WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-resolution digital array

  1. High Resolution Spectrum Estimation for Digital Tracking Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    local oscillator MRSS multi-resolution spectrum sensing MUSIC multiple signal classification PLL phase lock loop Q quad-phase RSNS...provide the initial tuning for the local oscillator (LO) and phase lock loop ( PLL ) to synchronize to the desired frequency. Due to the digital nature of...longer than that for a compiled program, such as LABVIEW . 85 Table 6. Summary of Simulation Results. Method SNR (dB

  2. Implementation of digital multiplexing for high resolution X-ray detector arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate for the first time the use of the novel Multiple Module Multiplexer (MMMIC) for a 2×2 array of new electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) based x-ray detectors. It is highly desirable for x-ray imaging systems to have larger fields of view (FOV) extensible in two directions yet to still be capable of doing high resolution imaging over regions-of-interest (ROI). The MMMIC achieves these goals by acquiring and multiplexing data from an array of imaging modules thereby enabling a larger FOV, and at the same time allowing high resolution ROI imaging through selection of a subset of modules in the array. MMMIC also supports different binning modes. This paper describes how a specific two stage configuration connecting three identical MMMICs is used to acquire and multiplex data from a 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors. The first stage contains two MMMICs wherein each MMMIC is getting data from two EMCCD detectors. The multiplexed data from these MMMICs is then forwarded to the second stage MMMIC in the similar fashion. The second stage that has only one MMMIC gives the final 12 bit multiplexed data from four modules. This data is then sent over a high speed Camera Link interface to the image processing computer. X-ray images taken through the 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors using this two stage configuration of MMMICs are shown successfully demonstrating the concept.

  3. High-resolution focal plane array IR detection modules and digital signal processing technologies at AIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanski, Wolfgang A.; Breiter, Rainer; Koch, R.; Mauk, Karl-Heinz; Rode, Werner; Ziegler, Johann; Eberhardt, Kurt; Oelmaier, Reinhard; Schneider, Harald; Walther, Martin

    2000-07-01

    Full video format focal plane array (FPA) modules with up to 640 X 512 pixels have been developed for high resolution imaging applications in either mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) mid wave (MWIR) infrared (IR) or platinum silicide (PtSi) and quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) technology as low cost alternatives to MCT for high performance IR imaging in the MWIR or long wave spectral band (LWIR). For the QWIP's, a new photovoltaic technology was introduced for improved NETD performance and higher dynamic range. MCT units provide fast frame rates > 100 Hz together with state of the art thermal resolution NETD rates of 30 - 60 Hz and provide thermal resolutions of NETD exchangeability of the units. New modular image processing hardware platforms and software for image visualization and nonuniformity correction including scene based self learning algorithms had to be developed to accomplish for the high data rates of up to 18 M pixels/s with 14-bit deep data, allowing to take into account nonlinear effects to access the full NETD by accurate reduction of residual fixed pattern noise. The main features of these modules are summarized together with measured performance data for long range detection systems with moderately fast to slow F-numbers like F/2.0 - F/3.5. An outlook shows most recent activities at AIM, heading for multicolor and faster frame rate detector modules based on MCT devices.

  4. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan, Jing; Yang, Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang, Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing, Zhenxue

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 × 2 detector binning, the projection

  5. A 16 channel high resolution (Digital Converter in a Field Programmable Gate Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugur, C.; Bayer, E.; Kurz, N.; Traxler, M.

    2012-02-01

    A 16-channel Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) was implemented in a general purpose Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The fine time calculations are achieved by using the dedicated carry-chain lines. The coarse counter defines the coarse time stamp. In order to overcome the negative effects of temperature and power supply dependency bin-by-bin calibration is applied. The time interval measurements are done using 2 channels. The time resolution of channels are calculated for 1 clock cycle and a minimum of 10.3 ps RMS on two channels, yielding 7.3 ps RMS (10.3 ps/√2) on a single channel is achieved.

  6. Implementation of a high resolution (< 11 ps RMS) Time-to-Digital Converter in a Field Programmable Gate Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugur, Cahit [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Bayer, Eugen [Department for Digital Electronics, University Kassel (Germany); Kurz, Nikolaus; Traxler, Michael [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt (Germany); Michel, Jan [Institute for Nuclear Physics, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A high resolution time-to-digital converter (TDC) was implemented in a general purpose field-programmable gate array (FPGA), a re-programmable digital chip. RMS and the time resolution of different channels are calculated for one clock cycle (5 ns) interval and a minimum of 10.3 ps RMS on two channels is achieved, which yields to a time resolution of 7.3 ps (10.3 ps/{radical}(2)) on a single channel. The TDC can be used in time-of-flight, time-over-threshold, drift time measurement applications as well as many other measurements with specific Front-End Electronics (FEE), e.g. charge measurements with charge-to-width (Q2W) FEE. The re-programmable flexibility of FPGAs also allows to have application specific features, e.g. trigger window, zero dead time etc.

  7. High-Resolution Time-to-Digital Converter in Field Programmable Gate Array

    CERN Document Server

    Aloisio, A; Cicalese, R; Giordano, R; Izzo, V; Loffredo, S; Lomoro, R

    2008-01-01

    Two high-resolution time-interval measuring systems implemented in a SRAM-based FPGA device are presented. The two methods ought to be used for time interpolation within the system clock cycle. We designed and built a PCB hosting a Virtex-5 Xilinx FPGA. We exploited high stability oscillators to test the two different architectures. In the first method, dedicated carry lines are used to perform fine time measurement, while in the second one a differential tapped delay line is used. In this paper we compare the two architectures and show their performance in terms of stability and resolution.

  8. High resolution digital delay timer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  9. Digital interface for high-resolution displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, David J.; Gorenflo, Ronald L.

    1999-08-01

    Commercial display interfaces are currently transitioning from analog to digital. Although this transition is in the very early stages, the military needs to begin planning their own transition to digital. There are many problems with the analog interface in high-resolution display systems that are solved by changing to a digital interface. Also, display system cost can be lower with a digital interface to a high resolution display. Battelle is under contract with DARPA to develop an advanced Display Interface (ADI) to replace the analog RGB interfaces currently used in high definition workstation displays. The goal is to create a standard digital display interface for military applications that is based on emerging commercial standards. Support for military application- specific functionality is addressed, including display test and control. The main challenges to implementing a digital display interface are described, along with approaches to address the problems. Conceptual ADI architectures are described and contrasted. The current and emerging commercial standards for digital display interfaces are reviewed in detail. Finally, the tasks required to complete the ADI effort are outlined and described.

  10. Single shot high resolution digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Kedar; Ali, P T Samsheer; Joseph, Joby

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate a novel computational method for high resolution image recovery from a single digital hologram frame. The complex object field is obtained from the recorded hologram by solving a constrained optimization problem. This approach which is unlike the physical hologram replay process is shown to provide high quality image recovery even when the dc and the cross terms in the hologram overlap in the Fourier domain. Experimental results are shown for a Fresnel zone hologram of a resolution chart, intentionally recorded with a small off-axis reference beam angle. Excellent image recovery is observed without the presence of dc or twin image terms and with minimal speckle noise.

  11. AIRBORNE HIGH-RESOLUTION DIGITAL IMAGING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prado-Molina, J.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost airborne digital imaging system capable to perform aerial surveys with small-format cameras isintroduced. The equipment is intended to obtain high-resolution multispectral digital photographs constituting so aviable alternative to conventional aerial photography and satellite imagery. Monitoring software handles all theprocedures involved in image acquisition, including flight planning, real-time graphics for aircraft position updatingin a mobile map, and supervises the main variables engaged in the imaging process. This software also creates fileswith the geographical position of the central point of every image, and the flight path followed by the aircraftduring the entire survey. The cameras are mounted on a three-axis stabilized platform. A set of inertial sensorsdetermines platform's deviations independently from the aircraft and an automatic control system keeps thecameras at a continuous nadir pointing and heading, with a precision better than ± 1 arc-degree in three-axis. Thecontrol system is also in charge of saving the platform’s orientation angles when the monitoring software triggersthe camera. These external orientation parameters, together with a procedure for camera calibration give theessential elements for image orthocorrection. Orthomosaics are constructed using commercial GIS software.This system demonstrates the feasibility of large area coverage in a practical and economical way using smallformatcameras. Monitoring and automatization reduce the work while increasing the quality and the amount ofuseful images.

  12. A 4 X 4 X 416 digital SiPM array with 192 TDCs for multiple high-resolution timestamp acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandai, S.; Charbon, E.

    2013-01-01

    We present a 4 X 4 array of digital silicon photomultipliers (D-SiPMs) capable of timestamping up to 48 photons per D-SiPM and we show the advantage of generating multiple timestamps in the context of positron emission tomography (PET). The D-SiPMs have a pitch of 800 μm and comprise 416 pixels

  13. A 4 X 4 X 416 digital SiPM array with 192 TDCs for multiple high-resolution timestamp acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandai, S.; Charbon, E.

    2013-01-01

    We present a 4 X 4 array of digital silicon photomultipliers (D-SiPMs) capable of timestamping up to 48 photons per D-SiPM and we show the advantage of generating multiple timestamps in the context of positron emission tomography (PET). The D-SiPMs have a pitch of 800 μm and comprise 416 pixels each

  14. GOSSIPO-4: an array of high resolution TDCs with a PLL control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zappon, F.; van Beuzekom, M.; Gromov, V.; Kluit, R.; Fang, X.; Kruth, A.

    2012-01-01

    GOSSIPO-4 is a prototype chip featuring an array of high resolution Time to Digital Converters with a PLL control that has been taped out the 9th of August 2011. This prototype is the successor of GOSSIPO-3 test chip and the precursor of the 65k pixel chip TimePix3. The prototype is being developed

  15. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Douglas S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Rojeski, Ronald A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  16. High-resolution imaging methods in array signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki

    The purpose of this study is to develop methods in array signal processing which achieve accurate signal reconstruction from limited observations resulting in high-resolution imaging. The focus is on underwater acoustic applications and sonar signal processing both in active (transmit and receive...... in active sonar signal processing for detection and imaging of submerged oil contamination in sea water from a deep-water oil leak. The submerged oil _eld is modeled as a uid medium exhibiting spatial perturbations in the acoustic parameters from their mean ambient values which cause weak scattering......) and passive (only receive) mode. The study addresses the limitations of existing methods and shows that, in many cases, the proposed methods overcome these limitations and outperform traditional methods for acoustic imaging. The project comprises two parts; The first part deals with computational methods...

  17. SAPHIRE: A New Flat-Panel Digital Mammography Detector With Avalanche Photoconductor and High-Resolution Field Emitter Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0554 TITLE: SAPHIRE : A New Flat-Panel Digital... SAPHIRE : A New Flat-Panel Digital Mammography Detector with Avalanche Photoconductor and High-Resolution Field Emitter Readout 5b. GRANT NUMBER w81xwh-04...CsI), and form a charge image that is read out by a high-resolution field emitter array (FEA). We call the proposed detector SAPHIRE (Scintillator

  18. A high-resolution multimode digital microscope system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Edward D; Shaw, Sidney L; Waters, Jennifer C; Waterman-Storer, Clare M; Maddox, Paul S; Yeh, Elaine; Bloom, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the development of a high-resolution, multimode digital imaging system based on a wide-field epifluorescent and transmitted light microscope, and a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The three main parts of this imaging system are Nikon FXA microscope, Hamamatsu C4880 cooled CCD camera, and MetaMorph digital imaging system. This chapter presents various design criteria for the instrument and describes the major features of the microscope components-the cooled CCD camera and the MetaMorph digital imaging system. The Nikon FXA upright microscope can produce high resolution images for both epifluorescent and transmitted light illumination without switching the objective or moving the specimen. The functional aspects of the microscope set-up can be considered in terms of the imaging optics, the epi-illumination optics, the transillumination optics, the focus control, and the vibration isolation table. This instrument is somewhat specialized for microtubule and mitosis studies, and it is also applicable to a variety of problems in cellular imaging, including tracking proteins fused to the green fluorescent protein in live cells. The instrument is also valuable for correlating the assembly dynamics of individual cytoplasmic microtubules (labeled by conjugating X-rhodamine to tubulin) with the dynamics of membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (labeled with DiOC6) and the dynamics of the cell cortex (by differential interference contrast) in migrating vertebrate epithelial cells. This imaging system also plays an important role in the analysis of mitotic mutants in the powerful yeast genetic system Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High Resolution Airborne Digital Imagery for Precision Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwitz, Stanley R.

    1998-01-01

    The Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program is a NASA initiative that seeks to demonstrate the application of cost-effective aircraft and sensor technology to private commercial ventures. In 1997-98, a series of flight-demonstrations and image acquisition efforts were conducted over the Hawaiian Islands using a remotely-piloted solar- powered platform (Pathfinder) and a fixed-wing piloted aircraft (Navajo) equipped with a Kodak DCS450 CIR (color infrared) digital camera. As an ERAST Science Team Member, I defined a set of flight lines over the largest coffee plantation in Hawaii: the Kauai Coffee Company's 4,000 acre Koloa Estate. Past studies have demonstrated the applications of airborne digital imaging to agricultural management. Few studies have examined the usefulness of high resolution airborne multispectral imagery with 10 cm pixel sizes. The Kodak digital camera integrated with ERAST's Airborne Real Time Imaging System (ARTIS) which generated multiband CCD images consisting of 6 x 106 pixel elements. At the designated flight altitude of 1,000 feet over the coffee plantation, pixel size was 10 cm. The study involved the analysis of imagery acquired on 5 March 1998 for the detection of anomalous reflectance values and for the definition of spectral signatures as indicators of tree vigor and treatment effectiveness (e.g., drip irrigation; fertilizer application).

  20. Theoretical analysis of high-resolution digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman; Karellas, Andrew; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2006-06-21

    The performance of a high-resolution charge coupled device-based full-field digital mammography imager was analysed using a mathematical framework based on an adaptation of cascaded linear systems theory described by other investigators. This work has been conducted in order to understand the impact of various design parameters on the physical performance characteristics of the imager. Specifically, the effect of pixel size, scintillator thickness and packing density, x-ray spectra, air kerma, dark current, charge integration time, and pixel fill-factor on the frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency was studied using a charge-coupled device as a reference platform. The imaging system was modelled as a series of physical processes with gain and spatial spreading. For each stage, the signal and noise power spectra were computed and propagated through the imaging chain as inputs to subsequent stages. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical predictions was obtained for various x-ray spectral conditions that were investigated. The modulation transfer function, MTF(f) and detective quantum efficiency DQE(f) characteristics obtained in this study are encouraging and comparable to other digital mammography systems. The results of this study strongly suggest the feasibility of large area scintillator-based digital mammography imagers with pixel sizes below 100 microm.

  1. High Resolution Digital Elevation Models of Pristine Explosion Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.; Krabill, W.; Garvin, J. B.

    2004-01-01

    In order to effectively capture a realistic terrain applicable to studies of cratering processes and landing hazards on Mars, we have obtained high resolution digital elevation models of several pristine explosion craters at the Nevada Test Site. We used the Airborne Terrain Mapper (ATM), operated by NASA's Wallops Flight Facility to obtain DEMs with 1 m spacing and 10 cm vertical errors of 4 main craters and many other craters and collapse pits. The main craters that were mapped are Sedan, Scooter, Schooner, and Danny Boy. The 370 m diameter Sedan crater, located on Yucca Flat, is the largest and freshest explosion crater on Earth that was formed under conditions similar to hypervelocity impact cratering. As such, it is effectively pristine, having been formed in 1962 as a result of a controlled detonation of a 100 kiloton thermonuclear device, buried at the appropriate equivalent depth of burst required to make a simple crater. Sedan was formed in alluvium of mixed lithology and subsequently studied using a variety of field-based methods. Nearby secondary craters were also formed at the time and were also mapped by ATM. Adjacent to Sedan and also in alluvium is Scooter, about 90 m in diameter and formed by a high-explosive event. Schooner (240 m) and Danny Boy (80 m) craters were also important targets for ATM as they were excavated in hard basalt and therefore have much rougher ejecta. This will allow study of ejecta patterns in hard rock as well as engineering tests of crater and rock avoidance and rover trafficability. In addition to the high resolution DEMs, crater geometric characteristics, RMS roughness maps, and other higher-order derived data products will be generated using these data. These will provide constraints for models of landing hazards on Mars and for rover trafficability. Other planned studies will include ejecta size-frequency distribution at the resolution of the DEM and at finer resolution through air photography and field measurements

  2. Birefringent Microlens Array for Ultra High Resolution HMDs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will be used to analyze, design, model, and test a birefringent microlens array for use in a new type of...

  3. Array Tomography: High-Resolution Three-Dimensional Immunofluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Kristina D. Micheva, Nancy O’Rourke, Brad Busse and Stephen J. Smith Adapted from [*Imaging: A Laboratory Manual* ](http://www.cshlpress.com/link/imagingp.htm)(ed. Yuste). CSHL Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA, 2010. ### INTRODUCTION Array tomography, which is described in this article, is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a g...

  4. High-resolution SNP array analysis of patients with developmental disorder and normal array CGH results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siggberg Linda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnostic analysis of patients with developmental disorders has improved over recent years largely due to the use of microarray technology. Array methods that facilitate copy number analysis have enabled the diagnosis of up to 20% more patients with previously normal karyotyping results. A substantial number of patients remain undiagnosed, however. Methods and Results Using the Genome-Wide Human SNP array 6.0, we analyzed 35 patients with a developmental disorder of unknown cause and normal array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH results, in order to characterize previously undefined genomic aberrations. We detected no seemingly pathogenic copy number aberrations. Most of the vast amount of data produced by the array was polymorphic and non-informative. Filtering of this data, based on copy number variant (CNV population frequencies as well as phenotypically relevant genes, enabled pinpointing regions of allelic homozygosity that included candidate genes correlating to the phenotypic features in four patients, but results could not be confirmed. Conclusions In this study, the use of an ultra high-resolution SNP array did not contribute to further diagnose patients with developmental disorders of unknown cause. The statistical power of these results is limited by the small size of the patient cohort, and interpretation of these negative results can only be applied to the patients studied here. We present the results of our study and the recurrence of clustered allelic homozygosity present in this material, as detected by the SNP 6.0 array.

  5. Arc arrays: studies of high resolution techniques for multibeam bathymetric applications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H.W.

    arrayof 15 degrees arc. The superiorityof the high resolution methods is seen by examining the patterns of the 15 degrees arc array under multiple source/interference conditions, i.e. the situation for rough terrain or artefactcreating conditions...

  6. High Resolution, Radiation Tolerant Focal Plane Array for Lunar And Deep Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerius Photonics and its partners propose the development of a high resolution, radiation hardened 3-D FLASH Focal Plane Array (FPA), with performance expected to be...

  7. High Resolution Digital Imaging of Paintings: The Vasari Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Kirk

    1991-01-01

    Describes VASARI (the Visual Art System for Archiving and Retrieval of Images), a project funded by the European Community to show the feasibility of high resolution colormetric imaging directly from paintings. The hardware and software used in the system are explained, storage on optical disks is described, and initial results are reported. (five…

  8. High Resolution Processing with an Active Phased Array SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijenboer, F.J.; Otten, M.P.G.

    1999-01-01

    The Dutch PHARUS system is a polarimetric active phased array SAR capable of performing advanced SAR modes. Advanced SAR modes that are being investigated are: spotlight SAR, sliding spotlight SAR, stepped frequency SAR and interferometric SAR. The flight experiments and automatic beam steering

  9. High-resolution displacement sensor using squid array amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, T.; Penanen, K.; Barmatz, M.; Paik, H.

    Improvement in the measurement of displacement has profound implications for gravitational physics. Examples of high-impact projects that can benefit from a better displacement sensor are: detection of gravitational waves, test of the equivalence principle, search for the postulated ?axion? particle, and test of the inverse square law of gravity. We describe the concept of a new displacement sensor that makes use of a recent development in the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) technology. The SQUID array amplifier, invented by Welty and Martinis (IEEE Trans. Appl. Superconductivity 3, 2605, 1993), has about the same noise as a conventional SQUID; however, it can work at a much higher frequency of up to 5 MHz. We explain how the higher bandwidth can be translated into higher resolution using a bridge-balancing scheme that can simultaneously balance out both the carrier signal at the bridge output and the electrostatic force acting on the test mass.

  10. Detection of proximal caries with high-resolution and standard resolution digital radiographic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, W.E.R.; Verheij, H.G.C.; Syriopoulos, K.; Li, G.; Sanderink, G.C.H.; van der Stelt, P.F.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to: (1) compare the diagnostic accuracy of the high-resolution and standard resolution settings of four digital imaging systems for caries diagnosis and (2) compare the effect on the diagnostic accuracy of reducing the high-resolution image sizes to the standard

  11. Optimized light sharing for high-resolution TOF PET detector based on digital silicon photomultipliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkowski, R; España, S; Van Holen, R; Vandenberghe, S

    2014-12-07

    The majority of current whole-body PET scanners are based on pixelated scintillator arrays with a transverse pixel size of 4 mm. However, recent studies have shown that decreasing the pixel size to 2 mm can significantly improve image spatial resolution. In this study, the performance of Digital Photon Counter (DPC) from Philips Digital Photon Counting (PDPC) was evaluated to determine their potential for high-resolution whole-body time of flight (TOF) PET scanners. Two detector configurations were evaluated. First, the DPC3200-44-22 DPC array was coupled to a LYSO block of 15 × 15 2 × 2 × 22 mm(3) pixels through a 1 mm thick light guide. Due to light sharing among the dies neighbour logic of the DPC was used. In a second setup the same DPC was coupled directly to a scalable 4 × 4 LYSO matrix of 1.9 × 1.9 × 22 mm(3) crystals with a dedicated reflector arrangement allowing for controlled light sharing patterns inside the matrix. With the first approach an average energy resolution of 14.5% and an average CRT of 376 ps were achieved. For the second configuration an average energy resolution of 11% and an average CRT of 295 ps were achieved. Our studies show that the DPC is a suitable photosensor for a high-resolution TOF-PET detector. The dedicated reflector arrangement allows one to achieve better performances than the light guide approach. The count loss, caused by dark counts, is overcome by fitting the matrix size to the size of DPC single die.

  12. Digitalizing historical high resolution water level data: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holinde, Lars; Hein, Hartmut; Barjenbruch, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Historical tide-gauge data offer the opportunities for determining variations in key characteristics for water level data and the analyses of past extreme events (storm surges). These information are important for calculating future trends and scenarios. But there are challenges involved due to the extensive effort needed to digitalize gauge sheets and quality control the resulting historical data. Based on these conditions, two main sources for inaccuracies in historical time series can be identified. First are several challenges due to the digitalization of the historical data, e.g. general quality of the sheets, multiple crossing lines of the observed water levels and additional comments on the sheet describing problems or additional information during the measurements. Second are problems during the measurements themselves. These can include the incorrect positioning of the sheets, trouble with the tide-gauge and maintenance. Errors resulting from these problems can be e.g. flat lines, discontinuities and outlier. Especially, the characterization of outliers has to be conducted carefully, to distinguish between real outliers and the appearance of extreme events. Methods for the quality control process involve the use of statistics, machine learning and neural networks. These will be described and applied to three different time series from tide gauge stations at the cost of Lower Saxony, Germany. Resulting difficulties and outcomes of the quality control process will be presented and explained. Furthermore, we will present a first glance at analyses for these time series.

  13. A high resolution germanium detector array for hypernuclear studies at PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleser, Sebastian; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Steinen, Marcell [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Gerl, Juergen; Kojouharova, Jasmina; Kojouharov, Ivan [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Iazzi, Felice [Politecnico, Torino (Italy); INFN, Torino (Italy); Pochodzalla, Josef; Rittgen, Kai; Sahin, Cihan [Institute for Nuclear Physics, JGU Mainz (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The PANDA experiment, planned at the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, aims at the high resolution γ-spectroscopy of double Λ hypernuclei. For this purpose a devoted detector setup is required, consisting of a primary nuclear target, an active secondary target and a germanium detector array for the γ-spectroscopy. Due to the limited space within the PANDA detector a compact design is required. In particular the conventional LN{sub 2} cooling system must be replaced by an electro mechanical device and a new arrangement of the crystals is needed. This presentation shows the progress in the development of the germanium detectors. First results of in-beam measurements at COSY with a new electro mechanically cooled single crystal prototype are presented. Digital pulse shape analysis is used to disentangle pile up events due to the high event rate. This analysis technique also allows to recover the high original energy resolution in case of neutron damage. Finally the status of the new triple crystal detector prototype is given.

  14. Real-time volumetric visualization of high-resolution array and toroidal volume search sonar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Robert A.

    1998-09-01

    The Advanced Volume Visualization Display (AVVD) research program is a joint research program between the Fraunhofer Center for Research in Computer Graphics, Inc. and Innovative Research and Development Corp. It is dedicated the application of the human visual system to real-time visualization of high- resolution volumetric sensor data sets. The AVVD program has successfully demonstrated its application to undersea imaging using data from the Naval Undersea Warfare Center -- Division Newport's High Resolution Array (HRA), and from the Naval Surface Warfare Center -- Coastal System Stations's Toroidal Volume Search Sonar (TVSS).

  15. [High resolution MR imaging of the hip using pelvic phased-array coil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niitsu, M; Mishima, H; Itai, Y

    1997-01-01

    A pelvic phased-array coil was applied to obtain high resolution MR images of the hip. Three-mm-thick fast spinecho images were obtained in seven hips. Images with a pelvic coil enhanced delineation of acetabular labrum and articular cartilage more clearly than those with a body coil or flexible-surface coil. The use of a pelvic coil in imaging of the hip may be of diagnostic value because of its superior delineation.

  16. Analysis of Chinese women with primary ovarian insufficiency by high resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Can; FU Fang; YANG Xin; SUN Yi-min; LI Dong-zhi

    2011-01-01

    Background Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is defined as a primary ovarian defect characterized by absent menarche (primary amenorrhea) or premature depletion of ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years. The etiology of primary ovarian insufficiency in human female patients is still unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential genetic causes in primary amenorrhea patients by high resolution array based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis.Methods Following the standard karyotyping analysis, genomic DNA from whole blood of 15 primary amenorrhea patients and 15 normal control women was hybridized with Affymetrix cytogenetic 2.7M arrays following the standard protocol. Copy number variations identified by array-CGH were confirmed by real time polymerase chain reaction.Results All the 30 samples were negative by conventional karyotyping analysis. Microdeletions on chromosome 17q21.31-q21.32 with approximately 1.3 Mb were identified in four patients by high resolution array-CGH analysis. This included the female reproductive secretory pathway related factor N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) gene.Conclusions The results of the present study suggest that there may be critical regions regulating primary ovarian insufficiency in women with a 17q21.31-q21.32 microdeletion. This effect might be due to the loss of function of the NSF gene/genes within the deleted region or to effects on contiguous genes.

  17. Wide bandwidth and high resolution planar filter array based on DBR-metasurface-DBR structures

    CERN Document Server

    Horie, Yu; Arbabi, Ehsan; Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a planar array of optical bandpass filters composed of low loss dielectric metasurface layers sandwiched between two distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs). The two DBRs form a Fabry-P\\'erot resonator whose center wavelength is controlled by the design of the transmissive metasurface layer which functions as a phase shifting element. We demonstrate an array of bandpass filters with spatially varying center wavelengths covering a wide range of operation wavelengths of 250 nm around {\\lambda} = 1550 nm ({\\Delta}{\\lambda}/{\\lambda} = 16%). The center wavelengths of each filter are independently controlled only by changing the in-plane geometry of the sandwiched metasurfaces, and the experimentally measured quality factors are larger than 700. The demonstrated filter array can be directly integrated on top of photodetector arrays to realize on-chip high-resolution spectrometers with free-space coupling.

  18. Laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) monitoring using high-resolution digital mammography: theory and experimental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minhaj, Ahmed M.; Manns, Fabrice; Salas, Nelson Jr.; Parel, Jean-Marie [Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami, FL (United States) and Biomedical Optics and Laser Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami, FL (United States)]. E-mails: aminhaj@med.miami.edu; fmanns@miami.edu; nsalas@med.miami.edu; jmparel@med.miami.edu; Milne, Peter J.; Denham, David B.; Nose, Izuru [Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States)]. E-mails: pmilne@rsmas.miami.edu; ddenham@med.miami.edu; inose@med.miami.edu; Damgaard-Iversen, Karsten [Fischer Imaging Corporation, Denver, CO (United States)]. E-mail: kdi@fischerimaging.de; Robinson, David S. [Center for Breast Care, St. Luke' s Hospital of Kansas City, Kansas City, MO (United States)]. E-mail: drobinson@saint-lukes.org

    2002-08-21

    Laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is a minimally-invasive laser hyperthermia procedure for the treatment of localized tumours. Real-time monitoring of LITT is essential to control the extent of tumour destruction and ensure safe and effective treatments. The feasibility of using high-resolution digital x-ray mammography to monitor LITT of breast cancer was evaluated. Tissue phantoms including polyacrylamide hydrogel and cadaver porcine tissue were heated using a 980 nm diode laser delivered through optical fibres with diffusing tips. Digital images of the tissue phantoms were recorded with a high-resolution digital stereotactic breast biopsy system during heating. The recorded images were processed and analysed to detect heat-induced changes. No changes were detected during heating of the hydrogel. Pixel-by-pixel subtraction of the initial image from images taken during laser heating shows observable thermally-induced changes around the fibre during laser irradiation that correlate with the thermal denaturation zone observed by gross anatomy. These experiments demonstrate that high-resolution digital x-ray mammography can be used to detect heat-induced tissue changes during experimental LITT in fibro-fatty tissue. (author)

  19. Evaluation of a compact, high-resolution SPECT detector based on digital silicon photomultipliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouckaert, Carmen; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Van Holen, Roel

    2014-12-07

    MicroSPECT is one of the main functional imaging techniques used in the preclinical setting. Even though high-resolution images can be obtained with currently available systems, their sensitivity is often quite low due to the use of multi-pinhole collimation. This results in long acquisition times and hampers dynamic imaging. However, it has already been shown that this limited sensitivity can be overcome using high-resolution detectors. In this article, we therefore investigated the use of a digital photon counter (DPC) in combination with a 2 mm thick monolithic LYSO crystal for SPECT imaging. These light sensors contain arrays of avalanche photodiodes whose signals are directly digitised. The DPCs have the advantage that they are very compact, have a high intrinsic resolution, are MR compatible and allow disabling cells with a high dark count rate. In order to investigate the influence of the temperature dependent dark count rate on the detector performance, we compared it at 3 °C and 18 °C. At 3 °C, we observed an energy resolution of 28.8% and an intrinsic spatial resolution of 0.48 mm. Furthermore, the count rate at 10% loss is 60 kcps. Next, we looked at the event loss at 18 °C caused by the higher dark count rate and found a 5% loss compared to the 3 °C measurements. At this higher temperature the energy resolution becomes 29.2% and the intrinsic spatial resolution decreases to 0.52 mm. Due to the 5% count loss, the count rate at 10% loss increases to 63 kcps. A small degradation of the detector performance is thus observed at 18 °C.These results show the usefulness of this detector for SPECT imaging together with its excellent intrinsic spatial resolution. A drawback of the detector is its low, spatially varying energy resolution. Even though the detection efficiency and intrinsic spatial resolution are better at 3 °C, results are still acceptable at 18 °C.

  20. High-Resolution Arrayed-Waveguide-Gratings in Astronomy: Design and Fabrication Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Stoll

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive design of a folded-architecture arrayed-waveguide-grating (AWG-device, targeted at applications as integrated photonic spectrographs (IPS in near-infrared astronomy, is presented. The AWG structure is designed for the astronomical H-band (1500 nm–1800 nm with a theoretical maximum resolving power R = 60,000 at 1630 nm. The geometry of the device is optimized for a compact structure with a footprint of 5.5 cm × 3.93 cm on SiO 2 platform. To evaluate the fabrication challenges of such high-resolution AWGs, effects of random perturbations of the effective refractive index (RI distribution in the free propagation region (FPR, as well as small variations of the array waveguide optical lengths are numerically investigated. The results of the investigation show a dramatic degradation of the point spread function (PSF for a random effective RI distribution with variance values above ∼ 10 - 4 for both the FPR and the waveguide array. Based on the results, requirements on the fabrication technology for high-resolution AWG-based spectrographs are given in the end.

  1. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2011-06-24

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronectin coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4-fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet arrays

  2. High resolution digital soil mapping as a future instrument for developing sustainable landuse strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gries, Philipp; Funke, Lisa-Marie; Baumann, Frank; Schmidt, Karsten; Behrens, Thorsten; Scholten, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Climate change, increase in population and intensification of land use pose a great challenge for sustainable handling of soils. Intelligent landuse systems are able to minimize and/or avoid soil erosion and loss of soil fertility. A successful application of such systems requires area-wide soil information with high resolution. Containing three consecutive steps, the project INE-2-H („innovative sustainable landuse") at the University of Tuebingen is about creating high-resolution soil information using Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) techniques to develop sustainable landuse strategies. Input data includes soil data from fieldwork (texture and carbon content), the official digital soil and geological map (1:50.000) as well as a wide selection of local, complex and combined terrain parameters. First, soil maps have been created using the DSM approach and Random Forest (RF). Due to high resolution (10x10 m pixels), those maps show a more detailed spatial variability of soil information compared to the official maps used. Root mean square errors (RMSE) of the modelled maps vary from 2.11 % to 6.87 % and the coefficients of determination (R²) go from 0.42 to 0.68. Second, soil erosion potentials have been estimated according to the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE). Long-term average annual soil loss ranges from 0.56 to 24.23 [t/ha/a]. Third, combining high-resolution erosion potentials with expert-knowledge of local farmers will result in a landuse system adapted to local conditions. This system will include sustainable strategies reducing soil erosion and conserving soil fertility.

  3. Integrated High Resolution Digital Color Light Sensor in 130 nm CMOS Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Strle

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a color light detection system integrated in 130 nm CMOS technology. The sensors and corresponding electronics detect light in a CIE XYZ color luminosity space using on-chip integrated sensors without any additional process steps, high-resolution analog-to-digital converter, and dedicated DSP algorithm. The sensor consists of a set of laterally arranged integrated photodiodes that are partly covered by metal, where color separation between the photodiodes is achieved by lateral carrier diffusion together with wavelength-dependent absorption. A high resolution, hybrid, ∑∆ ADC converts each photo diode’s current into a 22-bit digital result, canceling the dark current of the photo diodes. The digital results are further processed by the DSP, which calculates normalized XYZ or RGB color and intensity parameters using linear transformations of the three photo diode responses by multiplication of the data with a transformation matrix, where the coefficients are extracted by training in combination with a pseudo-inverse operation and the least-mean square approximation. The sensor system detects the color light parameters with 22-bit accuracy, consumes less than 60 μA on average at 10 readings per second, and occupies approx. 0.8 mm2 of silicon area (including three photodiodes and the analog part of the ADC. The DSP is currently implemented on FPGA.

  4. Integrated High Resolution Digital Color Light Sensor in 130 nm CMOS Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strle, Drago; Nahtigal, Uroš; Batistell, Graciele; Zhang, Vincent Chi; Ofner, Erwin; Fant, Andrea; Sturm, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a color light detection system integrated in 130 nm CMOS technology. The sensors and corresponding electronics detect light in a CIE XYZ color luminosity space using on-chip integrated sensors without any additional process steps, high-resolution analog-to-digital converter, and dedicated DSP algorithm. The sensor consists of a set of laterally arranged integrated photodiodes that are partly covered by metal, where color separation between the photodiodes is achieved by lateral carrier diffusion together with wavelength-dependent absorption. A high resolution, hybrid, ∑∆ ADC converts each photo diode’s current into a 22-bit digital result, canceling the dark current of the photo diodes. The digital results are further processed by the DSP, which calculates normalized XYZ or RGB color and intensity parameters using linear transformations of the three photo diode responses by multiplication of the data with a transformation matrix, where the coefficients are extracted by training in combination with a pseudo-inverse operation and the least-mean square approximation. The sensor system detects the color light parameters with 22-bit accuracy, consumes less than 60 μA on average at 10 readings per second, and occupies approx. 0.8 mm2 of silicon area (including three photodiodes and the analog part of the ADC). The DSP is currently implemented on FPGA. PMID:26205275

  5. High Resolution Digital Surface Model For Production Of Airport Obstruction Charts Using Spaceborne SAR Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Henrique; Rodrigues, Marco; Radius, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Airport Obstruction Charts (AOCs) are graphical representations of natural or man-made obstructions (its locations and heights) around airfields, according to International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Annexes 4, 14 and 15. One of the most important types of data used in AOCs production/update tasks is a Digital Surface Model (first reflective surface) of the surveyed area. The development of advanced remote sensing technologies provide the available tools for obstruction data acquisition, while Geographic Information Systems (GIS) present the perfect platform for storing and analyzing this type of data, enabling the production of digital ACOs, greatly contributing to the increase of the situational awareness of pilots and enhancing the air navigation safety level [1]. Data acquisition corresponding to the first reflective surface can be obtained through the use of Airborne Laser-Scanning and Light Detection and Ranging (ALS/LIDAR) or Spaceborne SAR Systems. The need of surveying broad areas, like the entire territory of a state, shows that Spaceborne SAR systems are the most adequate in economic and feasibility terms of the process, to perform the monitoring and producing a high resolution Digital Surface Model (DSM). The high resolution DSM generation depends on many factors: the available data set, the used technique and the setting parameters. To increase the precision and obtain high resolution products, two techniques are available using a stack of data: the PS (Permanent Scatterers) technique [2], that uses large stack of data to identify many stable and coherent targets through multi- temporal analysis, removing the atmospheric contribution and to minimize the estimation errors, and the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) technique ([3],[4]), that relies on the use of small baseline SAR interferograms and on the application of the so called singular value decomposition (SVD) method, in order to link independent SAR acquisition data sets, separated by large

  6. A four channel, self-calibrating, high resolution, time to digital converter

    CERN Document Server

    Mota, M

    1998-01-01

    A four channel, self-calibrating, High Resolution Time to Digital Converter (HRTDC) with an RMS error of 35 ps over a dynamic range of 3.2 \\mu s has been developed. Its architecture is based on an arr ay of delay locked loops and an 8-bit coarse time counter driven by an 80 MHz reference clock. Time measurements are buffered in two time registers per channel followed by a common 32 words deep read- out FIFO. The HRTDC has been built in a 0.7 \\mu m CMOS process using 23 mm^2 of silicon area.

  7. High-resolution dynamic pressure sensor array based on piezo-phototronic effect tuned photoluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mingzeng; Li, Zhou; Liu, Caihong; Zheng, Qiang; Shi, Xieqing; Song, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Du, Shiyu; Zhai, Junyi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-03-24

    A high-resolution dynamic tactile/pressure display is indispensable to the comprehensive perception of force/mechanical stimulations such as electronic skin, biomechanical imaging/analysis, or personalized signatures. Here, we present a dynamic pressure sensor array based on pressure/strain tuned photoluminescence imaging without the need for electricity. Each sensor is a nanopillar that consists of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells. Its photoluminescence intensity can be modulated dramatically and linearly by small strain (0-0.15%) owing to the piezo-phototronic effect. The sensor array has a high pixel density of 6350 dpi and exceptional small standard deviation of photoluminescence. High-quality tactile/pressure sensing distribution can be real-time recorded by parallel photoluminescence imaging without any cross-talk. The sensor array can be inexpensively fabricated over large areas by semiconductor product lines. The proposed dynamic all-optical pressure imaging with excellent resolution, high sensitivity, good uniformity, and ultrafast response time offers a suitable way for smart sensing, micro/nano-opto-electromechanical systems.

  8. Identifying firing mammalian neurons in networks with high-resolution multi-transistor array (MTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambacher, A.; Vitzthum, V.; Zeitler, R.; Eickenscheidt, M.; Eversmann, B.; Thewes, R.; Fromherz, P.

    2011-01-01

    The electrical activity of a network of mammalian neurons is mapped with a Multi-Transistor Array (MTA) fabricated with extended CMOS technology. The spatial resolution is 7.4 μm on an area of 1 mm2 at a sampling frequency of 6 kHz for a complete readout of 16,384 sensor transistors. Action potentials give rise to extracellular voltages with amplitudes in a range of 500 μV. On the basis of the high resolution in space and time, correlation algorithms are used to identify single action potentials with amplitudes as low as about 200μV, and to assign the signals to the activity of individual neurons even in a dense network.

  9. High resolution velocity structure beneath Mount Vesuvius from seismic array data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Roberto; Tronca, Fabrizio; Bianco, Francesca; Del Pezzo, Edoardo

    2002-11-01

    A high resolution P-wave image of Mt. Vesuvius edifice has been derived from simultaneous inversion of travel times and hypocentral parameters of local earthquakes, land based shots and small aperture array data. The results give details down to 300-500 m. The relocated local seismicity appears to extend down to 5 km below the central crater, distributed in a major cluster, centered at 3 km below the central crater and in a minor group, with diffuse hypocenters inside the volcanic edifice. The two clusters are separated by an anomalously high Vp region at around 1 km depth. A zone with high Vp/Vs in the upper layers is interpreted as produced by the presence of intense fluid circulation. The highest energy quakes (up to M = 3.6) are located in the deeper cluster, in a high P-wave velocity zone. Our results favor an interpretation in terms of absence of shallow magma reservoirs.

  10. Micro mirror arrays as high-resolution spatial light modulators for photoactivation and optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückerl, F.; Kielhorn, Martin; Tinevez, J.-Y.; Heber, J.; Heintzmann, R.; Shorte, S.

    2013-03-01

    The ability to control the illumination and imaging paths of optical microscopes is an essential part of advanced fluorescence microscopy, and a powerful tool for optogenetics. In order to maximize the visualization and the image quality of the objects under observation we use programmable, fast Micro Mirror Arrays (MMAs) as high-resolution Spatial Light Modulators (SLMs). Using two 256x256 MMAs in a mirror-based illumination setup allows for fast angular-spatial control at a wide range of wavelengths (300-1000nm). Additionally, the illumination intensity can be controlled at 10-bit resolution. The setup allows selective illumination of subcellular regions of interest enabling the precise, localized activation of fluorescent probes and the activation and deactivation of subcellular and cellular signaling cascades using photo-activated ion-channels. Furthermore, inasmuch as phototoxicity is dependent on the rate of photo illumination [1] we show that our system, which provides fast, compartmentalized illumination is minimally phototoxic.

  11. Application of high resolution SNP arrays in patients with congenital oral clefts in south China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TING-YING LEI; HONG-TAO WANG; FAN LI; YING-QIU CUI; FANG FU; RU LI; CAN LIAO

    2016-12-01

    Chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) has proven to be a powerful tool in postnatal patients with intellectual disabilities. However, the diagnostic capability of CMA in patients with congenital oral clefts remain mysterious. Here, we present ourclinical experience in implementing whole-genome high-resolution SNP arrays to investigate 33 patients with syndromic and nonsyndromic oral clefts in whom standard karyotyping analyses showed normal karyotypes. We aim to identify the genomic aetiology and candidate genes in patients with congenital oral clefts. CMA revealed copy number variants (CNVs) in every patient, which ranged from 2 to 9 per sample. The size of detected CNVs varied from 100 to 3.2 Mb. In 33 patients, we identified six clinically significant CNVs. The incidence of clinically significant CNVs was 18.2% (6/33). Three of these six CNVs were detected in patients with nonsyndromic clefts, including one who presented with isolated cleft lip with cleft palate (CLP) and two with cleft palate only (CPO). The remaining three CNVs were detected in patients with syndromic clefts. However, no CNV was detected in patients with cleft lip only (CLO). The six clinically significant CNVs were as follows: 8p23.1 microduplication (198 kb); 10q22.2-q22.3 microdeletion (1766 kb); 18q12.3 microduplication (638 kb); 20p12.1 microdeletion (184 kb); 6q26 microdeletion (389 kb); and 22q11.21-q11.23 microdeletion (3163 kb). In addition, two novel candidate genes for oral clefts, KAT6B and MACROD2, were putatively identified. We also found a CNV of unknown clinical significance witha detection rate of 3.0% (1/33). Our results further support the notion that CNVs significantly contributed to the genetic aetiology of oral clefts and emphasize the efficacy of whole-genome high-resolution SNP arrays to detect novel candidate genes in patients with syndromic and nonsyndromic clefts.

  12. Navigating Earthquake Physics with High-Resolution Array Back-Projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingsen

    Understanding earthquake source dynamics is a fundamental goal of geophysics. Progress toward this goal has been slow due to the gap between state-of-art earthquake simulations and the limited source imaging techniques based on conventional low-frequency finite fault inversions. Seismic array processing is an alternative source imaging technique that employs the higher frequency content of the earthquakes and provides finer detail of the source process with few prior assumptions. While the back-projection provides key observations of previous large earthquakes, the standard beamforming back-projection suffers from low resolution and severe artifacts. This thesis introduces the MUSIC technique, a high-resolution array processing method that aims to narrow the gap between the seismic observations and earthquake simulations. The MUSIC is a high-resolution method taking advantage of the higher order signal statistics. The method has not been widely used in seismology yet because of the nonstationary and incoherent nature of the seismic signal. We adapt MUSIC to transient seismic signal by incorporating the Multitaper cross-spectrum estimates. We also adopt a "reference window" strategy that mitigates the "swimming artifact," a systematic drift effect in back projection. The improved MUSIC back projections allow the imaging of recent large earthquakes in finer details which give rise to new perspectives on dynamic simulations. In the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, we observe frequency-dependent rupture behaviors which relate to the material variation along the dip of the subduction interface. In the 2012 off-Sumatra earthquake, we image the complicated ruptures involving orthogonal fault system and an usual branching direction. This result along with our complementary dynamic simulations probes the pressure-insensitive strength of the deep oceanic lithosphere. In another example, back projection is applied to the 2010 M7 Haiti earthquake recorded at regional distance. The

  13. BrainMaps.org - Interactive High-Resolution Digital Brain Atlases and Virtual Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikula, Shawn; Stone, James M; Jones, Edward G

    2008-01-01

    BrainMaps.org is an interactive high-resolution digital brain atlas and virtual microscope that is based on over 20 million megapixels of scanned images of serial sections of both primate and non-primate brains and that is integrated with a high-speed database for querying and retrieving data about brain structure and function over the internet. Complete brain datasets for various species, including Homo sapiens, Macaca mulatta, Chlorocebus aethiops, Felis catus, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, and Tyto alba, are accessible online. The methods and tools we describe are useful for both research and teaching, and can be replicated by labs seeking to increase accessibility and sharing of neuroanatomical data. These tools offer the possibility of visualizing and exploring completely digitized sections of brains at a sub-neuronal level, and can facilitate large-scale connectional tracing, histochemical and stereological analyses.

  14. Underwater Digital Terrain Model with GPS-aided High-resolution Profile-scan Sonar Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yong-jun; KOU Xin-jian

    2008-01-01

    The whole procedures of underwater digital terrain model (DTM) were presented by building with the global positioning system (GPS) aided high-resolution profile-scan sonar images. The algorithm regards the digital image scanned in a cycle as the raw data. First the label rings are detected with the improved Hough transform (HT) method and followed by curve-fitting for accurate location; then the most probable window for each ping is detected with weighted neighborhood gray-level co-occurrence matrix; and finally the DTM is built by integrating the GPS data with sonar data for 3D visualization. The case of an underwater trench for immersed tube road tunnel is illustrated.

  15. A high-resolution time-to-digital converter using a three-level resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Asma; Saneei, Mohsen; Mahani, Ali

    2016-08-01

    In this article, a three-level resolution Vernier delay line time-to-digital converter (TDC) was proposed. The proposed TDC core was based on the pseudo-differential digital architecture that made it insensitive to nMOS and pMOS transistor mismatches. It also employed a Vernier delay line (VDL) in conjunction with an asynchronous read-out circuitry. The time interval resolution was equal to the difference of delay between buffers of upper and lower chains. Then, via the extra chain included in the lower delay line, resolution was controlled and power consumption was reduced. This method led to high resolution and low power consumption. The measurement results of TDC showed a resolution of 4.5 ps, 12-bit output dynamic range, and integral nonlinearity of 1.5 least significant bits. This TDC achieved the consumption of 68.43 µW from 1.1-V supply.

  16. FERMI: a digital Front End and Readout MIcrosystem for high resolution calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanian, H.; Appelquist, G.; Bailly, P.; Benetta, R.; Berglund, S.; Bezamat, J.; Blouzon, F.; Bohm, C.; Breveglieri, L.; Brigati, S.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Dadda, L.; David, J.; Engström, M.; Genat, J. F.; Givoletti, M.; Goggi, V. G.; Gong, S.; Grieco, G. M.; Hansen, M.; Hentzell, H.; Holmberg, T.; Höglund, I.; Inkinen, S. J.; Kerek, A.; Landi, C.; Ledortz, O.; Lippi, M.; Lofstedt, B.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Maloberti, F.; Mutz, S.; Nayman, P.; Piuri, V.; Polesello, G.; Sami, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwemling, P.; Stefanelli, R.; Sundblad, R.; Svensson, C.; Torelli, G.; Vanuxem, J. P.; Yamdagni, N.; Yuan, J.; Ödmark, A.; Fermi Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    We present a digital solution for the front-end electronics of high resolution calorimeters at future colliders. It is based on analogue signal compression, high speed {A}/{D} converters, a fully programmable pipeline and a digital signal processing (DSP) chain with local intelligence and system supervision. This digital solution is aimed at providing maximal front-end processing power by performing waveform analysis using DSP methods. For the system integration of the multichannel device a multi-chip, silicon-on-silicon multi-chip module (MCM) has been adopted. This solution allows a high level of integration of complex analogue and digital functions, with excellent flexibility in mixing technologies for the different functional blocks. This type of multichip integration provides a high degree of reliability and programmability at both the function and the system level, with the additional possibility of customising the microsystem to detector-specific requirements. For enhanced reliability in high radiation environments, fault tolerance strategies, i.e. redundancy, reconfigurability, majority voting and coding for error detection and correction, are integrated into the design.

  17. Development of high-resolution gamma detector using sub-mm GAGG crystals coupled to TSV-MPPC array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovec, A.; Shimazoe, K.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this study a high-resolution gamma detector based on an array of sub-millimeter Ce:GAGG (Cerium doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12) crystals read out by an array of surface-mount type of TSV-MPPC was developed. MPPC sensor from Hamamatsu which has a 26 by 26 mm2 detector area with 64 channels was used. One channel has a 3 by 3 mm2 photosensitive area with 50 μ m pitch micro cells. MPPC sensor provides 576 mm2 sensing area and was used to decode 48 by 48 array with 0.4 by 0.4 by 20 mm3 Ce:GAGG crystals of 500 μ m pitch. The base of the detector with the crystal module was mounted to a read out board which consists of charge division circuit, thus allowing for a read out of four channels to identify the position of the incident event on the board. The read out signals were amplified using charge sensitive amplifiers. The four amplified signals were digitized and analyzed to produce a position sensitive event. For the performance analysis a 137Cs source was used. The produced events were used for flood histogram and energy analysis. The effects of the glass thickness between the Ce:GAGG and MPPC were analyzed using the experimental flood diagrams and Geant4 simulations. The glass between the scintillator and the detector allows the spread of the light over different channels and is necessary if the channel's sensitive area is bigger than the scintillator's area. The initial results demonstrate that this detector module is promising and could be used for applications requiring compact and high-resolution detectors. Experimental results show that the detectors precision increases using glass guide thickness of 1.35 mm and 1.85 mm; however the precision using 2.5 mm are practically the same as if using 0.8 mm or 1.0 mm glass guide thicknesses. In addition, simulations using Geant4 indicate that the light becomes scarcer if thicker glass is used, thus reducing the ability to indicate which crystal was targeted. When 2.5 mm glass thickness is used, the scarce light effect becomes

  18. A pilot evaluation study of high resolution digital thermal imaging in the assessment of burn depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwicke, Joseph; Thomson, Richard; Bamford, Amy; Moiemen, Naiem

    2013-02-01

    Thermal imaging is a tool that can be used to determine burn depth. We have revisited the use of this technology in the assessment of burns and aim to establish if high resolution, real-time technology can be practically used in conjunction with clinical examination to determine burn depth. 11 patients with burns affecting upper and lower limbs and the anterior and posterior trunk were included in this study. Digital and thermal images were recorded at between 42 h and 5 days post burn. When compared to skin temperature, full thickness burns were significantly cooler (pburns (pburns were not significantly different in temperature than non-burnt skin (p>0.05). Typically, full thickness burns were 2.3°C cooler than non-burnt skin; deep partial thickness burns were 1.2°C cooler than non-burnt skin; whilst superficial burns were only 0.1°C cooler. Thermal imaging can correctly determine difference in burn depth. The thermal camera produces images of high resolution and is quick and easy to use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. a Detailed Study about Digital Surface Model Generation Using High Resolution Satellite Stereo Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, K.; Fritsch, D.

    2016-06-01

    Photogrammetry is currently in a process of renaissance, caused by the development of dense stereo matching algorithms to provide very dense Digital Surface Models (DSMs). Moreover, satellite sensors have improved to provide sub-meter or even better Ground Sampling Distances (GSD) in recent years. Therefore, the generation of DSM from spaceborne stereo imagery becomes a vivid research area. This paper presents a comprehensive study about the DSM generation of high resolution satellite data and proposes several methods to implement the approach. The bias-compensated Rational Polynomial Coefficients (RPCs) Bundle Block Adjustment is applied to image orientation and the rectification of stereo scenes is realized based on the Project-Trajectory-Based Epipolarity (PTE) Model. Very dense DSMs are generated from WorldView-2 satellite stereo imagery using the dense image matching module of the C/C++ library LibTsgm. We carry out various tests to evaluate the quality of generated DSMs regarding robustness and precision. The results have verified that the presented pipeline of DSM generation from high resolution satellite imagery is applicable, reliable and very promising.

  20. High-resolution Very Large Array observations of 18 MIPSGAL bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Ingallinera, Adriano; Leto, Paolo; Umana, Grazia; Buemi, Carla; Bufano, Filomena; Agliozzo, Claudia; Riggi, Simone; Flagey, Nicolas; Silva, Kevin; Cerrigone, Luciano; Cavallaro, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We present radio observations of 18 MIPSGAL bubbles performed at 5 GHz (6 cm) with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in configuration B and BnA. The observations were aimed at understanding what kind of information high-resolution and high-sensitivity radio maps can supply on the circumstellar envelopes of different kinds of evolved stars and what their comparison with infrared images with similar resolution can tell us. We found that the 18 bubbles can be grouped into five categories according to their radio morphology. The three bubbles presenting a central point source in the radio images all correspond to luminous blue variable star candidates. Eleven bubbles show an elliptical shape and the total lack of a central object in the radio, and are likely associated with planetary nebulae. Under this assumption we derive their distance, their ionized mass and their distribution on the Galactic plane. We discuss the possibility that the MIPSGAL bubbles catalogue (428 objects) may contain a large fraction of a...

  1. Perspectives on open access high resolution digital elevation models to produce global flood hazard layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Christopher; Smith, Andrew; Bates, Paul; Neal, Jeffrey; Trigg, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Global flood hazard models have recently become a reality thanks to the release of open access global digital elevation models, the development of simplified and highly efficient flow algorithms, and the steady increase in computational power. In this commentary we argue that although the availability of open access global terrain data has been critical in enabling the development of such models, the relatively poor resolution and precision of these data now limit significantly our ability to estimate flood inundation and risk for the majority of the planet's surface. The difficulty of deriving an accurate 'bare-earth' terrain model due to the interaction of vegetation and urban structures with the satellite-based remote sensors means that global terrain data are often poorest in the areas where people, property (and thus vulnerability) are most concentrated. Furthermore, the current generation of open access global terrain models are over a decade old and many large floodplains, particularly those in developing countries, have undergone significant change in this time. There is therefore a pressing need for a new generation of high resolution and high vertical precision open access global digital elevation models to allow significantly improved global flood hazard models to be developed.

  2. High-resolution digital brain atlases: a Hubble telescope for the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edward G; Stone, James M; Karten, Harvey J

    2011-05-01

    We describe implementation of a method for digitizing at microscopic resolution brain tissue sections containing normal and experimental data and for making the content readily accessible online. Web-accessible brain atlases and virtual microscopes for online examination can be developed using existing computer and internet technologies. Resulting databases, made up of hierarchically organized, multiresolution images, enable rapid, seamless navigation through the vast image datasets generated by high-resolution scanning. Tools for visualization and annotation of virtual microscope slides enable remote and universal data sharing. Interactive visualization of a complete series of brain sections digitized at subneuronal levels of resolution offers fine grain and large-scale localization and quantification of many aspects of neural organization and structure. The method is straightforward and replicable; it can increase accessibility and facilitate sharing of neuroanatomical data. It provides an opportunity for capturing and preserving irreplaceable, archival neurohistological collections and making them available to all scientists in perpetuity, if resources could be obtained from hitherto uninterested agencies of scientific support. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. Massively parallel digital high resolution melt for rapid and absolutely quantitative sequence profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Daniel Ortiz; Mack, Hannah; Jupe, Julietta; Hawker, Sinead; Kulkarni, Ninad; Hedayatnia, Behnam; Zhang, Yang; Lawrence, Shelley; Fraley, Stephanie I.

    2017-02-01

    In clinical diagnostics and pathogen detection, profiling of complex samples for low-level genotypes represents a significant challenge. Advances in speed, sensitivity, and extent of multiplexing of molecular pathogen detection assays are needed to improve patient care. We report the development of an integrated platform enabling the identification of bacterial pathogen DNA sequences in complex samples in less than four hours. The system incorporates a microfluidic chip and instrumentation to accomplish universal PCR amplification, High Resolution Melting (HRM), and machine learning within 20,000 picoliter scale reactions, simultaneously. Clinically relevant concentrations of bacterial DNA molecules are separated by digitization across 20,000 reactions and amplified with universal primers targeting the bacterial 16S gene. Amplification is followed by HRM sequence fingerprinting in all reactions, simultaneously. The resulting bacteria-specific melt curves are identified by Support Vector Machine learning, and individual pathogen loads are quantified. The platform reduces reaction volumes by 99.995% and achieves a greater than 200-fold increase in dynamic range of detection compared to traditional PCR HRM approaches. Type I and II error rates are reduced by 99% and 100% respectively, compared to intercalating dye-based digital PCR (dPCR) methods. This technology could impact a number of quantitative profiling applications, especially infectious disease diagnostics.

  4. Massively parallel digital high resolution melt for rapid and absolutely quantitative sequence profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Daniel Ortiz; Mack, Hannah; Jupe, Julietta; Hawker, Sinead; Kulkarni, Ninad; Hedayatnia, Behnam; Zhang, Yang; Lawrence, Shelley; Fraley, Stephanie I.

    2017-01-01

    In clinical diagnostics and pathogen detection, profiling of complex samples for low-level genotypes represents a significant challenge. Advances in speed, sensitivity, and extent of multiplexing of molecular pathogen detection assays are needed to improve patient care. We report the development of an integrated platform enabling the identification of bacterial pathogen DNA sequences in complex samples in less than four hours. The system incorporates a microfluidic chip and instrumentation to accomplish universal PCR amplification, High Resolution Melting (HRM), and machine learning within 20,000 picoliter scale reactions, simultaneously. Clinically relevant concentrations of bacterial DNA molecules are separated by digitization across 20,000 reactions and amplified with universal primers targeting the bacterial 16S gene. Amplification is followed by HRM sequence fingerprinting in all reactions, simultaneously. The resulting bacteria-specific melt curves are identified by Support Vector Machine learning, and individual pathogen loads are quantified. The platform reduces reaction volumes by 99.995% and achieves a greater than 200-fold increase in dynamic range of detection compared to traditional PCR HRM approaches. Type I and II error rates are reduced by 99% and 100% respectively, compared to intercalating dye-based digital PCR (dPCR) methods. This technology could impact a number of quantitative profiling applications, especially infectious disease diagnostics. PMID:28176860

  5. Massively parallel digital high resolution melt for rapid and absolutely quantitative sequence profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Daniel Ortiz; Mack, Hannah; Jupe, Julietta; Hawker, Sinead; Kulkarni, Ninad; Hedayatnia, Behnam; Zhang, Yang; Lawrence, Shelley; Fraley, Stephanie I

    2017-02-08

    In clinical diagnostics and pathogen detection, profiling of complex samples for low-level genotypes represents a significant challenge. Advances in speed, sensitivity, and extent of multiplexing of molecular pathogen detection assays are needed to improve patient care. We report the development of an integrated platform enabling the identification of bacterial pathogen DNA sequences in complex samples in less than four hours. The system incorporates a microfluidic chip and instrumentation to accomplish universal PCR amplification, High Resolution Melting (HRM), and machine learning within 20,000 picoliter scale reactions, simultaneously. Clinically relevant concentrations of bacterial DNA molecules are separated by digitization across 20,000 reactions and amplified with universal primers targeting the bacterial 16S gene. Amplification is followed by HRM sequence fingerprinting in all reactions, simultaneously. The resulting bacteria-specific melt curves are identified by Support Vector Machine learning, and individual pathogen loads are quantified. The platform reduces reaction volumes by 99.995% and achieves a greater than 200-fold increase in dynamic range of detection compared to traditional PCR HRM approaches. Type I and II error rates are reduced by 99% and 100% respectively, compared to intercalating dye-based digital PCR (dPCR) methods. This technology could impact a number of quantitative profiling applications, especially infectious disease diagnostics.

  6. High Resolution Imagery and Three-line Array Imagery Automatic Registration for China’s TH-1 Satellite Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    An automatic image registration method of high resolution (HR) imagery and three-line array imagery for China’s TH-1 mapping satellite is invented. The 2m resolution HR imagery is normalized to 5m resolution three-line array imagery firstly. Then using precise point prediction model (P3M) matching method, thousands of correspondent points can be matched. Based on these matched points, feature points collected on HR imagery can be converted onto three-line array imagery automatically. Conseque...

  7. High-resolution images of tremor migrations beneath the Olympic Peninsula from stacked array of arrays seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yajun; Rubin, Allan M.

    2016-02-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) in subduction zones is generally interpreted as the manifestation of shear slip near the base of earthquake-generating portion of the plate interface. Here we devise a new method of cross-correlating stacked Array of Arrays seismic data that provides greatly improved tremor locations, a proxy for the underlying slow slip, beneath the Olympic Peninsula. This increased resolution allows us to image many features of tremor that were not visible previously. We resolve the spatial transition between the rupture zones of the inter-ETS and major ETS episodes in 2010, suggesting stress redistribution by the former. Most tremor migrations propagated along the slowly advancing main tremor front during both the inter-ETS and the major ETS episodes, even though the main front of the former deviated strongly from its usual (along-dip) orientation. We find a distinct contrast between along-dip rupture extent of large-scale rapid tremor reversals (RTRs) to the south and that to the north in our study region that anticorrelates with the locations of inter-ETS events. These RTRs originate from the main front, similar to smaller-scale RTRs previously observed at high-resolution, and many start by propagating along the main front. This could be consistent with RTRs being triggered by a cascading failure of brittle asperities. After initiation, the RTRs repeatedly occupy the same source region, and the early repetitions appear not to be tidally driven. Their stress drop may come from continuing fault weakening processes within the tremor zone, or loading by aseismic slip in surrounding regions.

  8. Genome-wide mapping of copy number variation in humans: comparative analysis of high resolution array platforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini R Haraksingh

    Full Text Available Accurate and efficient genome-wide detection of copy number variants (CNVs is essential for understanding human genomic variation, genome-wide CNV association type studies, cytogenetics research and diagnostics, and independent validation of CNVs identified from sequencing based technologies. Numerous, array-based platforms for CNV detection exist utilizing array Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP genotyping or both. We have quantitatively assessed the abilities of twelve leading genome-wide CNV detection platforms to accurately detect Gold Standard sets of CNVs in the genome of HapMap CEU sample NA12878, and found significant differences in performance. The technologies analyzed were the NimbleGen 4.2 M, 2.1 M and 3×720 K Whole Genome and CNV focused arrays, the Agilent 1×1 M CGH and High Resolution and 2×400 K CNV and SNP+CGH arrays, the Illumina Human Omni1Quad array and the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. The Gold Standards used were a 1000 Genomes Project sequencing-based set of 3997 validated CNVs and an ultra high-resolution aCGH-based set of 756 validated CNVs. We found that sensitivity, total number, size range and breakpoint resolution of CNV calls were highest for CNV focused arrays. Our results are important for cost effective CNV detection and validation for both basic and clinical applications.

  9. Digital differential interference contrast autofocus for high-resolution oil-immersion microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Feimo; Hodgson, Louis; Price, Jeffrey H; Hahn, Klaus M

    2008-07-01

    Continued advances in cellular fluorescent biosensors enable studying intracellular protein dynamics in individual, living cells. Autofocus is valuable in such studies to compensate for temperature drift, uneven substrate over multiple fields of view, and cell growth during long-term high-resolution time-lapse studies of hours to days. Observing cellular dynamics with the highest possible resolution and sensitivity motivates the use of high numerical aperture (NA) oil-immersion objectives, and control of fluorescence exposure to minimize phototoxicity. To limit phototoxicity, to maximize light throughput of the objective for biosensor studies, and because phase contrast is distorted by the meniscus in microtiter plates, we studied autofocus in differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy with a 60x 1.45 NA oil objective after removing the analyzer from the fluorescent light path. Based on a study of the experimental DIC modulation transfer function, we designed a new bandpass digital filter for measuring image sharpness. Repeated tests of DIC autofocus with this digital filter on 225 fields-of-view resulted in a precision of 8.6 nm (standard deviation). Autofocus trials on specimens with thicknesses from 9.47 to 33.20 mum, controlled by cell plating density, showed that autofocus precision was independent of specimen thickness. The results demonstrated that the selected spatial frequencies enabled very high-precision autofocus for high NA DIC automated microscopy, thereby potentially removing the problems of meniscus distortion in phase contrast imaging of microtiter plates and rendering the toxicity of additional fluorescence exposure unnecessary. (c) 2008 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry

  10. A Seamless, High-Resolution, Coastal Digital Elevation Model (DEM) for Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Hoover, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A seamless, 3-meter digital elevation model (DEM) was constructed for the entire Southern California coastal zone, extending 473 km from Point Conception to the Mexican border. The goal was to integrate the most recent, high-resolution datasets available (for example, Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) topography, multibeam and single beam sonar bathymetry, and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IfSAR) topography) into a continuous surface from at least the 20-m isobath to the 20-m elevation contour. This dataset was produced to provide critical boundary conditions (bathymetry and topography) for a modeling effort designed to predict the impacts of severe winter storms on the Southern California coast (Barnard and others, 2009). The hazards model, run in real-time or with prescribed scenarios, incorporates atmospheric information (wind and pressure fields) with a suite of state-of-the-art physical process models (tide, surge, and wave) to enable detailed prediction of water levels, run-up, wave heights, and currents. Research-grade predictions of coastal flooding, inundation, erosion, and cliff failure are also included. The DEM was constructed to define the general shape of nearshore, beach and cliff surfaces as accurately as possible, with less emphasis on the detailed variations in elevation inland of the coast and on bathymetry inside harbors. As a result this DEM should not be used for navigation purposes.

  11. High-resolution image digitizing through 12x3-bit RGB-filtered CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Andrew Y. S.; Pau, Michael C. Y.

    1996-09-01

    A high resolution computer-controlled CCD image capturing system is developed by using a 12 bits 1024 by 1024 pixels CCD camera and motorized RGB filters to grasp an image with color depth up to 36 bits. The filters distinguish the major components of color and collect them separately while the CCD camera maintains the spatial resolution and detector filling factor. The color separation can be done optically rather than electronically. The operation is simply by placing the capturing objects like color photos, slides and even x-ray transparencies under the camera system, the necessary parameters such as integration time, mixing level and light intensity are automatically adjusted by an on-line expert system. This greatly reduces the restrictions of the capturing species. This unique approach can save considerable time for adjusting the quality of image, give much more flexibility of manipulating captured object even if it is a 3D object with minimal setup fixers. In addition, cross sectional dimension of a 3D capturing object can be analyzed by adapting a fiber optic ring light source. It is particularly useful in non-contact metrology of a 3D structure. The digitized information can be stored in an easily transferable format. Users can also perform a special LUT mapping automatically or manually. Applications of the system include medical images archiving, printing quality control, 3D machine vision, and etc.

  12. Light weight digital array SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, M.; Maas, N.; Bolt, R.; Anitori, L.

    2010-01-01

    A light weight SAR has been designed, suitable for short range tactical UAVs, consisting of a fully digital receive array, and a very compact active transmit antenna. The weight of the complete RF front is expected to be below 3 kg, with a power consumption below 30 W. This X-band system can provide

  13. Studies of high resolution array processing algorithms for multibeam bathymetric applications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Schenke, H.W.

    methods. The study also considers the multiple source/interference condition, i.e. the situation for rough terrain as well as artifact-creating conditions. The superiority of the high resolution methods are observed in an examination of the beampatterns...

  14. Submarine Melting of Icebergs from Repeat High-Resolution Digital Elevation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderlin, E. M.; Hamilton, G. S.; Straneo, F.; Cenedese, C.

    2014-12-01

    Icebergs calved from tidewater glaciers act as distributed freshwater sources as they transit through fjords to the surrounding ocean basins. Glacier discharge estimates provide a crude approximation of the total iceberg discharge on inter-annual timescales, but the liquid freshwater flux from icebergs in glacial fjords is largely unknown. Here we use repeat high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to derive meltwater fluxes for 18 icebergs in Sermilik Fjord, East Greenland, during the 2011-2013 boreal summers, and for 33 comparably-sized icebergs in Ilulissat Fjord, West Greenland, during March-April 2011 and July 2012. We find that iceberg melt rates for Sermilik Fjord are in good agreement with simulated melt rates along the vertical terminus of Helheim Glacier in winter, i.e. when melting at the glacier front is not enhanced by subglacial discharge, providing an independent validation of our technique. Variations in meltwater fluxes from icebergs are primarily related to differences in the submerged area of individual icebergs, which is consistent with theory. The stratification of water masses in fjords has a noticeable effect on summertime-derived melt estimates, with lower melt rates (and meltwater fluxes) observed in the relatively cold and fresh Polar Water layer and higher melt rates in the underlying warmer and more saline Atlantic Water layer. The meltwater flux dependence on submerged area, particularly within the deeper Atlantic Water layer, suggests that changes in the characteristics of icebergs (size/shape/keel-depth) calved from a tidewater glacier will alter the magnitude and distribution of meltwater fluxes within the fjord, which may in turn influence fjord circulation and the heat content delivered to the glacier terminus.

  15. Hazard Mapping of Structurally Controlled Landslide in Southern Leyte, Philippines Using High Resolution Digital Elevation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzon, Paul Kenneth; Rochelle Montalbo, Kristina; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    The 2006 Guinsaugon landslide in St. Bernard, Southern Leyte is the largest known mass movement of soil in the Philippines. It consisted of a 15 million m3 rockslide-debris avalanche from an approximately 700 m high escarpment produced by continuous movement of the Philippine fault at approximately 2.5 cm/year. The landslide was preceded by continuous heavy rainfall totaling 571.2 mm from February 8 to 12, 2006. The catastrophic landslide killed more than 1,000 people and displaced 19,000 residents over its 6,400 km path. To investigate the present-day morphology of the scar and potential failure that may occur, an analysis of a high-resolution digital elevation model (10 m resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar images in 2013) was conducted, leading to the generation of a structurally controlled landslide hazard map of the area. Discontinuity sets that could contribute to any failure mechanism were identified using Coltop 3D software which uses a unique lower Schmidt-Lambert color scheme for any given dip and dip direction. Thus, finding main morpho-structural orientations became easier. Matterocking, a software designed for structural analysis, was used to generate possible planes that could slide due to the identified discontinuity sets. Conefall was then utilized to compute the extent to which the rock mass will run out. The results showed potential instabilities in the scarp area of the 2006 Guinsaguon landslide and in adjacent slopes because of the presence of steep discontinuities that range from 45-60°. Apart from the 2006 Guinsaugon potential landslides, conefall simulation generated farther rock mass extent in adjacent slopes. In conclusion, there is a high probability of landslides in the municipality of St. Bernard Leyte, where the 2006 Guinsaugon Landslide occurred. Concerned agencies may use maps produced from this study for disaster preparedness and to facilitate long-term recovery planning for hazardous areas.

  16. High-Resolution Digital-to-Time Converter Implemented in an FPGA Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation of a new digital-to-time converter (DTC. The obtained resolution is 1.02 ps, and the dynamic range is about 590 ns. The experimental results indicate that the measured differential nonlinearity (DNL and integral nonlinearity (INL are −0.17~+0.13 LSB and −0.35~+0.62 LSB, respectively. This DTC builds coarse and fine Vernier delay lines constructed by programmable delay lines (PDLs to ensure high performance delay. Benefited by the close-loop feedback mechanism of the PDLs’ control module, the presented DTC has excellent voltage and temperature stability. What is more, the proposed DTC can be implemented in a single field programmable gate array (FPGA chip.

  17. Note: High resolution ultra fast high-power pulse generator for inductive load using digital signal processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaxer, Eli

    2014-08-01

    We present a new design of a compact, ultra fast, high resolution and high-powered, pulse generator for inductive load, using power MOSFET, dedicated gate driver and a digital signal controller. This design is an improved circuit of our old version controller. We demonstrate the performance of this pulse generator as a driver for a new generation of high-pressure supersonic pulsed valves.

  18. A high resolution TOF-PET concept with axial geometry and digital SiPM readout

    CERN Document Server

    Casella, C; Joram, C; Schneider, T

    2014-01-01

    The axial arrangement of long scintillation crystals is a promising concept in PET instrumentation to address the need for optimized resolution and sensitivity. Individual crystal readout and arrays of wavelength shifter strips placed orthogonally to the crystals lead to a 3D-detection of the annihilations photons. A fully operational demonstrator scanner, developed by the AX-PET collaboration, proved the potential of this concept in terms of energy and spatial resolution as well as sensitivity. This paper describes a feasibility study, performed on axial prototype detector modules with 100 mm long LYSO crystals, read out by the novel digital Silicon Photomultipliers (dSiPM) from Philips. With their highly integrated readout electronics and excellent intrinsic time resolution, dSiPMs allow for compact, axial detector modules which may extend the potential of the axial PET concept by time of fl ight capabilities (TOF-PET). A coincidence time resolution of 211 ps (FWHM) was achieved in the coincidence of two ax...

  19. High resolution distributed time-to-digital converter (TDC) in a White Rabbit network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Weibin, E-mail: pwb.thu@gmail.com; Gong, Guanghua; Du, Qiang; Li, Hongming; Li, Jianmin

    2014-02-21

    The Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) project consists of a complex detector array with over 6000 detector nodes spreading over 1.2 km{sup 2} areas. The arrival times of shower particles are captured by time-to-digital converters (TDCs) in the detectors' frontend electronics, the arrival direction of the high energy cosmic ray are then to be reconstructed from the space-time information of all detector nodes. To guarantee the angular resolution of 0.5°, a time synchronization of 500 ps (RMS) accuracy and 100 ps precision must be achieved among all TDC nodes. A technology enhancing Gigabit Ethernet, called the White Rabbit (WR), has shown the capability of delivering sub-nanosecond accuracy and picoseconds precision of synchronization over the standard data packet transfer. In this paper we demonstrate a distributed TDC prototype system combining the FPGA based TDC and the WR technology. With the time synchronization and data transfer services from a compact WR node, separate FPGA-TDC nodes can be combined to provide uniform time measurement information for correlated events. The design detail and test performance will be described in the paper.

  20. Discovery of common Asian copy number variants using integrated high-resolution array CGH and massively parallel DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hansoo; Kim, Jong-Il; Ju, Young Seok; Gokcumen, Omer; Mills, Ryan E; Kim, Sheehyun; Lee, Seungbok; Suh, Dongwhan; Hong, Dongwan; Kang, Hyunseok Peter; Yoo, Yun Joo; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Yavartanoo, Maryam; Chang, Young Wha; Ha, Jung-Sook; Chong, Wilson; Hwang, Ga-Ram; Darvishi, Katayoon; Kim, Hyeran; Yang, Song Ju; Yang, Kap-Seok; Kim, Hyungtae; Hurles, Matthew E; Scherer, Stephen W; Carter, Nigel P; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Lee, Charles; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2010-05-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) account for the majority of human genomic diversity in terms of base coverage. Here, we have developed and applied a new method to combine high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) data with whole-genome DNA sequencing data to obtain a comprehensive catalog of common CNVs in Asian individuals. The genomes of 30 individuals from three Asian populations (Korean, Chinese and Japanese) were interrogated with an ultra-high-resolution array CGH platform containing 24 million probes. Whole-genome sequencing data from a reference genome (NA10851, with 28.3x coverage) and two Asian genomes (AK1, with 27.8x coverage and AK2, with 32.0x coverage) were used to transform the relative copy number information obtained from array CGH experiments into absolute copy number values. We discovered 5,177 CNVs, of which 3,547 were putative Asian-specific CNVs. These common CNVs in Asian populations will be a useful resource for subsequent genetic studies in these populations, and the new method of calling absolute CNVs will be essential for applying CNV data to personalized medicine.

  1. Fiber-coupled high resolution infrared array spectrometer for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenar, D. A.; Reuter, D.; Mumma, M. J.; Chin, G.; Wiedemann, G.; Jennings, D.

    1990-01-01

    A novel cryogenic grating spectrometer (FCAS) is being designed for observations of volatiles in cometary and planetary atmospheres, and in newly forming planetary systems. The instrument features two-dimensional detector arrays coupled to a high-dispersion echelle by infrared fibers, and will achieve a spectral resolving power of about 40,000. The primary observational platform for this instrument will be the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, but it will also be configured for use at ground-based observatories. Initially, the spectrometer will use a 58 x 62, 1- to 5-micron InSb array. Larger-format IR arrays and arrays of different composition, will later be incorporated as they become available. The instrument will be used in two modes. The first uses a large format IR array in the spectral image plane for the customary one-dimensional spectral-one-dimensional spatial coverage. In the second mode, a massive, coherent bundle of infrared transmitting ZrF4 fibers will be installed after the dispersive element, to reformat the two-dimensional array into an elongated one-dimensional array for wide spectral coverage, allowing multiple lines to be measured in a single integration with high sensitivity. The overall instrument design is discussed, and the system sensitivity is estimated.

  2. A Novel Method for Detection and Removal of Line Scratch in High Resolution Digital Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    With increasing need of high quality movie, more and more standard resolution films are upconverted to the high-resolution films. After this operation, the defects exist in the old movie are more obvious because they are enlarged in size, therefore, an efficient artifacts detection method with more precise result and lower computational complexity is in need. This paper provided a line scratch mathematical model, which derives from the Kokaram model and Bruni model, and then gave a detection method to meet the requirements of the high-resolution video application.

  3. Atmospheric studies using the high-resolution fly's eye xenon flasher array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiencke, Lawrence R.; Bird, D. J.; Chen, G. F.; Clay, R. W.; Dai, H. Y.; Dawson, B. R.; Huang, M. A.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kidd, M. J.; Kieda, D. B.; Ko, S.; Larsen, C. G.; Loh, Eugene C.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Sommers, Paul; Tang, J. K.; Thomas, Stan B.; Wilkinson, C. R.; Yoshida, S.

    1996-11-01

    The High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) cosmic ray detector at Dugway Utah, measures UV scintillation light from extensive air showers. The detection technique is calorimetric in that the amount of light produced is proportional to the energy of the primary particle. Primary particle energies range from 1017 to more than 1020 electron volts. The detector can measure air showers more than 30 km away, a distance of several atmospheric extinction lengths. Variations in the atmosphere can cause significant variations in the amount of light reaching the detector. Atmospheric monitoring is extremely important. This paper discusses a method, under development, that uses the HiRes detector to measure light scattered from pulsed collimated xenon flashbulb sources (Flashers). Discussion includes a description of the light sources and a preliminary data analysis to extract a measurement of atmospheric extinction length and scale height.

  4. Efficient high-resolution deletion discovery in Caenorhabditis elegans by array comparative genomic hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydan, Jason S.; Flibotte, Stephane; Edgley, Mark L.; Lau, Joanne; Selzer, Rebecca R.; Richmond, Todd A.; Pofahl, Nathan J.; Thomas, James H.; Moerman, Donald G.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed array Comparative Genomic Hybridization for Caenorhabditis elegans as a means of screening for novel induced deletions in this organism. We designed three microarrays consisting of overlapping 50-mer probes to annotated exons and micro-RNAs, the first with probes to chromosomes X and II, the second with probes to chromosome II alone, and a third to the entire genome. These arrays were used to reliably detect both a large (50 kb) multigene deletion and a small (1 kb) single-gene deletion in homozygous and heterozygous samples. In one case, a deletion breakpoint was resolved to fewer than 50 bp. In an experiment designed to identify new mutations we used the X:II and II arrays to detect deletions associated with lethal mutants on chromosome II. One is an 8-kb deletion targeting the ast-1 gene on chromosome II and another is a 141-bp deletion in the gene C06A8.1. Others span large sections of the chromosome, up to >750 kb. As a further application of array Comparative Genomic Hybridization in C. elegans we used the whole-genome array to detect the extensive natural gene content variation (almost 2%) between the N2 Bristol strain and the strain CB4856, a strain isolated in Hawaii and JU258, a strain isolated in Madeira. PMID:17267812

  5. High Res at High Speed: Automated Delivery of High-Resolution Images from Digital Library Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, R. Niccole; Watkins, Sean

    2012-01-01

    As primary source materials in the library are digitized and made available online, the focus of related library services is shifting to include new and innovative methods of digital delivery via social media, digital storytelling, and community-based and consortial image repositories. Most images on the Web are not of sufficient quality for most…

  6. High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed transition-edge sensor array

    CERN Document Server

    Noroozian, Omid; Bennett, Douglas A; Brevik, Justus A; Fowler, Joseph W; Gao, Jiansong; Hilton, Gene C; Horansky, Robert D; Irwin, Kent D; Kang, Zhao; Schmidt, Daniel R; Vale, Leila R; Ullom, Joel N

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate very high resolution photon spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed two-pixel transition-edge sensor (TES) array. We measured a $^{153}$Gd photon source and achieved an energy resolution of 63 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 97 keV and an equivalent readout system noise of 86 pA/$\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ at the TES. The readout circuit consists of superconducting microwave resonators coupled to radio-frequency superconducting-quantum-interference-devices (SQUID) and transduces changes in input current to changes in phase of a microwave signal. We use flux-ramp modulation to linearize the response and evade low-frequency noise. This demonstration establishes one path for the readout of cryogenic X-ray and gamma-ray sensor arrays with more than $10^3$ elements and spectral resolving powers $R=\\lambda/\\Delta\\lambda > 10^3$.

  7. SU-E-T-150: Brachytherapy QA Employing a High Resolution Liquid Filled Ionisation Chamber Array: Initial Experience and Limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gainey, M; Kollefrath, M; Bruggmoser, G [University Medical Centre Freiburg, Freiburg Im Breisgau, Baden-Wuerttemberg (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Verifying a complex 3D brachytherapy dose distribution by measurement is non-trivial. Ideally a photon detector array should be independent of energy and angle, have high spatial resolution and be robust for routine clinical use. Methods: An iridium-192 source was used. A PMMA jig was constructed comprising an outer slab and a central insert with eight milled channels for 1.33mm (outer diameter) steel needles, see figure. All calculations were performed using an empty CT study reconstructing eight virtual needles (QA-CT), using the v2 source model (Elekta AG, Sweden). A high resolution liquid filled ionisation chamber array SRS1000, together with Verisoft software v6.0 (PTW Freiburg, Germany), was used to perform measurements of plans of increasing complexity to evaluate its suitability for device- and patient-specific QA. The dimension of backscatter material was investigated. The patient plan dwell time distribution was entered manually into the QA-CT and the dose distribution was calculated. Results: Our measurements indicate that the array is independent of energy and angle. The resulting measured dose values are linearly interpolated to 2025 values. Shifts of 1mm of the entire needle are readily detectable. Individual dwell position shifts (2.5mm) are also readily measurable. Moreover a dwell time increase of 1 second both in the edge and central region are detectable. Conclusion: The high resolution SRS1000 array is a powerful instrument for brachytherapy QA enabling 977 simultaneous measurements to be performed. Our measurements suggest 60mm of RW3 backscatter material upstream and downstream are sufficient. Local percentage difference analysis is useful for device based QA, normalized relative percentage difference is arguably better for patient specific QA. Automated transfer of patient plan dwell time distribution to the QA plan is required to enable a comprehensive patient QA study to be performed. Moreover the described measurement technique

  8. A Compressed Sensing Based Method for Reducing the Sampling Time of A High Resolution Pressure Sensor Array System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chenglu; Li, Wei; Chen, Wei

    2017-08-10

    For extracting the pressure distribution image and respiratory waveform unobtrusively and comfortably, we proposed a smart mat which utilized a flexible pressure sensor array, printed electrodes and novel soft seven-layer structure to monitor those physiological information. However, in order to obtain high-resolution pressure distribution and more accurate respiratory waveform, it needs more time to acquire the pressure signal of all the pressure sensors embedded in the smart mat. In order to reduce the sampling time while keeping the same resolution and accuracy, a novel method based on compressed sensing (CS) theory was proposed. By utilizing the CS based method, 40% of the sampling time can be decreased by means of acquiring nearly one-third of original sampling points. Then several experiments were carried out to validate the performance of the CS based method. While less than one-third of original sampling points were measured, the correlation degree coefficient between reconstructed respiratory waveform and original waveform can achieve 0.9078, and the accuracy of the respiratory rate (RR) extracted from the reconstructed respiratory waveform can reach 95.54%. The experimental results demonstrated that the novel method can fit the high resolution smart mat system and be a viable option for reducing the sampling time of the pressure sensor array.

  9. Evaluation of Rock Mass Responses Using High Resolution Water-level Tiltmeter Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. S.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.; Stetler, L. D.; Volk, J. T.; Geox^Tm

    2010-12-01

    External forces act on the surface of the earth and produce deformation across all spatial and temporal scales. This research study focuses on the deformation evaluation of the rock-mass subjected to tidal, earthquake and surface forces. The events are monitored over horizontal distances of over 100 meters with tilt measurement arrays with a resolution of 10-8 radians. These measurements are obtained from hydrostatic leveling system (HLS) arrays that have been installed in the LaFarge mine in North Aurora, IL by Fermilab. Each sensor in the array is equipped with a water-filled reservoir beneath a capacitor. The amount of water in the reservoir is calculated as a function of the measured capacitance. Individual sensors are connected in a closed system via a water and air line. As the host rock expands and contracts sensors are raised relative to another and water is displaced. The water level in each reservoir is sent to a computer in the mine and recorded. In order to measure the tilt of the rock between two points, the difference in water levels between adjacent sensors is computed. The difference between the end sensors is also calculated to determine the larger-scale tilt of the array. The tiltmeters in LaFarge mine are supported by concrete pedestals installed on the floor of the drift. In the Homestake mine the tiltmeters are placed on similar pedestals, as well as platforms made of artificial wood decking. These platforms are fixed to the wall of the drift with a rock bolt. Time and frequency domain analyses were performed on time series ranging from hours to six months to capture relevant time scales including the response to the 2010 Chile Earthquake (hour-long scale), the stages of the moon (month scale), Fox River floods (flooding week long scales and pressure dissipation month-long scales). By monitoring tiltmeter array responses to different forces, we aim at making predictions about the material properties of rock masses.

  10. High-resolution microcontact printing and transfer of massive arrays of microorganisms on planar and compartmentalized nanoporous aluminium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Colin; Bomer, Johan; Sprenkels, Ad; van den Berg, Albert; de Vos, Willem; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan

    2010-06-07

    Handling microorganisms in high throughput and their deployment into miniaturized platforms presents significant challenges. Contact printing can be used to create dense arrays of viable microorganisms. Such "living arrays", potentially with multiple identical replicates, are useful in the selection of improved industrial microorganisms, screening antimicrobials, clinical diagnostics, strain storage, and for research into microbial genetics. A high throughput method to print microorganisms at high density was devised, employing a microscope and a stamp with a massive array of PDMS pins. Viable bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum, Esherichia coli), yeast (Candida albicans) and fungal spores (Aspergillus fumigatus) were deposited onto porous aluminium oxide (PAO) using arrays of pins with areas from 5 x 5 to 20 x 20 microm. Printing onto PAO with up to 8100 pins of 20 x 20 microm area with 3 replicates was achieved. Printing with up to 200 pins onto PAO culture chips (divided into 40 x 40 microm culture areas) allowed inoculation followed by effective segregation of microcolonies during outgrowth. Additionally, it was possible to print mixtures of C. albicans and spores of A. fumigatus with a degree of selectivity by capture onto a chemically modified PAO surface. High resolution printing of microorganisms within segregated compartments and on functionalized PAO surfaces has significant advantages over what is possible on semi-solid surfaces such as agar.

  11. High-resolution shallow structure revealed with ambient noise tomography on a dense array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X.; Thurber, C. H.; Luo, Y.; Matzel, E.; Team, P.

    2016-12-01

    A dense seismic array was deployed by the PoroTomo research team at Brady Hot Springs, Nevada in March 2016. The array consisted of 238 short-period three-component geophones (5-Hz corner frequency) with about 60 m spacing. Over the 15 day deployment, the array recorded over 6,000 active source signals (vibroseis sweeps) and ambient noise that was dominated by traffic noise.We adopted the one-bit method to better reduce the effect of the active source. Spectral whitening was performed between 0.5 and 2 Hz. The continuous record was chopped into 1 minute segments. The 1-minute cross-correlation functions were initially stacked linearly, and then the phase-weighted stacking method was applied to improve signal quality. More than two million noise correlation functions (NCFs) have been obtained.The Rayleigh wave group velocity was measured on the symmetric component of the NCFs with the frequency-time analysis method. The average group velocity is about 400 m/s at 4 Hz, which is consistent with preliminary active source result. To avoid mis-picking possible precursors, the arrival time was picked at the peak in a two-second time window predicted with the average group velocity of the fundamental mode. The quality of the arrival measurements is defined by the signal-to-noise ratio. We were able to pick reliable arrivals at about 35% of the station-pairs. Since the straight-ray assumption may not be valid in a strongly heterogeneous medium, the wave path was traced with a finite difference scheme and the LSQR method was utilized to invert group velocity. The heterogeneous features of the group velocity map are consistent with a local geologic map. The PoroTomo project is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. SWARM: A Compact High Resolution Correlator and Wideband VLBI Phased Array Upgrade for SMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintroub, Jonathan

    2014-06-01

    A new digital back end (DBE) is being commissioned on Mauna Kea. The “SMA Wideband Astronomical ROACH2 Machine”, or SWARM, processes a 4 GHz usable band in single polarization mode and is flexibly reconfigurable for 2 GHz full Stokes dual polarization. The hardware is based on the open source Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware 2 (ROACH2) platform from the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER). A 5 GSps quad-core analog-to-digital converter board uses a commercial chip from e2v installed on a CASPER-standard printed circuit board designed by Homin Jiang’s group at ASIAA. Two ADC channels are provided per ROACH2, each sampling a 2.3 GHz Nyquist band generated by a custom wideband block downconverter (BDC). The ROACH2 logic includes 16k-channel Polyphase Filterbank (F-engine) per input followed by a 10 GbE switch based corner-turn which feeds into correlator-accumulator logic (X-engines) co-located with the F-engines. This arrangement makes very effective use of a small amount of digital hardware (just 8 ROACH2s in 1U rack mount enclosures). The primary challenge now is to meet timing at full speed for a large and very complex FPGA bit code. Design of the VLBI phased sum and recorder interface logic is also in process. Our poster will describe the instrument design, with the focus on the particular challenges of ultra wideband signal processing. Early connected commissioning and science verification data will be presented.

  13. A new active array MST radar system with enhanced capabilities for high resolution atmospheric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durga rao, Meka; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Patra, Amit; Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Narayana Rao, T.; Kamaraj, Pandian; Jayaraj, Katta; Kmv, Prasad; Kamal Kumar, J.; Raghavendra, J.; Prasad, T. Rajendra; Thriveni, A.; Yasodha, Polisetti

    2016-07-01

    A new version of the 53-MHz MST Radar, using the 1024 solid state Transmit-Receive Modules (TRM), necessary feeder network, multi-channel receiver and a modified radar controller has been established using the existing antenna array of 1024 crossed Yagis. The new system has been configured for steering the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis in all 360o azimuth and 20o zenith angle, providing enhanced capability to study the Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere and Ionosphere. The multi channel receiver system has been designed for Spaced Antenna (SA) and Interferometry/ Iamging applications. The new system has also been configured for radiating in circular polarization for its application in the Ionosphere Incoherent Scatter mode. The new active array MST radar at Very-High-Frequency (53-MHz) located at Gadanki (13.45°N, 79.18°E), a tropical station in India, will be used to enhance the observations of winds, turbulence during the passage of convective events over the radar site as deep convection occurs very often at tropical latitudes. The new configuration with enhanced average power, beam agility with multi-channel experiments will be a potential source for studying middle atmosphere and ionosphere. In this paper, we present the system configuration, new capabilities and the first results obtained using the new version of the MST Radar.

  14. Superconducting tunnel junction array development for high-resolution energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barfknecht, A. T.; Cramer, S. P; Frank, M.; Friedrich, S.; Hiller, L. J.; Labov, S. E.; Mears, C. A.; Niderost, B.

    1998-07-01

    Cryogenic energy-dispersive x-ray detectors are being developed because of their superior energy resolution ((less than or equal to) 10 eV FWHM for keV x rays) compared to semiconductor EDS systems. So far, their range of application is limited due to their comparably small size and low count rate. We present data on the development of superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector arrays to address both of these issues. A single STJ detector has a resolution around 10 eV below 1 keV and can be operated at count rates of order 10,000 counts/s. We show that the simultaneous operation of several STJ detectors does not diminish their energy resolution significantly, while increasing the detector area and the maximum count rate by a factor given by the total number of independent channels.

  15. High-resolution parallel-detection sensor array using piezo-phototronics effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong L.; Pan, Caofeng

    2015-07-28

    A pressure sensor element includes a substrate, a first type of semiconductor material layer and an array of elongated light-emitting piezoelectric nanostructures extending upwardly from the first type of semiconductor material layer. A p-n junction is formed between each nanostructure and the first type semiconductor layer. An insulative resilient medium layer is infused around each of the elongated light-emitting piezoelectric nanostructures. A transparent planar electrode, disposed on the resilient medium layer, is electrically coupled to the top of each nanostructure. A voltage source is coupled to the first type of semiconductor material layer and the transparent planar electrode and applies a biasing voltage across each of the nanostructures. Each nanostructure emits light in an intensity that is proportional to an amount of compressive strain applied thereto.

  16. A seamless, high-resolution, coastal digital elevation model (DEM) for Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A seamless, three-meter digital elevation model (DEM) was constructed for the entire Southern California coastal zone, extending 473 km from Point Conception to the...

  17. A seamless, high-resolution, coastal digital elevation model (DEM) for Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A seamless, three-meter digital elevation model (DEM) was constructed for the entire Southern California coastal zone, extending 473 km from Point Conception to the...

  18. The Energy Spectrum of Telescope Array's Middle Drum Detector and the Direct Comparison to the High Resolution Fly's Eye Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array's Middle Drum fluorescence detector was instrumented with telescopes refurbished from the High Resolution Fly's Eye's HiRes-1 site. The data observed by Middle Drum in monocular mode was analyzed via the HiRes-1 profile-constrained geometry reconstruction technique and utilized the same calibration techniques enabling a direct comparison of the energy spectra and energy scales between the two experiments. The spectrum measured using the Middle Drum telescopes is based on a three-year exposure collected between December 16, 2007 and December 16, 2010. The calculated difference between the spectrum of the Middle Drum observations and the published spectrum obtained by the data collected by the HiRes-1 site allows the HiRes-1 energy scale to be transferred to Middle Drum. The HiRes energy scale is applied to the entire Telescope Array by making a comparison between Middle Drum monocular events and hybrid events that triggered both Middle Drum and the Telescope Array's scintillator Ground Arra...

  19. Investigation of high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging by means of surface and array radiofrequency coils at 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwaag, Wietske; Marques, José P; Hergt, Martin; Gruetter, Rolf

    2009-10-01

    In this investigation, high-resolution, 1x1x1-mm(3) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 7 T is performed using a multichannel array head coil and a surface coil approach. Scan geometry was optimized for each coil separately to exploit the strengths of both coils. Acquisitions with the surface coil focused on partial brain coverage, while whole-brain coverage fMRI experiments were performed with the array head coil. BOLD sensitivity in the occipital lobe was found to be higher with the surface coil than with the head array, suggesting that restriction of signal detection to the area of interest may be beneficial for localized activation studies. Performing independent component analysis (ICA) decomposition of the fMRI data, we consistently detected BOLD signal changes and resting state networks. In the surface coil data, a small negative BOLD response could be detected in these resting state network areas. Also in the data acquired with the surface coil, two distinct components of the positive BOLD signal were consistently observed. These two components were tentatively assigned to tissue and venous signal changes.

  20. High-Resolution Ultrasonic Imaging of Dento-Periodontal Tissues Using a Multi-Element Phased Array System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim-Cuong T; Le, Lawrence H; Kaipatur, Neelambar R; Zheng, Rui; Lou, Edmond H; Major, Paul W

    2016-10-01

    Intraoral ultrasonography uses high-frequency mechanical waves to study dento-periodontium. Besides the advantages of portability and cost-effectiveness, ultrasound technique has no ionizing radiation. Previous studies employed a single transducer or an array of transducer elements, and focused on enamel thickness and distance measurement. This study used a phased array system with a 128-element array transducer to image dento-periodontal tissues. We studied two porcine lower incisors from a 6-month-old piglet using 20-MHz ultrasound. The high-resolution ultrasonographs clearly showed the cross-sectional morphological images of the hard and soft tissues. The investigation used an integration of waveform analysis, travel-time calculation, and wavefield simulation to reveal the nature of the ultrasound data, which makes the study novel. With the assistance of time-distance radio-frequency records, we robustly justified the enamel-dentin interface, dentin-pulp interface, and the cemento-enamel junction. The alveolar crest level, the location of cemento-enamel junction, and the thickness of alveolar crest were measured from the images and compared favorably with those from the cone beam computed tomography with less than 10% difference. This preliminary and fundamental study has reinforced the conclusions from previous studies, that ultrasonography has great potential to become a non-invasive diagnostic imaging tool for quantitative assessment of periodontal structures and better delivery of oral care.

  1. Development of high resolution arrayed waveguide grating spectrometers for astronomical applications: first results

    CERN Document Server

    Gatkine, Pradip; Hu, Yiwen; Zhu, Tiecheng; Meng, Yang; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Dagenais, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Astrophotonics is the next-generation approach that provides the means to miniaturize near-infrared (NIR) spectrometers for upcoming large telescopes and make them more robust and inexpensive. The target requirements for our spectrograph are: a resolving power of about 3000, wide spectral range (J and H bands), free spectral range of about 30 nm, high on-chip throughput of about 80% (-1dB) and low crosstalk (high contrast ratio) between adjacent on-chip wavelength channels of less than 1% (-20dB). A promising photonic technology to achieve these requirements is Arrayed Waveguide Gratings (AWGs). We have developed our first generation of AWG devices using a silica-on-silicon substrate with a very thin layer of silicon-nitride in the core of our waveguides. The waveguide bending losses are minimized by optimizing the geometry of the waveguides. Our first generation of AWG devices are designed for H band and have a resolving power of around 1500 and free spectral range of about 10 nm around a central wavelength ...

  2. High-resolution Tangential AXUV Arrays for Radiated Power Density Measurements on NSTX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L [PPPL; Bell, R E [PPPL; Faust, I [MIT; Tritz, K [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21209, USA; Diallo, A [PPPL; Gerhardt, S P [PPPL; Kozub, T A [PPPL; LeBlanc, B P [PPPL; Stratton, B C [PPPL

    2014-07-01

    Precise measurements of the local radiated power density and total radiated power are a matter of the uttermost importance for understanding the onset of impurity-induced instabilities and the study of particle and heat transport. Accounting of power balance is also needed for the understanding the physics of various divertor con gurations for present and future high-power fusion devices. Poloidal asymmetries in the impurity density can result from high Mach numbers and can impact the assessment of their flux-surface-average and hence vary the estimates of P[sub]rad (r, t) and (Z[sub]eff); the latter is used in the calculation of the neoclassical conductivity and the interpretation of non-inductive and inductive current fractions. To this end, the bolometric diagnostic in NSTX-U will be upgraded, enhancing the midplane coverage and radial resolution with two tangential views, and adding a new set of poloidally-viewing arrays to measure the 2D radiation distribution. These systems are designed to contribute to the near- and long-term highest priority research goals for NSTX-U which will integrate non-inductive operation at reduced collisionality, with high-pressure, long energy-confinement-times and a divertor solution with metal walls.

  3. Identification of novel non-coding small RNAs from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 using high-resolution genome tiling arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swiatlo Edwin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of non-coding transcripts in human, mouse, and Escherichia coli has revealed their widespread occurrence and functional importance in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic life. In prokaryotes, studies have shown that non-coding transcripts participate in a broad range of cellular functions like gene regulation, stress and virulence. However, very little is known about non-coding transcripts in Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus, an obligate human respiratory pathogen responsible for significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. Tiling microarrays enable genome wide mRNA profiling as well as identification of novel transcripts at a high-resolution. Results Here, we describe a high-resolution transcription map of the S. pneumoniae clinical isolate TIGR4 using genomic tiling arrays. Our results indicate that approximately 66% of the genome is expressed under our experimental conditions. We identified a total of 50 non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs from the intergenic regions, of which 36 had no predicted function. Half of the identified sRNA sequences were found to be unique to S. pneumoniae genome. We identified eight overrepresented sequence motifs among sRNA sequences that correspond to sRNAs in different functional categories. Tiling arrays also identified approximately 202 operon structures in the genome. Conclusions In summary, the pneumococcal operon structures and novel sRNAs identified in this study enhance our understanding of the complexity and extent of the pneumococcal 'expressed' genome. Furthermore, the results of this study open up new avenues of research for understanding the complex RNA regulatory network governing S. pneumoniae physiology and virulence.

  4. 256-pixel microcalorimeter array for high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy of mixed-actinide materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, R., E-mail: rwinkler@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hoover, A.S.; Rabin, M.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bennett, D.A.; Doriese, W.B.; Fowler, J.W.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Horansky, R.D.; Reintsema, C.D.; Schmidt, D.R.; Vale, L.R.; Ullom, J.N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-01-11

    The application of cryogenic microcalorimeter detectors to γ-ray spectroscopy allows for measurements with unprecedented energy resolution. These detectors are ideally suited for γ-ray spectroscopy applications for which the measurement quality is limited by the spectral overlap of many closely spaced transitions using conventional detector technologies. The non-destructive analysis of mixed-isotope Pu materials is one such application where the precision can be potentially improved utilizing microcalorimeter detectors compared to current state-of-the-art high-purity Ge detectors (HPGe). The LANL-NIST γ-ray spectrometer, a 256-pixel microcalorimeter array based on transition-edge sensors (TESs), was recently commissioned and used to collect data on a variety of Pu isotopic standards to characterize the instrument performance. These measurements represent the first time the simultaneous readout of all 256 pixels for measurements of mixed-isotope Pu materials has been achieved. The LANL-NIST γ-ray spectrometer has demonstrated an average pixel resolution of 55 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 100 keV, nearly an order of magnitude better than HPGe detectors. Some challenges of the analysis of many-channel ultra-high resolution data and the techniques used to produce quality spectra for isotopic analysis will be presented. The LANL-NIST γ-ray spectrometer has also demonstrated stable operation and obtained high resolution measurements at total array event rates beyond 1 kHz. For a total event rate of 1.25 kHz, approximately 5.6 cps/pixel, a 72.2 eV average FWHM for the 103 keV photopeak of {sup 153}Gd was achieved.

  5. Validating a high-resolution digital soil map for precision agriculture across multiple fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digital soil mapping (DSM) for precision agriculture (PA) management is aimed at developing models that predict soil properties or classes using legacy soil data, sensors, and environmental covariates. The utility of DSM for PA is based on its ability to provide useful spatial soil information for o...

  6. High resolution millimeter wave digitally controlled oscillator with reconfigurable distributed metal capacitor passive resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, W.; Long, J.R.; Staszewski, B.

    2014-01-01

    A novel and useful millimeter-wave digitally controlled oscillator (DCO) that achieve a tuning range greater than 10% and fine frequency resolution less than 1 MHz. Switched metal capacitors are distributed across a passive resonator for tuning the oscillation frequency. To obtain sub-MHz frequency

  7. An autonomous low power high resolution micro-digital sun sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, N.; Theuwissen, A.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Digital Sun Sensor (μDSS) is a sun detector which senses the respective angle between a satellite and the sun. It is composed of a solar cell power supply, a RF communication block and a CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) chip, which is called APS+. The paper describes the implementation of a prototype o

  8. An autonomous low power high resolution micro-digital sun sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, N.; Theuwissen, A.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Digital Sun Sensor (μDSS) is a sun detector which senses the respective angle between a satellite and the sun. It is composed of a solar cell power supply, a RF communication block and a CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) chip, which is called APS+. The paper describes the implementation of a prototype

  9. High-speed and high-resolution analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Plassche, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters are important building blocks connecting the analog world of transducers with the digital world of computing, signal processing and data acquisition systems. In chapter two the converter as part of a system is described. Requirements of analog filte

  10. High-speed and high-resolution analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Plassche, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters are important building blocks connecting the analog world of transducers with the digital world of computing, signal processing and data acquisition systems. In chapter two the converter as part of a system is described. Requirements of analog

  11. Field testing of a convergent array of acoustic Doppler profilers for high-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, Samuel F.; Sellar, Brian; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2016-04-25

    An array of single-beam acoustic Doppler profilers has been developed for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities and subsequently tested in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use divergent acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using geometrically convergent acoustic beams creating a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. Away from the focal point, the array is also able to simultaneously reconstruct three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and is referred to herein as a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (C-ADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational commercial-scale Alstom 1MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine deployed at the European Marine Energy Center, Orkney Isles, UK. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the C-ADP system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation.

  12. Detection of Aspens Using High Resolution Aerial Laser Scanning Data and Digital Aerial Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Eerikäinen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to use high resolution Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS data and aerial images to detect European aspen (Populus tremula L. from among other deciduous trees. The field data consisted of 14 sample plots of 30 m × 30 m size located in the Koli National Park in the North Karelia, Eastern Finland. A Canopy Height Model (CHM was interpolated from the ALS data with a pulse density of 3.86/m2, low-pass filtered using Height-Based Filtering (HBF and binarized to create the mask needed to separate the ground pixels from the canopy pixels within individual areas. Watershed segmentation was applied to the low-pass filtered CHM in order to create preliminary canopy segments, from which the non-canopy elements were extracted to obtain the final canopy segmentation, i.e. the ground mask was analysed against the canopy mask. A manual classification of aerial images was employed to separate the canopy segments of deciduous trees from those of coniferous trees. Finally, linear discriminant analysis was applied to the correctly classified canopy segments of deciduous trees to classify them into segments belonging to aspen and those belonging to other deciduous trees. The independent variables used in the classification were obtained from the first pulse ALS point data. The accuracy of discrimination between aspen and other deciduous trees was 78.6%. The independent variables in the classification function were the proportion of vegetation hits, the standard deviation of in pulse heights, accumulated intensity at the 90th percentile and the proportion of laser points reflected at the 60th height percentile. The accuracy of classification corresponded to the validation results of earlier ALS-based studies on the classification of individual deciduous trees to tree species.

  13. Modelling high arctic percent vegetation cover using field digital images and high resolution satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nanfeng; Treitz, Paul

    2016-10-01

    In this study, digital images collected at a study site in the Canadian High Arctic were processed and classified to examine the spatial-temporal patterns of percent vegetation cover (PVC). To obtain the PVC of different plant functional groups (i.e., forbs, graminoids/sedges and mosses), field near infrared-green-blue (NGB) digital images were classified using an object-based image analysis (OBIA) approach. The PVC analyses comparing different vegetation types confirmed: (i) the polar semi-desert exhibited the lowest PVC with a large proportion of bare soil/rock cover; (ii) the mesic tundra cover consisted of approximately 60% mosses; and (iii) the wet sedge consisted almost exclusively of graminoids and sedges. As expected, the PVC and green normalized difference vegetation index (GNDVI; (RNIR - RGreen)/(RNIR + RGreen)), derived from field NGB digital images, increased during the summer growing season for each vegetation type: i.e., ∼5% (0.01) for polar semi-desert; ∼10% (0.04) for mesic tundra; and ∼12% (0.03) for wet sedge respectively. PVC derived from field images was found to be strongly correlated with WorldView-2 derived normalized difference spectral indices (NDSI; (Rx - Ry)/(Rx + Ry)), where Rx is the reflectance of the red edge (724.1 nm) or near infrared (832.9 nm and 949.3 nm) bands; Ry is the reflectance of the yellow (607.7 nm) or red (658.8 nm) bands with R2's ranging from 0.74 to 0.81. NDSIs that incorporated the yellow band (607.7 nm) performed slightly better than the NDSIs without, indicating that this band may be more useful for investigating Arctic vegetation that often includes large proportions of senescent vegetation throughout the growing season.

  14. Task-Based Modeling of a 5k Ultra-High-Resolution Medical Imaging System for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution, low-noise X-ray detectors based on CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) technology have demonstrated superior imaging performance for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). This paper presents a task-based model for a high-resolution medical imaging system to evaluate its ability to detect simulated microcalcifications and masses as lesions for breast cancer. A 3-D cascaded system analysis for a 50- [Formula: see text] pixel pitch CMOS APS X-ray detector was integrated with an object task function, a medical imaging display model, and the human eye contrast sensitivity function to calculate the detectability index and area under the ROC curve (AUC). It was demonstrated that the display pixel pitch and zoom factor should be optimized to improve the AUC for detecting small microcalcifications. In addition, detector electronic noise of smaller than 300 e(-) and a high display maximum luminance (>1000 cd/cm (2)) are desirable to distinguish microcalcifications of [Formula: see text] in size. For low contrast mass detection, a medical imaging display with a minimum of 12-bit gray levels is recommended to realize accurate luminance levels. A wide projection angle range of greater than ±30° in combination with the image gray level magnification could improve the mass detectability especially when the anatomical background noise is high. On the other hand, a narrower projection angle range below ±20° can improve the small, high contrast object detection. Due to the low mass contrast and luminance, the ambient luminance should be controlled below 5 cd/ [Formula: see text]. Task-based modeling provides important firsthand imaging performance of the high-resolution CMOS-based medical imaging system that is still at early stage development for DBT. The modeling results could guide the prototype design and clinical studies in the future.

  15. Clinical Experience With A High Resolution Digital Imaging System For Gastro-Intestinal Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, E. W.; Rowlands, J. A.; Hynes, D. M.; Toth, B. D.; Porter, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In our department, it is planned that the gastro-intestinal fluoroscopic area will be equipped entirely with digital imaging systems. The use of the 1024 X 1024 pixel frame store, backed by a hard disc for rapid image transfer, and the production of hard copy on a laser imager has reached the point where clinical efficacy and acceptance are assured. The further addition of facilities for annotation and the application of digital post-processing techniques are being explored both at the clinical site and at the research laboratorieS. The use of laser imaging has produced a further improvement in image quality and some of the practical problems related to this apparatus will be described. The availability of larger capacity laser disc image storage enables the local area network or "mini-PACS" system for fluoroscopy areas to become a concept worthy of investigation. We present our experience over a number of years with these systems, together with our latest investigations into potential applications of laser technology to the practice of radiology in a busy imaging centre.

  16. Information Entropy- and Average-Based High-Resolution Digital Storage Oscilloscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical resolution is an essential indicator of digital storage oscilloscope (DSO and the key to improving resolution is to increase digitalizing bits and lower noise. Averaging is a typical method to improve signal to noise ratio (SNR and the effective number of bits (ENOB. The existing averaging algorithm is apt to be restricted by the repetitiveness of signal and be influenced by gross error in quantization, and therefore its effect on restricting noise and improving resolution is limited. An information entropy-based data fusion and average-based decimation filtering algorithm, proceeding from improving average algorithm and in combination with relevant theories of information entropy, are proposed in this paper to improve the resolution of oscilloscope. For single acquiring signal, resolution is improved through eliminating gross error in quantization by utilizing the maximum entropy of sample data with further noise filtering via average-based decimation after data fusion of efficient sample data under the premise of oversampling. No subjective assumptions and constraints are added to the signal under test in the whole process without any impact on the analog bandwidth of oscilloscope under actual sampling rate.

  17. Digital Three-Dimensional Atlas of Quail Development Using High-Resolution MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth W. Ruffins

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an archetypal set of three-dimensional digital atlases of the quail embryo based on microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (μMRI. The atlases are composed of three modules: (1 images of fixed ex ovo quail, ranging in age from embryonic day 5 to 10 (e05 to e10; (2 a coarsely delineated anatomical atlas of the μMRI data; and (3 an organ system-based hierarchical graph linked to the anatomical delineations. The atlas is designed to be accessed using SHIVA, a free Java application. The atlas is extensible and can contain other types of information including anatomical, physiological, and functional descriptors. It can also be linked to online resources and references. This digital atlas provides a framework to place various data types, such as gene expression and cell migration data, within the normal three-dimensional anatomy of the developing quail embryo. This provides a method for the analysis and examination of the spatial relationships among the different types of information within the context of the entire embryo.

  18. ASTC-MIMO-TOPS Mode with Digital Beam-Forming in Elevation for High-Resolution Wide-Swath Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Huang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Future spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR missions require complete and frequent coverage of the earth with a high resolution. Terrain Observation by Progressive Scans (TOPS is a novel wide swath mode but has impaired azimuth resolution. In this paper, an innovative extended TOPS mode named Alamouti Space-time Coding multiple-input multiple-output TOPS (ASTC-MIMO-TOPS mode combined with digital beam-forming (DBF in elevation and multi-aperture SAR signal reconstruction in azimuth is proposed. This innovative mode achieves wide-swath coverage with a high geometric resolution and also overcomes major drawbacks in conventional MIMO SAR systems. The data processing scheme of this imaging scheme is presented in detail. The designed system example of the proposed ASTC-MIMO-TOPS mode, which has the imaging capacity of a 400 km wide swath with an azimuth resolution of 3 m, is given. Its system performance analysis results and simulated imaging results on point targets demonstrate the potential of the proposed novel spaceborne SAR mode for high-resolution wide-swath (HRWS imaging.

  19. Performance analysis of reversible image compression techniques for high-resolution digital teleradiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuduvalli, G R; Rangayyan, R M

    1992-01-01

    The performances of a number of block-based, reversible, compression algorithms suitable for compression of very-large-format images (4096x4096 pixels or more) are compared to that of a novel two-dimensional linear predictive coder developed by extending the multichannel version of the Burg algorithm to two dimensions. The compression schemes implemented are: Huffman coding, Lempel-Ziv coding, arithmetic coding, two-dimensional linear predictive coding (in addition to the aforementioned one), transform coding using discrete Fourier-, discrete cosine-, and discrete Walsh transforms, linear interpolative coding, and combinations thereof. The performances of these coding techniques for a few mammograms and chest radiographs digitized to sizes up to 4096x4096 10 b pixels are discussed. Compression from 10 b to 2.5-3.0 b/pixel on these images has been achieved without any loss of information. The modified multichannel linear predictor outperforms the other methods while offering certain advantages in implementation.

  20. User-Appropriate Viewer for High Resolution Interactive Engagement with 3d Digital Cultural Artefacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, D.; La Pensée, A.; Cooper, M.

    2013-07-01

    Three dimensional (3D) laser scanning is an important documentation technique for cultural heritage. This technology has been adopted from the engineering and aeronautical industry and is an invaluable tool for the documentation of objects within museum collections (La Pensée, 2008). The datasets created via close range laser scanning are extremely accurate and the created 3D dataset allows for a more detailed analysis in comparison to other documentation technologies such as photography. The dataset can be used for a range of different applications including: documentation; archiving; surface monitoring; replication; gallery interactives; educational sessions; conservation and visualization. However, the novel nature of a 3D dataset is presenting a rather unique challenge with respect to its sharing and dissemination. This is in part due to the need for specialised 3D software and a supported graphics card to display high resolution 3D models. This can be detrimental to one of the main goals of cultural institutions, which is to share knowledge and enable activities such as research, education and entertainment. This has limited the presentation of 3D models of cultural heritage objects to mainly either images or videos. Yet with recent developments in computer graphics, increased internet speed and emerging technologies such as Adobe's Stage 3D (Adobe, 2013) and WebGL (Khronos, 2013), it is now possible to share a dataset directly within a webpage. This allows website visitors to interact with the 3D dataset allowing them to explore every angle of the object, gaining an insight into its shape and nature. This can be very important considering that it is difficult to offer the same level of understanding of the object through the use of traditional mediums such as photographs and videos. Yet this presents a range of problems: this is a very novel experience and very few people have engaged with 3D objects outside of 3D software packages or games. This paper

  1. Cryogenic phased-array for high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); assessment of clinical and research applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Flora S.

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging is one of the most powerful tools in diagnostic medicine for soft tissue imaging. Image acquisition techniques and hardware receivers are very important in achieving high contrast and high resolution MR images. An aim of this dissertation is to design single and multi-element room and cryogenic temperature arrays and make assessments of their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and SNR gain. In this dissertation, four sets of MR receiver coils are built. They are the receiver-only cryo-coils that are not commercially available. A tuning and matching circuit is attached to each coil. The tuning and matching circuits are simple; however, each device component has to operate at a high magnetic field and cryogenic temperature environment. Remote DC bias of the varactor controls the tuning and matching outside the scanner room. Active detuning of the resonator is done by two p-i-n junction (PIN) diodes. Cooling of the receiver is done by a customized liquid nitrogen cryostat. The first application is to build a 3-Tesla 2x1 horseshoe counter-rotating current (CRC) cryogenic array to image the tibia in a human body. With significant increase in SNR, the surface coil should deliver high contrast and resolution images that can show the trabecular bone and bone marrow structure. This structural image will be used to model the mechanical strength of the bone as well as bone density and chance of fracture. The planar CRC is a unique design of this surface array. The second application is to modify the coil design to 7-Tesla to study the growth of infant rhesus monkey eyes. Fast scan MR images of the infant monkey heads are taken for monitoring shapes of their eyeballs. The monkeys are induced with shortsightedness by eye lenses, and they are scanned periodically to get images of their eyeballs. The field-of-view (FOV) of these images is about five centimeters and the area of interest is two centimeters deep from the surface. Because of these reasons

  2. Spatial disaggregation of satellite-derived irradiance using a high-resolution digital elevation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Arias, Jose A.; Tovar-Pescador, Joaquin [Department of Physics, University of Jaen (Spain); Cebecauer, Tomas [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Ispra (Italy); GeoModel s.r.o., Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute of Geography, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Suri, Marcel [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Ispra (Italy); GeoModel s.r.o., Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2010-09-15

    Downscaling of the Meteosat-derived solar radiation ({proportional_to}5 km grid resolution) is based on decomposing the global irradiance and correcting the systematic bias of its components using the elevation and horizon shadowing that are derived from the SRTM-3 digital elevation model (3 arc sec resolution). The procedure first applies the elevation correction based on the difference between coarse and high spatial resolution. Global irradiance is split into direct, diffuse circumsolar and diffuse isotropic components using statistical models, and then corrections due to terrain shading and sky-view fraction are applied. The effect of reflected irradiance is analysed only in the theoretical section. The method was applied in the eastern Andalusia, Spain, and the validation was carried out for 22 days on April, July and December 2006 comparing 15-min estimates of the satellite-derived solar irradiance and observations from nine ground stations. Overall, the corrections of the satellite estimates in the studied region strongly reduced the mean bias of the estimates for clear and cloudy days from roughly 2.3% to 0.4%. (author)

  3. Production of high-resolution digital terrain models in mountain regions to support risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Forlani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Demand for high-accuracy digital terrain models (DTMs in the Alpine region has been steadily increasing in recent years in valleys as well as high mountains. In the former, the determination of the geo-mechanical parameters of rock masses is the main objective; global warming, which causes the retreat of glaciers and the reduction of permafrost, is the main drive of the latter. The consequence is the instability of rock masses in high mountains: new cost-effective monitoring techniques are required to deal with the peculiar characteristics of such environment, delivering results at short notice. After discussing the design and execution of photogrammetric surveys in such areas, with particular reference to block orientation and block control, the paper describes the production of DTMs of rock faces and glacier fronts with light instrumentation and data acquisition techniques, allowing highly automated data processing. To this aim, the PhotoGPS technique and structure from motion algorithms are used to speed up the orientation process, while dense matching area-based correlation techniques are used to generate the DTMs.

  4. A flexible multi-channel high-resolution time-to-digital converter ASIC

    CERN Document Server

    Mota, M; Debieux, S; Ryzhov, V; Moreira, P; Marchioro, A

    2000-01-01

    A data driven multi-channel Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) circuit with programmable resolution ( similar to 25ps - 8OOps binning) and a dynamic range of 102.4mus has been implemented in a 0.25mum CMOS technology. An on-chip PLL is used for clock multiplication up to 320MHz from an external 40MHz reference. A 32 element Delay Locked Loop (DLL) performs time interpolation down to 97.5ps. Finally, finer time interpolation is obtained using four samples of the DLL separated by 24.5ps generated by an adjustable on-chip RC delay line. In the lower resolution modes of operation, 32 TDC channels are available. In the highest resolution mode eight channels are available, since four low-resolution channels are used to perform a single fine time interpolation. The TDC is capable of measuring both leading and trailing edges of the input signal. Measurements are initially stored as time stamps in individual four-location deep asynchronous channel buffers. After proper encoding, measurements are written into four 256-dee...

  5. Comprehensive genome characterization of solitary fibrous tumors using high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, François; Bouvier-Labit, Corinne; Finetti, Pascal; Adélaïde, José; Metellus, Philippe; Mokhtari, Karima; Decouvelaere, Anne-Valérie; Miquel, Catherine; Jouvet, Anne; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Pedeutour, Florence; Chaffanet, Max; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare spindle cell tumors with limited therapeutic options. Their molecular basis is poorly known. No consistent cytogenetic abnormality has been reported. We used high-resolution whole-genome array-based comparative genomic hybridization (Agilent 244K oligonucleotide chips) to profile 47 samples, meningeal in >75% of cases. Few copy number aberrations (CNAs) were observed. Sixty-eight percent of samples did not show any gene CNA after exclusion of probes located in regions with referenced copy number variation (CNV). Only low-level CNAs were observed. The genomic profiles were very homogeneous among samples. No molecular class was revealed by clustering of DNA copy numbers. All cases displayed a "simplex" profile. No recurrent CNA was identified. Imbalances occurring in >20%, such as the gain of 8p11.23-11.22 region, contained known CNVs. The 13q14.11-13q31.1 region (lost in 4% of cases) was the largest altered region and contained the lowest percentage of genes with referenced CNVs. A total of 425 genes without CNV showed copy number transition in at least one sample, but only but only 1 in at least 10% of samples. The genomic profiles of meningeal and extra-meningeal cases did not show any differences.

  6. Digital Array Gas Radiometer (DAGR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The digital array gas radiometer (DAGR) is a new sensor design for accurate measurement and monitoring of trace gases in the boundary layer from space, aircraft, or...

  7. Digital Array Gas Radiometer (DAGR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation proposed here is a digital array gas radiometer (DAGR), a new design for a gas filter correlation radiometer (GFCR) to accurately measure and monitor...

  8. EMODNet Bathymetry - building and providing a high resolution digital bathymetry for European seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Dick M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Access to marine data is a key issue for the implementation of the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). The EU communication 'Marine Knowledge 2020' underpins the importance of data availability and harmonising access to marine data from different sources. The European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODnet) is a long term marine data initiative from the European Commission Directorate-General for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (DG MARE) underpinning the Marine Knowledge 2020 strategy. EMODnet is a consortium of organisations assembling European marine data, data products and metadata from diverse sources in a uniform way. The main purpose of EMODnet is to unlock fragmented and hidden marine data resources and to make these available to individuals and organisations (public and private), and to facilitate investment in sustainable coastal and offshore activities through improved access to quality-assured, standardised and harmonised marine data which are interoperable and free of restrictions on use. The EMODnet data infrastructure is developed through a stepwise approach in three major phases. Currently EMODnet is in the 2nd phase of development with seven sub-portals in operation that provide access to marine data from the following themes: bathymetry, geology, physics, chemistry, biology, seabed habitats and human activities. EMODnet development is a dynamic process so new data, products and functionality are added regularly while portals are continuesly improved to make the service more fit for purpose and user friendly with the help of users and stakeholders. The EMODnet Bathymetry project develops and publishes Digital Terrain Models (DTM) for the European seas. These are produced from survey and aggregated data sets, that are indexed with metadata by adopting the SeaDataNet Common Data Index (CDI) data discovery and access service and the SeaDataNet Sextant data products catalogue service. The new EMODnet DTM will have a resolution of 1

  9. EMODNet Bathymetry - building and providing a high resolution digital bathymetry for European seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Dick M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Access to marine data is a key issue for the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive and the EU Marine Knowledge 2020 agenda and includes the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNet) initiative. EMODNet aims at assembling European marine data, data products and metadata from diverse sources in a uniform way. The EMODNet data infrastructure is developed through a stepwise approach in three major phases. Currently EMODNet is entering its 3rd phase with operational portals providing access to marine data for bathymetry, geology, physics, chemistry, biology, seabed habitats and human activities, complemented by checkpoint projects, analyzing the fitness for purpose of data provision. The EMODNet Bathymetry project develops and publishes Digital Terrain Models (DTM) for the European seas. These are produced from survey and aggregated data sets that are indexed with metadata by adopting from SeaDataNet the Common Data Index (CDI) data discovery and access service and the Sextant data products catalogue service. SeaDataNet is a network of major oceanographic data centers around the European seas that manage, operate and further develop a pan-European infrastructure for marine and ocean data management. SeaDataNet is also setting and governing marine data standards, and exploring and establishing interoperability solutions to connect to other e-infrastructures on the basis of standards such as ISO and OGC. The SeaDataNet portal provides users a number of interrelated meta directories, an extensive range of controlled vocabularies, and the various SeaDataNet standards and tools. SeaDataNet at present gives overview and access to more than 1.8 million data sets for physical oceanography, chemistry, geology, geophysics, bathymetry and biology from more than 100 connected data centers from 34 countries riparian to European seas. The latest EMODNet Bathymetry DTM has a resolution of 1/8 arc minute * 1/8 arc minute and covers all European sea regions. Use is made of

  10. Spatially explicit rangeland erosion monitoring using high-resolution digital aerial imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillan, Jeffrey K.; Karl, Jason W.; Barger, Nichole N.; Elaksher, Ahmed; Duniway, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all of the ecosystem services supported by rangelands, including production of livestock forage, carbon sequestration, and provisioning of clean water, are negatively impacted by soil erosion. Accordingly, monitoring the severity, spatial extent, and rate of soil erosion is essential for long-term sustainable management. Traditional field-based methods of monitoring erosion (sediment traps, erosion pins, and bridges) can be labor intensive and therefore are generally limited in spatial intensity and/or extent. There is a growing effort to monitor natural resources at broad scales, which is driving the need for new soil erosion monitoring tools. One remote-sensing technique that can be used to monitor soil movement is a time series of digital elevation models (DEMs) created using aerial photogrammetry methods. By geographically coregistering the DEMs and subtracting one surface from the other, an estimate of soil elevation change can be created. Such analysis enables spatially explicit quantification and visualization of net soil movement including erosion, deposition, and redistribution. We constructed DEMs (12-cm ground sampling distance) on the basis of aerial photography immediately before and 1 year after a vegetation removal treatment on a 31-ha Piñon-Juniper woodland in southeastern Utah to evaluate the use of aerial photography in detecting soil surface change. On average, we were able to detect surface elevation change of ± 8−9cm and greater, which was sufficient for the large amount of soil movement exhibited on the study area. Detecting more subtle soil erosion could be achieved using the same technique with higher-resolution imagery from lower-flying aircraft such as unmanned aerial vehicles. DEM differencing and process-focused field methods provided complementary information and a more complete assessment of soil loss and movement than any single technique alone. Photogrammetric DEM differencing could be used as a technique to

  11. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  12. Construction and visualization of high-resolution three-dimensional anatomical structure datasets for Chinese digital human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI AnAn; LIU Qian; ZENG ShaoQun; TANG Lei; ZHONG ShiZhen; LUO QingMing

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the China Digital Human Project (CDH) is to digitize and visualize the anatomical structures of human body. In the project, a database with information of morphology, physical charac-teristics and physiological function will be constructed. The raw data of CDH which was completed in the Southern Medical University is employed. In Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), the frozen section images are preprocessed, segmented, labeled in accordance with the major organs and tissues of human beings, and reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) models in parallel on high performance computing clusters (HPC). Some visualization software for 2D atlas and 3D mod-els are developed based on the new dataset with high resolution (0.1 mm×0.1 mm×0.2 mm). In order to share, release and popularize the above work, a website (www.vch.org.cn) is online. The dataset is one of the most important parts in the national information database and the medical infrastructure.

  13. Valles Marineris, Mars: High-Resolution Digital Terrain Model on the basis of Mars-Express HRSC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumke, A.; Spiegel, M.; van Gasselt, S.; Neukum, G.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction: Since December 2003, the European Space Agency's (ESA) Mars Express (MEX) orbiter has been investigating Mars. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), one of the scientific experiments onboard MEX, is a pushbroom stereo color scanning instrument with nine line detectors, each equipped with 5176 CCD sensor elements. Five CCD lines operate with panchromatic filters and four lines with red, green, blue and infrared filters at different observation angles [1]. MEX has a highly elliptical near-polar orbit and reaches a distance of 270 km at periapsis. Ground resolution of image data predominantly varies with respect to spacecraft altitude and the chosen macro-pixel format. Usually, although not exclusively, the nadir channel provides full resolution of up to 10 m per pixel. Stereo-, photometry and color channels generally have a coarser resolution. One of the goals for MEX HRSC is to cover Mars globally in color and stereoscopically at high-resolution. So far, HRSC has covered almost half of the surface of Mars at a resolution better than 20 meters per pixel. Such data are utilized to derive high resolution digital terrain models (DTM), ortho-image mosaics and additionally higher-level 3D data products such as 3D views. Standardized high-resolution single-strip digital terrain models (using improved orientation data) have been derived at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Berlin-Adlershof [2]. Those datasets, i.e. high-resolution digital terrain models as well as ortho-image data, are distributed as Vicar image files (http://www-mipl.jpl.nasa.gov/external/vicar.html) via the HRSCview web-interface [3], accessible at http://hrscview.fu-berlin.de. A systematic processing workflow is described in detail in [4,5]. In consideration of the scientific interest, the processing of the Valles Marineris region will be discussed in this paper. The DTM mosaic was derived from 82 HRSC orbits at approximately -22° S to 1° N and 250° to 311° E. Methods: Apart from

  14. Applications and Innovations for Use of High Definition and High Resolution Digital Motion Imagery in Space Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Rodney

    2016-01-01

    The first live High Definition Television (HDTV) from a spacecraft was in November, 2006, nearly ten years before the 2016 SpaceOps Conference. Much has changed since then. Now, live HDTV from the International Space Station (ISS) is routine. HDTV cameras stream live video views of the Earth from the exterior of the ISS every day on UStream, and HDTV has even flown around the Moon on a Japanese Space Agency spacecraft. A great deal has been learned about the operations applicability of HDTV and high resolution imagery since that first live broadcast. This paper will discuss the current state of real-time and file based HDTV and higher resolution video for space operations. A potential roadmap will be provided for further development and innovations of high-resolution digital motion imagery, including gaps in technology enablers, especially for deep space and unmanned missions. Specific topics to be covered in the paper will include: An update on radiation tolerance and performance of various camera types and sensors and ramifications on the future applicability of these types of cameras for space operations; Practical experience with downlinking very large imagery files with breaks in link coverage; Ramifications of larger camera resolutions like Ultra-High Definition, 6,000 [pixels] and 8,000 [pixels] in space applications; Enabling technologies such as the High Efficiency Video Codec, Bundle Streaming Delay Tolerant Networking, Optical Communications and Bayer Pattern Sensors and other similar innovations; Likely future operations scenarios for deep space missions with extreme latency and intermittent communications links.

  15. Performance Analysis of Digital loudspeaker Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bo Rohde; Kontomichos, Fotios; Mourjopoulos, John

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of digital loudspeaker arrays shows that the ways in which bits are mapped to the drivers influence the quality of the audio result. Specifically, a "bit-summed" rather than the traditional "bit-mapped" strategy greatly reduces the number of times drivers make binary transitions per...... period of the input frequency. Detailed simulations compare the results for a 32-loudspeaker array with a similar configuration with analog excitation of the drivers. Ideally, drivers in digital arrays should be very small and span a small area, but that sets limits on the low-frequency response...

  16. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations in intravenous leiomyomatosis of the uterus: high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buza, Natalia; Xu, Fang; Wu, Weiqing; Carr, Ryan J; Li, Peining; Hui, Pei

    2014-09-01

    Uterine intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) is a distinct smooth muscle neoplasm with a potential of clinical aggressiveness due to its ability to extend into intrauterine and extrauterine vasculature. In this study, chromosomal alterations analyzed by oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization were performed in 9 cases of IVL. The analysis was informative in all cases with multiple copy number losses and/or gains observed in each tumor. The most frequent recurrent loss of 22q12.3-q13.1 was observed in 6 tumors (66.7%), followed by losses of 22q11.23-q13.31, 1p36.13-p33, 2p25.3-p23.3, and 2q24.2-q32.2 and gains of 6p22.2, 2q37.3 and 10q22.2-q22.3, in decreasing order of frequency. Copy number variants were identified at 14q11.2, 15q11.1-q11.2, and 15q26.2. Genes mapping to the regions of loss include CHEK2, EWS, NF2, PDGFB, and MAP3K7IP1 on chromosome 22q, HEI10 on chromosome 14q, and succinate dehydrogenase subunit B, E2F2, ARID1A KPNA6, EIF3S2 , PTCH2, and PIK3R3 on chromosome 1p. Regional losses on chromosomes 22q and 1p and gains on chromosomes 12q showed overlaps with those previously observed in uterine leiomyosarcomas. In addition, presence of multiple chromosomal aberrations implies a higher level of genetic instability. Follow-up polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing analysis of MED12 gene revealed absence of G> A transition at nucleotides c.130 or c.131 in all 9 cases, a frequent mutation found in uterine leiomyoma and its variants. In conclusion, this is the first report of high-resolution, genome-wide investigation of IVL by oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization. The presence of high frequencies of recurrent regional loss involving several chromosomes is an important finding and likely related to the pathogenesis of the disease.

  17. Digital electrostatic acoustic transducer array

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of an array of electrostatic acoustic transducers. The array is micromachined on a silicon wafer using standard micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n electrostatic transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a hexagonal membrane shape structure, which is separated from the substrate by 3µm air gap. The membrane is made out 5µm thick polyimide layer that has a bottom gold electrode on the substrate and a gold top electrode on top of the membrane (250nm). The wafer layout design was diced in nine chips with different array configurations, with variation of the membrane dimensions. The device was tested with 90 V giving and sound output level as high as 35dB, while actuating all the elements at the same time.

  18. High resolution seismic refraction method with multichannel digital data acquisition system; Digital ta channel sokutei system wo mochiita koseido kussetsuho jishin tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, K. [Oyo Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    This paper introduces a multichannel digital data acquisition system and examples of measurements with the system in seismic exploration using the high resolution seismic refraction method. The high resolution seismic refraction system performs analyses nearly automatically by using a computer after initial travel time has been read. Therefore, the system requires high-accuracy travel time data, for which a multichannel digital measuring instrument developed recently for seismic exploration using the refraction method has been used for the measurement. The specification specifies the number of channels at 144 as a maximum, a sampling time of 62.5 {mu}sec to 4 m sec, the maximum number of sampling of 80,000 samples, and gain accuracy of {plus_minus} 1%. The system was used for surveying a tunnel having a maximum soil cover of about 800 m. The traverse line length is about 6 km, the distance between vibration receiving points is 50 m, and the number of vibration receiving points is 194. Executing measurements of single point system using GPS can derive accurate velocity in the vicinity of the basic face of the tunnel construction. Results were obtained from the investigation, which can serve more for actual construction work. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Per-Pixel Coded Exposure for High-Speed and High-Resolution Imaging Using a Digital Micromirror Device Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Feng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-speed photography is an important tool for studying rapid physical phenomena. However, low-frame-rate CCD (charge coupled device or CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor camera cannot effectively capture the rapid phenomena with high-speed and high-resolution. In this paper, we incorporate the hardware restrictions of existing image sensors, design the sampling functions, and implement a hardware prototype with a digital micromirror device (DMD camera in which spatial and temporal information can be flexibly modulated. Combined with the optical model of DMD camera, we theoretically analyze the per-pixel coded exposure and propose a three-element median quicksort method to increase the temporal resolution of the imaging system. Theoretically, this approach can rapidly increase the temporal resolution several, or even hundreds, of times without increasing bandwidth requirements of the camera. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method via extensive examples and achieve 100 fps (frames per second gain in temporal resolution by using a 25 fps camera.

  20. Autonomous selection of PDE inpainting techniques vs. exemplar inpainting techniques for void fill of high resolution digital surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmes, Mark; Yates, J. Harlan; Allen, Josef DeVaughn; Kelley, Patrick

    2007-04-01

    High resolution Digital Surface Models (DSMs) may contain voids (missing data) due to the data collection process used to obtain the DSM, inclement weather conditions, low returns, system errors/malfunctions for various collection platforms, and other factors. DSM voids are also created during bare earth processing where culture and vegetation features have been extracted. The Harris LiteSite TM Toolkit handles these void regions in DSMs via two novel techniques. We use both partial differential equations (PDEs) and exemplar based inpainting techniques to accurately fill voids. The PDE technique has its origin in fluid dynamics and heat equations (a particular subset of partial differential equations). The exemplar technique has its origin in texture analysis and image processing. Each technique is optimally suited for different input conditions. The PDE technique works better where the area to be void filled does not have disproportionately high frequency data in the neighborhood of the boundary of the void. Conversely, the exemplar based technique is better suited for high frequency areas. Both are autonomous with respect to detecting and repairing void regions. We describe a cohesive autonomous solution that dynamically selects the best technique as each void is being repaired.

  1. Levee crest elevation profiles derived from airborne lidar-based high resolution digital elevation models in south Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Thatcher, Cindy A.; Barras, John A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the feasibility of using airborne lidar surveys to construct high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) and develop an automated procedure to extract levee longitudinal elevation profiles for both federal levees in Atchafalaya Basin and local levees in Lafourche Parish, south Lousiana. This approach can successfully accommodate a high degree of levee sinuosity and abrupt changes in levee orientation (direction) in planar coordinates, variations in levee geometries, and differing DEM resolutions. The federal levees investigated in Atchafalaya Basin have crest elevations between 5.3 and 12 m while the local counterparts in Lafourche Parish are between 0.76 and 2.3 m. The vertical uncertainty in the elevation data is considered when assessing federal crest elevation against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers minimum height requirements to withstand the 100-year flood. Only approximately 5% of the crest points of the two federal levees investigated in the Atchafalaya Basin region met this requirement.

  2. A new seamless, high-resolution digital elevation model of the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregoso, Theresa; Wang, Rueen-Fang; Ateljevich, Eli; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2017-06-14

    Climate change, sea-level rise, and human development have contributed to the changing geomorphology of the San Francisco Bay - Delta (Bay-Delta) Estuary system. The need to predict scenarios of change led to the development of a new seamless, high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the Bay – Delta that can be used by modelers attempting to understand potential future changes to the estuary system. This report details the three phases of the creation of this DEM. The first phase took a bathymetric-only DEM created in 2005 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), refined it with additional data, and identified areas that would benefit from new surveys. The second phase began a USGS collaboration with the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) that updated a 2012 DWR seamless bathymetric/topographic DEM of the Bay-Delta with input from the USGS and modifications to fit the specific needs of USGS modelers. The third phase took the work from phase 2 and expanded the coverage area in the north to include the Yolo Bypass up to the Fremont Weir, the Sacramento River up to Knights Landing, and the American River up to the Nimbus Dam, and added back in the elevations for interior islands. The constant evolution of the Bay-Delta will require continuous updates to the DEM of the Delta, and there still are areas with older data that would benefit from modern surveys. As a result, DWR plans to continue updating the DEM.

  3. Per-Pixel Coded Exposure for High-Speed and High-Resolution Imaging Using a Digital Micromirror Device Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua; Zheng, Shiwei

    2016-03-04

    High-speed photography is an important tool for studying rapid physical phenomena. However, low-frame-rate CCD (charge coupled device) or CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) camera cannot effectively capture the rapid phenomena with high-speed and high-resolution. In this paper, we incorporate the hardware restrictions of existing image sensors, design the sampling functions, and implement a hardware prototype with a digital micromirror device (DMD) camera in which spatial and temporal information can be flexibly modulated. Combined with the optical model of DMD camera, we theoretically analyze the per-pixel coded exposure and propose a three-element median quicksort method to increase the temporal resolution of the imaging system. Theoretically, this approach can rapidly increase the temporal resolution several, or even hundreds, of times without increasing bandwidth requirements of the camera. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method via extensive examples and achieve 100 fps (frames per second) gain in temporal resolution by using a 25 fps camera.

  4. Digital Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection system with dynamic focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J. S.; Shin, H. J.; Song, S. J.; Song, T. K.

    2000-05-01

    Enhancement of the ultrasonic flaw detection and characterization is expected through the development of a high performance PAULI (Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection) system which can provide high resolution two-dimensional (sector scan: S-scan) images. The high-resolution S-scan image renders inspection results more readable compared to the conventional A-scan and B-scan results. Therefore, it can improve inspection efficiency and reliability. In this study, the ultrasonic imaging technologies developed in medical applications were adapted to develop a digital PAULI system for nondestructive testing. To provide real-time S-scan images, the PAULI system uses 64 independent transceiver channels controlled by proper delay laws for steering and focusing the ultrasound beams along each scan lines. The PAULI system employs a novel dynamic receive focusing technique in order to optimize the lateral resolution by focusing the ultrasound wave at all imaging points. The dynamic receive focusing is achieved in real-time by digital signal processing methods. The feasibility of PAULI system is demonstrated for the NDE of steel structures.

  5. Improved estimation of flood parameters by combining space based SAR data with very high resolution digital elevation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zwenzner

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe flood events turned out to be the most devastating catastrophes for Europe's population, economy and environment during the past decades. The total loss caused by the August 2002 flood is estimated to be 10 billion Euros for Germany alone. Due to their capability to present a synoptic view of the spatial extent of floods, remote sensing technology, and especially synthetic aperture radar (SAR systems, have been successfully applied for flood mapping and monitoring applications. However, the quality and accuracy of the flood masks and derived flood parameters always depends on the scale and the geometric precision of the original data as well as on the classification accuracy of the derived data products. The incorporation of auxiliary information such as elevation data can help to improve the plausibility and reliability of the derived flood masks as well as higher level products. This paper presents methods to improve the matching of flood masks with very high resolution digital elevation models as derived from LiDAR measurements for example. In the following, a cross section approach is presented that allows the dynamic fitting of the position of flood mask profiles according to the underlying terrain information from the DEM. This approach is tested in two study areas, using different input data sets. The first test area is part of the Elbe River (Germany where flood masks derived from Radarsat-1 and IKONOS during the 2002 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 1 m spatial resolution. The other test data set is located on the River Severn (UK and flood masks derived from the TerraSAR-X satellite and aerial photos acquired during the 2007 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 2 m pixel spacing. By means of these two examples the performance of the matching technique and the scaling effects are analysed and discussed. Furthermore, the systematic flood mapping capability of the different imaging systems are

  6. Standard guide for digital detector array radiology

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This standard is a user guide, which is intended to serve as a tutorial for selection and use of various digital detector array systems nominally composed of the detector array and an imaging system to perform digital radiography. This guide also serves as an in-detail reference for the following standards: Practices E2597, , and E2737. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Digitized crime scene forensics: automated trace separation of toolmarks on high-resolution 2D/3D CLSM surface data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausing, Eric; Vielhauer, Claus

    2015-03-01

    Locksmith forensics is an important and very challenging part of classic crime scene forensics. In prior work, we propose a partial transfer to the digital domain, to effectively support forensic experts and present approaches for a full process chain consisting of five steps: Trace positioning, 2D/3D acquisition with a confocal 3D laser scanning microscope, detection by segmentation, trace type determination, and determination of the opening method. In particular the step of trace segmentation on high-resolution 3D surfaces thereby turned out to be the part most difficult to implement. The reason for that is the highly structured and complex surfaces to be analyzed. These surfaces are cluttered with a high number of toolmarks, which overlap and distort each other. In Clausing et al., we present an improved approach for a reliable segmentation of relevant trace regions but without the possibility of separating single traces out of segmented trace regions. However, in our past research, especially features based on shape and dimension turned out to be highly relevant for a fully automated analysis and interpretation. In this paper, we consequently propose an approach for this separation. To achieve this goal, we use our segmentation approach and expand it with a combination of the watershed algorithm with a graph-based analysis. Found sub-regions are compared based on their surface character and are connected or divided depending on their similarity. We evaluate our approach with a test set of about 1,300 single traces on the exemplary locking cylinder component 'key pin' and thereby are able of showing the high suitability of our approach.

  8. Towards the modelling of pedestrian wind speed using high-resolution digital surface models and statistical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Lars; Onomura, Shiho; Lindberg, Fredrik; Seaquist, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Wind is a complex phenomenon and a critical factor in assessing climatic conditions and pedestrian comfort within cities. To obtain spatial information on near-ground wind speed, 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling is often used. This is a computationally intensive method which requires extensive computer resources and is time consuming. By using a simpler 2D method, larger areas can be processed and less time is required. This study attempts to model the relationship between near-ground wind speed and urban geometry using 2.5D raster data and variable selection methods. Such models can be implemented in a geographic information system (GIS) to assess the spatial distribution of wind speed at street level in complex urban environments at scales from neighbourhood to city. Wind speed data, 2 m above ground, is obtained from simulations by CFD modelling and used as a response variable. A number of derivatives calculated from high-resolution digital surface models (DSM) are used as potential predictors. A sequential variable selection algorithm followed by all-possible subset regression was used to select candidate models for further evaluation. The results show that the selected models explain general spatial wind speed pattern characteristics but the prediction errors are large, especially so in areas with high wind speeds. However, all selected models did explain 90 % of the wind speed variability (R 2 ≈ 0.90). Predictors adding information on width and height ratio and alignment of street canyons with respect to wind direction are suggested for improving model performance. To assess the applicability of any derived model, the results of the CFD model should be thoroughly evaluated against field measurements.

  9. High resolution digital elevation modelling from TLS and UAV campaign reveals structural complexity at the 2014 Holuhraun eruption site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel; Walter, Thomas R.; Titt, Tanja; Schöpa, Anne; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Dürig, Tobi

    2017-04-01

    Fissure eruptions are commonly linked to magma dikes at depth, associated with deformation that is described by subsidence and lateral widening at the surface. The structure formation associated with such fissure eruptions, however, is barely preserved in nature because of the rapid erosion and/or difficult access to these areas, which is why, so far, normal fault displacements are commonly assumed for this type of fractures. At the 2014 Holuhraun eruption sites, the largest fissure eruption in Iceland since almost two centuries, evidence is increasing that the developing structures are related to pre-existing topography, reactivation of earlier fractures and possible complexity in the opening mode of the dike. In an attempt to investigate the Holuhraun structures in greater detail, a fieldwork mapping project combining terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) based aerophoto analysis was realized. From this data, we generated a locally high resolution digital elevation model and a structural map that allow for identification of kinematic indicators and assessing senses of fault opening, strike-slip movements, and complexities in fracture pathways. We identified fracture curvatures, step-overs and en-echelon type structures, and measured strike directions for single fault segments including the amount of opening and opening angles. We conjecture that local complexities in the fracture paths and fracture geometries are closely related to pre-existing geometric and mechanical heterogeneities. Moreover, we identified local changes in fracture trends and offsets close to eruption sites, which are possibly associated with geometrical changes in the feeding dike itself. Results have important implications for the development of surface structures at fissure eruption sites and underline that the structural memory is a very important factor in understanding the complexities of local fault structures above dike intrusions.

  10. Digital Elevation Models of Greenland based on combined radar and laser altimetry as well as high-resolution stereoscopic imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinsen, J. F.; Smith, B. E.; Sandberg Sorensen, L.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Simonsen, S. B.; Forsberg, R.

    2015-12-01

    A number of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Greenland exist, each of which are applicable for different purposes. This study presents two such DEMs: One developed by merging contemporary radar and laser altimeter data, and one derived from high-resolution stereoscopic imagery. All products are made freely available. The former DEM covers the entire Greenland. It is specific to the year 2010, providing it with an advantage over previous models suffering from either a reduced spatial/ temporal data coverage or errors from surface elevation changes (SEC) occurring during data acquisition. Radar data are acquired with Envisat and CryoSat-2, and laser data with the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite, the Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor, and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Correcting radar data for errors from slope effects and surface penetration of the echoes, and merging these with laser data, yields a DEM capable of resolving both surface depressions as well as topographic features at higher altitudes. The spatial resolution is 2 x 2 km, making the DEM ideal for application in surface mass balance studies, SEC detection from radar altimetry, or for correcting such data for slope-induced errors. The other DEM is developed in a pilot study building the expertise to map all ice-free parts of Greenland. The work combines WorldView-2 and -3 as well as GeoEye1 imagery from 2014 and 2015 over the Disko, Narsaq, Tassilaq, and Zackenberg regions. The novelty of the work is the determination of the product specifications after elaborate discussions with interested parties from government institutions, the tourist industry, etc. Thus, a 10 m DEM, 1.5 m orthophotos, and vector maps are produced. This opens to the possibility of using orthophotos with up-to-date contour lines or for deriving updated coastlines to aid, e.g., emergency management. This allows for a product development directly in line with the needs of parties with specific interests in Greenland.

  11. Comparison of the image quality of a high-resolution screen-film system and a digital flat panel detector system in avian radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochmann, Monika; Ludewig, Eberhard; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Pees, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A conventional high-resolution screen-film system was compared with a digital detector system. A total of 20 birds (14 pigeons and six psittacine birds) with an average body mass of 533g were examined in dorsoventral as well as lateral projections. Digital radiographs were acquired with the same mAs as well as half the mAs used for the conventional radiographs. Three criteria and one overall assessment were defined for each of four anatomic regions and assessed by five veterinarians using a score system. Comparison of the ratings was done by visual grading analysis. For the majority of criteria, there was no significant difference regarding image quality between the digital and screen-film projections. However, for certain criteria the quality of the digital images was significantly superior. Using the same mAs as for the conventional radiographs, the humeral joint surfaces and the honeycomb structure of the lung were assessed as superior with the digital imaging system. The tracheal rings and the delineation of the trachea from the surrounding tissue were also superior with the digital system. Assessment of the trabecular structure of the humerus was superior when the full mAs was used compared with the reduced mAs. In conclusion the digital technique is equal or superior to the conventional screen-film high-resolution system for pet birds of a medium size. With some limitations, a dose reduction is possible with the digital system.

  12. Development of an high resolution neutron spectroscopy system using a diamond detector and a remote digital acquisition methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillon, Mario, E-mail: mario.pillon@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Andreoli, Fabrizio; Angelone, Maurizio [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Milocco, Alberto [University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Cardarelli, Roberto [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •We studied the response of a diamond detector connected, to a prototype preamplifier developed by our group. •The response was studied for quasi mono-energetic neutron energies between 5 and 20.5 MeV. •About 50 m of coaxial cable was interposed between the detector and the preamplifier. •This technique was developed in order to have the electronics located far from the high radiation zone. •Such approach could be interesting for hash environment like the Radial Neutron Camera of ITER. -- Abstract: The need of performing high resolution fast neutron spectroscopy in a very harsh environment like that of the Radial Neutron Camera (RNC) of ITER, requires to develop new detectors and methodologies. Diamond detectors have been proved to be excellent candidates but the electronics needs a substantial improvement. Because of the high radiation level and the temperatures expected near the detector positions in the RNC, the electronics must be placed several meters away. A novel Fast Charge Amplifier (FCA) was developed that, connected to a diamond detector using several tens of meters of low capacitance coaxial cable, is able to produce fast output signals suitable to be processed by digital electronics. These fast output signals allow to operate at high count rates avoiding pile-up problems. This novel amplifier connected to a digitizer is here tested in the neutron energy range from 5 to 20.5 MeV using the mono-energetic neutrons produced by the Van de Graaff (VdG) accelerator of the EC-JRC-IRMM and by the PTB cyclotron. From the measurements the experimental response functions of the diamond detector at different neutron energies were obtained. The shape of the response functions have been compared with that predicted with a routine which was implemented for the Monte Carlo code MCNPX with the scope to validate the calculations versus the experimental data. The goal is to develop a tool which allows to calculate the diamond detector response

  13. Performance Analysis of Digital loudspeaker Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bo Rohde; Kontomichos, Fotios; Mourjopoulos, John

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of digital loudspeaker arrays shows that the ways in which bits are mapped to the drivers influence the quality of the audio result. Specifically, a "bit-summed" rather than the traditional "bit-mapped" strategy greatly reduces the number of times drivers make binary transitions per p...

  14. High-resolution microcontact printing and transfer of massive arrays of microorganisms on planar and compartmentalized nanoporous aluminium oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingham, C.J.; Bomer, J.; Sprenkels, A.; Berg, van der A.; Vos, de W.M.; Hylckama, van J.

    2010-01-01

    Handling microorganisms in high throughput and their deployment into miniaturized platforms presents significant challenges. Contact printing can be used to create dense arrays of viable microorganisms. Such "living arrays", potentially with multiple identical replicates, are useful in the selection

  15. High-resolution microcontact printing and transfer of massive arrays of microorganisms on planar and compartmentalized nanoporous aluminium oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingham, Colin; Bomer, Johan; Sprenkels, Ad; Berg, van den Albert; Vos, de Willem; Hylckama Vlieg, van Johan

    2010-01-01

    Handling microorganisms in high throughput and their deployment into miniaturized platforms presents significant challenges. Contact printing can be used to create dense arrays of viable microorganisms. Such "living arrays'', potentially with multiple identical replicates, are useful in the selectio

  16. A critical source area phosphorus index with topographic transport factors using high resolution LiDAR digital elevation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian; Murphy, Paul; Fenton, Owen; Shine, Oliver; Mellander, Per-Erik; Dunlop, Paul; Jordan, Phil

    2015-04-01

    A new phosphorus index (PI) tool is presented which aims to improve the identification of critical source areas (CSAs) of phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural land to surface waters. In a novel approach, the PI incorporates topographic indices rather than watercourse proximity as proxies for runoff risk, to account for the dominant control of topography on runoff-generating areas and P transport pathways. Runoff propensity and hydrological connectivity are modelled using the Topographic Wetness Index (TWI) and Network Index (NI) respectively, utilising high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to capture the influence of micro-topographic features on runoff pathways. Additionally, the PI attempts to improve risk estimates of particulate P losses by incorporating an erosion factor that accounts for fine-scale topographic variability within fields. Erosion risk is modelled using the Unit Stream Power Erosion Deposition (USPED) model, which integrates DEM-derived upslope contributing area and Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) factors. The PI was developed using field, sub-field and sub-catchment scale datasets of P source, mobilisation and transport factors, for four intensive agricultural catchments in Ireland representing different agri-environmental conditions. Datasets included soil test P concentrations, degree of P saturation, soil attributes, land use, artificial subsurface drainage locations, and 2 m resolution LiDAR DEMs resampled from 0.25 m resolution data. All factor datasets were integrated within a Geographical Information System (GIS) and rasterised to 2 m resolution. For each factor, values were categorised and assigned relative risk scores which ranked P loss potential. Total risk scores were calculated for each grid cell using a component formulation, which summed the products of weighted factor risk scores for runoff and erosion pathways. Results showed that the new PI was able to predict

  17. High Resolution Acoustical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    1028 (September 1982). 26 G. Arfken , Mathematical Methods for Physicists (Academic Press, New York, 1971), 2nd printing, pp.662-666. 27 W. R. Hahn...difference in the approach used by the two methods , as noted in the previous paragraph, forming a direct mathematical com- parison may be impossible...examines high resolution methods which use a linear array to locate stationary objects which have scattered the fressure waves. Several;- new methods

  18. [Comparative radiography of the respiratory tract of snakes using conventional high-resolution film-screen-system and a digital detector system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pees, Michael; Bochmann, Monika; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Schmidt, Volker; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2010-01-01

    A conventional high-resolution screen-film-system (film Kodak MIN-R S, screen Kodak MIN-R 2000) was compared to a digital detector system (Varian PaxScan 4030E) for the evaluation of the respiratory tract in snakes. Digital radiographs were taken with the same dose as well as with half the dose used for the conventional radiographs. A total of 20 Burmese pythons (Python molurus) were examined in dorsoventral and lateral projection. Four criteria (three features, one overall assessment) were defined for each of the anatomical structures lung, trachea and spinal column and assessed by five veterinarians in a semi-blinded study using a score system. Comparison of the ratings between the techniques used was done using a visual grading analysis. For the lung, two of the three features as well as the overall assessment were rated significantly superior using the digital system. The trachea was rated significantly superior using the conventional system for the overall assessment as well as for one feature. For the spinal column, the overall assessment was significantly superior using the digital system with the full dose. Conventional radiography as well as digital radiography using half the dose was rated significantly inferior for one feature each. The of the relatively low-contrast respiratory tract. A limiting factor is the demonstration of particularly small structures. Generally, a dose reduction (compared to a conventional high-resolution film-screen-system) is possible for the evaluation of the respiratory system.

  19. Advancement and New Optimizations of Microcalorimeter Arrays for High-Resolution Imaging X-ray Spectroscopy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — "We propose to continue our successful research program in developing x-ray microcalorimeter arrays for astrophysics. This development will directly benefit not only...

  20. Basic performance evaluation of a Si-PM array-based LGSO phoswich DOI block detector for a high-resolution small animal PET system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi

    2013-07-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector for PET. However, it remains unclear whether Si-PM can be used for a depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector based on the decay time differences of the scintillator where pulse shape analysis is used. For clarification, we tested the Hamamatsu 4 × 4 Si-PM array (S11065-025P) combined with scintillators that used different decay times to develop DOI block detectors using the pulse shape analysis. First, Ce-doped Gd(2)SiO(5) (GSO) scintillators of 0.5 mol% Ce were arranged in a 4 × 4 matrix and were optically coupled to the center of each pixel of the Si-PM array for measurement of the energy resolution as well as its gain variations according to the temperature. Then two types of Ce-doped Lu(1.9)Gd(0.1)Si0(5) (LGSO) scintillators, 0.025 mol% Ce (decay time: ~31 ns) and 0.75 mol% Ce (decay time: ~46 ns), were optically coupled in the DOI direction, arranged in a 11 × 7 matrix, and optically coupled to a Si-PM array for testing of the possibility of a high-resolution DOI detector. The energy resolution of the Si-PM array-based GSO block detector was 18 ± 4.4 % FWHM for a Cs-137 gamma source (662 keV). Less than 1 mm crystals were clearly resolved in the position map of the LGSO DOI block detector. The peak-to-valley ratio (P/V) derived from the pulse shape spectra of the LGSO DOI block detector was 2.2. These results confirmed that Si-PM array-based DOI block detectors are promising for high-resolution small animal PET systems.

  1. Temporal Variations in the Roughness of Eroding River Banks Revealed by High-Resolution Digital Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, S. E.; Leyland, J.; Rinaldi, M.; Teruggi, L.; Ostuni, D.

    2010-12-01

    of the roughness is approximated as a series of user defined Gaussian functions, with the skin drag component characterised by the deviation of points from the fitted curves. In our study these bank ‘roughness profiles’ are extracted from an annual series (2003-present) of high-resolution DEMs of the river bank, the latter being constructed either through digital photogrammetry or terrestrial laser scanning surveys. The DEMs are used to quantify accurately the spatial trends and amounts of annual bank erosion observed in relation to the hydrological regime of the river, and are compared to the temporal variations in river bank form and skin roughness components as the bank erodes. The data are used to evaluate the extent to which there is a dynamic feedback between the bank erosion process and bank form roughness.

  2. High-resolution copy number arrays in cancer and the problem of normal genome copy number variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2008-11-01

    High-resolution techniques for analysis of genome copy number (CN) enable the analysis of complex cancer somatic genetics. However, the analysis of these data is difficult, and failure to consider a number of issues in depth may result in false leads or unnecessary rejection of true positives. First, segmental duplications may falsely generate CN breakpoints in aneuploid samples. Second, even when tumor data were each normalized to matching lymphocyte DNA, we still observed copy number polymorphisms masquerading as somatic alterations due to allelic imbalance. We investigated a number of different solutions and determined that evaluating matching normal DNA, or at least using locally derived normal baseline data, were preferable to relying on current online databases because of poor cross-platform compatibility and the likelihood of excluding genuine small somatic alterations.

  3. Implementation of High Resolution Whole Genome Array CGH in the Prenatal Clinical Setting: Advantages, Challenges, and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Evangelidou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization analysis is replacing postnatal chromosomal analysis in cases of intellectual disabilities, and it has been postulated that it might also become the first-tier test in prenatal diagnosis. In this study, array CGH was applied in 64 prenatal samples with whole genome oligonucleotide arrays (BlueGnome, Ltd. on DNA extracted from chorionic villi, amniotic fluid, foetal blood, and skin samples. Results were confirmed with Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization or Real-Time PCR. Fifty-three cases had normal karyotype and abnormal ultrasound findings, and seven samples had balanced rearrangements, five of which also had ultrasound findings. The value of array CGH in the characterization of previously known aberrations in five samples is also presented. Seventeen out of 64 samples carried copy number alterations giving a detection rate of 26.5%. Ten of these represent benign or variables of unknown significance, giving a diagnostic capacity of the method to be 10.9%. If karyotype is performed the additional diagnostic capacity of the method is 5.1% (3/59. This study indicates the ability of array CGH to identify chromosomal abnormalities which cannot be detected during routine prenatal cytogenetic analysis, therefore increasing the overall detection rate. In addition a thorough review of the literature is presented.

  4. Methods for high throughput validation of amplified fragment pools of BAC DNA for constructing high resolution CGH arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malloff Chad A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent development of array based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH technology provides improved resolution for detection of genomic DNA copy number alterations. In array CGH, generating spotting solution is a multi-step process where bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones are converted to replenishable PCR amplified fragments pools (AFP for use as spotting solution in a microarray format on glass substrate. With completion of the human and mouse genome sequencing, large BAC clone sets providing complete genome coverage are available for construction of whole genome BAC arrays. Currently, Southern hybridization, fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH, and BAC end sequencing methods are commonly used to identify the initial BAC clone but not the end product used for spotting arrays. The AFP sequencing technique described in this study is a novel method designed to verify the identity of array spotting solution in a high throughput manner. Results We show here that Southern hybridization, FISH, and AFP sequencing can be used to verify the identity of final spotting solutions using less than 10% of the AFP product. Single pass AFP sequencing identified over half of the 960 AFPs analyzed. Moreover, using two vector primers approximately 90% of the AFP spotting solutions can be identified. Conclusions In this feasibility study we demonstrate that current methods for identifying initial BAC clones can be adapted to verify the identity of AFP spotting solutions used in printing arrays. Of these methods, AFP sequencing proves to be the most efficient for large scale identification of spotting solution in a high throughput manner.

  5. Direct investigation of collective phenomena in patterned Ising-like arrays using high-resolution Kerr microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraleigh, Robert Douglas

    Magnetic systems with interacting ferromagnetic single-domain elements are a useful landscape to explore a wide range of fundamental and technological phenomena. In this dissertation, we consider a system of interacting ferromagnetic islands with perpendicular anisotropy. Islands are lithographically-defined to be single-domain and are arranged into large arrays with geometries that are geometrically frustrated and unfrustrated. We explore field-driven local and global magnetic switching behavior using a home-built diffraction-limited magneto-optical Kerr microscope wherein individual islands in each array are isolated, indexed, and tracked in the presence of an applied external field. Global and local switching behavior is directly accessed through analysis island switching fields in the presence of magnetic hysteresis loops. We first explore the considerations regarding lithographic definition of disconnected islands and deposition of Co/Pt multilayers with strong perpendicular anisotropy. The thickness and number of stacked Co/Pt bilayers as well as deposition method significantly affect the strength of perpendicular anisotropy. We find sputter deposition of a 8-stack bilayer of Co0.3 nm=Pt 1 nm optimizes strong perpendicular anisotropy with square hysteresis loops. Our experimental sample contains several sets of ordered arrays with varying geometry and inter-island spacing. Each island is single-domain with length scales amenable to Kerr imaging such that magnetic degrees of freedom are optically accessible. We next discuss the development, calibration, and operation of a home-built magneto-optical Kerr microscope. The Kerr microscope uses a xenon stabilized white light source, Glan-Thompson polarizers, and a 100x oil objective lens to illuminate a sample with linear polarized light. A cooled CCD camera receives the re ected light and transmits it to the computer in a sequence timed with the application of an external magnetic field. We use LabVIEW software to

  6. High-resolution hard x-ray spectroscopy of high-temperature plasmas using an array of quantum microcalorimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Daniel B; Gu, Ming F; Brown, Greg V; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Porter, F Scott; Kilbourne, Caroline A; Kelley, Richard L

    2008-10-01

    Quantum microcalorimeters show promise in being able to fully resolve x-ray spectra from heavy highly charged ions, such as would be found in hot plasmas with temperatures in excess of 50 keV. Quantum microcalorimeter arrays are able to achieve this as they have a high-resolving power and good effective quantum efficiency for hard x-ray photons up to 60 keV. To demonstrate this, we present a measurement using an array of thin HgTe quantum microcalorimeters to measure the K-shell spectrum of hydrogenlike through carbonlike praseodymium (Z=57). With this device we are able to attain a resolving power, E/DeltaE, of 1000 at a photon energy of 37 keV.

  7. High-resolution copy number profiling by array CGH using DNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Essen, Hendrik F; Ylstra, Bauke

    2012-01-01

    We describe protocols to acquire high-quality DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues for the use in array comparative genome hybridization (CGH). Formalin fixation combined with paraffin embedding is routine procedure for solid malignancies in the diagnostic practice of the pathologist. As a consequence, large archives of FFPE tissues are available in pathology institutes across the globe. This archival material is for many research questions an invaluable resource, with long-term clinical follow-up and survival data available. FFPE is, thus, highly attractive for large genomics studies, including experiments requiring samples for test/learning and validation. Most larger array CGH studies have, therefore, made use of FFPE material and show that CNAs have tumor- and tissue-specific traits (Chin et al. Cancer Cell 10: 529-541, 2006; Fridlyand et al. BMC Cancer 6: 96, 2006; Weiss et al. Oncogene 22: 1872-1879, 2003; Jong et al. Oncogene 26: 1499-1506, 2007). The protocols described are tailored to array CGH of FFPE solid malignancies: from sectioning FFPE blocks to specific cynosures for pathological revisions of sections, DNA isolation, quality testing, and amplification. The protocols are technical in character and elaborate up to the labeling of isolated DNA while further processes and interpretation and data analysis are beyond the scope.

  8. Germanium Collimating micro-Channel Arrays For High Resolution, High Energy Confocal X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Agyeman-Budu, David N; Coulthard, Ian; Gordon, Robert; Hallin, Emil; Woll, Arthur R

    2016-01-01

    Confocal x-ray fluorescence microscopy (CXRF) allows direct detection of x-ray fluorescence from a micron-scale 3D volume of an extended, unthinned sample. We have previously demonstrated the use of a novel collection optic, fabricated from silicon, that improves the spatial resolution of this approach by an order of magnitude over CXRF using polycapillaries. The optic, called a collimating channel array (CCA), consists of micron-scale, lithographically-fabricated arrays of collimating channels, all directed towards a single source position. Due to the limited absorbing power of silicon, the useful energy range of these optics was limited to fluorescence emission below about 10 keV. Here, we report fabrication of CCAs from germanium substrates, and demonstrate their practical use for CXRF up to 20 keV. Specifically we demonstrate a nearly energy-independent critical spatial resolution $d_R$ of 2.1$\\pm$0.17 \\um from 2-20 keV, as well as excellent background reduction compared to silicon-based CCAs throughout t...

  9. A High-Resolution SNP Array-Based Linkage Map Anchors a New Domestic Cat Draft Genome Assembly and Provides Detailed Patterns of Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Hillier, LaDeana W; Grahn, Robert A; Zimin, Aleksey V; David, Victor A; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Middleton, Rondo; Hannah, Steven; Hendrickson, Sher; Makunin, Alex; O'Brien, Stephen J; Minx, Pat; Wilson, Richard K; Lyons, Leslie A; Warren, Wesley C; Murphy, William J

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution genetic and physical maps are invaluable tools for building accurate genome assemblies, and interpreting results of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Previous genetic and physical maps anchored good quality draft assemblies of the domestic cat genome, enabling the discovery of numerous genes underlying hereditary disease and phenotypes of interest to the biomedical science and breeding communities. However, these maps lacked sufficient marker density to order thousands of shorter scaffolds in earlier assemblies, which instead relied heavily on comparative mapping with related species. A high-resolution map would aid in validating and ordering chromosome scaffolds from existing and new genome assemblies. Here, we describe a high-resolution genetic linkage map of the domestic cat genome based on genotyping 453 domestic cats from several multi-generational pedigrees on the Illumina 63K SNP array. The final maps include 58,055 SNP markers placed relative to 6637 markers with unique positions, distributed across all autosomes and the X chromosome. Our final sex-averaged maps span a total autosomal length of 4464 cM, the longest described linkage map for any mammal, confirming length estimates from a previous microsatellite-based map. The linkage map was used to order and orient the scaffolds from a substantially more contiguous domestic cat genome assembly (Felis catus v8.0), which incorporated ∼20 × coverage of Illumina fragment reads. The new genome assembly shows substantial improvements in contiguity, with a nearly fourfold increase in N50 scaffold size to 18 Mb. We use this map to report probable structural errors in previous maps and assemblies, and to describe features of the recombination landscape, including a massive (∼50 Mb) recombination desert (of virtually zero recombination) on the X chromosome that parallels a similar desert on the porcine X chromosome in both size and physical location.

  10. High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization of chromosome 8q: evaluation of putative progression markers for gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duin, M; van Marion, R; Vissers, K J; Hop, W C J; Dinjens, W N M; Tilanus, H W; Siersema, P D; van Dekken, H

    2007-01-01

    Amplification of 8q is frequently found in gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. It is usually detected in high-grade, high-stage GEJ adenocarcinomas. Moreover, it has been implicated in tumor progression in other cancer types. In this study, a detailed genomic analysis of 8q was performed on a series of GEJ adenocarcinomas, including 22 primary adenocarcinomas, 13 cell lines and two xenografts, by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) with a whole chromosome 8q contig array. Of the 37 specimens, 21 originated from the esophagus and 16 were derived from the gastric cardia. Commonly overrepresented regions were identified at distal 8q, i.e. 124-125 Mb (8q24.13), at 127-128 Mb (8q24.21), and at 141-142 Mb (8q24.3). From these regions six genes were selected with putative relevance to cancer: ANXA13, MTSS1, FAM84B (alias NSE2), MYC, C8orf17 (alias MOST-1) and PTK2 (alias FAK). In addition, the gene EXT1 was selected since it was found in a specific amplification in cell line SK-GT-5. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of these seven genes was subsequently performed on a panel of 24 gastroesophageal samples, including 13 cell lines, two xenografts and nine normal stomach controls. Significant overexpression was found for MYC and EXT1 in GEJ adenocarcinoma cell lines and xenografts compared to normal controls. Expression of the genes MTSS1, FAM84B and C8orf17 was found to be significantly decreased in this set of cell lines and xenografts. We conclude that, firstly, there are other genes than MYC involved in the 8q amplification in GEJ cancer. Secondly, the differential expression of these genes contributes to unravel the biology of GEJ adenocarcinomas.

  11. A full coverage, high-resolution, topographic model of Greenland computed from a variety of digital elevation data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekholm, Simon

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a new high-resolution elevation model of Greenland, including the ice sheet as well as the ice free regions, is presented. It is the first published full coverage model, computed with an average resolution of 2 km and providing an unprecedented degree of detail. The topography...... airborne laser data from the analysis and treating them as ground truth observations. The mean accuracy of the ice sheet elevations is estimated to be 12-13 m, and it is found that on surfaces of a slope between 0.2 degrees and 0.8 degrees, corresponding to approximately 50% of the ice sheet, the model...... is modeled from a wide selection of data sources, including satellite radar altimetry from Geosat and ERS 1, airborne radar altimetry and airborne laser altimetry over the ice sheet, and photogrammetric and manual map scannings in the ice free region. The ice sheet model accuracy is evaluated by omitting...

  12. An automated, open-source pipeline for mass production of digital elevation models (DEMs) from very-high-resolution commercial stereo satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shean, David E.; Alexandrov, Oleg; Moratto, Zachary M.; Smith, Benjamin E.; Joughin, Ian R.; Porter, Claire; Morin, Paul

    2016-06-01

    We adapted the automated, open source NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) to generate digital elevation models (DEMs) and orthoimages from very-high-resolution (VHR) commercial imagery of the Earth. These modifications include support for rigorous and rational polynomial coefficient (RPC) sensor models, sensor geometry correction, bundle adjustment, point cloud co-registration, and significant improvements to the ASP code base. We outline a processing workflow for ∼0.5 m ground sample distance (GSD) DigitalGlobe WorldView-1 and WorldView-2 along-track stereo image data, with an overview of ASP capabilities, an evaluation of ASP correlator options, benchmark test results, and two case studies of DEM accuracy. Output DEM products are posted at ∼2 m with direct geolocation accuracy of computing environment. We are leveraging these resources to produce dense time series and regional mosaics for the Earth's polar regions.

  13. Source detection and high-resolution localization using microphone arrays for UGS: results of the NATO TG25 experiment measurements (Bourges, October 2002)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengy, Sebastien; Naz, Pierre; Gounon, Patrick

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents different ways to process acoustic data in order to localize targets.Beamforming and the MUSIC high resolution method have been tested for different propagation conditions during a NATO experimental campaign. This campaign,organized by DG /DCE/ETBS,has involved 6 countries in October 2002 in Bourges, France). Different localization methods were used to get the position of moving sources on a 4 kilometres circuit.The I.S.L. (French-German research institute of Saint Louis)has deployed a network of arrays nearby the circuit to test those localization techniques in different propagation conditions (day/night,early morning,...).Variance and mean error of the localization are compared for the different techniques used.

  14. An improved high-resolution hybrid stepper motor for solar-array drive of Indian remote-sensing satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, K.R.; Krishnaswamy, M. [Indian Space Research Organization, Trivandrum (India). ISRO Inertial Systems Unit; Singh, B.; Singh, B.P. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents the computer-aided design and development of an improved 720-steps hybrid stepper motor used as the drive motor for the solar array of the Indian remote-sensing (IRS) satellite in the polar sun-synchronous orbit. The motor is of pancake type with coil redundancy, and the step angle is 0.5{degree}. It is designed to deliver a constant holding torque of 1 N{center_dot}m against a varying dc supply voltage of 28--42 V and in an operating temperature range from {minus}10 C to +60 C. The authors introduce a phenomenon named as torque saturation, achievable in a hybrid stepper motor by properly choosing the operating point of the rotor permanent magnet and the stator winding configuration. Apart from the computer-aided design procedure, relevant details regarding fabrication and testing are also provided. The test results of the developed motor match fairly with the computed values and confirm the high performance of the developed hybrid stepper motor.

  15. Hybridization of phase retrieval and off-axis digital holography for high resolution imaging of complex shape objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengpeng; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin; Zhao, Jie

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a hybrid method of phase retrieval and off-axis digital holography is proposed for imaging of the complex shape objects. Off-axis digital hologram and in-line hologram are recorded. The approximate phase distributions in the recording plane and object plane are obtained by constrained optimization approach from the off-axis hologram, and they are used as the initial value and the constraints in the phase retrieval for eliminating the twin image of in-line holography. Numerical simulations and optical experiments were carried out to validate the proposed method.

  16. The Digital Motion Control System for the Submillimeter Array Antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, T R; Kimberk, R; Leiker, P S; Patel, N A; Blundell, R; Christensen, R D; Diven, A R; Maute, J; Plante, R J; Riddle, P; Young, K H

    2013-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the digital servo and motion control system for the 6-meter diameter parabolic antennas of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The system is divided into three nested layers operating at a different, appropriate bandwidth. (1) A rack-mounted, real-time Unix system runs the position loop which reads the high resolution azimuth and elevation encoders and sends velocity and acceleration commands at 100 Hz to a custom-designed servo control board (SCB). (2) The microcontroller-based SCB reads the motor axis tachometers and implements the velocity loop by sending torque commands to the motor amplifiers at 558 Hz. (3) The motor amplifiers implement the torque loop by monitoring and sending current to the three-phase brushless drive motors at 20 kHz. The velocity loop uses a traditional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control algorithm, while the position loop uses only a proportional term and implements a command shaper based on the Gauss error functi...

  17. Large-scale, high-resolution multielectrode-array recording depicts functional network differences of cortical and hippocampal cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Ito

    Full Text Available Understanding the detailed circuitry of functioning neuronal networks is one of the major goals of neuroscience. Recent improvements in neuronal recording techniques have made it possible to record the spiking activity from hundreds of neurons simultaneously with sub-millisecond temporal resolution. Here we used a 512-channel multielectrode array system to record the activity from hundreds of neurons in organotypic cultures of cortico-hippocampal brain slices from mice. To probe the network structure, we employed a wavelet transform of the cross-correlogram to categorize the functional connectivity in different frequency ranges. With this method we directly compare, for the first time, in any preparation, the neuronal network structures of cortex and hippocampus, on the scale of hundreds of neurons, with sub-millisecond time resolution. Among the three frequency ranges that we investigated, the lower two frequency ranges (gamma (30-80 Hz and beta (12-30 Hz range showed similar network structure between cortex and hippocampus, but there were many significant differences between these structures in the high frequency range (100-1000 Hz. The high frequency networks in cortex showed short tailed degree-distributions, shorter decay length of connectivity density, smaller clustering coefficients, and positive assortativity. Our results suggest that our method can characterize frequency dependent differences of network architecture from different brain regions. Crucially, because these differences between brain regions require millisecond temporal scales to be observed and characterized, these results underscore the importance of high temporal resolution recordings for the understanding of functional networks in neuronal systems.

  18. High-resolution Digital Mapping of Historical Lava Flows as a Test-bed for Lava Flow Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, D. M.; Parks, M.; Nomikou, P.; Mather, T. A.; Simou, E.; Kalnins, L. M.; Paulatto, M.; Watts, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of high-resolution lava flow morphology can improve our understanding of past effusive eruptions by providing insight into eruptive processes and the rheological properties of erupted magmas. We report the results of an ongoing investigation into the young dacite lava flows of the Kameni islands, Santorini volcano, Greece, which were emplaced during both subaerial and shallow submarine eruptions over the past 3000 years. Historical eruptions of the Kameni islands since 1866 have been very carefully documented in contemporaneous scientific reports. Eruptions since 1573 appear to be time-predictable, with a close relationship between eruption length, the size of extruded lava domes, and the time elapsed since the previous eruption. A new NERC - Airborne Survey and Research Facility LiDAR survey of the Kameni islands was completed in May 2012, using a Leica ALS50 Airborne Laser Scanner mounted on a Dornier 228 aircraft. The topographic surface was mapped at an average point density of 2.1 points per square metre, and covers the entire extent of the youngest subaerial lava flow fields on Santorini. A 2-m DEM derived from the 2012 LiDAR dataset was merged with a 5-m resolution bathymetric grid, based on multibeam surveys carried out by the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, during cruises in 2001 and 2006, using a SEABEAM 2120 hull-mounted swath system. The resultant grid provides the first high resolution map of both subaerial and submarine historic lava flows emplaced in the centre of the Santorini caldera, and includes several previously unidentified submarine flows and cones. Attribute maps were used to delineate and identify discrete lava flows both onshore and offshore; and morphometric profiles were used to compute accurate volumetric estimates for each of the historic flows, and to determine bulk rheological properties of the lavas, assuming a Bingham rheology. This ongoing work will improve our analysis of the relationship between

  19. High-resolution mapping of genotype-phenotype relationships in cridu chat syndrome using array comparative genomic hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Snijders, Antoine; Segraves, Richard; Zhang,Xiuqing; Niebuhr, Anita; Albertson, Donna; Yang, Huanming; Gray, Joe; Niebuhr, Erik; Bolund, Lars; Pinkel, Dan

    2007-07-03

    We have used array comparative genomic hybridization to map DNA copy-number changes in 94 patients with cri du chat syndrome who had been carefully evaluated for the presence of the characteristic cry, speech delay, facial dysmorphology, and level of mental retardation (MR). Most subjects had simple deletions involving 5p (67 terminal and 12 interstitial). Genotype-phenotype correlations localized the region associated with the cry to 1.5 Mb in distal 5p15.31, between bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing markers D5S2054 and D5S676; speech delay to 3.2 Mb in 5p15.32-15.33, between BACs containing D5S417 and D5S635; and the region associated with facial dysmorphology to 2.4 Mb in 5p15.2-15.31, between BACs containing D5S208 and D5S2887. These results overlap and refine those reported in previous publications. MR depended approximately on the 5p deletion size and location, but there were many cases in which the retardation was disproportionately severe, given the 5p deletion. All 15 of these cases, approximately two-thirds of the severely retarded patients, were found to have copy-number aberrations in addition to the 5p deletion. Restriction of consideration to patients with only 5p deletions clarified the effect of such deletions and suggested the presence of three regions, MRI-III, with differing effect on retardation. Deletions including MRI, a 1.2-Mb region overlapping the previously defined cri du chat critical region but not including MRII and MRIII, produced a moderate level of retardation. Deletions restricted to MRII, located just proximal to MRI, produced a milder level of retardation, whereas deletions restricted to the still-more proximal MRIII produced no discernible phenotype. However, MR increased as deletions that included MRI extended progressively into MRII and MRIII, and MR became profound when all three regions were deleted.

  20. Use of personal digital assistants for retrieval of medical images and data on high-resolution flat panel displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman; McCoy, J Michael; McGill, D Ric; Li, Minglin; Brown, Allen

    2003-01-01

    For its new acute care hospital, the University of California at Los Angeles is evaluating innovative technology involving high-resolution flat panel display devices configured as "network appliances" that can be wall mounted for use in the retrieval and display of medical images and data. Physicians and healthcare providers can log on with wireless handheld computers, which can serve as an identification device as well as a navigational tool for selecting patient records and data. These data are displayed and manipulated on the flat panel display without the need for a keyboard or mouse. A prototype was developed with commercially available image display software, which was modified to allow the remote control of software functions from a handheld device through an infrared communication port. The system also allows navigation through the patient data in a World Wide Web-based electronic patient record. This prototype illustrates the evolution of radiologic facilities toward "shareable" high-quality display devices that allow more convenient and cost-effective access to medical images and related data in complex clinical environments, resulting in a paradigm shift in data navigation and accessibility.

  1. A microelectromechanical system digital 3C array seismic cone penetrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghose, R.

    2012-01-01

    A digital 3C array seismic cone penetrometer has been developed for multidisciplinary geophysical and geotechnical applications. Seven digital triaxial microelectromechanical system accelerometers are installed at 0.25-m intervals to make a 1.5-m-long downhole seismic array. The accelerometers have

  2. A new, high-resolution digital elevation model of Greenland fully validated with airborne laser altimeter data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bamber, J.L.; Ekholm, Simon; Krabill, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A new digital elevation model of the Greenland ice sheet and surrounding rock outcrops has been produced at 1-km postings from a comprehensive suite of satellite remote sensing and cartographic data sets. Height data over the ice sheet were mainly from ERS-1 and Geosat radar altimetry. These data...... coverage existed. The data were interpolated onto a regular grid with a spacing of similar to1 km. The accuracy of the resultant digital elevation model over the ice sheet was assessed using independent and spatially extensive measurements from an airborne laser altimeter that had an accuracy of between 10...... and 12 cm. In a comparison with the laser altimetry the digital elevation model was found to have a slope-dependent accuracy ranging from -1.04 +/-1.98 m to -0.06 +/- 14.33 m over the ice sheet for a slope range of 0.0-1.0 degrees. The mean accuracy over the whole ice sheet was -0.33 +/-6.97 m. Over...

  3. Identification of genomic aberrations associated with disease transformation by means of high-resolution SNP array analysis in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumi, Elisa; Harutyunyan, Ashot; Elena, Chiara; Pietra, Daniela; Klampfl, Thorsten; Bagienski, Klaudia; Berg, Tiina; Casetti, Ilaria; Pascutto, Cristiana; Passamonti, Francesco; Kralovics, Robert; Cazzola, Mario

    2011-12-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) include polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). These disorders may undergo phenotypic shifts, and may specifically evolve into secondary myelofibrosis (MF) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We studied genomic changes associated with these transformations in 29 patients who had serial samples collected in different phases of disease. Genomic DNA from granulocytes, i.e., the myeloproliferative genome, was processed and hybridized to genome-wide human SNP 6.0 arrays. Most patients in chronic phase had chromosomal regions with uniparental disomy (UPD) and/or copy number changes. Disease progression to secondary MF or AML was associated with the acquisition of additional chromosomal aberrations in granulocytes (P = 0.002). A close relationship was observed between aberrations of chromosome 9p (UPD and/or gain) and progression from PV to post-PV MF (P = 0.002). The acquisition of one or more aberrations involving chromosome 5, 7, or 17p was specifically associated with progression to AML (OR 5.9, 95% CI 1.2-27.7, P = 0.006), and significantly affected overall survival (HR 18, 95% CI 1.9-164, P = 0.01). These observations indicate that disease progression from chronic-phase MPN to secondary MF or AML is associated with specific chromosomal aberrations that can be detected by means of high-resolution SNP array analysis of granulocyte DNA. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. IDSAC-IUCAA digital sampler array controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Chordia, Pravin; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Burse, Mahesh P.; Joshi, Bhushan; Chillal, Kalpesh

    2016-07-01

    In order to run the large format detector arrays and mosaics that are required by most astronomical instruments, readout electronic controllers are required which can process multiple CCD outputs simultaneously at high speeds and low noise levels. These CCD controllers need to be modular and configurable, should be able to run multiple detector types to cater to a wide variety of requirements. IUCAA Digital Sampler Array Controller (IDSAC), is a generic CCD Controller based on a fully scalable architecture which is adequately flexible and powerful enough to control a wide variety of detectors used in ground based astronomy. The controller has a modular backplane architecture that consists of Single Board Controller Cards (SBCs) and can control up to 5 CCDs (mosaic or independent). Each Single Board Controller (SBC) has all the resources to a run Single large format CCD having up to four outputs. All SBCs are identical and are easily interchangeable without needing any reconfiguration. A four channel video processor on each SBC can process up to four output CCDs with or without dummy outputs at 0.5 Megapixels/Sec/Channel with 16 bit resolution. Each SBC has a USB 2.0 interface which can be connected to a host computer via optional USB to Fibre converters. The SBC uses a reconfigurable hardware (FPGA) as a Master Controller. IDSAC offers Digital Correlated Double Sampling (DCDS) to eliminate thermal kTC noise. CDS performed in Digital domain (DCDS) has several advantages over its analog counterpart, such as - less electronics, faster readout and easier post processing. It is also flexible with sampling rate and pixel throughput while maintaining the core circuit topology intact. Noise characterization of the IDSAC CDS signal chain has been performed by analytical modelling and practical measurements. Various types of noise such as white, pink, power supply, bias etc. has been considered while creating an analytical noise model tool to predict noise of a controller

  5. A High-Resolution S-band Down-Converting Digital Phase Detector for SASE FEL Use

    CERN Document Server

    Grelick, A E

    2004-01-01

    Each of the rf phase detectors in the Advanced Photon Source linac consists of a module that down converts from S-band to 20 MHz followed by an analog I/Q detector. Phase is calculated from one digitized sample per pulse each of I and Q. The resulting data has excellent long-term stability but is noisy enough so that a number of samples must be averaged to get a usable reading. The more recent requirement to support a SASE FEL has presented the need to accurately resolve the relative phase of a single pulse. Replacing analog detection with digital sampling and replacing internal intermediate frequency reference oscillators with a lower noise external oscillator were used to control the two largest components of noise. The implementation of a central, ultralow noise reference oscillator and a distribution system capable of maintaining the low phase noise is described, together with the results obtained to date. The principal remaining technical issue is determining the processing power required as a function o...

  6. Quantification of gully volume using very high resolution DSM generated through 3D reconstruction from airborne and field digital imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Carlos; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo; Laredo, Mario; Gómez, Jose Alfonso

    2013-04-01

    Major advances have been made recently in automatic 3D photo-reconstruction techniques using uncalibrated and non-metric cameras (James and Robson, 2012). However, its application on soil conservation studies and landscape feature identification is currently at the outset. The aim of this work is to compare the performance of a remote sensing technique using a digital camera mounted on an airborne platform, with 3D photo-reconstruction, a method already validated for gully erosion assessment purposes (Castillo et al., 2012). A field survey was conducted in November 2012 in a 250 m-long gully located in field crops on a Vertisol in Cordoba (Spain). The airborne campaign was conducted with a 4000x3000 digital camera installed onboard an aircraft flying at 300 m above ground level to acquire 6 cm resolution imagery. A total of 990 images were acquired over the area ensuring a large overlap in the across- and along-track direction of the aircraft. An ortho-mosaic and the digital surface model (DSM) were obtained through automatic aerial triangulation and camera calibration methods. For the field-level photo-reconstruction technique, the gully was divided in several reaches to allow appropriate reconstruction (about 150 pictures taken per reach) and, finally, the resulting point clouds were merged into a unique mesh. A centimetric-accuracy GPS provided a benchmark dataset for gully perimeter and distinguishable reference points in order to allow the assessment of measurement errors of the airborne technique and the georeferenciation of the photo-reconstruction 3D model. The uncertainty on the gully limits definition was explicitly addressed by comparison of several criteria obtained by 3D models (slope and second derivative) with the outer perimeter obtained by the GPS operator identifying visually the change in slope at the top of the gully walls. In this study we discussed the magnitude of planimetric and altimetric errors and the differences observed between the

  7. Obtaining biophysical measurements of woody vegetation from high resolution digital aerial photography in tropical and arid environments: Northern Territory, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staben, G. W.; Lucieer, A.; Evans, K. G.; Scarth, P.; Cook, G. D.

    2016-10-01

    Biophysical parameters obtained from woody vegetation are commonly measured using field based techniques which require significant investment in resources. Quantitative measurements of woody vegetation provide important information for ecological studies investigating landscape change. The fine spatial resolution of aerial photography enables identification of features such as trees and shrubs. Improvements in spatial and spectral resolution of digital aerial photographic sensors have increased the possibility of using these data in quantitative remote sensing. Obtaining biophysical measurements from aerial photography has the potential to enable it to be used as a surrogate for the collection of field data. In this study quantitative measurements obtained from digital aerial photography captured at ground sampling distance (GSD) of 15 cm (n = 50) and 30 cm (n = 52) were compared to woody biophysical parameters measured from 1 ha field plots. Supervised classification of the aerial photography using object based image analysis was used to quantify woody and non-woody vegetation components in the imagery. There was a high correlation (r ≥ 0.92) between all field measured woody canopy parameters and aerial derived green woody cover measurements, however only foliage projective cover (FPC) was found to be statistically significant (paired t-test; α = 0.01). There was no significant difference between measurements derived from imagery captured at either GSD of 15 cm and 30 cm over the same field site (n = 20). Live stand basal area (SBA) (m2 ha-1) was predicted from the aerial photographs by applying an allometric equation developed between field-measured live SBA and woody FPC. The results show that there was very little difference between live SBA predicted from FPC measured in the field or from aerial photography. The results of this study show that accurate woody biophysical parameters can be obtained from aerial photography from a range of woody vegetation

  8. Experimental Demonstration of Ideal Noise Shaping in Resonant Tunneling Delta-Sigma Modulator for High Resolution, Wide Band Analog-to-Digital Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maezawa, Koichi; Sakou, Mario; Matsubara, Wataru; Mizutani, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Hideaki

    2006-04-01

    A ΔΣ modulator using a frequency modulation intermediate signal was demonstrated using a resonant tunneling logic gate called a monostable bistable transition logic element (MOBILE). This ΔΣ modulator is based on the nature of an FM signal and suitable for high-speed operation. Experiments using an InP-based MOBILE demonstrate good noise shaping characteristics. Moreover, the operation with a higher FM carrier frequency than the sampling frequency was demonstrated, showing equally good noise shaping performance. This makes the design of the voltage-controlled oscillator, which is a key component of the FM ΔΣ modulator, much easier. Consequently, an FM ΔΣ modulator using MOBILE is promising for high-resolution, wide-band analog-to-digital converters (ADCs).

  9. Compensation of multi-channel mismatches in high-speed high-resolution photonic analog-to-digital converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Zou, Weiwen; Yu, Lei; Wu, Kan; Chen, Jianping

    2016-10-17

    We demonstrate a method to compensate multi-channel mismatches that intrinsically exist in a photonic analog-to-digital converter (ADC) system. This system, nominated time-wavelength interleaved photonic ADC (TWI-PADC), is time-interleaved via wavelength demultiplexing/multiplexing before photonic sampling, wavelength demultiplexing channelization, and electronic quantization. Mismatches among multiple channels are estimated in frequency domain and hardware adjustment are used to approach the device-limited accuracy. A multi-channel mismatch compensation algorithm, inspired from the time-interleaved electronic ADC, is developed to effectively improve the performance of TWI-PADC. In the experiment, we configure out a 4-channel TWI-PADC system with 40 GS/s sampling rate based on a 10-GHz actively mode-locked fiber laser. After multi-channel mismatch compensation, the effective number of bit (ENOB) of the 40-GS/s TWI-PADC system is enhanced from ~6 bits to >8.5 bits when the RF frequency is within 0.1-3.1 GHz and from ~6 bits to >7.5 bits within 3.1-12.1 GHz. The enhanced performance of the TWI-PADC system approaches the limitation determined by the timing jitter and noise.

  10. Integrated high-resolution array CGH and SKY analysis of homozygous deletions and other genomic alterations present in malignant mesothelioma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klorin, Geula; Rozenblum, Ester; Glebov, Oleg; Walker, Robert L; Park, Yoonsoo; Meltzer, Paul S; Kirsch, Ilan R; Kaye, Frederic J; Roschke, Anna V

    2013-05-01

    High-resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and spectral karyotyping (SKY) were applied to a panel of malignant mesothelioma (MMt) cell lines. SKY has not been applied to MMt before, and complete karyotypes are reported based on the integration of SKY and aCGH results. A whole genome search for homozygous deletions (HDs) produced the largest set of recurrent and non-recurrent HDs for MMt (52 recurrent HDs in 10 genomic regions; 36 non-recurrent HDs). For the first time, LINGO2, RBFOX1/A2BP1, RPL29, DUSP7, and CCSER1/FAM190A were found to be homozygously deleted in MMt, and some of these genes could be new tumor suppressor genes for MMt. Integration of SKY and aCGH data allowed reconstruction of chromosomal rearrangements that led to the formation of HDs. Our data imply that only with acquisition of structural and/or numerical karyotypic instability can MMt cells attain a complete loss of tumor suppressor genes located in 9p21.3, which is the most frequently homozygously deleted region. Tetraploidization is a late event in the karyotypic progression of MMt cells, after HDs in the 9p21.3 region have already been acquired.

  11. A High-Resolution Very Large Array Observation of a Protostar in OMC-3: Shock-induced X-ray Emission by a Protostellar Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Tsujimoto, M; Kobayashi, N; Saitó, M; Tsuboi, Y; Chandler, C J

    2004-01-01

    Using the Very Large Array (VLA) in the A-configuration, we have obtained a high-resolution 3.6 cm map of a hard X-ray source detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory in a protostellar clump in Orion molecular cloud 3. Two radio continuum sources were detected in the vicinity of the X-ray source, both of which have NIR counterparts. We conclude that these VLA sources are free-free emission produced by shocks in protostellar jets from the NIR class I protostars. Using the centimeter data, we determined the power and orientation of the protostellar jets. The center position of the X-ray emission was found to be ~1--2" offset from the exciting sources of the jets, and the displacement is in the direction of the jets and molecular outflows. We discuss the nature of the X-ray emission as the shock-excited plasma at the shock front where the jet propagates through interstellar medium at a speed of ~1000 km/s.

  12. A comparison of gold versus silver electrode contacts for high-resolution gastric electrical mapping using flexible printed circuit board arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, G; Paskaranandavadivel, N; Angeli, T R; Du, P; Windsor, J A; Cheng, L K; Pullan, A J

    2011-03-01

    Stomach contractions are initiated and coordinated by electrical events termed slow waves, and slow wave abnormalities contribute to gastric motility disorders. Recently, flexible printed circuit board (PCB) multi-electrode arrays were introduced, facilitating high-resolution mapping of slow wave activity in humans. However PCBs with gold contacts have shown a moderately inferior signal quality to previous custom-built silver-wire platforms, potentially limiting analyses. This study determined if using silver instead of gold contacts improved flexible PCB performance. In a salt-bath test, modestly higher stimulus amplitudes were recorded from silver PCBs (mean 312, s.d. 89 µV) than those from gold (mean 281, s.d. 85 µV) (p < 0.001); however, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was similar (p = 0.26). In eight in vivo experimental studies, involving gastric serosal recordings from five pigs, no silver versus gold differences were found in terms of slow wave amplitudes (mean 677 versus 682 µV; p = 0.91), SNR (mean 8.8 versus 8.8 dB; p = 0.94) or baseline drift (NRMS; mean 12.0 versus 12.1; p = 0.97). Under the prescribed conditions, flexible PCBs with silver or gold contacts provide comparable results in vivo, and contact material difference does not explain the performance difference between current-generation slow wave mapping platforms. Alternative explanations for this difference and the implications for electrode design are discussed.

  13. A comparison of gold vs silver electrode contacts for high-resolution gastric electrical mapping using flexible printed circuit board arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Grady, G; Paskaranandavadivel, N; Angeli, T R; Du, P; Windsor, J A; Cheng, L K; Pullan, A J

    2014-01-01

    Stomach contractions are initiated and coordinated by electrical events termed slow waves, and slow wave abnormalities contribute to gastric motility disorders. Recently, flexible printed circuit board (PCB) multi-electrode arrays were introduced, facilitating high-resolution mapping of slow wave activity in humans. However PCBs with gold-contacts have shown a moderately inferior signal quality to previous custom-built silver-wire platforms, potentially limiting analyses. This study determined if using silver instead of gold contacts improved flexible PCB performance. In a salt-bath test, modestly higher stimulus amplitudes were recorded from silver PCBs (mean 312 s.d. 89 μV) than gold (mean 281 s.d. 85 μV) (p<0.001); however the signal to noise ratio (SNR) was similar (p=0.26). In eight in-vivo experimental studies, involving gastric serosal recordings from five pigs, no silver vs gold differences were found in terms of slow wave amplitudes (mean 677 vs 682 μV; p=0.91), SNR (mean 8.8 vs 8.8 dB; p=0.94) or baseline drift (NMRS; mean 12.0 vs 12.1; p=0.97). Under the prescribed conditions, flexible PCBs with silver or gold contacts provide comparable results in-vivo, and contact material difference does not explain the performance difference between current-generation slow wave mapping platforms. Alternative explanations for this difference and the implications for electrode design are discussed. PMID:21252419

  14. Observer study for evaluating potential utility of a super-high-resolution LCD in the detection of clustered microcalcifications on digital mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junji; Abe, Hiroyuki; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Schmidt, Robert A; Doi, Kunio

    2010-04-01

    We evaluated the potential utility of a newly developed liquid-crystal display (LCD), which used an independent sub-pixel drive (ISD) technique for increasing the spatial resolution of a standard LCD three times in one direction, by use of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and a two-alternative-forced-choice (2AFC) method to determine improvement in radiologists' accuracy in the detection of clustered microcalcifications (MCLs) on digital mammograms. We used a standard LCD without and with the ISD technique, which can increase the spatial resolution of the LCD three times in one direction from three mega- to nine megapixels without changes in the size of the display. We used 60 single views of digital mammograms (30 with and 30 without clustered MCLs) for ROC studies and 60 regions of interest (ROIs) with clustered MCLs for 2AFC studies. In the ROC study, seven radiologists attempted to detect clustered MCLs without and with the ISD on the same LCD. In the 2AFC study, the same observer group compared the visibility of MCLs by use of the LCD without and with the ISD. Our institutional review board approved the use of this database and the participation of radiologists in this study. The accuracy in detecting clustered MCLs in the ROC study was improved by use of the LCD with the ISD, but the improvement was not statistically significant (p = 0.08). However, the superiority of the LCD with the ISD was demonstrated as significant (p LCD with ISD can improve the visibility of clustered MCLs when high-resolution digital mammograms are available.

  15. Development of a ground signal processor for digital synthetic array radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, C. R.; Estes, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    A modified APQ-102 sidelooking array radar (SLAR) in a B-57 aircraft test bed is used, with other optical and infrared sensors, in remote sensing of Earth surface features for various users at NASA Johnson Space Center. The video from the radar is normally recorded on photographic film and subsequently processed photographically into high resolution radar images. Using a high speed sampling (digitizing) system, the two receiver channels of cross-and co-polarized video are recorded on wideband magnetic tape along with radar and platform parameters. These data are subsequently reformatted and processed into digital synthetic aperture radar images with the image data available on magnetic tape for subsequent analysis by investigators. The system design and results obtained are described.

  16. High-resolution array CGH profiling identifies Na/K transporting ATPase interacting 2 (NKAIN2 as a predisposing candidate gene in neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Romania

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB, the most common solid cancer in early childhood, usually occurs sporadically but also its familial occurance is known in 1-2% of NB patients. Germline mutations in the ALK and PHOX2B genes have been found in a subset of familial NBs. However, because some individuals harbouring mutations in these genes do not develop this tumor, additional genetic alterations appear to be required for NB pathogenesis. Herein, we studied an Italian family with three NB patients, two siblings and a first cousin, carrying an ALK germline-activating mutation R1192P, that was inherited from their unaffected mothers and with no mutations in the PHOX2B gene. A comparison between somatic and germline DNA copy number changes in the two affected siblings by a high resolution array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH analysis revealed a germline gain at NKAIN2 (Na/K transporting ATPase interacting 2 locus in one of the sibling, that was inherited from the parent who does not carry the ALK mutation. Surprisingly, NKAIN2 was expressed at high levels also in the affected sibling that lacks the genomic gain at this locus, clearly suggesting the existance of other regulatory mechanisms. High levels of NKAIN2 were detected in the MYCN-amplified NB cell lines and in the most aggressive NB lesions as well as in the peripheral blood of a large cohort of NB patients. Consistent with a role of NKAIN2 in NB development, NKAIN2 was down-regulated during all-trans retinoic acid differentiation in two NB cell lines. Taken together, these data indicate a potential role of NKAIN2 gene in NB growth and differentiation.

  17. Low Power Systolic Array Based Digital Filter for DSP Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Karthick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Main concepts in DSP include filtering, averaging, modulating, and correlating the signals in digital form to estimate characteristic parameter of a signal into a desirable form. This paper presents a brief concept of low power datapath impact for Digital Signal Processing (DSP based biomedical application. Systolic array based digital filter used in signal processing of electrocardiogram analysis is presented with datapath architectural innovations in low power consumption perspective. Implementation was done with ASIC design methodology using TSMC 65 nm technological library node. The proposed systolic array filter has reduced leakage power up to 8.5% than the existing filter architectures.

  18. Low Power Systolic Array Based Digital Filter for DSP Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, S; Valarmathy, S; Prabhu, E

    2015-01-01

    Main concepts in DSP include filtering, averaging, modulating, and correlating the signals in digital form to estimate characteristic parameter of a signal into a desirable form. This paper presents a brief concept of low power datapath impact for Digital Signal Processing (DSP) based biomedical application. Systolic array based digital filter used in signal processing of electrocardiogram analysis is presented with datapath architectural innovations in low power consumption perspective. Implementation was done with ASIC design methodology using TSMC 65 nm technological library node. The proposed systolic array filter has reduced leakage power up to 8.5% than the existing filter architectures.

  19. Spatially adaptive regularized iterative high-resolution image reconstruction algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Won Bae; Park, Min K.; Kang, Moon Gi

    2000-12-01

    High resolution images are often required in applications such as remote sensing, frame freeze in video, military and medical imaging. Digital image sensor arrays, which are used for image acquisition in many imaging systems, are not dense enough to prevent aliasing, so the acquired images will be degraded by aliasing effects. To prevent aliasing without loss of resolution, a dense detector array is required. But it may be very costly or unavailable, thus, many imaging systems are designed to allow some level of aliasing during image acquisition. The purpose of our work is to reconstruct an unaliased high resolution image from the acquired aliased image sequence. In this paper, we propose a spatially adaptive regularized iterative high resolution image reconstruction algorithm for blurred, noisy and down-sampled image sequences. The proposed approach is based on a Constrained Least Squares (CLS) high resolution reconstruction algorithm, with spatially adaptive regularization operators and parameters. These regularization terms are shown to improve the reconstructed image quality by forcing smoothness, while preserving edges in the reconstructed high resolution image. Accurate sub-pixel motion registration is the key of the success of the high resolution image reconstruction algorithm. However, sub-pixel motion registration may have some level of registration error. Therefore, a reconstruction algorithm which is robust against the registration error is required. The registration algorithm uses a gradient based sub-pixel motion estimator which provides shift information for each of the recorded frames. The proposed algorithm is based on a technique of high resolution image reconstruction, and it solves spatially adaptive regularized constrained least square minimization functionals. In this paper, we show that the reconstruction algorithm gives dramatic improvements in the resolution of the reconstructed image and is effective in handling the aliased information. The

  20. Combining structure-from-motion derived point clouds from satellites and unmanned aircraft systems images with ground-truth data to create high-resolution digital elevation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaseanu, M.; Thatcher, C.; Danielson, J.; Gesch, D. B.; Poppenga, S.; Kottermair, M.; Jalandoni, A.; Carlson, E.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal topographic and bathymetric (topobathymetric) data with high spatial resolution (1-meter or better) and high vertical accuracy are needed to assess the vulnerability of Pacific Islands to climate change impacts, including sea level rise. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports, low-lying atolls in the Pacific Ocean are extremely vulnerable to king tide events, storm surge, tsunamis, and sea-level rise. The lack of coastal topobathymetric data has been identified as a critical data gap for climate vulnerability and adaptation efforts in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). For Majuro Atoll, home to the largest city of RMI, the only elevation dataset currently available is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission data which has a 30-meter spatial resolution and 16-meter vertical accuracy (expressed as linear error at 90%). To generate high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) in the RMI, elevation information and photographic imagery have been collected from field surveys using GNSS/total station and unmanned aerial vehicles for Structure-from-Motion (SfM) point cloud generation. Digital Globe WorldView II imagery was processed to create SfM point clouds to fill in gaps in the point cloud derived from the higher resolution UAS photos. The combined point cloud data is filtered and classified to bare-earth and georeferenced using the GNSS data acquired on roads and along survey transects perpendicular to the coast. A total station was used to collect elevation data under tree canopies where heavy vegetation cover blocked the view of GNSS satellites. A subset of the GPS / total station data was set aside for error assessment of the resulting DEM.

  1. Controlling the position and the dislocation of the middle ear transducer with high-resolution computed tomography and digital volume tomography: implications for the transducers' design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorinis, Georgios; Giesemann, Anja M; Witt, Thomas; Goetz, Friedrich; Schwab, Burkard

    2012-04-01

    A minimal tip dislocation of the middle ear transducer (MET(®), Otologics Ltd) may result in poor hearing performance. Our objective was to examine if a defined MET dislocation can be diagnosed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) or digital volume tomography (DVT). A human cadaver head was sequentially implanted with different MET tips (incus application) including a ceramic tip (T 1c), a titanium tip (T 1t), a new, thinner titanium tip (T 2), and a spherical titanium tip (Ts). HRCT and DVT studies were performed. Afterward, the tips were pulled back 0.5 mm, so that they were not attached to the incus. HRCT and DVT scans were repeated to identify the dislocation. Using the best plain in HRCT images, the dislocation of the transducer could be measured reliably and reproducibly in half of the cases. In particular, the precise positioning and the dislocation could be identified when T 1t and Ts were implanted, with the Ts showing the best visibility. DVT failed in recognizing the dislocation in all cases. The identification of MET tip's dislocation with HRCT depends on the shape, size, and material of the tip. This knowledge is useful for the design of the implants, as determination of the right position of the middle ear transducer may be proven important for the hearing outcome. In some cases, however, surgical exploration may still be required. Although DVT represents a promising imaging method for the otologists, it can barely help when MET dislocation is suspected.

  2. Automatic and Objective Detection of Shallow Landslides from Lidar-Derived High-Resolution Digital Elevation Models Using a Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, W. J.; McKean, J. A.; Tonina, D.

    2012-12-01

    An accurate and detailed inventory map of existing shallow landslides is a necessary component of shallow landslide risk assessment. Traditional methods for creating landslide inventory maps include visual interpretation of aerial photographs, visual analysis of topographic maps and field surveys. The visual methods tend to be subjective and can be greatly hampered by the presence of forests or other dense vegetation. Field surveying is time consuming and can be limited by access to steep or heavily vegetated terrain. Shallow slides are also often only reported as point locations with no recorded information about size or even two-dimensional footprint. The increasing availability of high resolution, LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs), showing bare earth topography even beneath forest canopies, has created new opportunities to improve and automate the shallow landslide mapping process. Here we introduce the Automated Shallow Landslide Detection (ASLD) method, which is an integrated set of Matlab® utilities that, uses a two-dimensional continuous Morlet wavelet transform in an automated and largely unsupervised manner, to analyze high resolution terrain data and map the locations and footprints of shallow landslides. The terrain data are filtered to remove the finest scale of roughness and then the Morlet wavelet transform is applied to the terrain model. The Morlet wavelet is directionally selective and effectively steered to align with the aspect at each node in the DEM. This reduces confusion with other, likely non-landslide generated, topographic features that are not aligned with the local slope direction. Convex-upward features are then eliminated, as the polarity of their wavelet transform will be reversed. Finally, simple user-defined rules for the general shape of shallow landslides are applied to further eliminate false positives. The capabilities of ASLD are demonstrated in two different drainages. Buckhorn Creek is tributary to the South Fork

  3. Digital data storage of core image using high resolution full color core scanner; Kokaizodo full color scanner wo mochiita core image no digital ka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, W.; Ujo, S.; Osato, K.; Takasugi, S. [Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports on digitization of core images by using a new type core scanner system. This system consists of a core scanner unit (equipped with a CCD camera), a personal computer and ancillary devices. This is a modification of the old type system, with measurable core length made to 100 cm/3 scans, and resolution enhanced to 5100 pixels/m (1024 pixels/m in the old type). The camera was changed to that of a color specification, and the A/D conversion was improved to 24-bit full color. As a result of carrying out a detail reproduction test on digital images of this core scanner, it was found that objects can be identified at a level of about the size of pixels constituting the image in the case when the best contrast is obtained between the objects and the background, and that in an evaluation test on visibility of concaves and convexes on core surface, reproducibility is not very good in large concaves and convexes. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  4. System Realization of Broad Band Digital Beam Forming for Digital Array Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Feng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Broad band Digital Beam Forming (DBF is the key technique for the realization of Digital Array Radar (DAR. We propose the method of combination realization of the channel equalization and DBF time delay filter function by using adaptive Sample Matrix Inversion algorithm. The broad band DBF function is realized on a new DBF module based on parallel fiber optic engines and Field Program Gate Array (FPGA. Good performance is achieved when it is used to some radar products.

  5. A Digital-Receiver for the Murchison Widefield Array

    CERN Document Server

    Prabu, Thiagaraj; Roshi, D Anish; Kamini, P A; Madhavi, S; Emrich, David; Crosse, Brian; Williams, Andrew J; Waterson, Mark; Deshpande, Avinash A; Shankar, N Udaya; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Briggs, Frank H; Goeke, Robert F; Tingay, Steven J; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; R, Gopalakrishna M; Morgan, Edward H; Pathikulangara, Joseph; Bunton, John D; Hampson, Grant; Williams, Christopher; Ord, Stephen M; Wayth, Randall B; Kumar, Deepak; Morales, Miguel F; deSouza, Ludi; Kratzenberg, Eric; Pallot, D; McWhirter, Russell; Hazelton, Bryna J; Arcus, Wayne; Barnes, David G; Bernardi, Gianni; Booler, T; Bowman, Judd D; Cappallo, Roger J; Corey, Brian E; Greenhill, Lincoln J; Herne, David; Hewitt, Jacqueline N; Kaplan, David L; Kasper, Justin C; Kincaid, Barton B; Koenig, Ronald; Lonsdale, Colin J; Lynch, Mervyn J; Mitchell, Daniel A; Oberoi, Divya; Remillard, Ronald A; Rogers, Alan E; Salah, Joseph E; Sault, Robert J; Stevens, Jamie B; Tremblay, S E; Webster, Rachel L; Whitney, Alan R; Wyithe, Stuart B

    2015-01-01

    An FPGA-based digital-receiver has been developed for a low-frequency imaging radio interferometer, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). The MWA, located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia, consists of 128 dual-polarized aperture-array elements (tiles) operating between 80 and 300\\,MHz, with a total processed bandwidth of 30.72 MHz for each polarization. Radio-frequency signals from the tiles are amplified and band limited using analog signal conditioning units; sampled and channelized by digital-receivers. The signals from eight tiles are processed by a single digital-receiver, thus requiring 16 digital-receivers for the MWA. The main function of the digital-receivers is to digitize the broad-band signals from each tile, channelize them to form the sky-band, and transport it through optical fibers to a centrally located correlator for further processing. The digital-receiver firmware also implements functions to measure the signal power, perform power equalization across ...

  6. High Resolution Elevation Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset contains contours generated from high resolution data sources such as LiDAR. Generally speaking this data is 2 foot or less contour interval.

  7. A major upgrade of the sediment echosounder ATLAS PARASOUND and the digital acquisition software ParaDigMA for high-resolution sea floor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerriets, A.; von Lom-Keil, H.; Spiess, V.; Zwanzig, C.; Bruns, R.

    2003-04-01

    The combination of the ATLAS PARASOUND sediment echosounder, designed by ATLAS Hydrographic, and the digital recording software package ParaDigMA (commercially available as ATLAS PARASTORE-3) for online digitisation, preprocessing and visualisation of recorded seismograms has proven to be a reliable system for high-resolution acoustic sea floor studies. During 10 years of successful operation aboard several research vessels, including R/V Meteor, R/V Sonne and R/V Polarstern, the system has been only slightly modified. Based on this experience, today's PARASOUND/ParaDigMA system has accomplished the step from DOS towards Windows platform and network capability. In cooperation of ATLAS Hydrographic and the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bremen a major upgrade of the PARASOUND/ParaDigMA system has been developed that adds significant functionality for surveys of sediment structures and sea floor morphology. The innovations primarily concern the control section of the ATLAS PARASOUND echosounder and the ParaDigMA user front end. The previous analogue PARASOUND control terminal has been replaced by a small real time control PC responsible for the control of the echosounder as well as for the continuous digitisation of the data. The control PC communicates via standard network protocols metadata and data with client applications that can display and store the acquired data on different computers on the network. The new network capabilities of the system overcome former limitations and admit a high flexibility with respect to numbers and locations of operator and recording/display PCs. The system now offers a simultaneous parallel registration of the 2.5-5.5kHz parametric signal and the 18kHz NBS signal. This feature in combination with the recording of complete soundings including the entire water column provides the basis for evolving scientific research topics e. g. gas venting. The ParaDigMA recording software now operates on Windows platforms which

  8. A high speed digital data acquisition system for the Indian National Gamma Array at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palit, R., E-mail: palit@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Saha, S.; Sethi, J.; Trivedi, T.; Sharma, S.; Naidu, B.S.; Jadhav, S.; Donthi, R.; Chavan, P.B. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Tan, H.; Hennig, W. [XIA LLC, Hayward, CA 94544 (United States)

    2012-07-11

    A digital data acquisition system for the Compton suppressed clover detector array has been implemented at the TIFR-BARC accelerator facility for the high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy using the Pixie-16 Digital Gamma Finder modules by XIA LLC. This system has a provision for simultaneous digitization of 96 preamplifier signals of high purity germanium crystals. The energy and timing characteristics of the clover detectors have been investigated in detail. In-beam data has been collected both in singles and in the coincidence mode. The system has been tested with 64 channels with each of the 64 crystals having an event rate up to 5 kHz and 2-fold clover coincidence rate up to 15 kHz. The use of the digital data acquisition system has improved the high counting rate handling capabilities for the clover array. Conventional systems with analog shaping are being replaced by digital system that provides higher throughput, better energy resolution and better stability for the multi-detector Compton suppressed clover array.

  9. Piezoelectric array elements for sound reconstruction with a digital input

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-10-13

    Various examples are provided for digital sound reconstruction using piezoelectric array elements. In one example, a digital loudspeaker includes a fixed frame and an array of transducers disposed on the fixed frame. Individual transducers of the array of transducers can include a flexible membrane disposed on a piezoelectric actuation element positioned over a corresponding opening that extends through the fixed frame. In another example, a method includes forming a flexible membrane structure on a substrate and backetching the substrate opposite the flexible membrane structure. The flexible membrane structure can be formed by disposing a first electrode layer on a substrate, disposing a piezoelectric layer on the first electrode layer and disposing a second electrode layer on the piezoelectric layer. A flexible membrane layer (e.g., polyimide) can be disposed on the second electrode layer.

  10. Crack nucleation using combined crystal plasticity modelling, high-resolution digital image correlation and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in a superalloy containing non-metallic inclusions under fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Jiang, Jun; Britton, Ben; Shollock, Barbara; Dunne, Fionn

    2016-05-01

    A crystal plasticity finite-element model, which explicitly and directly represents the complex microstructures of a non-metallic agglomerate inclusion within polycrystal nickel alloy, has been developed to study the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation. The methodology is to use the crystal plasticity model in conjunction with direct measurement at the microscale using high (angular) resolution-electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and high (spatial) resolution-digital image correlation (HR-DIC) strain measurement techniques. Experimentally, this sample has been subjected to heat treatment leading to the establishment of residual (elastic) strains local to the agglomerate and subsequently loaded under conditions of low cyclic fatigue. The full thermal and mechanical loading history was reproduced within the model. HR-EBSD and HR-DIC elastic and total strain measurements demonstrate qualitative and quantitative agreement with crystal plasticity results. Crack nucleation by interfacial decohesion at the nickel matrix/agglomerate inclusion boundaries is observed experimentally, and systematic modelling studies enable the mechanistic basis of the nucleation to be established. A number of fatigue crack nucleation indicators are also assessed against the experimental results. Decohesion was found to be driven by interface tensile normal stress alone, and the interfacial strength was determined to be in the range of 1270-1480 MPa.

  11. Multispectral high-resolution hologram generation using orthographic projection images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniraj, I.; Guo, C.; Sheridan, J. T.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new method of synthesizing a digital hologram of three-dimensional (3D) real-world objects from multiple orthographic projection images (OPI). A high-resolution multiple perspectives of 3D objects (i.e., two dimensional elemental image array) are captured under incoherent white light using synthetic aperture integral imaging (SAII) technique and their OPIs are obtained respectively. The reference beam is then multiplied with the corresponding OPI and integrated to form a Fourier hologram. Eventually, a modified phase retrieval algorithm (GS/HIO) is applied to reconstruct the hologram. The principle is validated experimentally and the results support the feasibility of the proposed method.

  12. High-resolution AMLCD for the electronic library system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Russel A.; Middo, Kathy; Turner, William D.; Lewis, Alan; Thompson, Malcolm J.; Silverstein, Louis D.

    1994-06-01

    The Electronic Library System (ELS), is a proposed data resource for the cockpit which can provide the aircrew with a vast array of technical information on their aircraft and flight plan. This information includes, but is not limited to, approach plates, Jeppeson Charts, and aircraft technical manuals. Most of these data are appropriate for digitization at high resolution (300 spi). Xerox Corporation has developed a flat panel active matrix liquid crystal display, AMLCD, that is an excellent match to the ELS, due to its innovative and aggressive design.

  13. Evaluation of a dedicated dual phased-array surface coil using a black-blood FSE sequence for high resolution MRI of the carotid vessel wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ouhlous (Mohamed); F. Lethimonnier; D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); M.R.H.M. van Sambeek (Marc); L.C.J. van Heerebeek (Lambertus C.); P.M.T. Pattynama (Peter); A. van der Lugt (Aad)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To investigate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the carotid vessel wall using a phased-array coil and a black-blood (BB) fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence. Materials and Methods: The phased-array coil was compared with a three-inch coil. Images from volun

  14. High resolution transforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volker, A.W.F.; Bloom, J.G.P.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of phased arrays opens-up a range of new possibilities for ultrasonic inspections. Arrays come in various shapes ranging from linear arrays for weld inspection to circular arrays emitting guided waves for permanent monitoring applications. For this kind of applications, the data is

  15. The application of taylor weighting, digital phase shifters, and digital attenuators to phased-array antennas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, Billy C.

    2008-03-01

    Application of Taylor weighting (taper) to an antenna aperture can achieve low peak sidelobes, but combining the Taylor weighting with quantized attenuators and phase shifters at each radiating element will impact the performance of a phased-array antenna. An examination of array performance is undertaken from the simple point of view of the characteristics of the array factor. Design rules and guidelines for determining the Taylor-weighting parameters, the number of bits required for the digital phase shifter, and the dynamic range and number of bits required for the digital attenuator are developed. For a radar application, when each element is fed directly from a transmit/receive module, the total power radiated by the array will be reduced as a result of the taper. Consequently, the issue of whether to apply the taper on both transmit and receive configurations, or only on the receive configuration is examined with respect to two-way sidelobe performance.

  16. High-resolution headlamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, Carsten; Cristea, Iulia; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    The following article shall describe how human vision by night can be influenced. At first, front lighting systems that are already available on the market will be described, followed by their analysis with respect to the positive effects on traffic safety. Furthermore, how traffic safety by night can be increased since the introduction of high resolution headlamps shall be discussed.

  17. Lithography-free high-resolution organic transistor arrays on polymer substrate by low energy selective laser ablation of inkjet-printed nanoparticle film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan, Heng; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Fréchet, Jean M. J.; Luscombe, Christine K.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2008-08-01

    Inkjet direct writing of functional materials provides a promising pathway towards realization of ultra-low-cost, large-area printed electronics, albeit at the expense of lowered resolution (˜20 50 μm). We demonstrate that selective laser sintering and ablation of inkjet-printed metal nanoparticles enables low-temperature metal deposition as well as high-resolution patterning. Combined with an air-stable carboxylate-functionalized polythiophene, all-inkjet-printed and laser-processed organic field effect transistors with micron to submicron critical feature resolution were fabricated in a fully maskless sequence, eliminating the need for any lithographic processes. All processing and characterization steps were carried out at plastic-compatible low temperatures and in air under ambient pressure.

  18. Reconfigurable signal processor designs for advanced digital array radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Hernan; Zhang, Yan (Rockee); Yu, Xining

    2017-05-01

    The new challenges originated from Digital Array Radar (DAR) demands a new generation of reconfigurable backend processor in the system. The new FPGA devices can support much higher speed, more bandwidth and processing capabilities for the need of digital Line Replaceable Unit (LRU). This study focuses on using the latest Altera and Xilinx devices in an adaptive beamforming processor. The field reprogrammable RF devices from Analog Devices are used as analog front end transceivers. Different from other existing Software-Defined Radio transceivers on the market, this processor is designed for distributed adaptive beamforming in a networked environment. The following aspects of the novel radar processor will be presented: (1) A new system-on-chip architecture based on Altera's devices and adaptive processing module, especially for the adaptive beamforming and pulse compression, will be introduced, (2) Successful implementation of generation 2 serial RapidIO data links on FPGA, which supports VITA-49 radio packet format for large distributed DAR processing. (3) Demonstration of the feasibility and capabilities of the processor in a Micro-TCA based, SRIO switching backplane to support multichannel beamforming in real-time. (4) Application of this processor in ongoing radar system development projects, including OU's dual-polarized digital array radar, the planned new cylindrical array radars, and future airborne radars.

  19. SU-E-T-460: Impact of the LINAC Repetition Rate On a High-Resolution Liquid Ionization Chamber Array for Patient-Specific QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S; Driewer, J; Zheng, D; Lei, Y; Zhang, Q; Zhu, X; Li, S; Enke, C; Zhou, S [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Xu, B [The Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fu Zhou, Fu Jian (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the LINAC repetition-rate (dose-rate) dependence of OCTAVIUS 1000SRS liquid ionization chamber (LIC) array for patient specific QA of SRT plans delivered with flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams. Methods: 1) The repetition-rate dependence of 1000SRS was measured in a phantom constructed with 5-cm solid water above and below the array for build-up and backscatter. A 0.3cc calibrated ion chamber was also placed along the central axis 2.3cm below the center chamber of the array for normalizing LINAC output fluctuation. The signals from the center chamber of the array under different repetition rates in the range of 400–2400 MU/min for 6xFFF and 10xFFF beams on a Varian TrueBeamSTx LINAC, normalized by the independent chamber readings, were analyzed for the array response dependence on repetition rates. 2) Twelve Step-and-shoot IMRS QA plans (6xFFF and 10xFFF) were delivered to the array under different repetition rates for analysis and comparison. 3) The absolute doses measured by the center chamber were compared to measurements using an independent ionization chamber with the identical setup, taken as the gold standard. 4) The correction factors based on the actual delivery repetition rate were applied to the measurements, and the results were compared again to the gold standard. Results: 1) The 1000SRS array exhibited repetition-rate dependence for FFF beams, up to 5% for 6xFFF and 10% for 10xFFF; 2) The array showed clinically-acceptable repetition-rate dependence for regular flattened beams; 3) This repetition-rate dependence significantly affected the measurement accuracy, thereby affecting IMRS QA results; 4) By applying an empirical repetition-rate correction, the corrected measurements agreed better with the gold standard ion chamber measurements. Conclusion: OCTAVIUS 1000SRS LIC array exhibited considerable repetition-rate dependence for FFF beams, which will affect the accuracy of the absolute QA

  20. SU-E-T-163: Characterization of a Novel High Resolution 1D Silicon Monolithic Array for Small Field Commissioning and Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisello, F [FAU University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen, DE (Germany); IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, DE (United States); McGlade, J; Wang, P; Kralik, J; Kosterin, P; Mooij, R; Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvenia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Menichelli, D; Celi, J [IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, DE (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the suitability of a novel 1D silicon monolithic array for dosimetry of small radiation fields and for QA of high dose gradient treatment modalities (IMRT and SBRT). Methods: A 1D array composed of 4 monolithic silicon modules of 64 mm length and 1 mm pixel pitch was developed by IBA Dosimetry. Measurements were carried out for 6MV and 15MV photons on two commercial different linacs (TrueBeam and Clinac iX, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and for a CyberKnife G4 (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA). The 1D array was used to measure output factors (OF), profiles and off axis correction factors (OACF) for the Iris CyberKnife variable collimator (5–60 mm). In addition, dose profiles (at the isocenter plane) were measured for multiple IMRT and SBRT treatment plans and compared with those obtained using EDR2radiographic film (Carestream Health, Rochester NY), a commercial 2D diode array and with the dose distribution calculated using a commercial TPS (Eclipse, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Results: Due to the small pixel pitch of the detector, IMRT and SBRT plan profiles deviate from film measurements by less than 2%. Similarly, the 1D array exhibits better performance than the 2D diode array due to the larger (7 mm) pitch of that device. Iris collimator OFs measured using the 1D silicon array are in good agreement with the commissioning values obtained using a commercial stereotactic diode as well as with published data. Maximum deviations are < 3% for the smallest field (5 and 7.5mm) and below 1% for all other dimensions. Conclusion: We have demonstrated good performances of the array for commissioning of small photon fields and in patient QA, compared with diodes and film typically used in these clinical applications. The technology compares favorably with existing commercial solutions The presenting author is founded by a Marie Curie Early Initial Training Network Fellowship of the European Communitys Seventh Framework Programme under

  1. Ultra high resolution tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  2. Development of a Digital Tracking Array with Single- Channel RSNS and Monopulse Digital Beamforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    digital beamforming (DBF) to track a UAV’s transmitted signal is described in this thesis. The RSNS is used as the direction finding (DF) algorithm and... algorithm and can provide high angle resolution with two closely spaced elements. However, as is typical for an array, the angle accuracy is reduced...25 1. Single-Target Tracker ( STT ) ............................................................25 2

  3. Antarctic-wide array of high-resolution ice core records reveals pervasive lead pollution began in 1889 and persists today

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McConnell, J.R.; Maselli, OJ; Sigl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Interior Antarctica is among the most remote places on Earth and was thought to be beyond the reach of human impacts when Amundsen and Scott raced to the South Pole in 1911. Here we show detailed measurements from an extensive array of 16 ice cores quantifying substantial toxic heavy metal lead p...

  4. Targeting the Treponemal Microbiome of Digital Dermatitis Infections by High-Resolution Phylogenetic Analyses and Comparison with Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kirstine Klitgaard; Foix Bretó, Antoni; Boye, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Modern pyrosequencing technology allows for a more comprehensive approach than traditional Sanger sequencing for elucidating the etiology of bovine digital dermatitis. We sought to describe the composition and diversity of treponemes in digital dermatitis lesions by using deep sequencing of the V...

  5. Time-resolved dosimetric verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy exposures using a high-resolution 2D ionisation chamber array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R B; Agnew, C E; O'Connell, B F; Prise, K M; Hounsell, A R; McGarry, C K

    2016-08-07

    The aim of this work was to track and verify the delivery of respiratory-gated irradiations, performed with three versions of TrueBeam linac, using a novel phantom arrangement that combined the OCTAVIUS(®) SRS 1000 array with a moving platform. The platform was programmed to generate sinusoidal motion of the array. This motion was tracked using the real-time position management (RPM) system and four amplitude gating options were employed to interrupt MV beam delivery when the platform was not located within set limits. Time-resolved spatial information extracted from analysis of x-ray fluences measured by the array was compared to the programmed motion of the platform and to the trace recorded by the RPM system during the delivery of the x-ray field. Temporal data recorded by the phantom and the RPM system were validated against trajectory log files, recorded by the linac during the irradiation, as well as oscilloscope waveforms recorded from the linac target signal. Gamma analysis was employed to compare time-integrated 2D x-ray dose fluences with theoretical fluences derived from the probability density function for each of the gating settings applied, where gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm and 0.5%/0.5 mm were used to evaluate the limitations of the RPM system. Excellent agreement was observed in the analysis of spatial information extracted from the SRS 1000 array measurements. Comparisons of the average platform position with the expected position indicated absolute deviations of  90% when criteria of 0.5%/0.5 mm were used. Results using this novel phantom arrangement indicate that the RPM system is capable of accurately gating x-ray exposure during the delivery of a fixed-field treatment beam.

  6. Time-resolved dosimetric verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy exposures using a high-resolution 2D ionisation chamber array

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R. B.; Agnew, C. E.; O'Connell, B. F.; Prise, K. M.; Hounsell, A. R.; McGarry, C. K.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to track and verify the delivery of respiratory-gated irradiations, performed with three versions of TrueBeam linac, using a novel phantom arrangement that combined the OCTAVIUS® SRS 1000 array with a moving platform. The platform was programmed to generate sinusoidal motion of the array. This motion was tracked using the real-time position management (RPM) system and four amplitude gating options were employed to interrupt MV beam delivery when the platform was not located within set limits. Time-resolved spatial information extracted from analysis of x-ray fluences measured by the array was compared to the programmed motion of the platform and to the trace recorded by the RPM system during the delivery of the x-ray field. Temporal data recorded by the phantom and the RPM system were validated against trajectory log files, recorded by the linac during the irradiation, as well as oscilloscope waveforms recorded from the linac target signal. Gamma analysis was employed to compare time-integrated 2D x-ray dose fluences with theoretical fluences derived from the probability density function for each of the gating settings applied, where gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm and 0.5%/0.5 mm were used to evaluate the limitations of the RPM system. Excellent agreement was observed in the analysis of spatial information extracted from the SRS 1000 array measurements. Comparisons of the average platform position with the expected position indicated absolute deviations of  90% when criteria of 0.5%/0.5 mm were used. Results using this novel phantom arrangement indicate that the RPM system is capable of accurately gating x-ray exposure during the delivery of a fixed-field treatment beam.

  7. Digital Background Calibration Algorithm for High-Speed and High-Resolution Analog-Digital Converter%高速高精度模数转换器的数字后台校准算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊召新; 蔡敏; 贺小勇

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the digital background calibration technique of analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and presents a new algorithm applied to the high-speed and high-resolution 2.5-b/stage pipelined ADC.In this algorithm,signal-dependent dither signals are injected into the 2.5-b/stage flip-over multiplying DAC (MDAC) to measure the nonlinear errors resulting from capacitor mismatch and finite opamp gain in MDAC and feed back the errors to the digital outputs of pipelined ADC for correction.This calibration algorithm is easy to realize and can works at very high speed without interrupting the normal operation of high-resolution ADC.Moreover,it can effectively calibrate all gain errors resulting from capacitor mismatch,finite opamp gain and other sources.Behavior simulation results show that,by using the proposed calibration scheme,the signal-to-noise distortion ratio increases from 63.3 dB to 78.7 dB and the spurious-free dynamic range improves from 63.9 dB to 91.8 dB.%研究了模数转换器(ADC)的数字后台校准技术,提出了一种针对2.5b/级高速高精度流水线ADC的数字后台校准算法.在2.5b/级电容翻转式余量增益电路(MDAC)中注入与输入信号相关的抖动信号,提取MDAC中由于电容失配和放大器增益有限性造成的非线性误差,并在最终的数字输出端对这些误差进行校准.文中提出的数字后台校准算法具有电路实现简单、不中断ADC正常工作、适合高速高精度流水线ADC等优点,能有效地降低电容失配和放大器有限增益等非理想因素对流水线ADC精度的影响.仿真结果表明,经校准后的ADC信号噪声失真比可从63.3 dB提高到78.7 dB,无杂散动态范围由63.9 dB提高到91.8dB.

  8. High-resolution genome-wide array-based comparative genome hybridization reveals cryptic chromosome changes in AML and MDS cases with trisomy 8 as the sole cytogenetic aberration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, K; Heidenblad, M; Strömbeck, B; Staaf, J; Jönsson, G; Borg, A; Fioretos, T; Johansson, B

    2006-05-01

    Although trisomy 8 as the sole chromosome aberration is the most common numerical abnormality in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), little is known about its pathogenetic effects. Considering that +8 is a frequent secondary change in AML/MDS, cryptic--possibly primary--genetic aberrations may occur in cases with trisomy 8 as the apparently single anomaly. However, no such hidden anomalies have been reported. We performed a high-resolution genome-wide array-based comparative genome hybridization (array CGH) analysis of 10 AML/MDS cases with isolated +8, utilizing a 32K bacterial artificial chromosome array set, providing >98% coverage of the genome with a resolution of 100 kb. Array CGH revealed intrachromosomal imbalances, not corresponding to known genomic copy number polymorphisms, in 4/10 cases, comprising nine duplications and hemizygous deletions ranging in size from 0.5 to 2.2 Mb. A 1.8 Mb deletion at 7p14.1, which had occurred prior to the +8, was identified in MDS transforming to AML. Furthermore, a deletion including ETV6 was present in one case. The remaining seven imbalances involved more than 40 genes. The present results show that cryptic genetic abnormalities are frequent in trisomy 8-positive AML/MDS cases and that +8 as the sole cytogenetic aberration is not always the primary genetic event.

  9. Saturn's rings - high resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Voyager 2 obtained this high-resolution picture of Saturn's rings Aug. 22, when the spacecraft was 4 million kilometers (2.5 million miles) away. Evident here are the numerous 'spoke' features, in the B-ring; their very sharp, narrow appearance suggests short formation times. Scientists think electromagnetic forces are responsible in some way for these features, but no detailed theory has been worked out. Pictures such as this and analyses of Voyager 2's spoke movies may reveal more clues about the origins of these complex structures. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  10. A methodological approach towards high-resolution surface wave imaging of the San Jacinto Fault Zone using ambient-noise recordings at a spatially dense array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Philippe; Moreau, Ludovic; Lecointre, Albanne; Hillers, Gregor; Campillo, Michel; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Zigone, Dimitri; Vernon, Frank

    2016-08-01

    We present a new technique for deriving detailed information on seismic velocities of the subsurface material from continuous ambient noise recorded by spatially dense seismic arrays. This method uses iterative double beamforming between various subarrays to extract surface wave contributions from the ambient-noise data in complex environments with unfavourable noise-source distributions. The iterative double beamforming extraction makes it possible to retrieve large amounts of Rayleigh wave traveltime information in a wide frequency band. The method is applied to data recorded by a highly dense Nodal array with 1108 vertical geophones, centred on the damage zone of the Clark branch of the San Jacinto Fault Zone south of Anza, California. The array covers a region of ˜650 × 700 m2, with instrument spacing of 10-30 m, and continuous recording at 500 samples s-1 over 30 d in 2014. Using this iterative double beamforming on subarrays of 25 sensors and cross-correlations between all of the station pairs, we separate surface waves from body waves that are abundant in the raw cross-correlation data. Focusing solely on surface waves, maps of traveltimes are obtained at different frequencies with unprecedented accuracy at each point of a 15-m-spacing grid. Group velocity inversions at 2-4 Hz reveal depth and lateral variations in the structural properties within and around the San Jacinto Fault Zone in the study area. This method can be used over wider frequency ranges and can be combined with other imaging techniques, such as eikonal tomography, to provide unprecedented detailed structural images of the subsurface material.

  11. Antarctic-wide array of high-resolution ice core records reveals pervasive lead pollution began in 1889 and persists today

    OpenAIRE

    J. R. McConnell; O. J. Maselli; Sigl, M.; P. Vallelonga; Neumann, T; H. Anschütz; R. C. Bales; Curran, M.A.J.; S. B. Das; Edwards, R.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Layman, L; E. R. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Interior Antarctica is among the most remote places on Earth and was thought to be beyond the reach of human impacts when Amundsen and Scott raced to the South Pole in 1911. Here we show detailed measurements from an extensive array of 16 ice cores quantifying substantial toxic heavy metal lead pollution at South Pole and throughout Antarctica by 1889 - beating polar explorers by more than 22 years. Unlike the Arctic where lead pollution peaked in the 1970s, lead pollution in Antarctica was a...

  12. Helmholtz-pair transmit coil with integrated receive array for high-resolution MRI of trabecular bone in the distal tibia at 7 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alexander C.; Lemdiasov, Rostislav; Connick, Thomas J.; Bhagat, Yusuf A.; Magland, Jeremy F.; Song, Hee Kwon; Toddes, Steven P.; Ludwig, Reinhold; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2011-05-01

    A Helmholtz-pair local transmit RF coil with an integrated four-element receive array RF coil and foot immobilization platform was designed and constructed for imaging the distal tibia in a whole-body 7 T MRI scanner. Simulations and measurements of the B1 field distribution of the transmit coil are described, along with SAR considerations for operation at 7 T. Results of imaging the trabecular bone of three volunteers at 1.5 T, 3 T and 7 T are presented, using identical 1.5 T and 3 T versions of the 7 T four-element receive array. The spatially registered images reveal improved visibility for individual trabeculae and show average gains in SNR of 2.8× and 4.9× for imaging at 7 T compared to 3 T and 1.5 T, respectively. The results thus display an approximately linear dependence of SNR with field strength and enable the practical utility of 7 T scanners for micro-MRI of trabecular bone.

  13. Wideband high-resolution direction of arrival estimation method based on the pressure-velocity combined processing using the acoustic vector sensor array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Xingyu; YANG Desen; ZHAO Chunhui

    2007-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of DOA (Direction of Arrival) estimation of underwater distant wideband targets, a novel coherent signal-subspace method based on the cross spectral matrix of pressure and particle velocity using the Acoustic Vector Sensor Array (AVSA)is proposed in this paper. The proposed method is different from existing AVSA based DOA estimation methods in using particle velocity information of Acoustic Vector Sensor (AVS) as an independent array element. It is entirely based on the combined information processing of pressure and particle velocity, namely, the P-V cross spectrum, has better DOA estimation performance than existing methods in isotropic noise field. By theoretical analysis, both focusing principle and eigendecomposition theory based on the P-V cross spectral matrix are given.At the same time, the corresponding criteria for source number detection is also presented.Computer simulations with data from lake trials demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and obviously outperforms existing methods in resolution and accuracy in the case of low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR).

  14. Submicroscopic deletions of 11q24-25 in individuals without Jacobsen syndrome: re-examination of the critical region by high-resolution array-CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VanAllen Margot I

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jacobsen syndrome is a rare contiguous gene disorder that results from a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. It is typically characterized by intellectual disability, a variety of physical anomalies and a distinctive facial appearance. The 11q deletion has traditionally been identified by routine chromosome analysis. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH has offered new opportunities to identify and refine chromosomal abnormalities in regions known to be associated with clinical syndromes. Results Using the 1 Mb BAC array (Spectral Genomics, we screened 70 chromosomally normal children with idiopathic intellectual disability (ID and congenital abnormalities, and identified five cases with submicroscopic abnormalities believed to contribute to their phenotypes. Here, we provide detailed molecular cytogenetic descriptions and clinical presentation of two unrelated subjects with de novo submicroscopic deletions within chromosome bands 11q24-25. In subject 1 the chromosome rearrangement consisted of a 6.18 Mb deletion (from 128.25–134.43 Mb and an adjacent 5.04 Mb duplication (from 123.15–128.19 Mb, while in subject 2, a 4.74 Mb interstitial deletion was found (from 124.29–129.03 Mb. Higher resolution array analysis (385 K Nimblegen was used to refine all breakpoints. Deletions of the 11q24-25 region are known to be associated with Jacobsen syndrome (JBS: OMIM 147791. However, neither of the subjects had the typical features of JBS (trigonocephaly, platelet disorder, heart abnormalities. Both subjects had ID, dysmorphic features and additional phenotypic abnormalities: subject 1 had a kidney abnormality, bilateral preauricular pits, pectus excavatum, mild to moderate conductive hearing loss and behavioral concerns; subject 2 had macrocephaly, an abnormal MRI with delayed myelination, fifth finger shortening and squaring of all fingertips, and sensorineural hearing loss. Conclusion Two

  15. High-resolution seismic profiling on water

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, T.M.

    2000-01-01

    Herein is presented an overview of high-resolution seismic profiling on water. Included are basic concepts and terminology as well as discussions of types of sources and receivers, field practice, data recording and data processing. Emphasis is on digital single-channel profiling for engineering and environmental purposes.

  16. A high-resolution TDC-based board for a fully digital trigger and data acquisition system in the NA62 experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Pedreschi, Elena; Avanzini, Carlo; Galeotti, Stefano; Lamanna, Gianluca; Magazzu, Guido; Pinzino, Jacopo; Piandani, Roberto; Sozzi, Marco; Spinella, Franco; Venditti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    A Time to Digital Converter (TDC) based system, to be used for most sub-detectors in the high-flux rare-decay experiment NA62 at CERN SPS, was built as part of the NA62 fully digital Trigger and Data AcQuisition system (TDAQ), in which the TDC Board (TDCB) and a general-purpose motherboard (TEL62) will play a fundamental role. While TDCBs, housing four High Performance Time to Digital Converters (HPTDC), measure hit times from sub-detectors, the motherboard processes and stores them in a buffer, produces trigger primitives from different detectors and extracts only data related to the lowest trigger level decision, once this is taken on the basis of the trigger primitives themselves. The features of the TDCB board developed by the Pisa NA62 group are extensively discussed and performance data is presented in order to show its compliance with the experiment requirements.

  17. A High-Resolution TDC-Based Board for a Fully Digital Trigger and Data Acquisition System in the NA62 Experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreschi, Elena; Angelucci, Bruno; Avanzini, Carlo; Galeotti, Stefano; Lamanna, Gianluca; Magazzu, Guido; Pinzino, Jacopo; Piandani, Roberto; Sozzi, Marco; Spinella, Franco; Venditti, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    A Time to Digital Converter (TDC) based system, to be used for most sub-detectors in the high-flux rare-decay experiment NA62 at CERN SPS, was built as part of the NA62 fully digital Trigger and Data AcQuisition system (TDAQ), in which the TDC Board (TDCB) and a general-purpose motherboard (TEL62) will play a fundamental role. While TDCBs, housing four High Performance Time to Digital Converters (HPTDC), measure hit times from sub-detectors, the motherboard processes and stores them in a buffer, produces trigger primitives from different detectors and extracts only data related to the lowest trigger level decision, once this is taken on the basis of the trigger primitives themselves. The features of the TDCB board developed by the Pisa NA62 group are extensively discussed and performance data is presented in order to show its compliance with the experiment requirements.

  18. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brünken, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limita...

  19. Digital PCR using micropatterned superporous absorbent array chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhen; Southard, Kristopher M; Zeng, Yong

    2016-06-21

    Digital PCR (dPCR) is an emerging technology for genetic analysis and clinical diagnostics. To facilitate the widespread application of dPCR, here we developed a new micropatterned superporous absorbent array chip (μSAAC) which consists of an array of microwells packed with highly porous agarose microbeads. The packed beads construct a hierarchically porous microgel which confers superior water adsorption capacity to enable spontaneous filling of PDMS microwells for fluid compartmentalization without the need of sophisticated microfluidic equipment and operation expertise. Using large λ-DNA as the model template, we validated the μSAAC for stochastic partitioning and quantitative digital detection of DNA molecules. Furthermore, as a proof-of-concept, we conducted dPCR detection and single-molecule sequencing of a mutation prevalent in blood cancer, the chromosomal translocation t(14;18), demonstrating the feasibility of the μSAAC for analysis of disease-associated mutations. These experiments were carried out using the standard molecular biology techniques and instruments. Because of its low cost, ease of fabrication, and equipment-free liquid partitioning, the μSAAC is readily adaptable to general lab settings, which could significantly facilitate the widespread application of dPCR technology in basic research and clinical practice.

  20. The EarthScope Array Network Facility: application-driven low-latency web-based tools for accessing high-resolution multi-channel waveform data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, R. L.; Lindquist, K. G.; Clemesha, A.; Vernon, F. L.

    2008-12-01

    Since April 2004 the EarthScope USArray seismic network has grown to over 400 broadband stations that stream multi-channel data in near real-time to the Array Network Facility in San Diego. Providing secure, yet open, access to real-time and archived data for a broad range of audiences is best served by a series of platform agnostic low-latency web-based applications. We present a framework of tools that interface between the world wide web and Boulder Real Time Technologies Antelope Environmental Monitoring System data acquisition and archival software. These tools provide audiences ranging from network operators and geoscience researchers, to funding agencies and the general public, with comprehensive information about the experiment. This ranges from network-wide to station-specific metadata, state-of-health metrics, event detection rates, archival data and dynamic report generation over a stations two year life span. Leveraging open source web-site development frameworks for both the server side (Perl, Python and PHP) and client-side (Flickr, Google Maps/Earth and jQuery) facilitates the development of a robust extensible architecture that can be tailored on a per-user basis, with rapid prototyping and development that adheres to web-standards.

  1. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: HIGH-RESOLUTION SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF ACT SZE-SELECTED CLUSTERS FROM THE EQUATORIAL STRIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Erik D.; Mroczkowski, Tony; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Menanteau, Felipe; Baker, Andrew J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Hilton, Matt [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Sievers, Jonathan; Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Aguirre, Paula; Duenner, Rolando [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Appel, John William; Das, Sudeep; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Hincks, Adam D. [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Fowler, Joseph W.; Hill, J. Colin [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); and others

    2012-05-20

    We present follow-up observations with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array (SZA) of optically confirmed galaxy clusters found in the equatorial survey region of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT): ACT-CL J0022-0036, ACT-CL J2051+0057, and ACT-CL J2337+0016. ACT-CL J0022-0036 is a newly discovered, massive ({approx_equal} 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun }), high-redshift (z = 0.81) cluster revealed by ACT through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE). Deep, targeted observations with the SZA allow us to probe a broader range of cluster spatial scales, better disentangle cluster decrements from radio point-source emission, and derive more robust integrated SZE flux and mass estimates than we can with ACT data alone. For the two clusters we detect with the SZA we compute integrated SZE signal and derive masses from the SZA data only. ACT-CL J2337+0016, also known as A2631, has archival Chandra data that allow an additional X-ray-based mass estimate. Optical richness is also used to estimate cluster masses and shows good agreement with the SZE and X-ray-based estimates. Based on the point sources detected by the SZA in these three cluster fields and an extrapolation to ACT's frequency, we estimate that point sources could be contaminating the SZE decrement at the {approx}< 20% level for some fraction of clusters.

  2. Antarctic-Wide Array of High-Resolution Ice Core Records Reveals Pervasive Lead Pollution Began in 1889 and Persists Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, J. R.; Maselli, O. J.; Sigl, M.; Vallelonga, P.; Neumann, Thomas Allen; Anschutz, H.; Bales, R. C.; Curran, M. A. J.; Das, S. B.; Edwards, R.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Layman, L.; Thomas, E. R.

    2014-01-01

    Interior Antarctica is among the most remote places on Earth and was thought to be beyond the reach of human impacts when Amundsen and Scott raced to the South Pole in 1911. Here we show detailed measurements from an extensive array of 16 ice cores quantifying substantial toxic heavy metal lead pollution at South Pole and throughout Antarctica by 1889 - beating polar explorers by more than 22 years. Unlike the Arctic where lead pollution peaked in the 1970s, lead pollution in Antarctica was as high in the early 20th century as at any time since industrialization. The similar timing and magnitude of changes in lead deposition across Antarctica, as well as the characteristic isotopic signature of Broken Hill lead found throughout the continent, suggest that this single emission source in southern Australia was responsible for the introduction of lead pollution into Antarctica at the end of the 19th century and remains a significant source today. An estimated 660 t of industrial lead have been deposited over Antarctica during the past 130 years as a result of mid-latitude industrial emissions, with regional-to-global scale circulation likely modulating aerosol concentrations. Despite abatement efforts, significant lead pollution in Antarctica persists into the 21st century.

  3. A Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) spectral imager (7.7 to 12.3 μ) based on cooled detector array and high resolution Circular Variable Filter (CVF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabib, Dario; Lavi, Moshe; Gil, Amir; Ohel, Eran; Dolev, Jacob; Milman, Uri

    2013-10-01

    Spectral imagers in the Long Wave IR spectral range (8 to 12 microns) suffer from the problem of high production costs because the existing commercial cooled array detectors are expensive, and in fact they are prohibitively expensive for many applications. As a result, the drive to lower the cost of Long Wave IR spectral imagers is strong: this is the main motivation for CI to investigate a new design that allows these spectral imagers to be more affordable. One area of possible cost reduction without relinquishing the advantages of a cryogenically cooled detector is the method used to provide the spectral information. CI Systems has developed a long wave IR (7.7 to 12.3 micron) spectral imager concept using a Circular Variable Filter (CVF), (a proprietary component based on multiple layer interference filter technology) which has advantages over the interferometric Fourier Transform method commonly used in this spectral range. The CVF method has its own development challenges; however, once proven, this concept may be more suitable and affordable for applications in which a spectral resolution of 0.5% of the wavelength (or 50 nm at 10 μ) is required. The design of the optical system must minimize background signals without being cooled to cryogenic temperatures, so we called it VIrtually COld (or VICO). CI is in the final stages of prototype building and characterization. Present initial calibration results and measurement examples are given in this paper.

  4. A digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using digital signal processor and field programmable gate array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Binghe, Sun; Yueping, Ma; Ruyan, Zhao

    2013-05-01

    A digital spectrometer for low-field magnetic resonance imaging is described. A digital signal processor (DSP) is utilized as the pulse programmer on which a pulse sequence is executed as a subroutine. Field programmable gate array (FPGA) devices that are logically mapped into the external addressing space of the DSP work as auxiliary controllers of gradient control, radio frequency (rf) generation, and rf receiving separately. The pulse programmer triggers an event by setting the 32-bit control register of the corresponding FPGA, and then the FPGA automatically carries out the event function according to preset configurations in cooperation with other devices; accordingly, event control of the spectrometer is flexible and efficient. Digital techniques are in widespread use: gradient control is implemented in real-time by a FPGA; rf source is constructed using direct digital synthesis technique, and rf receiver is constructed using digital quadrature detection technique. Well-designed performance is achieved, including 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, and 2 MHz signal receiving bandwidth. Both rf synthesis and rf digitalization operate at the same 60 MHz clock, therefore, the frequency range of transmitting and receiving is from DC to ~27 MHz. A majority of pulse sequences have been developed, and the imaging performance of the spectrometer has been validated through a large number of experiments. Furthermore, the spectrometer is also suitable for relaxation measurement in nuclear magnetic resonance field.

  5. A digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using digital signal processor and field programmable gate array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Binghe, Sun; Yueping, Ma; Ruyan, Zhao

    2013-05-01

    A digital spectrometer for low-field magnetic resonance imaging is described. A digital signal processor (DSP) is utilized as the pulse programmer on which a pulse sequence is executed as a subroutine. Field programmable gate array (FPGA) devices that are logically mapped into the external addressing space of the DSP work as auxiliary controllers of gradient control, radio frequency (rf) generation, and rf receiving separately. The pulse programmer triggers an event by setting the 32-bit control register of the corresponding FPGA, and then the FPGA automatically carries out the event function according to preset configurations in cooperation with other devices; accordingly, event control of the spectrometer is flexible and efficient. Digital techniques are in widespread use: gradient control is implemented in real-time by a FPGA; rf source is constructed using direct digital synthesis technique, and rf receiver is constructed using digital quadrature detection technique. Well-designed performance is achieved, including 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, and 2 MHz signal receiving bandwidth. Both rf synthesis and rf digitalization operate at the same 60 MHz clock, therefore, the frequency range of transmitting and receiving is from DC to ˜27 MHz. A majority of pulse sequences have been developed, and the imaging performance of the spectrometer has been validated through a large number of experiments. Furthermore, the spectrometer is also suitable for relaxation measurement in nuclear magnetic resonance field.

  6. Improved mapping of flood extent and flood depth using space based SAR data in combination with very high resolution digital elevation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwenzner, H.

    2009-04-01

    Due to their capability to present a synoptic view of the spatial extent of floods, remote sensing technology, and especially synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems, have been successfully applied for flood mapping and monitoring applications during the past decades. However, the quality and accuracy of the flood masks and derived flood parameters highly depend on the geometric precision of the satellite data as well as on the classification accuracy of the derived water mask. The incorporation of high resolution elevation data from LiDAR measurements for example can help to improve the plausibility and reliability of the flood masks. On the basis of the improved flood masks more sophisticated parameters such as inundation depth can be derived. A cross section approach is presented that allows the dynamic fitting of the position of the flood mask profiles according to the underlying terrain information from the DEM. The method was tested on the River Severn (UK), for which TerraSAR-X stripmap data with 3 meters pixel spacing acquired during the 2007 summer flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 2 meters pixel size. Initially, the cross sections were established perpendicularly to the major flow direction along the 7 km reach of the River Severn. The profile spacing was set to 50 meters. For each cross section profile the water level was extracted at the position of the left and the right border of the flood. On the basis of the longitudinal profile, which contains the sequence of all cross section profiles, a moving average was applied on the water levels in order to get a smooth water surface and to reduce single outliers. However, in case of obvious irregularities in the water levels illustrated in the longitudinal profile and caused by misclassification the respective cross-sections had to be excluded from further analysis. It must be taken into account, that the approach is mainly affected by possible classification errors in the dimension of more

  7. Evaluation of Different Change Detection Techniques in Forestry for Improvement of Spatial Objects Extraction Algorithms by Very High Resolution Remote Sensing Digital Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, N.

    2013-09-01

    Earth observations which are being useable by spatial analysis ability play an important role in detecting, management and solving environmental problems such as climate changes, deforestation, disasters, land use, water resource and carbon cycle. Remote sensing technology in combination with geospatial information system (GIS) can render reliable information on vegetation cover. Satellite Remote sensed data and GIS for land cover/use with its changes is a key to many diverse applications such as Forestry. Change detection can be defined as the process of identifying differences in the state of an object or phenomenon by observing it at different times. The analysis of the spatial extent and temporal change of vegetation cover (Forest) by using remotely sensed data is critically importance to natural resource management sciences. The main aim of this review paper is to go through the different change detection methods and algorithms based on very high resolution remote sensing imagery data, evaluate the quality of the spatial individual crown cover extraction in forests with high density, analyse, compare the results by optimized performance of control data for the same objects to provide the improvement in technique for detection and improve the mathematical sides of the change detection algorithms for high dense forests regions with different boundaries.

  8. Standard practice for radiological examination using digital detector arrays

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice establishes the minimum requirements for radiological examination for metallic and nonmetallic material using a digital detector array (DDA) system. 1.2 The requirements in this practice are intended to control the quality of radiologic images and are not intended to establish acceptance criteria for parts or materials. 1.3 This practice covers the radiologic examination with DDAs including DDAs described in Practice E2597 such as a device that contains a photoconductor attached to a Thin Film Transistor (TFT) read out structure, a device that has a phosphor coupled directly to an amorphous silicon read-out structure, and devices where a phosphor is coupled to a CMOS (Complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor) array, a Linear Detector Array (LDA) or a CCD (charge coupled device) crystalline silicon read-out structure. 1.4 The DDA shall be selected for an NDT application based on knowledge of the technology described in Guide , and of the selected DDA properties provided by the manufactu...

  9. Assessing the Accuracy of High Resolution Digital Surface Models Computed by PhotoScan ® and MicMac ® in Sub-Optimal Survey Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Marion Jaud; Sophie Passot; Réjanne Le Bivic; Christophe Delacourt; Philippe Grandjean; Nicolas Le Dantec

    2016-01-01

    International audience; For monitoring purposes and in the context of geomorphological research, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) appear to be a promising solution to provide multi-temporal Digital Surface Models (DSMs) and orthophotographs. There are a variety of photogrammetric software tools available for UAV-based data. The objective of this study is to investigate the level of accuracy that can be achieved using two of these software tools: Agisoft PhotoScan ® Pro and an open-source altern...

  10. Displaying a high-resolution digital hologram on a low-resolution spatial light modulator with the same resolution obtained from the hologram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, P W M; Poon, T-C; Zhou, C

    2013-07-29

    In this paper, a fast method for displaying a digital, real and off-axis Fresnel hologram on a lower resolution device is reported. Preserving the original resolution of the hologram upon display is one of the important attributes of the proposed method. Our method can be divided into 3 stages. First, a digital hologram representing a given three dimensional (3D) object is down-sampled based on a fix, jitter down-sampling lattice. Second, the down-sampled hologram is interpolated, through pixel duplication, into a low resolution hologram that can be displayed with a low-resolution spatial light modulator (SLM). Third, the SLM is overlaid with a grating which is generated based on the same jitter down-sampling lattice that samples the hologram. The integration of the grating and the low-resolution hologram results in, to a good approximation, the resolution of the original hologram. As such, our proposed method enables digital holograms to be displayed with lower resolution SLMs, paving the way for the development of low-cost holographic video display.

  11. Assessing the Accuracy of High Resolution Digital Surface Models Computed by PhotoScan® and MicMac® in Sub-Optimal Survey Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Marion Jaud; Sophie Passot; Réjanne Le Bivic; Christophe Delacourt; Philippe Grandjean; Nicolas Le Dantec

    2016-01-01

    For monitoring purposes and in the context of geomorphological research, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) appear to be a promising solution to provide multi-temporal Digital Surface Models (DSMs) and orthophotographs. There are a variety of photogrammetric software tools available for UAV-based data. The objective of this study is to investigate the level of accuracy that can be achieved using two of these software tools: Agisoft PhotoScan® Pro and an open-source alternative, IGN© MicMac®, in s...

  12. Digital Radiography Using Digital Detector Arrays Fulfills Critical Applications for Offshore Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes RicardoTadeu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital radiography in the inspection of welded pipes to be installed under deep water offshore gas and oil pipelines, like a presalt in Brazil, in the paper has been investigated. The aim is to use digital radiography for nondestructive testing of welds as it is already in use in the medical, aerospace, security, automotive, and petrochemical sectors. Among the current options, the DDA (Digital Detector Array is considered as one of the best solutions to replace industrial films, as well as to increase the sensitivity to reduce the inspection cycle time. This paper shows the results of this new technique, comparing it to radiography with industrial films systems. In this paper, 20 test specimens of longitudinal welded pipe joints, specially prepared with artificial defects like cracks, lack of fusion, lack of penetration, and porosities and slag inclusions with varying dimensions and in 06 different base metal wall thicknesses, were tested and a comparison of the techniques was made. These experiments verified the purposed rules for parameter definitions and selections to control the required digital radiographic image quality as described in the draft international standard ISO/DIS 10893-7. This draft is first standard establishing the parameters for digital radiography on weld seam of welded steel pipes for pressure purposes to be used on gas and oil pipelines.

  13. A methodology to generate high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) and surface water profile for a physical model using close range photogrammetric (CRP) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, V. K.; Kuiry, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Comprehensive understanding of the river flow dynamics with varying topography in a real field is very intricate and difficult. Conventional experimental methods based on manual data collection are time consuming and prone to many errors. Recently, remotely sensed satellite imageries are at the best to provide necessary information for large area provided the high resolution but which are very expensive and untimely, consequently, attaining accurate river bathymetry from relatively course resolution and untimely imageries are inaccurate and impractical. Despite of that, these data are often being used to calibrate the river flow models, though these models require highly accurate morpho-dynamic data in order to predict the flow field precisely. Under this circumstance, these data could be supplemented through experimental observations in a physical model with modern techniques. This paper proposes a methodology to generate highly accurate river bathymetry and water surface (WS) profile for a physical model of river network system using CRP technique. For the task accomplishment, a number of DSLR Nikon D5300 cameras (mounted at 3.5 m above the river bed) were used to capture the images of the physical model and the flooding scenarios during the experiments. During experiment, non-specular materials were introduced at the inlet and images were taken simultaneously from different orientations and altitudes with significant overlap of 80%. Ground control points were surveyed using two ultrasonic sensors with ±0.5 mm vertical accuracy. The captured images are, then processed in PhotoScan software to generate the DEM and WS profile. The generated data were then passed through statistical analysis to identify errors. Accuracy of WS profile was limited by extent and density of non-specular powder and stereo-matching discrepancies. Furthermore, several factors of camera including orientation, illumination and altitude of camera. The CRP technique for a large scale physical

  14. A methodology to generate high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) and surface water profile for a physical model using close range photogrammetric (CRP) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez Incera, F. J.; Erikson, L. H.; Ruggiero, P.; Barnard, P.; Camus, P.; Rueda Zamora, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Comprehensive understanding of the river flow dynamics with varying topography in a real field is very intricate and difficult. Conventional experimental methods based on manual data collection are time consuming and prone to many errors. Recently, remotely sensed satellite imageries are at the best to provide necessary information for large area provided the high resolution but which are very expensive and untimely, consequently, attaining accurate river bathymetry from relatively course resolution and untimely imageries are inaccurate and impractical. Despite of that, these data are often being used to calibrate the river flow models, though these models require highly accurate morpho-dynamic data in order to predict the flow field precisely. Under this circumstance, these data could be supplemented through experimental observations in a physical model with modern techniques. This paper proposes a methodology to generate highly accurate river bathymetry and water surface (WS) profile for a physical model of river network system using CRP technique. For the task accomplishment, a number of DSLR Nikon D5300 cameras (mounted at 3.5 m above the river bed) were used to capture the images of the physical model and the flooding scenarios during the experiments. During experiment, non-specular materials were introduced at the inlet and images were taken simultaneously from different orientations and altitudes with significant overlap of 80%. Ground control points were surveyed using two ultrasonic sensors with ±0.5 mm vertical accuracy. The captured images are, then processed in PhotoScan software to generate the DEM and WS profile. The generated data were then passed through statistical analysis to identify errors. Accuracy of WS profile was limited by extent and density of non-specular powder and stereo-matching discrepancies. Furthermore, several factors of camera including orientation, illumination and altitude of camera. The CRP technique for a large scale physical

  15. Digital Pixel Sensor Array with Logarithmic Delta-Sigma Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Alireza; Li, Jing; Joseph, Dileepan

    2013-01-01

    Like the human eye, logarithmic image sensors achieve wide dynamic range easily at video rates, but, unlike the human eye, they suffer from low peak signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratios (PSNDRs). To improve the PSNDR, we propose integrating a delta-sigma analog-to-digital converter (ADC) in each pixel. An image sensor employing this architecture is designed, built and tested in 0.18 micron complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. It achieves a PSNDR better than state-of-the-art logarithmic sensors and comparable to the human eye. As the approach concerns an array of many ADCs, we use a small-area low-power delta-sigma design. For scalability, each pixel has its own decimator. The prototype is compared to a variety of other image sensors, linear and nonlinear, from industry and academia. PMID:23959239

  16. Digital Pixel Sensor Array with Logarithmic Delta-Sigma Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Like the human eye, logarithmic image sensors achieve wide dynamic range easily at video rates, but, unlike the human eye, they suffer from low peak signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratios (PSNDRs. To improve the PSNDR, we propose integrating a delta-sigma analog-to-digital converter (ADC in each pixel. An image sensor employing this architecture is designed, built and tested in 0.18 micron complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology. It achieves a PSNDR better than state-of-the-art logarithmic sensors and comparable to the human eye. As the approach concerns an array of many ADCs, we use a small-area low-power delta-sigma design. For scalability, each pixel has its own decimator. The prototype is compared to a variety of other image sensors, linear and nonlinear, from industry and academia.

  17. Digital pixel sensor array with logarithmic delta-sigma architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Alireza; Li, Jing; Joseph, Dileepan

    2013-08-16

    Like the human eye, logarithmic image sensors achieve wide dynamic range easily at video rates, but, unlike the human eye, they suffer from low peak signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratios (PSNDRs). To improve the PSNDR, we propose integrating a delta-sigma analog-to-digital converter (ADC) in each pixel. An image sensor employing this architecture is designed, built and tested in 0.18 micron complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. It achieves a PSNDR better than state-of-the-art logarithmic sensors and comparable to the human eye. As the approach concerns an array of many ADCs, we use a small-area low-power delta-sigma design. For scalability, each pixel has its own decimator. The prototype is compared to a variety of other image sensors, linear and nonlinear, from industry and academia.

  18. High-resolution digital elevation model of Mount St. Helens crater and upper North Fork Toutle River basin, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of September 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the North Fork Toutle River basin, which drains the northern flank of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, built a sediment retention structure on the North Fork Toutle River in 1989 to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From September 16–20, 2009, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 214 square kilometers (83 square miles) of Mount St. Helens and the upper North Fork Toutle River basin from the sediment retention structure to the volcano's crater. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at Castle, Coldwater, and Spirit Lakes. Final results averaged about five laser last

  19. High-resolution digital elevation model of lower Cowlitz and Toutle Rivers, adjacent to Mount St. Helens, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of October 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the Toutle River basin, which drains the northern and western flanks of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and lower Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, continues to monitor and mitigate excess sediment in North and South Fork Toutle River basins to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From October 22–27, 2007, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 273 square kilometers (105 square miles) of lower Cowlitz and Toutle River tributaries from the Columbia River at Kelso, Washington, to upper North Fork Toutle River (below the volcano's edifice), including lower South Fork Toutle River. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at

  20. Simultaneous Transmit and Receive Performance of an 8-channel Digital Phased Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-16

    Simultaneous Transmit and Receive Performance of an 8- channel Digital Phased Array Jonathan P. Doane, Kenneth E. Kolodziej, Bradley T. Perry MIT...traditional digital cancellation is typically limited by channel noise and distortion. A unique aspect of the ALSTAR digital canceller is the use of...elements, and an 8- channel digital transceiver chassis. width which is mixed to an IF center frequency of 187.5 MHz, supporting digital sampling in the

  1. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  2. High-resolution digital elevation dataset for Newberry Volcano and vicinity, Oregon, based on lidar survey of August-September, 2010 and bathymetric survey of June, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Joseph A.; Ramsey, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Newberry Volcano, one of the largest Quaternary volcanoes in the conterminous United States, is a broad shield-shaped volcano measuring 60 km north-south by 30 km east-west with a maximum elevation of more than 2 km above sea level. It is the product of deposits from thousands of eruptions, including at least 25 in (approximately) the last 12,000 years (the Holocene Epoch). Newberry Volcano has erupted as recently as 1,300 years ago, but isotopic ages indicate that the volcano began its growth as early as 0.6 million years ago. Such a long eruptive history together with recent activity suggests that Newberry Volcano is likely to erupt in the future. This DEM (digital elevation model) of Newberry Volcano contributes to natural hazard monitoring efforts, the study of regional geology, volcanic landforms, and landscape modification during and after future volcanic eruptions, both at Newberry Volcano or elsewhere globally. In collaboration with the USGS, the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries-led Oregon Lidar Consortium contracted Watershed Sciences to collect 500 square miles of high-precision airborne lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) data. These data provide a digital map of the ground surface beneath forest cover. The lidar-derived DEM is amended to include bathymetric surveys of East Lake and Paulina Lake. The bathymetric surveys were performed in June, 2001 by Bob Reynolds of Central Oregon Community College, Bend, Oregon. The bathymetry is mosaicked into the DEM in place of the lidar derived lake surfaces. This release is comprised of a DEM dataset accompanied by a hillshade raster, each divided into eighteen tiles. Each tile’s bounding rectangle is identical to the extent of the USGS 7.5 minute topographic quadrangles covering the same area. The names of the DEM tiles are eleven characters long (e.g., dem_xxxxxx) with the prefix, "dem", indicating the file is a DEM and the last seven characters corresponding to the map reference code of the

  3. High-resolution digital elevation models from single-pass TanDEM-X interferometry over mountainous regions: A case study of Inylchek Glacier, Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelmeijer, Julia; Motagh, Mahdi; Bookhagen, Bodo

    2017-08-01

    This study demonstrates the potential of using single-pass TanDEM-X (TDX) radar imagery to analyse inter- and intra-annual glacier changes in mountainous terrain. Based on SAR images acquired in February 2012, March 2013 and November 2013 over the Inylchek Glacier, Kyrgyzstan, we discuss in detail the processing steps required to generate three reliable digital elevation models (DEMs) with a spatial resolution of 10 m that can be used for glacial mass balance studies. We describe the interferometric processing steps and the influence of a priori elevation information that is required to model long-wavelength topographic effects. We also focus on DEM alignment to allow optimal DEM comparisons and on the effects of radar signal penetration on ice and snow surface elevations. We finally compare glacier elevation changes between the three TDX DEMs and the C-band shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM) DEM from February 2000. We introduce a new approach for glacier elevation change calculations that depends on the elevation and slope of the terrain. We highlight the superior quality of the TDX DEMs compared to the SRTM DEM, describe remaining DEM uncertainties and discuss the limitations that arise due to the side-looking nature of the radar sensor.

  4. Genome-wide detection of predicted non-coding RNAs in Rhizobium etli expressed during free-living and host-associated growth using a high-resolution tiling array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs Inge M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs play a crucial role in the intricate regulation of bacterial gene expression, allowing bacteria to quickly adapt to changing environments. In the past few years, a growing number of regulatory RNA elements have been predicted by computational methods, mostly in well-studied γ-proteobacteria but lately in several α-proteobacteria as well. Here, we have compared an extensive compilation of these non-coding RNA predictions to intergenic expression data of a whole-genome high-resolution tiling array in the soil-dwelling α-proteobacterium Rhizobium etli. Results Expression of 89 candidate ncRNAs was detected, both on the chromosome and on the six megaplasmids encompassing the R. etli genome. Of these, 11 correspond to functionally well characterized ncRNAs, 12 were previously identified in other α-proteobacteria but are as yet uncharacterized and 66 were computationally predicted earlier but had not been experimentally identified and were therefore classified as novel ncRNAs. The latter comprise 17 putative sRNAs and 49 putative cis-regulatory ncRNAs. A selection of these candidate ncRNAs was validated by RT-qPCR, Northern blotting and 5' RACE, confirming the existence of 4 ncRNAs. Interestingly, individual transcript levels of numerous ncRNAs varied during free-living growth and during interaction with the eukaryotic host plant, pointing to possible ncRNA-dependent regulation of these specialized processes. Conclusions Our data support the practical value of previous ncRNA prediction algorithms and significantly expand the list of candidate ncRNAs encoded in the intergenic regions of R. etli and, by extension, of α-proteobacteria. Moreover, we show high-resolution tiling arrays to be suitable tools for studying intergenic ncRNA transcription profiles across the genome. The differential expression levels of some of these ncRNAs may indicate a role in adaptation to changing environmental conditions.

  5. Assessing the Accuracy of High Resolution Digital Surface Models Computed by PhotoScan® and MicMac® in Sub-Optimal Survey Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Jaud

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For monitoring purposes and in the context of geomorphological research, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV appear to be a promising solution to provide multi-temporal Digital Surface Models (DSMs and orthophotographs. There are a variety of photogrammetric software tools available for UAV-based data. The objective of this study is to investigate the level of accuracy that can be achieved using two of these software tools: Agisoft PhotoScan® Pro and an open-source alternative, IGN© MicMac®, in sub-optimal survey conditions (rugged terrain, with a large variety of morphological features covering a range of roughness sizes, poor GPS reception. A set of UAV images has been taken by a hexacopter drone above the Rivière des Remparts, a river on Reunion Island. This site was chosen for its challenging survey conditions: the topography of the study area (i involved constraints on the flight plan; (ii implied errors on some GPS measurements; (iii prevented an optimal distribution of the Ground Control Points (GCPs and; (iv was very complex to reconstruct. Several image processing tests are performed with different scenarios in order to analyze the sensitivity of each software package to different parameters (image quality, numbers of GCPs, etc.. When computing the horizontal and vertical errors within a control region on a set of ground reference targets, both methods provide rather similar results. A precision up to 3–4 cm is achievable with these software packages. The DSM quality is also assessed over the entire study area comparing PhotoScan DSM and MicMac DSM with a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS point cloud. PhotoScan and MicMac DSM are also compared at the scale of particular features. Both software packages provide satisfying results: PhotoScan is more straightforward to use but its source code is not open; MicMac is recommended for experimented users as it is more flexible.

  6. 高分辨率阵列感应测井在薄层评价中的应用%Application of high resolution array induction logging in thin bed evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张菲; 孙培安; 张乐

    2012-01-01

    薄层由于受围岩影响较大,常规测井曲线难以有效的反映薄层的真实测井响应,进而无法有效评价储层特性和解释储层参数.随着测井新技术的发展和日趋成熟,高分辨率阵列感应测井已大批量投入到了实际生产中.根据研究表明,阵列感应测井能够准确识别薄层、划分厚度、判断油水层等,在薄层评价中具有明显的技术优势,取得了很好的应用效果.%Severely influenced by surrounding rocks, it is difficult to obtain real logging response of thin bed by conventional logging curves. As the development of new logging techniques, high resolution array induction logging has been widely applied in field productions. It can precisely identify thin bed, define thickness, and distinguish oil/water layer. It takes obvious advantage of thin bed reserve evaluation, and has gained good application effects.

  7. Assessment of sediment sources throughout the proglacial area of a small Arctic catchment based on high-resolution digital elevation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kociuba, Waldemar

    2017-06-01

    The article presents calculations of quantitative modifications of the morphology of selected subsystems of a glacial valley through: (i) identification of the spatial distribution of important sources of sediment, (ii) assessment of the spatiotemporal variety of sediment volume and landform morphology, and (iii) assessment of the role of particular subsystems in sediment distribution. The study involved a comparison of the results of field measurements from 2010 to 2013 performed in the Scott Glacier catchment (10.1 km2) in NW Wedel Jarlsberg Land (Spitsbergen). The assessment of the landform surface changes was performed by means of a precise Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) survey. The applied field and post-processing techniques for oblique laser scanning permitted the acquisition of digital elevation data at a resolution 0.01 m and density > 500 pt m- 2. This allowed the development of a detailed terrain model, and balancing spatial quantitative changes in six research test areas (10,000 m2) located within two subsystems of the catchment in a cascade arrangement. In the alluvial valley-floor subsystem, the survey covered: 1) the glacier terminus, 2) the intramarginal outwash plain, 3) the extramarginal braid-plain and 4) the alluvial fan, and in the slope subsystem: 5) the erosional-depositional slope in the gorge through terminal moraines, and 6) the solifluction slope. Three zones differing in terms of the spatiotemporal dynamics of geomorphic processes were distinguished within the two analysed valley subsystems. In the valley floor subsystem, these are: (i) the zone of basic supply (distribution throughout the melting season) and (ii) the redeposition zone (distribution particularly during floods), and in the slope subsystem: (iii) zone of periodical supply (distributed mainly in periods of increased precipitation and rapid increases in temperature in summer and during snow avalanches in winter). The glacier and the landforms of the channel and valley

  8. The Sequencing Bead Array (SBA, a next-generation digital suspension array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Akhras

    Full Text Available Here we describe the novel Sequencing Bead Array (SBA, a complete assay for molecular diagnostics and typing applications. SBA is a digital suspension array using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS, to replace conventional optical readout platforms. The technology allows for reducing the number of instruments required in a laboratory setting, where the same NGS instrument could be employed from whole-genome and targeted sequencing to SBA broad-range biomarker detection and genotyping. As proof-of-concept, a model assay was designed that could distinguish ten Human Papillomavirus (HPV genotypes associated with cervical cancer progression. SBA was used to genotype 20 cervical tumor samples and, when compared with amplicon pyrosequencing, was able to detect two additional co-infections due to increased sensitivity. We also introduce in-house software Sphix, enabling easy accessibility and interpretation of results. The technology offers a multi-parallel, rapid, robust, and scalable system that is readily adaptable for a multitude of microarray diagnostic and typing applications, e.g. genetic signatures, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, structural variations, and immunoassays. SBA has the potential to dramatically change the way we perform probe-based applications, and allow for a smooth transition towards the technology offered by genomic sequencing.

  9. The Sequencing Bead Array (SBA), a next-generation digital suspension array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhras, Michael S; Pettersson, Erik; Diamond, Lisa; Unemo, Magnus; Okamoto, Jennifer; Davis, Ronald W; Pourmand, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe the novel Sequencing Bead Array (SBA), a complete assay for molecular diagnostics and typing applications. SBA is a digital suspension array using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS), to replace conventional optical readout platforms. The technology allows for reducing the number of instruments required in a laboratory setting, where the same NGS instrument could be employed from whole-genome and targeted sequencing to SBA broad-range biomarker detection and genotyping. As proof-of-concept, a model assay was designed that could distinguish ten Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes associated with cervical cancer progression. SBA was used to genotype 20 cervical tumor samples and, when compared with amplicon pyrosequencing, was able to detect two additional co-infections due to increased sensitivity. We also introduce in-house software Sphix, enabling easy accessibility and interpretation of results. The technology offers a multi-parallel, rapid, robust, and scalable system that is readily adaptable for a multitude of microarray diagnostic and typing applications, e.g. genetic signatures, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), structural variations, and immunoassays. SBA has the potential to dramatically change the way we perform probe-based applications, and allow for a smooth transition towards the technology offered by genomic sequencing.

  10. Preparation, applications, and digital simulation of carbon interdigitated array electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Kolesov, Grigory; Parkinson, B A

    2014-08-05

    Carbon interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes with features sizes down to 1.2 μm were fabricated by controlled pyrolysis of patterned photoresist. Cyclic voltammetry of reversible redox species produced the expected steady-state currents. The collection efficiency depends on the IDA electrode spacing, which ranged from around 2.7 to 16.5 μm, with the smaller dimensions achieving higher collection efficiencies of up to 98%. The signal amplification because of redox cycling makes it possible to detect species at relatively low concentrations (10(-5) molar) and the small spacing allows detection of transient electrogenerated species with much shorter lifetimes (submillisecond). Digital simulation software that accounts for both the width and height of electrode elements as well as the electrode spacing was developed to model the IDA electrode response. The simulations are in quantitative agreement with experimental data for both a simple fast one electron redox reaction and an electron transfer with a following chemical reaction at the IDAs with larger gaps whereas currents measured for the smallest IDA electrodes, that were larger than the simulated currents, are attributed to convection from induced charge electrokinetic flow.

  11. Preparation, Applications, and Digital Simulation of Carbon Interdigitated Array Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fei; Kolesov, Grigory; Parkinson, Bruce A.

    2014-12-16

    Carbon interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes with features sizes down to 1.2 μm were fabricated by controlled pyrolysis of patterned photoresist. Cyclic voltam-metry of reversible redox species produced the expected steady-state currents. The collection efficiency depends on the IDA electrode spacing, which ranged from around 2.7 to 16.5 μm, with the smaller dimensions achieving higher collection efficiencies of up to 98%. The signal amplification because of redox cycling makes it possible to detect species at relatively low concentrations (10–5 molar) and the small spacing allows detection of transient electrogenerated species with much shorter lifetimes (submillisecond). Digital simulation software that accounts for both the width and height of electrode elements as well as the electrode spacing was developed to model the IDA electrode response. The simulations are in quantitative agreement with experimental data for both a simple fast one electron redox reaction and an electron transfer with a following chemical reaction at the IDAs with larger gaps whereas currents measured for the smallest IDA electrodes, that were larger than the simulated currents, are attributed to convection from induced charge electrokinetic flow. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the Department of Energy, Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  12. Ping-Pong Beam Training with Hybrid Digital-Analog Antenna Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manchón, Carles Navarro; Carvalho, Elisabeth De; Andersen, Jørgen Bach

    2017-01-01

    In this article we propose an iterative training scheme that approximates optimal beamforming between two transceivers equipped with hybrid digital-analog antenna arrays. Inspired by methods proposed for digital arrays that exploit algebraic power iterations, the proposed training procedure...... is based on a series of alternate (ping-pong) transmissions between the two devices over a reciprocal channel. During the transmissions, the devices updates their digital beamformers by conjugation and normalization operations on the received digital signal, while the analog beamformers are progressively...

  13. Detection of genomic copy number changes in patients with idiopathic mental retardation by high-resolution X-array-CGH: important role for increased gene dosage of XLMR genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyen, Guy; Van Esch, Hilde; Bauters, Marijke; Hollanders, Karen; Frints, Suzanna G M; Vermeesch, Joris R; Devriendt, Koen; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Marynen, Peter

    2007-10-01

    A tiling X-chromosome-specific genomic array with a theoretical resolution of 80 kb was developed to screen patients with idiopathic mental retardation (MR) for submicroscopic copy number differences. Four patients with aberrations previously detected at lower resolution were first analyzed. This facilitated delineation of the location and extent of the aberration at high resolution and subsequently, more precise genotype-phenotype analyses. A cohort of 108 patients was screened, 57 of which were suspected of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), 26 were probands of brother pairs, and 25 were sporadic cases. A total of 15 copy number changes in 14 patients (13%) were detected, which included two deletions and 13 duplications ranging from 0.1 to 2.7 Mb. The aberrations are associated with the phenotype in five patients (4.6%), based on the following criteria: de novo aberration; involvement of a known or candidate X-linked nonsyndromic(syndromic) MR (MRX(S)) gene; segregation with the disease in the family; absence in control individuals; and skewed X-inactivation in carrier females. These include deletions that contain the MRX(S) genes CDKL5, OPHN1, and CASK, and duplications harboring CDKL5, NXF5, MECP2, and GDI1. In addition, seven imbalances were apparent novel polymorphic regions because they do not fulfill the proposed criteria. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that not only deletions but also duplications on the X chromosome contribute to the phenotype more often than expected, supporting the increased gene dosage mechanism for deregulation of normal cognitive development.

  14. Shallow Seismic Reflection Survey at Garner Valley Digital Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Z. S.; Brackman, T. B.; Bodin, P.; Stephenson, W. J.; Steidl, J. H.; Gomberg, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Garner Valley Digital Array (GVDA) site is a NEES-sponsored facility in a small, sediment-filled, intermountain valley in Southern California, established for the purpose of investigating ground motion site response and soil-structure interaction, in situ. The site has been well-characterized geotechnically, and is thoroughly instrumented with both surface and downhole instrumentation of various types. Nevertheless, a borehole recently drilled into lake bed sediments and deeply weathered granitic rocks that comprise the valley fill at GVDA encountered hard, unweathered bedrock at an unexpected depth, suggesting an apparent 38 meter offset in the unweathered bedrock between two wells 40 meters apart. The apparent offset can be most easily explained either by faulting, or as a buried erosional surface. The Hot Springs fault, a strand of the San Jacinto fault zone, runs through Garner Valley, although its inferred location is several hundred meters east of GVDA. To better characterize the subsurface strata, particularly the existence and configuration of faulting that may disturb them; we conducted a 120-meter long, 12-fold shallow seismic reflection common midpoint (CMP) survey at GVDA using a 24-channel seismograph, vertical 4.5 Hz geophones at 2-meter intervals and a sledgehammer seismic source. Preliminary processing reveals strong refractors and surface waves that may mask reflections, although reflections are visible in some raw shot records. Semi-continuous reflections seen in the CMP section from a shallow reflector may coincide with the water table. There are also deeper, discontinuous reflectors obscured by bands of coherent noise. We plan to present a fully migrated and interpreted CMP record section.

  15. A bit-level systolic array for digital contour smoothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkov, Nikolai; Sloboda, Fridrich

    1989-01-01

    Linear operators for digital contour smoothing are described. These operators are defined by circulant Toeplitz matrices and allow to smooth digital contours in the least-squares sense. They minimize the undersampling, digitizing and quantizing error and allow to calculate invariants, such as curvat

  16. Pilot Study on the Detection of Simulated Lesions Using a 2D and 3D Digital Full-Field Mammography System with a Newly Developed High Resolution Detector Based on Two Shifts of a-Se.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Wendtland, R; Bani, M; Lux, M P; Schwab, S; Loehberg, C R; Jud, S M; Rauh, C; Bayer, C M; Beckmann, M W; Uder, M; Fasching, P A; Adamietz, B; Meier-Meitinger, M

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Experimental study of a new system for digital 2D and 3D full-field mammography (FFDM) using a high resolution detector based on two shifts of a-Se. Material and Methods: Images were acquired using the new FFDM system Amulet® (FujiFilm, Tokio, Japan), an a-Se detector (receptor 24 × 30 cm(2), pixel size 50 µm, memory depth 12 bit, spatial resolution 10 lp/mm, DQE > 0.50). Integrated in the detector is a new method for data transfer, based on optical switch technology. The object of investigation was the Wisconsin Mammographic Random Phantom, Model 152A (Radiation Measurement Inc., Middleton, WI, USA) and the same parameters and exposure data (Tungsten, 100 mAs, 30 kV) were consistently used. We acquired 3 different pairs of images in the c-c and ml planes (2D) and in the c-c and c-c planes with an angle of 4 degrees (3D). Five radiologists experienced in mammography (experience ranging from 3 months to more than 5 years) analyzed the images (monitoring) which had been randomly encoded (random generator) with regard to the recognition of details such as specks of aluminum oxide (200-740 µm), nylon fibers (0.4-1.6 mm) and round lesions/masses (diameters 5-14 mm), using special linear glasses for 3D visualization, and compared the results. Results: A total of 225 correct positive decisions could be detected: we found 222 (98.7 %) correct positive results for 2D and 3D visualization in each case. Conclusion: The results of this phantom study showed the same detection rates for both 2D and 3D imaging using full field digital mammography. Our results must be confirmed in further clinical trials.

  17. Simultaneous Transmit and Receive Performance of an 8-Channel Digital Phased Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-16

    Receive (STAR) could provide significant benefits for many applications including communications, radar, spectral sens- ing, and multifunctional...shown in Fig . 1. Transmit digital beamforming is used to reduce the total coupled power at each receive element, allowing the receive array to maintain...Canceller Receive Digital Beamfomer Isolated Receive SignalTransmit Signal ALSTAR Transmit Elements ALSTAR Receive Elements ... ... Fig . 1

  18. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  19. Performance of the Fully Digital FPGA-based Front-End Electronics for the GALILEO Array

    CERN Document Server

    Barrientos, D; Bazzacco, D; Bortolato, D; Cocconi, P; Gadea, A; González, V; Gulmini, M; Isocrate, R; Mengoni, D; Pullia, A; Recchia, F; Rosso, D; Sanchis, E; Toniolo, N; Ur, C A; Valiente-Dobón, J J

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present the architecture and results of a fully digital Front End Electronics (FEE) read out system developed for the GALILEO array. The FEE system, developed in collaboration with the Advanced Gamma Tracking Array (AGATA) collaboration, is composed of three main blocks: preamplifiers, digitizers and preprocessing electronics. The slow control system contains a custom Linux driver, a dynamic library and a server implementing network services. The digital processing of the data from the GALILEO germanium detectors has demonstrated the capability to achieve an energy resolution of 1.53 per mil at an energy of 1.33 MeV.

  20. Methodology of high-resolution photography for mural condition database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, R.; Suzuki, T.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Digital documentation is one of the most useful techniques to record the condition of cultural heritage. Recently, high-resolution images become increasingly useful because it is possible to show general views of mural paintings and also detailed mural conditions in a single image. As mural paintings are damaged by environmental stresses, it is necessary to record the details of painting condition on high-resolution base maps. Unfortunately, the cost of high-resolution photography and the difficulty of operating its instruments and software have commonly been an impediment for researchers and conservators. However, the recent development of graphic software makes its operation simpler and less expensive. In this paper, we suggest a new approach to make digital heritage inventories without special instruments, based on our recent our research project in Üzümlü church in Cappadocia, Turkey. This method enables us to achieve a high-resolution image database with low costs, short time, and limited human resources.

  1. High-resolution wide-band Fast Fourier Transform spectrometers

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Bernd; Krämer, Ingo; Bell, Andreas; Meyer, Klaus; Güsten, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    We describe the performance of our latest generations of sensitive wide-band high-resolution digital Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FFTS). Their design, optimized for a wide range of radio astronomical applications, is presented. Developed for operation with the GREAT far infrared heterodyne spectrometer on-board SOFIA, the eXtended bandwidth FFTS (XFFTS) offers a high instantaneous bandwidth of 2.5 GHz with 88.5 kHz spectral resolution and has been in routine operation during SOFIA's Basic Science since July 2011. We discuss the advanced field programmable gate array (FPGA) signal processing pipeline, with an optimized multi-tap polyphase filter bank algorithm that provides a nearly loss-less time-to-frequency data conversion with significantly reduced frequency scallop and fast sidelobe fall-off. Our digital spectrometers have been proven to be extremely reliable and robust, even under the harsh environmental conditions of an airborne observatory, with Allan-variance stability times of several 1000 se...

  2. A HIGH RESOLUTION WIDE SWATH SAR METHOD BASED ON INTRA-PULSE NULL STEERING AND MIMO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    High Resolution Wide Swath(HRWS)Synthetic Aperture Radar(SAR)often Sufiers from low Signal-to-Noise Ratio(SNR)due to small transmitting antenna,especially in phased array antenna systems.Digital Beam Forming(DBF)based on Single Input and Multiple Output(SIMO)achieves receiving array gain at the cost of increasing data rate.This letter proposes a new HRWS SAR method, which employs intra-pulse null steering to get receiving gain in elevation and decrease the data rate,and Multiple Input and Multiple Output(MIMO)using Space-Time Block Coding(STBC)in azimuth to get transmitting gain and receiving array gain simultaneously.The feasibility is verified by deduction and simulations.

  3. Intra- and Inter-Seasonal Supra-glacial Water Variability over the West Greenland Ice Sheet as Estimated from Combining High Resolution Satellite Optical Data and a Digital Elevation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. G.; Tedesco, M.; Smith, L. C.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Yang, K.

    2015-12-01

    The supra-glacial hydrology of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) plays a crucial role on the surface energy and mass balance budgets of the ice sheet as a whole. The surface hydrology network variability of small streams in the ablation zone of Greenland is poorly understood both spatially and temporally. Using satellites that can spatially resolve the presence and associated properties of small streams, the scientific community is now able to be provided with accurate spatial and temporal analysis of surface hydrology on the ice sheet (that could not have been resolved with other sensors such as those on board MODIS or LANDSAT). In this study we report mapped supra-glacial water networks over a region of the West GrIS (approximately 164 km2) derived from high resolution multispectral satellite imagery from the Quickbird and WorldView - 2 satellites in tandem with a 2 meter stereographic SETSM DEM (digital elevation model). The branching complexity of the identified surface streams is computed from the available DEM as well as the intra- and inter seasonal changes observed in the hydrological system. The stream networks created during the melt season (at several different stages of melting) are compared and discussed as well as the networks mapped between consecutive years for proximate dates. Also, depth and volume estimations for the surface water features identified were extracted via band math algorithms, threshold classifications, and morphological operations. Our results indicate that the higher stream orders have the largest amount of stored surface water per km but the lower stream orders, specifically 1st order with widths of ~ 2 meters, hold more stored surface water overall. We also employ and compare runoff data from the numerical model MAR (Modèle Atmosphérique Régional) to the estimations found using imagery and the DEM.

  4. High Resolution Orientation Imaging Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    carbon distribution as it relates to the presence of Bainite phase (with small tetragonality) interspersed among the cubic ferrite. An example of the...preferentially segregate. The view offered by these high resolution methods differs from what has been considered before: grains thought to be Bainite

  5. High-Resolution Instrumentation Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-30

    30 September 1986 Los Angeles Air Force Station 13. NUMBER OF PAGES Los Angeles, Calif. 90009-2960 36 74. MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(If...TREE PLMUT ",-20 -CUTLIASS DumpER SED AN... TREE TRUNK, -0 - MERC BUMPER f - 40 H!-I -50 iI Fig. 7. High-Resolution Instrumentation Radar View of

  6. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  7. Digitalization decoupling method and its application to the phased array in MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xiaoyu; WANG Weidong; ZHANG Bida; LEI Ming; BAO Shanglian

    2003-01-01

    A general network decoupling method for phased array radio frequency coil used in magnetic resonance imaging is developed. A more flexible digital approach further simplifies the method, which has an even higher signal-to-noise ratio. The performance of the digitalized decoupling method was confirmed by the calculated result by using a high frequency structure simulation software with the method of finite element for a tree-port phased array RF coil. The consistence was well established between the theoretical and simulated results.

  8. Optical Manipulation of Single Magnetic Beads in a Microwell Array on a Digital Microfluidic Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decrop, Deborah; Brans, Toon; Gijsenbergh, Pieter; Lu, Jiadi; Spasic, Dragana; Kokalj, Tadej; Beunis, Filip; Goos, Peter; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    The detection of single molecules in magnetic microbead microwell array formats revolutionized the development of digital bioassays. However, retrieval of individual magnetic beads from these arrays has not been realized until now despite having great potential for studying captured targets at the individual level. In this paper, optical tweezers were implemented on a digital microfluidic platform for accurate manipulation of single magnetic beads seeded in a microwell array. Successful optical trapping of magnetic beads was found to be dependent on Brownian motion of the beads, suggesting a 99% chance of trapping a vibrating bead. A tailor-made experimental design was used to screen the effect of bead type, ionic buffer strength, surfactant type, and concentration on the Brownian activity of beads in microwells. With the optimal conditions, the manipulation of magnetic beads was demonstrated by their trapping, retrieving, transporting, and repositioning to a desired microwell on the array. The presented platform combines the strengths of digital microfluidics, digital bioassays, and optical tweezers, resulting in a powerful dynamic microwell array system for single molecule and single cell studies.

  9. A Circular aperture-array structure optical system for digital sun sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the first type of Rayleigh Sommerfeld diffraction formula, an imaging model of circular aperture-array structure digital sun sensor optical system is developed. Then a 6×6 circular aperture-array structure optical system is designed. The results of numerical simulation show that the optical system is designed well and is conformed to the requirements of miniaturization and high accuracy of sun sensor.

  10. Digital model of TiO(2 memristor for field-programmable gate array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyi Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A digital model which imitates the behaviour of a TiO(2 memristor as a new block in Alter DSP Builder is proposed in this Letter. The proposed model can be used as an independent memristor unit working with other units for designing memristor circuits based on field-programmable gate array. The accuracy of the digital model is confirmed not only by simulations, but also by hardwire experiments.

  11. High-resolution digital elevation dataset for Crater Lake National Park and vicinity, Oregon, based on LiDAR survey of August-September 2010 and bathymetric survey of July 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joel E.

    2012-01-01

    Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago during the eruption of a 12,000-foot volcano known as Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming or climactic eruption of Mount Mazama devastated the surrounding landscape, left a thick deposit of pumice and ash in adjacent valleys, and spread a blanket of volcanic ash as far away as southern Canada. Because the Crater Lake region is potentially volcanically active, knowledge of past events is important to understanding hazards from future eruptions. Similarly, because the area is seismically active, documenting and evaluating geologic faults is critical to assessing hazards from earthquakes. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey was awarded funding for high-precision airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) data collection at several volcanoes in the Cascade Range through the Oregon LiDAR Consortium, administered by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI). The Oregon LiDAR Consortium contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc., to conduct the data collection surveys. Collaborating agencies participating with the Oregon LiDAR Consortium for data collection in the Crater Lake region include Crater Lake National Park (National Park Service) and the Federal Highway Administration. In the immediate vicinity of Crater Lake National Park, 798 square kilometers of LiDAR data were collected, providing a digital elevation dataset of the ground surface beneath forest cover with an average resolution of 1.6 laser returns/m2 and both vertical and horizontal accuracies of ±5 cm. The LiDAR data were mosaicked in this report with bathymetry of the lake floor of Crater Lake, collected in 2000 using high-resolution multibeam sonar in a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey, Crater Lake National Park, and the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping at the University of New Hampshire. The bathymetric survey

  12. 基于光-频率转换器的高精度数字脉搏血氧仪的设计%Design of Digital Pulse Oximeter with High Resolution Based on Optical-Frequency Converter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨涛; 林宛华; 翁羽洁; 杨玲; 吴小玲

    2011-01-01

    针对目前脉搏血氧仪进口成本高、功耗大、抗干扰差、检测范围小等问题,本文给出了一种低成本低功耗的数字脉搏血氧仪设计方法.采用基于光-频率转换器的高分辨数字探头提高精度和检测范围,移植直流跟踪滤波器去基线漂移提高抗干扰能力,利用上升沿和下降沿检测脉率算法提高检测准确率.本设计在人体小幅运动及手指轻度抖动时,仍能得到稳定的脉搏波形和脉率,通过使用Fluke Index2型血氧模拟仪在不同条件下进行重复实验,发现血氧饱和度为35%~100%时精度为1%、弱灌注量小于等于0.2%时精度达到4%;脉率检测的误差小于1.表明此设计在高精度、大范围、重复性和抗抖动方面均有所改善,适合于家庭、社区等医用监护场合使用.%Due to pulse oximeters have some disadvantages such as high cost of import, high power consumption , poor interference immunization , and small detection range. In this study , we presented a kind of digital pulse oximeter with low cost and power consumption. A digital detector based on light-frequency converter and with high resolution was adopted to improve precision and detection range , A DC tracking filter was used to cancel baseline drift to improve anti-interference ability , and a pulse rate detection algorithm using rising and falling edge was utilized to improve detection accuracy. In this study, stable pulse waveform and pulse rate could still be captured when body moved gently and fingers trembled slightly. After repeating the experiment under different conditions by Fluck Index2 oximeter simulator, we found that the accuracy was l% when oxygen saturation was 35% to 100 % , the accuracy was 4% when low perfusion was smaller than or equal to 0. 2% ; and the pulse rate error is less than 1. In this study , the design had been improved in aspects of high precision, large scale , repetitiveness and anti-jitter. It is suitable for

  13. Novel high-resolution VGA QWIP detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, H.; Asplund, C.; Lindberg, A.; Smuk, S.; Alverbro, J.; Evans, D.; Sehlin, S.; Becanovic, S.; Tinghag, P.; Höglund, L.; Sjöström, F.; Costard, E.

    2017-02-01

    Continuing with its legacy of producing high performance infrared detectors, IRnova introduces its high resolution LWIR IDDCA (Integrated Detector Dewar Cooler assembly) based on QWIP (quantum well infrared photodetector) technology. The Focal Plane Array (FPA) has 640×512 pixels, with small (15μm) pixel pitch, and is based on the FLIRIndigo ISC0403 Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC). The QWIP epitaxial structures are grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) at IRnova. Detector stability and response uniformity inherent to III/V based material will be demonstrated in terms of high performing detectors. Results showing low NETD at high frame rate will be presented. This makes it one of the first 15μm pitch QWIP based LWIR IDDCA commercially available on the market. High operability and stability of our other QWIP based products will also be shared.

  14. Fabrication of a curved microlens array using double gray-scale digital maskless lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ningning; Zhang, Zhimin

    2017-03-01

    Digital maskless lithography is considered to be a high-efficiency and low-cost approach for the fabrication of microstructures, but is limited by the gray scale capability of spatial light modulators. In this work, a novel method of double gray-scale digital maskless lithography is presented for forming a curved microlens array. The target exposure dose profile of the curved microlens array is first split into two individual 3D energy profiles, and then each 3D energy profile can be respectively realized by a single gray-scale digital lithography. Two gray-scale digital masks obtained by projection calculation are superposed on the substrate so as to realize the exposure dose profile of the curved microlens array. Thus, the effective steps that are achieved through the photoresist response to the modulated UV exposure are doubled, so a smoother profile with a steep gradient can be formed by the precise modulation of double gray-scale masks. As a result of the double gray-scale method, a curved microlens array with 183 micro lenslets on a 1024 µm  ×  768 µm spherical surface has been successfully fabricated.

  15. Geiger-Mode Avalanche Photodiode Arrays Integrated to All-Digital CMOS Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aull, Brian

    2016-04-08

    This article reviews MIT Lincoln Laboratory's work over the past 20 years to develop photon-sensitive image sensors based on arrays of silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes. Integration of these detectors to all-digital CMOS readout circuits enable exquisitely sensitive solid-state imagers for lidar, wavefront sensing, and passive imaging.

  16. Multi-Mode FMCW Radar Array with Independent Digital Beam Steering for Transmit and Receive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, R. van; Houwen, E.H. van der; Maas, A.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    A phased-array FMCW radar has been design and built from COTS components. The generation of the frequency sweep is done by mixing a central local oscillator signal with a baseband sweep of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS). To ensure maximum flexibility the receive side has been equipped with it's

  17. Geiger-Mode Avalanche Photodiode Arrays Integrated to All-Digital CMOS Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Aull

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews MIT Lincoln Laboratory's work over the past 20 years to develop photon-sensitive image sensors based on arrays of silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes. Integration of these detectors to all-digital CMOS readout circuits enable exquisitely sensitive solid-state imagers for lidar, wavefront sensing, and passive imaging.

  18. Geiger-Mode Avalanche Photodiode Arrays Integrated to All-Digital CMOS Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Brian Aull

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews MIT Lincoln Laboratory's work over the past 20 years to develop photon-sensitive image sensors based on arrays of silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes. Integration of these detectors to all-digital CMOS readout circuits enable exquisitely sensitive solid-state imagers for lidar, wavefront sensing, and passive imaging.

  19. An Undergraduate Course and Laboratory in Digital Signal Processing with Field Programmable Gate Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Base, U.; Vera, A.; Meyer-Base, A.; Pattichis, M. S.; Perry, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, an innovative educational approach to introducing undergraduates to both digital signal processing (DSP) and field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based design in a one-semester course and laboratory is described. While both DSP and FPGA-based courses are currently present in different curricula, this integrated approach reduces the…

  20. Realization of 16-channel digital PGC demodulator for fiber laser sensor array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Lin; He Jun; Li Fang; Liu Yuliang, E-mail: wlcas@semi.ac.cn [Optoelectronics System Laboratory, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes a 16-element DFB FL (distributed feedback fiber laser) sensor array system interrogated by NI-PXI-based (PCI extensions for Instrumentation) digital PGC (phase generated carrier) technique. The lasing wavelengths of the DFB FLs are changed by the external strains or temperatures, and hence they can be used as sensors by detecting the wavelength shifts. An unbalanced MI (Michelson interferometer) is employed in the sensor array system to amplify the wavelength shifts of DFB FL sensors to detectable phase shifts. The output phase signals of the MI are separated into different channels by a DWDM, and then detected by a low-noise photodiode array. The digital PGC algorithm is realized on a PXI platform (NI, National Instruments), which consists of three FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) modules and a high performance system controller. The normalization of the interference fringe is proposed and realized in this paper to reduce the influence of the light intensity fluctuations, and a trigger mechanism is introduced into the digital multi-channel PGC demodulation scheme to synchronize the date among different channels. A 16-element DFB fiber laser sensor array system has been set up in the experiment and the demodulated results have demonstrated a minimum detectable wavelength shift of 1x10{sup -6} pmA/{radical}Hz, a linearity of as high as 0.9994, and a dynamic range of 110dB-100Hz.

  1. FlashCam: A fully digital camera for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Pühlhofer, G; Eisenkolb, F; Florin, D; Föhr, C; Gadola, A; Hermann, G; Kalkuhl, C; Kasperek, J; Kihm, T; Koziol, J; Manalaysay, A; Marszalek, A; Rajda, P J; Romaszkan, W; Rupinski, M; Schanz, T; Steiner, S; Straumann, U; Tenzer, C; Vollhardt, A; Weitzel, Q; Winiarski, K; Zietara, K

    2013-01-01

    FlashCam is a Cherenkov camera development project centered around a fully digital trigger and readout scheme with smart, digital signal processing, and a "horizontal" architecture for the electromechanical implementation. The fully digital approach, based on commercial FADCs and FPGAs as key components, provides the option to easily implement different types of triggers as well as digitization and readout scenarios using identical hardware, by simply changing the firmware on the FPGAs. At the same time, a large dynamic range and high resolution of low-amplitude signals in a single readout channel per pixel is achieved using compression of high amplitude signals in the preamplifier and signal processing in the FPGA. The readout of the front-end modules into a camera server is Ethernet-based using standard Ethernet switches. In its current implementation, data transfer and backend processing rates of ~3.8 GBytes/sec have been achieved. Together with the dead-time-free front end event buffering on the FPGAs, th...

  2. Digital Spectro-Correlator System for the Atacama Compact Array of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kamazaki, T; Chikada, Y; Okuda, T; Kurono, Y; Iguchi, S; Mitsuishi, S; Murakami, Y; Nishimuta, N; Mita, H; Sano, R

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an FX-architecture digital spectro-correlator for the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The correlator is able to simultaneously process four pairs of dual polarization signals with the bandwidth of 2 GHz, which are received by up to sixteen antennas. It can calculate auto- and cross-correlation spectra including cross-polarization in all combinations of all the antennas, and output correlation spectra with flexible spectral configuration such as multiple frequency ranges and multiple frequency resolutions. Its spectral dynamic range is estimated to be higher than 10^4 relative to Tsys from processing results of thermal noise for eight hours with a typical correlator configuration. The sensitivity loss is also confirmed to be 0.9 % with the same configuration. In this paper, we report the detailed design of the correlator and the verification results of the developed hardware.

  3. High-resolution land topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massonnet, Didier; Elachi, Charles

    2006-11-01

    After a description of the background, methods of production and some scientific uses of high-resolution land topography, we present the current status and the prospect of radar interferometry, regarded as one of the best techniques for obtaining the most global and the most accurate topographic maps. After introducing briefly the theoretical aspects of radar interferometry - principles, limits of operation and various capabilities -, we will focus on the topographic applications that resulted in an almost global topographic map of the earth: the SRTM map. After introducing the Interferometric Cartwheel system, we will build on its expected performances to discuss the scientific prospects of refining a global topographic map to sub-metric accuracy. We also show how other fields of sciences such as hydrology may benefit from the products generated by interferometric radar systems. To cite this article: D. Massonnet, C. Elachi, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  4. High-resolution image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, K

    1986-01-01

    In many departments of cytology, cytogenetics, hematology, and pathology, research projects using high-resolution computerized microscopy are now being mounted for computation of morphometric measurements on various structural components, as well as for determination of cellular DNA content. The majority of these measurements are made in a partially automated, computer-assisted mode, wherein there is strong interaction between the user and the computerized microscope. At the same time, full automation has been accomplished for both sample preparation and sample examination for clinical determination of the white blood cell differential count. At the time of writing, approximately 1,000 robot differential counting microscopes are in the field, analyzing images of human white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets at the overall rate of about 100,000 slides per day. This mammoth through-put represents a major accomplishment in the application of machine vision to automated microscopy for hematology. In other areas of automated high-resolution microscopy, such as cytology and cytogenetics, no commercial instruments are available (although a few metaphase-finding machines are available and other new machines have been announced during the past year). This is a disappointing product, considering the nearly half century of research effort in these areas. This paper provides examples of the state of the art in automation of cell analysis for blood smears, cervical smears, and chromosome preparations. Also treated are new developments in multi-resolution automated microscopy, where images are now being generated and analyzed by a single machine over a range of 64:1 magnification and from 10,000 X 20,000 to 500 X 500 in total picture elements (pixels). Examples of images of human lymph node and liver tissue are presented. Semi-automated systems are not treated, although there is mention of recent research in the automation of tissue analysis.

  5. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  6. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  7. HRSC: High resolution stereo camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Basilevsky, A.T.; Dumke, A.; Van Gasselt, S.; Giese, B.; Hauber, E.; Head, J. W.; Heipke, C.; Hoekzema, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Greeley, R.; Gwinner, K.; Kirk, R.; Markiewicz, W.; McCord, T.B.; Michael, G.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Murray, J.B.; Oberst, J.; Pinet, P.; Pischel, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Willner, K.

    2009-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express has delivered a wealth of image data, amounting to over 2.5 TB from the start of the mapping phase in January 2004 to September 2008. In that time, more than a third of Mars was covered at a resolution of 10-20 m/pixel in stereo and colour. After five years in orbit, HRSC is still in excellent shape, and it could continue to operate for many more years. HRSC has proven its ability to close the gap between the low-resolution Viking image data and the high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images, leading to a global picture of the geological evolution of Mars that is now much clearer than ever before. Derived highest-resolution terrain model data have closed major gaps and provided an unprecedented insight into the shape of the surface, which is paramount not only for surface analysis and geological interpretation, but also for combination with and analysis of data from other instruments, as well as in planning for future missions. This chapter presents the scientific output from data analysis and highlevel data processing, complemented by a summary of how the experiment is conducted by the HRSC team members working in geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry and spectrophotometry. Many of these contributions have been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals and special issues. They form a cross-section of the scientific output, either by summarising the new geoscientific picture of Mars provided by HRSC or by detailing some of the topics of data analysis concerning photogrammetry, cartography and spectral data analysis.

  8. Field Programmable Gate Array for Implementation of Redundant Advanced Digital Feedback Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, K. D.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this effort was to develop a digital motor controller using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). This is a more rugged approach than a conventional microprocessor digital controller. FPGAs typically have higher radiation (rad) tolerance than both the microprocessor and memory required for a conventional digital controller. Furthermore, FPGAs can typically operate at higher speeds. (While speed is usually not an issue for motor controllers, it can be for other system controllers.) Other than motor power, only a 3.3-V digital power supply was used in the controller; no analog bias supplies were used. Since most of the circuit was implemented in the FPGA, no additional parts were needed other than the power transistors to drive the motor. The benefits that FPGAs provide over conventional designs-lower power and fewer parts-allow for smaller packaging and reduced weight and cost.

  9. Crusta: Visualizing High-resolution Global Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardin, T. S.; Kreylos, O.; Bowles, C. J.; Cowgill, E.; Hamann, B.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2009-12-01

    Virtual globes have become indispensable tools for visualizing, understanding and presenting data from Earth and other planetary bodies. The scientific community has invested much effort into exploiting existing globes to their fullest potential by refining and adapting their capabilities to better satisfy specific needs. For example, Google Earth provides users with the ability to view hillshade images derived from airborne LiDAR data such as the 2007 Northern California GeoEarthScope data. However, because most available globes were not designed with the specific needs of geoscientists in mind, shortcomings are becoming increasingly evident in geoscience applications such as terrain visualization. In particular, earth scientists struggle to visualize digital elevation models with both high spatial resolution (0.5 - 1 square meters per sample) and large extent (>2000 square kilometers), such as those obtained with airborne LiDAR. To address the specific earth science need of real-time terrain visualization of LiDAR data, we are developing Crusta as part of a close collaboration involving earth and computer scientists. Crusta is a new virtual globe that differs from widely used globes by both providing accurate global data representation and the ability to easily visualize custom topographic and image data. As a result, Crusta enables real-time, interactive visualization of high resolution digital elevation data spanning thousands of square kilometers, such as the complete 2007 Northern California GeoEarthScope airborne LiDAR data set. To implement an accurate data representation and avoid distortion of the display at the poles, where other projections have singularities, Crusta represents the globe as a thirty-sided polyhedron. Each side of this polyhedron can be subdivided to an arbitrarily fine grid on the surface of the globe, which allows Crusta to accommodate input data of arbitrary resolution ranging from global (e.g., Blue Marble) to local (e.g., a tripod

  10. Integrated High Resolution Monitoring of Mediterranean vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaraccio, Carla; Piga, Alessandra; Ventura, Andrea; Arca, Angelo; Duce, Pierpaolo; Mereu, Simone

    2017-04-01

    The study of the vegetation features in a complex and highly vulnerable ecosystems, such as Mediterranean maquis, leads to the need of using continuous monitoring systems at high spatial and temporal resolution, for a better interpretation of the mechanisms of phenological and eco-physiological processes. Near-surface remote sensing techniques are used to quantify, at high temporal resolution, and with a certain degree of spatial integration, the seasonal variations of the surface optical and radiometric properties. In recent decades, the design and implementation of global monitoring networks involved the use of non-destructive and/or cheaper approaches such as (i) continuous surface fluxes measurement stations, (ii) phenological observation networks, and (iii) measurement of temporal and spatial variations of the vegetation spectral properties. In this work preliminary results from the ECO-SCALE (Integrated High Resolution Monitoring of Mediterranean vegetation) project are reported. The project was manly aimed to develop an integrated system for environmental monitoring based on digital photography, hyperspectral radiometry , and micrometeorological techniques during three years of experimentation (2013-2016) in a Mediterranean site of Italy (Capo Caccia, Alghero). The main results concerned the analysis of chromatic coordinates indices from digital images, to characterized the phenological patterns for typical shrubland species, determining start and duration of the growing season, and the physiological status in relation to different environmental drought conditions; then the seasonal patterns of canopy phenology, was compared to NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange) patterns, showing similarities. However, maximum values of NEE and ER (Ecosystem respiration), and short term variation, seemed mainly tuned by inter annual pattern of meteorological variables, in particular of temperature recorded in the months preceding the vegetation green-up. Finally, green signals

  11. Development of digital sideband separating down-conversion for Yuan-Tseh Lee Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao-Te; Kubo, Derek; Cheng, Jen-Chieh; Kuroda, John; Srinivasan, Ranjani; Ho, Solomon; Guzzino, Kim; Chen, Ming-Tang

    2016-07-01

    This report presents a down-conversion method involving digital sideband separation for the Yuan-Tseh Lee Array (YTLA) to double the processing bandwidth. The receiver consists of a MMIC HEMT LNA front end operating at a wavelength of 3 mm, and sub-harmonic mixers that output signals at intermediate frequencies (IFs) of 2-18 GHz. The sideband separation scheme involves an analog 90° hybrid followed by two mixers that provide down-conversion of the IF signal to a pair of in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) signals in baseband. The I and Q baseband signals are digitized using 5 Giga sample per second (Gsps) analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). A second hybrid is digitally implemented using field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) to produce two sidebands, each with a bandwidth of 1.6 GHz. The 2 x 1.6 GHz band can be tuned to cover any 3.6 GHz window within the aforementioned IF range of the array. Sideband rejection ratios (SRRs) above 20 dB can be obtained across the 3.6 GHz bandwidth by equalizing the power and delay between the I and Q baseband signals. Furthermore, SRRs above 30 dB can be achieved when calibration is applied.

  12. High-resolution noise radar using slow ADC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Konstantin; Vyplavin, Pavlo; Zemlyanyi, Oleg; Lukin, Sergiy; Palamarchuk, Volodymyr

    2011-06-01

    Conventional digital signal processing scheme in noise radars has some limitations related to combination of high resolution and high dynamic range. Those limitations are caused by a tradeoff in performance of currently available ADCs: the faster is ADC the smaller is its depth (number of bits) available. Depth of the ADC determines relation between the smallest and highest observable signals and thus limits its dynamic range. In noise radar with conventional processing the sounding and reference signals are to be digitized at intermediate frequency band and to be processed digitally. The power spectrum bandwidth of noise signal which can be digitized with ADC depends on its sampling rate. The bandwidth of radar signal defines range resolution of any radar: the wider the spectrum the better the resolution. Actually this is the main bottleneck of high resolution Noise Radars: conventional processing doesn't enable to get both high range resolution and high dynamic range. In the paper we present a way to go around this drawback by changing signal processing ideology in noise radar. We present results of our consideration and design of high resolution Noise Radar which uses slow ADCs. The design is based upon generation of both probing and reference signals digitally and realization of their cross-correlation in an analog correlator. The output of the correlator is a narrowband signal that requires rather slow ADC to be sampled which nowadays may give up to 130 dB dynamic range.

  13. High Resolution Flexible Tactile Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Bilberg, Arne

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a tactile sensor for robotics inspired by the human sense of touch. It consists of two parts: a static tactile array sensor based on piezoresistive rubber and a dynamic sensor based on piezoelectric PVDF film. The combination of these two layers addresses b...

  14. Digital cell counting device integrated with a single-cell array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Tatsuya; Hosokawa, Masahito; Lim, Tae-kyu; Harada, Manabu; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel cell counting method accomplished using a single-cell array fabricated on an image sensor, complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensor. The single-cell array was constructed using a microcavity array, which can trap up to 7,500 single cells on microcavities periodically arranged on a plane metallic substrate via the application of a negative pressure. The proposed method for cell counting is based on shadow imaging, which uses a light diffraction pattern generated by the microcavity array and trapped cells. Under illumination, the cell-occupied microcavities are visualized as shadow patterns in an image recorded by the complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensor due to light attenuation. The cell count is determined by enumerating the uniform shadow patterns created from one-on-one relationships with single cells trapped on the microcavities in digital format. In the experiment, all cell counting processes including entrapment of non-labeled HeLa cells from suspensions on the array and image acquisition of a wide-field-of-view of 30 mm(2) in 1/60 seconds were implemented in a single integrated device. As a result, the results from the digital cell counting had a linear relationship with those obtained from microscopic observation (r(2)  = 0.99). This platform could be used at extremely low cell concentrations, i.e., 25-15,000 cells/mL. Our proposed system provides a simple and rapid miniaturized cell counting device for routine laboratory use.

  15. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024 ×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  16. Digitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnemann, Niels Ole

    2014-01-01

    Processes of digitization have for years represented a major trend in the developments of modern society but have only recently been related to processes of mediatization. The purpose of this article is to look into the relation between the concepts of mediatization and digitization and to clarify...... what a concept of digital media might add to the understanding of processes of mediatization and what the concept of mediatization might add to the understanding of digital media. It is argued that digital media open an array of new trajectories in human communication, trajectories which were...... not anticipated in previous conceptualizations of media and mediatization. If digital media are to be included, the concept of mediatization has to be revised and new parameters are to be built into the concept of media. At the same time it is argued that the concept of mediatization still provides a variety...

  17. Application of bistable optical logic gate arrays to all-optical digital parallel processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A. C.

    1986-05-01

    Arrays of bistable optical gates can form the basis of an all-optical digital parallel processor. Two classes of signal input geometry exist - on- and off-axis - and lead to distinctly different device characteristics. The optical implementation of multisignal fan-in to an array of intrinsically bistable optical gates using the more efficient off-axis option is discussed together with the construction of programmable read/write memories from optically bistable devices. Finally the design of a demonstration all-optical parallel processor incorporating these concepts is presented.

  18. Diode-array UV solar spectroradiometer implementing a digital micromirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, A.; Burnitt, T.; Porrovecchio, G.; Smid, M.; Egli, L.; Gröbner, J.; Nield, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    The solar ultraviolet spectrum captured by commercially available diode-array spectroradiometers is dominated by stray light from longer wavelengths with higher intensity. The implementation of a digital micromirror device in an array spectroradiometer has the potential to enable the precise selection of desired wavelengths as well as the ability to reduce spectral intensity of some wavelengths via selective mirror modulation, both reducing long wavelength stray light. A prototype consisting of off-the-shelf components has been assembled to verify the validity of the base concept, and initial measurements have been performed to confirm the throughput and image qualities such as spectral resolution and astigmatism.

  19. Interference mitigation for simultaneous transmit and receive applications on digital phased array systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Trevor M.

    As analog-to-digital (ADC) and digital-to-analog conversion (DAC) technologies become cheaper and digital processing capabilities improve, phased array systems with digital transceivers at every element will become more commonplace. These architectures offer greater capability over traditional analog systems and enable advanced applications such as multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) communications, adaptive beamforming, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), and MIMO for radar. Capabilities for such systems are still limited by the need for isolating self-interference from transmitters at co-located receivers. The typical approach of time-sharing the antenna aperture between transmitters and receivers works but leaves the receivers blind for a period of time. For full-duplex operation, some systems use separate frequency bands for transmission and reception, but these require fixed filtering which reduces the system's ability to adapt to its environment and is also an inefficient use of spectral resources. To that end, tunable, high quality-factor filters are used for sub-band isolation and protect receivers while allowing open reception at other frequencies. For more flexibility, another emergent area of related research has focused on co-located spatial isolation using multiple antennas and direct injection of interference cancellation signals into receivers, which enables same-frequency full-duplex operation. With all these methods, self-interference must be reduced by an amount that prevents saturation of the ADC. Intermodulation products generated in the receiver in this process can potentially be problematic, as certain intermodulation products may appear to come from a particular angle and cohere in the beamformer. This work explores various digital phased array architectures and the how the flexibility afforded by an all-digital beamforming architecture, layered with other methods of isolation, can be used to reduce self-interference within the system

  20. High-resolution infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Charles M.

    2010-08-01

    The hands and mind of an artist are intimately involved in the creative process of image formation, intrinsically making paintings significantly more complex than photographs to analyze. In spite of this difficulty, several years ago the artist David Hockney and I identified optical evidence within a number of paintings that demonstrated artists began using optical projections as early as c1425 - nearly 175 years before Galileo - as aids for producing portions of their images. In the course of our work, Hockney and I developed insights that I have been applying to a new approach to computerized image analysis. Recently I developed and characterized a portable high resolution infrared for capturing additional information from paintings. Because many pigments are semi-transparent in the IR, in a number of cases IR photographs ("reflectograms") have revealed marks made by the artists that had been hidden under paint ever since they were made. I have used this IR camera to capture photographs ("reflectograms") of hundreds of paintings in over a dozen museums on three continents and, in some cases, these reflectograms have provided new insights into decisions the artists made in creating the final images that we see in the visible.

  1. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Alan G.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometry has been revolutionized by access to instruments of increasingly high mass-resolving power. For small molecules up to ˜400 Da (e.g., drugs, metabolites, and various natural organic mixtures ranging from foods to petroleum), it is possible to determine elemental compositions (CcHhNnOoSsPp…) of thousands of chemical components simultaneously from accurate mass measurements (the same can be done up to 1000 Da if additional information is included). At higher mass, it becomes possible to identify proteins (including posttranslational modifications) from proteolytic peptides, as well as lipids, glycoconjugates, and other biological components. At even higher mass (˜100,000 Da or higher), it is possible to characterize posttranslational modifications of intact proteins and to map the binding surfaces of large biomolecule complexes. Here we review the principles and techniques of the highest-resolution analytical mass spectrometers (time-of-flight and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass analyzers) and describe some representative high-resolution applications.

  2. Wideband aperture array using RF channelizers and massively parallel digital 2D IIR filterbank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Arindam; Madanayake, Arjuna; Gómez-García, Roberto; Engeberg, Erik D.

    2014-05-01

    Wideband receive-mode beamforming applications in wireless location, electronically-scanned antennas for radar, RF sensing, microwave imaging and wireless communications require digital aperture arrays that offer a relatively constant far-field beam over several octaves of bandwidth. Several beamforming schemes including the well-known true time-delay and the phased array beamformers have been realized using either finite impulse response (FIR) or fast Fourier transform (FFT) digital filter-sum based techniques. These beamforming algorithms offer the desired selectivity at the cost of a high computational complexity and frequency-dependant far-field array patterns. A novel approach to receiver beamforming is the use of massively parallel 2-D infinite impulse response (IIR) fan filterbanks for the synthesis of relatively frequency independent RF beams at an order of magnitude lower multiplier complexity compared to FFT or FIR filter based conventional algorithms. The 2-D IIR filterbanks demand fast digital processing that can support several octaves of RF bandwidth, fast analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) for RF-to-bits type direct conversion of wideband antenna element signals. Fast digital implementation platforms that can realize high-precision recursive filter structures necessary for real-time beamforming, at RF radio bandwidths, are also desired. We propose a novel technique that combines a passive RF channelizer, multichannel ADC technology, and single-phase massively parallel 2-D IIR digital fan filterbanks, realized at low complexity using FPGA and/or ASIC technology. There exists native support for a larger bandwidth than the maximum clock frequency of the digital implementation technology. We also strive to achieve More-than-Moore throughput by processing a wideband RF signal having content with N-fold (B = N Fclk/2) bandwidth compared to the maximum clock frequency Fclk Hz of the digital VLSI platform under consideration. Such increase in bandwidth is

  3. High-resolution slug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemansky, G M; McElwee, C D

    2005-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) variation has important ramifications for ground water flow and the transport of contaminants in ground water. The delineation of the nature of that variation can be critical to complete characterization of a site and the planning of effective and efficient remedial measures. Site-specific features (such as high-conductivity zones) need to be quantified. Our alluvial field site in the Kansas River valley exhibits spatial variability, very high conductivities, and nonlinear behavior for slug tests in the sand and gravel aquifer. High-resolution, multilevel slug tests have been performed in a number of wells that are fully screened. A general nonlinear model based on the Navier-Stokes equation, nonlinear frictional loss, non-Darcian flow, acceleration effects, radius changes in the wellbore, and a Hvorslev model for the aquifer has been used to analyze the data, employing an automated processing system that runs within the Excel spreadsheet program. It is concluded that slug tests can provide the necessary data to identify the nature of both horizontal and vertical K variation in an aquifer and that improved delineation or higher resolution of K structure is possible with shorter test intervals. The gradation into zones of higher conductivity is sharper than seen previously, and the maximum conductivity observed is greater than previously measured. However, data from this project indicate that well development, the presence of fines, and the antecedent history of the well are important interrelated factors in regard to slug-test response and can prevent obtaining consistent results in some cases.

  4. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimeter spatial resolution PET detector module using a digital silicon photomultiplier coupled LGSO array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Hyun Tae; Choi, Yong; Kim, Kyu Bom; Lee, Sangwon; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Yeom, Jung-Yeol

    2017-02-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) for breast, brain and small animal imaging, the spatial resolution of a PET detector is crucial to obtain high quality PET images. In this study, a PET detector for sub-millimeter spatial resolution imaging purpose was assembled using 4×4 pixels of a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM, DPC-3200-22-44, Philips) coupled with a 15×15 LGSO array with BaSO4 reflector, and a 1 mm thick acrylic light guide for light distribution between the dSiPM pixels. The active area of each dSiPM pixel was 3.2×3.9 mm2 and the size of each LGSO scintillator element was 0.7×0.7×6 mm3. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrated the performance of the PET detector by measuring the energy resolution, 2D flood map, peak to valley (P/V) ratio, and coincidence resolving time (CRT). All measurements were performed at a temperature of 10±1 ℃. The average energy resolution was 15.6% (without correcting for saturation effects) at 511 keV and the best CRT was 242±5 ps. The 2D flood map obtained with an energy window of 400-600 keV demonstrated clear identification of all pixels, and the average P/V ratio of the X- and Y-directions were 7.31 and 7.81, respectively. This study demonstrated that the PET detector could be suitable for application in high resolution PET while achieving good timing resolution.

  5. Digital data acquisition for the Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipschutz, S., E-mail: lipschutz@nscl.msu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Zegers, R.G.T.; Hill, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Liddick, S.N. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Noji, S., E-mail: noji@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Prokop, C.J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Scott, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Solt, M., E-mail: mrsolt@stanford.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, MI (United States); and others

    2016-04-11

    A digital data acquisition system (DDAS) has been implemented for the Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA). LENDA is an array of 24 BC-408 plastic-scintillator bars designed to measure low-energy neutrons with kinetic energies in the range of 100 keV–10 MeV from (p,n)-type charge-exchange reactions. Compared to the previous data acquisition (DAQ) system for LENDA, DDAS offers the possibility to lower the neutron detection threshold, increase the overall neutron-detection efficiency, decrease the dead time of the system, and allow for easy expansion of the array. The system utilized in this work was XIA's Digital Gamma Finder Pixie-16 250 MHz digitizers. A detector-limited timing resolution of 400 ps was achieved for a single LENDA bar. Using DDAS, the neutron detection threshold of the system was reduced compared to the previous analog system, now reaching below 100 keV. The new DAQ system was successfully used in a recent charge-exchange experiment using the {sup 16}C(p,n) reaction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL).

  6. Digital Data Acquisition For the Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA)

    CERN Document Server

    Lipschutz, S; Hill, J; Liddick, S N; Noji, S; Prokop, C J; Scott, M; Solt, M; Sullivan, C; Tompkins, J

    2016-01-01

    A digital data acquisition system (DDAS) has been implemented for the Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA). LENDA is an array of 24 BC-408 plastic-scintillator bars designed to measure low-energy neutrons with kinetic energies in the range of 100 keV to 10 MeV from (p,n)-type charge-exchange reactions. Compared to the previous data acquisition (DAQ) system for LENDA, DDAS offers the possibility to lower the neutron detection threshold, increase the overall neutron-detection efficiency, decrease the dead time of the system, and allow for easy expansion of the array. The system utilized in this work was XIA's Digital Gamma Finder Pixie-16 250 MHz digitizers. A detector-limited timing resolution of 400 ps was achieved for a single LENDA bar. Using DDAS, the neutron detection threshold of the system was reduced compared to the previous analog system, now reaching below 100 keV. The new DAQ system was successfully used in a recent charge-exchange experiment using the $^{16}$C(p,n) reaction at the National Sup...

  7. Boosting the SNR by adding a receive-only endorectal monopole to an external antenna array for high-resolution, T2 -weighted imaging of early-stage cervical cancer with 7-T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kalleveen, I M L; Hoogendam, J P; Raaijmakers, A J E; Visser, F; Arteaga de Castro, C S; Verheijen, R H M; Luijten, P R; Zweemer, R P; Veldhuis, W B; Klomp, D W J

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain in early-stage cervical cancer at ultrahigh-field MRI (e.g. 7 T) using a combination of multiple external antennas and a single endorectal antenna. In particular, we used an endorectal monopole antenna to increase the SNR in cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This should allow high-resolution, T2 -weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) for metabolic staging, which could facilitate the local tumor status assessment. In a prospective feasibility study, five healthy female volunteers and six patients with histologically proven stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer were scanned at 7 T. We used seven external fractionated dipole antennas for transmit-receive (transceive) and an endorectally placed monopole antenna for reception only. A region of interest, containing both normal cervix and tumor tissue, was selected for the SNR measurement. Separated signal and noise measurements were obtained in the region of the cervix for each element and in the near field of the monopole antenna (radius antenna in each patient. We obtained high-resolution, T2 -weighted images with a voxel size of 0.7 × 0.8 × 3.0 mm(3) . In four cases with optimal placement of the endorectal antenna (verified on the T2 -weighted images), a mean gain of 2.2 in SNR was obtained at the overall cervix and tumor tissue area. Within a radius of 30 mm from the monopole antenna, a mean SNR gain of 3.7 was achieved in the four optimal cases. Overlap between the two different regions of the SNR calculations was around 24%. We have demonstrated that the use of an endorectal monopole antenna substantially increases the SNR of 7-T MRI at the cervical anatomy. Combined with the intrinsically high SNR of ultrahigh-field MRI, this gain may be employed to obtain metabolic information using MRS and to enhance spatial resolutions to assess tumor invasion. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The european FAZIA initiative: a high-performance digital telescope array for heavy-ion studies

    CERN Document Server

    Casini, G; Pasquali, G; Pastore, G; Bini, M; Carboni, S; Olmi, A; Piantelli, S; Poggi, G; Stefanini, A; Valdre', S; Bonnet, E; Borderie, B; Bougault, R; Bruno, M; Chbihi, A; Cinausero, M; Degerlier, M; Edelbruck, P; Frankland, J D; Gramegna, F; Gruyer, D; Guerzoni, M; Kordjasz, A; Kozik, T; Neindre, N Le; Lopez, O; Marchi, T; Marini, P; Morelli, L; Ordine, A; Parlog, M; Rivet, M F; Rosato, E; Salomon, F; Spadaccini, G; Twarog, T; Vient, E; Vigilante, M

    2013-01-01

    The european Fazia collaboration aims at building a new modular array for charged product identification to be employed for heavy-ion studies. The elementary module of the array is a Silicon-Silicon-CsI telescope, optimized for ion identification also via pulse shape analysis. The achievement of top performances imposes specific electronics which has been developed by FAZIA and features high quality charge and current preamplifiers, coupled to fully digital front-end. During the initial R&D phase, original and novel solutions have been tested in prototypes, obtaining unprecedented ion identification capabilities. FAZIA is now constructing a demonstrator array consisting of about two hundreds telescopes arranged in a compact and transportable configuration. In this contribution, we mainly summarize some aspects studied by FAZIA to improve the ion identification. Then we will briefly discuss the FAZIA program centered on experiments to be done with the demonstrator. First results on the isospin dynamics obt...

  9. High-resolution intravital microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Andresen

    Full Text Available Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy--the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and

  10. High Resolution Radar Measurements of Snow Avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwaine, Jim; Sovilla, Betty; Vriend, Nathalie; Brennan, Paul; Ash, Matt; Keylock, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Geophysical mass flows, such as snow avalanches, are a major hazard in mountainous areas and have a significant impact on the infrastructure, economy and tourism of such regions. Obtaining a thorough understanding of the dynamics of snow avalanches is crucial for risk assessment and the design of defensive structures. However, because the underlying physics is poorly understood there are significant uncertainties concerning current models, which are poorly validated due to a lack of high resolution data. Direct observations of the denser core of a large avalanche are particularly difficult, since it is frequently obscured by the dilute powder cloud. We have developed and installed a phased array FMCW radar system that penetrates the powder cloud and directly images the dense core with a resolution of around 1 m at 50 Hz over the entire slope. We present data from recent avalanches at Vallee de la Sionne that show a wealth of internal structure and allow the tracking of individual fronts, roll waves and surges down the slope for the first time. We also show good agreement between the radar results and existing measurement systems that record data at particular points on the avalanche track.

  11. Quantifying geological processes on Mars - Results of the high resolution stereo camera (HRSC) on Mars express

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaumann, R.; Tirsch, D.; Hauber, E.; Ansan, V.; Di Achille, G.; Erkeling, G.; Fueten, F.; Head, J.; Kleinhans, M. G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/217675123; Mangold, N.; Michael, G. G.; Neukum, G.; Pacifici, A.; Platz, T.; Pondrelli, M.; Raack, J.; Reiss, D.; Williams, D. A.; Adeli, S.; Baratoux, D.; De Villiers, G.; Foing, B.; Gupta, S.; Gwinner, K.; Hiesinger, H.; Hoffmann, H.; Deit, L. Le; Marinangeli, L.; Matz, K. D.; Mertens, V.; Muller, J. P.; Pasckert, J. H.; Roatsch, T.; Rossi, A. P.; Scholten, F.; Sowe, M.; Voigt, J.; Warner, N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This review summarizes the use of High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) data as an instrumental tool and its application in the analysis of geological processes and landforms on Mars during the last 10 years of operation. High-resolution digital elevations models on a local to regional scale

  12. Quantifying geological processes on Mars - Results of the high resolution stereo camera (HRSC) on Mars express

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaumann, R.; Tirsch, D.; Hauber, E.; Ansan, V.; Di Achille, G.; Erkeling, G.; Fueten, F.; Head, J.; Kleinhans, M. G.; Mangold, N.; Michael, G. G.; Neukum, G.; Pacifici, A.; Platz, T.; Pondrelli, M.; Raack, J.; Reiss, D.; Williams, D. A.; Adeli, S.; Baratoux, D.; De Villiers, G.; Foing, B.; Gupta, S.; Gwinner, K.; Hiesinger, H.; Hoffmann, H.; Deit, L. Le; Marinangeli, L.; Matz, K. D.; Mertens, V.; Muller, J. P.; Pasckert, J. H.; Roatsch, T.; Rossi, A. P.; Scholten, F.; Sowe, M.; Voigt, J.; Warner, N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This review summarizes the use of High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) data as an instrumental tool and its application in the analysis of geological processes and landforms on Mars during the last 10 years of operation. High-resolution digital elevations models on a local to regional scale

  13. Fusion Experiments of HSI and High Resolution Panchromatic Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    map derived from the unsharpened HSI. The classification is performed with an unsupervised feature extraction using principal component analysis (PCA... Classification of Hyperspectral Data in Urban Area", P. 169-172, SPIE Vol.3502 8. R. C. Gonzalez, P. Wintz, Digital Image Processing, Addison-Wesley...MA 02420-9185 Abstract In this paper, the fusion of hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor data and high-resolution panchromatic imagery (HPI) is

  14. Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI) develops novel technologies for studying biological processes at unprecedented speed and resolution. Research...

  15. Change detection studies in and around Kolleru Lake using high resolution data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, M.V.; Rao. K.H.; Ramana, I.V.; Sasamal, S.K.; Choudhury, S.B.; Bhan, S.K.

    under fish pond culture within the lake area using high resolution data from satellites. The changes that are occurred during the last ten years in Kolleru lake area have been studied. The digital base map covering the lake and surroundings...

  16. Digital cell counting device integrated with a single-cell array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Saeki

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel cell counting method accomplished using a single-cell array fabricated on an image sensor, complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensor. The single-cell array was constructed using a microcavity array, which can trap up to 7,500 single cells on microcavities periodically arranged on a plane metallic substrate via the application of a negative pressure. The proposed method for cell counting is based on shadow imaging, which uses a light diffraction pattern generated by the microcavity array and trapped cells. Under illumination, the cell-occupied microcavities are visualized as shadow patterns in an image recorded by the complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensor due to light attenuation. The cell count is determined by enumerating the uniform shadow patterns created from one-on-one relationships with single cells trapped on the microcavities in digital format. In the experiment, all cell counting processes including entrapment of non-labeled HeLa cells from suspensions on the array and image acquisition of a wide-field-of-view of 30 mm(2 in 1/60 seconds were implemented in a single integrated device. As a result, the results from the digital cell counting had a linear relationship with those obtained from microscopic observation (r(2  = 0.99. This platform could be used at extremely low cell concentrations, i.e., 25-15,000 cells/mL. Our proposed system provides a simple and rapid miniaturized cell counting device for routine laboratory use.

  17. High resolution upgrade of the ATF damping ring BPM system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Frisch, J.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Seryi, A.; Smith, T.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC; Briegel, C.; Dysert, R.; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    A beam position monitor (BPM) upgrade at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring has been accomplished in its first stage, carried out by a KEK/FNAL/SLAC collaboration under the umbrella of the global ILC R&D effort. The upgrade consists of a high resolution, high reproducibility read-out system, based on analog and digital downconversion techniques, digital signal processing, and also tests a new automatic gain error correction schema. The technical concept and realization, as well as preliminary results of beam studies are presented.

  18. Array microscopy technology and its application to digital detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Brian P.

    Tuberculosis causes more deaths worldwide than any other curable infectious disease. This is the case despite tuberculosis appearing to be on the verge of eradication midway through the last century. Efforts at reversing the spread of tuberculosis have intensified since the early 1990s. Since then, microscopy has been the primary frontline diagnostic. In this dissertation, advances in clinical microscopy towards array microscopy for digital detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are presented. Digital array microscopy separates the tasks of microscope operation and pathogen detection and will reduce the specialization needed in order to operate the microscope. Distributing the work and reducing specialization will allow this technology to be deployed at the point of care, taking the front-line diagnostic for tuberculosis from the microscopy center to the community health center. By improving access to microscopy centers, hundreds of thousands of lives can be saved. For this dissertation, a lens was designed that can be manufactured as 4x6 array of microscopes. This lens design is diffraction limited, having less than 0.071 waves of aberration (root mean square) over the entire field of view. A total area imaged onto a full-frame digital image sensor is expected to be 3.94 mm2, which according to tuberculosis microscopy guidelines is more than sufficient for a sensitive diagnosis. The design is tolerant to single point diamond turning manufacturing errors, as found by tolerance analysis and by fabricating a prototype. Diamond micro-milling, a fabrication technique for lens array molds, was applied to plastic plano-concave and plano-convex lens arrays, and found to produce high quality optical surfaces. The micro-milling technique did not prove robust enough to produce bi-convex and meniscus lens arrays in a variety of lens shapes, however, and it required lengthy fabrication times. In order to rapidly prototype new lenses, a new diamond machining technique was

  19. Ultra-high resolution AMOLED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacyk, Ihor; Prache, Olivier; Ghosh, Amal

    2011-06-01

    AMOLED microdisplays continue to show improvement in resolution and optical performance, enhancing their appeal for a broad range of near-eye applications such as night vision, simulation and training, situational awareness, augmented reality, medical imaging, and mobile video entertainment and gaming. eMagin's latest development of an HDTV+ resolution technology integrates an OLED pixel of 3.2 × 9.6 microns in size on a 0.18 micron CMOS backplane to deliver significant new functionality as well as the capability to implement a 1920×1200 microdisplay in a 0.86" diagonal area. In addition to the conventional matrix addressing circuitry, the HDTV+ display includes a very lowpower, low-voltage-differential-signaling (LVDS) serialized interface to minimize cable and connector size as well as electromagnetic emissions (EMI), an on-chip set of look-up-tables for digital gamma correction, and a novel pulsewidth- modulation (PWM) scheme that together with the standard analog control provides a total dimming range of 0.05cd/m2 to 2000cd/m2 in the monochrome version. The PWM function also enables an impulse drive mode of operation that significantly reduces motion artifacts in high speed scene changes. An internal 10-bit DAC ensures that a full 256 gamma-corrected gray levels are available across the entire dimming range, resulting in a measured dynamic range exceeding 20-bits. This device has been successfully tested for operation at frame rates ranging from 30Hz up to 85Hz. This paper describes the operational features and detailed optical and electrical test results for the new AMOLED WUXGA resolution microdisplay.

  20. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.L. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Martel, I. [Dpto de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); CERN, ISOLDE, CH 1211 Geneva, 23 (Switzerland); Jiménez, R. [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Galán, J., E-mail: jgalan@diesia.uhu.es [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Salmerón, P. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain)

    2016-09-11

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from {sup 12}C up to {sup 84}Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  1. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. L.; Martel, I.; Jiménez, R.; Galán, J.; Salmerón, P.

    2016-09-01

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from 12C up to 84Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  2. Amplitude calibration of a digital radio antenna array for measuring cosmic ray air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Nehls, S; Arts, M J; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; van Cappellen, W A; Falcke, H; Haungs, A; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Krömer, O

    2008-01-01

    Radio pulses are emitted during the development of air showers, where air showers are generated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays entering the Earth's atmosphere. These nanosecond short pulses are presently investigated by various experiments for the purpose of using them as a new detection technique for cosmic particles. For an array of 30 digital radio antennas (LOPES experiment) an absolute amplitude calibration of the radio antennas including the full electronic chain of the data acquisition system is performed, in order to estimate absolute values of the electric field strength for these short radio pulses. This is mandatory, because the measured radio signals in the MHz frequency range have to be compared with theoretical estimates and with predictions from Monte Carlo simulations to reconstruct features of the primary cosmic particle. A commercial reference radio emitter is used to estimate frequency dependent correction factors for each single antenna of the radio antenna array. The expected received p...

  3. Focal length measurement of microlens-array by the clarity function of digital image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xianchang; Wu, Fan; Cao, Xuedong; Wu, Shibin; Zhang, Peng; Jing, Hongwei

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a method for the focal length measurement of Microlens-array (MLA) is introduced. The measuring setup is composed by monochromatic, condenser, collimator, MLA, microscope and CCD sensor. An experiment was performed using a MLA whose focal length is about 8 mm and a GUI based on Matlab software was developed to analyze the image gathered at the vertex and the focus by the clarity of digital image processing technology. The measuring uncertainty of this method is about 0.8% and this method introduced in this paper can finish tens of microlens array measurement at a single shot. Compared with traditional technology for MLA measuring, this method not only has a preferable precision but also super efficiency.

  4. A digital optical phase-locked loop for diode lasers based on field programmable gate array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Zhouxiang; Zhang Xian; Huang Kaikai; Lu Xuanhui [Physics Department, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China)

    2012-09-15

    We have designed and implemented a highly digital optical phase-locked loop (OPLL) for diode lasers in atom interferometry. The three parts of controlling circuit in this OPLL, including phase and frequency detector (PFD), loop filter and proportional integral derivative (PID) controller, are implemented in a single field programmable gate array chip. A structure type compatible with the model MAX9382/MCH12140 is chosen for PFD and pipeline and parallelism technology have been adapted in PID controller. Especially, high speed clock and twisted ring counter have been integrated in the most crucial part, the loop filter. This OPLL has the narrow beat note line width below 1 Hz, residual mean-square phase error of 0.14 rad{sup 2} and transition time of 100 {mu}s under 10 MHz frequency step. A main innovation of this design is the completely digitalization of the whole controlling circuit in OPLL for diode lasers.

  5. Miniature objective lens for array digital pathology: design improvement based on clinical evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Brian; Pierce, Mark; Graviss, Edward A.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2016-03-01

    A miniature objective designed for digital detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) was evaluated for diagnostic accuracy. The objective was designed for array microscopy, but fabricated and evaluated at this stage of development as a single objective. The counts and diagnoses of patient samples were directly compared for digital detection and standard microscopy. The results were found to be correlated and highly concordant. The evaluation of this lens by direct comparison to standard fluorescence sputum smear microscopy presented unique challenges and led to some new insights in the role played by the system parameters of the microscope. The design parameters and how they were developed are reviewed in light of these results. New system parameters are proposed with the goal of easing the challenges of evaluating the miniature objective and maintaining the optical performance that produced the agreeable results presented without over-optimizing. A new design is presented that meets and exceeds these criteria.

  6. Digital-beamforming array antenna technologies for future ocean-observing satellite missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iupikov, Oleg A.; Ivashina, Marianna V.; Cappellin, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Existing passive microwave radiometers that are used for ocean observations are limited in spatial resolution and geographic coverage, due to the limitations of traditional antenna technologies using mechanically-scanning reflectors and horn-type feeds. Future ocean observation missions call...... for new solutions, such as digitally-beamforming array feeds (DBAFs) as well as stationary and more complex reflectors. Our studies demonstrate that DBAFs can overcome the physically fundamental limitations of traditional horn feeds, and are capable of meeting all the challenging requirements for the next...

  7. Digital pulse-timing technique for the neutron detector array NEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modamio, V., E-mail: victor.modamio@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Valiente-Dobón, J.J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Jaworski, G. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Hüyük, T. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Triossi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Egea, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Department of Electronic Engineering, Universitat de València, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Söderström, P.-A. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Agramunt Ros, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Angelis, G. de [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); France, G. de [GANIL, CEA/DSAM and CNRS/IN2P3, F-14076 Caen (France); Erduran, M.N. [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, 34303 Istanbul (Turkey); and others

    2015-03-01

    A new digital pulse-timing algorithm, to be used with the future neutron detector array NEDA, has been developed and tested. The time resolution of four 5 in. diameter photomultiplier tubes (XP4512, R4144, R11833-100, and ET9390-kb), coupled to a cylindrical 5 in. by 5 in. BC501A liquid scintillator detector was measured by employing digital sampling electronics and a constant fraction discriminator (CFD) algorithm. The zero crossing of the CFD algorithm was obtained with a cubic spline interpolation, which was continuous up to the second derivative. The performance of the algorithm was studied at sampling rates of 500 MS/s and 200 MS/s. The time resolution obtained with the digital electronics was compared to the values acquired with a standard analog CFD. The result of this comparison shows that the time resolution from the analog and the digital measurements at 500 MS/s and at 200 MS/s are within 15% for all the tested photomultiplier tubes.

  8. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Brochard, T.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Siegbahn, E. A.; Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Bravin, A.; Dusseau, L.; Berkvens, P.

    2010-07-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow (˜25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 μm microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy/s, micron

  9. High-resolution light field reconstruction using a hybrid imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Li, Lin; Hou, GuangQi

    2016-04-01

    Recently, light field cameras have drawn much attraction for their innovative performance in photographic and scientific applications. However, narrow baselines and constrained spatial resolution of current light field cameras impose restrictions on their usability. Therefore, we design a hybrid imaging system containing a light field camera and a high-resolution digital single lens reflex camera, and these two kinds of cameras share the same optical path with a beam splitter so as to achieve the reconstruction of high-resolution light fields. The high-resolution 4D light fields are reconstructed with a phase-based perspective variation strategy. First, we apply complex steerable pyramid decomposition on the high-resolution image from the digital single lens reflex camera. Then, we perform phase-based perspective-shift processing with the disparity value, which is extracted from the upsampled light field depth map, to create high-resolution synthetic light field images. High-resolution digital refocused images and high-resolution depth maps can be generated in this way. Furthermore, controlling the magnitude of the perspective shift enables us to change the depth of field rendering in the digital refocused images. We show several experimental results to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  10. CMOS Ultrasound Transceiver Chip for High-Resolution Ultrasonic Imaging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insoo Kim; Hyunsoo Kim; Griggio, F; Tutwiler, R L; Jackson, T N; Trolier-McKinstry, S; Kyusun Choi

    2009-10-01

    The proposed CMOS ultrasound transceiver chip will enable the development of portable high resolution, high-frequency ultrasonic imaging systems. The transceiver chip is designed for close-coupled MEMS transducer arrays which operate with a 3.3-V power supply. In addition, a transmit digital beamforming system architecture is supported in this work. A prototype chip containing 16 receive and transmit channels with preamplifiers, time-gain compensation amplifiers, a multiplexed analog-to-digital converter with 3 kB of on-chip SRAM, and 50-MHz resolution time delayed excitation pulse generators has been fabricated. By utilizing a shared A/D converter architecture, the number of A/D converter and SRAM is cut down to one, unlike typical digital beamforming systems which need 16 A/D converters for 16 receive channels. The chip was fabricated in a 0.35-mum standard CMOS process. The chip size is 10 mm(2), and its average power consumption in receive mode is approximately 270 mW with a 3.3-V power supply. The transceiver chip specifications and designs are described, as well as measured results of each transceiver component and initial pulse-echo experimental results are presented.

  11. High resolution, MRI-based, segmented, computerized head phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubal, I.G.; Harrell, C.R.; Smith, E.O.; Smith, A.L.; Krischlunas, P. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1999-01-01

    The authors have created a high-resolution software phantom of the human brain which is applicable to voxel-based radiation transport calculations yielding nuclear medicine simulated images and/or internal dose estimates. A software head phantom was created from 124 transverse MRI images of a healthy normal individual. The transverse T2 slices, recorded in a 256x256 matrix from a GE Signa 2 scanner, have isotropic voxel dimensions of 1.5 mm and were manually segmented by the clinical staff. Each voxel of the phantom contains one of 62 index numbers designating anatomical, neurological, and taxonomical structures. The result is stored as a 256x256x128 byte array. Internal volumes compare favorably to those described in the ICRP Reference Man. The computerized array represents a high resolution model of a typical human brain and serves as a voxel-based anthropomorphic head phantom suitable for computer-based modeling and simulation calculations. It offers an improved realism over previous mathematically described software brain phantoms, and creates a reference standard for comparing results of newly emerging voxel-based computations. Such voxel-based computations lead the way to developing diagnostic and dosimetry calculations which can utilize patient-specific diagnostic images. However, such individualized approaches lack fast, automatic segmentation schemes for routine use; therefore, the high resolution, typical head geometry gives the most realistic patient model currently available.

  12. High-resolution quadruple sulfur isotope analyses of 3.2 Ga pyrite from the Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa reveal distinct environmental controls on sulfide isotopic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerdink, Desiree L.; Mason, Paul R. D.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Reimer, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopes in Paleoarchean pyrite record valuable information on atmospheric processes and emerging microbial activity in the early sulfur cycle. Here, we report quadruple sulfur isotope data (32S, 33S, 34S, 36S) analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry from pyrite in a 3.26-3.23 Ga sedimentary barite deposit in the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. Our results demonstrate the presence of distinct pyrite populations and reproducible isotopic arrays in barite-free and barite-rich samples. The most 34S-depleted signatures with weakly positive Δ33S/δ34S were found in disseminated pyrite in barite, whereas positive Δ33S-values with negative Δ33S/δ34S and Δ36S/Δ33S = -0.9 ± 0.2 were exclusively observed in pyrite hosted by chert, dolomite, conglomerate and breccia. We interpret these variations to be related to local redox reactions and mixing in the sulfide phase, rather than representing primary atmospheric variability alone. The strong correlation between lithology and isotopic composition indicates distinct environments of sulfide formation linked to local sulfate concentrations and fluctuating inputs from different sulfur metabolisms. Strongly 34S-depleted sulfide was formed by microbial sulfate reduction at [SO42-] > 200 μM during deposition of barite-rich sediments, whereas isotope effects were suppressed when sulfate levels decreased during deposition of terrigeneous clastic rocks. Positive Δ33S-values indicate an increased input of sulfide derived from elemental sulfur metabolisms when sulfate concentrations fell below 200 μM. Our results support an important role for local sulfate concentrations on the expression of biogenic sulfur isotope signatures in some of the oldest rocks on Earth.

  13. DESIR high resolution separator at GANIL, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toprek Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution separator for the SPIRAL2/DESIR project at GANIL has been designed. The extracted isotopes from SPIRAL2 will be transported to and cooled in a RFQ cooler yielding beams with very low transverse emittance and energy spread. These beams will then be accelerated to 60 keV and sent to a high-resolution mass separator where a specific isotope will be selected. The good beam properties extracted from the RFQ cooler will allow one to obtain a mass resolution of č26000 with the high-resolution mass separator.

  14. Design of DSP-based high-power digital solar array simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Zhilong; Tong, Weichao; Feng, Jian; Ji, Yibo

    2013-12-01

    To satisfy rigid performance specifications, a feedback control was presented for zoom optical lens plants. With the increasing of global energy consumption, research of the photovoltaic(PV) systems get more and more attention. Research of the digital high-power solar array simulator provides technical support for high-power grid-connected PV systems research.This paper introduces a design scheme of the high-power digital solar array simulator based on TMS320F28335. A DC-DC full-bridge topology was used in the system's main circuit. The switching frequency of IGBT is 25kHz.Maximum output voltage is 900V. Maximum output current is 20A. Simulator can be pre-stored solar panel IV curves.The curve is composed of 128 discrete points .When the system was running, the main circuit voltage and current values was feedback to the DSP by the voltage and current sensors in real-time. Through incremental PI,DSP control the simulator in the closed-loop control system. Experimental data show that Simulator output voltage and current follow a preset solar panels IV curve. In connection with the formation of high-power inverter, the system becomes gridconnected PV system. The inverter can find the simulator's maximum power point and the output power can be stabilized at the maximum power point (MPP).

  15. Digital Plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Gjonaj, Bergin; Johnson, Patrick M; Mosk, Allard P; Kuipers, Kobus; Lagendijk, Ad

    2010-01-01

    The field of plasmonics offers a route to control light fields with metallic nanostructures through the excitation of Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs). These surface waves, bound to a metal dielectric interface, tightly confine electromagnetic energy. Active control over SPPs has potential for applications in sensing, photovoltaics, quantum communication, nano circuitry, metamaterials and super-resolution microscopy. We achieve here a new level of control of plasmonic fields using a digital spatial light modulator. Optimizing the plasmonic phases via feedback we focus SPPs at a freely pre-chosen point on the surface of a nanohole array with high resolution. Digital addressing and scanning of SPPs without mechanical motion will enable novel interdisciplinary applications of advanced plasmonic devices in cell microscopy, optical data storage and sensing.

  16. Fabricating High-Resolution X-Ray Collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Michael; Atkinson, James E.; Fraser, Iain; Klinger, Jill

    2008-01-01

    A process and method for fabricating multi-grid, high-resolution rotating modulation collimators for arcsecond and sub-arcsecond x-ray and gamma-ray imaging involves photochemical machining and precision stack lamination. The special fixturing and etching techniques that have been developed are used for the fabrication of multiple high-resolution grids on a single array substrate. This technology has application in solar and astrophysics and in a number of medical imaging applications including mammography, computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and gamma cameras used in nuclear medicine. This collimator improvement can also be used in non-destructive testing, hydrodynamic weapons testing, and microbeam radiation therapy.

  17. Wide-field, high-resolution Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Guoan; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report an imaging method, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), which iteratively stitches together a number of variably illuminated, low-resolution intensity images in Fourier space to produce a wide-field, high-resolution complex sample image. By adopting a wavefront correction strategy, the FPM method can also correct for aberrations and digitally extend a microscope's depth-of-focus beyond the physical limitations of its optics. As a demonstration, we built a microscope prototype with a resolution of 0.78 um, a field-of-view of ~120 mm2, and a resolution-invariant depth-of-focus of 0.3 mm (characterized at 632 nm). Gigapixel colour images of histology slides verify FPM's successful operation. The reported imaging procedure transforms the general challenge of high-throughput, high-resolution microscopy from one that is coupled to the physical limitations of the system's optics to one that is solvable through computation.

  18. High Resolution Silicon Deformable Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes a plan to build a prototype small stroke, high precision deformable mirror suitable for space-based operation in systems for high-resolution...

  19. High Resolution Silicon Deformable Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal we describe a plan to build a deformable mirror suitable for space-based operation in systems for high-resolution imaging. The prototype DM will be...

  20. VT Hydrography Dataset - High Resolution NHD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The Vermont Hydrography Dataset (VHD) is compliant with the local resolution (also known as High Resolution) National Hydrography Dataset (NHD)...

  1. Study on Anti-Disturbance and High-Resolution Shallow Seismic Exploration of Active Faults in Urban Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Jishun; Zhang Xiankang; Liu Baojin; Fan Shengming; Wang Fuyun; Duan Yonghong; Zhang Hongqiang

    2003-01-01

    The significance of detection of urban active faults and the general situation concerning detection of urban active faults in the world are briefly introduced. In a brief description of the basic principles of anti-disturbance and high-resolution shallow seismic exploration, the stress is put on the excitation of seismic sources, the performance of digital seismographs, receiving mode and conditions, geometry as well as data acquisition, processing and interpretation in the anti-disturbance and high-resolution shallow seismic exploration of urban active faults. The study indicates that a controlled seismic source with a linear or nonlinear frequency-conversion scanning function and the relevant seismographs must be used in data acquisition, as well as working methods for small group interval, small offset, multi-channel receiving, short-array and high-frequency detectors for receiving are used. Attention should be paid to the application of techniques for static correction of refraction, noise suppressing, high-precision analysis of velocity, wavelet compressing, zero-phasing of wavelet and pre-stacking migration to data processing and interpretation. Finally, some cases of anti-disturbance and high-resolution shallow seismic exploration of urban active faults are present in the paper.

  2. Structure of high-resolution NMR spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Corio, PL

    2012-01-01

    Structure of High-Resolution NMR Spectra provides the principles, theories, and mathematical and physical concepts of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.The book presents the elementary theory of magnetic resonance; the quantum mechanical theory of angular momentum; the general theory of steady state spectra; and multiple quantum transitions, double resonance and spin echo experiments.Physicists, chemists, and researchers will find the book a valuable reference text.

  3. High Resolution Photon Timing with MCP-PMTs: A Comparison of a Commercial Constant Fraction Discriminator (CFD) with the ASIC-based Waveform Digitizers TARGET and WaveCatcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, D.; /Orsay, LAL; Delagnes, E.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Maalmi, J.; /Orsay, LAL; Nishimura, K.; Ruckman, L.L.; Varner, G.; /Hawaii U.; Va' vra, J.; /SLAC

    2011-07-14

    There is a considerable interest to develop new time-of-flight detectors using, for example, micro-channel-plate photodetectors (MCP-PMTs). The question we pose in this paper is if new waveform digitizer ASICs, such as the WaveCatcher and TARGET, operating with a sampling rate of 2-3 GSa/s can compete with 1GHz BW CFD/TDC/ADC electronics. We have performed a series of measurements with these waveform digitizers coupled to MCP-PMTs operating at low gain and with a signal equivalent to {approx}40 photoelectrons. The tests were done with a laser diode on detectors operating under the same condition used previously in SLAC and Fermilab beam tests. Our test results indicate that one can achieve similar resolution with both methods. Although the commercial CFD-based electronics does exist and performs very well, it is difficult to implement on a very large scale, and therefore the custom electronics is needed. In addition, the analog delay line requirement makes it very difficult to incorporate CFD discriminators in ASIC designs.

  4. Creating high-resolution bare-earth digital elevation models (DEMs) from stereo imagery in an area of densely vegetated deciduous forest using combinations of procedures designed for lidar point cloud filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Jessica D.; Warner, Timothy A.; Chirico, Pete; Bergstresser, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    For areas of the world that do not have access to lidar, fine-scale digital elevation models (DEMs) can be photogrammetrically created using globally available high-spatial resolution stereo satellite imagery. The resultant DEM is best termed a digital surface model (DSM) because it includes heights of surface features. In densely vegetated conditions, this inclusion can limit its usefulness in applications requiring a bare-earth DEM. This study explores the use of techniques designed for filtering lidar point clouds to mitigate the elevation artifacts caused by above ground features, within the context of a case study of Prince William Forest Park, Virginia, USA. The influences of land cover and leaf-on vs. leaf-off conditions are investigated, and the accuracy of the raw photogrammetric DSM extracted from leaf-on imagery was between that of a lidar bare-earth DEM and the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission DEM. Although the filtered leaf-on photogrammetric DEM retains some artifacts of the vegetation canopy and may not be useful for some applications, filtering procedures significantly improved the accuracy of the modeled terrain. The accuracy of the DSM extracted in leaf-off conditions was comparable in most areas to the lidar bare-earth DEM and filtering procedures resulted in accuracy comparable of that to the lidar DEM.

  5. The european FAZIA initiative: a high-performance digital telescope array for heavy-ion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Pasquali, G.; Pastore, G.; Bini, M.; Carboni, S.; Olmi, A.; Piantelli, S.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A.; Valdré, S.; Bonnet, E.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Bruno, M.; Chbihi, A.; Cinausero, M.; Degerlier, M.; Edelbruck, P.; Frankland, J. D.; Gramegna, F.; Gruyer, D.; Guerzoni, M.; Kordjasz, A.; Kozik, T.; Le Neindre, N.; Lopez, O.; Marchi, T.; Marini, P.; Morelli, L.; Ordine, A.; Pârlog, M.; Rivet, M. F.; Rosato, E.; Salomon, F.; Spadaccini, G.; Twaróg, T.; Vient, E.; Vigilante, M.

    2014-03-01

    The european Fazia collaboration aims at building a new modular array for charged product identification to be employed for heavy-ion studies. The elementary module of the array is a Silicon-Silicon-CsI telescope, optimized for ion identification including pulse shape analysis, too. The achievement of top performances imposes specific electronics which has been developed by the FAZIA collaboration and includes high quality charge and current preamplifiers, coupled to fully digital front-end. During the initial R&D phase, original and novel solutions have been tested in prototypes, obtaining unprecedented ion identification capabilities. FAZIA is now constructing a demonstrator array consisting of about two hundreds telescopes arranged in a compact and transportable configuration. In this contribution, we mainly summarize some aspects studied by FAZIA to improve the ion identification. Then we will briefly discuss the FAZIA program focused on experiments to be done with the demonstrator. First results on the isospin dynamics obtained with a reduced set-up demonstrate well the performance of the telescope and represent a good starting point towards future investigations with both stable and exotic beams.

  6. The european FAZIA initiative: a high-performance digital telescope array for heavy-ion studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casini G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The european Fazia collaboration aims at building a new modular array for charged product identification to be employed for heavy-ion studies. The elementary module of the array is a Silicon-Silicon-CsI telescope, optimized for ion identification including pulse shape analysis, too. The achievement of top performances imposes specific electronics which has been developed by the FAZIA collaboration and includes high quality charge and current preamplifiers, coupled to fully digital front-end. During the initial R&D phase, original and novel solutions have been tested in prototypes, obtaining unprecedented ion identification capabilities. FAZIA is now constructing a demonstrator array consisting of about two hundreds telescopes arranged in a compact and transportable configuration. In this contribution, we mainly summarize some aspects studied by FAZIA to improve the ion identification. Then we will briefly discuss the FAZIA program focused on experiments to be done with the demonstrator. First results on the isospin dynamics obtained with a reduced set-up demonstrate well the performance of the telescope and represent a good starting point towards future investigations with both stable and exotic beams.

  7. A versatile digital camera trigger for telescopes in the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Schwanke, U; Sulanke, K -H; Vorobiov, S; Wischnewski, R

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of an FPGA-based digital camera trigger for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, developed for the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The proposed camera trigger is designed to select images initiated by the Cherenkov emission of extended air showers from very-high energy (VHE, E>20 GeV) photons and charged particles while suppressing signatures from background light. The trigger comprises three stages. A first stage employs programmable discriminators to digitize the signals arriving from the camera channels (pixels). At the second stage, a grid of low-cost FPGAs is used to process the digitized signals for camera regions with 37 pixels. At the third stage, trigger conditions found independently in any of the overlapping 37-pixel regions are combined into a global camera trigger by few central FPGAs. Trigger prototype boards based on Xilinx FPGAs have been designed, built and tested and were shown to function properly. Using these components a full camera trigger wi...

  8. Direct-referencing Two-dimensional-array Digital Microfluidics Using Multi-layer Printed Circuit Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jian; Kim, Chang-Jin “CJ”

    2008-01-01

    Digital (i.e. droplet-based) microfluidics, by the electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) mechanism, has shown great potential for a wide range of applications, such as lab-on-a-chip. While most reported EWOD chips use a series of electrode pads essentially in one-dimensional line pattern designed for specific tasks, the desired universal chips allowing user-reconfigurable paths would require the electrode pads in two-dimensional pattern. However, to electrically access the electrode pads independently, conductive lines need to be fabricated underneath the pads in multiple layers, raising a cost issue especially for disposable chip applications. In this article, we report the building of digital microfluidic plates based on a printed-circuit-board (PCB), in which multilayer electrical access lines were created inexpensively using mature PCB technology. However, due to its surface topography and roughness and resulting high resistance against droplet movement, as-fabricated PCB surfaces require unacceptably high (~500 V) voltages unless coated with or immersed in oil. Our goal is EWOD operations of aqueous droplets not only on oil-covered but also on dry surfaces. To meet varying levels of performances, three types of gradually complex post-PCB microfabrication processes are developed and evaluated. By introducing land-grid-array (LGA) sockets in the packaging, a scalable digital microfluidics system with reconfigurable and low-cost chip is also demonstrated. PMID:19234613

  9. Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor Array System Based on Digital Phase Generated Carrier Demodulation and Reference Compensation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun He; Fang Li; Hao Xiao; Yu-Liang Liu

    2008-01-01

    A novel fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor array system based on digital phase generated carrier (PGC) demodulation and reference compensation method is proposed and set up. Experimental results confirm that the digital PGC demodulation can be used for wavelength-division-multiplexed FBG sensor array and the reference compensation method can reduce the environmental interference by approximately 40 dB in the frequency range from 20 Hz to 2 kHz. The minimum detectable wavelength-shift of the sensor system is 1×10-3 pm/Hz1/2.

  10. Composite x-ray image assembly for large-field digital mammography with one- and two-dimensional positioning of a focal plane array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halama, G.; McAdoo, J.; Liu, H.

    1998-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel large-field digital mammography technique, a 1024 x 1024 pixel Loral charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane array (FPA) was positioned in a mammographic field with one- and two-dimensional scan sequences to obtain 950 x 1800 pixel and 3600 x 3600 pixel composite images, respectively. These experiments verify that precise positioning of FPAs produced seamless composites and that the CCD mosaic concept has potential for high-resolution, large-field imaging. The proposed CCD mosaic concept resembles a checkerboard pattern with spacing left between the CCDs for the driver and readout electronics. To obtain a complete x-ray image, the mosaic must be repositioned four times, with an x-ray exposure at each position. To reduce the patient dose, a lead shield with appropriately patterned holes is placed between the x-ray source and the patient. The high-precision motorized translation stages and the fiber-coupled-scintillating-screen-CCD sensor assembly were placed in the position usually occupied by the film cassette. Because of the high mechanical precision, seamless composites were constructed from the subimages. This paper discusses the positioning, image alignment procedure, and composite image results. The paper only addresses the formation of a seamless composite image from subimages and will not consider the effects of the lead shield, multiple CCDs, or the speed of motion.

  11. Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Project -- Fully Integrated Linear Detector ArrayStatus Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Roney; Robert Seifert; Bob Pink; Mike Smith

    2011-09-01

    The field-portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography (DRCT) x-ray inspection systems developed for the Project Manager for NonStockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) over the past 13 years have used linear diode detector arrays from two manufacturers; Thomson and Thales. These two manufacturers no longer produce this type of detector. In the interest of insuring the long term viability of the portable DRCT single munitions inspection systems and to improve the imaging capabilities, this project has been investigating improved, commercially available detectors. During FY-10, detectors were evaluated and one in particular, manufactured by Detection Technologies (DT), Inc, was acquired for possible integration into the DRCT systems. The remainder of this report describes the work performed in FY-11 to complete evaluations and fully integrate the detector onto a representative DRCT platform.

  12. Digitally focused array ultrasonic testing technique for carbon fiber composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salchak, Y.; Zhvyrblya, V.; Sednev, D.; Lider, A.

    2016-06-01

    Composite fiber reinforced polymers are highly promising structures. At present, they are widely used in different areas such as aeronautics and nuclear industries. There is a great number of advantages of composite structures such as design flexibility, low cost per cubic inch, resistance to corrosion, lower material costs, lighter weight and improved productivity. However, composites degradation may be caused by different mechanisms such as overload, impact, overheating, creep and fatigue. Comparing to inspection of other materials some unique consideration is required for testing and analysis. Ultrasound testing is the most common method for inspection of composite structures. Digitally Focused Array Technology is considered as novel approach which enables fast and effective quantitative automatic testing. In this study new methodology of quality assurance of composite structure components based on DFA is performed.

  13. Centrifugal micro-channel array droplet generation for highly parallel digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zitian; Liao, Peiyu; Zhang, Fangli; Jiang, Mengcheng; Zhu, Yusen; Huang, Yanyi

    2017-01-17

    Stable water-in-oil emulsion is essential to digital PCR and many other bioanalytical reactions that employ droplets as microreactors. We developed a novel technology to produce monodisperse emulsion droplets with high efficiency and high throughput using a bench-top centrifuge. Upon centrifugal spinning, the continuous aqueous phase is dispersed into monodisperse droplet jets in air through a micro-channel array (MiCA) and then submerged into oil as a stable emulsion. We performed dPCR reactions with a high dynamic range through the MiCA approach, and demonstrated that this cost-effective method not only eliminates the usage of complex microfluidic devices and control systems, but also greatly suppresses the loss of materials and cross-contamination. MiCA-enabled highly parallel emulsion generation combines both easiness and robustness of picoliter droplet production, and breaks the technical challenges by using conventional lab equipment and supplies.

  14. High resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy system for nondestructive evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    With increased demand for high resolution ultrasonic evaluation, computer based systems or work stations become essential. The ultrasonic spectroscopy method of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) was used to develop a high resolution ultrasonic inspection system supported by modern signal processing, pattern recognition, and neural network technologies. The basic system which was completed consists of a 386/20 MHz PC (IBM AT compatible), a pulser/receiver, a digital oscilloscope with serial and parallel communications to the computer, an immersion tank with motor control of X-Y axis movement, and the supporting software package, IUNDE, for interactive ultrasonic evaluation. Although the hardware components are commercially available, the software development is entirely original. By integrating signal processing, pattern recognition, maximum entropy spectral analysis, and artificial neural network functions into the system, many NDE tasks can be performed. The high resolution graphics capability provides visualization of complex NDE problems. The phase 3 efforts involve intensive marketing of the software package and collaborative work with industrial sectors.

  15. Digital array gas radiometer (DAGR): a sensitive and reliable trace gas detection concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordley, Larry L.; McHugh, Martin J.; Marshall, B. T.; Thompson, Earl

    2009-05-01

    The Digital Array Gas Radiometer (DAGR) concept is based on traditional and reliable Gas Filter Correlation Radiometry (GFCR) for remote trace gas detection and monitoring. GFCR sensors have been successful in many infrared remote sensing applications. Historically however, solar backscatter measurements have not been as successful because instrument designs have been susceptible to natural variations in surface albedo, which induce clutter and degrade the sensitivity. DAGR overcomes this limitation with several key innovations. First, a pupil imaging system scrambles the received light, removing nearly all spatial clutter and permitting a small calibration source to be easily inserted. Then, by using focal plane arrays rather than single detectors to collect the light, dramatic advances in dynamic range can be achieved. Finally, when used with the calibration source, data processing approaches can further mitigate detector non-uniformity effects. DAGR sensors can be made as small as digital cameras and are well suited for downlooking detection of gases in the boundary layer, where solar backscatter measurements are needed to overcome the lack of thermal contrast in the IR. Easily integrated into a satellite platform, a space-based DAGR would provide near-global sensing of climatically important species such as such as CO, CH4, and N2O. Aircraft and UAV measurements with a DAGR could be used to monitor agricultural and industrial emissions. Ground-based or portable DAGRs could augment early warning systems for chemical weapons or toxic materials. Finally, planetary science applications include detection and mapping of biomarkers such as CH4 in the Martian atmosphere.

  16. High-resolution DEM Effects on Geophysical Flow Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. R.; Bursik, M. I.; Stefanescu, R. E. R.; Patra, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical mass flow models are numerical models that approximate pyroclastic flow events and can be used to assess the volcanic hazards certain areas may face. One such model, TITAN2D, approximates granular-flow physics based on a depth-averaged analytical model using inputs of basal and internal friction, material volume at a coordinate point, and a GIS in the form of a digital elevation model (DEM). The volume of modeled material propagates over the DEM in a way that is governed by the slope and curvature of the DEM surface and the basal and internal friction angles. Results from TITAN2D are highly dependent upon the inputs to the model. Here we focus on a single input: the DEM, which can vary in resolution. High resolution DEMs are advantageous in that they contain more surface details than lower-resolution models, presumably allowing modeled flows to propagate in a way more true to the real surface. However, very high resolution DEMs can create undesirable artifacts in the slope and curvature that corrupt flow calculations. With high-resolution DEMs becoming more widely available and preferable for use, determining the point at which high resolution data is less advantageous compared to lower resolution data becomes important. We find that in cases of high resolution, integer-valued DEMs, very high-resolution is detrimental to good model outputs when moderate-to-low (<10-15°) slope angles are involved. At these slope angles, multiple adjacent DEM cell elevation values are equal due to the need for the DEM to approximate the low slope with a limited set of integer values for elevation. The first derivative of the elevation surface thus becomes zero. In these cases, flow propagation is inhibited by these spurious zero-slope conditions. Here we present evidence for this "terracing effect" from 1) a mathematically defined simulated elevation model, to demonstrate the terracing effects of integer valued data, and 2) a real-world DEM where terracing must be

  17. Design, optimization and evaluation of a "smart" pixel sensor array for low-dose digital radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Xinghui; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been widely used to build flat-panel X-ray detectors for digital radiography (DR). As the demand for low-dose X-ray imaging grows, a detector with high signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) pixel architecture emerges. "Smart" pixel is intended to use a dual-gate photosensitive TFT for sensing, storage, and switch. It differs from a conventional passive pixel sensor (PPS) and active pixel sensor (APS) in that all these three functions are combined into one device instead of three separate units in a pixel. Thus, it is expected to have high fill factor and high spatial resolution. In addition, it utilizes the amplification effect of the dual-gate photosensitive TFT to form a one-transistor APS that leads to a potentially high SNR. This paper addresses the design, optimization and evaluation of the smart pixel sensor and array for low-dose DR. We will design and optimize the smart pixel from the scintillator to TFT levels and validate it through optical and electrical simulation and experiments of a 4x4 sensor array.

  18. Color Calibration for Colorized Vision System with Digital Sensor and LED Array Illuminator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenmin Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Color measurement by the colorized vision system is a superior method to achieve the evaluation of color objectively and continuously. However, the accuracy of color measurement is influenced by the spectral responses of digital sensor and the spectral mismatch of illumination. In this paper, two-color vision system illuminated by digital sensor and LED array, respectively, is presented. The Polynomial-Based Regression method is applied to solve the problem of color calibration in the sRGB and CIE  L⁎a⁎b⁎ color spaces. By mapping the tristimulus values from RGB to sRGB color space, color difference between the estimated values and the reference values is less than 3ΔE. Additionally, the mapping matrix ΦRGB→sRGB has proved a better performance in reducing the color difference, and it is introduced subsequently into the colorized vision system proposed for a better color measurement. Necessarily, the printed matter of clothes and the colored ceramic tile are chosen as the application experiment samples of our colorized vision system. As shown in the experimental data, the average color difference of images is less than 6ΔE. It indicates that a better performance of color measurement is obtained via the colorized vision system proposed.

  19. Trace gas detection and monitoring with the Digital Array Gas-correlation Radiometer (DAGR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordley, Larry L.; Hervig, Mark E.; Fish, Chad; McHugh, Martin J.

    2011-05-01

    We present the first results from a Digital Array Gas-correlation Radiometer (DAGR) prototype sensor, and discuss applications in remote sensing of trace gases. The sensor concept is based on traditional and reliable Gas Filter Correlation Radiometry (GFCR), but overcomes the limitations in solar backscatter applications. The DAGR sensor design can be scaled to the size of a digital camera and is ideal for downlooking detection of gases in the boundary layer, where solar backscatter measurements are needed to overcome the lack of thermal contrast in the IR. Ground-based portable DAGR sensors can monitor carbon sequestration sites or industrial facilities. Aircraft or UAV deployment can quickly survey large areas and are particularly well suited for gas leak detection or carbon monitoring. From space-based platforms, Doppler modulation can be exploited to produce an extremely fine spectral resolution with effective resolving power exceeding 100,000. Such space-based DAGR observations could provide near-global sensing of climatically important species such as such as CO2, CO, CH4, O3 and N2O. Planetary science applications include detection and mapping of biomarkers in the Martian atmosphere.

  20. Resolution enhancement using pulse width modulation in digital micromirror device-based point-array scanning pattern exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hung-Fei; Huang, Yi-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Digital-mask lithography systems, with a digital micromirror device (DMD) as their central piece, have been widely used for defining patterns on printed circuit board (PCB). This study designed optical module parameters for point-array projection lithography based on field tracing technique to improve the quality of the aerial image on the exposure plane. In the realized optical module for the point-array projection lithography, a DMD was used as the dynamic digital-mask, and a 405-nm-wavelength laser was used to illuminate the DMD. The laser was then focused through the micro-lens array in the optical module to form a point array and was projected onto a dynamic scanning stage. By calculating the beam-overlapping rate, stage velocity, spot diameter, and DMD frame rate and programming them into the stage- and DMD-synchronized controller, the point array formed line patterns on the photoresist. Furthermore, using pulse width modulation (PWM) technique to operate the activation periods of the DMD mirrors effectively controlled the exposure and achieved a feature linewidth of less than 10 μm.

  1. Digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) implementing time delay and integration (TDI) for scanning type infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Omer; Shafique, Atia; Burak, Abdurrahman; Caliskan, Can; Yazici, Melik; Abbasi, Shahbaz; Galioglu, Arman; Kayahan, Huseyin; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) implementing time delay and integration (TDI) for scanning type infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs) with a charge handling capacity of 44.8 Me- while achieving quantization noise of 198 e- and power consumption of 14.35 mW. Conventional pulse frequency modulation (PFM) method is supported by a single slope ramp ADC technique to have a very low quantization noise together with a low power consumption. The proposed digital TDI ROIC converts the photocurrent into digital domain in two phases; in the first phase, most significant bits (MSBs) are generated by the conventional PFM technique in the charge domain, while in the second phase least significant bits (LSBs) are generated by a single slope ramp ADC in the time domain. A 90 × 8 prototype has been fabricated and verified, showing a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 51 dB for low illumination levels (280,000 collected electrons), which is attributed to the TDI implementation method and very low quantization noise due to the single slope ADC implemented for LSBs. Proposed digital TDI ROIC proves the benefit of digital readouts for scanning arrays enabling smaller pixel pitches, better SNR for the low illumination levels and lower power consumption compared to analog TDI readouts for scanning arrays.

  2. Polystyrene negative resist for high-resolution electron beam lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Siqi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We studied the exposure behavior of low molecular weight polystyrene as a negative tone electron beam lithography (EBL resist, with the goal of finding the ultimate achievable resolution. It demonstrated fairly well-defined patterning of a 20-nm period line array and a 15-nm period dot array, which are the densest patterns ever achieved using organic EBL resists. Such dense patterns can be achieved both at 20 and 5 keV beam energies using different developers. In addition to its ultra-high resolution capability, polystyrene is a simple and low-cost resist with easy process control and practically unlimited shelf life. It is also considerably more resistant to dry etching than PMMA. With a low sensitivity, it would find applications where negative resist is desired and throughput is not a major concern.

  3. High resolution spectroscopy from low altitude satellites. [gamma ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The P 78 1 satellite to be placed in a synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 550-660 km will carry two identical high resolution spectrometers each consisting of a single (approximately 85 cc) intrinsic germanium IGE detector. The payload also includes a pair of phoswitch scintillators, an array of CdTe detectors and several particle detectors, all of which are mounted on the wheel of the satellite. The intrinsic high purity IGE detectors receive cooling from two Stirling cycle refrigerators and facilitate the assembly of large and complex detector arrays planned for the next generation of high sensitivity instruments such as those planned for the gamma ray observatory. The major subsystems of the spectrometer are discussed as well as its capabilities.

  4. High-resolution mapping of bifurcations in nonlinear biochemical circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genot, A. J.; Baccouche, A.; Sieskind, R.; Aubert-Kato, N.; Bredeche, N.; Bartolo, J. F.; Taly, V.; Fujii, T.; Rondelez, Y.

    2016-08-01

    Analog molecular circuits can exploit the nonlinear nature of biochemical reaction networks to compute low-precision outputs with fewer resources than digital circuits. This analog computation is similar to that employed by gene-regulation networks. Although digital systems have a tractable link between structure and function, the nonlinear and continuous nature of analog circuits yields an intricate functional landscape, which makes their design counter-intuitive, their characterization laborious and their analysis delicate. Here, using droplet-based microfluidics, we map with high resolution and dimensionality the bifurcation diagrams of two synthetic, out-of-equilibrium and nonlinear programs: a bistable DNA switch and a predator-prey DNA oscillator. The diagrams delineate where function is optimal, dynamics bifurcates and models fail. Inverse problem solving on these large-scale data sets indicates interference from enzymatic coupling. Additionally, data mining exposes the presence of rare, stochastically bursting oscillators near deterministic bifurcations.

  5. High-resolution mapping of bifurcations in nonlinear biochemical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genot, A J; Baccouche, A; Sieskind, R; Aubert-Kato, N; Bredeche, N; Bartolo, J F; Taly, V; Fujii, T; Rondelez, Y

    2016-08-01

    Analog molecular circuits can exploit the nonlinear nature of biochemical reaction networks to compute low-precision outputs with fewer resources than digital circuits. This analog computation is similar to that employed by gene-regulation networks. Although digital systems have a tractable link between structure and function, the nonlinear and continuous nature of analog circuits yields an intricate functional landscape, which makes their design counter-intuitive, their characterization laborious and their analysis delicate. Here, using droplet-based microfluidics, we map with high resolution and dimensionality the bifurcation diagrams of two synthetic, out-of-equilibrium and nonlinear programs: a bistable DNA switch and a predator-prey DNA oscillator. The diagrams delineate where function is optimal, dynamics bifurcates and models fail. Inverse problem solving on these large-scale data sets indicates interference from enzymatic coupling. Additionally, data mining exposes the presence of rare, stochastically bursting oscillators near deterministic bifurcations.

  6. High-resolution workstations for primary and secondary radiology readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Ricky K.; Simons, Margaret A.; Razavi, Mahmood; Kangarloo, Hooshang; Boechat, Maria I.; Hall, Theodore R.; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Huang, H. K.; Eldredge, Sandra L.

    1990-08-01

    We have implemented two high resolution workstations within our pediatric radiology PACS module: a two-monitor 2K x 2K station and a six-monitor 1K x 1K station. The 2K x 2K workstation is under evaluation for primary reading of pediatric radiographs from a computed radiography unit. System implementation and evaluation methods are described. Operational efficiency measures of both film and digital systems are reported. This study is our first attempt to integrate a primary viewing station into a busy clinical environment. The 1K x 1K workstation is available 24-hours a day, 7 days a week for fast reviews by referring physicians. Images from a compated radiography system are available at the workstation in about 8 minutes. A digital voice reporting system is being developed to communicate radiology reports from the 2K x 2K workstation to the 1K x 1K secondary review station.

  7. The future of high resolution electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D Van Dyck

    2000-01-01

    The state of the art and the future in quantitative high resolution electron microscopy are discussed in the framework of parameter estimation. Reconstruction methods are then to be considered as direct methods to yield a starting structure for further refinement. With the increasing flexibility of the instruments, computer aided experimental strategy will become important.

  8. High resolution spectroscopy of planet bearing stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Gálvez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here the first steps of an extended spectroscopic survey in order to characterize the stellar hosts of extra-solar planets. We have selected several known stars with plan- ets and using high resolution spectroscopy, we have studied their properties.

  9. Compact high-resolution spectral phase shaper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, S.; Walle, van der P.; Offerhaus, H.L.; Hulst, van N.F.

    2005-01-01

    The design and operation of a high-resolution spectral phase shaper with a footprint of only 7×10 cm2 is presented. The liquid-crystal modulator has 4096 elements. More than 600 independent degrees of freedom can be positioned with a relative accuracy of 1 pixel. The spectral shaping of pulses fro

  10. A High-Resolution Stopwatch for Cents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingl, Z.; Kopasz, K.

    2011-01-01

    A very low-cost, easy-to-make stopwatch is presented to support various experiments in mechanics. The high-resolution stopwatch is based on two photodetectors connected directly to the microphone input of a sound card. Dedicated free open-source software has been developed and made available to download. The efficiency is demonstrated by a free…

  11. Compressive sensing for high resolution radar imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present some preliminary results on the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) to high resolution radar imaging. CS is a recently developed theory which allows reconstruction of sparse signals with a number of measurements much lower than what is required by the Shannon sampling th

  12. Limiting liability via high-resolution image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwade, L. E.; Overlin, Trudy K.

    1997-01-01

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as 'evidence ready,' even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  13. Image Monitoring of Pharmaceutical Blending Processes and the Determination of an End Point by Using a Portable Near-Infrared Imaging Device Based on a Polychromator-Type Near-Infrared Spectrometer with a High-speed and High-Resolution Photo Diode Array Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodai Murayama

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we have developed a new version (ND-NIRs of a polychromator-type near-infrared (NIR spectrometer with a high-resolution photo diode array detector, which we built before (D-NIRs. The new version has four 5 W halogen lamps compared with the three lamps for the older version. The new version also has a condenser lens with a shorter focal point length. The increase in the number of the lamps and the shortening of the focal point of the condenser lens realize high signal-to-noise ratio and high-speed NIR imaging measurement. By using the ND-NIRs we carried out the in-line monitoring of pharmaceutical blending and determined an end point of the blending process. Moreover, to determinate a more accurate end point, a NIR image of the blending sample was acquired by means of a portable NIR imaging device based on ND-NIRs. The imaging result has demonstrated that the mixing time of 8 min is enough for homogeneous mixing. In this way the present study has demonstrated that ND-NIRs and the imaging system based on a ND-NIRs hold considerable promise for process analysis.

  14. TARGET: A digitizing and trigger ASIC for the Cherenkov telescope array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, S.; Jankowsky, D.; Katagiri, H.; Kraus, M.; Okumura, A.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Shigenaka, A.; Tajima, H.; Tibaldo, L.; Varner, G.; Zink, A.; Zorn, J.

    2017-01-01

    The future ground-based gamma-ray observatory Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will feature multiple types of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, each with thousands of pixels. To be affiordable, camera concepts for these telescopes have to feature low cost per channel and at the same time meet the requirements for CTA in order to achieve the desired scientific goals. We present the concept of the TeV Array Readout Electronics with GSa/s sampling and Event Trigger (TARGET) Application Specific Circuit (ASIC), envisaged to be used in the cameras of various CTA telescopes, e.g. the Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope (GCT), a proposed 2-Mirror Small-Sized Telescope, and the Schwarzschild-Couder Telescope (SCT), a proposed Medium-Sized Telescope. In the latest version of this readout concept the sampling and trigger parts are split into dedicated ASICs, TARGET C and T5TEA, both providing 16 parallel input channels. TARGET C features a tunable sampling rate (usually 1 GSa/s), a 16k sample deep buffier for each channel and on-demand digitization and transmission of waveforms with typical spans of ˜100 ns. The trigger ASIC, T5TEA, provides 4 low voltage diffierential signal (LVDS) trigger outputs and can generate a pedestal voltage independently for each channel. Trigger signals are generated by T5TEA based on the analog sum of the input in four independent groups of four adjacent channels and compared to a threshold set by the user. Thus, T5TEA generates four LVDS trigger outputs, as well as 16 pedestal voltages fed to TARGET C independently for each channel. We show preliminary results of the characterization and testing of TARGET C and T5TEA.

  15. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm(2) area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10(-1) to 4 × 10(-3) copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings.

  16. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm2 area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10-1 to 4 × 10-3 copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings. PMID:27074005

  17. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yong; Wang Xuben; Li Zhirong; Li Qiong; Li Zhengwen

    2009-01-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  18. Smartphone microendoscopy for high resolution fluorescence imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Xiangqian; Mugler, Dale H; Yu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    High resolution optical endoscopes are increasingly used in diagnosis of various medical conditions of internal organs, such as the gastrointestinal tracts, but they are too expensive for use in resource-poor settings. On the other hand, smartphones with high resolution cameras and Internet access have become more affordable, enabling them to diffuse into most rural areas and developing countries in the past decade. In this letter we describe a smartphone microendoscope that can take fluorescence images with a spatial resolution of 3.1 {\\mu}m. Images collected from ex vivo, in vitro and in vivo samples using the device are also presented. The compact and cost-effective smartphone microendoscope may be envisaged as a powerful tool for detecting pre-cancerous lesions of internal organs in low and middle income countries.

  19. Progress toward high resolution EUV spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korendyke, C.; Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H.; Young, P. R.; Chua, D.; Hassler, D. M.; Landi, E.; Davila, J. M.; Klimchuck, J.; Tun, S.; DeForest, C.; Mariska, J. T.; Solar C Spectroscopy Working Group; LEMUR; EUVST Development Team

    2013-07-01

    HIgh resolution EUV spectroscopy is a critical instrumental technique to understand fundamental physical processes in the high temperature solar atmosphere. Spectroscopic observations are used to measure differential emission measure, line of sight and turbulent flows, plasma densities and emission measures. Spatially resolved, spectra of these emission lines with adequate cadence will provide the necessary clues linking small scale structures with large scale, energetic solar phenomena. The necessary observations to determine underlying physical processes and to provide comprehensive temperature coverage of the solar atmosphere above the chromosphere will be obtained by the proposed EUVST instrument for Solar C. This instrument and its design will be discussed in this paper. Progress on the VEry high Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (VERIS) sounding rocket instrument presently under development at the Naval Research Laboratory will also be discussed.

  20. Stellar Tools for High Resolution Population Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, M.; Bertone, E.; Rodríguez-Merino, L.; Buzzoni, A.

    2005-12-01

    We present preliminary results of the application of a new stellar library of high-resolution synthetic spectra (based upon ATLAS9 and SYNTHE codes developed by R. L. Kurucz) in the calculation of the ultraviolet-optical spectral energy distribution of simple stellar populations (SSPs). For this purpose, the library has been coupled with Buzzoni's population synthesis code. Part of this paper is also devoted to illustrate quantitatively the extent to which synthetic stellar libraries represent real stars.

  1. Petrous apex mucocele: high resolution CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memis, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital of Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Memis, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital of Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Alper, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital of Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Calli, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital of Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Ozer, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital of Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Ozdamar, N. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hospital of Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    1994-11-01

    Mucocele of the petrous apex is very rare, only three cases having been reported. Since this area is inaccessible to direct examination, imaging, preferably high resolution computed tomography (HR CT) is essential. We report a case showing an eroding, non enhancing mass with sharp, lobulated contours, within the petrous apex. The presence of a large air cell on the opposite side suggested a mucocele. (orig.)

  2. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    1969-01-01

    High Resolution NMR: Theory and Chemical Applications focuses on the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as chemical shifts, lattices, and couplings. The book first offers information on the theory of NMR, including nuclear spin and magnetic moment, spin lattice relaxation, line widths, saturation, quantum mechanical description of NMR, and ringing. The text then ponders on instrumentation and techniques and chemical shifts. Discussions focus on the origin of chemical shifts, reference compounds, empirical correlations of chemical shifts, modulation and phase detection,

  3. 4MOST: the high-resolution spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, W.; Xu, W.; Buschkamp, P.; Feiz, C.; Saviauk, A.; Barden, S.; Quirrenbach, A.; Mandel, H.

    2016-08-01

    4MOST (4-meter Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope) is a wide-field, fiber-feed, high-multiplex spectroscopic survey facility to be installed on the 4-meter ESO telescope VISTA in Chile. It consists of two identical low resolution spectrographs and one high resolution spectrograph. The instrument is presently in the preliminary design phase and expected to get operational end of 2022. The high resolution spectrograph will afford simultaneous observations of up to 812 targets - over a hexagonal field of view of 4.1 sq.degrees on sky - with a spectral resolution R>18,000 covering a wavelength range from 393 to 679nm in three channels. In this paper we present the optical and mechanical design of the high resolution spectrograph (HRS) as prepared for the review at ESO, Garching. The expected performance including the highly multiplexed fiber slit concept is simulated and its impact on the optical performance given. We show the thermal and finite element analyses and the resulting stability of the spectrograph under operational conditions.

  4. High-Resolution US of Rheumatologic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Melville, David M; Gimber, Lana H; Scalcione, Luke R; Miller, Margaret D; Kwoh, C Kent; Klauser, Andrea S

    2015-01-01

    For the past 15 years, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) is being routinely and increasingly used for initial evaluation and treatment follow-up of rheumatologic diseases. This imaging technique is performed by using high-frequency linear transducers and has proved to be a powerful diagnostic tool in evaluation of articular erosions, simple and complex joint and bursal effusions, tendon sheath effusions, and synovitis, with results comparable to those of magnetic resonance imaging, excluding detection of bone marrow edema. Crystal deposition diseases including gouty arthropathy and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) have characteristic appearances at US, enabling differentiation between these two diseases and from inflammatory arthropathies. Enthesopathy, which frequently accompanies psoriatic and reactive arthritis, also has a characteristic appearance at high-resolution US, distinguishing these two entities from other inflammatory and metabolic arthropathies. The presence of Doppler signal in examined joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths indicates active synovitis. Microbubble echo contrast agents augment detection of tissue vascularity and may act in the future as a drug delivery vehicle. Frequently, joint, tendon sheath, and bursal fluid aspirations and therapeutic injections are performed under US guidance. The authors describe the high-resolution US technique including gray-scale, color or power Doppler, and contrast agent-enhanced US that is used in evaluation of rheumatologic diseases of the wrist and hand and the ankle and foot in their routine clinical practice. This article demonstrates imaging findings of normal joints, rheumatoid arthritis, gouty arthritis, CPPD, psoriatic and reactive arthritis, and osteoarthritis.

  5. High-resolution traction force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Sergey V; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S; Waterman, Clare M

    2014-01-01

    Cellular forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton and transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through discrete, integrin-based protein assemblies, that is, focal adhesions, are critical to developmental morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, as well as disease progression in cancer. However, quantitative mapping of these forces has been difficult since there has been no experimental technique to visualize nanonewton forces at submicrometer spatial resolution. Here, we provide detailed protocols for measuring cellular forces exerted on two-dimensional elastic substrates with a high-resolution traction force microscopy (TFM) method. We describe fabrication of polyacrylamide substrates labeled with multiple colors of fiducial markers, functionalization of the substrates with ECM proteins, setting up the experiment, and imaging procedures. In addition, we provide the theoretical background of traction reconstruction and experimental considerations important to design a high-resolution TFM experiment. We describe the implementation of a new algorithm for processing of images of fiducial markers that are taken below the surface of the substrate, which significantly improves data quality. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm and explain how to choose a regularization parameter for suppression of the measurement error. A brief discussion of different ways to visualize and analyze the results serves to illustrate possible uses of high-resolution TFM in biomedical research. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. High resolution 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagliardi, Frank M., E-mail: frank.gagliardi@wbrc.org.au [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia and School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia); Cornelius, Iwan [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Blencowe, Anton [Division of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, The University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia and Division of Information Technology, Engineering and the Environment, Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Franich, Rick D. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Geso, Moshi [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) techniques are under investigation at synchrotrons worldwide. Favourable outcomes from animal and cell culture studies have proven the efficacy of MRT. The aim of MRT researchers currently is to progress to human clinical trials in the near future. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the high resolution and 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams in PRESAGE® dosimeters using laser fluorescence confocal microscopy. Methods: Water equivalent PRESAGE® dosimeters were fabricated and irradiated with microbeams on the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Microbeam arrays comprised of microbeams 25–50 μm wide with 200 or 400 μm peak-to-peak spacing were delivered as single, cross-fire, multidirectional, and interspersed arrays. Imaging of the dosimeters was performed using a NIKON A1 laser fluorescence confocal microscope. Results: The spatial fractionation of the MRT beams was clearly visible in 2D and up to 9 mm in depth. Individual microbeams were easily resolved with the full width at half maximum of microbeams measured on images with resolutions of as low as 0.09 μm/pixel. Profiles obtained demonstrated the change of the peak-to-valley dose ratio for interspersed MRT microbeam arrays and subtle variations in the sample positioning by the sample stage goniometer were measured. Conclusions: Laser fluorescence confocal microscopy of MRT irradiated PRESAGE® dosimeters has been validated in this study as a high resolution imaging tool for the independent spatial and geometrical verification of MRT beam delivery.

  7. Automated analysis for microcalcifications in high resolution digital mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascio, Laura N.

    1996-01-01

    A method for automatically locating microcalcifications indicating breast cancer. The invention assists mammographers in finding very subtle microcalcifications and in recognizing the pattern formed by all the microcalcifications. It also draws attention to microcalcifications that might be overlooked because a more prominent feature draws attention away from an important object. A new filter has been designed to weed out false positives in one of the steps of the method. Previously, iterative selection threshold was used to separate microcalcifications from the spurious signals resulting from texture or other background. A Selective Erosion or Enhancement (SEE) Filter has been invented to improve this step. Since the algorithm detects areas containing potential calcifications on the mammogram, it can be used to determine which areas need be stored at the highest resolution available, while, in addition, the full mammogram can be reduced to an appropriate resolution for the remaining cancer signs.

  8. Investigation of certain characteristics of thinned antenna arrays with digital signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilevskii, L. V.; Domanov, Iu. A.; Korobko, O. V.; Tauroginskii, B. I.

    1983-11-01

    A thinned array with correlation processing of input signals is examined. It is shown that amplitude quantization does not change the signal at the thinned-array input as compared with the complete antenna array. The discreteness of time delay causes the thinned and complete arrays to become nonequivalent. Computer-simulation results are presented.

  9. Standard practice for digital detector array performance evaluation and long-term stability

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes the evaluation of DDA systems for industrial radiology. It is intended to ensure that the evaluation of image quality, as far as this is influenced by the DDA system, meets the needs of users, and their customers, and enables process control and long term stability of the DDA system. 1.2 This practice specifies the fundamental parameters of Digital Detector Array (DDA) systems to be measured to determine baseline performance, and to track the long term stability of the DDA system. 1.3 The DDA system performance tests specified in this practice shall be completed upon acceptance of the system from the manufacturer and at intervals specified in this practice to monitor long term stability of the system. The intent of these tests is to monitor the system performance for degradation and to identify when an action needs to be taken when the system degrades by a certain level. 1.4 The use of the gages provided in this standard is mandatory for each test. In the event these tests or ga...

  10. Developments of FPGA-based digital back-ends for low frequency antenna arrays at Medicina radio telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, G.; Bartolini, M.; Mattana, A.; Pupillo, G.; Hickish, J.; Foster, G.; Bianchi, G.; Lingua, A.; Monari, J.; Montebugnoli, S.; Perini, F.; Rusticelli, S.; Schiaffino, M.; Virone, G.; Zarb Adami, K.

    In radio astronomy Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology is largely used for the implementation of digital signal processing techniques applied to antenna arrays. This is mainly due to the good trade-off among computing resources, power consumption and cost offered by FPGA chip compared to other technologies like ASIC, GPU and CPU. In the last years several digital backend systems based on such devices have been developed at the Medicina radio astronomical station (INAF-IRA, Bologna, Italy). Instruments like FX correlator, direct imager, beamformer, multi-beam system have been successfully designed and realized on CASPER (Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research, https://casper.berkeley.edu) processing boards. In this paper we present the gained experience in this kind of applications.

  11. The Digital Signal Processing Platform for the Low Frequency Aperture Array: Preliminary Results on the Data Acquisition Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, Giovanni; Mattana, Andrea; Pastore, Sandro; Alderighi, Monica; Zarb Adami, Kristian; Schillirò, Francesco; Aminaei, Amin; Baker, Jeremy; Belli, Carolina; Comoretto, Gianni; Chiarucci, Simone; Chiello, Riccardo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Dalle Mura, Gabriele; De Marco, Andrea; Halsall, Rob; Magro, Alessio; Monari, Jader; Roberts, Matt; Perini, Federico; Poloni, Marco; Pupillo, Giuseppe; Rusticelli, Simone; Schiaffino, Marco; Zaccaro, Emanuele

    A signal processing hardware platform has been developed for the Low Frequency Aperture Array component of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The processing board, called an Analog Digital Unit (ADU), is able to acquire and digitize broadband (up to 500MHz bandwidth) radio-frequency streams from 16 dual polarized antennas, channel the data streams and then combine them flexibly as part of a larger beamforming system. It is envisaged that there will be more than 8000 of these signal processing platforms in the first phase of the SKA, so particular attention has been devoted to ensure the design is low-cost and low-power. This paper describes the main features of the data acquisition unit of such a platform and presents preliminary results characterizing its performance.

  12. High-resolution detection of sustained ventricular and supraventricular tachycardia through FPGA-based fuzzy processing of ECG signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Chowdhury, Shubhajit

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based fast processing system with 12-channel high-resolution (24 bits) front-end for ECG signal processing. The implemented high-resolution data conversion makes the system suitable for recording of late potentials of the QRS complex in patients prone to sustained ventricular tachycardia. The system accepts ECG signals through 12 channels and then filtered to minimize baseline wander and power-line interference. The filter outputs are connected to 12 delta-sigma ADCs. The whole ADCs work synchronously at 8 kHz sampling frequency, and their output data are transferred to an FPGA that computes online on the digitized sample values in real time and ascertains whether the patient under study suffers from ventricular tachycardia or not. In order to ascertain the QRS complex accurately in the noisy ECG signal, fuzzy entropy of the sample values has been computed and provided as an input to inverse multiquadratic radial basis function neural network. Using the standard CSE ECG database, the algorithm performed highly effectively. The performance of the algorithm in respect of QRS detection with sensitivity of 99.83 % and accuracy of 99.7 % is achieved when tested using single-channel ECG with entropy criteria. The performance of the QRS detection system has been compared and found to be better than most of the QRS detection systems available in the literature. Using the system, 200 patients have been diagnosed with an accuracy of 99 %.

  13. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging with compress sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyi; Ke, Jun

    2016-10-01

    LIDAR three-dimensional imaging technology have been used in many fields, such as military detection. However, LIDAR require extremely fast data acquisition speed. This makes the manufacture of detector array for LIDAR system is very difficult. To solve this problem, we consider using compress sensing which can greatly decrease the data acquisition and relax the requirement of a detection device. To use the compressive sensing idea, a spatial light modulator will be used to modulate the pulsed light source. Then a photodetector is used to receive the reflected light. A convex optimization problem is solved to reconstruct the 2D depth map of the object. To improve the resolution in transversal direction, we use multiframe image restoration technology. For each 2D piecewise-planar scene, we move the SLM half-pixel each time. Then the position where the modulated light illuminates will changed accordingly. We repeat moving the SLM to four different directions. Then we can get four low-resolution depth maps with different details of the same plane scene. If we use all of the measurements obtained by the subpixel movements, we can reconstruct a high-resolution depth map of the sense. A linear minimum-mean-square error algorithm is used for the reconstruction. By combining compress sensing and multiframe image restoration technology, we reduce the burden on data analyze and improve the efficiency of detection. More importantly, we obtain high-resolution depth maps of a 3D scene.

  14. A high resolution pneumatic stepping actuator for harsh reactor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippetts, Thomas B.; Evans, Paul S.; Riffle, George K.

    1993-01-01

    A reactivity control actuator for a high-power density nuclear propulsion reactor must be installed in close proximity to the reactor core. The energy input from radiation to the actuator structure could exceed hundreds of W/cc unless low-cross section, low-absorptivity materials are chosen. Also, for post-test handling and subsequent storage, materials should not be used that are activated into long half-life isotopes. Pneumatic actuators can be constructed from various reactor-compatible materials, but conventional pneumatic piston actuators generally lack the stiffness required for high resolution reactivity control unless electrical position sensors and compensated electronic control systems are used. To overcome these limitations, a pneumatic actuator is under development that positions an output shaft in response to a series of pneumatic pulses, comprising a pneumatic analog of an electrical stepping motor. The pneumatic pulses are generated remotely, beyond the strong radiation environment, and transmitted to the actuator through tubing. The mechanically simple actuator uses a nutating gear harmonic drive to convert motion of small pistons directly to high-resolution angular motion of the output shaft. The digital nature of this actuator is suitable for various reactor control algorithms but is especially compatible with the three bean salad algorithm discussed by Ball et al. (1991).

  15. 3D mapping from high resolution satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulas, D.; Georgopoulos, A.; Sarakenos, A.; Paraschou, Ch.

    2013-08-01

    In recent years 3D information has become more easily available. Users' needs are constantly increasing, adapting to this reality and 3D maps are in more demand. 3D models of the terrain in CAD or other environments have already been common practice; however one is bound by the computer screen. This is why contemporary digital methods have been developed in order to produce portable and, hence, handier 3D maps of various forms. This paper deals with the implementation of the necessary procedures to produce holographic 3D maps and three dimensionally printed maps. The main objective is the production of three dimensional maps from high resolution aerial and/or satellite imagery with the use of holography and but also 3D printing methods. As study area the island of Antiparos was chosen, as there were readily available suitable data. These data were two stereo pairs of Geoeye-1 and a high resolution DTM of the island. Firstly the theoretical bases of holography and 3D printing are described, and the two methods are analyzed and there implementation is explained. In practice a x-axis parallax holographic map of the Antiparos Island is created and a full parallax (x-axis and y-axis) holographic map is created and printed, using the holographic method. Moreover a three dimensional printed map of the study area has been created using 3dp (3d printing) method. The results are evaluated for their usefulness and efficiency.

  16. A High Resolution Scale-of-four

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, V.

    1949-08-25

    A high resolution scale-of-four has been developed to be used in conjunction with the nuclear particle detection devices in applications where the counting rate is unusually high. Specifically, it is intended to precede the commercially available medium resolution scaling circuits and so decrease the resolving time of the counting system. The circuit will function reliably on continuously recurring pulses separated by less than 0.1 microseconds. It will resolve two pulses (occurring at a moderate repetition rate) which are spaced at 0.04 microseconds. A five-volt input signal is sufficient to actuate the device.

  17. SPIRAL2/DESIR high resolution mass separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtukian-Nieto, T., E-mail: kurtukia@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Centre d’Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Baartman, R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver B.C., V6T 2A3 (Canada); Blank, B.; Chiron, T. [Centre d’Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Davids, C. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Delalee, F. [Centre d’Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Duval, M. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); El Abbeir, S.; Fournier, A. [Centre d’Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Lunney, D. [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Université de Paris Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Méot, F. [BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York (United States); Serani, L. [Centre d’Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Stodel, M.-H.; Varenne, F. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); and others

    2013-12-15

    DESIR is the low-energy part of the SPIRAL2 ISOL facility under construction at GANIL. DESIR includes a high-resolution mass separator (HRS) with a designed resolving power m/Δm of 31,000 for a 1 π-mm-mrad beam emittance, obtained using a high-intensity beam cooling device. The proposed design consists of two 90-degree magnetic dipoles, complemented by electrostatic quadrupoles, sextupoles, and a multipole, arranged in a symmetric configuration to minimize aberrations. A detailed description of the design and results of extensive simulations are given.

  18. Fast Backprojection Techniques for High Resolution Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Koshev, Nikolay; Miqueles, Eduardo X

    2016-01-01

    Fast image reconstruction techniques are becoming important with the increasing number of scientific cases in high resolution micro and nano tomography. The processing of the large scale three-dimensional data demands new mathematical tools for the tomographic reconstruction task because of the big computational complexity of most current algorithms as the sizes of tomographic data grow with the development of more powerful acquisition hardware and more refined scientific needs. In the present paper we propose a new fast back-projection operator for the processing of tomographic data and compare it against other fast reconstruction techniques.

  19. High resolution SAR applications and instrument design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, C.; Torre, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has viewed, in the last two years, a huge increment of interest from many preset and potential users. The good spatial resolution associated to the all weather capability lead to considering SAR not only a scientific instrument but a tool for verifying and controlling the daily human relationships with the Earth Environment. New missions were identified for SAR as spatial resolution became lower than three meters: disasters, pollution, ships traffic, volcanic eruptions, earthquake effect are only a few of the possible objects which can be effectively detected, controlled and monitored by SAR mounted on satellites. High resolution radar design constraints and dimensioning are discussed.

  20. A digital instantaneous frequency measurement technique utilising high speed analogue to digital converters and field programmable gate arrays

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, PLR

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In modern information and sensor systems, the timely estimation of the carrier frequency of received signals is of critical importance. This paper presents a digital instantaneous frequency measurement (DIFM) technique, which can measure the carrier...

  1. High-resolution eye tracking using V1 neuron activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, James M.; Bondy, Adrian G.; Cumming, Bruce G.; Butts, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of high-acuity visual cortical processing have been limited by the inability to track eye position with sufficient accuracy to precisely reconstruct the visual stimulus on the retina. As a result, studies on primary visual cortex (V1) have been performed almost entirely on neurons outside the high-resolution central portion of the visual field (the fovea). Here we describe a procedure for inferring eye position using multi-electrode array recordings from V1 coupled with nonlinear stimulus processing models. We show that this method can be used to infer eye position with one arc-minute accuracy – significantly better than conventional techniques. This allows for analysis of foveal stimulus processing, and provides a means to correct for eye-movement induced biases present even outside the fovea. This method could thus reveal critical insights into the role of eye movements in cortical coding, as well as their contribution to measures of cortical variability. PMID:25197783

  2. Automated data processing of high-resolution mass spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Adsetts Edberg; Smedsgaard, Jørn

    There has been an almost explosive growth in performance and applications of Electrospray Ionization (ESI) Time of Flight (TOF) mass spectrometry, which today is one of the most efficient tools for screening of metabolites in complex bio-samples. Most efficiently ESI-MS can be used by directly...... infusion of crude extracts into the source taking advantage of the high sensitivity, high mass resolution and accuracy and the limited fragmentation. Unfortunately, there has not been a comparable development in the data processing techniques to fully exploit gain in high resolution and accuracy...... and mass axis on to a fixed one-dimensional array, we obtain a vector that can be used directly as input in multivariate statistics or library search methods. We demonstrate that both cluster- and discriminant analysis as well as PCA (and related methods) can be applied directly on mass spectra from direct...

  3. High-Resolution Mammography Detector Employing Optical Switching Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irisawa, Kaku; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Yamane, Katsutoshi; Sendai, Tomonari; Hosoi, Yuichi

    Conceiving a new detector structure, FUJIFILM Corporation has successfully put its invention of an X-ray detector employing "Optical Switching" into practical use. Since Optical Switching Technology allows an electrode structure to be easily designed, both high resolution of pixel pitch and low electrical noise readout have been achieved, which have consequently realized the world's smallest pixel size of 50×50 μm2 from a Direct-conversion FPD system as well as high DQE. The digital mammography system equipped with this detector enables to acquire high definition images while maintaining granularity. Its outstanding feature is to be able to acquire high-precision images of microcalcifications which is an important index in breast examination.

  4. Principles of high resolution NMR in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Mehring, Michael

    1983-01-01

    The field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has developed at a fascinating pace during the last decade. It always has been an extremely valuable tool to the organic chemist by supplying molecular "finger print" spectra at the atomic level. Unfortunately the high resolution achievable in liquid solutions could not be obtained in solids and physicists and physical chemists had to live with unresolved lines open to a wealth of curve fitting procedures and a vast amount of speculations. High resolution NMR in solids seemed to be a paradoxon. Broad structure­ less lines are usually encountered when dealing with NMR in solids. Only with the recent advent of mUltiple pulse, magic angle, cross-polarization, two-dimen­ sional and multiple-quantum spectroscopy and other techniques during the last decade it became possible to resolve finer details of nuclear spin interactions in solids. I have felt that graduate students, researchers and others beginning to get involved with these techniques needed a book which trea...

  5. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  6. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  7. A review on high-resolution CMOS delay lines: towards sub-picosecond jitter performance

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulrazzaq, Bilal I.; Abdul Halin, Izhal; Kawahito, Shoji; Sidek, Roslina M.; Shafie, Suhaidi; Yunus, Nurul Amziah Md

    2016-01-01

    A review on CMOS delay lines with a focus on the most frequently used techniques for high-resolution delay step is presented. The primary types, specifications, delay circuits, and operating principles are presented. The delay circuits reported in this paper are used for delaying digital inputs and clock signals. The most common analog and digitally-controlled delay elements topologies are presented, focusing on the main delay-tuning strategies. IC variables, namely, process, supply voltage, ...

  8. Use of high resolution optical and radar imagery for intelligence and situational awareness in urban areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, A.C. van den; Dekker, R.J.; Gutjahr, K.; Raggam, H.

    2007-01-01

    We have used high resolution optical satellite stereo data to generate a digital surface model containing building heights, so that 3-dimensional information is available for the purpose of urban situational awareness. In addition we have applied change detection techniques to Radarsat fine beam ima

  9. All-Digital Wideband Space-Frequency Beamforming for the SKA Aperture Array

    CERN Document Server

    Khlebnikov, Vasily A; Armstrong, Richard P; Jones, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of optimum multi-domain real-time beamforming and high-precision beam pattern positioning in application to very large wideband array antennas, particularly to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) aperture array antenna. We present a new structure for wideband space-frequency beamforming and beamsteering that maximizes detectability of cosmic signals over the array operational frequency range.

  10. High resolution urban morphology data for urban wind flow modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cionco, Ronald M.; Ellefsen, Richard

    The application of urban forestry methods and technologies to a number of practical problems can be further enhanced by the use and incorporation of localized, high resolution wind and temperature fields into their analysis methods. The numerical simulation of these micrometeorological fields will represent the interactions and influences of urban structures, vegetation elements, and variable terrain as an integral part of the dynamics of an urban domain. Detailed information of the natural and man-made components that make up the urban area is needed to more realistically model meteorological fields in urban domains. Simulating high resolution wind and temperatures over and through an urban domain utilizing detailed morphology data can also define and quantify local areas where urban forestry applications can contribute to better solutions. Applications such as the benefits of planting trees for shade purposes can be considered, planned, and evaluated for their impact on conserving energy and cooling costs as well as the possible reconfiguration or removal of trees and other barriers for improved airflow ventilation and similar processes. To generate these fields, a wind model must be provided, as a minimum, the location, type, height, structural silhouette, and surface roughness of these components, in order to account for the presence and effects of these land morphology features upon the ambient airflow. The morphology of Sacramento, CA has been characterized and quantified in considerable detail primarily for wind flow modeling, simulation, and analyses, but can also be used for improved meteorological analyses, urban forestry, urban planning, and other urban related activities. Morphology methods previously developed by Ellefsen are applied to the Sacramento scenario with a high resolution grid of 100 m × 100 m. The Urban Morphology Scheme defines Urban Terrain Zones (UTZ) according to how buildings and other urban elements are structured and placed with

  11. New Jersey 2007 - 2008 High Resolution Orthophotography

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  12. Multidimensional Systolic Arrays of LMS AlgorithmAdaptive (FIR Digital Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakir A. R. Al-Hashemy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A multidimensional systolic arrays realization of LMS algorithm by a method of mapping regular algorithm onto processor array, are designed. They are based on appropriately selected 1-D systolic array filter that depends on the inner product sum systolic implementation. Various arrays may be derived that exhibit a regular arrangement of the cells (processors and local interconnection pattern, which are important for VLSI implementation. It reduces latency time and increases the throughput rate in comparison to classical 1-D systolic arrays. The 3-D multilayered array consists of 2-D layers, which are connected with each other only by edges. Such arrays for LMS-based adaptive (FIR filter may be opposed the fundamental requirements of fast convergence rate in most adaptive filter applications.

  13. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; Eisenhardt, P.; Fowler, J.; Koribalski, B.; Lake, S.; Neill, James D.; Seibert, M.; Stanford, S.; Wright, E.

    2012-01-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 micron, 4.6 micron, 12 micron, and 22 micron. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  15. Speleothems as high-resolution paleoflood archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denniston, Rhawn F.; Luetscher, Marc

    2017-08-01

    Over the last two decades, speleothems have become widely utilized records of past environmental variability, typically through their stable isotopic and trace elemental chemistry. Numerous speleothem researchers have identified evidence of flooding recorded by detrital layers trapped within speleothems, but few studies have developed paleoflood reconstructions from such samples. Because they can be precisely dated, are generally immune to post-depositional distortion or erosion, and can be tied to a fixed elevational baseline, speleothems hold enormous potential as high-resolution archives of cave floods, and thus as proxies for extreme rainfall or other hydrologic drivers of cave flooding. Here we review speleothem-based paleoflood reconstruction methods, identify potential biases and pitfalls, and suggest standard practices for future studies.

  16. High-resolution CT of otosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewen, Yang; Kodama, Takao; Tono, Tetsuya; Ochiai, Reiji; Kiyomizu, Kensuke; Suzuki, Yukiko; Yano, Takanori; Watanabe, Katsushi [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    High-resolution CT (HRCT) scans of thirty-two patients (60 ears) with the clinical diagnosis of fenestral otosclerosis were evaluated retrospectively. HRCT was performed with 1-mm-thick targeted sections and 1-mm (36 ears) or 0.5-mm (10 ears) intervals in the semiaxial projection. Seven patients (14 ears) underwent helical scanning with a 1-mm slice thickness and 1-mm/sec table speed. Forty-five ears (75%) were found to have one or more otospongiotic or otosclerotic foci on HRCT. In most instances (30 ears), the otospongiotic foci were found in the region of the fissula ante fenestram. No significant correlations between CT findings and air conduction threshold were observed. We found a significant relationship between lesions of the labyrinthine capsule and sensorineural hearing loss. We conclude that HRCT is a valuable modality for diagnosing otosclerosis, especially when otospongiotic focus is detected. (author)

  17. High-resolution TOF with RPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonte, P. E-mail: fonte@lipc.fis.uc.pt; Peskov, V

    2002-01-21

    In this work, we describe some recent results concerning the application of Resistive Plate Chambers operated in avalanche mode at atmospheric pressure for high-resolution time-of-flight measurements. A combination of multiple, mechanically accurate, thin gas gaps and state-of-the-art electronics yielded an overall (detector plus electronics) timing accuracy better than 50 ps {sigma} with a detection efficiency up to 99% for MIPs. Single gap chambers were also tested in order to clarify experimentally several aspects of the mode of operation of these detectors. These results open perspectives of affordable and reliable high granularity large area TOF detectors, with an efficiency and time resolution comparable to the existing scintillator-based TOF technology but with a significantly, up to an order of magnitude, lower price per channel.

  18. High resolution studies of massive primordial haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, M A; Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J

    2012-01-01

    Atomic cooling haloes with T_vir > 10^4 K are the most plausible sites for the formation of the first galaxies. In this article, we aim to study the implications of gravity driven turbulence in protogalactic haloes. By varying the resolution per Jeans length, we explore whether the turbulent cascade is resolved well enough to obtain converged results. We have performed high resolution cosmological simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo including a subgrid-scale turbulence model to study the role of unresolved turbulence. We compared the results of three different Jeans resolutions from 16 to 64 cells. While radially averaged profiles roughly agree at different resolutions, differences in the morphology reveal that even the highest resolution employed provides no convergence. Moreover, taking into account unresolved turbulence significantly influences the morphology of a halo. We have quantified the properties of the high-density clumps in the halo. These clumps are gravitationally unbound wi...

  19. GRANULOMETRIC MAPS FROM HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Mering

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method of land cover mapping from satellite images using granulometric analysis is presented here. Discontinuous landscapes such as steppian bushes of semi arid regions and recently growing urban settlements are especially concerned by this study. Spatial organisations of the land cover are quantified by means of the size distribution analysis of the land cover units extracted from high resolution remotely sensed images. A granulometric map is built by automatic classification of every pixel of the image according to the granulometric density inside a sliding neighbourhood. Granulometric mapping brings some advantages over traditional thematic mapping by remote sensing by focusing on fine spatial events and small changes in one peculiar category of the landscape.

  20. High resolution CT of Meckel's cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, M; Tucker, W; Hudson, A; Bayer, N

    1985-01-01

    High resolution CT of the parasellar region was carried out in 50 patients studied for suspected pituitary microadenoma, but who showed normal pituitary gland or microadenoma on CT. This control group of patients all showed an ellipsoid low-density area in the posterior parasellar region. Knowledge of the gross anatomy and correlation with metrizamide cisternography suggest that the low density region represents Meckel's cave, rather than just the trigeminal ganglion alone. Though there is considerable variation in the size of Meckel's cave in different patients as well as the two sides of the same patient, the rather constant ellipsoid configuration of the cave in normal subjects will aid in diagnosing small pathological lesions, thereby obviating more invasive cisternography via the transovale or lumbar route. Patients with "idiopathic" tic douloureux do not show a Meckel's cave significantly different from the control group.

  1. Venus gravity - A high-resolution map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasenberg, R. D.; Goldberg, Z. M.; Macneil, P. E.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1981-01-01

    The Doppler data from the radio tracking of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) have been used in a two-stage analysis to develop a high-resolution map of the gravitational potential of Venus, represented by a central mass and a surface mass density. The two-stage procedure invokes a Kalman filter-smoother to determine the orbit of the spacecraft, and a stabilized linear inverter to estimate the surface mass density. The resultant gravity map is highly correlated with the topographic map derived from the PVO radar altimeter data. However, the magnitudes of the gravity variations are smaller than would be expected if the topography were uncompensated, indicating that at least partial compensation has taken place.

  2. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jang-Ung; Hardy, Matt; Kang, Seong Jun; Barton, Kira; Adair, Kurt; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore; Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S.; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Georgiadis, John G.; Ferreira, Placid M.; Rogers, John A.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts to adapt and extend graphic arts printing techniques for demanding device applications in electronics, biotechnology and microelectromechanical systems have grown rapidly in recent years. Here, we describe the use of electrohydrodynamically induced fluid flows through fine microcapillary nozzles for jet printing of patterns and functional devices with submicrometre resolution. Key aspects of the physics of this approach, which has some features in common with related but comparatively low-resolution techniques for graphic arts, are revealed through direct high-speed imaging of the droplet formation processes. Printing of complex patterns of inks, ranging from insulating and conducting polymers, to solution suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and rods, to single-walled carbon nanotubes, using integrated computer-controlled printer systems illustrates some of the capabilities. High-resolution printed metal interconnects, electrodes and probing pads for representative circuit patterns and functional transistors with critical dimensions as small as 1μm demonstrate potential applications in printed electronics.

  3. Georadar - high resolution geophysical electromagnetic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Stern

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Georadar is a high resolution geophysical electromagnetic device that was developed in the first part of the 1980's. In Slovenia it was first tested in 1991 on several objects of economicgeological, geotechnical and hydrogeologic nature.Here its usefulness in karst studied is presented. The first part of the paper deals with description of measurement procedure and methodological bases, and the second part with experience and results of case histories. Shown are radargrams from ornamental stone quarry Hotavlje, calcite mine Stahovica, Golobja jama karstcave near Divača and from highway construction site Razdrto-Čebulovica. All measurements were performed with the georadar instrument Pulse EKKO IV with a lOOMHz antenna according to the method of reflection profiling.

  4. High-Resolution Movement EEG Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Štastný

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the contribution is to analyze possibilities of high-resolution movement classification using human EEG. For this purpose, a database of the EEG recorded during right-thumb and little-finger fast flexion movements of the experimental subjects was created. The statistical analysis of the EEG was done on the subject's basis instead of the commonly used grand averaging. Statistically significant differences between the EEG accompanying movements of both fingers were found, extending the results of other so far published works. The classifier based on hidden Markov models was able to distinguish between movement and resting states (classification score of 94–100%, but it was unable to recognize the type of the movement. This is caused by the large fraction of other (nonmovement related EEG activities in the recorded signals. A classification method based on advanced EEG signal denoising is being currently developed to overcome this problem.

  5. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  6. High-resolution transcriptome of human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Beyer

    Full Text Available Macrophages are dynamic cells integrating signals from their microenvironment to develop specific functional responses. Although, microarray-based transcriptional profiling has established transcriptional reprogramming as an important mechanism for signal integration and cell function of macrophages, current knowledge on transcriptional regulation of human macrophages is far from complete. To discover novel marker genes, an area of great need particularly in human macrophage biology but also to generate a much more thorough transcriptome of human M1- and M1-like macrophages, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq of human macrophages. Using this approach we can now provide a high-resolution transcriptome profile of human macrophages under classical (M1-like and alternative (M2-like polarization conditions and demonstrate a dynamic range exceeding observations obtained by previous technologies, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the transcriptome of human macrophages. Using this approach, we identify important gene clusters so far not appreciated by standard microarray techniques. In addition, we were able to detect differential promoter usage, alternative transcription start sites, and different coding sequences for 57 gene loci in human macrophages. Moreover, this approach led to the identification of novel M1-associated (CD120b, TLR2, SLAMF7 as well as M2-associated (CD1a, CD1b, CD93, CD226 cell surface markers. Taken together, these data support that high-resolution transcriptome profiling of human macrophages by RNA-seq leads to a better understanding of macrophage function and will form the basis for a better characterization of macrophages in human health and disease.

  7. A digital output accelerometer using MEMS-based piezoelectric accelerometers and arrayed CMOS inverters with satellite capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T.; Okada, H.; Masuda, T.; Maeda, R.; Itoh, T.

    2011-06-01

    The present paper describes the development of a digital output accelerometer composed of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-based piezoelectric accelerometers and arrayed complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) inverters accompanied by capacitors. The piezoelectric accelerometers were fabricated from multilayers of Pt/Ti/PZT/Pt/Ti/SiO2 deposited on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. The fabricated piezoelectric accelerometers were connected to arrayed CMOS inverters. Each of the CMOS inverters was accompanied by a capacitor with a different capacitance called a 'satellite capacitor'. We have confirmed that the output voltage generated from the piezoelectric accelerometers can vary the output of the CMOS inverters from a high to a low level; the state of the CMOS inverters has turned from the 'off-state' into the 'on-state' when the output voltage of the piezoelectric accelerometers is larger than the threshold voltage of the CMOS inverters. We have also confirmed that the CMOS inverters accompanied by the larger satellite capacitor have become 'on-state' at a lower acceleration. On increasing the acceleration, the number of on-state CMOS inverters has increased. Assuming that the on-state and off-state of CMOS inverters correspond to logic '0' and '1', the present digital output accelerometers have expressed the accelerations of 2.0, 3.0, 5.0, and 5.5 m s - 2 as digital outputs of 111, 110, 100, and 000, respectively.

  8. A New, Adaptable, Optical High-Resolution 3-Axis Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Buchhold

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new optical, multi-functional, high-resolution 3-axis sensor which serves to navigate and can, for example, replace standard joysticks in medical devices such as electric wheelchairs, surgical robots or medical diagnosis devices. A light source, e.g., a laser diode, is affixed to a movable axis and projects a random geometric shape on an image sensor (CMOS or CCD. The downstream microcontroller’s software identifies the geometric shape’s center, distortion and size, and then calculates x, y, and z coordinates, which can be processed in attached devices. Depending on the image sensor in use (e.g., 6.41 megapixels, the 3-axis sensor features a resolution of 1544 digits from right to left and 1038 digits up and down. Through interpolation, these values rise by a factor of 100. A unique feature is the exact reproducibility (deflection to coordinates and its precise ability to return to its neutral position. Moreover, optical signal processing provides a high level of protection against electromagnetic and radio frequency interference. The sensor is adaptive and adjustable to fit a user’s range of motion (stroke and force. This recommendation aims to optimize sensor systems such as joysticks in medical devices in terms of safety, ease of use, and adaptability.

  9. A New, Adaptable, Optical High-Resolution 3-Axis Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhold, Niels; Baumgartner, Christian

    2017-01-27

    This article presents a new optical, multi-functional, high-resolution 3-axis sensor which serves to navigate and can, for example, replace standard joysticks in medical devices such as electric wheelchairs, surgical robots or medical diagnosis devices. A light source, e.g., a laser diode, is affixed to a movable axis and projects a random geometric shape on an image sensor (CMOS or CCD). The downstream microcontroller's software identifies the geometric shape's center, distortion and size, and then calculates x, y, and z coordinates, which can be processed in attached devices. Depending on the image sensor in use (e.g., 6.41 megapixels), the 3-axis sensor features a resolution of 1544 digits from right to left and 1038 digits up and down. Through interpolation, these values rise by a factor of 100. A unique feature is the exact reproducibility (deflection to coordinates) and its precise ability to return to its neutral position. Moreover, optical signal processing provides a high level of protection against electromagnetic and radio frequency interference. The sensor is adaptive and adjustable to fit a user's range of motion (stroke and force). This recommendation aims to optimize sensor systems such as joysticks in medical devices in terms of safety, ease of use, and adaptability.

  10. A New, Adaptable, Optical High-Resolution 3-Axis Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhold, Niels; Baumgartner, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a new optical, multi-functional, high-resolution 3-axis sensor which serves to navigate and can, for example, replace standard joysticks in medical devices such as electric wheelchairs, surgical robots or medical diagnosis devices. A light source, e.g., a laser diode, is affixed to a movable axis and projects a random geometric shape on an image sensor (CMOS or CCD). The downstream microcontroller’s software identifies the geometric shape’s center, distortion and size, and then calculates x, y, and z coordinates, which can be processed in attached devices. Depending on the image sensor in use (e.g., 6.41 megapixels), the 3-axis sensor features a resolution of 1544 digits from right to left and 1038 digits up and down. Through interpolation, these values rise by a factor of 100. A unique feature is the exact reproducibility (deflection to coordinates) and its precise ability to return to its neutral position. Moreover, optical signal processing provides a high level of protection against electromagnetic and radio frequency interference. The sensor is adaptive and adjustable to fit a user’s range of motion (stroke and force). This recommendation aims to optimize sensor systems such as joysticks in medical devices in terms of safety, ease of use, and adaptability. PMID:28134824

  11. Evaluating large scale orthophotos derived from high resolution satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Maria Teresa; Georgopoulos, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    For the purposes of a research project, for the compilation of the archaeological and environmental digital map of the island of Antiparos, the production of updated large scale orthophotos was required. Hence suitable stereoscopic high resolution satellite imagery was acquired. Two Geoeye-1 stereopairs were enough to cover this small island of the Cyclades complex in the central Aegean. For the orientation of the two stereopairs numerous ground control points were determined using GPS observations. Some of them would also serve as check points. The images were processed using commercial stereophotogrammetric software suitable to process satellite stereoscopic imagery. The results of the orientations are evaluated and the digital terrain model was produced using automated and manual procedures. The DTM was checked both internally and externally with comparison to other available DTMs. In this paper the procedures for producing the desired orthophotography are critically presented and the final result is compared and evaluated for its accuracy, completeness and efficiency. The final product is also compared against the orthophotography produced by Ktimatologio S.A. using aerial images in 2007. The orthophotography produced has been evaluated metrically using the available check points, while qualitative evaluation has also been performed. The results are presented and a critical approach for the usability of satellite imagery for the production of large scale orthophotos is attempted.

  12. A new high-resolution electromagnetic method for subsurface imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wanjie

    For most electromagnetic (EM) geophysical systems, the contamination of primary fields on secondary fields ultimately limits the capability of the controlled-source EM methods. Null coupling techniques were proposed to solve this problem. However, the small orientation errors in the null coupling systems greatly restrict the applications of these systems. Another problem encountered by most EM systems is the surface interference and geologic noise, which sometimes make the geophysical survey impossible to carry out. In order to solve these problems, the alternating target antenna coupling (ATAC) method was introduced, which greatly removed the influence of the primary field and reduced the surface interference. But this system has limitations on the maximum transmitter moment that can be used. The differential target antenna coupling (DTAC) method was proposed to allow much larger transmitter moments and at the same time maintain the advantages of the ATAC method. In this dissertation, first, the theoretical DTAC calculations were derived mathematically using Born and Wolf's complex magnetic vector. 1D layered and 2D blocked earth models were used to demonstrate that the DTAC method has no responses for 1D and 2D structures. Analytical studies of the plate model influenced by conductive and resistive backgrounds were presented to explain the physical phenomenology behind the DTAC method, which is the magnetic fields of the subsurface targets are required to be frequency dependent. Then, the advantages of the DTAC method, e.g., high-resolution, reducing the geologic noise and insensitive to surface interference, were analyzed using surface and subsurface numerical examples in the EMGIMA software. Next, the theoretical advantages, such as high resolution and insensitive to surface interference, were verified by designing and developing a low-power (moment of 50 Am 2) vertical-array DTAC system and testing it on controlled targets and scaled target coils. At last, a

  13. Image speculative: the new concept for obtaining digital terrain model with orbital color image high resolution (0,5m) - innovation, speed, accuracy and cost reduction; Imagem especulativa: um novo conceito para obtencao de modelo digital do terreno a partir de imagem orbital colorida de alta resolucao (0,5m) - inovacao, velocidade, precisao e reducao de custos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Bruno Nogueira da [R3 Engenharia, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: bruno.costa@r3engenharia.com.br

    2011-10-15

    In this article the reader will find methodology created to generate a geographic database from the use of remote sensing technology, which represents the minimization of time and cost savings in the production of inventory studies and basic design of Small Hydroelectric (HCP). In addition, you can evaluate the methods used to generate this basis that rely on the use of stereoscopic pairs of images from high resolution satellite and achievements, particularly in relation to the spatial resolution and accuracy of data generated. You can also check the timing of delivery of a database for a consulting firm active in the market of PCH and comparison with other technologies used to acquire spatial data such as aerial photogrammetric. (author)

  14. Study of fish response using particle image velocimetry and high-speed, high-resolution imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gruensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Fish swimming has fascinated both engineers and fish biologists for decades. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging are recently developed analysis tools that can help engineers and biologists better understand how fish respond to turbulent environments. This report details studies to evaluate DPIV. The studies included a review of existing literature on DPIV, preliminary studies to test the feasibility of using DPIV conducted at our Flow Biology Laboratory in Richland, Washington September through December 2003, and applications of high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging with advanced motion analysis to investigations of fish injury mechanisms in turbulent shear flows and bead trajectories in laboratory physical models. Several conclusions were drawn based on these studies, which are summarized as recommendations for proposed research at the end of this report.

  15. A DFB Fiber Laser Sensor System with Ultra-High Resolution and Its Noise Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Xiao; Fang Li; Jun He; Yu-Liang Liu

    2008-01-01

    A distributed feedback fiber laser (DFB FL) sensor system with ultra-high resolution is described. The sensor is made by writing distributed feedback structures into a high gain active fiber, and the system employs an unbalanced Michelson interferometer to translate laser wavelength shifts induced by weak measurands into phase shifts. A digital phase generated carrier demodulation scheme is introduced to achieve ultra-high resolution interrogation. A detailed noise analysis of the system is presented, and it is shown that the system resolution is limited by the frequency noise of the DFB FL.

  16. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We propose to design and build the first imaging hard X-ray detector system that incorporates 3D stacking of closely packed detector readouts in finely-spaced imaging arrays with their required data processing and control electronics. In virtually all imaging astronomical detectors, detector readout is done with flex connectors or connections that are not vertical but rather horizontal , requiring loss of focal plane area. For high resolution pixel detectors needed for high speed event-based X-ray imaging, from low energy applications (CMOS) with focusing X-ray telescopes, to hard X-ray applications with pixelated CZT for large area coded aperture telescopes, this new detector development offers great promise. We propose to extend our previous and current APRA supported ProtoEXIST program that has developed the first large area imaging CZT detectors and demonstrated their astrophysical capabilities on two successful balloon flight to a next generation High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI), which would incorporate microvia technology for the first time to connect the readout ASIC on each CZT crystal directly to its control and data processing system. This 3-dimensional stacking of detector and readout/control system means that large area (>2m2) imaging detector planes for a High Resolution Wide-field hard X-ray telescope can be built with initially greatly reduced detector gaps and ultimately with no gaps. This increases detector area, efficiency, and simplicity of detector integration. Thus higher sensitivity wide-field imagers will be possible at lower cost. HREXI will enable a post-Swift NASA mission such as the EREXS concept proposed to PCOS to be conducted as a future MIDEX mission. This mission would conduct a high resolution (<2 arcmin) , broad band (5 200 keV) hard X-ray survey of black holes on all scales with ~10X higher sensitivity than Swift. In the current era of Time Domain Astrophysics, such a survey capability, in conjunction with a n

  17. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hau, Ionel Dragos [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on 6LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, α) reactions with fast neutrons in 6Li and 10B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies kBT on the order of μeV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution ΔE ~ (kBT2C)1/2, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB2 absorber using thermal neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in 7Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a 6Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the 6Li(n, α)3H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  18. COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF VERY HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE AND AERIAL ORTHOIMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Agrafiotis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to assess the accuracy and radiometric quality of orthorectified high resolution satellite imagery from Pleiades-1B satellites through a comparative evaluation of their quantitative and qualitative properties. A Pleiades-B1 stereopair of high resolution images taken in 2013, two adjacent GeoEye-1 stereopairs from 2011 and aerial orthomosaic (LSO provided by NCMA S.A (Hellenic Cadastre from 2007 have been used for the comparison tests. As control dataset orthomosaic from aerial imagery provided also by NCMA S.A (0.25m GSD from 2012 was selected. The process for DSM and orthoimage production was performed using commercial digital photogrammetric workstations. The two resulting orthoimages and the aerial orthomosaic (LSO were relatively and absolutely evaluated for their quantitative and qualitative properties. Test measurements were performed using the same check points in order to establish their accuracy both as far as the single point coordinates as well as their distances are concerned. Check points were distributed according to JRC Guidelines for Best Practice and Quality Checking of Ortho Imagery and NSSDA standards while areas with different terrain relief and land cover were also included. The tests performed were based also on JRC and NSSDA accuracy standards. Finally, tests were carried out in order to assess the radiometric quality of the orthoimagery. The results are presented with a statistical analysis and they are evaluated in order to present the merits and demerits of the imaging sensors involved for orthoimage production. The results also serve for a critical approach for the usability and cost efficiency of satellite imagery for the production of Large Scale Orthophotos.

  19. Comparative Assessment of Very High Resolution Satellite and Aerial Orthoimagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrafiotis, P.; Georgopoulos, A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims to assess the accuracy and radiometric quality of orthorectified high resolution satellite imagery from Pleiades-1B satellites through a comparative evaluation of their quantitative and qualitative properties. A Pleiades-B1 stereopair of high resolution images taken in 2013, two adjacent GeoEye-1 stereopairs from 2011 and aerial orthomosaic (LSO) provided by NCMA S.A (Hellenic Cadastre) from 2007 have been used for the comparison tests. As control dataset orthomosaic from aerial imagery provided also by NCMA S.A (0.25m GSD) from 2012 was selected. The process for DSM and orthoimage production was performed using commercial digital photogrammetric workstations. The two resulting orthoimages and the aerial orthomosaic (LSO) were relatively and absolutely evaluated for their quantitative and qualitative properties. Test measurements were performed using the same check points in order to establish their accuracy both as far as the single point coordinates as well as their distances are concerned. Check points were distributed according to JRC Guidelines for Best Practice and Quality Checking of Ortho Imagery and NSSDA standards while areas with different terrain relief and land cover were also included. The tests performed were based also on JRC and NSSDA accuracy standards. Finally, tests were carried out in order to assess the radiometric quality of the orthoimagery. The results are presented with a statistical analysis and they are evaluated in order to present the merits and demerits of the imaging sensors involved for orthoimage production. The results also serve for a critical approach for the usability and cost efficiency of satellite imagery for the production of Large Scale Orthophotos.

  20. [INVITED] Laser-induced forward transfer: A high resolution additive manufacturing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaporte, Philippe; Alloncle, Anne-Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Among the additive manufacturing techniques, laser-induced forward transfer addresses the challenges of printing thin films in solid phase or small volume droplets in liquid phase with very high resolution. This paper reviews the physics of this process and explores the pros and cons of this technology versus other digital printing technologies. The main field of applications are printed electronics, organic electronics and tissue engineering, and the most promising short terms ones concern digital laser printing of sensors and conductive tracks. Future directions and emerging areas of interest are discussed such as printing solid from a liquid phase and 3D digital nanomanufacturing.

  1. 3D-Information Fusion from Very High Resolution Satellite Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Krauss, T; P. d'Angelo; G. Kuschk; Tian, J.; T. Partovi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we show the pre-processing and potential for environmental applications of very high resolution (VHR) satellite stereo imagery like these from WorldView-2 or Pl´eiades with ground sampling distances (GSD) of half a metre to a metre. To process such data first a dense digital surface model (DSM) has to be generated. Afterwards from this a digital terrain model (DTM) representing the ground and a so called normalized digital elevation model (nDEM) representing off-ground ...

  2. High resolution infrared acquisitions droning over the LUSI mud eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Felice, Fabio; Romeo, Giovanni; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Mazzini, Adriano

    2016-04-01

    The use of low-cost hand-held infrared (IR) thermal cameras based on uncooled micro-bolometer detector arrays became more widespread during the recent years. Thermal cameras have the ability to estimate temperature values without contact and therefore can be used in circumstances where objects are difficult or dangerous to reach such as volcanic eruptions. Since May 2006 the Indonesian LUSI mud eruption continues to spew boiling mud, water, aqueous vapor, CO2, CH4 and covers a surface of nearly 7 km2. At this locality we performed surveys over the unreachable erupting crater. In the framework of the LUSI Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126), in 2014 and 2015, we acquired high resolution infrared images using a specifically equipped remote-controlled drone flying at an altitude of m 100. The drone is equipped with GPS and an autopilot system that allows pre-programming the flying path or designing grids. The mounted thermal camera has peak spectral sensitivity in LW wavelength (μm 10) that is characterized by low water vapor and CO2 absorption. The low distance (high resolution) acquisitions have a temperature detail every cm 40, therefore it is possible to detect and observe physical phenomena such as thermodynamic behavior, hot mud and fluids emissions locations and their time shifts. Despite the harsh logistics and the continuously varying gas concentrations we managed to collect thermal images to estimate the crater zone spatial thermal variations. We applied atmosphere corrections to calculate infrared absorption by high concentration of water vapor. Thousands of images have been stitched together to obtain a mosaic of the crater zone. Regular monitoring with heat variation measurements collected, e.g. every six months, could give important information about the volcano activity estimating its evolution. A future data base of infrared high resolution and visible images stored in a web server could be a useful monitoring tool. An interesting development will be

  3. High resolution modelling of extreme precipitation events in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemerink, Martijn; Volp, Nicolette; Schuurmans, Wytze; Deckers, Dave

    2015-04-01

    The present day society needs to adjust to the effects of climate change. More extreme weather conditions are expected, which can lead to longer periods of drought, but also to more extreme precipitation events. Urban water systems are not designed for such extreme events. Most sewer systems are not able to drain the excessive storm water, causing urban flooding. This leads to high economic damage. In order to take appropriate measures against extreme urban storms, detailed knowledge about the behaviour of the urban water system above and below the streets is required. To investigate the behaviour of urban water systems during extreme precipitation events new assessment tools are necessary. These tools should provide a detailed and integral description of the flow in the full domain of overland runoff, sewer flow, surface water flow and groundwater flow. We developed a new assessment tool, called 3Di, which provides detailed insight in the urban water system. This tool is based on a new numerical methodology that can accurately deal with the interaction between overland runoff, sewer flow and surface water flow. A one-dimensional model for the sewer system and open channel flow is fully coupled to a two-dimensional depth-averaged model that simulates the overland flow. The tool uses a subgrid-based approach in order to take high resolution information of the sewer system and of the terrain into account [1, 2]. The combination of using the high resolution information and the subgrid based approach results in an accurate and efficient modelling tool. It is now possible to simulate entire urban water systems using extreme high resolution (0.5m x 0.5m) terrain data in combination with a detailed sewer and surface water network representation. The new tool has been tested in several Dutch cities, such as Rotterdam, Amsterdam and The Hague. We will present the results of an extreme precipitation event in the city of Schiedam (The Netherlands). This city deals with

  4. A Search for Radio Gravitational Lenses, Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Very Large Array

    CERN Document Server

    Boyce, E R; Bolton, A S; Hewitt, J N; Burles, S; Boyce, Edward R.; Bowman, Judd D.; Bolton, Adam S.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Burles, Scott

    2006-01-01

    We report on a novel search for radio gravitational lenses. Using the Very Large Array, we imaged ten candidates with both dual redshifts in Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra and 1.4 GHz radio flux >2 mJy in the FIRST survey. The VLA maps show that in each case the radio emission is associated with the foreground galaxy rather than being lensed emission from the background galaxy, although at least four of our targets are strong lenses at optical wavelengths. These SDSS dual-redshift systems do not have lensed radio emission at the sensitivity of current radio surveys.

  5. Preliminary Clinical Studies Using A Self Scanning Lineak Diode Array To Obtain 1024 X 1024 Digital Radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashin, Donald; Slasky, B. Simon; Sternglass, Ernest J.; Bron, Klaus M.; Herron, John M.; Kennedy, William H.; Boyer, Joseph W.; Girdany, Bertram R.; Simpson, Raymond W.; Horton, Joseph A.

    1984-08-01

    A digital radiography system using self scanning linear diode arrays is being developed for improved diagnosis at reduced radiation dose. Our technique is based on the use of solid state sensors with 1024 diodes per inch and with very high dynamic range. The slit geometry of our method results in image improvement and dose reduction by efficiently rejecting scattered x-rays in the patient. In our present configuration the images have a field of view of six inches by six inches or 6 inches by 12 inches and are digitized to 1024 x 1024 pixels with 12 bits. This digital system differs from the conventional digital radiography in that no image intensifier TV fluoroscopy chain is required. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated the high detail of our system at low radiation levels. In dog studies the system has clearly visualized very small coronary arteries following aortic root injection of contrast material. Even with intravenous injections some of the coronary arteries could be seen.

  6. Logging Data High-Resolution Sequence Stratigraphy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hongqi; Xie Yinfu; Sun Zhongchun; Luo Xingping

    2006-01-01

    The recognition and contrast of bed sets in parasequence is difficult in terrestrial basin high-resolution sequence stratigraphy. This study puts forward new methods for the boundary identification and contrast of bed sets on the basis of manifold logging data. The formation of calcareous interbeds, shale resistivity differences and the relation of reservoir resistivity to altitude are considered on the basis of log curve morphological characteristics, core observation, cast thin section, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the thickness of calcareous interbeds is between 0.5 m and 2 m, increasing on weathering crusts and faults. Calcareous interbeds occur at the bottom of Reservoir resistivity increases with altitude. Calcareous interbeds may be a symbol of recognition for the boundary of bed sets and isochronous contrast bed sets, and shale resistivity differences may confirm the stack relation and connectivity of bed sets. Based on this, a high-rcsolution chronostratigraphic framework of Xi-1 segment in Shinan area, Junggar basin is presented, and the connectivity of bed sets and oil-water contact is confirmed. In this chronostratigraphic framework, the growth order, stack mode and space shape of bed sets are qualitatively and quantitatively described.

  7. High Resolution Measurement of the Glycolytic Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Carla X.; Loaiza, Anitsi; Ruminot, Iván; Larenas, Valeria; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Gutiérrez, Robin; Córdova, Alex; Valdebenito, Rocío; Frommer, Wolf B.; Barros, L. Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The glycolytic rate is sensitive to physiological activity, hormones, stress, aging, and malignant transformation. Standard techniques to measure the glycolytic rate are based on radioactive isotopes, are not able to resolve single cells and have poor temporal resolution, limitations that hamper the study of energy metabolism in the brain and other organs. A new method is described in this article, which makes use of a recently developed FRET glucose nanosensor to measure the rate of glycolysis in single cells with high temporal resolution. Used in cultured astrocytes, the method showed for the first time that glycolysis can be activated within seconds by a combination of glutamate and K+, supporting a role for astrocytes in neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling in the brain. It was also possible to make a direct comparison of metabolism in neurons and astrocytes lying in close proximity, paving the way to a high-resolution characterization of brain energy metabolism. Single-cell glycolytic rates were also measured in fibroblasts, adipocytes, myoblasts, and tumor cells, showing higher rates for undifferentiated cells and significant metabolic heterogeneity within cell types. This method should facilitate the investigation of tissue metabolism at the single-cell level and is readily adaptable for high-throughput analysis. PMID:20890447

  8. High resolution measurement of the glycolytic rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla X Bittner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The glycolytic rate is sensitive to physiological activity, hormones, stress, aging and malignant transformation. Standard techniques to measure the glycolytic rate are based on radioactive isotopes, are not able to resolve single cells and have poor temporal resolution, limitations that hamper the study of energy metabolism in the brain and other organs. A new method is described in this article, which makes use of a recently-developed FRET glucose nanosensor to measure the rate of glycolysis in single cells with high temporal resolution. Used in cultured astrocytes, the method showed for the first time that glycolysis can be activated within seconds by a combination of glutamate and K+, supporting a role for astrocytes in neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling in the brain. It was also possible to make a direct comparison of metabolism in neurons and astrocytes lying in close proximity, paving the way to a high-resolution characterization of brain energy metabolism. Single-cell glycolytic rates were also measured in fibroblasts, adipocytes, myoblasts and tumor cells, showing higher rates for undifferentiated cells and significant metabolic heterogeneity within cell types. This method should facilitate the investigation of tissue metabolism at the single-cell level and is readily adaptable for high-throughput analysis.

  9. Radiation length imaging with high resolution telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Stolzenberg, U; Schwenker, B; Wieduwilt, P; Marinas, C; Lütticke, F

    2016-01-01

    The construction of low mass vertex detectors with a high level of system integration is of great interest for next generation collider experiments. Radiation length images with a sufficient spatial resolution can be used to measure and disentangle complex radiation length $X$/$X_0$ profiles and contribute to the understanding of vertex detector systems. Test beam experiments with multi GeV particle beams and high-resolution tracking telescopes provide an opportunity to obtain precise 2D images of the radiation length of thin planar objects. At the heart of the $X$/$X_0$ imaging is a spatially resolved measurement of the scattering angles of particles traversing the object under study. The main challenges are the alignment of the reference telescope and the calibration of its angular resolution. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of $X$/$X_0$ imaging, a test beam experiment has been conducted. The devices under test were two mechanical prototype modules of the Belle II vertex detector. A data sample of ...

  10. High-resolution light microscopy of nanoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Pustovyy, Oleg; Vainrub, Arnold

    2007-09-01

    We developed a high resolution light imaging system. Diffraction gratings with 100 nm width lines as well as less than 100 nm size features of different-shaped objects are clearly visible on a calibrated microscope test slide (Vainrub et al., Optics Letters, 2006, 31, 2855). The two-point resolution increase results from a known narrowing of the central diffraction peak for the annular aperture. Better visibility and advanced contrast of the smallest features in the image are due to enhancement of high spatial frequencies in the optical transfer function. The imaging system is portable, low energy, and battery operated. It has been adapted to use in both transmitting and reflecting light. It is particularly applicable for motile nanoform systems where structure and functions can be depicted in real time. We have isolated micrometer and submicrometer particles, termed proteons, from human and animal blood. Proteons form by reversible seeded aggregation of proteins around proteon nucleating centers (PNCs). PNCs are comprised of 1-2nm metallic nanoclusters containing 40-300 atoms. Proteons are capable of spontaneous assembling into higher nanoform systems assuming structure of complicated topology. The arrangement of complex proteon system mimics the structure of a small biological cell. It has structures that imitate membrane and nucleolus or nuclei. Some of these nanoforms are motile. They interact and divide. Complex nanoform systems can spontaneously reduce to simple proteons. The physical properties of these nanoforms could shed some light on the properties of early life forms or forms at extreme conditions.

  11. High resolution CT of temporal bone trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Eun Kyung [Korea General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-10-15

    Radiographic studies of the temporal bone following head trauma are indicated when there is cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea or rhinorrhoea, hearing loss, or facial nerve paralysis. Plain radiography displays only 17-30% of temporal bone fractures and pluridirectional tomography is both difficult to perform, particularly in the acutely ill patient, and less satisfactory for the demonstration of fine fractures. Consequently, high resolution CT is the imaging method of choice for the investigation of suspected temporal bone trauma and allows special resolution of fine bony detail comparable to that attainable by conventional tomography. Eight cases of temporal bone trauma examined at Korea General Hospital April 1985 through May 1986. The results were as follows: Seven patients (87%) suffered longitudinal fractures. In 6 patients who had purely conductive hearing loss, CT revealed various ossicular chain abnormality. In one patient who had neuro sensory hearing loss, CT demonstrated intract ossicular with a fracture nearing lateral wall of the lateral semicircular canal. In one patient who had mixed hearing loss, CT showed complex fracture.

  12. Automatic abundance analysis of high resolution spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifacio, P; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Caffau, Elisabetta

    2003-01-01

    We describe an automatic procedure for determining abundances from high resolution spectra. Such procedures are becoming increasingly important as large amounts of data are delivered from 8m telescopes and their high-multiplexing fiber facilities, such as FLAMES on ESO-VLT. The present procedure is specifically targeted for the analysis of spectra of giants in the Sgr dSph; however, the procedure may be, in principle, tailored to analyse stars of any type. Emphasis is placed on the algorithms and on the stability of the method; the external accuracy rests, ultimately, on the reliability of the theoretical models (model-atmospheres, synthetic spectra) used to interpret the data. Comparison of the results of the procedure with the results of a traditional analysis for 12 Sgr giants shows that abundances accurate at the level of 0.2 dex, comparable with that of traditional analysis of the same spectra, may be derived in a fast and efficient way. Such automatic procedures are not meant to replace the traditional ...

  13. Holographic high-resolution endoscopic image recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1991-03-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help

  14. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  15. Supporting observation campaigns with high resolution modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Daniel; Brueck, Matthias; Voigt, Aiko

    2017-04-01

    High resolution simulation in support of measurement campaigns offers a promising and emerging way to create large-scale context for small-scale observations of clouds and precipitation processes. As these simulation include the coupling of measured small-scale processes with the circulation, they also help to integrate the research communities from modeling and observations and allow for detailed model evaluations against dedicated observations. In connection with the measurement campaign NARVAL (August 2016 and December 2013) simulations with a grid-spacing of 2.5 km for the tropical Atlantic region (9000x3300 km), with local refinement to 1.2 km for the western part of the domain, were performed using the icosahedral non-hydrostatic (ICON) general circulation model. These simulations are again used to drive large eddy resolving simulations with the same model for selected days in the high definition clouds and precipitation for advancing climate prediction (HD(CP)2) project. The simulations are presented with the focus on selected results showing the benefit for the scientific communities doing atmospheric measurements and numerical modeling of climate and weather. Additionally, an outlook will be given on how similar simulations will support the NAWDEX measurement campaign in the North Atlantic and AC3 measurement campaign in the Arctic.

  16. Laser wavelength comparison by high resolution interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, H P; Deslattes, R D; Schweitzer, W G

    1976-03-01

    High resolution interferometry has been used to determine the wavelength ratio between two molecularly stabilized He-Ne lasers, one locked to a methane absorption at 3.39 microm and the other locked to the k peak of (129)I(2) at 633 nm. An optical beat frequency technique gave fractional orders while a microwave sideband method yielded the integer parts. Conventional (third derivative) peak seeking servoes stabilized both laser and cavity lengths. Reproducibility of the electronic control system and optics was a few parts in 10(12), while systematic errors associated with curvature of the cavity mirrors limited the accuracy of the wavelength ratio measurement to 2 parts in 10(10). The measured wavelength ratio of the methane stabilized He-Ne laser at 3.39 microm [P(7) line, nu(3) band] to the (129)I(2) (k peak) stabilized He-Ne laser at 633 nm was 5.359 049 260 6 (0.000 2 ppm). This ratio agrees with that calculated from the (lower accuracy) results of earlier wavelength measurements made relative to the (86)Kr standard. Its higher accuracy thus permits a provisional extension of the frequency scale based on the cesium oscillator into the visible spectrum.

  17. High resolution imaging detectors and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Swapan K

    2015-01-01

    Interferometric observations need snapshots of very high time resolution of the order of (i) frame integration of about 100 Hz or (ii) photon-recording rates of several megahertz (MHz). Detectors play a key role in astronomical observations, and since the explanation of the photoelectric effect by Albert Einstein, the technology has evolved rather fast. The present-day technology has made it possible to develop large-format complementary metal oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled device (CCD) array mosaics, orthogonal transfer CCDs, electron-multiplication CCDs, electron-avalanche photodiode arrays, and quantum-well infrared (IR) photon detectors. The requirements to develop artifact-free photon shot noise-limited images are higher sensitivity and quantum efficiency, reduced noise that includes dark current, read-out and amplifier noise, smaller point-spread functions, and higher spectral bandwidth. This book aims to address such systems, technologies and design, evaluation and calibration, control...

  18. Test definitions for the evaluation of digital waveform recorders.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kromer, Richard Paul (R.P. Kromer Consulting, Albuquerque, NM); Hart, Darren M.; Harris, James Mark

    2007-07-01

    This Test Definition for the Evaluation of Digitizing Waveform Recorders (DWR) defines the process that can be performed as part of the evaluation and testing of geophysical sensors, digitizers, sensor subsystems and geophysical station/array systems. The objectives are to (1) evaluate the overall technical performance of the DWR, measure the distortions introduced by the high resolution digitizers and provide a performance check of the internal calibrator if provided and (2) evaluate the technical performance of the DWR for a specific sensor application. The results of these evaluations can be compared to the manufacturer's specifications and any relevant application requirements or specifications.

  19. WAHRSIS: A Low-cost, High-resolution Whole Sky Imager With Near-Infrared Capabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, Soumyabrata; Lee, Yee Hui; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Cloud imaging using ground-based whole sky imagers is essential for a fine-grained understanding of the effects of cloud formations, which can be useful in many applications. Some such imagers are available commercially, but their cost is relatively high, and their flexibility is limited. Therefore, we built a new daytime Whole Sky Imager (WSI) called Wide Angle High-Resolution Sky Imaging System. The strengths of our new design are its simplicity, low manufacturing cost and high resolution. Our imager captures the entire hemisphere in a single high-resolution picture via a digital camera using a fish-eye lens. The camera was modified to capture light across the visible as well as the near-infrared spectral ranges. This paper describes the design of the device as well as the geometric and radiometric calibration of the imaging system.

  20. Frequency division multiplexed microwave and baseband digital optical fiber link for phased array antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Peter J.; McClay, C. Phillip

    1990-05-01

    A frequency-division multiplexed optical fiber link is described in which microwave (1-8 GHz) and baseband digital (1-10 Mb/s) signals are combined electrically and transmitted through a direct-modulation microwave optical link. The microwave signal does not affect bit error rate (BER) performance of the Manchester-coded baseband digital data link. The baseband digital signal affects microwave signal quality by generating second-order intermodulation noise. The intermodulation noise power density is found to be proportional to both the microwave input power and the digital input power, enabling the system to be modeled as a mixer (AM modulator). The conversion loss for the digital signal is approximately 68 dB for a 1-GHz microwave signal and is highly dependent on the microwave frequency, reaching a minimum value of 41 dB at 4.5 GHz, corresponding to the laser diode relaxation oscillation frequency. It is shown that Manchester coding on the digital link places the intermodulation noise peak away from the microwave signal, preventing degradation of close-carrier phase noise (<1 kHz offset). A direct trade-off between intermodulation noise and digital link margin is developed to project system performance.

  1. High Resolution Real Time Sonography of the Thyroid Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Honarbakhsh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: High-resolution sonography equipment permits for visualization of normal and abnormal thyroid gland with or without gel pad or water bath. This study prospectively presents surgically and pathologically proved patients with thyroid disease by direct ultrasound with or without Doppler (pulse, color, power Doppler."nPatients and Methods: This study was performed by 7.5-10 MHz frequency linear probe transducer with axial resolution of 0.7mm and lateral resolution of 1-2 mm (Aloka 650 and super SG 140 Toshiba unit assembly with color, power Doppler. Patient's neck was extended as a supine position."nResults: Pathologic proof was obtained in 45 patients with benign and five patients with malignant thyroid disease. Benign lesions were follicular adenoma in 30 patients, goiter in 10 patients, as hashimoto thyroiditis in two patients, hemorrhagic cyst in two patients and simple cyst in one patient. Malignant lesions were follicular, papillary, and medulary carcinoma which seen in two, two, and one patients respectively. Echopatterns were as follow: Most of them showed decreades echo when we compare to normal thyroid tissue, some malignant lesions showed increased echo and some isoecho, in the last group we need other work up for example Doppler (pulse, color, power for evaluation vascularity. We did not have metastasis to thyroid gland."nConclusion: With advace in technology in crystal and design overall probe as a result creat broadband width probe and also full digital sonography unit inclding (beam forming - CPU in images resolution is with high grade than semi digital unit that before used for thytoid gland. When With any reason resolution is increased we sould be able to diagnosed very small and smallest lesion (for example mest to thyroid or reccurency after total Lobectomy: there is three primay uses of sonography, 1 detection of mutionodular gland when only one nodule is suspected clinically and by isotop scan.2 High

  2. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  3. High-resolution downscaling for hydrological management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Uwe; Rust, Henning; Meredith, Edmund; Kpogo-Nuwoklo, Komlan; Vagenas, Christos

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological modellers and water managers require high-resolution climate data to model regional hydrologies and how these may respond to future changes in the large-scale climate. The ability to successfully model such changes and, by extension, critical infrastructure planning is often impeded by a lack of suitable climate data. This typically takes the form of too-coarse data from climate models, which are not sufficiently detailed in either space or time to be able to support water management decisions and hydrological research. BINGO (Bringing INnovation in onGOing water management; ) aims to bridge the gap between the needs of hydrological modellers and planners, and the currently available range of climate data, with the overarching aim of providing adaptation strategies for climate change-related challenges. Producing the kilometre- and sub-daily-scale climate data needed by hydrologists through continuous simulations is generally computationally infeasible. To circumvent this hurdle, we adopt a two-pronged approach involving (1) selective dynamical downscaling and (2) conditional stochastic weather generators, with the former presented here. We take an event-based approach to downscaling in order to achieve the kilometre-scale input needed by hydrological modellers. Computational expenses are minimized by identifying extremal weather patterns for each BINGO research site in lower-resolution simulations and then only downscaling to the kilometre-scale (convection permitting) those events during which such patterns occur. Here we (1) outline the methodology behind the selection of the events, and (2) compare the modelled precipitation distribution and variability (preconditioned on the extremal weather patterns) with that found in observations.

  4. High-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Esther; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Bowman, Brett; Schwientek, Patrick; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Gies, Esther; Hallam, Steve; Tringe, Susannah; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The representation of bacterial and archaeal genome sequences is strongly biased towards cultivated organisms, which belong to merely four phylogenetic groups. Functional information and inter-phylum level relationships are still largely underexplored for candidate phyla, which are often referred to as microbial dark matter. Furthermore, a large portion of the 16S rRNA gene records in the GenBank database are labeled as environmental samples and unclassified, which is in part due to low read accuracy, potential chimeric sequences produced during PCR amplifications and the low resolution of short amplicons. In order to improve the phylogenetic classification of novel species and advance our knowledge of the ecosystem function of uncultivated microorganisms, high-throughput full length 16S rRNA gene sequencing methodologies with reduced biases are needed. We evaluated the performance of PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing in high-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling. For this purpose, we compared PacBio and Illumina metagenomic shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of a mock community as well as of an environmental sample from Sakinaw Lake, British Columbia. Sakinaw Lake is known to contain a large age of microbial species from candidate phyla. Sequencing results show that community structure based on PacBio shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequences is highly similar in both the mock and the environmental communities. Resolution power and community representation accuracy from SMRT sequencing data appeared to be independent of GC content of microbial genomes and was higher when compared to Illumina-based metagenome shotgun and 16S rRNA gene (iTag) sequences, e.g. full-length sequencing resolved all 23 OTUs in the mock community, while iTags did not resolve closely related species. SMRT sequencing hence offers various potential benefits when characterizing uncharted microbial communities.

  5. Low-power Broadband Digitizer for Millimeter-Wave Sensor Array Readout Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Multiplexing in frequency domain using a bank of high-Q micro-resonators is an emerging method of reading out large arrays of transition-edge sensors and...

  6. Updating Object for GIS Database Information Using High Resolution Satellite Images: a Case Study Zonguldak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, M.; Arca, D.; Bayik, Ç.; Marangoz, A. M.

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays Geographic Information Systems (GIS) uses Remote Sensing (RS) data for a lot of applications. One of the application areas is the updating of the GIS database using high resolution imagery. In this context high resolution satellite imagery data is very important for many applications areas today's and future. And also, high resolution satellite imagery data will be used in many applications for different purposes. Information systems needs to high resolution imagery data for updating. Updating is very important component for the any of the GIS systems. One of this area will be updated and kept alive GIS database information. High resolution satellite imagery is used with different data base which serve map information via internet and different aims of information systems applications in future topographic and cartographic information systems will very important in our country in this sense use of the satellite images will be unavoidable. In this study explain to how is acquired to satellite images and how is use this images in information systems for object and roads. Firstly, pan-sharpened two of the IKONOS's images have been produced by fusion of high resolution PAN and MS images using PCI Geomatica v9.1 software package. Automatic object extraction has been made using eCognition v4.0.6. On the other hand, these objects have been manually digitized from high resolution images using ArcGIS v9.3. software package. Application section of in this study, satellite images data will be compared each other and GIS objects and road database. It is also determined which data is useful in Geographic Information Systems. Finally, this article explains that integration of remote sensing technology and GIS applications.

  7. An experimental study of the scatter correction by using a beam-stop-array algorithm with digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ye-Seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, Jae-Gu [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a technique that was developed to overcome the limitations of conventional digital mammography by reconstructing slices through the breast from projections acquired at different angles. In developing and optimizing DBT, The x-ray scatter reduction technique remains a significant challenge due to projection geometry and radiation dose limitations. The most common approach to scatter reduction is a beam-stop-array (BSA) algorithm; however, this method raises concerns regarding the additional exposure involved in acquiring the scatter distribution. The compressed breast is roughly symmetric, and the scatter profiles from projections acquired at axially opposite angles are similar to mirror images. The purpose of this study was to apply the BSA algorithm with only two scans with a beam stop array, which estimates the scatter distribution with minimum additional exposure. The results of the scatter correction with angular interpolation were comparable to those of the scatter correction with all scatter distributions at each angle. The exposure increase was less than 13%. This study demonstrated the influence of the scatter correction obtained by using the BSA algorithm with minimum exposure, which indicates its potential for practical applications.

  8. An advanced distributed automated extraction of drainage network model on high-resolution DEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Y.; Ye, A.; Xu, J.; Ma, F.; Deng, X.; Miao, C.; Gong, W.; Di, Z.

    2014-07-01

    A high-resolution and high-accuracy drainage network map is a prerequisite for simulating the water cycle in land surface hydrological models. The objective of this study was to develop a new automated extraction of drainage network model, which can get high-precision continuous drainage network on high-resolution DEM (Digital Elevation Model). The high-resolution DEM need too much computer resources to extract drainage network. The conventional GIS method often can not complete to calculate on high-resolution DEM of big basins, because the number of grids is too large. In order to decrease the computation time, an advanced distributed automated extraction of drainage network model (Adam) was proposed in the study. The Adam model has two features: (1) searching upward from outlet of basin instead of sink filling, (2) dividing sub-basins on low-resolution DEM, and then extracting drainage network on sub-basins of high-resolution DEM. The case study used elevation data of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) at 3 arc-second resolution in Zhujiang River basin, China. The results show Adam model can dramatically reduce the computation time. The extracting drainage network was continuous and more accurate than HydroSHEDS (Hydrological data and maps based on Shuttle Elevation Derivatives at multiple Scales).

  9. Discrete cosine transform based high-resolution image reconstruction considering the inaccurate subpixel motion information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min K.; Lee, Eun S.; Park, Jin Y.; Kang, Moon Gi; Kim, Jaihie

    2002-02-01

    The demand for high-resolution images is gradually increasing, whereas many imaging systems have been designed to enable a certain level of aliasing during image acquisition. In this sense, digital image processing approaches have recently been investigated to reconstruct a high-resolution image from aliased low-resolution images. However, since the subpixel motion information is assumed to be accurate in most conventional approaches, the satisfactory high-resolution image cannot be obtained when the subpixel motion information is inaccurate. Hence, we propose a new algorithm to reduce the distortion in the reconstructed high-resolution image due to the inaccuracy of subpixel motion information. For this purpose, we analyze the effect of inaccurate subpixel motion information on a high-resolution image reconstruction, and model it as zero-mean additive Gaussian errors added respectively to each low- resolution image. To reduce the distortion, we apply the modified multichannel image deconvolution approach to the problem. The validity of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally.

  10. High Resolution Airborne Shallow Water Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbacher, F.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Aufleger, M.; Ullrich, A.

    2012-07-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperation with the Bavarian Water Authority (WWA Weilheim) a pilot project was initiated by the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck and RIEGL Laser Measurement Systems exploiting the possibilities of a new LIDAR measurement system with high spatial resolution and high measurement rate to capture about 70 km of riverbed and foreland for the river Loisach in Bavaria/Germany and the estuary and parts of the shoreline (about 40km in length) of lake Ammersee. The entire area surveyed was referenced to classic terrestrial cross-section surveys with the aim to derive products for the monitoring and managing needs of the inland water bodies forced by the EU-WFD. The survey was performed in July 2011 by helicopter and airplane and took 3 days in total. In addition, high resolution areal images were taken to provide an optical reference, offering a wide range of possibilities on further research, monitoring, and managing responsibilities. The operating altitude was about 500 m to maintain eye-safety, even for the aided eye, the airspeed was about 55 kts for the helicopter and 75 kts for the aircraft. The helicopter was used in the alpine regions while the fixed wing aircraft was used in the plains and the urban area, using appropriate scan rates to receive evenly distributed point clouds. The resulting point density ranged from 10 to 25 points per square meter. By carefully selecting days with optimum water quality, satisfactory penetration down to the river bed was achieved

  11. High-resolution MRI encoding using radiofrequency phase gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jonathan C; King, Scott B; Deng, Qunli; Volotovskyy, Vyacheslav; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2013-11-01

    Although MRI offers highly diagnostic medical imagery, patient access to this modality worldwide is very limited when compared with X-ray or ultrasound. One reason for this is the expense and complexity of the equipment used to generate the switched magnetic fields necessary for MRI encoding. These field gradients are also responsible for intense acoustic noise and have the potential to induce nerve stimulation. We present results with a new MRI encoding principle which operates entirely without the use of conventional B0 field gradients. This new approach--'Transmit Array Spatial Encoding' (TRASE)--uses only the resonant radiofrequency (RF) field to produce Fourier spatial encoding equivalent to conventional MRI. k-space traversal (image encoding) is achieved by spin refocusing with phase gradient transmit fields in spin echo trains. A transmit coil array, driven by just a single transmitter channel, was constructed to produce four phase gradient fields, which allows the encoding of two orthogonal spatial axes. High-resolution two-dimensional-encoded in vivo MR images of hand and wrist were obtained at 0.2 T. TRASE exploits RF field phase gradients, and offers the possibility of very low-cost diagnostics and novel experiments exploiting unique capabilities, such as imaging without disturbance of the main B0 magnetic field. Lower field imaging (imaging are favorable application domains as, in both cases, it is technically easier to achieve the short RF pulses desirable for long echo trains, and also to limit RF power deposition. As TRASE is simply an alternative mechanism (and technology) of moving through k space, there are many close analogies between it and conventional B0 -encoded techniques. TRASE is compatible with both B0 gradient encoding and parallel imaging, and so hybrid sequences containing all three spatial encoding approaches are possible.

  12. Understanding reconstructed Dante spectra using high resolution spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Weaver, J.; Widmann, K.; Kemp, G. E.; Thorn, D.; Colvin, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Moore, A.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-11-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel filtered diode array used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux between 50 eV and 20 keV from various targets. The absolute flux is determined from the radiometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters, and mirrors and a reconstruction algorithm applied to the recorded voltages from each channel. The reconstructed spectra are very low resolution with features consistent with the instrument response and are not necessarily consistent with the spectral emission features from the plasma. Errors may exist between the reconstructed spectra and the actual emission features due to assumptions in the algorithm. Recently, a high resolution convex crystal spectrometer, VIRGIL, has been installed at NIF with the same line of sight as the Dante. Spectra from L-shell Ag and Xe have been recorded by both VIRGIL and Dante. Comparisons of these two spectroscopic measurements yield insights into the accuracy of the Dante reconstructions.

  13. Understanding reconstructed Dante spectra using high resolution spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, M. J., E-mail: may13@llnl.gov; Widmann, K.; Kemp, G. E.; Thorn, D.; Colvin, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Moore, A.; Blue, B. E. [L-170 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Weaver, J. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Dante is an 18 channel filtered diode array used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux between 50 eV and 20 keV from various targets. The absolute flux is determined from the radiometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters, and mirrors and a reconstruction algorithm applied to the recorded voltages from each channel. The reconstructed spectra are very low resolution with features consistent with the instrument response and are not necessarily consistent with the spectral emission features from the plasma. Errors may exist between the reconstructed spectra and the actual emission features due to assumptions in the algorithm. Recently, a high resolution convex crystal spectrometer, VIRGIL, has been installed at NIF with the same line of sight as the Dante. Spectra from L-shell Ag and Xe have been recorded by both VIRGIL and Dante. Comparisons of these two spectroscopic measurements yield insights into the accuracy of the Dante reconstructions.

  14. High-Resolution Observations of a Binary Black Hole Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chao-Wei; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Jarrett, Thomas; Emonts, Bjorn; Cluver, Michelle; Eisenhardt, Peter; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto

    2012-10-01

    We propose a 12-hour 2.3 GHz continuum Long Baseline Array (LBA) observation of WISE J2332-5056, a newly discovered supermassive black hole (SMBH) merger candidate that is located in the nearby universe (z = 0.3447). Our recently acquired 9 GHz ATCA map shows unusual radio morphology: a one-sided, smaller (and likely younger) FR-I jet perpendicular to a larger, Doppler-boosted FR-II jet. Follow-up Gemini-S/GMOS spectroscopy of this WISE-selected radio galaxy reveals broad emission lines blue-shifted by > 3,500 km/s with respect to the narrow lines and host galaxy, hallmarks of a dual AGN system. Combined, the optical spectroscopy and radio morphology of this object are strongly suggestive of a black hole merger system. Even in the local universe these systems are extremely difficult to identify; yet the process of supermassive blackhole growth is vital toward understanding galaxy evolution from the early to the current universe. Moreover, nearby merging SMBHs may serve as outstanding targets for gravitational wave studies. The proposed high resolution LBA map, reaching 50 pc resolution at the source redshift will allow us to investigate the SMBH merger scenario hypothesis.

  15. Development of a high resolution module for PET scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringhini, G.; Pizzichemi, M.; Ghezzi, A.; Stojkovic, A.; Tavernier, S.; Niknejad, T.; Varela, J.; Paganoni, M.; Auffray, E.

    2017-02-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners require high performances in term of spatial resolution and sensitivity to allow early detection of cancer masses. In small animal and organ dedicated PET scanners the Depth of Interaction (DOI) information has to be obtained to avoid parallax errors and to reconstruct high resolution images. In the whole body PET, the DOI information can be useful to correct for the time jitter of the optical photons along the main axis of the scintillator, improving the time performances. In this work we present the development of PET module designed to reach high performance as compared to the current scanners while keeping the complexity of the system reasonably low. The module presented is based on a 64 LYSO (Lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate) crystals matrix and on a 4×4 MPPC (Multi Pixels Photon Counter) array as detector in a 4 to 1 coupling between the crystals and the detector and a single side readout. The lateral surfaces of the crystals are optically treated to be unpolished. The DOI and the energy resolution of the PET module are presented and a fast method to obtain the DOI calibration is discussed.

  16. High-resolution ultrasonic thermometer for radiation dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyarenko, Eugene V; Heyman, Joseph S; Chen-Mayer, H Heather; Tosh, Ronald E

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes recent developments in the area of high-precision ultrasonic thermometry with the potential to provide on-site direct determination of radiation doses administered for cancer treatment. Conventional calorimeters used for this purpose measure radiation-induced heating in a water phantom at one point in space by means of immersed thermistors and are subject to various thermal disturbances due to Ohmic heating and interactions of the radiation with the sensor probes. By contrast, the method described here is based on a high-resolution ultrasonic system that determines the change of the speed of sound due to small temperature changes in an acoustic propagation path in the radiation-heated water, thereby avoiding such undesired thermal effects. The thermometer is able to measure tens of microkelvin changes in the water temperature averaged over the acoustic path of about 60 cm at room temperature, with root-mean-squared noise of about 5 microK. Both incandescent and ionizing radiation heating data are presented for analog and digital implementations of a laboratory prototype. This application of the ultrasonic technique opens up possibilities for a new approach to performing therapy-level radiation dosimetry for medical clinics and standards laboratories.

  17. Depth of interaction resolution measurements for a high resolution PET detector using position sensitive avalanche photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongfeng; Dokhale, Purushottam A; Silverman, Robert W; Shah, Kanai S; McClish, Mickel A; Farrell, Richard; Entine, Gerald; Cherry, Simon R

    2006-05-07

    We explore dual-ended read out of LSO arrays with two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) as a high resolution, high efficiency depth-encoding detector for PET applications. Flood histograms, energy resolution and depth of interaction (DOI) resolution were measured for unpolished LSO arrays with individual crystal sizes of 1.0, 1.3 and 1.5 mm, and for a polished LSO array with 1.3 mm pixels. The thickness of the crystal arrays was 20 mm. Good flood histograms were obtained for all four arrays, and crystals in all four arrays can be clearly resolved. Although the amplitude of each PSAPD signal decreases as the interaction depth moves further from the PSAPD, the sum of the two PSAPD signals is essentially constant with irradiation depth for all four arrays. The energy resolutions were similar for all four arrays, ranging from 14.7% to 15.4%. A DOI resolution of 3-4 mm (including the width of the irradiation band which is approximately 2 mm) was obtained for all the unpolished arrays. The best DOI resolution was achieved with the unpolished 1 mm array (average 3.5 mm). The DOI resolution for the 1.3 mm and 1.5 mm unpolished arrays was 3.7 and 4.0 mm respectively. For the polished array, the DOI resolution was only 16.5 mm. Summing the DOI profiles across all crystals for the 1 mm array only degraded the DOI resolution from 3.5 mm to 3.9 mm, indicating that it may not be necessary to calibrate the DOI response separately for each crystal within an array. The DOI response of individual crystals in the array confirms this finding. These results provide a detailed characterization of the DOI response of these PSAPD-based PET detectors which will be important in the design and calibration of a PET scanner making use of this detector approach.

  18. Commissioning and Characterization of a Dedicated High-Resolution Breast PET Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    project consists of many detector modules formed by coupling pairs of high resolution scintillation crystal arrays to position sensitive avalanche...completed part of the camera. Two panels with each 8 layers of 16 dual modules can be seen. A water cooled heatsink is visible as well. Flat Flexible...mounted to using a miniature screw. These fins conduct the produced heat ( about 3 mW per fin ) to the edge of the detector panels . A thermoelectric

  19. Low-Speed ADC Sampling Based High-Resolution Compressive Channel Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Gui, Guan; Kuang, Aihua; Wang, Ling

    2012-01-01

    Broadband channel is often characterized by a sparse multipath channel where dominant multipath taps are widely separated in time, thereby resulting in a large delay spread. Traditionally, accurate channel estimation is done by sampling received signal by analog-to-digital converter (ADC) at Nyquist rate (high-speed ADC sampling) and then estimate all channel taps with high-resolution. However, traditional linear estimation methods have two mainly disadvantages: 1) demand of the high-speed AD...

  20. High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Rubén; García, Ricardo; Schwarz, Udo

    2009-07-01

    original papers authored by many of the leading groups in the field with the goal of providing a well-balanced overview on the state-of-the-art in this rapidly evolving field. These papers, many of which are based on notable presentations given during the Madrid conference, feature highlights such as (1) the development of sophisticated force spectroscopy procedures that are able to map the complete 3D tip-sample force field on different surfaces; (2) the considerable resolution improvement of Kelvin probe force microscopy (reaching, in some cases, the atomic scale), which is accompanied by a thorough, quantitative understanding of the contrast observed; (3) the perfecting of atomic resolution imaging on insulating substrates, which helps reshape our microscopic understanding of surface properties and chemical activity of these surfaces; (4) the description of instrumental and methodological developments that pave the way to the atomic-scale characterization of magnetic and electronic properties of nanostructures, and last but not least (5) the extension of dynamic imaging modes to high-resolution operation in liquids, ultimately achieving atomic resolution. The latter developments are already having a significant impact in the highly competitive field of biological imaging under physiological conditions. This special issue of Nanotechnology would not have been possible without the highly professional support from Nina Couzin, Amy Harvey, Alex Wotherspoon and the entire Nanotechnology team at IOP Publishing. We are thankful for their help in pushing this project forward. We also thank the authors who have contributed their excellent original articles to this issue, the referees whose comments have helped make the issue an accurate portrait of this rapidly moving field, and the entire NC-AFM community that continues to drive NC-AFM to new horizons.