, easy-to-make stopwatch is presented to support various experiments in mechanics. The high-resolution stopwatch is based on two photodetectors connected directly to the microphone input of a sound card. Dedicated free open-source software has been developed and made available to download. The efficiency is demonstrated by a free…

  3. Planning for shallow high resolution seismic surveys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fourie, CJS

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available of the input wave. This information can be used in conjunction with this spreadsheet to aid the geophysicist in designing shallow high resolution seismic surveys to achieve maximum resolution and penetration. This Excel spreadsheet is available free from...

  4. Attenuated total internal reflection infrared microspectroscopic imaging using a large-radius germanium internal reflection element and a linear array detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brian M; Havrilla, George J

    2006-11-01

    The number of techniques and instruments available for Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopic imaging has grown significantly over the past few years. Attenuated total internal reflectance (ATR) FT-IR microspectroscopy reduces sample preparation time and has simplified the analysis of many difficult samples. FT-IR imaging has become a powerful analytical tool using either a focal plane array or a linear array detector, especially when coupled with a chemometric analysis package. The field of view of the ATR-IR microspectroscopic imaging area can be greatly increased from 300 x 300 microm to 2500 x 2500 microm using a larger internal reflection element of 12.5 mm radius instead of the typical 1.5 mm radius. This gives an area increase of 70x before aberrant effects become too great. Parameters evaluated include the change in penetration depth as a function of beam displacement, measurements of the active area, magnification factor, and change in spatial resolution over the imaging area. Drawbacks such as large file size will also be discussed. This technique has been successfully applied to the FT-IR imaging of polydimethylsiloxane foam cross-sections, latent human fingerprints, and a model inorganic mixture, which demonstrates the usefulness of the method for pharmaceuticals.

  5. Electrically Cooled Germanium System for Measurements of Uranium Enrichments in UF6 Cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvornyak, P.; Koestlbauer, M.; Lebrun, A.; Murray, M.; Nizhnik, V.; Saidler, C.; Twomey, T.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of Uranium enrichment in UF6 cylinders is a significant part of the IAEA Safeguards verification activities at enrichment and conversion plants. Nowadays, one of the main tools for verification of Uranium enrichment in UF6 cylinders used by Safeguards inspectors is the gamma spectroscopy system with HPGe detector cooled with liquid nitrogen. Electrically Cooled Germanium System (ECGS) is a new compact and portable high resolution gamma spectrometric system free from liquid nitrogen cooling, which can be used for the same safeguards applications. It consists of the ORTEC Micro-trans-SPEC HPGe Portable Spectrometer, a special tungsten collimator and UF6 enrichment measurement software. The enrichment of uranium is determined by of quantifying the area of the 185.7 keV peak provided that the measurement is performed with a detector viewing an infinite thickness of material. Prior starting the verification of uranium enrichment at the facility, the ECGS has to be calibrated with a sample of known uranium enrichment, material matrix, container wall thickness and container material. Evaluation of the ECGS capabilities was performed by carrying out a field test on actual enrichment verification of uranium in UF6 cylinder or other forms of uranium under infinite thickness conditions. The results of these evaluations allow to say that the use of ECGS will enhance practicality of the enrichment measurements and support unannounced inspection activities at enrichment and conversion plants. (author)

  6. Large microcalorimeter arrays for high-resolution X- and gamma-rayspectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, A.S., E-mail: ahoover@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hoteling, N.; Rabin, M.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ullom, J.N.; Bennett, D.A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Karpius, P.J.; Vo, D.T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Doriese, W.B.; Hilton, G.C.; Horansky, R.D.; Irwin, K.D.; Kotsubo, V. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Lee, D.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Vale, L.R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Microcalorimeter detectors provide unprecedented energy resolution for the measurement of X-rays and soft gamma-rays. Energy resolution in the 100 keV region can be up to an order of magnitude better than planar high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The technology is well-suited to analysis of materials with complex spectra presenting closely spaced photopeaks. One application area is the measurement and assay of nuclear materials for safeguards and fuel cycle applications. In this paper, we discuss the operation and performance of a 256-pixel array, and present results of a head-to-head comparison of isotopic determination measurements with high-purity germanium using a plutonium standard. We show that the uncertainty of a single measurement is smaller for the microcalorimeter data compared to the HPGe data when photopeak areas are equal. We identify several key areas where analysis codes can be optimized that will likely lead to improvement in the microcalorimeter performance.

  7. Improvement of sensitivity in high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, H.; Nakajima, K.; Suzuki, M.; Kimura, K.; Sasakawa, K.

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity (limit of detection) of high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS) is mainly determined by the background noise of the spectrometer. There are two major origins of the background noise in HRBS, one is the stray ions scattered from the inner wall of the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer and the other is the dark noise of the microchannel plate (MCP) detector which is commonly used as a focal plane detector of the spectrometer in HRBS. In order to reject the stray ions, several barriers are installed inside the spectrometer and a thin Mylar foil is mounted in front of the detector. The dark noise of the MCP detector is rejected by the coincidence measurement with the secondary electrons emitted from the Mylar foil upon the ion passage. After these improvements, the background noise is reduced by a factor of 200 at a maximum. The detection limit can be improved down to 10 ppm for As in Si at a measurement time of 1 h under ideal conditions.

  8. New method of measurement IN VIVO Combination internal whole body with high-resolution germanium detectors. Rapid response in cross-contamination v; Nuevo metodo de medida in vivo de la combinacion interna en cuerpo entero con detectores de germanio de alta resolucion. respuesta rapida en contaminaciones cruzadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro Amaro, J. F.; Perez Lopez, B.; Lopez Ponte, M. A.; Navarro Bravo, T.

    2013-07-01

    This test method is a substantial improvement on the current capacities of the Personal Internal Dosimetry Service CIEMAT, as it will in a very short time make accurate measurements in vivo, excellent resolution and low background radiation environment in geometry whole body. The method will complement the existing laboratory [3] and may be used in emergencies or radiological accident in which the complexity of measuring spectra (cross contamination, multipicos interference) require a higher spectral resolution. (Author)

  9. Smartphone microendoscopy for high resolution fluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangqian Hong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available High resolution optical endoscopes are increasingly used in diagnosis of various medical conditions of internal organs, such as the cervix and gastrointestinal (GI tracts, but they are too expensive for use in resource-poor settings. On the other hand, smartphones with high resolution cameras and Internet access have become more affordable, enabling them to diffuse into most rural areas and developing countries in the past decade. In this paper, we describe a smartphone microendoscope that can take fluorescence images with a spatial resolution of 3.1 μm. Images collected from ex vivo, in vitro and in vivo samples using the device are also presented. The compact and cost-effective smartphone microendoscope may be envisaged as a powerful tool for detecting pre-cancerous lesions of internal organs in low and middle-income countries (LMICs.

  10. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    2012-01-01

    High Resolution NMR: Theory and Chemical Applications discusses the principles and theory of nuclear magnetic resonance and how this concept is used in the chemical sciences. This book is written at an intermediate level, with mathematics used to augment verbal descriptions of the phenomena. This text pays attention to developing and interrelating four approaches - the steady state energy levels, the rotating vector picture, the density matrix, and the product operator formalism. The style of this book is based on the assumption that the reader has an acquaintance with the general principles of quantum mechanics, but no extensive background in quantum theory or proficiency in mathematics is required. This book begins with a description of the basic physics, together with a brief account of the historical development of the field. It looks at the study of NMR in liquids, including high resolution NMR in the solid state and the principles of NMR imaging and localized spectroscopy. This book is intended to assis...

  11. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    1999-01-01

    High Resolution NMR provides a broad treatment of the principles and theory of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as it is used in the chemical sciences. It is written at an "intermediate" level, with mathematics used to augment, rather than replace, clear verbal descriptions of the phenomena. The book is intended to allow a graduate student, advanced undergraduate, or researcher to understand NMR at a fundamental level, and to see illustrations of the applications of NMR to the determination of the structure of small organic molecules and macromolecules, including proteins. Emphasis is on the study of NMR in liquids, but the treatment also includes high resolution NMR in the solid state and the principles of NMR imaging and localized spectroscopy. Careful attention is given to developing and interrelating four approaches - steady state energy levels, the rotating vector picture, the density matrix, and the product operator formalism. The presentation is based on the assumption that the reader has an acquaintan...

  12. Metallic magnetic calorimeters for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, M.; Hengstler, D.; Geist, J.; Schoetz, C.; Hassel, K.; Hendricks, S.; Keller, M.; Kempf, S.; Gastaldo, L.; Fleischmann, A.; Enss, C. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). KIP

    2015-07-01

    We develop microfabricated, energy dispersive particle detector arrays based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy to challenge bound-state QED calculations. Our MMCs are operated at about T=30 mK and use a paramagnetic temperature sensor, read-out by a SQUID, to measure the energy deposited by single X-ray photons. We discuss the physics of MMCs, the detector performance and the cryogenic setups for two different detector arrays. We present their microfabrication layouts with focus on challenges like the heatsinking of each pixel of the detector and the overhanging absorbers. The maXs-20 detector is a linear 1x8-pixel array with excellent linearity in its designated energy range up to 20 keV and unsurpassed energy resolution of 1.6 eV for 6 keV x-rays. MaXs-20 operated in a highly portable pulse tube cooled ADR setup has already been used at the EBIT facilities of the MPI-K for new reference measurements of V-like and Ti-like tungsten. The maXs-30 detector currently in development is a 8x8-pixel 2d-array with an active detection area of 16 mm{sup 2} and is designed to detect X-rays up to 50 keV with a designated energy resolution below 5 eV. MaXs-30 will be operated in a cryogen free 3He/4He-dilution refrigerator at the tip of a 40 cm long cold finger at T=20 mK.

  13. High resolution imaging of boron carbide microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, I.D.R.; Aselage, T.; Van Deusen, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    Two samples of boron carbide have been examined using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A hot-pressed B 13 C 2 sample shows a high density of variable width twins normal to (10*1). Subtle shifts or offsets of lattice fringes along the twin plane and normal to approx.(10*5) were also observed. A B 4 C powder showed little evidence of stacking disorder in crystalline regions

  14. High-Resolution MRI in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieguez, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution MRI is the best method of assessing the relation of the rectal tumor with the potential circumferential resection margin (CRM). Therefore it is currently considered the method of choice for local staging of rectal cancer. The primary surgery of rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision (TME), which plane of dissection is formed by the mesorectal fascia surrounding mesorectal fat and rectum. This fascia will determine the circumferential margin of resection. At the same time, high resolution MRI allows adequate pre-operative identification of important prognostic risk factors, improving the selection and indication of therapy for each patient. This information includes, besides the circumferential margin of resection, tumor and lymph node staging, extramural vascular invasion and the description of lower rectal tumors. All these should be described in detail in the report, being part of the discussion in the multidisciplinary team, the place where the decisions involving the patient with rectal cancer will take place. The aim of this study is to provide the information necessary to understand the use of high resolution MRI in the identification of prognostic risk factors in rectal cancer. The technical requirements and standardized report for this study will be describe, as well as the anatomical landmarks of importance for the total mesorectal excision (TME), as we have said is the surgery of choice for rectal cancer. (authors) [es

  15. Ultra-high resolution protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Kazuki; Hirano, Yu; Miki, Kunio

    2010-01-01

    Many protein structures have been determined by X-ray crystallography and deposited with the Protein Data Bank. However, these structures at usual resolution (1.5< d<3.0 A) are insufficient in their precision and quantity for elucidating the molecular mechanism of protein functions directly from structural information. Several studies at ultra-high resolution (d<0.8 A) have been performed with synchrotron radiation in the last decade. The highest resolution of the protein crystals was achieved at 0.54 A resolution for a small protein, crambin. In such high resolution crystals, almost all of hydrogen atoms of proteins and some hydrogen atoms of bound water molecules are experimentally observed. In addition, outer-shell electrons of proteins can be analyzed by the multipole refinement procedure. However, the influence of X-rays should be precisely estimated in order to derive meaningful information from the crystallographic results. In this review, we summarize refinement procedures, current status and perspectives for ultra high resolution protein crystallography. (author)

  16. Immersion Gratings for Infrared High-resolution Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarugaku, Yuki; Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Kaji, Sayumi; Sukegawa, Takashi; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Nakagawa, Takao; Arasaki, Takayuki; Kondo, Sohei; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Yasui, Chikako; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy in the infrared wavelength range is essential for observations of minor isotopologues, such as HDO for water, and prebiotic organic molecules like hydrocarbons/P-bearing molecules because numerous vibrational molecular bands (including non-polar molecules) are located in this wavelength range. High spectral resolution enables us to detect weak lines without spectral line confusion. This technique has been widely used in planetary sciences, e.g., cometary coma (H2O, CO, and organic molecules), the martian atmosphere (CH4, CO2, H2O and HDO), and the upper atmosphere of gas giants (H3+ and organic molecules such as C2H6). Spectrographs with higher resolution (and higher sensitivity) still have a potential to provide a plenty of findings. However, because the size of spectrographs scales with the spectral resolution, it is difficult to realize it.Immersion grating (IG), which is a diffraction grating wherein the diffraction surface is immersed in a material with a high refractive index (n > 2), provides n times higher spectral resolution compared to a reflective grating of the same size. Because IG reduces the size of spectrograph to 1/n compared to the spectrograph with the same spectral resolution using a conventional reflective grating, it is widely acknowledged as a key optical device to realize compact spectrographs with high spectral resolution.Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a CdZnTe immersion grating with the theoretically predicted diffraction efficiency by machining process using an ultrahigh-precision five-axis processing machine developed by Canon Inc. Using the same technique, we completed a practical germanium (Ge) immersion grating with both a reflection coating on the grating surface and the an AR coating on the entrance surface. It is noteworthy that the wide wavelength range from 2 to 20 um can be covered by the two immersion gratings.In this paper, we present the performances and the applications of the immersion

  17. High resolution, high speed ultrahigh vacuum microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppa, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    The history and future of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is discussed as it refers to the eventual development of instruments and techniques applicable to the real time in situ investigation of surface processes with high resolution. To reach this objective, it was necessary to transform conventional high resolution instruments so that an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment at the sample site was created, that access to the sample by various in situ sample modification procedures was provided, and that in situ sample exchanges with other integrated surface analytical systems became possible. Furthermore, high resolution image acquisition systems had to be developed to take advantage of the high speed imaging capabilities of projection imaging microscopes. These changes to conventional electron microscopy and its uses were slowly realized in a few international laboratories over a period of almost 40 years by a relatively small number of researchers crucially interested in advancing the state of the art of electron microscopy and its applications to diverse areas of interest; often concentrating on the nucleation, growth, and properties of thin films on well defined material surfaces. A part of this review is dedicated to the recognition of the major contributions to surface and thin film science by these pioneers. Finally, some of the important current developments in aberration corrected electron optics and eventual adaptations to in situ UHV microscopy are discussed. As a result of all the path breaking developments that have led to today's highly sophisticated UHV-TEM systems, integrated fundamental studies are now possible that combine many traditional surface science approaches. Combined investigations to date have involved in situ and ex situ surface microscopies such as scanning tunneling microscopy/atomic force microscopy, scanning Auger microscopy, and photoemission electron microscopy, and area-integrating techniques such as x-ray photoelectron

  18. USGS High Resolution Orthoimagery Collection - Historical - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) High Resolution Orthoimagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS high resolution orthorectified images from The National Map combine the image characteristics of an aerial photograph with the geometric qualities of a map. An...

  19. Determination of 137Cs activity in soil from Qatar using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sulaiti, Huda; Nasir, Tabassum; Al Mugren, K.S.; Alkhomashi, N.; Al-Dahan, N.; Al-Dosari, M.; Bradley, D.A.; Bukhari, S.; Matthews, M.; Regan, P.H.; Santawamaitre, T.; Malain, D.; Habib, A.; Al-Dosari, Hanan; Al Sadig, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    With interest in establishing baseline concentrations of 137 Cs in soil from the Qatarian peninsula, we focus on determination of the activity concentrations in 129 soil samples collected across the State of Qatar prior to the 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident. As such, the data provides the basis of a reference map for the detection of releases of this fission product. The activity concentrations were measured via high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry using a hyper-pure germanium detector enclosed in a copper-lined passive lead shield that was situated in a low-background environment. The activity concentrations ranged from 0.21 to 15.41 Bq/kg, with a median value of 1 Bq/kg, the greatest activity concentration being observed in a sample obtained from northern Qatar. Although it cannot be confirmed, it is expected that this contamination is mainly due to releases from the Chernobyl accident of 26 April 1986, there being a lack of data from Qatar before the accident. The values are typically within but are sometimes lower than the range indicated by data from other countries in the region. The lower values than those of others is suggested to be due to variation in soil characteristics as well as metrological factors at the time of deposition. - Highlights: • A baseline for the radionuclide 137 Cs in soil samples collected from Qatar was established. • 129 soil samples collected across the landscape. • Samples were collected before the most recent accident “the 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi NNP accident”. • The highest activity concentration was found to be 15.41±0.67 Stat. and 0.11 Syst. • The relatively high concentrations can be attributed to rain washout.

  20. An atlas of high-resolution IRAS maps on nearby galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Walter

    1993-01-01

    An atlas of far-infrared IRAS maps with near 1 arcmin angular resolution of 30 optically large galaxies is presented. The high-resolution IRAS maps were produced with the Maximum Correlation Method (MCM) image construction and enhancement technique developed at IPAC. The MCM technique, which recovers the spatial information contained in the overlapping detector data samples of the IRAS all-sky survey scans, is outlined and tests to verify the structural reliability and photometric integrity of the high-resolution maps are presented. The infrared structure revealed in individual galaxies is discussed. The atlas complements the IRAS Nearby Galaxy High-Resolution Image Atlas, the high-resolution galaxy images encoded in FITS format, which is provided to the astronomical community as an IPAC product.

  1. Evaluation of a high resolution silicon PET insert module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grkovski, Milan, E-mail: milan.grkovski@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Brzezinski, Karol [IFIC/CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Cindro, Vladimir [Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Clinthorne, Neal H. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kagan, Harris [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Lacasta, Carlos [IFIC/CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Mikuž, Marko [Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Solaz, Carles [IFIC/CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Studen, Andrej [Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Weilhammer, Peter [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Žontar, Dejan [Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-07-11

    Conventional PET systems can be augmented with additional detectors placed in close proximity of the region of interest. We developed a high resolution PET insert module to evaluate the added benefit of such a combination. The insert module consists of two back-to-back 1 mm thick silicon sensors, each segmented into 1040 1 mm{sup 2} pads arranged in a 40 by 26 array. A set of 16 VATAGP7.1 ASICs and a custom assembled data acquisition board were used to read out the signal from the insert module. Data were acquired in slice (2D) geometry with a Jaszczak phantom (rod diameters of 1.2–4.8 mm) filled with {sup 18}F-FDG and the images were reconstructed with ML-EM method. Both data with full and limited angular coverage from the insert module were considered and three types of coincidence events were combined. The ratio of high-resolution data that substantially improves quality of the reconstructed image for the region near the surface of the insert module was estimated to be about 4%. Results from our previous studies suggest that such ratio could be achieved at a moderate technological expense by using an equivalent of two insert modules (an effective sensor thickness of 4 mm)

  2. An original acquisition chain for the TOHR High Resolution Tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinot, Laurent

    1999-01-01

    The framework of this work is part of a new approach of emission tomography adapted to small animals. The principle of our tomographic system TOHR (French acronym for High Resolution Tomograph) is based on the use of large solid angle and high resolution focusing collimators each mounted in front of a detection module of high efficiency. With a first-generation acquisition chain we were able to characterize TOHR, however, to take fully advantage of the TOHR possibilities, a completely new acquisition scheme had to be designed. This system, being the main topic of this work, makes use of temporal information. The detection of a particle that entered the detector is translated into temporal logical signals. These signals pass into a time coding circuitry and the coded results are transferred in a digital processor. According to the initial terms of delivery, the developed acquisition chain steers the detection of events dependent on the deposited energy and time of arrival. The latter is done by coincidence measurements. All elements are mounted on a special board included into a PC unit and a dedicated program controls the whole system. First experiments showed up the interest of the new acquisition unit for other application in physics or medical imaging

  3. High resolution and simultaneous monitoring of airborne radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, T.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Muguntha Manikandan, N.; Komura, K.

    2005-01-01

    By using 11 extremely low background Ge detectors at Ogoya Underground Laboratory, it became possible to investigate temporal variations of airborne 212 Pb (T 1/2 =10.6 h) along with 210 Pb and 7 Be with order of magnitude higher time resolution. Then, we have measured airborne nuclides at three monitoring points, (1) roof of our laboratory (LLRL; 40 m ASL), (2) Shinshiku Plateau (640 m ASL) located about 8 km from LLRL as a comparison of vertical distribution, and (3) Hegura Island (10 m ASL) at about 50 km from Wajima located north of Noto Peninsula facing on the Sea of Japan (about 180 km to the north-northeast of LLRL), to investigate influence of Asian continent. Airborne nuclides were collected by high volume air samplers at intervals of a few hours at either two or three points simultaneously. In the same manner, high resolution monitoring was carried out also at the time of passage of typhoon and cold front. In this study, we observed drastic temporal variations of airborne radionuclides and correlations of multiple monitoring points. The results indicate that high resolution and simultaneous monitoring is very useful to understand dynamic state of variations of airborne nuclides due to short and long-term air-mass movement. (author)

  4. Unattented mode monitoring of high resolution gamma-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.G.R.; Van Dyck, P.; Debraix, P.

    1991-01-01

    An Isotope Monitoring System (IMS) for unattended spectrum acquisition is described. This consists of a simple low cost flexible software package running on a Compaq 80386 and controlling up to 4 Canberra Packard System 100 multi-channel analyzer (MCA) cards. The IMS permits the independent configuration of each of the 4 MCA cards for different monitoring cycles and for different spectrum acquisition cycles each being based upon different trigger criteria. In this way IMS is able to automatically identify events, time tag them, and acquire and store valid spectra corresponding to those event. An additional feature of IMS permits to run a Multigroup Analysis (MGA) software package for the determination of plutonium isotopic compositions in batch mode. One particular application is discussed which consists of 4 high resolution gamma-ray detector systems connected together to the IMS for unattended spectrum acquisition. The off-line batch mode analysis of the spectra using MGA is also discussed

  5. Determination of the activity concentration levels of the artificial radionuclide137Cs in soil samples collected from Qatar using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sulaiti, Huda; Nasir, Tabassum; Al Mugren, K. S.; Alkhomashi, N.; Al-Dahan, N.; Al-Dosari, M.; Bradley, D. A.; Bukhari, S.; Regan, P. H.; Santawamaitre, T.; Malain, D.; Habib, A.; Al-Dosari, Hanan; Daar, Eman

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to establish the first baseline measurements for radioactivity concentration of the artificial radionuclide 137Cs in soil samples collected from the Qatarian peninsula. The work focused on the determination of the activity concentrations levels of man-made radiation in 129 soil samples collected across the landscape of the State of Qatar. All the samples were collected before the most recent accident in Japan, “the 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident”. The activity concentrations have been measured via high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry using a hyper-pure germanium detector situated in a low-background environment with a copper inner-plated passive lead shield. A radiological map showing the activity concentrations of 137Cs is presented in this work. The concentration wasfound to range from 0.21 to 15.41 Bq/kg. The highest activity concentration of 137Cs was observed in sample no. 26 in North of Qatar. The mean value was found to be around 2.15 ± 0.27 Bq/kg. These values lie within the expected range relative to the countries in the region. It is expected that this contamination is mainly due to the Chernobyl accident on 26 April 1986, but this conclusion cannot be confirmed because of the lack of data before this accident.

  6. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-01-01

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling

  7. Ultra-high resolution coded wavefront sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Congli

    2017-06-08

    Wavefront sensors and more general phase retrieval methods have recently attracted a lot of attention in a host of application domains, ranging from astronomy to scientific imaging and microscopy. In this paper, we introduce a new class of sensor, the Coded Wavefront Sensor, which provides high spatio-temporal resolution using a simple masked sensor under white light illumination. Specifically, we demonstrate megapixel spatial resolution and phase accuracy better than 0.1 wavelengths at reconstruction rates of 50 Hz or more, thus opening up many new applications from high-resolution adaptive optics to real-time phase retrieval in microscopy.

  8. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-09-23

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling.

  9. High-resolution computer-aided moire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Cesar A.; Bhat, Gopalakrishna K.

    1991-12-01

    This paper presents a high resolution computer assisted moire technique for the measurement of displacements and strains at the microscopic level. The detection of micro-displacements using a moire grid and the problem associated with the recovery of displacement field from the sampled values of the grid intensity are discussed. A two dimensional Fourier transform method for the extraction of displacements from the image of the moire grid is outlined. An example of application of the technique to the measurement of strains and stresses in the vicinity of the crack tip in a compact tension specimen is given.

  10. SPIRAL2/DESIR high resolution mass separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtukian-Nieto, T., E-mail: kurtukia@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Centre d’Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Baartman, R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver B.C., V6T 2A3 (Canada); Blank, B.; Chiron, T. [Centre d’Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Davids, C. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Delalee, F. [Centre d’Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Duval, M. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); El Abbeir, S.; Fournier, A. [Centre d’Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Lunney, D. [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Université de Paris Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Méot, F. [BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York (United States); Serani, L. [Centre d’Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Stodel, M.-H.; Varenne, F. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); and others

    2013-12-15

    DESIR is the low-energy part of the SPIRAL2 ISOL facility under construction at GANIL. DESIR includes a high-resolution mass separator (HRS) with a designed resolving power m/Δm of 31,000 for a 1 π-mm-mrad beam emittance, obtained using a high-intensity beam cooling device. The proposed design consists of two 90-degree magnetic dipoles, complemented by electrostatic quadrupoles, sextupoles, and a multipole, arranged in a symmetric configuration to minimize aberrations. A detailed description of the design and results of extensive simulations are given.

  11. Laboratory of High resolution gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez G, A.; Giber F, J.; Rivas C, I.; Reyes A, B.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Nuclear Experimentation of the Nuclear Systems Management requests the collaboration of the Engineering unit for the supervision of the execution of the work of the High resolution Gamma spectrometry and low bottom laboratory, using the hut of the sub critic reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. This laboratory has the purpose of determining the activity of special materials irradiated in nuclear power plants. In this report the architecture development, concepts, materials and diagrams for the realization of this type of work are presented. (Author)

  12. High resolution neutron spectroscopy for helium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Wahab, M.S.; Klages, H.O.; Schmalz, G.; Haesner, B.H.; Kecskemeti, J.; Schwarz, P.; Wilczynski, J.

    1992-01-01

    A high resolution fast neutron time-of-flight spectrometer is described, neutron time-of-flight spectra are taken using a specially designed TDC in connection to an on-line computer. The high time-of-flight resolution of 5 ps/m enabled the study of the total cross section of 4 He for neutrons near the 3/2 + resonance in the 5 He nucleus. The resonance parameters were determined by a single level Breit-Winger fit to the data. (orig.)

  13. An efficiency study of a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti Climent, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the different curves for the efficiency fit of a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer was made. These curves are used to fit the efficiency of our detector system. In order to study the goodness of the different fits various standards were used, and the ICRP GAM-83 exercise results were employed. (author)

  14. High-purity germanium crystal growing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

    1982-10-01

    The germanium crystals used for the fabrication of nuclear radiation detectors are required to have a purity and crystalline perfection which is unsurpassed by any other solid material. These crystals should not have a net electrically active impurity concentration greater than 10 10 cm - 3 and be essentially free of charge trapping defects. Such perfect crystals of germanium can be grown only because of the highly favorable chemical and physical properties of this element. However, ten years of laboratory scale and commercial experience has still not made the production of such crystals routine. The origin and control of many impurities and electrically active defect complexes is now fairly well understood but regular production is often interrupted for long periods due to the difficulty of achieving the required high purity or to charge trapping in detectors made from crystals seemingly grown under the required conditions. The compromises involved in the selection of zone refining and crystal grower parts and ambients is discussed and the difficulty in controlling the purity of key elements in the process is emphasized. The consequences of growing in a hydrogen ambient are discussed in detail and it is shown how complexes of neutral defects produce electrically active centers

  15. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  16. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  17. High resolution studies of barium Rydberg states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliel, E.R.

    1982-01-01

    The subtle structure of Rydberg states of barium with orbital angular momentum 0, 1, 2 and 3 is investigated. Some aspects of atomic theory for a configuration with two valence electrons are reviewed. The Multi Channel Quantum Defect Theory (MQDT) is concisely introduced as a convenient way to describe interactions between Rydberg series. Three high-resolution UV studies are presented. The first two, presenting results on a transition in indium and europium serve as an illustration of the frequency doubling technique. The third study is of hyperfine structure and isotope shifts in low-lying p states in Sr and Ba. An extensive study of the 6snp and 6snf Rydberg states of barium is presented with particular emphasis on the 6snf states. It is shown that the level structure cannot be fully explained with the model introduced earlier. Rather an effective two-body spin-orbit interaction has to be introduced to account for the observed splittings, illustrating that high resolution studies on Rydberg states offer an unique opportunity to determine the importance of such effects. Finally, the 6sns and 6snd series are considered. The hyperfine induced isotope shift in the simple excitation spectra to 6sns 1 S 0 is discussed and attention is paid to series perturbers. It is shown that level mixing parameters can easily be extracted from the experimental data. (Auth.)

  18. Principles of high resolution NMR in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Mehring, Michael

    1983-01-01

    The field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has developed at a fascinating pace during the last decade. It always has been an extremely valuable tool to the organic chemist by supplying molecular "finger print" spectra at the atomic level. Unfortunately the high resolution achievable in liquid solutions could not be obtained in solids and physicists and physical chemists had to live with unresolved lines open to a wealth of curve fitting procedures and a vast amount of speculations. High resolution NMR in solids seemed to be a paradoxon. Broad structure­ less lines are usually encountered when dealing with NMR in solids. Only with the recent advent of mUltiple pulse, magic angle, cross-polarization, two-dimen­ sional and multiple-quantum spectroscopy and other techniques during the last decade it became possible to resolve finer details of nuclear spin interactions in solids. I have felt that graduate students, researchers and others beginning to get involved with these techniques needed a book which trea...

  19. High Resolution Gamma Ray Analysis of Medical Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillery, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Compton-suppressed high-purity Germanium detectors at the University of Massachusetts Lowell have been used to study medical radioisotopes produced at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), in particular isotopes such as Pt-191 used for cancer therapy in patients. The ability to precisely analyze the concentrations of such radio-isotopes is essential for both production facilities such as Brookhaven and consumer hospitals across the U.S. Without accurate knowledge of the quantities and strengths of these isotopes, it is possible for doctors to administer incorrect dosages to patients, thus leading to undesired results. Samples have been produced at Brookhaven and shipped to UML, and the advanced electronics and data acquisition capabilities at UML have been used to extract peak areas in the gamma decay spectra. Levels of Pt isotopes in diluted samples have been quantified, and reaction cross-sections deduced from the irradiation parameters. These provide both cross checks with published work, as well as a rigorous quantitative framework with high quality state-of-the-art detection apparatus in use in the experimental nuclear physics community.

  20. Semiconductor ionizino. radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Spectrometric semiconductor detectors of ionizing radiation with the electron-hole junction, based on silicon and germanium are presented. The following parameters are given for the individual types of germanium detectors: energy range of detected radiation, energy resolution given as full width at half maximum (FWHM) and full width at one tenth of maximum (FWTM) for 57 Co and 60 Co, detection sensitivity, optimal voltage, and electric capacitance at optimal voltage. For silicon detectors the value of FWHM for 239 Pu is given, the sensitive area and the depth of the sensitive area. (E.S.)

  1. Tunable conductivity in mesoporous germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Meghan N.; Bioud, Youcef A.; Hobson, David G.; Boucherif, Abderraouf; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Drouin, Dominique; Arès, Richard; Hinzer, Karin

    2018-05-01

    Germanium-based nanostructures have attracted increasing attention due to favourable electrical and optical properties, which are tunable on the nanoscale. High densities of germanium nanocrystals are synthesized via electrochemical etching, making porous germanium an appealing nanostructured material for a variety of applications. In this work, we have demonstrated highly tunable electrical conductivity in mesoporous germanium layers by conducting a systematic study varying crystallite size using thermal annealing, with experimental conductivities ranging from 0.6 to 33 (×10‑3) Ω‑1 cm‑1. The conductivity of as-prepared mesoporous germanium with 70% porosity and crystallite size between 4 and 10 nm is shown to be ∼0.9 × 10‑3 Ω‑1 cm‑1, 5 orders of magnitude smaller than that of bulk p-type germanium. Thermal annealing for 10 min at 400 °C further reduced the conductivity; however, annealing at 450 °C caused a morphological transformation from columnar crystallites to interconnecting granular crystallites and an increase in conductivity by two orders of magnitude relative to as-prepared mesoporous germanium caused by reduced influence of surface states. We developed an electrostatic model relating the carrier concentration and mobility of p-type mesoporous germanium to the nanoscale morphology. Correlation within an order of magnitude was found between modelled and experimental conductivities, limited by variation in sample uniformity and uncertainty in void size and fraction after annealing. Furthermore, theoretical results suggest that mesoporous germanium conductivity could be tuned over four orders of magnitude, leading to optimized hybrid devices.

  2. Germanium geochemistry and mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    Germanium is enriched in the following geologic environments: 1. (1) iron meteorites and terrestrial iron-nickel; 2. (2) sulfide ore deposits, particularly those hosted by sedimentary rocks; 3. (3) iron oxide deposits; 4. (4) oxidized zones of Ge-bearing sulfide deposits; 5. (5) pegmatites, greisens, and skarns; and 6. (6) coal and lignitized wood. In silicate melts, Ge is highly siderophile in the presence of native iron-nickel; otherwise, it is highly lithophile. Among silicate minerals, Ge is concentrated in those having less polymerized silicate tetrahedra such as olivine and topaz. In deposits formed from hydrothermal solutions, Ge tends to be enriched mostly in either sulfides or in fluorine-bearing phases; it is thus concentrated both in some hydrothermal sulfide deposits and in pegmatites, greisens, and skarns. In sulfide deposits that formed from solutions having low to moderate sulfur activity, Ge is concentrated in sphalerite in amounts up to 3000 ppm. Sulfide deposits that formed from solutions having higher sulfur activity allowed Ge to either form its own sulfides, particularly with Cu, or to substitute for As, Sn, or other metals in sulfosalts. The Ge in hydrothermal fluids probably derives from enrichment during the fractional crystallization of igneous fluids, or is due to the incorporation of Ge from the country rocks, particularly from those containing organic material. Germanium bonds to lignin-derivative organic compounds that are found in peat and lignite, accounting for its common concentration in coals and related organic material. Germanium is precipitated from water together with iron hydroxide, accounting for its concentration in some sedimentary and supergene iron oxide deposits. It also is able to substitute for Fe in magnetite in a variety of geologic environments. In the oxidized zone of Ge-bearing sulfide deposits, Ge is concentrated in oxides, hydroxides, and hydroxy-sulfates, sometimes forming its own minerals. It is particularly

  3. New hydrogen donors in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokotilo, Yu.M.; Petukh, A.N.; Litvinov, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    The electrophysical properties of the n-type conductivity germanium, irradiated through protons, is studied by the volt-farad method. It is shown that the heat treatment of the implanted germanium at the temperature of 200-300 deg C leads to formation of the fast-diffusing second-rate donors. It is established that the diffusion coefficient of the identified donors coincides with the diffusion coefficient of the atomic hydrogen with an account of the capture on the traps. The conclusion is made, that the atomic hydrogen is the second-rate donor center in germanium [ru

  4. High resolution CT of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Harumi (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1991-02-01

    The emergence of computed tomography (CT) in the early 1970s has greatly contributed to diagnostic radiology. The brain was the first organ examined with CT, followed by the abdomen. For the chest, CT has also come into use shortly after the introduction in the examination of the thoracic cavity and mediastinum. CT techniques were, however, of limited significance in the evaluation of pulmonary diseases, especially diffuse pulmonary diseases. High-resolution CT (HRCT) has been introduced in clinical investigations of the lung field. This article is designed to present chest radiographic and conventional tomographic interpretations and to introduce findings of HRCT corresponding to the same shadows, with a summation of the significance of HRCT and issues of diagnostic imaging. Materials outlined are tuberculosis, pneumoconiosis, bronchopneumonia, mycoplasma pneumonia, lymphangitic carcinomatosis, sarcoidosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, interstitial pneumonia, and pulmonary emphysema. Finally, an overview of basic investigations evolved from HRCT is given. (N.K.) 140 refs.

  5. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 micron, 4.6 micron, 12 micron, and 22 micron. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  6. A high resolution jet analysis for LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hariri, S.

    1992-11-01

    A high resolution multijet analysis of hadronic events produced in e + e - annihilation at a C.M.S. energy of 91.2 GeV is described. Hadronic events produced in e + e - annihilations are generated using the Monte Carlo program JETSET7.3 with its two options: Matrix Element (M.E.) and Parton Showers (P.S.). The shower option is used with its default parameter values while the M.E. option is used with an invariant mass cut Y CUT =0.01 instead of 0.02. This choice ensures a better continuity in the evolution of the event shape variables. (K.A.) 3 refs.; 26 figs.; 1 tab

  7. High Resolution Displays Using NCAP Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macknick, A. Brian; Jones, Phil; White, Larry

    1989-07-01

    Nematic curvilinear aligned phase (NCAP) liquid crystals have been found useful for high information content video displays. NCAP materials are liquid crystals which have been encapsulated in a polymer matrix and which have a light transmission which is variable with applied electric fields. Because NCAP materials do not require polarizers, their on-state transmission is substantially better than twisted nematic cells. All dimensional tolerances are locked in during the encapsulation process and hence there are no critical sealing or spacing issues. By controlling the polymer/liquid crystal morphology, switching speeds of NCAP materials have been significantly improved over twisted nematic systems. Recent work has combined active matrix addressing with NCAP materials. Active matrices, such as thin film transistors, have given displays of high resolution. The paper will discuss the advantages of NCAP materials specifically designed for operation at video rates on transistor arrays; applications for both backlit and projection displays will be discussed.

  8. High resolution VUV facility at INDUS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurty, G.; Saraswathy, P.; Rao, P.M.R.; Mishra, A.P.; Kartha, V.B.

    1993-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) generated in the electron storage rings is an unique source for the study of atomic and molecular spectroscopy especially in the vacuum ultra violet region. Realizing the potential of this light source, efforts are in progress to develop a beamline facility at INDUS-1 to carry out high resolution atomic and molecular spectroscopy. This beam line consists of a fore-optic which is a combination of three cylindrical mirrors. The mirrors are so chosen that SR beam having a 60 mrad (horizontal) x 6 mrad (vertical) divergence is focussed onto a slit of a 6.65 metre off-plane spectrometer in Eagle Mount equipped with horizontal slit and vertical dispersion. The design of the various components of the beam line is completed. It is decided to build the spectrometer as per the requirements of the user community. Details of the various aspects of the beam line will be presented. (author). 3 figs

  9. High-resolution CT of airway reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herold, C.J.; Brown, R.H.; Hirshman, C.A.; Mitzner, W.; Zerhouni, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    Assessment of airway reactivity has generally been limited to experimental nonimaging models. This authors of this paper used high-resolution CT (HRCT) to evaluate airway reactivity and to calculate airway resistance (Raw) compared with lung resistance (RL). Ten anesthetized and ventilated dogs were investigated with HRCT (10 contiguous 2-mm sections through the lower lung lobes) during control state, following aerosol histamine challenge, and following posthistamine hyperinflation. The HRCT scans were digitized, and areas of 10 airways per dog (diameter, 1-10 mm) were measured with a computer edging process. Changes in airway area and Raw (calculated by 1/[area] 2 ) were measured. RL was assessed separately, following the same protocol. Data were analyzed by use of a paired t-test with significance at p < .05

  10. High-resolution CT of otosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewen, Yang; Kodama, Takao; Tono, Tetsuya; Ochiai, Reiji; Kiyomizu, Kensuke; Suzuki, Yukiko; Yano, Takanori; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1997-01-01

    High-resolution CT (HRCT) scans of thirty-two patients (60 ears) with the clinical diagnosis of fenestral otosclerosis were evaluated retrospectively. HRCT was performed with 1-mm-thick targeted sections and 1-mm (36 ears) or 0.5-mm (10 ears) intervals in the semiaxial projection. Seven patients (14 ears) underwent helical scanning with a 1-mm slice thickness and 1-mm/sec table speed. Forty-five ears (75%) were found to have one or more otospongiotic or otosclerotic foci on HRCT. In most instances (30 ears), the otospongiotic foci were found in the region of the fissula ante fenestram. No significant correlations between CT findings and air conduction threshold were observed. We found a significant relationship between lesions of the labyrinthine capsule and sensorineural hearing loss. We conclude that HRCT is a valuable modality for diagnosing otosclerosis, especially when otospongiotic focus is detected. (author)

  11. High resolution CT in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spina, Juan C.; Curros, Marisela L.; Gomez, M.; Gonzalez, A.; Chacon, Carolina; Guerendiain, G.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To establish the particular advantages of High Resolution CT (HRCT) for the diagnosis of pulmonary sarcoidosis. Material and Methods: A series of fourteen patients, (4 men and 10 women; mean age 44,5 years) with thoracic sarcoidosis. All patients were studied using HRCT and diagnosis was confirmed for each case. Confidence intervals were obtained for different disease manifestations. Results: The most common findings were: lymph node enlargement (n=14 patients), pulmonary nodules (n=13), thickening of septa (n=6), peribronquial vascular thickening (n=5) pulmonary pseudo mass (n=5) and signs of fibrosis (n=4). The stage most commonly observed was stage II. It is worth noting that no cases of pleural effusion or cavitations of pulmonary lesions were observed. Conclusions: In this series, confidence interval overlapping for lymph node enlargement, single pulmonary nodules and septum thickening, allows to infer that their presence in a young adult, with few clinical symptoms, forces to rule out first the possibility of sarcoidosis. (author)

  12. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  13. High resolution infrared spectroscopy of symbiotic stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensammar, S.

    1989-01-01

    We report here very early results of high resolution (5x10 3 - 4x10 4 ) infrared spectroscopy (1 - 2.5 μm) of different symbiotic stars (T CrB, RW Hya, CI Cyg, PU Vul) observed with the Fourier Transform Spectrometer of the 3.60m Canada France Hawaii Telescope. These stars are usually considered as interacting binaries and only little details are known about the nature of their cool component. CO absorption lines are detected for the four stars. Very different profiles of hydrogen Brackett γ and helium 10830 A lines are shown for CI Cyg observed at different phases, while Pu Vul shows very intense emission lines

  14. GRANULOMETRIC MAPS FROM HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Mering

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method of land cover mapping from satellite images using granulometric analysis is presented here. Discontinuous landscapes such as steppian bushes of semi arid regions and recently growing urban settlements are especially concerned by this study. Spatial organisations of the land cover are quantified by means of the size distribution analysis of the land cover units extracted from high resolution remotely sensed images. A granulometric map is built by automatic classification of every pixel of the image according to the granulometric density inside a sliding neighbourhood. Granulometric mapping brings some advantages over traditional thematic mapping by remote sensing by focusing on fine spatial events and small changes in one peculiar category of the landscape.

  15. Determination of radium-226 by high-resolution alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sill, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Condition were determined under which high resolution and accurate and reliable results can be obtained. Refractory solids are dissolved completely by fusion with KF and Ba-133 tracer. The fluoride cake is then transposed with sulfuric acid to a pyrosulfate fusion. Radium is precipitated with barium by addition of lead perchlorate to a dilute HCl solution of the pyrosulfate cake. The resulting insoluble sulfates are dissolved in an alkaline solution of DTPA and the Ra and Ba sulfates are reprecipitated with acetic acid to produce very small crystals. The precipitate is mounted on 0.1-μm membrane filter and analyzed by alpha spectrometry. Water samples are partially evaporated and treated similarly. Resolution, almost as good as with actinides electrodeposited on polished steel plates, is about 60 keV full-width-half-maximum with 100 μg of barium on a 1-inch filter with a 450 mm 2 detector at 20% counting efficiency. Recovery is about 97%. One solid sample can be prepared for counting in less than 2 hours. Methods are discussed for ensuring reliability of the results. Severe contamination of the surface-barrier detector by polonium-210 and recoil products is discussed

  16. High-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Jesson, D.E.

    1992-03-01

    The high-resolution imaging of crystalline materials in the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is reviewed with particular emphasis on the conditions under which an incoherent image can be obtained. It is shown that a high-angle annular detector can be used to break the coherence of the imaging process, in the transverse plane through the geometry of the detector, or in three dimensions if multiphonon diffuse scattering is detected. In the latter case, each atom can be treated as a highly independent source of high-angle scattering. The most effective fast electron states are therefore tightly bound s-type Bloch states. Furthermore, they add constructively for each incident angle in the coherent STEM probe, so that s states are responsible for practically the entire image contrast. Dynamical effects are largely removed, and almost perfect incoherent imaging is achieved. s states are relatively insensitive to neighboring strings, so that incoherent imaging is maintained for superlattice and interfaces, and supercell calculations are unnecessary. With an optimum probe profile, the incoherent image represents a direct image of the crystal projection, with compositional sensitivity built in through the strong dependence of the scattering cross sections on atomic number Z

  17. Compact multichannel high-resolution micro-electro-mechanical systems-based interrogator for Fiber Bragg grating sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganziy, Denis; Rose, Bjarke; Bang, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel type of compact high-resolution multichannel micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based interrogator, where we replace the linear detector with a digital micromirror device (DMD). The DMD is typically cheaper and has better pixel sampling than an InGaAs detector used...

  18. High Resolution Tracking Devices Based on Capillaries Filled with Liquid Scintillator

    CERN Multimedia

    Bonekamper, D; Vassiltchenko, V; Wolff, T

    2002-01-01

    %RD46 %title\\\\ \\\\The aim of the project is to develop high resolution tracking devices based on thin glass capillary arrays filled with liquid scintillator. This technique provides high hit densities and a position resolution better than 20 $\\mu$m. Further, their radiation hardness makes them superior to other types of tracking devices with comparable performance. Therefore, the technique is attractive for inner tracking in collider experiments, microvertex devices, or active targets for short-lived particle detection. High integration levels in the read-out based on the use of multi-pixel photon detectors and the possibility of optical multiplexing allow to reduce considerably the number of output channels, and, thus, the cost for the detector.\\\\ \\\\New optoelectronic devices have been developed and tested: the megapixel Electron Bombarded CCD (EBCCD), a high resolution image-detector having an outstanding capability of single photo-electron detection; the Vacuum Image Pipeline (VIP), a high-speed gateable pi...

  19. Optical properties of Germanium nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in acetone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikiran eVadavalli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germanium (Ge nanoparticles (NPs are synthesized by means of pulsed laser ablation of bulk germanium target immersed in acetone with ns laser pulses at different pulse energies. The fabricated NPs are characterized by employing different techniques such as UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. The mean size of the Ge NPs is found to vary from few nm to 40 nm with the increase in laser pulse energy. Shift in the position of the absorption spectra is observed and also the photoluminescence peak shift is observed due to quantum confinement effects. High resolution TEM combined with micro-Raman spectroscopy confirms the crystalline nature of the generated germanium nanoparticles. The formation of various sizes of germanium NPs at different laser pulse energies is evident from the asymmetry in the Raman spectra and the shift in its peak position towards the lower wavenumber side. The FESEM micrographs confirm the formation of germanium micro/nanostructures at the laser ablated position of the bulk germanium. In particular, the measured NP sizes from the micro-Raman phonon quantum confinement model are found in good agreement with TEM measurements of Ge NPs.

  20. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Muramatsu, Yukio; Gomi, Shiho; Suzuki, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Hirobumi; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Aso, Tomohiko; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Tsuchida, Takaaki; Tsuta, Koji; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Tochigi, Naobumi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Sugihara, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT) scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT) scanners. Materials and Methods: This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm × 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm × 16 or 0.5 mm × 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images fr...

  1. The dynamic range of ultra-high-resolution cryogenic gamma-ray spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Shafinaz [Advanced Detector Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Terracol, Stephane F. [Advanced Detector Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Drury, Owen B. [Advanced Detector Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Friedrich, Stephan [Advanced Detector Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)]. E-mail: friedrich1@llnl.gov

    2006-04-15

    We are developing high-resolution cryogenic gamma-ray spectrometers for nuclear science and non-proliferation applications. The gamma-ray detectors are composed of a bulk superconducting Sn foil absorber attached to a multilayer Mo/Cu transition-edge sensor (TES). The energy resolution of a detector with a 1x1x0.25 mm{sup 3} Sn absorber is 50-90 eV FWHM for {gamma}-rays up to 100 keV, and it decreases for larger absorbers. Here, we present the detector performance for different absorber volumes, and discuss the trade-offs between energy resolution and dynamic range.

  2. Integrated High Resolution Monitoring of Mediterranean vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaraccio, Carla; Piga, Alessandra; Ventura, Andrea; Arca, Angelo; Duce, Pierpaolo; Mereu, Simone

    2017-04-01

    The study of the vegetation features in a complex and highly vulnerable ecosystems, such as Mediterranean maquis, leads to the need of using continuous monitoring systems at high spatial and temporal resolution, for a better interpretation of the mechanisms of phenological and eco-physiological processes. Near-surface remote sensing techniques are used to quantify, at high temporal resolution, and with a certain degree of spatial integration, the seasonal variations of the surface optical and radiometric properties. In recent decades, the design and implementation of global monitoring networks involved the use of non-destructive and/or cheaper approaches such as (i) continuous surface fluxes measurement stations, (ii) phenological observation networks, and (iii) measurement of temporal and spatial variations of the vegetation spectral properties. In this work preliminary results from the ECO-SCALE (Integrated High Resolution Monitoring of Mediterranean vegetation) project are reported. The project was manly aimed to develop an integrated system for environmental monitoring based on digital photography, hyperspectral radiometry , and micrometeorological techniques during three years of experimentation (2013-2016) in a Mediterranean site of Italy (Capo Caccia, Alghero). The main results concerned the analysis of chromatic coordinates indices from digital images, to characterized the phenological patterns for typical shrubland species, determining start and duration of the growing season, and the physiological status in relation to different environmental drought conditions; then the seasonal patterns of canopy phenology, was compared to NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange) patterns, showing similarities. However, maximum values of NEE and ER (Ecosystem respiration), and short term variation, seemed mainly tuned by inter annual pattern of meteorological variables, in particular of temperature recorded in the months preceding the vegetation green-up. Finally, green signals

  3. High-Resolution Integrated Optical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakapenka, V. B.; Goncharov, A. F.; Holtgrewe, N.; Greenberg, E.

    2017-12-01

    Raman and optical spectroscopy in-situ at extreme high pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the planets' deep interior is a versatile tool for characterization of wide range of properties of minerals essential for understanding the structure, composition, and evolution of terrestrial and giant planets. Optical methods, greatly complementing X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy techniques, become crucial when dealing with light elements. Study of vibrational and optical properties of minerals and volatiles, was a topic of many research efforts in past decades. A great deal of information on the materials properties under extreme pressure and temperature has been acquired including that related to structural phase changes, electronic transitions, and chemical transformations. These provide an important insight into physical and chemical states of planetary interiors (e.g. nature of deep reservoirs) and their dynamics including heat and mass transport (e.g. deep carbon cycle). Optical and vibrational spectroscopy can be also very instrumental for elucidating the nature of the materials molten states such as those related to the Earth's volatiles (CO2, CH4, H2O), aqueous fluids and silicate melts, planetary ices (H2O, CH4, NH3), noble gases, and H2. The optical spectroscopy study performed concomitantly with X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy measurements at the GSECARS beamlines on the same sample and at the same P-T conditions would greatly enhance the quality of this research and, moreover, will provide unique new information on chemical state of matter. The advanced high-resolution user-friendly integrated optical system is currently under construction and expected to be completed by 2018. In our conceptual design we have implemented Raman spectroscopy with five excitation wavelengths (266, 473, 532, 660, 946 nm), confocal imaging, double sided IR laser heating combined with high temperature Raman (including coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering) and

  4. Long-term radiation damage to a spaceborne germanium spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kurczynski, P; Hull, E L; Palmer, D; Harris, M J; Seifert, H; Teegarden, B J; Gehrels, N; Cline, T L; Ramaty, R; Sheppard, D; Madden, N W; Luke, P N; Cork, C P; Landis, D A; Malone, D F; Hurley, K

    1999-01-01

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer aboard the Wind spacecraft in deep space has observed gamma-ray bursts and solar events for four years. The germanium detector in the instrument has gradually deteriorated from exposure to the approx 10 sup 8 p/cm sup 2 /yr(>100 MeV) cosmic-ray flux. Low-energy tailing and loss of efficiency, attributed to hole trapping and conversion of the germanium from n- to p-type as a result of crystal damage, were observed. Raising the detector bias voltage ameliorated both difficulties and restored the spectrometer to working operation. Together, these observations extend our understanding of the effects of radiation damage to include the previously unsuccessfully studied regime of long-term operation in space. (author)

  5. Method for manufacturing nuclear radiation detector with deep diffused junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, R.N.

    1977-01-01

    Germanium radiation detectors are manufactured by diffusing lithium into high purity p-type germanium. The diffusion is most readily accomplished from a lithium-lead-bismuth alloy at approximately 430 0 C and is monitored by a quartz half cell containing a standard composition of this alloy. Detectors having n-type cores may be constructed by converting high purity p-type germanium to n-type by a lithium diffusion and subsequently diffusing some of the lithium back out through the surface to create a deep p-n junction. Production of coaxial germanium detectors comprising deep p-n junctions by the lithium diffusion process is described

  6. High resolution computed tomography of positron emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Cahoon, J.L.; Huesman, R.H.; Jackson, H.G.

    1976-10-01

    High resolution computed transaxial radionuclide tomography has been performed on phantoms containing positron-emitting isotopes. The imaging system consisted of two opposing groups of eight NaI(Tl) crystals 8 mm x 30 mm x 50 mm deep and the phantoms were rotated to measure coincident events along 8960 projection integrals as they would be measured by a 280-crystal ring system now under construction. The spatial resolution in the reconstructed images is 7.5 mm FWHM at the center of the ring and approximately 11 mm FWHM at a radius of 10 cm. We present measurements of imaging and background rates under various operating conditions. Based on these measurements, the full 280-crystal system will image 10,000 events per sec with 400 μCi in a section 1 cm thick and 20 cm in diameter. We show that 1.5 million events are sufficient to reliably image 3.5-mm hot spots with 14-mm center-to-center spacing and isolated 9-mm diameter cold spots in phantoms 15 to 20 cm in diameter

  7. High speed, High resolution terahertz spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Youngchan; Yee, Dae Su; Yi, Miwoo; Ahn, Jaewook

    2008-01-01

    A variety of sources and methods have been developed for terahertz spectroscopy during almost two decades. Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz TDS)has attracted particular attention as a basic measurement method in the fields of THz science and technology. Recently, asynchronous optical sampling (AOS)THz TDS has been demonstrated, featuring rapid data acquisition and a high spectral resolution. Also, terahertz frequency comb spectroscopy (TFCS)possesses attractive features for high precision terahertz spectroscopy. In this presentation, we report on these two types of terahertz spectrometer. Our high speed, high resolution terahertz spectrometer is demonstrated using two mode locked femtosecond lasers with slightly different repetition frequencies without a mechanical delay stage. The repetition frequencies of the two femtosecond lasers are stabilized by use of two phase locked loops sharing the same reference oscillator. The time resolution of our terahertz spectrometer is measured using the cross correlation method to be 270 fs. AOS THz TDS is presented in Fig. 1, which shows a time domain waveform rapidly acquired on a 10ns time window. The inset shows a zoom into the signal with 100ps time window. The spectrum obtained by the fast Fourier Transformation (FFT)of the time domain waveform has a frequency resolution of 100MHz. The dependence of the signal to noise ratio (SNR)on the measurement time is also investigated

  8. High resolution CT of temporal bone trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Eun Kyung

    1986-01-01

    Radiographic studies of the temporal bone following head trauma are indicated when there is cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea or rhinorrhoea, hearing loss, or facial nerve paralysis. Plain radiography displays only 17-30% of temporal bone fractures and pluridirectional tomography is both difficult to perform, particularly in the acutely ill patient, and less satisfactory for the demonstration of fine fractures. Consequently, high resolution CT is the imaging method of choice for the investigation of suspected temporal bone trauma and allows special resolution of fine bony detail comparable to that attainable by conventional tomography. Eight cases of temporal bone trauma examined at Korea General Hospital April 1985 through May 1986. The results were as follows: Seven patients (87%) suffered longitudinal fractures. In 6 patients who had purely conductive hearing loss, CT revealed various ossicular chain abnormality. In one patient who had neuro sensory hearing loss, CT demonstrated intract ossicular with a fracture nearing lateral wall of the lateral semicircular canal. In one patient who had mixed hearing loss, CT showed complex fracture.

  9. High resolution SETI: Experiences and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Paul; Clubok, Ken

    Megachannel spectroscopy with sub-Hertz resolution constitutes an attractive strategy for a microwave search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), assuming the transmission of a narrowband radiofrequency beacon. Such resolution matches the properties of the interstellar medium, and the necessary Doppler corrections provide a high degree of interference rejection. We have constructed a frequency-agile receiver with an FFT-based 8 megachannel digital spectrum analyzer, on-line signal recognition, and multithreshold archiving. We are using it to conduct a meridian transit search of the northern sky at the Harvard-Smithsonian 26-m antenna, with a second identical system scheduled to begin observations in Argentina this month. Successive 400 kHz spectra, at 0.05 Hz resolution, are searched for features characteristic of an intentional narrowband beacon transmission. These spectra are centered on guessable frequencies (such as λ21 cm), referenced successively to the local standard of rest, the galactic barycenter, and the cosmic blackbody rest frame. This search has rejected interference admirably, but is greatly limited both in total frequency coverage and sensitivity to signals other than carriers. We summarize five years of high resolution SETI at Harvard, in the context of answering the questions "How useful is narrowband SETI, how serious are its limitations, what can be done to circumvent them, and in what direction should SETI evolve?" Increasingly powerful signal processing hardware, combined with ever-higher memory densities, are particularly relevant, permitting the construction of compact and affordable gigachannel spectrum analyzers covering hundreds of megahertz of instantaneous bandwidth.

  10. High-resolution CCD imaging alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. L.; Acker, D. E.

    1992-08-01

    High resolution CCD color cameras have recently stimulated the interest of a large number of potential end-users for a wide range of practical applications. Real-time High Definition Television (HDTV) systems are now being used or considered for use in applications ranging from entertainment program origination through digital image storage to medical and scientific research. HDTV generation of electronic images offers significant cost and time-saving advantages over the use of film in such applications. Further in still image systems electronic image capture is faster and more efficient than conventional image scanners. The CCD still camera can capture 3-dimensional objects into the computing environment directly without having to shoot a picture on film develop it and then scan the image into a computer. 2. EXTENDING CCD TECHNOLOGY BEYOND BROADCAST Most standard production CCD sensor chips are made for broadcast-compatible systems. One popular CCD and the basis for this discussion offers arrays of roughly 750 x 580 picture elements (pixels) or a total array of approximately 435 pixels (see Fig. 1). FOR. A has developed a technique to increase the number of available pixels for a given image compared to that produced by the standard CCD itself. Using an inter-lined CCD with an overall spatial structure several times larger than the photo-sensitive sensor areas each of the CCD sensors is shifted in two dimensions in order to fill in spatial gaps between adjacent sensors.

  11. High resolution spectrometry for relativistic heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabor, G; Schimmerling, W; Greiner, D; Bieser, F; Lindstrom, P [California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

    1975-12-01

    Several techniques are discussed for velocity and energy spectrometry of relativistic heavy ions with good resolution. A foil telescope with chevron channel plate detectors is described. A test of this telescope was performed using 2.1 GeV/A C/sup 6 +/ ions, and a time-of-flight resolution of 160 ps was measured. Qualitative information on the effect of foil thickness was also obtained.

  12. 235U enrichment determination on UF6 cylinders with CZT detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Reinhard; Mortreau, Patricia

    2018-04-01

    Measurements of uranium enrichment in UF6 transit cylinders are an important nuclear safeguards verification task, which is performed using a non-destructive assay method, the traditional enrichment meter, which involves measuring the count rate of the 186 keV gamma ray. This provides a direct measure of the 235U enrichment. Measurements are typically performed using either high-resolution detectors (Germanium) with e-cooling and battery operation, or portable devices equipped with low resolution detectors (NaI). Despite good results being achieved when measuring Low Enriched Uranium in 30B type cylinders and natural uranium in 48Y type containers using both detector systems, there are situations, which preclude the use of one or both of these systems. The focus of this work is to address some of the recognized limitations in relation to the current use of the above detector systems by considering the feasibility of an inspection instrument for 235U enrichment measurements on UF6 cylinders using the compact and light Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors. In the present work, test measurements were carried out, under field conditions and on full-size objects, with different CZT detectors, in particular for situations where existing systems cannot be used e.g. for stacks of 48Y type containers with depleted uranium. The main result of this study shows that the CZT detectors, actually a cluster of four μCZT1500 micro spectrometers provide as good results as the germanium detector in the ORTEC Micro-trans SPEC HPGe Portable spectrometer, and most importantly in particular for natural and depleted uranium in 48Y cylinders.

  13. High-resolution X-ray television and high-resolution video recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haendle, J.; Horbaschek, H.; Alexandrescu, M.

    1977-01-01

    The improved transmission properties of the high-resolution X-ray television chain described here make it possible to transmit more information per television image. The resolution in the fluoroscopic image, which is visually determined, depends on the dose rate and the inertia of the television pick-up tube. This connection is discussed. In the last few years, video recorders have been increasingly used in X-ray diagnostics. The video recorder is a further quality-limiting element in X-ray television. The development of function patterns of high-resolution magnetic video recorders shows that this quality drop may be largely overcome. The influence of electrical band width and number of lines on the resolution in the X-ray television image stored is explained in more detail. (orig.) [de

  14. Evaluation and optimization of the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoess, C.

    2004-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an imaging technique used in medicine to determine qualitative and quantitative metabolic parameters in vivo. The High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) is a new high resolution tomograph that was designed for brain studies (312 mm transaxial field-of-view (FOV), 252 mm axial FOV). The detector blocks are arranged in a quadrant sharing design and consist of two crystal layers with dimensions of 2.1 mm x 2.1 mm x 7.5 mm. The main detector material is the newly developed scintillator lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO). Events from the different crystal layers are distinguished by Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) to gain Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. This will improve the spatial resolution, especially at the edges of the FOV. A prototype of the tomograph was installed at the Max-Planck Institute for Neurological Research in Cologne, Germany in 1999 and was evaluated with respect to spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, and count rate behavior. These performance measurements showed that this prototype provided a spatial resolution of around 2.5 mm in a volume big enough to contain the human brain. A comparison with a single layer HRRT prototype showed a 10% worsening of the resolution, despite the fact that DOI was used. Without DOI, the resolution decreased considerably. The sensitivity, as measured with a 22 Na point source, was 46.5 cps/kBq for an energy window of 350-650 keV and 37.9 cps/kBq for an energy window of 400-650 keV, while the scatter fractions were 56% for 350-650 keV and 51% for 400-650 keV, respectively. A daily quality check was developed and implemented that uses the uniform, natural radioactive background of the scintillator material LSO. In 2001, the manufacturer decided to build a series of additional HRRT scanners to try to improve the design (detector electronics, transmission source design, and shielding against out-of-FOV activity) and to eliminate problems (difficult detector

  15. Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2010-12-28

    A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

  16. High-Resolution Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for beta-Spectroscopy on 187-Rhenium and Position Resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Porst, Jan-Patrick

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) for high resolution spectroscopy. MMCs are energy dispersive particle detectors based on the calorimetric principle which are typically operated at temperatures below 100 mK. The detectors make use of a paramagnetic temperature sensor to transform the temperature rise upon the absorption of a particle in the detector into a measurable magnetic flux change in a dc-SQUID. The application of MMCs for neutrino mass mea...

  17. Porous germanium multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garralaga Rojas, Enrique; Hensen, Jan; Brendel, Rolf [Institut fuer Solarenergieforschung Hameln (ISFH), Emmerthal (Germany); Carstensen, Juergen; Foell, Helmut [Chair for General Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    We present the reproducible fabrication of porous germanium (PGe) single- and multilayers. Mesoporous layers form on heavily doped 4'' p-type Ge wafers by electrochemical etching in highly concentrated HF-based electrolytes with concentrations in a range of 30-50 wt.%. Direct PGe formation is accompanied by a constant dissolution of the already-formed porous layer at the electrolyte/PGe interface, hence yielding a thinner substrate after etching. This effect inhibits multilayer formation as the starting layer is etched while forming the second layer. We avoid dissolution of the porous layer by alternating the etching bias from anodic to cathodic. PGe formation occurs during anodic etching whereas the cathodic step passivates pore walls with H-atoms and avoids electropolishing. The passivation lasts a limited time depending on the etching current density and electrolyte concentration, necessitating a repetition of the cathodic step at suitable intervals. With optimized alternating bias mesoporous multilayer production is possible. We control the porosity of each single layer by varying the etching current density and the electrolyte (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Germanium field-effect transistor made from a high-purity substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.L.; Goulding, F.S.; Haller, E.E.

    1978-11-01

    Field effect transistors have been fabricated on high-purity germanium substrates using low-temperature technology. The aim of this work is to preserve the low density of trapping centers in high-quality starting material by low-temperature ( 0 C) processing. The use of germanium promises to eliminate some of the traps which cause generation-recombination noise in silicon field-effect transistors (FET's) at low temperatures. Typically, the transconductance (g/sub m/) in the germanium FET's is 10 mA/V and the gate leakage can be less than 10 -12 A. Present devices exhibit a large 1/f noise component and most of this noise must be eliminated if they are to be competitive with silicon FET's commonly used in high-resolution nuclear spectrometers

  19. Processing method for high resolution monochromator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiriyama, Koji; Mitsui, Takaya

    2006-12-01

    A processing method for high resolution monochromator (HRM) has been developed at Japanese Atomic Energy Agency/Quantum Beam Science Directorate/Synchrotron Radiation Research unit at SPring-8. For manufacturing a HRM, a sophisticated slicing machine and X-ray diffractometer have been installed for shaping a crystal ingot and orienting precisely the surface of a crystal ingot, respectively. The specification of the slicing machine is following; Maximum size of a diamond blade is φ 350mm in diameter, φ 38.1mm in the spindle diameter, and 2mm in thickness. A large crystal such as an ingot with 100mm in diameter, 200mm in length can be cut. Thin crystal samples such as a wafer can be also cut using by another sample holder. Working distance of a main shaft with the direction perpendicular to working table in the machine is 350mm at maximum. Smallest resolution of the main shaft with directions of front-and-back and top-and-bottom are 0.001mm read by a digital encoder. 2mm/min can set for cutting samples in the forward direction. For orienting crystal faces relative to the blade direction adjustment, a one-circle goniometer and 2-circle segment are equipped on the working table in the machine. A rotation and a tilt of the stage can be done by manual operation. Digital encoder in a turn stage is furnished and has angle resolution of less than 0.01 degrees. In addition, a hand drill as a supporting device for detailed processing of crystal is prepared. Then, an ideal crystal face can be cut from crystal samples within an accuracy of about 0.01 degrees. By installation of these devices, a high energy resolution monochromator crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and a beam collimator are got in hand and are expected to be used for nanotechnology studies. (author)

  20. Zeolites - a high resolution electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfredsson, V.

    1994-10-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been used to investigate a number of zeolites (EMT, FAU, LTL, MFI and MOR) and a member of the mesoporous M41S family. The electron optical artefact, manifested as a dark spot in the projected centre of the large zeolite channels, caused by insufficient transfer of certain reflections in the objective lens has been explained. The artefact severely hinders observation of materials confined in the zeolite channels and cavities. It is shown how to circumvent the artefact problem and how to image confined materials in spite of disturbance caused by the artefact. Image processing by means of a Wiener filter has been applied for removal of the artefact. The detailed surface structure of FAU has been investigated. Comparison of experimental micrographs with images simulated using different surface models indicates that the surface can be terminated in different ways depending on synthesis methods. The dealuminated form of FAU (USY) is covered by an amorphous region. Platinum incorporated in FAU has a preponderance to aggregate in the (111) twin planes, probably due to a local difference in cage structure with more spacious cages. It is shown that platinum is intra-zeolitic as opposed to being located on the external surface of the zeolite crystal. This could be deduced from tomography of ultra-thin sections among observations. HRTEM studies of the mesoporous MCM-41 show that the pores have a hexagonal shape and also supports the mechanistic model proposed which involves a cooperative formation of a mesophase including the silicate species as well as the surfactant. 66 refs, 24 figs