WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-resolution 3d photoacoustic

  1. 3D noninvasive, high-resolution imaging using a photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system and rapid wavelength-cycling lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Gross, Daniel; Klosner, Marc; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-05-01

    Globally, cancer is a major health issue as advances in modern medicine continue to extend the human life span. Breast cancer ranks second as a cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) provides high molecular contrast at greater depths in tissue without the use of ionizing radiation. In this work, we describe the development of a PA tomography (PAT) system and a rapid wavelength-cycling Alexandrite laser designed for clinical PAI applications. The laser produces 450 mJ/pulse at 25 Hz to illuminate the entire breast, which eliminates the need to scan the laser source. Wavelength cycling provides a pulse sequence in which the output wavelength repeatedly alternates between 755 nm and 797 nm rapidly within milliseconds. We present imaging results of breast phantoms with inclusions of different sizes at varying depths, obtained with this laser source, a 5-MHz 128-element transducer and a 128-channel Verasonics system. Results include PA images and 3D reconstruction of the breast phantom at 755 and 797 nm, delineating the inclusions that mimic tumors in the breast.

  2. Accelerated high-resolution photoacoustic tomography via compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arridge, Simon; Beard, Paul; Betcke, Marta; Cox, Ben; Huynh, Nam; Lucka, Felix; Ogunlade, Olumide; Zhang, Edward

    2016-12-21

    Current 3D photoacoustic tomography (PAT) systems offer either high image quality or high frame rates but are not able to deliver high spatial and temporal resolution simultaneously, which limits their ability to image dynamic processes in living tissue (4D PAT). A particular example is the planar Fabry-Pérot (FP) photoacoustic scanner, which yields high-resolution 3D images but takes several minutes to sequentially map the incident photoacoustic field on the 2D sensor plane, point-by-point. However, as the spatio-temporal complexity of many absorbing tissue structures is rather low, the data recorded in such a conventional, regularly sampled fashion is often highly redundant. We demonstrate that combining model-based, variational image reconstruction methods using spatial sparsity constraints with the development of novel PAT acquisition systems capable of sub-sampling the acoustic wave field can dramatically increase the acquisition speed while maintaining a good spatial resolution: first, we describe and model two general spatial sub-sampling schemes. Then, we discuss how to implement them using the FP interferometer and demonstrate the potential of these novel compressed sensing PAT devices through simulated data from a realistic numerical phantom and through measured data from a dynamic experimental phantom as well as from in vivo experiments. Our results show that images with good spatial resolution and contrast can be obtained from highly sub-sampled PAT data if variational image reconstruction techniques that describe the tissues structures with suitable sparsity-constraints are used. In particular, we examine the use of total variation (TV) regularization enhanced by Bregman iterations. These novel reconstruction strategies offer new opportunities to dramatically increase the acquisition speed of photoacoustic scanners that employ point-by-point sequential scanning as well as reducing the channel count of parallelized schemes that use detector arrays.

  3. Accelerated high-resolution photoacoustic tomography via compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arridge, Simon; Beard, Paul; Betcke, Marta; Cox, Ben; Huynh, Nam; Lucka, Felix; Ogunlade, Olumide; Zhang, Edward

    2016-12-01

    Current 3D photoacoustic tomography (PAT) systems offer either high image quality or high frame rates but are not able to deliver high spatial and temporal resolution simultaneously, which limits their ability to image dynamic processes in living tissue (4D PAT). A particular example is the planar Fabry-Pérot (FP) photoacoustic scanner, which yields high-resolution 3D images but takes several minutes to sequentially map the incident photoacoustic field on the 2D sensor plane, point-by-point. However, as the spatio-temporal complexity of many absorbing tissue structures is rather low, the data recorded in such a conventional, regularly sampled fashion is often highly redundant. We demonstrate that combining model-based, variational image reconstruction methods using spatial sparsity constraints with the development of novel PAT acquisition systems capable of sub-sampling the acoustic wave field can dramatically increase the acquisition speed while maintaining a good spatial resolution: first, we describe and model two general spatial sub-sampling schemes. Then, we discuss how to implement them using the FP interferometer and demonstrate the potential of these novel compressed sensing PAT devices through simulated data from a realistic numerical phantom and through measured data from a dynamic experimental phantom as well as from in vivo experiments. Our results show that images with good spatial resolution and contrast can be obtained from highly sub-sampled PAT data if variational image reconstruction techniques that describe the tissues structures with suitable sparsity-constraints are used. In particular, we examine the use of total variation (TV) regularization enhanced by Bregman iterations. These novel reconstruction strategies offer new opportunities to dramatically increase the acquisition speed of photoacoustic scanners that employ point-by-point sequential scanning as well as reducing the channel count of parallelized schemes that use detector arrays.

  4. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Strohm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  5. Calibration of a High Resolution Airborne 3-D SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Grinder-Pedersen, Jan; Madsen, S.N.

    1997-01-01

    The potential of across-track interferometric (XTI) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for producing high resolution 3D imagery has been demonstrated by several airborne systems including EMISAR, the dual frequency, polarimetric, and interferometric SAR developed at the Dept. of Electromagnetic Systems...

  6. High resolution 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagliardi, Frank M., E-mail: frank.gagliardi@wbrc.org.au [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia and School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia); Cornelius, Iwan [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Blencowe, Anton [Division of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, The University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia and Division of Information Technology, Engineering and the Environment, Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Franich, Rick D. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Geso, Moshi [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) techniques are under investigation at synchrotrons worldwide. Favourable outcomes from animal and cell culture studies have proven the efficacy of MRT. The aim of MRT researchers currently is to progress to human clinical trials in the near future. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the high resolution and 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams in PRESAGE® dosimeters using laser fluorescence confocal microscopy. Methods: Water equivalent PRESAGE® dosimeters were fabricated and irradiated with microbeams on the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Microbeam arrays comprised of microbeams 25–50 μm wide with 200 or 400 μm peak-to-peak spacing were delivered as single, cross-fire, multidirectional, and interspersed arrays. Imaging of the dosimeters was performed using a NIKON A1 laser fluorescence confocal microscope. Results: The spatial fractionation of the MRT beams was clearly visible in 2D and up to 9 mm in depth. Individual microbeams were easily resolved with the full width at half maximum of microbeams measured on images with resolutions of as low as 0.09 μm/pixel. Profiles obtained demonstrated the change of the peak-to-valley dose ratio for interspersed MRT microbeam arrays and subtle variations in the sample positioning by the sample stage goniometer were measured. Conclusions: Laser fluorescence confocal microscopy of MRT irradiated PRESAGE® dosimeters has been validated in this study as a high resolution imaging tool for the independent spatial and geometrical verification of MRT beam delivery.

  7. High Resolution 3D Radar Imaging of Comet Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Gim, Y.; Belton, M.; Brophy, J.; Weissman, P. R.; Heggy, E.

    2012-12-01

    Knowing the interiors of comets and other primitive bodies is fundamental to our understanding of how planets formed. We have developed a Discovery-class mission formulation, Comet Radar Explorer (CORE), based on the use of previously flown planetary radar sounding techniques, with the goal of obtaining high resolution 3D images of the interior of a small primitive body. We focus on the Jupiter-Family Comets (JFCs) as these are among the most primitive bodies reachable by spacecraft. Scattered in from far beyond Neptune, they are ultimate targets of a cryogenic sample return mission according to the Decadal Survey. Other suitable targets include primitive NEOs, Main Belt Comets, and Jupiter Trojans. The approach is optimal for small icy bodies ~3-20 km diameter with spin periods faster than about 12 hours, since (a) navigation is relatively easy, (b) radar penetration is global for decameter wavelengths, and (c) repeated overlapping ground tracks are obtained. The science mission can be as short as ~1 month for a fast-rotating JFC. Bodies smaller than ~1 km can be globally imaged, but the navigation solutions are less accurate and the relative resolution is coarse. Larger comets are more interesting, but radar signal is unlikely to be reflected from depths greater than ~10 km. So, JFCs are excellent targets for a variety of reasons. We furthermore focus on the use of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) to rendezvous shortly after the comet's perihelion. This approach leaves us with ample power for science operations under dormant conditions beyond ~2-3 AU. This leads to a natural mission approach of distant observation, followed by closer inspection, terminated by a dedicated radar mapping orbit. Radar reflections are obtained from a polar orbit about the icy nucleus, which spins underneath. Echoes are obtained from a sounder operating at dual frequencies 5 and 15 MHz, with 1 and 10 MHz bandwidths respectively. The dense network of echoes is used to obtain global 3D

  8. Photoacoustic 3D visualization of tumor angiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brinke, G.A.; Kolkman, R.G.M.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; McAleavey, Stephen A.; D'hooge, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is used to obtain a range of three-dimensional images representing tumor neovascularization over a 10-day period after subcutaneous inoculation of pancreatic tumor cells in a rat. The images are reconstructed from data measured with a double-ring photoacoustic detector. The

  9. High resolution functional photoacoustic tomography of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaoqi; Yao, Lei; Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei, E-mail: hjiang@bme.ufl.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Heldermon, Coy D. [Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of functional photoacoustic tomography (fPAT) for high resolution detection and characterization of breast cancer and to demonstrate for the first time quantitative hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation images of breasts that were formed with model-based reconstruction of tomographic photoacoustic data. Methods: The study was HIPAA compliant and was approved by the university institutional review board. Written informed consents were obtained from all the participants. Ten cases, including six cancer and four healthy (mean age = 50 yr; age range = 41–66 yr), were examined. Functional images of breast tissue including absolute total hemoglobin concentration (Hb{sub T}) and oxygen saturation (StO{sub 2}%) were obtained by fPAT and cross validated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) readings and/or histopathology. Results: Hb{sub T} and StO{sub 2}% maps from all six pathology-confirmed cancer cases (60%) show clear detection of tumor, while MR images indicate clear detection of tumor for five of six cancer cases; one small tumor was read as near-complete-resolution by MRI. The average Hb{sub T} and StO{sub 2}% value of suspicious lesion area for the cancer cases was 61.6 ± 18.9 μM/l and 67.5% ± 5.2% compared to 25.6 ± 7.4 μM/l and 65.2% ± 3.8% for background normal tissue. Conclusions: fPAT has the potential to be a significant add-on in breast cancer detection and characterization as it provides submillimeter resolution functional images of breast lesions.

  10. Model based learning for accelerated, limited-view 3D photoacoustic tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Hauptmann, Andreas; Lucka, Felix; Betcke, Marta; Huynh, Nam; Cox, Ben; Beard, Paul; Ourselin, Sebastien; Arridge, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in deep learning for tomographic reconstructions have shown great potential to create accurate and high quality images with a considerable speed-up. In this work we present a deep neural network that is specifically designed to provide high resolution 3D images from restricted photoacoustic measurements. The network is designed to represent an iterative scheme and incorporates gradient information of the data fit to compensate for limited view artefacts. Due to the high comple...

  11. CSpace high-resolution volumetric 3D display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refai, Hakki H.; Melnik, George; Willner, Mark

    2013-05-01

    We are currently in the process of developing a static-volume 3D display, CSpace® display, that has the capability to produce images of much larger size than any other static-volume display currently under development, with up to nearly 800 million voxel resolution. A key component in achieving the size and resolution of the display is the optical system that transfers the pixel data from a standard DMD projection unit to the voxel size required by the display with high contrast and minimal distortion. The current optical system is capable of such performance for only small image sizes, and thus new designs of the optical system must be developed. We report here on the design and testing of a new optical projection system with the intent of achieving performance close to that of a telecentric lens. Theoretical analysis with Zemax allowed selection of appropriate lens size, spacing, and focal length, and identified the need for tilting the assembly to produce the desired beam properties. Experimental analysis using the CSpace® prototype showed that the improved beam parameters allowed for higher resolution and brighter images than those previously achieved, though their remains room for further improvement of the design. Heating of the DMD and its housing components were also addressed to minimize heating effects on the optical system. A combination of a thermo-electric cooler and a small fan produced sufficient cooling to stabilize the temperature of the system to acceptable levels.

  12. High resolution 3D seismic survey off-shore the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeghs, P.; Vandeweijer, V.P.; Meekes, J.A.C.; Paap, B.F.; Kleine, M.P.E. de

    2014-01-01

    TNO has carried out a high resolution 3D seismic survey off-shore Rotterdam. The new deployment concept that was tested with this survey results in high-quality 3D images of the shallow subsurface at relatively low cost, particularly in comparison with conventional 3D seismic data acquisition.

  13. Ultra-compact, High Resolution, LADAR system for 3D Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SiWave proposes to develop an innovative, ultra-compact, high resolution, long range LADAR system to produce a 3D map of the exterior of any object in space such as...

  14. Two-stage automated measurement process for high-resolution 3D digitization of unknown objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaszewski, M; Stępień, M; Sitnik, R

    2016-10-10

    In this paper, a process for high-resolution, automated 3D digitization of unknown objects (i.e., without any digital model) is presented. The process has two stages-the first leads to a coarse 3D digital model of the object, and the second obtains the final model. A rough model, acquired by a 3D measurement head with a large working volume and relatively low resolution, is used to calculate the precise head positions required for the full digitization of the object, as well as collision detection and avoidance. We show that this approach is much more efficient than digitization with only a precise head, when its positions for subsequent measurements (so-called next-best-views) must be calculated based only on a partially recovered 3D model of the object. We also show how using a rough object representation for collision detection shortens the high-resolution digitization process.

  15. The AX-PET project Demonstration of a high resolution axial 3D PET

    CERN Document Server

    Bolle, E; Casella, C; Chesi, E; Clinthorne, N; Cochran, E; De Leo, R; Dissertori, G; Djambazov, G; Fanti, V; Honscheid, K; Huh, S; Johnson, I; Joram, C; Kagan, H; Lustermann, W; Meddi, F; Nappi, E; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Oliver, J F; Pauss, P; Rafecas, M; Renker, D; Rudge, A; Schinzel, D; Schneider, T; Seguinot, J; Smith, S; Solevi, P; Stapnes, S; Weilhammer, P

    2010-01-01

    The AX-PET is a new geometrical concept for a high resolution 3D PET scanner, based on matrices of axially oriented LYSO crystals interleaved by stacks of WLS, both individually read out by G-APDs. A PET demonstrator, based on two detector modules used in coincidence, is currently under construction.

  16. 3D high-resolution two-photon crosslinked hydrogel structures for biological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Laura; Urciuolo, Anna; Giulitti, Stefano; Della Giustina, Gioia; Tromayer, Maximilian; Liska, Robert; Elvassore, Nicola; Brusatin, Giovanna

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogels are widely used as matrices for cell growth due to the their tuneable chemical and physical properties, which mimic the extracellular matrix of natural tissue. The microfabrication of hydrogels into arbitrarily complex 3D structures is becoming essential for numerous biological applications, and in particular for investigating the correlation between cell shape and cell function in a 3D environment. Micrometric and sub-micrometric resolution hydrogel scaffolds are required to deeply investigate molecular mechanisms behind cell-matrix interaction and downstream cellular processes. We report the design and development of high resolution 3D gelatin hydrogel woodpile structures by two-photon crosslinking. Hydrated structures of lateral linewidth down to 0.5µm, lateral and axial resolution down to a few µm are demonstrated. According to the processing parameters, different degrees of polymerization are obtained, resulting in hydrated scaffolds of variable swelling and deformation. The 3D hydrogels are biocompatible and promote cell adhesion and migration. Interestingly, according to the polymerization degree, 3D hydrogel woodpile structures show variable extent of cell adhesion and invasion. Human BJ cell lines show capability of deforming 3D micrometric resolved hydrogel structures. The design and development of high resolution 3D gelatin hydrogel woodpile structures by two-photon crosslinking is reported. Significantly, topological and mechanical conditions of polymerized gelatin structures were suitable for cell accommodation in the volume of the woodpiles, leading to a cell density per unit area comparable to the bare substrate. The fabricated structures, presenting micrometric features of high resolution, are actively deformed by cells, both in terms of cell invasion within rods and of cell attachment in-between contiguous woodpiles. Possible biological targets for this 3D approach are customized 3D tissue models, or studies of cell adhesion

  17. Integration of High-Resolution Laser Displacement Sensors and 3D Printing for Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Kuo, Shih-Yu; Huang, Ting-Hsuan

    2017-12-22

    This paper presents a novel experimental design for complex structural health monitoring (SHM) studies achieved by integrating 3D printing technologies, high-resolution laser displacement sensors, and multiscale entropy SHM theory. A seven-story structure with a variety of composite bracing systems was constructed using a dual-material 3D printer. A wireless Bluetooth vibration speaker was used to excite the ground floor of the structure, and high-resolution laser displacement sensors (1-μm resolution) were used to monitor the displacement history on different floors. Our results showed that the multiscale entropy SHM method could detect damage on the 3D-printed structures. The results of this study demonstrate that integrating 3D printing technologies and high-resolution laser displacement sensors enables the design of cheap, fast processing, complex, small-scale civil structures for future SHM studies. The novel experimental design proposed in this study provides a suitable platform for investigating the validity and sensitivity of SHM in different composite structures and damage conditions for real life applications in the future.

  18. Quantitative 3D high resolution transmission ultrasound tomography: creating clinically relevant images (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskin, James; Klock, John; Iuanow, Elaine; Borup, Dave T.; Terry, Robin; Malik, Bilal H.; Lenox, Mark

    2017-03-01

    There has been a great deal of research into ultrasound tomography for breast imaging over the past 35 years. Few successful attempts have been made to reconstruct high-resolution images using transmission ultrasound. To this end, advances have been made in 2D and 3D algorithms that utilize either time of arrival or full wave data to reconstruct images with high spatial and contrast resolution suitable for clinical interpretation. The highest resolution and quantitative accuracy result from inverse scattering applied to full wave data in 3D. However, this has been prohibitively computationally expensive, meaning that full inverse scattering ultrasound tomography has not been considered clinically viable. Here we show the results of applying a nonlinear inverse scattering algorithm to 3D data in a clinically useful time frame. This method yields Quantitative Transmission (QT) ultrasound images with high spatial and contrast resolution. We reconstruct sound speeds for various 2D and 3D phantoms and verify these values with independent measurements. The data are fully 3D as is the reconstruction algorithm, with no 2D approximations. We show that 2D reconstruction algorithms can introduce artifacts into the QT breast image which are avoided by using a full 3D algorithm and data. We show high resolution gross and microscopic anatomic correlations comparing cadaveric breast QT images with MRI to establish imaging capability and accuracy. Finally, we show reconstructions of data from volunteers, as well as an objective visual grading analysis to confirm clinical imaging capability and accuracy.

  19. Assessment of engineered surfaces roughness by high-resolution 3D SEM photogrammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gontard, L.C., E-mail: lionelcg@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real 11510 (Spain); López-Castro, J.D.; González-Rovira, L. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería, Laboratorio de Corrosión, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real 11519 (Spain); Vázquez-Martínez, J.M. [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica y Diseño Industrial, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real 11519 (Spain); Varela-Feria, F.M. [Servicio de Microscopía Centro de Investigación, Tecnología e Innovación (CITIUS), Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 4b, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Marcos, M. [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica y Diseño Industrial, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real 11519 (Spain); and others

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • We describe a method to acquire a high-angle tilt series of SEM images that is symmetrical respect to the zero tilt of the sample stage. The method can be applied in any SEM microscope. • Using the method, high-resolution 3D SEM photogrammetry can be applied on planar surfaces. • 3D models of three surfaces patterned with grooves are reconstructed with high resolution using multi-view freeware photogrammetry software as described in LC Gontard et al. Ultramicroscopy, 2016. • From the 3D models roughness parameters are measured • 3D SEM high-resolution photogrammetry is compared with two conventional methods used for roughness characetrization: stereophotogrammetry and contact profilometry. • It provides three-dimensional information with high-resolution that is out of reach for any other metrological technique. - Abstract: We describe a methodology to obtain three-dimensional models of engineered surfaces using scanning electron microscopy and multi-view photogrammetry (3DSEM). For the reconstruction of the 3D models of the surfaces we used freeware available in the cloud. The method was applied to study the surface roughness of metallic samples patterned with parallel grooves by means of laser. The results are compared with measurements obtained using stylus profilometry (PR) and SEM stereo-photogrammetry (SP). The application of 3DSEM is more time demanding than PR or SP, but it provides a more accurate representation of the surfaces. The results obtained with the three techniques are compared by investigating the influence of sampling step on roughness parameters.

  20. Towards high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buongiorno Nardelli, B.; Guinehut, S.; Pascual, A.; Drillet, Y.; Ruiz, S.; Mulet, S.

    2012-10-01

    The MyOcean R&D project MESCLA (MEsoSCaLe dynamical Analysis through combined model, satellite and in situ data) was devoted to the high resolution 3-D retrieval of tracer and velocity fields in the oceans, based on the combination of in situ and satellite observations and quasi-geostrophic dynamical models. The retrieval techniques were also tested and compared with the output of a primitive equation model, with particular attention to the accuracy of the vertical velocity field as estimated through the Q vector formulation of the omega equation. The project focused on a test case, covering the region where the Gulf Stream separates from the US East Coast. This work demonstrated that innovative methods for the high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations can be used to build the next generations of operational observation-based products.

  1. Towards high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Buongiorno Nardelli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The MyOcean R&D project MESCLA (MEsoSCaLe dynamical Analysis through combined model, satellite and in situ data was devoted to the high resolution 3-D retrieval of tracer and velocity fields in the oceans, based on the combination of in situ and satellite observations and quasi-geostrophic dynamical models. The retrieval techniques were also tested and compared with the output of a primitive equation model, with particular attention to the accuracy of the vertical velocity field as estimated through the Q vector formulation of the omega equation. The project focused on a test case, covering the region where the Gulf Stream separates from the US East Coast. This work demonstrated that innovative methods for the high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations can be used to build the next generations of operational observation-based products.

  2. 3D High Resolution l1-SPIRiT Reconstruction on Gadgetron based Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Hui; Kelmann, Peter; Inati, Souheil

    framework to support distributed computing in a cloud environment. This extension is named GT-Plus. A cloud version of 3D l1-SPIRiT was implemented on the GT-Plus framework. We demonstrate that a 3mins reconstruction could be achieved for 1mm3 isotropic resolution neuro scans with significantly improved......Applying non-linear reconstruction to high resolution 3D MRI is challenging because of the lengthy computing time needed for those iterative algorithms. To achieve practical processing duration to enable clinical usage of non-linear reconstruction, we have extended previously published Gadgetron...

  3. Feasibility of fabricating personalized 3D-printed bone grafts guided by high-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Abigail L.; Newman, Benjamin T.; Khalid, Arbab; Teter, Olivia M.; Kobe, Elizabeth A.; Shukurova, Malika; Shinde, Rohit; Sipzner, Daniel; Pignolo, Robert J.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Rajapakse, Chamith S.

    2017-03-01

    Current methods of bone graft treatment for critical size bone defects can give way to several clinical complications such as limited available bone for autografts, non-matching bone structure, lack of strength which can compromise a patient's skeletal system, and sterilization processes that can prevent osteogenesis in the case of allografts. We intend to overcome these disadvantages by generating a patient-specific 3D printed bone graft guided by high-resolution medical imaging. Our synthetic model allows us to customize the graft for the patients' macro- and microstructure and correct any structural deficiencies in the re-meshing process. These 3D-printed models can presumptively serve as the scaffolding for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) engraftment in order to facilitate bone growth. We performed highresolution CT imaging of a cadaveric human proximal femur at 0.030-mm isotropic voxels. We used these images to generate a 3D computer model that mimics bone geometry from micro to macro scale represented by STereoLithography (STL) format. These models were then reformatted to a format that can be interpreted by the 3D printer. To assess how much of the microstructure was replicated, 3D-printed models were re-imaged using micro-CT at 0.025-mm isotropic voxels and compared to original high-resolution CT images used to generate the 3D model in 32 sub-regions. We found a strong correlation between 3D-printed bone volume and volume of bone in the original images used for 3D printing (R2 = 0.97). We expect to further refine our approach with additional testing to create a viable synthetic bone graft with clinical functionality.

  4. A Microscopic Optically Tracking Navigation System That Uses High-resolution 3D Computer Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Masanori; Saito, Toki; Kin, Taichi; Nakagawa, Daichi; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics (CG) are useful for preoperative planning of neurosurgical operations. However, application of 3D CG to intraoperative navigation is not widespread because existing commercial operative navigation systems do not show 3D CG in sufficient detail. We have developed a microscopic optically tracking navigation system that uses high-resolution 3D CG. This article presents the technical details of our microscopic optically tracking navigation system. Our navigation system consists of three components: the operative microscope, registration, and the image display system. An optical tracker was attached to the microscope to monitor the position and attitude of the microscope in real time; point-pair registration was used to register the operation room coordinate system, and the image coordinate system; and the image display system showed the 3D CG image in the field-of-view of the microscope. Ten neurosurgeons (seven males, two females; mean age 32.9 years) participated in an experiment to assess the accuracy of this system using a phantom model. Accuracy of our system was compared with the commercial system. The 3D CG provided by the navigation system coincided well with the operative scene under the microscope. Target registration error for our system was 2.9 ± 1.9 mm. Our navigation system provides a clear image of the operation position and the surrounding structures. Systems like this may reduce intraoperative complications.

  5. Markerless 3D Head Tracking for Motion Correction in High Resolution PET Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter

    relying on markers. Data-driven motion correction is problematic due to the physiological dynamics. Marker-based tracking is potentially unreliable, and it is extremely hard to validate when the tracking information is correct. The motion estimation is essential for proper motion correction of the PET...... images. Incorrect motion correction can in the worst cases result in wrong diagnosis or treatment. The evolution of a markerless custom-made structured light 3D surface tracking system is presented. The system is targeted at state-of-the-art high resolution dedicated brain PET scanners with a resolution...

  6. Towards high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations

    OpenAIRE

    Buongiorno Nardelli, B.; Guinehut, S.; Pascual, A.; Drillet, Y.; Ruiz, S.; Mulet, S.

    2012-01-01

    The MyOcean R&D project MESCLA (MEsoSCaLe dynamical Analysis through combined model, satellite and in situ data) was devoted to the high resolution 3-D retrieval of tracer and velocity fields in the oceans, based on the combination of in situ and satellite observations and quasi-geostrophic dynamical models. The retrieval techniques were also tested and compared with the output of a primitive equation model, with particular attention to the accuracy of the vertical velocity field as estim...

  7. High Resolution 3D Models for the Teaching of American Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odor, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Millions of Americans in all age groups are affected by deafness and impaired hearing. They communicate with others using the American Sign Language (ASL). Teaching is tutorial (person-to-person) or with limited video content. We believe that high resolution 3D models and their animations can be used to effectively teach the ASL, with the following advantages over the traditional teaching approach: a) signing can be played at varying speeds and as many times as necessary, b) being 3-D constructs, models can be viewed from diverse angles, c) signing can be applied to different characters (male, female, child, elderly, etc.), d) special editing like close-ups, picture-in-picture, and phantom movements, can make learning easier, and e) clothing, surrounding environment and lighting conditions can be varied to present the student to less than ideal situations.

  8. High resolution 3D confocal microscope imaging of volcanic ash particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, David; Gillmore, Gavin; Gill, Ian; Petford, Nick

    2017-07-15

    We present initial results from a novel high resolution confocal microscopy study of the 3D surface structure of volcanic ash particles from two recent explosive basaltic eruptions, Eyjafjallajökull (2010) and Grimsvötn (2011), in Iceland. The majority of particles imaged are less than 100μm in size and include PM10s, known to be harmful to humans if inhaled. Previous studies have mainly used 2D microscopy to examine volcanic particles. The aim of this study was to test the potential of 3D laser scanning confocal microscopy as a reliable analysis tool for these materials and if so to what degree high resolution surface and volume data could be obtained that would further aid in their classification. First results obtained using an Olympus LEXT scanning confocal microscope with a ×50 and ×100 objective lens are highly encouraging. They reveal a range of discrete particle types characterised by sharp or concave edges consistent with explosive formation and sudden rupture of magma. Initial surface area/volume ratios are given that may prove useful in subsequent modelling of damage to aircraft engines and human tissue where inhalation has occurred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. True 3D High Resolution imagery of a Buried Shipwreck: the Invincible (1758)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, J. K.; Bull, J. M.; Henstock, T.; Gutowski, M.; Hogarth, P.; Leighton, T. G.; White, P. R.

    2005-12-01

    This paper will present the first true 3D high resolution acoustic imagery of a wreck site buried in the marine environment. Using a 3D Chirp system developed at the University of Southampton, a marine seismic survey of the mid-eighteenth century wreck site has been undertaken. The Invincible was a 74 gun warship built by the French in 1744, captured by the British in 1747 and subsequently lost off Portsmouth, UK in February 1758. The wreck was re-discovered by divers in 1979, partially buried on the margins of a mobile sandbank in approximately 8 metres of water. In 2004 the system was surveyed using a 60 channel, rigid framed 3D Chirp (1.5-13 kHz source sweep) system with integral RTK GPS and attitude systems. An area of 160 m x 160 m, centered over the wreck site, was surveyed with a total of 150 Gb data being acquired. The data was processed, using 3D Promax, to produce 25 cm bins with typical 3-6 fold coverage. The stacked traces have been visualized and interpreted using Kingdom Suite software. The final imagery shows at unprecedented resolution the full three-dimensional buried form of the wreck and it's relationship to the surrounding sedimentary sequences, enabling the full evolution of the site to be discussed. Further, the data is compared to previously acquired swath bathymetry and 2D seismic data in order to illustrate the impact of such a device for underwater cultural heritage management.

  10. High-resolution mobile optical 3D scanner with color mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Roland; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2017-07-01

    A high-resolution mobile handheld scanning device suitable for 3D data acquisition and analysis for forensic investigations, rapid prototyping, design, quality management, and archaeology with a measurement volume of approximately 325 mm x 200 mm x 100mm and a lateral object resolution of 170 µm developed at our institute is introduced. The scanners weight is 4.4 kg with an optional color DLSR camera. The PC for measurement control and point calculation is included inside the housing. Power supply is realized by rechargeable batteries. Possible operation time is between 30 and 60 minutes. The object distance is between 400 and 500 mm, and the scan time for one 3D shot may vary between 0.1 and 0.5 seconds. The complete 3D result is obtained a few seconds after starting the scan. For higher quality 3D and color images the scanner is attachable to tripod use. Measurement objects larger than the measurement volume must be acquired partly. The different resulting datasets are merged using a suitable software module. The scanner has been successfully used in various applications.

  11. High-resolution laser radar for 3D imaging in artwork cataloging, reproduction, and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Roberto; Fantoni, Roberta; Ferri de Collibus, Mario; Fornetti, Giorgio G.; Guarneri, Massimiliano; Poggi, Claudio

    2003-10-01

    A high resolution Amplitude Modulated Laser Radar (AM-LR) sensor has recently been developed, aimed at accurately reconstructing 3D digital models of real targets, either single objects or complex scenes. The sensor sounding beam can be swept linearly across the object or circularly around it, by placing the object on a controlled rotating platform, enabling to obtain respectively linear and cylindrical range maps. Both amplitude and phase shift of the modulating wave of back-scattered light are collected and processed, providing respectively a shade-free, high resolution, photographic-like picture and accurate range data in the form of a range image. The resolution of range measurements depends mainly on the laser modulation frequency, provided that the power of the backscattered light reaching the detector is at least a few nW (current best performances are ~100 μm). The complete object surface can be reconstructed from the sampled points by using specifically developed software tools. The system has been successfully applied to scan different types of real surfaces (stone, wood, alloys, bones), with relevant applications in different fields, ranging from industrial machining to medical diagnostics, to vision in hostile environments. Examples of artwork reconstructed models (pottery, marble statues) are presented and the relevance of this technology for reverse engineering applied to cultural heritage conservation and restoration are discussed. Final 3D models can be passed to numeric control machines for rapid-prototyping, exported in standard formats for CAD/CAM purposes and made available on the Internet by adopting a virtual museum paradigm, thus possibly enabling specialists to perform remote inspections on high resolution digital reproductions of hardly accessible masterpieces.

  12. User-Appropriate Viewer for High Resolution Interactive Engagement with 3d Digital Cultural Artefacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, D.; La Pensée, A.; Cooper, M.

    2013-07-01

    Three dimensional (3D) laser scanning is an important documentation technique for cultural heritage. This technology has been adopted from the engineering and aeronautical industry and is an invaluable tool for the documentation of objects within museum collections (La Pensée, 2008). The datasets created via close range laser scanning are extremely accurate and the created 3D dataset allows for a more detailed analysis in comparison to other documentation technologies such as photography. The dataset can be used for a range of different applications including: documentation; archiving; surface monitoring; replication; gallery interactives; educational sessions; conservation and visualization. However, the novel nature of a 3D dataset is presenting a rather unique challenge with respect to its sharing and dissemination. This is in part due to the need for specialised 3D software and a supported graphics card to display high resolution 3D models. This can be detrimental to one of the main goals of cultural institutions, which is to share knowledge and enable activities such as research, education and entertainment. This has limited the presentation of 3D models of cultural heritage objects to mainly either images or videos. Yet with recent developments in computer graphics, increased internet speed and emerging technologies such as Adobe's Stage 3D (Adobe, 2013) and WebGL (Khronos, 2013), it is now possible to share a dataset directly within a webpage. This allows website visitors to interact with the 3D dataset allowing them to explore every angle of the object, gaining an insight into its shape and nature. This can be very important considering that it is difficult to offer the same level of understanding of the object through the use of traditional mediums such as photographs and videos. Yet this presents a range of problems: this is a very novel experience and very few people have engaged with 3D objects outside of 3D software packages or games. This paper

  13. USER–APPROPRIATE VIEWER FOR HIGH RESOLUTION INTERACTIVE ENGAGEMENT WITH 3D DIGITAL CULTURAL ARTEFACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gillespie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional (3D laser scanning is an important documentation technique for cultural heritage. This technology has been adopted from the engineering and aeronautical industry and is an invaluable tool for the documentation of objects within museum collections (La Pensée, 2008. The datasets created via close range laser scanning are extremely accurate and the created 3D dataset allows for a more detailed analysis in comparison to other documentation technologies such as photography. The dataset can be used for a range of different applications including: documentation; archiving; surface monitoring; replication; gallery interactives; educational sessions; conservation and visualization. However, the novel nature of a 3D dataset is presenting a rather unique challenge with respect to its sharing and dissemination. This is in part due to the need for specialised 3D software and a supported graphics card to display high resolution 3D models. This can be detrimental to one of the main goals of cultural institutions, which is to share knowledge and enable activities such as research, education and entertainment. This has limited the presentation of 3D models of cultural heritage objects to mainly either images or videos. Yet with recent developments in computer graphics, increased internet speed and emerging technologies such as Adobe's Stage 3D (Adobe, 2013 and WebGL (Khronos, 2013, it is now possible to share a dataset directly within a webpage. This allows website visitors to interact with the 3D dataset allowing them to explore every angle of the object, gaining an insight into its shape and nature. This can be very important considering that it is difficult to offer the same level of understanding of the object through the use of traditional mediums such as photographs and videos. Yet this presents a range of problems: this is a very novel experience and very few people have engaged with 3D objects outside of 3D software packages or games

  14. High-resolution 3D translation measurements using point source x-ray stereoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Wasil H. M.; Soons, Joris A. M.; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2011-02-01

    A method for high-resolution measurement of 3D coordinates and translations of small objects is presented, using single x-ray point-source stereoscopy. The theory of the pinhole method is re-derived for a point-source x-ray projection setup using a conical beam. The method is then implemented using a micro x-ray tomography setup with a single 8 µm point source. Stereo projections are obtained by rotating the object over 90° between subsequent recordings, and microscopic tungsten beads are used as marker points. The accuracy of the method is tested on a spherical calibration object, and found to be better than 10 µm. Using a translation stage, the measurement uncertainty for translation measurements was found to be better than 5 µm along both axes parallel to the detector and at right angles to the detector. Due to the short measurement time and the high resolution, the method will be useful to study the biomechanics of small specimens, and the principle of the method is useful in any cone-beam-based setup.

  15. Feasibility analysis of high resolution tissue image registration using 3-D synthetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yachna; Moffitt, Richard A; Stokes, Todd H; Chaudry, Qaiser; Wang, May D

    2011-01-01

    Registration of high-resolution tissue images is a critical step in the 3D analysis of protein expression. Because the distance between images (~4-5μm thickness of a tissue section) is nearly the size of the objects of interest (~10-20μm cancer cell nucleus), a given object is often not present in both of two adjacent images. Without consistent correspondence of objects between images, registration becomes a difficult task. This work assesses the feasibility of current registration techniques for such images. We generated high resolution synthetic 3-D image data sets emulating the constraints in real data. We applied multiple registration methods to the synthetic image data sets and assessed the registration performance of three techniques (i.e., mutual information (MI), kernel density estimate (KDE) method [1], and principal component analysis (PCA)) at various slice thicknesses (with increments of 1μm) in order to quantify the limitations of each method. Our analysis shows that PCA, when combined with the KDE method based on nuclei centers, aligns images corresponding to 5μm thick sections with acceptable accuracy. We also note that registration error increases rapidly with increasing distance between images, and that the choice of feature points which are conserved between slices improves performance. We used simulation to help select appropriate features and methods for image registration by estimating best-case-scenario errors for given data constraints in histological images. The results of this study suggest that much of the difficulty of stained tissue registration can be reduced to the problem of accurately identifying feature points, such as the center of nuclei.

  16. Feasibility analysis of high resolution tissue image registration using 3-D synthetic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yachna Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Registration of high-resolution tissue images is a critical step in the 3D analysis of protein expression. Because the distance between images (~4-5μm thickness of a tissue section is nearly the size of the objects of interest (~10-20μm cancer cell nucleus, a given object is often not present in both of two adjacent images. Without consistent correspondence of objects between images, registration becomes a difficult task. This work assesses the feasibility of current registration techniques for such images. Methods: We generated high resolution synthetic 3-D image data sets emulating the constraints in real data. We applied multiple registration methods to the synthetic image data sets and assessed the registration performance of three techniques (i.e., mutual information (MI, kernel density estimate (KDE method [1], and principal component analysis (PCA at various slice thicknesses (with increments of 1μm in order to quantify the limitations of each method. Results: Our analysis shows that PCA, when combined with the KDE method based on nuclei centers, aligns images corresponding to 5μm thick sections with acceptable accuracy. We also note that registration error increases rapidly with increasing distance between images, and that the choice of feature points which are conserved between slices improves performance. Conclusions: We used simulation to help select appropriate features and methods for image registration by estimating best-case-scenario errors for given data constraints in histological images. The results of this study suggest that much of the difficulty of stained tissue registration can be reduced to the problem of accurately identifying feature points, such as the center of nuclei.

  17. High-resolution 3D simulations of NIF ignition targets performed on Sequoia with HYDRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinak, M. M.; Clark, D. S.; Jones, O. S.; Kerbel, G. D.; Sepke, S.; Patel, M. V.; Koning, J. M.; Schroeder, C. R.

    2015-11-01

    Developments in the multiphysics ICF code HYDRA enable it to perform large-scale simulations on the Sequoia machine at LLNL. With an aggregate computing power of 20 Petaflops, Sequoia offers an unprecedented capability to resolve the physical processes in NIF ignition targets for a more complete, consistent treatment of the sources of asymmetry. We describe modifications to HYDRA that enable it to scale to over one million processes on Sequoia. These include new options for replicating parts of the mesh over a subset of the processes, to avoid strong scaling limits. We consider results from a 3D full ignition capsule-only simulation performed using over one billion zones run on 262,000 processors which resolves surface perturbations through modes l = 200. We also report progress towards a high-resolution 3D integrated hohlraum simulation performed using 262,000 processors which resolves surface perturbations on the ignition capsule through modes l = 70. These aim for the most complete calculations yet of the interactions and overall impact of the various sources of asymmetry for NIF ignition targets. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. 3D-information fusion from very high resolution satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, T.; d'Angelo, P.; Kuschk, G.; Tian, J.; Partovi, T.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we show the pre-processing and potential for environmental applications of very high resolution (VHR) satellite stereo imagery like these from WorldView-2 or Pl'eiades with ground sampling distances (GSD) of half a metre to a metre. To process such data first a dense digital surface model (DSM) has to be generated. Afterwards from this a digital terrain model (DTM) representing the ground and a so called normalized digital elevation model (nDEM) representing off-ground objects are derived. Combining these elevation based data with a spectral classification allows detection and extraction of objects from the satellite scenes. Beside the object extraction also the DSM and DTM can directly be used for simulation and monitoring of environmental issues. Examples are the simulation of floodings, building-volume and people estimation, simulation of noise from roads, wave-propagation for cellphones, wind and light for estimating renewable energy sources, 3D change detection, earthquake preparedness and crisis relief, urban development and sprawl of informal settlements and much more. Also outside of urban areas volume information brings literally a new dimension to earth oberservation tasks like the volume estimations of forests and illegal logging, volume of (illegal) open pit mining activities, estimation of flooding or tsunami risks, dike planning, etc. In this paper we present the preprocessing from the original level-1 satellite data to digital surface models (DSMs), corresponding VHR ortho images and derived digital terrain models (DTMs). From these components we present how a monitoring and decision fusion based 3D change detection can be realized by using different acquisitions. The results are analyzed and assessed to derive quality parameters for the presented method. Finally the usability of 3D information fusion from VHR satellite imagery is discussed and evaluated.

  19. Two millennia of soil dynamics derived from ancient desert terraces using high resolution 3-D data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filin, Sagi; Arav, Reuma; Avni, Yoav

    2017-04-01

    Large areas in the arid southern Levant are dotted with ancient terrace-based agriculture systems which were irrigated by runoff harvesting techniques. They were constructed and maintained between the 3rd - 9th centuries AD and abandoned in the 10th century AD. During their 600 years of cultivation, these terraces documented the gradual aggradation of alluvial soils, erosion processes within the drainage basins, as well as flashflood damage. From their abandonment and onwards, they documented 1000 years and more of land degradation and soil erosion processes. Examination of these installations presents an opportunity to study natural and anthropogenic induced changes over almost two millennia. On a global scale, such an analysis is unique as it is rare to find intact manifestations of anthropogenic influences over such time-scales because of landscape dynamics. It is also rare to find a near millennia documentation of soil erosion processes. We study in this paper the aggradation processes within intact agriculture plots in the region surrounding the world heritage Roman-Byzantine ancient city of Avdat, Negev Highlands. We follow the complete cycle of the historical desert agriculture, from the configuration pre-dating the first anthropogenic intervention, through the centuries of cultivation, and up to the present erosion phase, which spans over more than a millennium. We use high resolution 3-D laser scans to document the erosion and the environmental dynamics during these two millennia. The high-resolution data is then utilized to compute siltation rates as well as erosion rates. The long-term measures of soil erosion and land degradation we present here significantly improve our understanding of the mechanism of long-term environmental change acting in arid environments. For sustainable desert inhabitation, the study offers insights into better planning of modern agriculture in similar zones as well as insights on strategies needed to protect such historical

  20. 3D high-resolution radar imaging of small body interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sava, Paul; Asphaug, Erik

    2017-10-01

    Answering fundamental questions about the origin and evolution of small planetary bodies hinges on our ability to image their interior structure in detail and at high resolution (Asphaug, 2009). We often infer internal structure from surface observations, e.g. that comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is a primordial agglomeration of cometesimals (Massironi et al., 2015). However, the interior structure is not easily accessible without systematic imaging using, e.g., radar transmission and reflection data, as suggested by the CONSERT experiment on Rosetta. Interior imaging depends on observations from multiple viewpoints, as in medical tomography.We discuss radar imaging using methodology adapted from terrestrial exploration seismology (Sava et al., 2015). We primarily focus on full wavefield methods that facilitate high quality imaging of small body interiors characterized by complex structure and large contrasts of physical properties. We consider the case of a monostatic system (co-located transmitters and receivers) operated at two frequency bands, centered around 5 and 15 MHz, from a spacecraft in slow polar orbit around a spinning comet nucleus. Assuming that the spin period is significantly (e.g. 5x) faster than the orbital period, this configuration allows repeated views from multiple directions (Safaeinili et al., 2002)Using realistic numerical experiments, we argue that (1) the comet/asteroid imaging problem is intrinsically 3D and conventional SAR methodology does not satisfy imaging, sampling and resolution requirements; (2) imaging at different frequency bands can provide information about internal surfaces (through migration) and internal volumes (through tomography); (3) interior imaging can be accomplished progressively as data are being acquired through successive orbits around the studied object; (4) imaging resolution can go beyond the apparent radar frequency band by deconvolution of the point-spread-function characterizing the imaging system; and (5

  1. Computation of a high-resolution MRI 3D stereotaxic atlas of the sheep brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ella, Arsène; Delgadillo, José A; Chemineau, Philippe; Keller, Matthieu

    2017-02-15

    The sheep model was first used in the fields of animal reproduction and veterinary sciences and then was utilized in fundamental and preclinical studies. For more than a decade, magnetic resonance (MR) studies performed on this model have been increasingly reported, especially in the field of neuroscience. To contribute to MR translational neuroscience research, a brain template and an atlas are necessary. We have recently generated the first complete T1-weighted (T1W) and T2W MR population average images (or templates) of in vivo sheep brains. In this study, we 1) defined a 3D stereotaxic coordinate system for previously established in vivo population average templates; 2) used deformation fields obtained during optimized nonlinear registrations to compute nonlinear tissues or prior probability maps (nlTPMs) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), gray matter (GM), and white matter (WM) tissues; 3) delineated 25 external and 28 internal sheep brain structures by segmenting both templates and nlTPMs; and 4) annotated and labeled these structures using an existing histological atlas. We built a quality high-resolution 3D atlas of average in vivo sheep brains linked to a reference stereotaxic space. The atlas and nlTPMs, associated with previously computed T1W and T2W in vivo sheep brain templates and nlTPMs, provide a complete set of imaging space that are able to be imported into other imaging software programs and could be used as standardized tools for neuroimaging studies or other neuroscience methods, such as image registration, image segmentation, identification of brain structures, implementation of recording devices, or neuronavigation. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:676-692, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. On the feasibility of comprehensive high-resolution 3D remote dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juang, Titania [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiation Oncology Physics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Grant, Ryan [The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Adamovics, John [Department of Chemistry and Biology, Rider University, Lawrenceville, New Jersey, 08648 (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Oldham, Mark, E-mail: mark.oldham@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology Physics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: This study investigates the feasibility of remote high-resolution 3D dosimetry with the PRESAGE®/Optical-CT system. In remote dosimetry, dosimeters are shipped out from a central base institution to a remote institution for irradiation, then shipped back to the base institution for subsequent readout and analysis. Methods: Two nominally identical optical-CT scanners for 3D dosimetry were constructed and placed at the base (Duke University) and remote (Radiological Physics Center) institutions. Two formulations of PRESAGE® (SS1, SS2) radiochromic dosimeters were investigated. Higher sensitivity was expected in SS1, which had higher initiator content (0.25% bromotrichloromethane), while greater temporal stability was expected in SS2. Four unirradiated PRESAGE® dosimeters (two per formulation, cylindrical dimensions 11 cm diameter, 8.5–9.5 cm length) were imaged at the base institution, then shipped to the remote institution for planning and irradiation. Each dosimeter was irradiated with the same simple treatment plan: an isocentric 3-field “cross” arrangement of 4 × 4 cm open 6 MV beams configured as parallel opposed laterals with an anterior beam. This simple plan was amenable to accurate and repeatable setup, as well as accurate dose modeling by a commissioned treatment planning system (Pinnacle). After irradiation and subsequent (within 1 h) optical-CT readout at the remote institution, the dosimeters were shipped back to the base institution for remote dosimetry readout 3 days postirradiation. Measured on-site and remote relative 3D dose distributions were registered to the Pinnacle dose calculation, which served as the reference distribution for 3D gamma calculations with passing criteria of 5%/2 mm, 3%/3 mm, and 3%/2 mm with a 10% dose threshold. Gamma passing rates, dose profiles, and color-maps were all used to assess and compare the performance of both PRESAGE® formulations for remote dosimetry. Results: The best agreements between the

  3. Airborne LIDAR and high resolution satellite data for rapid 3D feature extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawak, S. D.; Panditrao, S. N.; Luis, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    This work uses the canopy height model (CHM) based workflow for individual tree crown delineation and 3D feature extraction approach (Overwatch Geospatial's proprietary algorithm) for building feature delineation from high-density light detection and ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data in an urban environment and evaluates its accuracy by using very high-resolution panchromatic (PAN) (spatial) and 8-band (multispectral) WorldView-2 (WV-2) imagery. LiDAR point cloud data over San Francisco, California, USA, recorded in June 2010, was used to detect tree and building features by classifying point elevation values. The workflow employed includes resampling of LiDAR point cloud to generate a raster surface or digital terrain model (DTM), generation of a hill-shade image and an intensity image, extraction of digital surface model, generation of bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) and extraction of tree and building features. First, the optical WV-2 data and the LiDAR intensity image were co-registered using ground control points (GCPs). The WV-2 rational polynomial coefficients model (RPC) was executed in ERDAS Leica Photogrammetry Suite (LPS) using supplementary *.RPB file. In the second stage, ortho-rectification was carried out using ERDAS LPS by incorporating well-distributed GCPs. The root mean square error (RMSE) for the WV-2 was estimated to be 0.25 m by using more than 10 well-distributed GCPs. In the second stage, we generated the bare earth DEM from LiDAR point cloud data. In most of the cases, bare earth DEM does not represent true ground elevation. Hence, the model was edited to get the most accurate DEM/ DTM possible and normalized the LiDAR point cloud data based on DTM in order to reduce the effect of undulating terrain. We normalized the vegetation point cloud values by subtracting the ground points (DEM) from the LiDAR point cloud. A normalized digital surface model (nDSM) or CHM was calculated from the LiDAR data by subtracting the DEM from the DSM

  4. High-resolution modelling of 3D hydrodynamics in coastal archipelagos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettunen, Elina; Tuomi, Laura; Ropponen, Janne; Lignell, Risto

    2016-04-01

    Dynamics of the coastal seas are affected by eutrophication, over-fishing, coastal construction and climate change. To enable the sustainable development of these areas, monitoring and modelling of the state of the sea are needed. The Archipelago Sea, located in the northern part of the semi-enclosed and brackish water Baltic Sea, is one of the most complex coastal areas with over 40 000 small islands and islets. It is also very vulnerable area already heavily stressed with eutrophication. Applicable modelling tools are needed to support the decision making and to provide sufficiently reliable information on the effects of the planned actions on the state of the coastal waters. We used 3D hydrodynamic model COHERENS to model the Archipelago Sea area with high spatial resolution of 0.25 nmi. Boundary conditions for this limited area were provided from coarser resolution, 2 nmi, Baltic Sea grid. In order to evaluate the performance of the high-resolution coastal model implementation a comprehensive measurement dataset was gathered, including hydrographic data from three intensive monitoring stations and several more rarely visited monitoring or research stations. The hydrodynamic model was able to simulate the surface temperature and salinity fields and their seasonal variation with good accuracy in this complex area. The sharp depth gradients typical for this area provided some challenges to the modelling. There was some over mixing and related to too strong vertical currents in the steep slopes of the deeper fault lines. Also the water exchange between the more open sea and coastal areas through narrow channels between the islands is not sufficiently well reproduced with the current resolution, leading to too high bottom temperatures.

  5. Comparison of 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction algorithms for High-Resolution Research Tomograph studies: effects of randoms estimation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velden, Floris H. P.; Kloet, Reina W.; van Berckel, Bart N. M.; Wolfensberger, Saskia P. A.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Boellaard, Ronald

    2008-06-01

    The High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) is a dedicated human brain positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Recently, a 3D filtered backprojection (3D-FBP) reconstruction method has been implemented to reduce bias in short duration frames, currently observed in 3D ordinary Poisson OSEM (3D-OP-OSEM) reconstructions. Further improvements might be expected using a new method of variance reduction on randoms (VRR) based on coincidence histograms instead of using the delayed window technique (DW) to estimate randoms. The goal of this study was to evaluate VRR in combination with 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction techniques. To this end, several phantom studies and a human brain study were performed. For most phantom studies, 3D-OP-OSEM showed higher accuracy of observed activity concentrations with VRR than with DW. However, both positive and negative deviations in reconstructed activity concentrations and large biases of grey to white matter contrast ratio (up to 88%) were still observed as a function of scan statistics. Moreover 3D-OP-OSEM+VRR also showed bias up to 64% in clinical data, i.e. in some pharmacokinetic parameters as compared with those obtained with 3D-FBP+VRR. In the case of 3D-FBP, VRR showed similar results as DW for both phantom and clinical data, except that VRR showed a better standard deviation of 6-10%. Therefore, VRR should be used to correct for randoms in HRRT PET studies.

  6. Comparison of 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction algorithms for High-Resolution Research Tomograph studies: effects of randoms estimation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velden, Floris H P van; Kloet, Reina W; Berckel, Bart N M van; Wolfensberger, Saskia P A; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald [Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, VU University Medical Centre, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: f.vvelden@vumc.nl

    2008-06-21

    The High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) is a dedicated human brain positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Recently, a 3D filtered backprojection (3D-FBP) reconstruction method has been implemented to reduce bias in short duration frames, currently observed in 3D ordinary Poisson OSEM (3D-OP-OSEM) reconstructions. Further improvements might be expected using a new method of variance reduction on randoms (VRR) based on coincidence histograms instead of using the delayed window technique (DW) to estimate randoms. The goal of this study was to evaluate VRR in combination with 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction techniques. To this end, several phantom studies and a human brain study were performed. For most phantom studies, 3D-OP-OSEM showed higher accuracy of observed activity concentrations with VRR than with DW. However, both positive and negative deviations in reconstructed activity concentrations and large biases of grey to white matter contrast ratio (up to 88%) were still observed as a function of scan statistics. Moreover 3D-OP-OSEM+VRR also showed bias up to 64% in clinical data, i.e. in some pharmacokinetic parameters as compared with those obtained with 3D-FBP+VRR. In the case of 3D-FBP, VRR showed similar results as DW for both phantom and clinical data, except that VRR showed a better standard deviation of 6-10%. Therefore, VRR should be used to correct for randoms in HRRT PET studies.

  7. Lensless high-resolution photoacoustic imaging scanner for in vivo skin imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Taiichiro; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Omuro, Toshiyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi

    2017-10-01

    We previously launched a high-resolution photoacoustic (PA) imaging scanner based on a unique lensless design for in vivo skin imaging. The design, imaging algorithm and characteristics of the system are described in this paper. Neither an optical lens nor an acoustic lens is used in the system. In the imaging head, four sensor elements are arranged quadrilaterally, and by checking the phase differences for PA waves detected with these four sensors, a set of PA signals only originating from a chromophore located on the sensor center axis is extracted for constructing an image. A phantom study using a carbon fiber showed a depth-independent horizontal resolution of 84.0 ± 3.5 µm, and the scan direction-dependent variation of PA signals was about ± 20%. We then performed imaging of vasculature phantoms: patterns of red ink lines with widths of 100 or 200 μm formed in an acrylic block co-polymer. The patterns were visualized with high contrast, showing the capability for imaging arterioles and venues in the skin. Vasculatures in rat burn models and healthy human skin were also clearly visualized in vivo.

  8. Improving the process of geological mapping in sedimentary terrain by using high-resolution topography in 3D environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yu-Chang; Shih, Nai-Cih; Chiu, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Yu-Chung

    2017-04-01

    Traditional geologic maps were basically produced by field geologists through direct field investigations and interpretations from 2D topographic maps. However, the quality of traditional geologic maps was knowingly compromised by field conditions, particularly, when the mapping area is largely inaccessible or covered by heavy forest canopies. Recent advancement in airborne LiDAR technology can virtually remove trees or buildings, thus, providing a useful high-resolution topographic data set for the bare ground surface. The high-resolution topography still needs to be interpreted in terms of geology, and fundamental questions regarding how to apply the high-resolution topography remain to be answered for improving the process and quality of geological mapping. In this study, we aim to test the quality and reliability of high-resolution geologic maps produced by recently developed methods by an example from the fold-and-thrust belt in northern Taiwan. We performed the geological mapping by applying the LiDAR-derived DEM, self-developed Python program tools and many layers of relevant information at interactive 3D environments on a computer. Our mapping results indicate that the proposed mapping methods will significantly raise the quality and consistency of the geologic maps. Our study also shows that in order to gain consistent mapping results, future high-resolution geologic maps should be produced in 3D environments based on existing geologic maps and a few field checks for verification.

  9. Advanced Multivariate Inversion Techniques for High Resolution 3D Geophysical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Tarim Basin (western China) they used gravity data from the GRACE satellite mission (Tapley et al., 2005) along with high-resolution surface wave...between the Basin and Range to the west and the Colorado Plateau to the east (Figure 3). We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal...and shows better definition of the velocity anomaly associated with the transition from the Basin and Range to the west to the Colorado Plateau to

  10. High-Resolution Visual 3D Recontructions for Rapid Archaeological Characterization

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The final output will be geotiffs and a custom 3D texture model format that allows for dynamic level-of-detail rendering. The work discussed in the proposal will...

  11. Robust automatic high resolution segmentation of SOFC anode porosity in 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2008-01-01

    anode in 3D. The technique is based on numerical approximations to partial differential equations to evolve a 3D surface to the desired phase boundary. Vector fields derived from the experimentally acquired data are used as the driving force. The automatic segmentation compared to manual delineation......Routine use of 3D characterization of SOFCs by focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning is generally restricted by the time consuming task of manually delineating structures within each image slice. We apply advanced image analysis algorithms to automatically segment the porosity phase of an SOFC...... reveals and good correspondence and the two approaches are quantitatively compared. It is concluded that the. automatic approach is more robust, more reproduceable and orders of magnitude quicker than manual segmentation of SOFC anode porosity for subsequent quantitative 3D analysis. Lastly...

  12. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenou, M; Sa'ar, A; Kotler, Z

    2015-11-25

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures.

  13. The new high resolution method of Godunov`s type for 3D viscous flow calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yershov, S.V.; Rusanov, A.V. [Ukranian National Academy of Sciences, Kahrkov (Ukraine)

    1996-12-31

    The numerical method is suggested for the calculations of the 3D viscous compressible flows described by the thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The method is based on the Godunov`s finite-difference scheme and it uses the ENO reconstruction suggested by Harten to achieve the uniformly high-order accuracy. The computational efficiency is provided with the simplified multi grid approach and the implicit step written in {delta} -form. The turbulent effects are simulated with the Baldwin - Lomax turbulence model. The application package FlowER is developed to calculate the 3D turbulent flows within complex-shape channels. The numerical results for the 3D flow around a cylinder and through the complex-shaped channels show the accuracy and the reliability of the suggested method. (author)

  14. High resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy for 3D spin vectorial analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Taichi; Miyamoto, Koji; Kimura, Akio; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2013-03-01

    Spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) is the excellent tool which can directly observe the band structure of crystals with separating spin-up and -down states. Recent findings of new class of materials possessing strong spin orbit interaction such as Rashba spin splitting systems or topological insulators stimulate to develop new SARPES apparatuses and many sophisticated techniques have been reported recently. Here we report our newly developed a SARPES apparatus for spin vectorial analysis with high precision at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center. Highly efficient spin polarimeter utilizing very low energy electron diffraction (VLEED) makes high resolution (ΔE Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  15. Robust classification of subcellular location patterns in high resolution 3D fluorescence microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Murphy, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of a protein's subcellular location is essential to a complete understanding of its functions. Automated interpretation methods for protein location patterns are needed for proteomics projects, and we have previously described systems for classifying the major subcellular patterns in cultured mammalian cells. We describe here the calculation of improved 3D Haralick texture features, which yielded a near-perfect classification accuracy when combined with 3D morphological and edge features. In particular, a set of 7 features achieved 98% overall accuracy for classifying 10 major subcellular location patterns in HeLa cells.

  16. Compressive Sensing in High-resolution 3D SAR Tomography of Urban Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Ming-sheng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In modern high resolution SAR data, due to the intrinsic side-looking geometry of SAR sensors, layover and foreshortening issues inevitably arise, especially in dense urban areas. SAR tomography provides a new way of overcoming these problems by exploiting the back-scattering property for each pixel. However, traditional non-parametric spectral estimators, e.g. Truncated Singular Value Decomposition (TSVD, are limited by their poor elevation resolution, which is not comparable to the azimuth and slant-range resolution. In this paper, the Compressive Sensing (CS approach using Basis Pursuit (BP and TWo-step Iterative Shrinkage/Thresholding (TWIST are introduced. Experimental studies with real spotlight-mode TerraSAR-X dataset are carried out using both BP and TWIST, to demonstrate the merits of compressive sensing approaches in terms of robustness, computational efficiency, and super-resolution capability.

  17. A High-Resolution 3D Weather Radar, MSG, and Lightning Sensor Observation Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Malte; Senf, Fabian; Wapler, Kathrin; Simmer, Clemens

    2013-04-01

    Within the research group 'Object-based Analysis and SEamless prediction' (OASE) of the Hans Ertel Centre for Weather Research programme (HerZ), a data composite containing weather radar, lightning sensor, and Meteosat Second Generation observations is being developed for the use in object-based weather analysis and nowcasting. At present, a 3D merging scheme combines measurements of the Bonn and Jülich dual polarimetric weather radar systems (data provided by the TR32 and TERENO projects) into a 3-dimensional polar-stereographic volume grid, with 500 meters horizontal, and 250 meters vertical resolution. The merging takes into account and compensates for various observational error sources, such as attenuation through hydrometeors, beam blockage through topography and buildings, minimum detectable signal as a function of noise threshold, non-hydrometeor echos like insects, and interference from other radar systems. In addition to this, the effect of convection during the radar 5-minute volume scan pattern is mitigated through calculation of advection vectors from subsequent scans and their use for advection correction when projecting the measurements into space for any desired timestamp. The Meteosat Second Generation rapid scan service provides a scan in 12 spectral visual and infrared wavelengths every 5 minutes over Germany and Europe. These scans, together with the derived microphysical cloud parameters, are projected into the same polar stereographic grid used for the radar data. Lightning counts from the LINET lightning sensor network are also provided for every 2D grid pixel. The combined 3D radar and 2D MSG/LINET data is stored in a fully documented netCDF file for every 5 minute interval, and is made ready for tracking and object based weather analysis. At the moment, the 3D data only covers the Bonn and Jülich area, but the algorithms are planed to be adapted to the newly conceived DWD polarimetric C-Band 5 minute interval volume scan strategy. An

  18. A 3D high-resolution gamma camera for radiopharmaceutical studies with small animals

    CERN Document Server

    Loudos, G K; Giokaris, N D; Styliaris, E; Archimandritis, S C; Varvarigou, A D; Papanicolas, C N; Majewski, S; Weisenberger, D; Pani, R; Scopinaro, F; Uzunoglu, N K; Maintas, D; Stefanis, K

    2003-01-01

    The results of studies conducted with a small field of view tomographic gamma camera based on a Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube are reported. The system has been used for the evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals in small animals. Phantom studies have shown a spatial resolution of 2 mm in planar and 2-3 mm in tomographic imaging. Imaging studies in mice have been carried out both in 2D and 3D. Conventional radiopharmaceuticals have been used and the results have been compared with images from a clinically used system.

  19. A compact 3D omnidirectional range sensor of high resolution for robust reconstruction of environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marani, Roberto; Renò, Vito; Nitti, Massimiliano; D'Orazio, Tiziana; Stella, Ettore

    2015-01-22

    In this paper, an accurate range sensor for the three-dimensional reconstruction of environments is designed and developed. Following the principles of laser profilometry, the device exploits a set of optical transmitters able to project a laser line on the environment. A high-resolution and high-frame-rate camera assisted by a telecentric lens collects the laser light reflected by a parabolic mirror, whose shape is designed ad hoc to achieve a maximum measurement error of 10 mm when the target is placed 3 m away from the laser source. Measurements are derived by means of an analytical model, whose parameters are estimated during a preliminary calibration phase. Geometrical parameters, analytical modeling and image processing steps are validated through several experiments, which indicate the capability of the proposed device to recover the shape of a target with high accuracy. Experimental measurements show Gaussian statistics, having standard deviation of 1.74 mm within the measurable range. Results prove that the presented range sensor is a good candidate for environmental inspections and measurements.

  20. A Compact 3D Omnidirectional Range Sensor of High Resolution for Robust Reconstruction of Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Marani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an accurate range sensor for the three-dimensional reconstruction of environments is designed and developed. Following the principles of laser profilometry, the device exploits a set of optical transmitters able to project a laser line on the environment. A high-resolution and high-frame-rate camera assisted by a telecentric lens collects the laser light reflected by a parabolic mirror, whose shape is designed ad hoc to achieve a maximum measurement error of 10 mm when the target is placed 3 m away from the laser source. Measurements are derived by means of an analytical model, whose parameters are estimated during a preliminary calibration phase. Geometrical parameters, analytical modeling and image processing steps are validated through several experiments, which indicate the capability of the proposed device to recover the shape of a target with high accuracy. Experimental measurements show Gaussian statistics, having standard deviation of 1.74 mm within the measurable range. Results prove that the presented range sensor is a good candidate for environmental inspections and measurements.

  1. Fast High Resolution Volume Carving for 3D Plant Shoot Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanno Scharr

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Volume carving is a well established method for visual hull reconstruction and has been successfully applied in plant phenotyping, especially for 3d reconstruction of small plants and seeds. When imaging larger plants at still relatively high spatial resolution (≤1 mm, well known implementations become slow or have prohibitively large memory needs. Here we present and evaluate a computationally efficient algorithm for volume carving, allowing e.g., 3D reconstruction of plant shoots. It combines a well-known multi-grid representation called “Octree” with an efficient image region integration scheme called “Integral image.” Speedup with respect to less efficient octree implementations is about 2 orders of magnitude, due to the introduced refinement strategy “Mark and refine.” Speedup is about a factor 1.6 compared to a highly optimized GPU implementation using equidistant voxel grids, even without using any parallelization. We demonstrate the application of this method for trait derivation of banana and maize plants.

  2. High resolution Ca/P maps of bone architecture in 3D synchrotron radiation microtomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzaphlidou, M. [Laboratory of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Ioannina, PO Box 1186, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)]. E-mail: mtzaphli@cc.uoi.gr; Speller, R. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, 11-20 Capper Street, London WC1E 6JA (United Kingdom); Royle, G. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, 11-20 Capper Street, London WC1E 6JA (United Kingdom); Griffiths, J. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, 11-20 Capper Street, London WC1E 6JA (United Kingdom); Olivo, A. [Department of Physics, University of Trieste (Italy); Pani, S. [Department of Physics, University of Trieste (Italy); Longo, R. [Department of Physics, University of Trieste (Italy)

    2005-04-01

    The Ca/P ratio was measured in cortical bone samples from the femoral neck and tibia of different animal species, using synchrotron radiation microtomography. Use of a monoenergetic X-ray beam, as provided by the synchrotron facility, generates accurate 3D maps of the linear attenuation coefficient within the sample and hence gives the ability to map different chemical components. Also, by comparing normal and abnormal bones, i.e. osteoporotic (induced by inflammation), changes in the Ca/P ratio brought about by bone diseases can be detected. MicroCT data sets were collected at 20 and 28keV for each bone sample and two calibration phantoms. From the 3D data sets, multiple 2D slices were reconstructed with a slice thickness of {approx}30{mu}m. Regions of interest were defined around suitable sites and were converted to Ca/P ratios using the data collected from the test phantoms. A significant difference (p0.001) between osteoporotics and age-matched normals at both energies was detected. Differences between different bone sites from the same animal are not significant (p>0.5) while those between the same bone sites from different animals are highly significant (p0.001). Differences between estimates made at 20 and 28keV are not significant (p>0.5). An important aspect is the ability to map the spatial distribution of the Ca/P ratio.

  3. High-resolution 3D-GRE imaging of the abdomen using controlled aliasing acceleration technique - a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Busireddy, Kiran K R; Liu, Baodong; Burke, Lauren M; Altun, Ersan; Dale, Brian M; Semelka, Richard C

    2015-12-01

    To assess the feasibility of high-resolution 3D-gradient-recalled echo (GRE) fat-suppressed T1-weighted images using controlled aliasing acceleration technique (CAIPIRINHA-VIBE), and compare image quality and lesion detection to standard-resolution 3D-GRE images using conventional acceleration technique (GRAPPA-VIBE). Eighty-four patients (41 males, 43 females; age range: 14-90 years, 58.8 ± 15.6 years) underwent abdominal MRI at 1.5 T with CAIPIRINHA-VIBE [spatial resolution, 0.76 ± 0.04 mm] and GRAPPA-VIBE [spatial resolution, 1.17 ± 0.14 mm]. Two readers independently reviewed image quality, presence of artefacts, lesion conspicuity, and lesion detection. Kappa statistic was used to assess interobserver agreement. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for image qualitative pairwise comparisons. Logistic regression with post-hoc testing was used to evaluate statistical significance of lesions evaluation. Interobserver agreement ranged between 0.45-0.93. Pre-contrast CAIPIRINHA-VIBE showed significantly (p acceleration technique is feasible and yields sharper images compared to standard-resolution images using standard acceleration, with higher post-contrast image quality and trend for improved hepatic lesions detection. • High-resolution imaging of the upper abdomen is clinically feasible using 2D-controlled aliasing acceleration technique. • High-resolution imaging yields significantly sharper images and increased hepatic lesions conspicuity. • High-resolution imaging yields significantly less respiratory motion and residual aliasing artefacts. • Controlled-aliasing offers substantial acquisition-time reduction in patients with breath-holding difficulties.

  4. Automated detection, 3D segmentation and analysis of high resolution spine MR images using statistical shape models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, A; Fripp, J; Engstrom, C; Schwarz, R; Lauer, L; Salvado, O; Crozier, S

    2012-12-21

    Recent advances in high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine provide a basis for the automated assessment of intervertebral disc (IVD) and vertebral body (VB) anatomy. High resolution three-dimensional (3D) morphological information contained in these images may be useful for early detection and monitoring of common spine disorders, such as disc degeneration. This work proposes an automated approach to extract the 3D segmentations of lumbar and thoracic IVDs and VBs from MR images using statistical shape analysis and registration of grey level intensity profiles. The algorithm was validated on a dataset of volumetric scans of the thoracolumbar spine of asymptomatic volunteers obtained on a 3T scanner using the relatively new 3D T2-weighted SPACE pulse sequence. Manual segmentations and expert radiological findings of early signs of disc degeneration were used in the validation. There was good agreement between manual and automated segmentation of the IVD and VB volumes with the mean Dice scores of 0.89 ± 0.04 and 0.91 ± 0.02 and mean absolute surface distances of 0.55 ± 0.18 mm and 0.67 ± 0.17 mm respectively. The method compares favourably to existing 3D MR segmentation techniques for VBs. This is the first time IVDs have been automatically segmented from 3D volumetric scans and shape parameters obtained were used in preliminary analyses to accurately classify (100% sensitivity, 98.3% specificity) disc abnormalities associated with early degenerative changes.

  5. Can high resolution 3D topographic surveys provide reliable grain size estimates in gravel bed rivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, E.; Smith, M. W.; Klaar, M. J.; Brown, L. E.

    2017-09-01

    High resolution topographic surveys such as those provided by Structure-from-Motion (SfM) contain a wealth of information that is not always exploited in the generation of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). In particular, several authors have related sub-metre scale topographic variability (or 'surface roughness') to sediment grain size by deriving empirical relationships between the two. In fluvial applications, such relationships permit rapid analysis of the spatial distribution of grain size over entire river reaches, providing improved data to drive three-dimensional hydraulic models, allowing rapid geomorphic monitoring of sub-reach river restoration projects, and enabling more robust characterisation of riverbed habitats. However, comparison of previously published roughness-grain-size relationships shows substantial variability between field sites. Using a combination of over 300 laboratory and field-based SfM surveys, we demonstrate the influence of inherent survey error, irregularity of natural gravels, particle shape, grain packing structure, sorting, and form roughness on roughness-grain-size relationships. Roughness analysis from SfM datasets can accurately predict the diameter of smooth hemispheres, though natural, irregular gravels result in a higher roughness value for a given diameter and different grain shapes yield different relationships. A suite of empirical relationships is presented as a decision tree which improves predictions of grain size. By accounting for differences in patch facies, large improvements in D50 prediction are possible. SfM is capable of providing accurate grain size estimates, although further refinement is needed for poorly sorted gravel patches, for which c-axis percentiles are better predicted than b-axis percentiles.

  6. Assessment of engineered surfaces roughness by high-resolution 3D SEM photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontard, L C; López-Castro, J D; González-Rovira, L; Vázquez-Martínez, J M; Varela-Feria, F M; Marcos, M; Calvino, J J

    2017-06-01

    We describe a methodology to obtain three-dimensional models of engineered surfaces using scanning electron microscopy and multi-view photogrammetry (3DSEM). For the reconstruction of the 3D models of the surfaces we used freeware available in the cloud. The method was applied to study the surface roughness of metallic samples patterned with parallel grooves by means of laser. The results are compared with measurements obtained using stylus profilometry (PR) and SEM stereo-photogrammetry (SP). The application of 3DSEM is more time demanding than PR or SP, but it provides a more accurate representation of the surfaces. The results obtained with the three techniques are compared by investigating the influence of sampling step on roughness parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Denoising of high resolution small animal 3D PET data using the non-subsampled Haar wavelet transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa Domínguez, Humberto de Jesús, E-mail: hochoa@uacj.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Máynez, Leticia O. [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Vergara Villegas, Osslan O. [Departamento de Ingeniería Industrial, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Mederos, Boris; Mejía, José M.; Cruz Sánchez, Vianey G. [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico)

    2015-06-01

    PET allows functional imaging of the living tissue. However, one of the most serious technical problems affecting the reconstructed data is the noise, particularly in images of small animals. In this paper, a method for high-resolution small animal 3D PET data is proposed with the aim to reduce the noise and preserve details. The method is based on the estimation of the non-subsampled Haar wavelet coefficients by using a linear estimator. The procedure is applied to the volumetric images, reconstructed without correction factors (plane reconstruction). Results show that the method preserves the structures and drastically reduces the noise that contaminates the image.

  8. A high resolution hydrodynamic 3-D model simulation of the malta shelf area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Drago

    Full Text Available The seasonal variability of the water masses and transport in the Malta Channel and proximity of the Maltese Islands have been simulated by a high resolution (1.6 km horizontal grid on average, 15 vertical sigma layers eddy resolving primitive equation shelf model (ROSARIO-I. The numerical simulation was run with climatological forcing and includes thermohaline dynamics with a turbulence scheme for the vertical mixing coefficients on the basis of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM. The model has been coupled by one-way nesting along three lateral boundaries (east, south and west to an intermediate coarser resolution model (5 km implemented over the Sicilian Channel area. The fields at the open boundaries and the atmospheric forcing at the air-sea interface were applied on a repeating "perpetual" year climatological cycle.

    The ability of the model to reproduce a realistic circulation of the Sicilian-Maltese shelf area has been demonstrated. The skill of the nesting procedure was tested by model-modelc omparisons showing that the major features of the coarse model flow field can be reproduced by the fine model with additional eddy space scale components. The numerical results included upwelling, mainly in summer and early autumn, along the southern coasts of Sicily and Malta; a strong eastward shelf surface flow along shore to Sicily, forming part of the Atlantic Ionian Stream, with a presence throughout the year and with significant seasonal modulation, and a westward winter intensified flow of LIW centered at a depth of around 280 m under the shelf break to the south of Malta. The seasonal variability in the thermohaline structure of the domain and the associated large-scale flow structures can be related to the current knowledge on the observed hydrography of the area. The level of mesoscale resolution achieved by the model allowed the spatial and temporal evolution of the changing flow patterns, triggered by

  9. A high resolution hydrodynamic 3-D model simulation of the malta shelf area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Drago

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal variability of the water masses and transport in the Malta Channel and proximity of the Maltese Islands have been simulated by a high resolution (1.6 km horizontal grid on average, 15 vertical sigma layers eddy resolving primitive equation shelf model (ROSARIO-I. The numerical simulation was run with climatological forcing and includes thermohaline dynamics with a turbulence scheme for the vertical mixing coefficients on the basis of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM. The model has been coupled by one-way nesting along three lateral boundaries (east, south and west to an intermediate coarser resolution model (5 km implemented over the Sicilian Channel area. The fields at the open boundaries and the atmospheric forcing at the air-sea interface were applied on a repeating "perpetual" year climatological cycle. The ability of the model to reproduce a realistic circulation of the Sicilian-Maltese shelf area has been demonstrated. The skill of the nesting procedure was tested by model-modelc omparisons showing that the major features of the coarse model flow field can be reproduced by the fine model with additional eddy space scale components. The numerical results included upwelling, mainly in summer and early autumn, along the southern coasts of Sicily and Malta; a strong eastward shelf surface flow along shore to Sicily, forming part of the Atlantic Ionian Stream, with a presence throughout the year and with significant seasonal modulation, and a westward winter intensified flow of LIW centered at a depth of around 280 m under the shelf break to the south of Malta. The seasonal variability in the thermohaline structure of the domain and the associated large-scale flow structures can be related to the current knowledge on the observed hydrography of the area. The level of mesoscale resolution achieved by the model allowed the spatial and temporal evolution of the changing flow patterns, triggered by internal dynamics, to be followed in

  10. Novel short-pulse laser diode source for high-resolution 3D flash lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Celine; Laugustin, Arnaud; Kohl, Andreas; Rabot, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    Imaging based on laser illumination is present in various fields of applications such as medicine, security, defense, civil engineering and in the automotive sector. In this last domain, research and development to bring autonomous vehicles on the roads has been intensified the recent years. Among the various technologies currently studied, automotive lidars are a fast-growing one due to their accuracy to detect a wide range of objects at distances up to a few hundreds of meters in various weather conditions. First commercialized devices for ADAS were laser scanners. Since then, new architectures have recently appeared such as solid-state lidar and flash lidar that offer a higher compactness, robustness and a cost reduction. Flash lidars are based on time-of-flight measurements, with the particularity that they do not require beam scanners because only one short laser pulse with a large divergence is used to enlighten the whole scene. Depth of encountered objects can then be recovered from measurement of echoed light at once, hence enabling real-time 3D mapping of the environment. This paper will bring into the picture a cutting edge laser diode source that can deliver millijoule pulses as short as 12 ns, which makes them highly suitable for integration in flash lidars. They provide a 100-kW peak power highly divergent beam in a footprint of 4x5 cm2 (including both the laser diode and driver) and with a 30-% electrical-to-optical efficiency, making them suitable for integration in environments in which compactness and power consumption are a priority. Their emission in the range of 800-1000 nm is considered to be eye safe when taking into account the high divergence of the output beam. An overview of architecture of these state-of-the-art pulsed laser diode sources will be given together with some solutions for their integration in 3D mapping systems. Future work leads will be discussed for miniaturization of the laser diode and drastic cost reduction.

  11. Study of CT-based positron range correction in high resolution 3D PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cal-Gonzalez, J., E-mail: jacobo@nuclear.fis.ucm.es [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Herraiz, J.L. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Vicente, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Herranz, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Dpto. de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Positron range limits the spatial resolution of PET images and has a different effect for different isotopes and positron propagation materials. Therefore it is important to consider it during image reconstruction, in order to obtain optimal image quality. Positron range distributions for most common isotopes used in PET in different materials were computed using the Monte Carlo simulations with PeneloPET. The range profiles were introduced into the 3D OSEM image reconstruction software FIRST and employed to blur the image either in the forward projection or in the forward and backward projection. The blurring introduced takes into account the different materials in which the positron propagates. Information on these materials may be obtained, for instance, from a segmentation of a CT image. The results of introducing positron blurring in both forward and backward projection operations was compared to using it only during forward projection. Further, the effect of different shapes of positron range profile in the quality of the reconstructed images with positron range correction was studied. For high positron energy isotopes, the reconstructed images show significant improvement in spatial resolution when positron range is taken into account during reconstruction, compared to reconstructions without positron range modeling.

  12. High resolution 3D imaging of bump-bonds by means of synchrotron radiation computed laminography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecilia, A.; Hamann, E.; Koenig, T.; Xu, F.; Cheng, Y.; Helfen, L.; Ruat, M.; Scheel, M.; Zuber, M.; Baumbach, T.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.

    2013-12-01

    During the flip-chip bonding process of a semiconductor sensor onto readout electronics, a formation of defects may take place, like solder joint displacements, voids, cracks, pores and bridges. This may result in blind spots on the detector, which are insensitive to photons and thus reduce the detector performance. In this work, the flip-chip interconnections of selected CdTe and GaAs Medipix detectors were investigated by synchrotron radiation computed laminography at a micrometer scale. The analysis of the volume rendering proved the presence of voids in the CdTe sensor flip-chip interconnections, with sizes between 3 μm and 9 μm. These voids can be harmful for the long term use of the device, because their presence weakens the adhesive strength between a contact and the readout electronics. Consequently, their formation needs to be avoided. The GaAs Medipix detectors investigated include two sensors that were produced with different flip-chip methods. The comparison of the 3D renderings of the bump-bond interconnections in the two GaAs sensors demonstrated the presence of a misalignment in the range of 5-12 μm between pixel passivation and bump-bonds in the detector produced with an older technique. In contrast to this, no misalignment was observed for the most recently produced detector. The only remarkable observation is the presence of ``satellites'' of solder that do not compromise the detector operation.

  13. 3-D photoacoustic and pulse echo imaging of prostate tumor progression in the mouse window chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Daniel R.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Montilla, Leonardo G.; Witte, Russell S.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the tumor microenvironment is critical to characterizing how cancers operate and predicting their response to treatment. We describe a novel, high-resolution coregistered photoacoustic (PA) and pulse echo (PE) ultrasound system used to image the tumor microenvironment. Compared to traditional optical systems, the platform provides complementary contrast and important depth information. Three mice are implanted with a dorsal skin flap window chamber and injected with PC-3 prostate tumor cells transfected with green fluorescent protein. The ensuing tumor invasion is mapped during three weeks or more using simultaneous PA and PE imaging at 25 MHz, combined with optical and fluorescent techniques. Pulse echo imaging provides details of tumor structure and the surrounding environment with 100-μm3 resolution. Tumor size increases dramatically with an average volumetric growth rate of 5.35 mm3∕day, correlating well with 2-D fluorescent imaging (R = 0.97, p < 0.01). Photoacoustic imaging is able to track the underlying vascular network and identify hemorrhaging, while PA spectroscopy helps classify blood vessels according to their optical absorption spectrum, suggesting variation in blood oxygen saturation. Photoacoustic and PE imaging are safe, translational modalities that provide enhanced depth resolution and complementary contrast to track the tumor microenvironment, evaluate new cancer therapies, and develop molecular contrast agents in vivo. PMID:21361696

  14. High-Resolution Urban Greenery Mapping for Micro-Climate Modelling Based on 3d City Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofierka, J.; Gallay, M.; Kaňuk, J.; Šupinský, J.; Šašak, J.

    2017-10-01

    Urban greenery has various positive micro-climate effects including mitigation of heat islands. The primary root of heat islands in cities is in absorption of solar radiation by the mass of building structures, roads and other solid materials. The absorbed heat is subsequently re-radiated into the surroundings and increases ambient temperatures. The vegetation can stop and absorb most of incoming solar radiation mostly via the photosynthesis and evapotranspiration process. However, vegetation in mild climate of Europe manifests considerable annual seasonality which can also contribute to the seasonal change in the cooling effect of the vegetation on the urban climate. Modern methods of high-resolution mapping and new generations of sensors have brought opportunity to record the dynamics of urban greenery in a high resolution in spatial, spectral, and temporal domains. In this paper, we use the case study of the city of Košice in Eastern Slovakia to demonstrate the methodology of 3D mapping and modelling the urban greenery during one vegetation season in 2016. The purpose of this monitoring is to capture 3D effects of urban greenery on spatial distribution of solar radiation in urban environment. Terrestrial laser scanning was conducted on four selected sites within Košice in ultra-high spatial resolution. The entire study area, which included these four smaller sites, comprised 4 km2 of the central part of the city was flown within a single airborne lidar and photogrammetric mission to capture the upper parts of buildings and vegetation. The acquired airborne data were used to generate a 3D city model and the time series of terrestrial lidar data were integrated with the 3D city model. The results show that the terrestrial and airborne laser scanning techniques can be effectively used to monitor seasonal changes in foliage of trees in order to assess the transmissivity of the canopy for microclimate modelling.

  15. HIGH-RESOLUTION URBAN GREENERY MAPPING FOR MICRO-CLIMATE MODELLING BASED ON 3D CITY MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hofierka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Urban greenery has various positive micro-climate effects including mitigation of heat islands. The primary root of heat islands in cities is in absorption of solar radiation by the mass of building structures, roads and other solid materials. The absorbed heat is subsequently re-radiated into the surroundings and increases ambient temperatures. The vegetation can stop and absorb most of incoming solar radiation mostly via the photosynthesis and evapotranspiration process. However, vegetation in mild climate of Europe manifests considerable annual seasonality which can also contribute to the seasonal change in the cooling effect of the vegetation on the urban climate. Modern methods of high-resolution mapping and new generations of sensors have brought opportunity to record the dynamics of urban greenery in a high resolution in spatial, spectral, and temporal domains. In this paper, we use the case study of the city of Košice in Eastern Slovakia to demonstrate the methodology of 3D mapping and modelling the urban greenery during one vegetation season in 2016. The purpose of this monitoring is to capture 3D effects of urban greenery on spatial distribution of solar radiation in urban environment. Terrestrial laser scanning was conducted on four selected sites within Košice in ultra-high spatial resolution. The entire study area, which included these four smaller sites, comprised 4 km2 of the central part of the city was flown within a single airborne lidar and photogrammetric mission to capture the upper parts of buildings and vegetation. The acquired airborne data were used to generate a 3D city model and the time series of terrestrial lidar data were integrated with the 3D city model. The results show that the terrestrial and airborne laser scanning techniques can be effectively used to monitor seasonal changes in foliage of trees in order to assess the transmissivity of the canopy for microclimate modelling.

  16. 3D high-resolution thermomechanical modeling of Venus coronae and novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, Taras

    2013-04-01

    513 coronae and 64 novae are large (typically several hundred km across) circular surface features on Venus, whose complex structures, with traces of tectonic and magmatic activity as well as their mutual relationship remain enigmatic. Several competing hypotheses were proposed for both coronae and novae based on variability of their sizes, shapes, internal structures and topography, yet little work has been done for quantitative testing of these hypotheses. Here we demonstrate based on new high-resolution three-dimensional thermomechanical numerical model that formation of medium sized (50-300 km) novae and coronae can be explained by tectono-magmatic interaction of mantle plume with hot and thin lithosphere, which has thick low-viscosity lower-middle crust and thin brittle upper crust characterized by elevated surface temperature. According to this model, the process is initiated by decompression melting of hot plume material, which penetrates to the bottom of the lower crust. This melting produces large amount of mafic magma intruding into the ductile lower crust and triggering crustal melting and convection. The crustal convection cell exists for up to several tens of millions years where plume magma and partially molten lower-middle crustal rocks interact and mechanically mix causing gradual thinning and then breaking and fragmentation of the brittle upper crustal lid. The long time span of the convection cell is maintained by the plume heat, which causes gradual warming and melting of crustal rocks. Up to six subsequent stages of the convection cell evolution are found in the experiments : (1) pre-nova stage, (2) young and (3) mature nova stages, and (4) advancing, (5) subsiding and (6) fossil corona stages, which differ in term of crustal structure and fracturing and topography patterns. Novae forms at the initial stage of the process by radial fracturing of the uplifted region above the actively rising convection cell center. At the later stage, such novae

  17. Intraoperative neuronavigation integrated high resolution 3D ultrasound for brainshift and tumor resection control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The link between the neurosurgeon’s knowledge and the scientific improvements made a dramatic change in the field expressed both in impressive drop in the mortality and morbidity rates that were operated in the beginning of the XXth century and in operating with high rates of success cases that were considered inoperable in the past. Neuronavigation systems have been used for many years on surgical orientation purposes especially for small, deep seated lesions where the use of neuronavigation is correlated with smaller corticotomies and with the extended use of transulcal approaches. The major problem of neuronavigation, the brainshift once the dura is opened can be solved either by integrated ultrasound or intraoperative MRI which is out of reach for many neurosurgical departments. METHOD: The procedure of neuronavigation and ultrasonic localization of the tumor is described starting with positioning the patient in the visual field of the neuronavigation integrated 3D ultrasonography system to the control of tumor resection by repeating the ultrasonographic scan in the end of the procedure. DISCUSSION: As demonstrated by many clinical trials on gliomas, the more tumor removed, the better long term control of tumor regrowth and the longer survival with a good quality of life. Of course, no matter how aggressive the surgery, no new deficits are acceptable in the modern era neurosurgery. There are many adjuvant methods for the neurosurgeon to achieve this maximal and safe tumor removal, including the 3T MRI combined with tractography and functional MRI, the intraoperative neuronavigation and neurophysiologic monitoring in both anesthetized and awake patients. The ultrasonography integrated in neuronavigaton comes as a welcomed addition to this adjuvants to help the surgeon achieve the set purpose. CONCLUSION: With the use of this real time imaging device, the common problem of brainshift encountered with the neuronavigation systems

  18. High resolution 3D MRI of mouse mammary glands with intra-ductal injection of contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Erica; Fan, Xiaobing; Mustafi, Devkumar; Zamora, Marta; Roman, Brian B; Jansen, Sanaz A; Macleod, Kay; Conzen, Suzanne D; Karczmar, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use high resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study mouse mammary gland ductal architecture based on intra-ductal injection of contrast agents. Female FVB/N mice age 12-20 weeks (n=12), were used in this study. A 34G, 45° tip Hamilton needle with a 25μL Hamilton syringe was inserted into the tip of the nipple. Approximately 20-25μL of a Gadodiamide/Trypan blue/saline solution was injected slowly over one minute into the nipple and duct. To prevent washout of contrast media from ducts due to perfusion, and maximize the conspicuity of ducts on MRI, mice were sacrificed one minute after injection. High resolution 3D T1-weighted images were acquired on a 9.4T Bruker scanner after sacrifice to eliminate motion artifacts and reduce contrast media leakage from ducts. Trypan blue staining was well distributed throughout the ductal tree. MRI showed the mammary gland ductal structure clearly. In spoiled gradient echo T1-weighted images, the signal-to-noise ratio of regions identified as enhancing mammary ducts following contrast injection was significantly higher than that of muscle (pcontrast media (pcontrast agents to measure metabolism or target receptors in normal ducts and ducts with in situ cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterizing the metabolic heterogeneity in human breast cancer xenografts by 3D high resolution fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N; Zheng, Gang; Tchou, Julia; Nioka, Shoko; Li, Lin Z

    2013-12-01

    necrotic regions, indicative of the existence of viable cells which was also supported by the H&E staining. Significant heterogeneity of the redox state indices was also observed in clinical specimens of breast cancer patients. As abnormal metabolism including the Warburg effect (high glycolysis) plays important roles in cancer transformation and progression, our observations that reveal the 3D intratumor metabolic heterogeneity as a characteristic feature of breast tumors are of great importance for understanding cancer biology and developing diagnostic and therapeutic methods.

  20. SAETTA: high resolution 3D mapping of the lightning activity around Corsica Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquillat, Sylvain; Defer, Eric; Lambert, Dominique; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Pont, Véronique; Prieur, Serge

    2017-04-01

    In the frame of the French atmospheric observatory CORSiCA (http://www.obs-mip.fr/corsica), a total lightning activity detection system called SAETTA (Suivi de l'Activité Electrique Tridimensionnelle Totale de l'Atmosphère) has been deployed in Corsica Island in order to strengthen the potential of observation of convective events causing heavy rainfall and flash floods in the West Mediterranean basin. SAETTA is a network of 12 LMA stations (Lightning Mapping Array) developed by New Mexico Tech (USA). The instrument allows observing lightning flashes in 3D and real time, at high temporal (80 µs) and spatial resolutions. It detects the radiations emitted by cloud discharges in the 60-66 MHz band, in a radius of about 350 km from the centre of the network, in passive mode and standalone (solar panel and batteries). Initially deployed in May 2014, SAETTA operated from July 13 to October 20 in 2014 and from April 19 to December 1st in 2015. It is now in permanent operation since 16 April 2016. Many high quality observations have been performed so far that provide an accurate location in space and time of the convective events. They also bring interesting dynamical and microphysical features of those events. For example the intensity of the convective surges, the transport of charged ice particles in the stratiform area of the thunderclouds can be deduced from SAETTA observations. Specific events have also been detected as well: bolts-from-the-blue, inter cloud discharges, high level discharges in convective but also in stratiform areas, inverted dipoles. The specific lightning patterns of 2015 illustrate the complex influence of the relief, probably via slope and valley winds over Corsica and via induced lee-side convergences over the sea. SAETTA is expected to operate for at least a decade over Corsica so it will participate to the calibration/validation of upcoming lightning detectors from space such as MTG-LI. It will also be a key instrument during the field

  1. High resolution 3D global climate modeling of Pluto's atmosphere to interpret New Horizons observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Tanguy; Forget, Francois; New Horizons Science Team

    2017-10-01

    We use the LMD Global Climate Model (GCM) of Pluto's atmosphere to interpret New Horizons observations and simulate the Pluto climate system. The model takes into account the cycles of N2, CH4, CO and organic haze. It is described in details in Forget et al., 2017. In order to ensure our simulations, sensitive to our initial conditions, correctly describe reality, we initialize the 3D model with a set of subsurface temperatures and ice distribution, which converged toward steady state after thousands of years simulated with a 2D version of the model (Bertrand and Forget, 2016).We identify three “realistic” simulations which differ by their spatial distribution of N2 ice in 2015 but remain consistent with the evolution of the surface pressure (Sicardy et al., 2016) and the amount of atmospheric methane observed on Pluto (Lellouch et al., 2015). We perform a comprehensive characterization of Pluto’s atmosphere in 2015 using these simulations. Near surface winds can be compared to wind streaks on Pluto, while the simulated waves and thermal structure can be compared to the New Horizons occultations measurements (Hinson et al., 2017).In particular, we demonstrate the sensitivity of the general circulation to the distribution of N2 ice on the surface. Our latest results suggest that Pluto’s atmosphere undergoes retrograde rotation, a unique circulation regime in the Solar System, induced by the condensation-sublimation of N2 in the Sputnik Planitia basin. In Sputnik Planitia, the near-surface winds favor a deposition of haze particles in the northern and western part of the ice cap, which helps to interpret the different colors observed. The GCM also shows that several atmospheric phenomena are at the origin of the cold boundary layer observed deep in the Sputnik Planitia basin, in particular the sublimation of N2, effects of topography and the supply of cold air by winds. This allows us to understand the near-surface differences observed between the entry and

  2. High-resolution 3D reconstruction of microtubule structures by quantitative multi-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Luhong; Wu, Jian; Xiu, Peng; Fan, Jiannan; Hu, Miao; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Liu, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) has been widely used in biomedical research to visualize cellular processes near the cell surface. In this study, a novel multi-angle ring-illuminated TIRFM system, equipped with two galvo mirrors that are on conjugate plan of a 4f optical system was developed. Multi-angle TIRFM generates images with different penetration depths through the controlled variation of the incident angle of illuminating laser. We presented a method to perform three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of microtubules from multi-angle TIRFM images. The performance of our method was validated in simulated microtubules with variable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and the axial resolution and accuracy of reconstruction were evaluated in selecting different numbers of illumination angles or in different SNR conditions. In U373 cells, we reconstructed the 3-D localization of microtubules near the cell surface with high resolution using over a hundred different angles. Theoretically, the presented TIRFM setup and 3-D reconstruction method can achieve 40 nm axial resolution in experimental conditions where SNR is as low as 2, with 35 different illumination angles. Moreover, our system and reconstruction method have the potential to be used in live cells to track membrane dynamics in 3-D.

  3. High resolution model mesh and 3D printing of the Gaudí’s Porta del Drac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Juan; Garcia-Almirall, Pilar; Marco, Adria

    2017-10-01

    This article intends to explore the limits of scanning with the technology of 3D Laser Scanner and the 3D printing, as an approximation to its application for the survey and the study of singular elements of the architectural heritage. The case study we developed is the Porta del Drac, in the Pavelló Güell, designed by Antoni Gaudí. We divided the process in two parts, one about how to scan and optimize the survey with the Laser Scanner Technology, made with a Faro Forus3D x330 scanner. The second one, about the optimization of the survey as a high-resolution mesh to have a scaled 3D model to be printed in 3D, for the musealization of the Verdaguer House of Literature in Vil.la Joana (Barcelona), a project developed by the Museum of History of Barcelona, in tribute to Jacint Verdaguer. In the first place, we propose a methodology for the survey of this atypical model, which is of special interest for several factors: the geometric complexity in relation to the occlusions, the thickness of the metallic surfaces, the hidden internal structure partially seen from the outside, the produced noise in its interior, and the instrumental errors. These factors make the survey process complex from the data collection, having to perform several scans from different positions to cover the entire sculpture, which has a geometry composed of a variety of folds that cause occlusions. Also, the union of the positions and the average of the surfaces is of great relevance, since the elements of the sculpture are constructed by a metal plate of 2mm, therefore, the error in the union of all these many positions must be smaller than this. Moreover, optimization of the cloud has a great difficulty because of the noise created by the instrumental error as it is a metal sculpture and because of noise point clouds that are generated inside the internal folds of the wings, which are made with a welded wire mesh with little spaces between them. Finally, the added difficulty that there is an

  4. High-resolution 3D magnetic resonance imaging and quantification of carious lesions and dental pulp in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymofiyeva, Olga; Boldt, Julian; Rottner, Kurt; Schmid, Florian; Richter, Ernst-Juergen; Jakob, Peter M

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the feasibility of MRI of three-dimensional visualization and quantification of carious lesions, as well as measurement of the distance between the lesion and dental pulp in vivo. High-resolution 3D MRI was performed to measure seven carious lesions in vivo using gelatinous gadolinium-based oral contrast medium in combination with an intraoral radio frequency receiver coil on a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner. Extension of the carious lesion in three spatial dimensions and the minimum distance between the lesion and dental pulp were quantified. When possible, the result was compared to an X-ray projection and an impression of the lesion taken using a plastic impression material before and after dental treatment. Carious lesions, including pit and fissure, approximal lesions, and occult dentin caries, could be visualized due to the MRI signal rise in the porous affected dentin. The minimum distance between the carious lesion and dental pulp could be determined in all cases. The results presented demonstrate the feasibility of high-resolution dental MRI to three-dimensionally visualize and quantify carious lesions, including approximal and occult caries lesions, and measure the minimum distance to the dental pulp.

  5. 3D Geological Object Recognition in High-Resolution Seismic Data : A Case Study from a Palaeocene Fluvio-Estuarine Reservoir in Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivera Rabelo, I.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop methods for extracting and quantifying sedimentary bodies in 3D high-resolution seismic data. A case study was used with an exceptionally high-resolution seismic and a large number of wells: the Palaeocene Tambaredjo field in Suriname. A large-scale

  6. 3D Geological Object Recognition in High-Resolution Seismic Data: A Case Study from a Palaeocene Fluvio-Estuarine Reservoir in Suriname

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera Rabelo, I.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop methods for extracting and quantifying sedimentary bodies in 3D high-resolution seismic data. A case study was used with an exceptionally high-resolution seismic and a large number of wells: the Palaeocene Tambaredjo field in Suriname. A large-scale interactive 3D visualization system was used to permit interactive exploration of seismic volumes and to make appropriate choices of the processing methods to be used. The different output volumes provided...

  7. Skeletonization algorithm-based blood vessel quantification using in vivo 3D photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiburger, K. M.; Nam, S. Y.; Chung, E.; Suggs, L. J.; Emelianov, S. Y.; Molinari, F.

    2016-11-01

    Blood vessels are the only system to provide nutrients and oxygen to every part of the body. Many diseases can have significant effects on blood vessel formation, so that the vascular network can be a cue to assess malicious tumor and ischemic tissues. Various imaging techniques can visualize blood vessel structure, but their applications are often constrained by either expensive costs, contrast agents, ionizing radiations, or a combination of the above. Photoacoustic imaging combines the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging, and image contrast depends on optical absorption. This enables the detection of light absorbing chromophores such as hemoglobin with a greater penetration depth compared to purely optical techniques. We present here a skeletonization algorithm for vessel architectural analysis using non-invasive photoacoustic 3D images acquired without the administration of any exogenous contrast agents. 3D photoacoustic images were acquired on rats (n  =  4) in two different time points: before and after a burn surgery. A skeletonization technique based on the application of a vesselness filter and medial axis extraction is proposed to extract the vessel structure from the image data and six vascular parameters (number of vascular trees (NT), vascular density (VD), number of branches (NB), 2D distance metric (DM), inflection count metric (ICM), and sum of angles metric (SOAM)) were calculated from the skeleton. The parameters were compared (1) in locations with and without the burn wound on the same day and (2) in the same anatomic location before (control) and after the burn surgery. Four out of the six descriptors were statistically different (VD, NB, DM, ICM, p  <  0.05) when comparing two anatomic locations on the same day and when considering the same anatomic location at two separate times (i.e. before and after burn surgery). The study demonstrates an

  8. High-resolution 3D-GRE imaging of the abdomen using controlled aliasing acceleration technique - a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Busireddy, Kiran K.R.; Liu, Baodong; Burke, Lauren M.; Altun, Ersan; Semelka, Richard C. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Radiology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Dale, Brian M. [Siemens Medical Solutions, MR Research and Development, Morrisville, NC (United States)

    2015-12-15

    To assess the feasibility of high-resolution 3D-gradient-recalled echo (GRE) fat-suppressed T1-weighted images using controlled aliasing acceleration technique (CAIPIRINHA-VIBE), and compare image quality and lesion detection to standard-resolution 3D-GRE images using conventional acceleration technique (GRAPPA-VIBE). Eighty-four patients (41 males, 43 females; age range: 14-90 years, 58.8 ± 15.6 years) underwent abdominal MRI at 1.5 T with CAIPIRINHA-VIBE [spatial resolution, 0.76 ± 0.04 mm] and GRAPPA-VIBE [spatial resolution, 1.17 ± 0.14 mm]. Two readers independently reviewed image quality, presence of artefacts, lesion conspicuity, and lesion detection. Kappa statistic was used to assess interobserver agreement. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for image qualitative pairwise comparisons. Logistic regression with post-hoc testing was used to evaluate statistical significance of lesions evaluation. Interobserver agreement ranged between 0.45-0.93. Pre-contrast CAIPIRINHA-VIBE showed significantly (p < 0.001) sharper images and lesion conspicuity with decreased residual aliasing, but more noise enhancement and inferior image quality. Post-contrast CAIPIRINHA-VIBE showed significantly (p < 0.001) sharper images and higher lesion conspicuity, with less respiratory motion and residual aliasing artefacts. Inferior fat-suppression was noticeable on CAIPIRINHA-VIBE sequences (p < 0.001). High in-plane resolution abdominal 3D-GRE fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging using controlled-aliasing acceleration technique is feasible and yields sharper images compared to standard-resolution images using standard acceleration, with higher post-contrast image quality and trend for improved hepatic lesions detection. (orig.)

  9. Digitized crime scene forensics: automated trace separation of toolmarks on high-resolution 2D/3D CLSM surface data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausing, Eric; Vielhauer, Claus

    2015-03-01

    Locksmith forensics is an important and very challenging part of classic crime scene forensics. In prior work, we propose a partial transfer to the digital domain, to effectively support forensic experts and present approaches for a full process chain consisting of five steps: Trace positioning, 2D/3D acquisition with a confocal 3D laser scanning microscope, detection by segmentation, trace type determination, and determination of the opening method. In particular the step of trace segmentation on high-resolution 3D surfaces thereby turned out to be the part most difficult to implement. The reason for that is the highly structured and complex surfaces to be analyzed. These surfaces are cluttered with a high number of toolmarks, which overlap and distort each other. In Clausing et al., we present an improved approach for a reliable segmentation of relevant trace regions but without the possibility of separating single traces out of segmented trace regions. However, in our past research, especially features based on shape and dimension turned out to be highly relevant for a fully automated analysis and interpretation. In this paper, we consequently propose an approach for this separation. To achieve this goal, we use our segmentation approach and expand it with a combination of the watershed algorithm with a graph-based analysis. Found sub-regions are compared based on their surface character and are connected or divided depending on their similarity. We evaluate our approach with a test set of about 1,300 single traces on the exemplary locking cylinder component 'key pin' and thereby are able of showing the high suitability of our approach.

  10. 3D printing for orthopedic applications: from high resolution cone beam CT images to life size physical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Amiee; Ray, Lawrence A.; Dangi, Shusil; Ben-Zikri, Yehuda K.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2017-03-01

    With increasing resolution in image acquisition, the project explores capabilities of printing toward faithfully reflecting detail and features depicted in medical images. To improve safety and efficiency of orthopedic surgery and spatial conceptualization in training and education, this project focused on generating virtual models of orthopedic anatomy from clinical quality computed tomography (CT) image datasets and manufacturing life-size physical models of the anatomy using 3D printing tools. Beginning with raw micro CT data, several image segmentation techniques including thresholding, edge recognition, and region-growing algorithms available in packages such as ITK-SNAP, MITK, or Mimics, were utilized to separate bone from surrounding soft tissue. After converting the resulting data to a standard 3D printing format, stereolithography (STL), the STL file was edited using Meshlab, Netfabb, and Meshmixer. The editing process was necessary to ensure a fully connected surface (no loose elements), positive volume with manifold geometry (geometry possible in the 3D physical world), and a single, closed shell. The resulting surface was then imported into a "slicing" software to scale and orient for printing on a Flashforge Creator Pro. In printing, relationships between orientation, print bed volume, model quality, material use and cost, and print time were considered. We generated anatomical models of the hand, elbow, knee, ankle, and foot from both low-dose high-resolution cone-beam CT images acquired using the soon to be released scanner developed by Carestream, as well as scaled models of the skeletal anatomy of the arm and leg, together with life-size models of the hand and foot.

  11. High-resolution all-optical photoacoustic imaging system for remote interrogation of biological specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin

    2014-05-01

    Conventional photoacoustic imaging (PAI) employs light pulses to produce a photoacoustic (PA) effect and detects the resulting acoustic waves using an ultrasound transducer acoustically coupled to the target tissue. The resolution of conventional PAI is limited by the sensitivity and bandwidth of the ultrasound transducer. We have developed an all-optical versatile PAI system for characterizing ex vivo and in vivo biological specimens. The system employs noncontact interferometric detection of the acoustic signals that overcomes limitations of conventional PAI. A 532-nm pump laser with a pulse duration of 5 ns excited the PA effect in tissue. Resulting acoustic waves produced surface displacements that were sensed using a 532-nm continuous-wave (CW) probe laser in a Michelson interferometer with a GHz bandwidth. The pump and probe beams were coaxially focused using a 50X objective giving a diffraction-limited spot size of 0.48 μm. The phase-encoded probe beam was demodulated using a homodyne interferometer. The detected time-domain signal was time reversed using k-space wave-propagation methods to produce a spatial distribution of PA sources in the target tissue. Performance was assessed using PA images of ex vivo rabbit lymph node specimens and human tooth samples. A minimum peak surface displacement sensitivity of 0.19 pm was measured. The all-optical PAI (AOPAI) system is well suited for assessment of retinal diseases, caries lesion detection, skin burns, section less histology and pressure or friction ulcers.

  12. Detection of latent fingerprints using high-resolution 3D confocal microscopy in non-planar acquisition scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirst, Stefan; Vielhauer, Claus

    2015-03-01

    In digitized forensics the support of investigators in any manner is one of the main goals. Using conservative lifting methods, the detection of traces is done manually. For non-destructive contactless methods, the necessity for detecting traces is obvious for further biometric analysis. High resolutional 3D confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) grants the possibility for a detection by segmentation approach with improved detection results. Optimal scan results with CLSM are achieved on surfaces orthogonal to the sensor, which is not always possible due to environmental circumstances or the surface's shape. This introduces additional noise, outliers and a lack of contrast, making a detection of traces even harder. Prior work showed the possibility of determining angle-independent classification models for the detection of latent fingerprints (LFP). Enhancing this approach, we introduce a larger feature space containing a variety of statistical-, roughness-, color-, edge-directivity-, histogram-, Gabor-, gradient- and Tamura features based on raw data and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) using high resolutional data. Our test set consists of eight different surfaces for the detection of LFP in four different acquisition angles with a total of 1920 single scans. For each surface and angles in steps of 10, we capture samples from five donors to introduce variance by a variety of sweat compositions and application influences such as pressure or differences in ridge thickness. By analyzing the present test set with our approach, we intend to determine angle- and substrate-dependent classification models to determine optimal surface specific acquisition setups and also classification models for a general detection purpose for both, angles and substrates. The results on overall models with classification rates up to 75.15% (kappa 0.50) already show a positive tendency regarding the usability of the proposed methods for LFP detection on varying surfaces in non

  13. A novel two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound imaging. It consists of a miniaturized single-element ultrasound transducer driven by a unique 2-axis liquid-immersible electromagnetic microactuator. With a mechanical scanning frequency of 19.532 Hz and an ultrasound pulse repetition rate of 5 kHz, the scanning transducer was scanned along 60 concentric paths with 256 detection points on each to simulate a physical 2D ultrasound transducer array of 60 × 256 elements. Using the scanning transducer, 3D pulse-echo ultrasound imaging of two silicon discs immersed in water as the imaging target was successfully conducted. The lateral resolution of the 3D ultrasound image was further improved with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer doesn't require complex and expensive multi-channel data acquisition (DAQ) electronics. Therefore, it could provide a new approach to achieve compact and low-cost 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging systems, especially for handheld operations.

  14. A High-resolution 3D Geodynamical Model of the Present-day India-Asia Collision System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, B.; Baumann, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-resolution, 3D geodynamic model of the present-day India-Asia collision system. The model is separated into multiple tectonic blocks, for which we estimate the first order rheological properties and the impact on the dynamics of the collision system. This is done by performing systematic simulations with different rheologies to minimize the misfit to observational constraints such as the GPS-velocity field. The simulations are performed with the parallel staggered grid FD code LaMEM using a numerical resolution of at least 512x512x256 cells to resolve dynamically important shear zones reasonably well. A fundamental part of this study is the reconstruction of the 3D present-day geometry of Tibet and the adjacent regions. Our interpretations of crust and mantle lithosphere geometry are jointly based on a globally available shear wave tomography (Schaeffer and Lebedev, 2013) and the Crust 1.0 model (Laske et al. http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/crust1.html). We regionally refined and modified our interpretations based on seismicity distributions and focal mechanisms and incorporated regional receiver function studies to improve the accuracy of the Moho in particular. Results suggest that we can identify at least one "best-fit" solution in terms of rheological model properties that reproduces the observed velocity field reasonably well, including the strong rotation of the GPS velocity around the eastern syntax of the Himalaya. We also present model co-variances to illustrate the trade-offs between the rheological model parameters, their respective uncertainties, and the model fit. Schaeffer, A.J., Lebedev, S., 2013. Global shear speed structure of the upper mantle and transition zone. Geophysical Journal International 194, 417-449. doi:10.1093/gji/ggt095

  15. Integrating a High Resolution Optically Pumped Magnetometer with a Multi-Rotor UAV towards 3-D Magnetic Gradiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, A.; Walter, C. A.; Parvar, K.

    2016-12-01

    The current platforms for collecting magnetic data include dense coverage, but low resolution traditional airborne surveys, and high resolution, but low coverage terrestrial surveys. Both platforms leave a critical observation gap between the ground surface and approximately 100m above ground elevation, which can be navigated efficiently by new technologies, such as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Specifically, multi rotor UAV platforms provide the ability to sense the magnetic field in a full 3-D tensor, which increases the quality of data collected over other current platform types. Payload requirements and target requirements must be balanced to fully exploit the 3-D magnetic tensor. This study outlines the integration of a GEM Systems Cesium Vapour UAV Magnetometer, a Lightware SF-11 Laser Altimeter and a uBlox EVK-7P GPS module with a DJI s900 Multi Rotor UAV. The Cesium Magnetometer is suspended beneath the UAV platform by a cable of varying length. A set of surveys was carried out to optimize the sensor orientation, sensor cable length beneath the UAV and data collection methods of the GEM Systems Cesium Vapour UAV Magnetometer when mounted on the DJI s900. The target for these surveys is a 12 inch steam pipeline located approximately 2 feet below the ground surface. A systematic variation of cable length, sensor orientation and inclination was conducted. The data collected from the UAV magnetometer was compared to a terrestrial survey conducted with the GEM GST-19 Proton Procession Magnetometer at the same elevation, which also served a reference station. This allowed for a cross examination between the UAV system and a proven industry standard for magnetic field data collection. The surveys resulted in optimizing the above parameters based on minimizing instrument error and ensuring reliable data acquisition. The results demonstrate that optimizing the UAV magnetometer survey can yield to industry standard measurements.

  16. High-resolution non-invasive 3D imaging of paint microstructure by synchrotron-based X-ray laminography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reischig, Peter [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Delft University of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); Helfen, Lukas [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, Grenoble Cedex (France); Wallert, Arie [Rijksmuseum, Postbus 74888, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baumbach, Tilo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Dik, Joris [Delft University of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    The characterisation of the microstructure and micromechanical behaviour of paint is key to a range of problems related to the conservation or technical art history of paintings. Synchrotron-based X-ray laminography is demonstrated in this paper to image the local sub-surface microstructure in paintings in a non-invasive and non-destructive way. Based on absorption and phase contrast, the method can provide high-resolution 3D maps of the paint stratigraphy, including the substrate, and visualise small features, such as pigment particles, voids, cracks, wood cells, canvas fibres etc. Reconstructions may be indicative of local density or chemical composition due to increased attenuation of X-rays by elements of higher atomic number. The paint layers and their interfaces can be distinguished via variations in morphology or composition. Results of feasibility tests on a painting mockup (oak panel, chalk ground, vermilion and lead white paint) are shown, where lateral and depth resolution of up to a few micrometres is demonstrated. The method is well adapted to study the temporal evolution of the stratigraphy in test specimens and offers an alternative to destructive sampling of original works of art. (orig.)

  17. 3D GCM modelling of thermospheric nitric oxide during the 2003 Halloween Storm using high resolution solar flux data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbin, A.; Aylward, A.

    Radiative emission by excited nitric oxide NO is an important cooling mechanism in the lower thermosphere Numerical modelling of thermospheric temperatures must therefore include a realistic representation of NO densities At low latitudes the abundance of this key constituent is thought to be is directly related to the flux of solar soft X-ray radiation while at high latitudes NO is affected by the flux of precipitating electrons In the present study the coupled middle atmosphere and thermosphere CMAT general circulation model has been used to simulate the 11-day period from 23rd October to 3rd November 2003 During this time the Earth was subject to highly variable solar irradiance and extremely high levels of geomagnetic activity The 3D model used incorporates a complex ion and neutral chemical scheme including a detailed self consistent calculation of NO production and transport High-resolution solar flux data taken from the SOLAR2000 irradiance model is incorporated along with variable auroral energy inputs Predictions of the global distribution of nitric oxide in the lower thermosphere are presented along with thermospheric temperatures for the storm period

  18. High-resolution 3-D T1*-mapping and quantitative image analysis of GRAY ZONE in chronic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Mihaela; Ramanan, Venkat; Yang, Franklin; Zhang, Li; Newbigging, Susan; Ghugre, Nilesh R; Wright, Graham A

    2014-12-01

    The substrate of potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmias often resides in the gray zone (GZ), a mixture of viable myocytes and collagen strands found between healthy myocardium and infarct core (IC). The specific aims of this paper are to demonstrate correspondence between regions delineated in T1* (apparent T1) maps and tissue characteristics seen in histopathology and to determine the MR imaging resolution needed to adequately identify GZ-associated substrate in chronic infarct. For this, a novel 3-D multicontrast late enhancement (MCLE) MR method was used to image ex vivo swine hearts with chronic infarction, at high resolution ( 0.6×0.6×1.25 mm). Pixel-wise classified tissue maps were calculated using steady-state and T1* images as input to a fuzzy-clustering algorithm. Quantitative histology based on collagen stains was performed in n = 10 selected slabs and showed very good correlations between histologically-determined areas of heterogeneous and dense fibrosis, and the corresponding GZ ( R2 = 0.96) and IC ( R2 = 0.97 ) in tissue classified maps. Furthermore, in n = 24 slabs, we performed volumetric measurements of GZ and IC, at the original and decreased image resolutions. Our results demonstrated that the IC volume remained relatively unchanged across all resolutions, whereas the GZ volume progressively increased with diminished image resolution, with changes reaching significance at 1×1×5 mm resolution (p infarct. Future work will focus on translating these findings to optimizing the current in vivo MCLE imaging of the GZ.

  19. Plant tissues in 3D via X-ray tomography: simple contrasting methods allow high resolution imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick M Staedler

    Full Text Available Computed tomography remains strongly underused in plant sciences despite its high potential in delivering detailed 3D phenotypical information because of the low X-ray absorption of most plant tissues. Existing protocols to study soft tissues display poor performance, especially when compared to those used on animals. More efficient protocols to study plant material are therefore needed. Flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana and Marcgravia caudata were immersed in a selection of contrasting agents used to treat samples for transmission electron microscopy. Grayscale values for floral tissues and background were measured as a function of time. Contrast was quantified via a contrast index. The thick buds of Marcgravia were scanned to determine which contrasting agents best penetrate thick tissues. The highest contrast increase with cytoplasm-rich tissues was obtained with phosphotungstate, whereas osmium tetroxide and bismuth tatrate displayed the highest contrast increase with vacuolated tissues. Phosphotungstate also displayed the best sample penetration. Furthermore, infiltration with phosphotungstate allowed imaging of all plants parts at a high resolution of 3 µm, which approaches the maximum resolution of our equipment: 1.5 µm. The high affinity of phosphotungstate for vasculature, cytoplasm-rich tissue, and pollen causes these tissues to absorb more X-rays than the surrounding tissues, which, in turn, makes these tissues appear brighter on the scan data. Tissues with different brightness can then be virtually dissected from each other by selecting the bracket of grayscale to be visualized. Promising directions for the future include in silico phenotyping and developmental studies of plant inner parts (e.g., ovules, vasculature, pollen, and cell nuclei via virtual dissection as well as correlations of quantitative phenotypes with omics datasets. Therefore, this work represents a crucial improvement of previous methods, allowing new directions of

  20. Plant tissues in 3D via X-ray tomography: simple contrasting methods allow high resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staedler, Yannick M; Masson, David; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography remains strongly underused in plant sciences despite its high potential in delivering detailed 3D phenotypical information because of the low X-ray absorption of most plant tissues. Existing protocols to study soft tissues display poor performance, especially when compared to those used on animals. More efficient protocols to study plant material are therefore needed. Flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana and Marcgravia caudata were immersed in a selection of contrasting agents used to treat samples for transmission electron microscopy. Grayscale values for floral tissues and background were measured as a function of time. Contrast was quantified via a contrast index. The thick buds of Marcgravia were scanned to determine which contrasting agents best penetrate thick tissues. The highest contrast increase with cytoplasm-rich tissues was obtained with phosphotungstate, whereas osmium tetroxide and bismuth tatrate displayed the highest contrast increase with vacuolated tissues. Phosphotungstate also displayed the best sample penetration. Furthermore, infiltration with phosphotungstate allowed imaging of all plants parts at a high resolution of 3 µm, which approaches the maximum resolution of our equipment: 1.5 µm. The high affinity of phosphotungstate for vasculature, cytoplasm-rich tissue, and pollen causes these tissues to absorb more X-rays than the surrounding tissues, which, in turn, makes these tissues appear brighter on the scan data. Tissues with different brightness can then be virtually dissected from each other by selecting the bracket of grayscale to be visualized. Promising directions for the future include in silico phenotyping and developmental studies of plant inner parts (e.g., ovules, vasculature, pollen, and cell nuclei) via virtual dissection as well as correlations of quantitative phenotypes with omics datasets. Therefore, this work represents a crucial improvement of previous methods, allowing new directions of research to be

  1. Cardiovascular morphometry with high-resolution 3D magnetic resonance: First application to left ventricle diastolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Diego; Vardoulis, Orestis; Monney, Pierre; Piccini, Davide; Antiochos, Panagiotis; Schwitter, Juerg; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2017-09-01

    In this study, an image-based morphometry toolset quantifying geometric descriptors of the left ventricle, aorta and their coupling is applied to investigate whether morphological information can differentiate between subjects affected by diastolic dysfunction (patient group) and their age-matched controls (control group). The ventriculo-aortic region of 20 total participants (10 per group) were segmented from high-resolution 3D magnetic resonance images, from the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Each geometry was divided into segments in correspondence of anatomical landmarks. The orientation of each segment was estimated by least-squares fitting of the respective centerline segment to a plane. Curvature and torsion of vessels' centerlines were automatically extracted, and aortic arch was characterized in terms of height and width. Tilt angle between subsequent best-fit planes in the left ventricle and ascending aorta regions, curvature and cross-sectional area in the descending aorta resulted significantly different between patient and control groups (P-values< 0.05). Aortic volume (P = 0.04) and aortic arch width (P = 0.03) resulted significantly different between the two groups. The observed morphometric differences underlie differences in hemodynamics, by virtue of the influence of geometry on blood flow patterns. The present exploratory analysis does not determine if aortic geometric changes precede diastolic dysfunction, or vice versa. However, this study (1) underlines differences between healthy and diastolic dysfunction subjects, and (2) provides geometric parameters that might help to determine early aortic geometric alterations and potentially prevent evolution toward advanced diastolic dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Single-side access, isotropic resolution and multispectral 3D photoacoustic imaging with rotate-translate scanning of ultrasonic detector array

    CERN Document Server

    Gateau, Jérôme; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging can achieve high-resolution three-dimensional visualization of optical absorbers at penetration depths ~ 1 cm in biological tissues by detecting optically-induced high ultrasound frequencies. Tomographic acquisition with ultrasound linear arrays offers an easy implementation of single-side access, parallelized and high-frequency detection, but usually comes with an image quality impaired by the directionality of the detectors. Indeed, a simple translation of the array perpendicularly to its median imaging plane is often used, but results both in a poor resolution in the translation direction and in strong limited view artifacts. To improve the spatial resolution and the visibility of complex structures while keeping a planar detection geometry, we introduce, in this paper, a novel rotate-translate scanning scheme, and investigate the performance of a scanner implemented at 15 MHz center frequency. The developed system achieved a quasi-isotropic uniform 3D resolution of ~170 um over a cub...

  3. Coupling 3D Monte Carlo light transport in optically heterogeneous tissues to photoacoustic signal generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Jacques

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The generation of photoacoustic signals for imaging objects embedded within tissues is dependent on how well light can penetrate to and deposit energy within an optically absorbing object, such as a blood vessel. This report couples a 3D Monte Carlo simulation of light transport to stress wave generation to predict the acoustic signals received by a detector at the tissue surface. The Monte Carlo simulation allows modeling of optically heterogeneous tissues, and a simple MATLAB™ acoustic algorithm predicts signals reaching a surface detector. An example simulation considers a skin with a pigmented epidermis, a dermis with a background blood perfusion, and a 500-μm-dia. blood vessel centered at a 1-mm depth in the skin. The simulation yields acoustic signals received by a surface detector, which are generated by a pulsed 532-nm laser exposure before and after inserting the blood vessel. A MATLAB™ version of the acoustic algorithm and a link to the 3D Monte Carlo website are provided.

  4. High Resolution Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging of Orthotopic Lung Cancer in Mice: New Perspectives for Onco-Pharmacology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Raes

    Full Text Available We have developed a relevant preclinical model associated with a specific imaging protocol dedicated to onco-pharmacology studies in mice.We optimized both the animal model and an ultrasound imaging procedure to follow up longitudinally the lung tumor growth in mice. Moreover we proposed to measure by photoacoustic imaging the intratumoral hypoxia, which is a crucial parameter responsible for resistance to therapies. Finally, we compared ultrasound data to x-ray micro computed tomography and volumetric measurements to validate the relevance of this approach on the NCI-H460 human orthotopic lung tumor.This study demonstrates the ability of ultrasound imaging to detect and monitor the in vivo orthotopic lung tumor growth by high resolution ultrasound imaging. This approach enabled us to characterize key biological parameters such as oxygenation, perfusion status and vascularization of tumors.Such an experimental approach has never been reported previously and it would provide a nonradiative tool for assessment of anticancer therapeutic efficacy in mice. Considering the absence of ultrasound propagation through the lung parenchyma, this strategy requires the implantation of tumors strictly located in the superficial posterior part of the lung.

  5. Neoarchaean tectonic history of the Witwatersrand Basin and Ventersdorp Supergroup: New constraints from high-resolution 3D seismic reflection data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Manzi, MSD

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available First-order scale structures in the West Wits Line and West Rand goldfields of the Witwatersrand Basin (South Africa) were mapped using the high-resolution 3D reflection seismic method. Structural models constrain the magnitude of displacement...

  6. An efficient implementation of 3D high-resolution imaging for large-scale seismic data with GPU/CPU heterogeneous parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jincheng; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jin; Liu, Linong; Zhang, Jianfeng

    2018-02-01

    De-absorption pre-stack time migration (QPSTM) compensates for the absorption and dispersion of seismic waves by introducing an effective Q parameter, thereby making it an effective tool for 3D, high-resolution imaging of seismic data. Although the optimal aperture obtained via stationary-phase migration reduces the computational cost of 3D QPSTM and yields 3D stationary-phase QPSTM, the associated computational efficiency is still the main problem in the processing of 3D, high-resolution images for real large-scale seismic data. In the current paper, we proposed a division method for large-scale, 3D seismic data to optimize the performance of stationary-phase QPSTM on clusters of graphics processing units (GPU). Then, we designed an imaging point parallel strategy to achieve an optimal parallel computing performance. Afterward, we adopted an asynchronous double buffering scheme for multi-stream to perform the GPU/CPU parallel computing. Moreover, several key optimization strategies of computation and storage based on the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) were adopted to accelerate the 3D stationary-phase QPSTM algorithm. Compared with the initial GPU code, the implementation of the key optimization steps, including thread optimization, shared memory optimization, register optimization and special function units (SFU), greatly improved the efficiency. A numerical example employing real large-scale, 3D seismic data showed that our scheme is nearly 80 times faster than the CPU-QPSTM algorithm. Our GPU/CPU heterogeneous parallel computing framework significant reduces the computational cost and facilitates 3D high-resolution imaging for large-scale seismic data.

  7. Effects of multiple-interaction photon events in a high-resolution PET system that uses 3-D positioning detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yi; Pratx, Guillem; Lau, Frances W. Y.; Levin, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The authors’ laboratory is developing a dual-panel, breast-dedicated PET system. The detector panels are built from dual-LSO-position-sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) modules—units holding two 8×8 arrays of 1 mm3 LSO crystals, where each array is coupled to a PSAPD. When stacked to form an imaging volume, these modules are capable of recording the 3-D coordinates of individual interactions of a multiple-interaction photon event (MIPE). The small size of the scintillation crystal elements used increases the likelihood of photon scattering between crystal arrays. In this article, the authors investigate how MIPEs impact the system photon sensitivity, the data acquisition scheme, and the quality and quantitative accuracy of reconstructed PET images. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulated PET scan using the dual-panel system was performed on a uniformly radioactive phantom for the photon sensitivity study. To establish the impact of MIPEs on a proposed PSAPD multiplexing scheme, experimental data were collected from a dual-LSO-PSAPD module edge-irradiated with a 22Na point source, the data were compared against simulation data based on an identical setup. To assess the impact of MIPEs on the dual-panel PET images, a simulated PET of a phantom comprising a matrix of hot spherical radiation sources of varying diameters immersed in a warm background was performed. The list-mode output data were used for image reconstruction, where various methods were used for estimating the location of the first photon interaction in MIPEs for more accurate line of response positioning. The contrast recovery coefficient (CRC), contrast to noise ratio (CNR), and the full width at half maximum spatial resolution of the spheres in the reconstructed images were used as figures of merit to facilitate comparison. Results: Compared to image reconstruction employing only events with interactions confined to one LSO array, a potential single photon sensitivity gain of >46.9% (>115

  8. Effects of multiple-interaction photon events in a high-resolution PET system that uses 3-D positioning detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yi; Pratx, Guillem; Lau, Frances W Y; Levin, Craig S

    2010-10-01

    The authors' laboratory is developing a dual-panel, breast-dedicated PET system. The detector panels are built from dual-LSO-position-sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) modules-units holding two 8 x 8 arrays of 1 mm3 LSO crystals, where each array is coupled to a PSAPD. When stacked to form an imaging volume, these modules are capable of recording the 3-D coordinates of individual interactions of a multiple-interaction photon event (MIPE). The small size of the scintillation crystal elements used increases the likelihood of photon scattering between crystal arrays. In this article, the authors investigate how MIPEs impact the system photon sensitivity, the data acquisition scheme, and the quality and quantitative accuracy of reconstructed PET images. A Monte Carlo simulated PET scan using the dual-panel system was performed on a uniformly radioactive phantom for the photon sensitivity study. To establish the impact of MIPEs on a proposed PSAPD multiplexing scheme, experimental data were collected from a dual-LSO-PSAPD module edge-irradiated with a 22Na point source, the data were compared against simulation data based on an identical setup. To assess the impact of MIPEs on the dual-panel PET images, a simulated PET of a phantom comprising a matrix of hot spherical radiation sources of varying diameters immersed in a warm background was performed. The list-mode output data were used for image reconstruction, where various methods were used for estimating the location of the first photon interaction in MIPEs for more accurate line of response positioning. The contrast recovery coefficient (CRC), contrast to noise ratio (CNR), and the full width at half maximum spatial resolution of the spheres in the reconstructed images were used as figures of merit to facilitate comparison. Compared to image reconstruction employing only events with interactions confined to one LSO array, a potential single photon sensitivity gain of > 46.9% (> 115.7% for coincidence) was noted

  9. True 3D kinematic analysis for slope instability assessment in the Siq of Petra (Jordan), from high resolution TLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigli, Giovanni; Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele; Ruther, Heinz; Casagli, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Most classifications of mass movements in rock slopes use relatively simple, idealized geometries for the basal sliding surface, like planar sliding, wedge sliding, toppling or columnar failures. For small volumes, the real sliding surface can be often well described by such simple geometries. Extended and complex rock surfaces, however, can exhibit a large number of mass movements, also showing various kind of kinematisms. As a consequence, the real situation in large rock surfaces with a complicate geometry is generally very complex and a site depending analysis, such as fieldwork and compass, cannot be comprehensive of the real situation. Since the outstanding development of terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) in recent years, rock slopes can now be investigated and mapped through high resolution point clouds, reaching the resolution of few mm's and accuracy less than a cm in most advanced instruments, even from remote surveying. The availability of slope surface digital data can offer a unique chance to determine potential kinematisms in a wide distributed area for all the investigated geomorphological processes. More in detail the proposed method is based on the definition of least squares fitting planes on clusters of points extracted by moving a sampling cube on the point cloud. If the associated standard deviation is below a defined threshold, the cluster is considered valid. By applying geometric criteria it is possible to join all the clusters lying on the same surface; in this way discontinuity planes can be reconstructed, rock mass geometrical properties are calculated and, finally, potential kinematisms established. The Siq of Petra (Jordan), is a 1.2 km naturally formed gorge, with an irregular horizontal shape and a complex vertical slope, that represents the main entrance to Nabatean archaeological site. In the Siq, discontinuities of various type (bedding, joints, faults), mainly related to geomorphological evolution of the slope, lateral stress

  10. Feasibility and evaluation of dual-source transmit 3D imaging of the orbits: Comparison to high-resolution conventional MRI at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Achim, E-mail: achim.seeger@gmx.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Schulze, Maximilian, E-mail: maximilian.schulze@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Schuettauf, Frank, E-mail: fschuettauf@uni-tuebingen.de [University Eye Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Schleichstrasse 12, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Klose, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.klose@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Ernemann, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.ernemann@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Hauser, Till-Karsten, E-mail: till-karsten.hauser@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Reduced FOV imaging enables a 3D approach for a very fast assessment of the orbits. • Conventional MRI exhibited higher eSNR values and consecutively higher scores for overall image quality in the subjective readers’ analysis. • All pathologies could be detected compared to high-resolution conventional MRI making 3D pTX SPACE to a potential alternative and fast imaging technique. - Abstract: Purpose: To prospectively compare the image quality and diagnostic performance of orbital MR images obtained by using a dual-source parallel transmission (pTX) 3D sequence (Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution, SPACE) with the image quality of conventional high-resolution standard protocol for clinical use in patients at 3T. Materials and methods: After obtaining institutional review board approval and patient consent, 32 patients with clinical indication for orbital MRI were examined using a high-resolution conventional sequences and 3D pTX SPACE sequences. Quantitative measurements, image quality of the healthy orbit, incidence of artifacts, and the subjective diagnostic performance to establish diagnosis was rated. Statistical significance was calculated by using a Student's t-test and nonparametric Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Length measurements were comparable in the two techniques, 3D pTX SPACE resulted in significant faster image acquisition with higher spatial resolution and less motion artifacts as well as better delineation of the optic nerve sheath. However, estimated contrast-to-noise and signal-to-noise and overall image quality as well as subjective scores of the conventional TSE imaging were rated significantly higher. The conventional MR sequences were the preferred techniques by the readers. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility of 3D pTX SPACE of the orbit resulting in a rapid acquisition of isotropic high-resolution images. Although no pathology was

  11. Measurement of tumor size in adult glioblastoma: Classical cross-sectional criteria on 2D MRI or volumetric criteria on high resolution 3D MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Mei-Yun, E-mail: meiyun9999@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People' s Hospital, 7 Weiwu Rd., Zhengzhou, Henan 450003 (China); Cheng, Jing-Liang, E-mail: cjr.chjl@vip.163.com [MRI Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Han, Yan-Hong, E-mail: hyh_yafeng@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People' s Hospital, 7 Weiwu Rd., Zhengzhou, Henan 450003 (China); Li, Yong-Li, E-mail: shyliyongli@126.com [Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People' s Hospital, 7 Weiwu Rd., Zhengzhou, Henan 450003 (China); Dai, Jian-Ping, E-mail: cjr.shidapeng@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People' s Hospital, 7 Weiwu Rd., Zhengzhou, Henan 450003 (China); Shi, Da-Peng, E-mail: daijianping_2008@126.com [Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People' s Hospital, 7 Weiwu Rd., Zhengzhou, Henan 450003 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To investigate the added value of volume on post-contrast three dimensional (3D) T1-weighted image (T1WI) over classical cross-sectional area on two dimensional (2D) T1WI in evaluating tumor response in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods: Tumor cross-sectional area and volume measurements were performed on 104 MRI studies from 42 adult patients with GBM on post-contrast 5 mm 2D T1WI and isotropic high resolution 3D T1WI, respectively. 52 pairs of MRI scans were analyzed for relative change. Radiographic responses were determined based on change in either area or volume. Results: A high correlation was revealed between tumor size measured by area on thick 2D and volume on high resolution 3D MRI in 104 scans (r = 0.82, p < 0.001). When four tumor response criteria were used according to the percentage changes (complete response/partial response/stable disease/progression), the kappa coefficient between the area on 2D and volume on 3D was 0.68 (p < 0.05) with an overall agreement of 81%. Conclusions: Tumor cross-sectional area on post-contrast 2D T1WI appears comparable to volume on 3D T1WI and should still be a practical alternate of volume on 3D for evaluating tumor response.

  12. Depiction of Achilles Tendon Microstructure In-Vivo Using High-Resolution 3D Ultrashort Echo-Time MRI at 7T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Misung; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Liu, Jing; Krug, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the feasibility of depicting the internal structure of the Achilles tendon in vivo using high-resolution 3D ultrashort echo-time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7T. Materials and Methods For our UTE imaging, a minimum-phase radiofrequency pulse and an anisotropic field-of-view 3D radial acquisition were used to minimize the echo time and scan time. A fat saturation pulse was applied every eight spoke acquisitions to reduce blurring and chemical shift artifacts from fat and to improve dynamic range of the tendon signal. Five healthy volunteers and one patient were scanned with an isotropic spatial resolution of up to 0.6 mm. Fat-suppressed UTE images were qualitatively evaluated and compared to non-fat-suppressed UTE images and longer echo-time images. Results High-resolution UTE imaging was able to visualize the microstructure of the Achilles tendon. Fat suppression substantially improved the depiction of the internal structure. The UTE images revealed a fascicular pattern in the Achilles tendon and fibrocartilage at the tendon insertion. In a patient who had tendon elongation surgery after birth there was clear depiction of disrupted tendon structure. Conclusions High-resolution fat-suppressed 3D UTE imaging at 7T allows for evaluation of the Achilles tendon microstructure in vivo. PMID:24500089

  13. MR imaging of cranial nerve lesions using six different high-resolution T1- and T2(*)-weighted 3D and 2D sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, J.; Held, P.; Strotzer, M.; Voelk, M.; Nitz, W.R.; Dorenbeck, U.; Feuerbach, S. [Univ. Hospital of Regensburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Stamato, S. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-07-01

    Purpose: To find a suitable high-resolution MR protocol for the visualization of lesions of all 12 cranial nerves. Material and Methods: Thirty-eight pathologically changed cranial nerves (17 patients) were studied with MR imaging at 1.5T using 3D T2*-weighted CISS, T1-weighted 3D MP-RAGE (without and with i.v. contrast medium), T2-weighted 3D TSE, T2-weighted 2D TSE and T1-weighted fat saturation 2D TSE sequences. Visibility of the 38 lesions of the 12 cranial nerves in each sequence was evaluated by consensus of two radiologists using an evaluation scale from 1 (excellently visible) to 4 (not visible). Results: The 3D CISS sequence provided the best resolution of the cranial nerves and their lesions when surrounded by CSF. In nerves which were not surrounded by CSF, the 2D T1-weighted contrast-enhanced fat suppression technique was the best sequence. Conclusions: A combination of 3D CISS, the 2D T1-weighted fat suppressed sequence and a 3D contrast-enhanced MP-RAGE proved to be the most useful sequence to visualize all lesions of the cranial nerves. For the determination of enhancement, an additional 3D MP-RAGE sequence without contrast medium is required. This sequence is also very sensitive for the detection of hemorrhage.

  14. Defining left ventricular apex-to-base twist mechanics computed from high-resolution 3D echocardiography: validation against sonomicrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Muhammad; Myronenko, Andriy; Nguyen, Thuan; Inage, Akio; Smith, Wayne; Lowe, Robert I; Thiele, Karl; Gibbons Kroeker, Carol A; Tyberg, John V; Smallhorn, Jeffrey F; Sahn, David J; Song, Xubo

    2010-03-01

    To compute left ventricular (LV) twist from 3-dimensional (3D) echocardiography. LV twist is a sensitive index of cardiac performance. Conventional 2-dimensional based methods of computing LV twist are cumbersome and subject to errors. We studied 10 adult open-chest pigs. The pre-load to the heart was altered by temporary controlled occlusion of the inferior vena cava, and myocardial ischemia was produced by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery. Full-volume 3D loops were reconstructed by stitching of pyramidal volumes acquired from 7 consecutive heart beats with electrocardiography gating on a Philips IE33 system (Philips Medical Systems, Andover, Massachusetts) at baseline and other steady states. Polar coordinate data of the 3D images were entered into an envelope detection program implemented in MatLab (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, Massachusetts), and speckle motion was tracked using nonrigid image registration with spline-based transformation parameterization. The 3D displacement field was obtained, and rotation at apical and basal planes was computed. LV twist was derived as the net difference of apical and basal rotation. Sonomicrometry data of cardiac motion were also acquired from crystals anchored to epicardium in apical and basal planes at all states. The 3D dense tracking slightly overestimated the LV twist, but detected changes in LV twist at different states and showed good correlation (r = 0.89) when compared with sonomicrometry-derived twist at all steady states. In open chest pigs, peak cardiac twist was increased with reduction of pre-load from inferior vena cava occlusion from 6.25 degrees +/- 1.65 degrees to 9.45 degrees +/- 1.95 degrees . With myocardial ischemia from left anterior descending coronary artery ligation, twist was decreased to 4.90 degrees +/- 0.85 degrees (r = 0.8759). Despite lower spatiotemporal resolution of 3D echocardiography, LV twist and torsion can be computed accurately. Copyright 2010 American College of

  15. Plant Tissues in 3D via X-Ray Tomography: Simple Contrasting Methods Allow High Resolution Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Yannick M Staedler; David Masson; Jürg Schönenberger

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography remains strongly underused in plant sciences despite its high potential in delivering detailed 3D phenotypical information because of the low X-ray absorption of most plant tissues. Existing protocols to study soft tissues display poor performance, especially when compared to those used on animals. More efficient protocols to study plant material are therefore needed. Flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana and Marcgravia caudata were immersed in a selection of contrasting agents ...

  16. GENFIRE: A Generalized Fourier Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm for High-Resolution 3D Electron and X-ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Alan; Yang, Yongsoo; Rana, Arjun; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Zhou, Jihan; Hung Lo, Yuan; Melinte, Georgian; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Miao, Jianwei

    2017-07-01

    Tomography has made a radical impact on diverse fields ranging from the study of 3D atomic arrangements in matter to the study of human health in medicine. Despite its very diverse applications, the core of tomography remains the same, that is, a mathematical method must be implemented to reconstruct the 3D structure of an object from a number of 2D projections. In many scientific applications, however, the number of projections that can be measured is limited due to geometric constraints, tolerable radiation dose and/or acquisition speed. Thus it becomes an important problem to obtain the best-possible reconstruction from a limited number of projections. Here, we present the mathematical implementation of a tomographic algorithm, termed GENeralized Fourier Iterative REconstruction (GENFIRE). By iterating between real and reciprocal space, GENFIRE searches for a global solution that is concurrently consistent with the measured data and general physical constraints. The algorithm requires minimal human intervention and also incorporates angular refinement to reduce the tilt angle error. We demonstrate that GENFIRE can produce superior results relative to several other popular tomographic reconstruction techniques by numerical simulations, and by experimentally by reconstructing the 3D structure of a porous material and a frozen-hydrated marine cyanobacterium. Equipped with a graphical user interface, GENFIRE is freely available from our website and is expected to find broad applications across different disciplines.

  17. Rapid, High-Resolution 3D Interference Printing of Multilevel Ultralong Nanochannel Arrays for High-Throughput Nanofluidic Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junyong; Kim, Kyung-Il; Kim, Kisun; Kim, Dae-Chul; Cho, Donghwi; Lee, Jung Heon; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2015-12-22

    3D interference printing enables the single-step production of multilayered ultralong nanochannel arrays with nanoscale regularity. The superior depth-of-focus of this technique realizes a state-of-the-art nanostructure which has intensively stacked 32 layers of inch-long, horizonontal nanochannels with sub-100 nm holes in a monolithic matrix (≈15 μm). This exceptional structure can be integrated into microfluidic devices, facilitating high-flux rheological platforms using nanocapillarity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Comparison of 3D Maximum A Posteriori and Filtered Backprojection algorithms for high resolution animal imaging in microPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatziioannou, A.; Qi, J.; Moore, A.; Annala, A.; Nguyen, K.; Leahy, R.M.; Cherry, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    We have evaluated the performance of two three dimensional reconstruction algorithms with data acquired from microPET, a high resolution tomograph dedicated to small animal imaging. The first was a linear filtered-backprojection algorithm (FBP) with reprojection of the missing data and the second was a statistical maximum-aposteriori probability algorithm (MAP). The two algorithms were evaluated in terms of their resolution performance, both in phantoms and in vivo. Sixty independent realizations of a phantom simulating the brain of a baby monkey were acquired, each containing 3 million counts. Each of these realizations was reconstructed independently with both algorithms. The ensemble of the sixty reconstructed realizations was used to estimate the standard deviation as a measure of the noise for each reconstruction algorithm. More detail was recovered in the MAP reconstruction without an increase in noise relative to FBP. Studies in a simple cylindrical compartment phantom demonstrated improved recovery of known activity ratios with MAP. Finally in vivo studies also demonstrated a clear improvement in spatial resolution using the MAP algorithm. The quantitative accuracy of the MAP reconstruction was also evaluated by comparison with autoradiography and direct well counting of tissue samples and was shown to be superior.

  19. Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Karen; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; D'Amore, Domenic C; Rayfield, Emily J; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2008-06-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) displays a unique hold and pull-feeding technique. Its delicate 'space-frame' skull morphology differs greatly from that apparent in most living large prey specialists and is suggestive of a high degree of optimization, wherein use of materials is minimized. Here, using high-resolution finite element modelling based on dissection and in vivo bite and pull data, we present results detailing the mechanical performance of the giant lizard's skull. Unlike most modern predators, V. komodoensis applies minimal input from the jaw muscles when butchering prey. Instead it uses series of actions controlled by postcranial muscles. A particularly interesting feature of the performance of the skull is that it reveals considerably lower overall stress when these additional extrinsic forces are added to those of the jaw adductors. This remarkable reduction in stress in response to additional force is facilitated by both internal and external bone anatomy. Functional correlations obtained from these analyses also provide a solid basis for the interpretation of feeding ecology in extinct species, including dinosaurs and sabre-tooth cats, with which V. komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics.

  20. Joint Stochastic Inversion of Pre-Stack 3D Seismic Data and Well Logs for High Resolution Hydrocarbon Reservoir Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Verdin, C.

    2007-05-01

    This paper describes the successful implementation of a new 3D AVA stochastic inversion algorithm to quantitatively integrate pre-stack seismic amplitude data and well logs. The stochastic inversion algorithm is used to characterize flow units of a deepwater reservoir located in the central Gulf of Mexico. Conventional fluid/lithology sensitivity analysis indicates that the shale/sand interface represented by the top of the hydrocarbon-bearing turbidite deposits generates typical Class III AVA responses. On the other hand, layer- dependent Biot-Gassmann analysis shows significant sensitivity of the P-wave velocity and density to fluid substitution. Accordingly, AVA stochastic inversion, which combines the advantages of AVA analysis with those of geostatistical inversion, provided quantitative information about the lateral continuity of the turbidite reservoirs based on the interpretation of inverted acoustic properties (P-velocity, S-velocity, density), and lithotype (sand- shale) distributions. The quantitative use of rock/fluid information through AVA seismic amplitude data, coupled with the implementation of co-simulation via lithotype-dependent multidimensional joint probability distributions of acoustic/petrophysical properties, yields accurate 3D models of petrophysical properties such as porosity and permeability. Finally, by fully integrating pre-stack seismic amplitude data and well logs, the vertical resolution of inverted products is higher than that of deterministic inversions methods.

  1. Phase unwrapping with graph cuts optimization and dual decomposition acceleration for 3D high-resolution MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jianwu; Chen, Feng; Zhou, Dong; Liu, Tian; Yu, Zhaofei; Wang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Existence of low SNR regions and rapid-phase variations pose challenges to spatial phase unwrapping algorithms. Global optimization-based phase unwrapping methods are widely used, but are significantly slower than greedy methods. In this paper, dual decomposition acceleration is introduced to speed up a three-dimensional graph cut-based phase unwrapping algorithm. The phase unwrapping problem is formulated as a global discrete energy minimization problem, whereas the technique of dual decomposition is used to increase the computational efficiency by splitting the full problem into overlapping subproblems and enforcing the congruence of overlapping variables. Using three dimensional (3D) multiecho gradient echo images from an agarose phantom and five brain hemorrhage patients, we compared this proposed method with an unaccelerated graph cut-based method. Experimental results show up to 18-fold acceleration in computation time. Dual decomposition significantly improves the computational efficiency of 3D graph cut-based phase unwrapping algorithms. Magn Reson Med 77:1353-1358, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. A new high-resolution 3-D quantitative method for identifying bone surface modifications with implications for the Early Stone Age archaeological record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pante, Michael C; Muttart, Matthew V; Keevil, Trevor L; Blumenschine, Robert J; Njau, Jackson K; Merritt, Stephen R

    2017-01-01

    Bone surface modifications have become important indicators of hominin behavior and ecology at prehistoric archaeological sites. However, the method by which we identify and interpret these marks remains largely unchanged despite decades of research, relying on qualitative criteria and lacking standardization between analysts. Recently, zooarchaeologists have begun using new technologies capable of capturing 3-D data from bone surface modifications to advance our knowledge of these informative traces. However, an important step in this research has been overlooked and after years of work, we lack both a universal and replicable protocol and an understanding of the precision of these techniques. Here we propose a new standard for identifying bone surface modifications using high-resolution 3-D data and offer a systematic and replicable approach for researchers to follow. Data were collected with a white-light non-contact confocal profilometer and analyzed with Digital Surf's Mountains ® software. Our data show that when methods are standardized, results between researchers are statistically indistinguishable. Multivariate analyses using the measured parameters allow discrimination between stone tool cut marks and mammalian carnivore tooth marks with 97.5% accuracy. Application of this method to fossil specimens resulted in 100% correspondence with identifications made by an experienced analyst using macroscopic observations of qualitative features of bone surface modifications. High-resolution 3-D analyses of bone surface modifications have great potential to improve the reliability and accuracy of taphonomic research, but only if our methods are replicable and precise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. SEM-microphotogrammetry, a new take on an old method for generating high-resolution 3D models from SEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, A D; Job, P A; Walker, A E L

    2017-08-01

    The method we present here uses a scanning electron microscope programmed via macros to automatically capture dozens of images at suitable angles to generate accurate, detailed three-dimensional (3D) surface models with micron-scale resolution. We demonstrate that it is possible to use these Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images in conjunction with commercially available software originally developed for photogrammetry reconstructions from Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) cameras and to reconstruct 3D models of the specimen. These 3D models can then be exported as polygon meshes and eventually 3D printed. This technique offers the potential to obtain data suitable to reconstruct very tiny features (e.g. diatoms, butterfly scales and mineral fabrics) at nanometre resolution. Ultimately, we foresee this as being a useful tool for better understanding spatial relationships at very high resolution. However, our motivation is also to use it to produce 3D models to be used in public outreach events and exhibitions, especially for the blind or partially sighted. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. High-resolution random mesh algorithms for creating a probabilistic 3D surface atlas of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P M; Schwartz, C; Toga, A W

    1996-02-01

    Striking variations exist, across individuals, in the internal and external geometry of the brain. Such normal variations in the size, orientation, topology, and geometric complexity of cortical and subcortical structures have complicated the problem of quantifying deviations from normal anatomy and of developing standardized neuroanatomical atlases. This paper describes the design, implementation, and results of a technique for creating a three-dimensional (3D) probabilistic surface atlas of the human brain. We have developed, implemented, and tested a new 3D statistical method for assessing structural variations in a data-base of anatomic images. The algorithm enables the internal surface anatomy of new subjects to be analyzed at an extremely local level. The goal was to quantify subtle and distributed patterns of deviation from normal anatomy by automatically generating detailed probability maps of the anatomy of new subjects. Connected systems of parametric meshes were used to model the internal course of the following structures in both hemispheres: the parieto-occipital sulcus, the anterior and posterior rami of the calcarine sulcus, the cingulate and marginal sulci, and the supracallosal sulcus. These sulci penetrate sufficiently deeply into the brain to introduce an obvious topological decomposition of its volume architecture. A family of surface maps was constructed, encoding statistical properties of local anatomical variation within individual sulci. A probability space of random transformations, based on the theory of Gaussian random fields, was developed to reflect the observed variability in stereotaxic space of the connected system of anatomic surfaces. A complete system of probability density functions was computed, yielding confidence limits on surface variation. The ultimate goal of brain mapping is to provide a framework for integrating functional and anatomical data across many subjects and modalities. This task requires precise quantitative

  5. Scalable, incremental learning with MapReduce parallelization for cell detection in high-resolution 3D microscopy data

    KAUST Repository

    Sung, Chul

    2013-08-01

    Accurate estimation of neuronal count and distribution is central to the understanding of the organization and layout of cortical maps in the brain, and changes in the cell population induced by brain disorders. High-throughput 3D microscopy techniques such as Knife-Edge Scanning Microscopy (KESM) are enabling whole-brain survey of neuronal distributions. Data from such techniques pose serious challenges to quantitative analysis due to the massive, growing, and sparsely labeled nature of the data. In this paper, we present a scalable, incremental learning algorithm for cell body detection that can address these issues. Our algorithm is computationally efficient (linear mapping, non-iterative) and does not require retraining (unlike gradient-based approaches) or retention of old raw data (unlike instance-based learning). We tested our algorithm on our rat brain Nissl data set, showing superior performance compared to an artificial neural network-based benchmark, and also demonstrated robust performance in a scenario where the data set is rapidly growing in size. Our algorithm is also highly parallelizable due to its incremental nature, and we demonstrated this empirically using a MapReduce-based implementation of the algorithm. We expect our scalable, incremental learning approach to be widely applicable to medical imaging domains where there is a constant flux of new data. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. Acquisition and Processing of High Resolution Hyperspectral Imageries for the 3d Mapping of Urban Heat Islands and Microparticles of Montreal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongeau, R.; Baudouin, Y.; Cavayas, F.

    2017-10-01

    Ville de Montreal wanted to develop a system to identify heat islands and microparticles at the urban scale and to study their formation. UQAM and UdeM universities have joined their expertise under the framework "Observatoire Spatial Urbain" to create a representative geospatial database of thermal and atmospheric parameters collected during the summer months. They innovated in the development of a methodology for processing high resolution hyperspectral images (1-2 m). In partnership with Ville de Montreal, they integrated 3D geospatial data (topography, transportation and meteorology) in the process. The 3D mapping of intraurban heat islands as well as air micro-particles makes it possible, initially, to identify the problematic situations for future civil protection interventions during extreme heat. Moreover, it will be used as a reference for the Ville de Montreal to establish a strategy for public domain tree planting and in the analysis of urban development projects.

  7. High-resolution 3D imaging of osteocytes and computational modelling in mechanobiology: insights on bone development, ageing, health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, P M; Zygalakis, K C; Oreffo, R O; Schneider, P

    2016-05-22

    Osteocytes are involved in mechanosensation and mechanotransduction in bone and hence, are key to bone adaptation in response to development, ageing and disease. Thus, detailed knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the osteocyte network (ON) and the surrounding lacuno-canalicular network (LCN) is essential. Enhanced understanding of the ON&LCN will contribute to a better understanding of bone mechanics on cellular and sub-cellular scales, for instance through improved computational models of bone mechanotransduction. Until now, the location of the ON within the hard bone matrix and the sub-µm dimensions of the ON&LCN have posed significant challenges for 3D imaging. This review identifies relevant microstructural phenotypes of the ON&LCN in health and disease and summarises how light microscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray imaging techniques have been used in studies of osteocyte anatomy, pathology and mechanobiology to date. In this review, we assess the requirements for ON&LCN imaging and examine the state of the art in the fields of imaging and computational modelling as well as recent advances in high-resolution 3D imaging. Suggestions for future investigations using volume electron microscopy are indicated and we present new data on the ON&LCN using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy. A correlative approach using these high-resolution 3D imaging techniques in conjunction with in silico modelling in bone mechanobiology will increase understanding of osteocyte function and, ultimately, lead to improved pathways for diagnosis and treatment of bone diseases such as osteoporosis.

  8. Physical model of a fumarolic system inferred from a high-resolution 3-D Resistivity image of Solfatara volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresse, Marceau; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Byrdina, Svetlana; Chiodini, Giovanni; Rinaldi, Antonio Pio; Johnson, Timothy C.; Ricci, Tullio; Petrillo, Zaccaria; Vilardo, Giuseppe; Lebourg, Thomas; Mangiacapra, Annarita

    2017-04-01

    Solfatara crater, located inside the Phlegrean Fields caldera, is showing a significant unrest activity since 10 years with a increase of ground deformation, degassing and heating. Electrical Resistivity Imaging was performed between 2012 and 2016 with the purpose of improving our knowledge of the shallow hydrothermal system. The complete dataset includes 43,432 D-C measurements inverted using the E4D code. This 3-D inversion was compared with the mappings of surface temperature, diffuse soil CO2 flux and self-potential in order to better constrain the interpretation of the observed resistivity structure in terms of lithological contrasts and hydrothermal signatures. For the first time, we highlighted in 3-D the main geological units: Monte Olibano lava dome and Solfatara crypto-dome appear as two relatively resistive bodies (50-100 Ω.m). Furthermore, the resistivity model clearly revealed the contrasting geometry of the hydrothermal circulation in the Solfatara crater. A channel-like conductive structure (7 Ω.m) represents the condensate that flows from the main fumarolic area down to the liquid-dominated Fangaia mud pool. This interpretation is consistent with the negative Self-Potential anomaly and with the surface observations. We imaged at a metric-resolution the two main fumaroles, Bocca Grande and Bocca Nuova, that have the following geochemical characteristics. Bocca Grande vent: 162°C, ˜150 t of CO2 released per day with a mass ratio CO2/H20 = 0.4 and Bocca Nuova vent: 148°C, ˜50 t of CO2 released per day with a mass ratio CO2/H20 = 0.45. The differences between these geochemical characteristics could lead one to believe that they are fed by two distinct sources at depth. On the contrary, our resistivity model shows that the two fumarolic vents are directly connected to a common resistive body (30-50 Ω.m) at a depth of 50 meters. This structure likely represents a single gas reservoir feeding the two fumaroles. Its depth corresponds indeed to a

  9. High-resolution 3D spatial modelling of complex geological structures for an environmental risk assessment of abundant mining and industrial megasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wycisk, P.; Hubert, T.; Gossel, W.; Neumann, Ch.

    2009-01-01

    Conceptual geological models of industrial and mining megasites are an essential task of groundwater investigations as well as environmental risk assessment studies. Therefore, the conceptualization process of the structural geological model has depended on the development of a set of 2D cross-sections to portray a 3D picture of groundwater flow. This attempt always includes some simplifications that require, only to some extent, the true 3D situation of heterogeneous aquifers. Consequently, the modelled predictions of the path flow and transport conditions of contaminated groundwater are not satisfying in terms of a flow-path and risk based modelling approach. A more structured approach to develop the hydrogeological framework for the conceptual model is advocated, using different 3D geological modelling software packages to assemble the data, working in three dimensions and using this platform for subsequent groundwater flow modelling. Attention is given to the capability of different 3D modelling approaches, indicated by geostatistically based versus constructive cross-section based interpolations of complex sedimentary successions, that are compared in their results and suitability for subsequent hydrogeological modelling requirements. The paper describes the results, in high-resolution 3D modelling, of the complex geological environment of the Bitterfeld/Wolfen megasite in the eastern part of Germany. Identification, assessment, and remediation of large-scale groundwater contamination require a detailed knowledge of the heterogeneous geological structure to predict the fate and pathways of contaminants and their potential interaction with, e.g., surface water. An area of 16 km 2 of the model area of the Bitterfeld/Wolfen area was chosen to transfer the complex structural geological setting. The subsurface geology could be assigned to 31 lithostratigraphic units and depicted using a 10×10 m GIS grid. This constructive and "knowledge-driven" 3D modelling allows

  10. SU-E-T-296: Dosimetric Analysis of Small Animal Image-Guided Irradiator Using High Resolution Optical CT Imaging of 3D Dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Y; Qian, X; Wuu, C [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Adamovics, J [John Adamovics, Skillman, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To verify the dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator using a high-resolution of optical CT imaging of 3D dosimeters. Methods: PRESAEGE 3D dosimeters were used to determine dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator and compared with EBT2 films. Cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters with 7cm height and 6cm diameter were placed along the central axis of the beam. The films were positioned between 6×6cm{sup 2} cubed plastic water phantoms perpendicular to the beam direction with multiple depths. PRESAGE dosimeters and EBT2 films were then irradiated with the irradiator beams at 220kVp and 13mA. Each of irradiated PRESAGE dosimeters named PA1, PA2, PB1, and PB2, was independently scanned using a high-resolution single laser beam optical CT scanner. The transverse images were reconstructed with a 0.1mm high-resolution pixel. A commercial Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was used for readout of irradiated EBT2 films at a 0.4mm pixel resolution. PDD curves and beam profiles were measured for the irradiated PRESAGE dosimeters and EBT2 films. Results: The PDD agreements between the irradiated PRESAGE dosimeter PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2 and the EB2 films were 1.7, 2.3, 1.9, and 1.9% for the multiple depths at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 50mm, respectively. The FWHM measurements for each PRESAEGE dosimeter and film agreed with 0.5, 1.1, 0.4, and 1.7%, respectively, at 30mm depth. Both PDD and FWHM measurements for the PRESAGE dosimeters and the films agreed overall within 2%. The 20%–80% penumbral widths of each PRESAGE dosimeter and the film at a given depth were respectively found to be 0.97, 0.91, 0.79, 0.88, and 0.37mm. Conclusion: Dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator have been demonstrated with the measurements of PRESAGE dosimeter and EB2 film. With the high resolution and accuracy obtained from this 3D dosimetry system, precise targeting small animal irradiation can be

  11. T1-refBlochi: high resolution 3D post-contrast T1 myocardial mapping based on a single 3D late gadolinium enhancement volume, Bloch equations, and a reference T1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenxi; Sinusas, Albert J; Huber, Steffen; Thorn, Stephanie; Stacy, Mitchel R; Mojibian, Hamid; Peters, Dana C

    2017-08-18

    High resolution 3D T1 mapping is important for assessment of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in left atrium or other thin-walled structures. In this work, we investigated a fast single-TI 3D high resolution T1 mapping method that directly transforms a 3D late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) volume to a 3D T1 map. The proposed method, T1-refBlochi, is based on Bloch equation modeling of the LGE signal, a single-point calibration, and assumptions that proton density and T2* are relatively uniform in the heart. Several sources of error of this method were analyzed mathematically and with simulations. Imaging was performed in phantoms, eight swine and five patients, comparing T1-refBlochi to a standard spin-echo T1 mapping, 3D multi-TI T1 mapping, and 2D ShMOLLI, respectively. The method has a good accuracy and adequate precision, even considering various sources of error. In phantoms, over a range of protocols, heart-rates and T1 s, the bias ±1SD was -3 ms ± 9 ms. The porcine studies showed excellent agreement between T1-refBlochi and the multi-TI method (bias ±1SD = -6 ± 22 ms). The proton density and T2* weightings yielded ratios for scar/blood of 0.94 ± 0.01 and for myocardium/blood of 1.03 ± 0.02 in the eight swine, confirming that sufficient uniformity of proton density and T2* weightings exists among heterogeneous tissues of the heart. In the patients, the mean T1 bias ±1SD in myocardium and blood between T1-refBlochi and ShMOLLI was -9 ms ± 21 ms. T1-refBlochi provides a fast single-TI high resolution 3D T1 map of the heart with good accuracy and adequate precision.

  12. High-resolution 3D coronary vessel wall imaging with near 100% respiratory efficiency using epicardial fat tracking: reproducibility and comparison with standard methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew D; Keegan, Jennifer; Firmin, David N

    2011-01-01

    To quantitatively assess the performance and reproducibility of 3D spiral coronary artery wall imaging with beat-to-beat respiratory-motion-correction (B2B-RMC) compared to navigator gated 2D spiral and turbo-spin-echo (TSE) acquisitions. High-resolution (0.7 × 0.7 mm) cross-sectional right coronary wall acquisitions were performed in 10 subjects using four techniques (B2B-RMC 3D spiral with alternate (2RR) and single (1RR) R-wave gating, navigator-gated 2D spiral (2RR) and navigator-gated 2D TSE (2RR)) on two occasions. Wall thickness measurements were compared with repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Reproducibility was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). In all, 91% (73/80) of acquisitions were successful (failures: four TSE, two 3D spiral (1RR) and one 3D spiral (2RR)). Respiratory efficiency of the B2B-RMC was less variable and substantially higher than for navigator gating (99.6 ± 1.2% vs. 39.0 ± 7.5%, P B2B-RMC permits coronary vessel wall assessment over multiple thin contiguous slices in a clinically feasible duration. Excellent reproducibility of the technique potentially enables studies of disease progression/regression. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. R2OBBIE-3D, a Fast Robotic High-Resolution System for Quantitative Phenotyping of Surface Geometry and Colour-Texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukyan, Liana; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    While recent imaging techniques provide insights into biological processes from the molecular to the cellular scale, phenotypes at larger scales remain poorly amenable to quantitative analyses. For example, investigations of the biophysical mechanisms generating skin morphological complexity and diversity would greatly benefit from 3D geometry and colour-texture reconstructions. Here, we report on R2OBBIE-3D, an integrated system that combines a robotic arm, a high-resolution digital colour camera, an illumination basket of high-intensity light-emitting diodes and state-of-the-art 3D-reconstruction approaches. We demonstrate that R2OBBIE generates accurate 3D models of biological objects between 1 and 100 cm, makes multiview photometric stereo scanning possible in practical processing times, and enables the capture of colour-texture and geometric resolutions better than 15 μm without the use of magnifying lenses. R2OBBIE has the potential to greatly improve quantitative analyses of phenotypes in addition to providing multiple new applications in, e.g., biomedical science. PMID:26039509

  14. Use of patient specific 3D printed neurovascular phantoms to evaluate the clinical utility of a high resolution x-ray imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Russ, M.; Ionita, C. N.; Bednarek, D.; Rudin, S.

    2017-03-01

    Modern 3D printing technology can fabricate vascular phantoms based on an actual human patient with a high degree of precision facilitating a realistic simulation environment for an intervention. We present two experimental setups using 3D printed patient-specific neurovasculature to simulate different disease anatomies. To simulate the human neurovasculature in the Circle of Willis, patient-based phantoms with aneurysms were 3D printed using a Objet Eden 260V printer. Anthropomorphic head phantoms and a human skull combined with acrylic plates simulated human head bone anatomy and x-ray attenuation. For dynamic studies the 3D printed phantom was connected to a pulsatile flow loop with the anthropomorphic phantom underneath. By combining different 3D printed phantoms and the anthropomorphic phantoms, different patient pathologies can be simulated. For static studies a 3D printed neurovascular phantom was embedded inside a human skull and used as a positional reference for treatment devices such as stents. To simulate tissue attenuation acrylic layers were added. Different combinations can simulate different patient treatment procedures. The Complementary-Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) based High Resolution Fluoroscope (HRF) with 75μm pixels offers an advantage over the state-of-the-art 200 μm pixel Flat Panel Detector (FPD) due to higher Nyquist frequency and better DQE performance. Whether this advantage is clinically useful during an actual clinical neurovascular intervention can be addressed by qualitatively evaluating images from a cohort of various cases performed using both detectors. The above-mentioned method can offer a realistic substitute for an actual clinical procedure. Also a large cohort of cases can be generated and used for a HRF clinical utility determination study.

  15. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R; Murshudov, Garib N; Short, Judith M; Scheres, Sjors H W; Henderson, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  16. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Short, Judith M.; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Henderson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  17. Application of the Minkowski functionals in 3D to high-resolution MR images of trabecular bone: prediction of the biomechanical strength by nonlinear topological measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Holger F.; Link, Thomas M.; Monetti, Roberto A.; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Newitt, David; Majumdar, Sharmila; Raeth, Christoph W.

    2004-05-01

    Multi-dimensional convex objects can be characterized with respect to shape, structure, and the connectivity of their components using a set of morphological descriptors known as the Minkowski functionals. In a 3D Euclidian space, these correspond to volume, surface area, mean integral curvature, and the Euler-Poincaré characteristic. We introduce the Minkowski functionals to medical image processing for the morphological analysis of trabecular bone tissue. In the context of osteoporosis-a metabolic disorder leading to a weakening of bone due to deterioration of micro-architecture-the structure of bone increasingly gains attention in the quantification of bone quality. The trabecular architecture of healthy cancellous bone consists of a complex 3D system of inter-connected mineralised elements whereas in osteoporosis the micro-structure is dominated by gaps and disconnections. At present, the standard parameter for diagnosis and assessment of fracture risk in osteoporosis is the bone mineral density (BMD) - a bulk measure of mineralisation irrespective of structural texture characteristics. With the development of modern imaging modalities (high resolution MRI, micro-CT) with spatial resolutions allowing to depict individual trabeculae bone micro-architecture has successfully been analysed using linear, 2- dimensional structural measures adopted from standard histo-morphometry. The preliminary results of our study demonstrate that due to the complex - i.e. the non-linear - network of trabecular bone structures non-linear measures in 3D are superior to linear ones in predicting mechanical properties of trabecular bone from structural information extracted from high resolution MR image data.

  18. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Short, Judith M.; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Henderson, Richard, E-mail: rh15@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk

    2013-12-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  19. Use of high-resolution X-ray computed tomography and 3D image analysis to quantify mineral dissemination and pore space in oxide copper ore particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bao-hua; Wu, Ai-xiang; Narsilio, Guillermo A.; Miao, Xiu-xiu; Wu, Shu-yue

    2017-09-01

    Mineral dissemination and pore space distribution in ore particles are important features that influence heap leaching performance. To quantify the mineral dissemination and pore space distribution of an ore particle, a cylindrical copper oxide ore sample (ϕ4.6 mm × 5.6 mm) was scanned using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT), a nondestructive imaging technology, at a spatial resolution of 4.85 μm. Combined with three-dimensional (3D) image analysis techniques, the main mineral phases and pore space were segmented and the volume fraction of each phase was calculated. In addition, the mass fraction of each mineral phase was estimated and the result was validated with that obtained using traditional techniques. Furthermore, the pore phase features, including the pore size distribution, pore surface area, pore fractal dimension, pore centerline, and the pore connectivity, were investigated quantitatively. The pore space analysis results indicate that the pore size distribution closely fits a log-normal distribution and that the pore space morphology is complicated, with a large surface area and low connectivity. This study demonstrates that the combination of HRXCT and 3D image analysis is an effective tool for acquiring 3D mineralogical and pore structural data.

  20. Non Destructive High-Resolution 3D Investigation of Vesicle Textures in Pumice and Scoria by Synchrotron X-Ray Computed Microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polacci, M.; Baker, D.; Mancini, L.; Tromba, G.; Zanini, F.

    2005-12-01

    High resolution X-ray computed microtomography was applied to investigate the 3D structure of pyroclastic material from different active, explosive, hazardous volcanic areas. The experiments were performed at the SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility in Trieste (Italy). The 2D image slices resulting from tomography of selected pumice and scoria samples were transformed into volume renderings via specific tomographic software. The reconstructed volumes allowed us to test the applicability of this technique, novel in the field of volcanology, to volcanic specimens with different textural characteristics. The use of a third generation synchrotron radiation facility allowed optimal visualization of vesicle and crystal geometry in the reconstructed volume where conventional X-ray methods are strongly limited. The BLOB3D software package was used to accomplish quantitative descriptions of vesicle textures in terms of vesicularity, number density, volume and connectivity. The results exhibited complex patterns of the vesicle content, size, shape and distribution within the different pyroclasts and allowed us to track the degassing history of each single clast. With this preliminary study we demonstrate that computed microtomography is a feasible tool complementary to conventional microscopy methods for the full 3D textural characterization of volcanic clasts, and that it may be used to provide further constraints to models of degassing at active volcanoes.

  1. High-resolution spiral computed tomography with multiplanar reformatting, 3D surface- and volume rendering: a non-destructive method to visualize ancient Egyptian mummification techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Roel J; Poulus, Martin; Taconis, Wijbren; Stoker, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    Ancient Egyptians used mummification techniques to prevent their deceased from decay. This study evaluates the potential of computed tomography (CT) in determining these techniques in a non-destructive way. Twenty-five mummies were studied by using high-resolution spiral CT, 1mm slice thickness for the head and 3mm slice thickness for the rest of the body. Images were reconstructed with 3D, multiplanar reformatting and volume rendering. In all cases the used mummification techniques could be reconstructed. The way the brain was removed, the presence of chemicals, like resin and natron, could be detected and the way the intestines were handled could be made visible. The use of CT is indispensable as a non-destructive method in the reconstruction of mummification techniques.

  2. Large-scale and high-resolution 3-D cave mapping by terrestrial laser scanning: a case study of the Domica Cave, Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Gallay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mapping and modelling the complicated geometry of caves is a challenging task that has traditionally been undertaken by tacheometric surveying methods. These methods are excellent for capturing the general shape of a cave system but they are not suitable for high-speed, high-resolution mapping of complex surfaces found in this environment. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS technologies can acquire millions of points represented by 3-D coordinates, at very high spatial densities on complex multifaceted surfaces within minutes. In the last few years, advances in measurement speed, reduction in size / cost and increased portability of this technology has revolutionised the collection of 3-D data. This paper discusses the methodological framework and the advantages / disadvantages of adopting terrestrial laser scanning to rapidly map a complex cave system on the example of the Domica Cave in Slovakia. This cave originated in the largest karst region in the West Carpathians. The collected data set or ‘point cloud’ contains over 11.9 billion measured points, captured in 5 days from 327 individual scanning positions. The dataset represents almost 1600 m of the cave passages. Semi-automatic registration of these scans was carried out using reference spheres placed in each scene and this method archived an overall registration error of 2.24 mm (RMSE. Transformation of the final registered point cloud from its local coordinate system to the national cartographic system was achieved with total accuracy of 21 mm (RMSE. This very detailed data set was used to create a 3-D cave surface model needed for volumetric analyses. In the future, it will be used for spatial analyses or simulating the interaction of surface and subsurface processes contributing to the development of the cave system on the basis of a 3-D GIS platform.

  3. Towards high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations: preliminary comparison of retrieval techniques and models within MESCLA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buongiorno Nardelli, B.; Guinehut, S.; Pascual, A.; Drillet, Y.; Ruiz, S.; Mulet, S.

    2012-03-01

    Within the MyOcean R&D project MESCLA (MEsoSCale dynamical Analysis through combined model, satellite and in situ data), different estimates of the vertical velocities derived from observations have been compared. Two main approaches have been considered, one based on the retrieval of 3-D fields from the observations alone and one based on the analyses provided by MyOcean MERCATOR models. The motivation for this double approach is that, while data assimilation in numerical models is crucial to obtain more accurate analyses and forecasts, its results might be significantly influenced by specific model configurations (e.g. forcing, parameterization of smaller scale processes and spatial resolution). On the other hand, the purely observation-based approach is limited by the underlying assumptions of simplified dynamical models and by the relatively low resolution of present products. MESCLA tested innovative methods for the high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations, developing new products that might be used to gradually build the next generations of operational observation-based products.

  4. Comprehensive Non-Destructive Conservation Documentation of Lunar Samples Using High-Resolution Image-Based 3D Reconstructions and X-Ray CT Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, E. H.; Evans, C. A.; Oshel, E. R.; Liddle, D. A.; Beaulieu, K.; Zeigler, R. A.; Hanna, R. D.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Established contemporary conservation methods within the fields of Natural and Cultural Heritage encourage an interdisciplinary approach to preservation of heritage material (both tangible and intangible) that holds "Outstanding Universal Value" for our global community. NASA's lunar samples were acquired from the moon for the primary purpose of intensive scientific investigation. These samples, however, also invoke cultural significance, as evidenced by the millions of people per year that visit lunar displays in museums and heritage centers around the world. Being both scientifically and culturally significant, the lunar samples require a unique conservation approach. Government mandate dictates that NASA's Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office develop and maintain protocols for "documentation, preservation, preparation and distribution of samples for research, education and public outreach" for both current and future collections of astromaterials. Documentation, considered the first stage within the conservation methodology, has evolved many new techniques since curation protocols for the lunar samples were first implemented, and the development of new documentation strategies for current and future astromaterials is beneficial to keeping curation protocols up to date. We have developed and tested a comprehensive non-destructive documentation technique using high-resolution image-based 3D reconstruction and X-ray CT (XCT) data in order to create interactive 3D models of lunar samples that would ultimately be served to both researchers and the public. These data enhance preliminary scientific investigations including targeted sample requests, and also provide a new visual platform for the public to experience and interact with the lunar samples. We intend to serve these data as they are acquired on NASA's Astromaterials Acquisistion and Curation website at http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/. Providing 3D interior and exterior documentation of astromaterial

  5. What's the Point of a Raster ? Advantages of 3D Point Cloud Processing over Raster Based Methods for Accurate Geomorphic Analysis of High Resolution Topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lague, D.

    2014-12-01

    High Resolution Topographic (HRT) datasets are predominantly stored and analyzed as 2D raster grids of elevations (i.e., Digital Elevation Models). Raster grid processing is common in GIS software and benefits from a large library of fast algorithms dedicated to geometrical analysis, drainage network computation and topographic change measurement. Yet, all instruments or methods currently generating HRT datasets (e.g., ALS, TLS, SFM, stereo satellite imagery) output natively 3D unstructured point clouds that are (i) non-regularly sampled, (ii) incomplete (e.g., submerged parts of river channels are rarely measured), and (iii) include 3D elements (e.g., vegetation, vertical features such as river banks or cliffs) that cannot be accurately described in a DEM. Interpolating the raw point cloud onto a 2D grid generally results in a loss of position accuracy, spatial resolution and in more or less controlled interpolation. Here I demonstrate how studying earth surface topography and processes directly on native 3D point cloud datasets offers several advantages over raster based methods: point cloud methods preserve the accuracy of the original data, can better handle the evaluation of uncertainty associated to topographic change measurements and are more suitable to study vegetation characteristics and steep features of the landscape. In this presentation, I will illustrate and compare Point Cloud based and Raster based workflows with various examples involving ALS, TLS and SFM for the analysis of bank erosion processes in bedrock and alluvial rivers, rockfall statistics (including rockfall volume estimate directly from point clouds) and the interaction of vegetation/hydraulics and sedimentation in salt marshes. These workflows use 2 recently published algorithms for point cloud classification (CANUPO) and point cloud comparison (M3C2) now implemented in the open source software CloudCompare.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of interstitial pneumonia using 3D-curved high-resolution CT imaging parallel to the chest wall: A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyasu Umakoshi

    Full Text Available To quantify the imaging findings of patients with interstitial pneumonia (IP and emphysema using three-dimensional curved high-resolution computed tomography (3D-cHRCT at a constant depth from the chest wall, and compare the results to visual assessment of IP and each patient's diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLco.We retrospectively reviewed the axial CT findings and pulmonary function test results of 95 patients with lung cancer (72 men and 23 women, aged 45-84 years with or without IP, as follows: non-IP (n = 47, mild IP (n = 31, and moderate IP (n = 17. The 3D-cHRCT images of the lung at a 1-cm depth from the chest wall were reconstructed automatically using original software; total area (TA, high-attenuation area (HAA >-500 HU, and low-attenuation area (LAA <-950 HU were calculated on a workstation. The %HAA and %LAA were calculated as follows: [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text].The %HAA and %LAA respective values were 3.2±0.9 and 27.7±8.2, 3.9±1.2 and 27.6±5.9, and 6.9±2.2 and 25.4±8.7 in non-IP, mild IP, and moderate IP patients, respectively. There were significant differences in %HAA between the 3 groups of patients (P<0.001, but no differences in %LAA (P = 0.558. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that %HAA and %LAA were negatively correlated with predicted DLco (standard partial regression coefficient [b*] = -0.453, P<0.001; b* = -0.447, P<0.001, respectively.The %HAA and %LAA values computed using 3D-cHRCT were significantly correlated with DLco and may be important quantitative parameters for both IP and emphysema.

  7. Simultaneous real-time 3D photoacoustic tomography and EEG for neurovascular coupling study in an animal model of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Xiao, Jiaying; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Neurovascular coupling in epilepsy is poorly understood; its study requires simultaneous monitoring of hemodynamic changes and neural activity in the brain. Approach. Here for the first time we present a combined real-time 3D photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and electrophysiology/electroencephalography (EEG) system for the study of neurovascular coupling in epilepsy, whose ability was demonstrated with a pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) induced generalized seizure model in rats. Two groups of experiments were carried out with different wavelengths to detect the changes of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR) signals in the rat brain. We extracted the average PAT signals of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), and compared them with the EEG signal. Main results. Results showed that the seizure process can be divided into three stages. A ‘dip’ lasting for 1-2 min in the first stage and the following hyperfusion in the second stage were observed. The HbO2 signal and the HbR signal were generally negatively correlated. The change of blood flow was also estimated. All the acquired results here were in accordance with other published results. Significance. Compared to other existing functional neuroimaging tools, the method proposed here enables reliable tracking of hemodynamic signal with both high spatial and high temporal resolution in 3D, so it is more suitable for neurovascular coupling study of epilepsy.

  8. High-resolution sub-bottom sonar imaging and 3D modeling of drowned Pleistocene river paleochannel architecture (Strunjan bay, Adriatic Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobec, Ana; Šmuc, Andrej; Poglajen, Sašo; Vrabec, Marko

    2015-04-01

    In the Gulf of Trieste (northern Adriatic), the seafloor is covered by up to several 100s of m of continental sediments, characterized predominately by alluvial and aeolian deposits that formed during Pleistocene sea-level lowstands. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry revealed the existence of several meandering river channels. One such channel appears to be vertically offset across a linear, NE-SW striking morphological flexure, which could be an expression of active faulting. Initial sub-bottom sonar profiles showed abrupt terminations of subhorizontal strata of Pleistocene sediments which roughly coincide with the flexure position. To obtain a high-resolution 3D interpretation of this peculiar feature, we investigated the outermost part of the Strunjan bay (southern Slovenian coast). A grid of 25 m spaced sub-bottom profiles covering the area of 1225 x 500 m and comprising a total of 71 orthogonal profiles was acquired with the Innomar parametric sediment echo sounder SES-2000, using a sampling interval of 69 μs and a frequency of 8000 Hz. Data processing included conversion from proprietary to standard SEG-Y data format, deconvolution, elimination of swell movement and Automatic Gain Control. Geopositioned profiles were interpreted and correlated in IHS Kingdom seismic interpretation software, which was used to pick horizons and model 3D geometry of key stratigraphic surfaces. Four distinct acoustic facies were resolved from the sonar profiles to a depth of up to 10 m below the seafloor. The first reflection represents the seafloor, ranging in depth from 20 to 26 m. Acoustic facies A in the immediate subsurface represents Holocene marine sediments that are up to 9 m thick. The paleochannel and associated river deposits are represented in the underlying acoustic facies B. Characteristic for this facies is strong attenuation of signal along the river channel which we interpret as a consequence of lateral channel migration and/or later gas accumulations in this

  9. 2D and 3D high resolution seismic imaging of shallow Solfatara crater in Campi Flegrei (Italy): new insights on deep hydrothermal fluid circulation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Landro, Grazia; Gammaldi, Sergio; Serlenga, Vincenzo; Amoroso, Ortensia; Russo, Guido; Festa, Gaetano; D'Auria, Luca; Bruno, Pier Paolo; Gresse, Marceau; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Zollo, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    Seismic tomography can be used to image the spatial variation of rock properties within complex geological media such as volcanoes. Solfatara is a volcano located within the Campi Flegrei still active caldera, characterized by periodic episodes of extended, low-rate ground subsidence and uplift called bradyseism accompanied by intense seismic and geochemical activities. In particular, Solfatara is characterized by an impressive magnitude diffuse degassing, which underlines the relevance of fluid and heat transport at the crater and prompted further research to improve the understanding of the hydrothermal system feeding the surface phenomenon. In this line, an active seismic experiment, Repeated Induced Earthquake and Noise (RICEN) (EU Project MEDSUV), was carried out between September 2013 and November 2014 to provide time-varying high-resolution images of the structure of Solfatara. In this study we used the datasets provided by two different acquisition geometries: a) A 2D array cover an area of 90 x 115 m ^ 2 sampled by a regular grid of 240 vertical sensors deployed at the crater surface; b) two 1D orthogonal seismic arrays deployed along NE-SW and NW-SE directions crossing the 400 m crater surface. The arrays are sampled with a regular line of 240 receiver and 116 shots. We present 2D and 3D tomographic high-resolution P-wave velocity images obtained using two different tomographic methods adopting a multiscale strategy. The 3D image of the shallow (30-35 m) central part of Solfatara crater is performed through the iterative, linearized, tomographic inversion of the P-wave first arrival times. 2D P-wave velocity sections (60-70 m) are obtained using a non-linear travel-time tomography method based on the evaluation of a posteriori probability density with a Bayesian approach. The 3D retrieved images integrated with resistivity section and temperature and CO2 flux measurements , define the following characteristics: 1. A depth dependent P-wave velocity layer

  10. Application of Internal Standard Method for Several 3d-Transition Metallic Elements in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using a Multi-wavelength High-resolution Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toya, Yusuke; Itagaki, Toshiko; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    We investigated a simultaneous internal standard method in flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), in order to better the analytical precision of 3d-transition metals contained in steel materials. For this purpose, a new spectrometer system for FAAS, comprising a bright xenon lamp as the primary radiation source and a high-resolution Echelle monochromator, was employed to measure several absorption lines at a wavelength width of ca. 0.3 nm at the same time, which enables the absorbances of an analytical line and also an internal standard line to be estimated. In considering several criteria for selecting an internal standard element and the absorption line, it could be suggested that platinum-group elements: ruthenium, rhodium, or palladium, were suitable for an internal standard element to determine the 3d-transition metal elements, such as titanium, iron, and nickel, by measuring an appropriate pair of these absorption lines simultaneously. Several variances of the absorption signal, such as a variation in aspirated amounts of sample solution and a short-period drift of the primary light source, would be corrected and thus reduced, when the absorbance ratio of the analytical line to the internal standard line was measured. In Ti-Pd, Ni-Rh, and Fe-Ru systems chosen as typical test samples, the repeatability of the signal respnses was investigated with/without the internal standard method, resulting in better precision when the internal standard method was applied in the FAAS with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame rather than an air-acetylene flame.

  11. Focused ion beam (FIB) combined with high resolution scanning electron microscopy: a promising tool for 3D analysis of chromosome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder-Reiter, Elizabeth; Pérez-Willard, Fabián; Zeile, Ulrike; Wanner, Gerhard

    2009-02-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling in combination with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was applied to investigations of metaphase barley chromosomes, providing new insight into the chromatin packaging in the chromosome interior and 3D distribution of histone variants in the centromeric region. Whole mount chromosomes were sectioned with FIB with thicknesses in the range of 7-20nm, resulting in up to 2000 sections, which allow high resolution three-dimensional reconstruction. For the first time, it could be shown that the chromosome interior is characterized by a network of interconnected cavities, with openings to the chromosome surface. In combination with immunogold labeling, the centromere-correlated distribution of histone variants (phosphorylated histone H3, CENH3) could be investigated with FIB in three dimensions. Limitations of classical SEM analysis of whole mount chromosomes with back-scattered electrons requiring higher accelerating voltages, e.g. faint and blurred interior signals, could be overcome with FIB milling: from within the chromosome even very small labels in the range of 10nm could be precisely visualized. This allowed direct quantification of marker molecules in a three-dimensional context. Distribution of DNA in the chromosome interior could be directly analyzed after staining with a DNA-specific platinorganic compound Platinum Blue. Higher resolution visualization of DNA distribution could be performed by preparation of FIB lamellae with the in situ lift-out technique followed by investigation in dark field with a scanning transmission electron detector (STEM) at 30kV.

  12. New High-Resolution 3D Seismic Imagery of Deformation and Fault Architecture Along Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon Fault in the Inner California Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J. J.; Bormann, J. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic deformation and geomorphology of the Inner California Borderlands (ICB) records the transition from a convergent plate margin to a predominantly dextral strike-slip system. Geodetic measurements of plate boundary deformation onshore indicate that approximately 15%, or 6-8 mm/yr, of the total Pacific-North American relative plate motion is accommodated by faults offshore. The largest near-shore fault system, the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon (NI/RC) fault complex, has a Holocene slip rate estimate of 1.5-2.0 mm/yr, according to onshore trenching, and current models suggest the potential to produce an Mw 7.0+ earthquake. The fault zone extends approximately 120 km, initiating from the south near downtown San Diego and striking northwards with a constraining bend north of Mt. Soledad in La Jolla and continuing northwestward along the continental shelf, eventually stepping onshore at Newport Beach, California. In late 2013, we completed the first high-resolution 3D seismic survey (3.125 m bins) of the NI/RC fault offshore of San Onofre as part of the Southern California Regional Fault Mapping project. We present new constraints on fault geometry and segmentation of the fault system that may play a role in limiting the extent of future earthquake ruptures. In addition, slip rate estimates using piercing points such as offset channels will be explored. These new observations will allow us to investigate recent deformation and strain transfer along the NI/RC fault system.

  13. New High-Resolution 3D Imagery of Fault Deformation and Segmentation of the San Onofre and San Mateo Trends in the Inner California Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G. M.; Bormann, J. M.; Harding, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Inner California Borderlands (ICB) is situated off the coast of southern California and northern Baja. The structural and geomorphic characteristics of the area record a middle Oligocene transition from subduction to microplate capture along the California coast. Marine stratigraphic evidence shows large-scale extension and rotation overprinted by modern strike-slip deformation. Geodetic and geologic observations indicate that approximately 6-8 mm/yr of Pacific-North American relative plate motion is accommodated by offshore strike-slip faulting in the ICB. The farthest inshore fault system, the Newport-Inglewood Rose Canyon (NIRC) fault complex is a dextral strike-slip system that extends primarily offshore approximately 120 km from San Diego to the San Joaquin Hills near Newport Beach, California. Based on trenching and well data, the NIRC fault system Holocene slip rate is 1.5-2.0 mm/yr to the south and 0.5-1.0 mm/yr along its northern extent. An earthquake rupturing the entire length of the system could produce an Mw 7.0 earthquake or larger. West of the main segments of the NIRC fault complex are the San Mateo and San Onofre fault trends along the continental slope. Previous work concluded that these were part of a strike-slip system that eventually merged with the NIRC complex. Others have interpreted these trends as deformation associated with the Oceanside Blind Thrust fault purported to underlie most of the region. In late 2013, we acquired the first high-resolution 3D P-Cable seismic surveys (3.125 m bin resolution) of the San Mateo and San Onofre trends as part of the Southern California Regional Fault Mapping project aboard the R/V New Horizon. Analysis of these volumes provides important new insights and constraints on the fault segmentation and transfer of deformation. Based on the new 3D sparker seismic data, our preferred interpretation for the San Mateo and San Onofre fault trends is they are transpressional features associated with westward

  14. Demonstration of a Novel, Integrated, Multi-Scale Procedure for High-Resolution 3D Reservoir Characterization and Improved CO2-EOR/Sequestration Management, SACROC Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott R. Reeves

    2007-09-30

    The primary goal of this project was to demonstrate a new and novel approach for high resolution, 3D reservoir characterization that can enable better management of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects and, looking to the future, carbon sequestration projects. The approach adopted has been the subject of previous research by the DOE and others, and relies primarily upon data-mining and advanced pattern recognition approaches. This approach honors all reservoir characterization data collected, but accepts that our understanding of how these measurements relate to the information of most interest, such as how porosity and permeability vary over a reservoir volume, is imperfect. Ideally the data needed for such an approach includes surface seismic to provide the greatest amount of data over the entire reservoir volume of interest, crosswell seismic to fill the resolution gap between surface seismic and wellbore-scale measurements, geophysical well logs to provide the vertical resolution sought, and core data to provide the tie to the information of most interest. These data are combined via a series of one or more relational models to enable, in its most successful application, the prediction of porosity and permeability on a vertical resolution similar to logs at each surface seismic trace location. In this project, the procedure was applied to the giant (and highly complex) SACROC unit of the Permian basin in West Texas, one of the world's largest CO{sub 2}-EOR projects and a potentially world-class geologic sequestration site. Due to operational scheduling considerations on the part of the operator of the field, the crosswell data was not obtained during the period of project performance (it is currently being collected however as part of another DOE project). This compromised the utility of the surface seismic data for the project due to the resolution gap between it and the geophysical well logs. An alternative approach was adopted that utilized a

  15. Multitemporal field-based plant height estimation using 3D point clouds generated from small unmanned aerial systems high-resolution imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malambo, L.; Popescu, S. C.; Murray, S. C.; Putman, E.; Pugh, N. A.; Horne, D. W.; Richardson, G.; Sheridan, R.; Rooney, W. L.; Avant, R.; Vidrine, M.; McCutchen, B.; Baltensperger, D.; Bishop, M.

    2018-02-01

    Plant breeders and agronomists are increasingly interested in repeated plant height measurements over large experimental fields to study critical aspects of plant physiology, genetics and environmental conditions during plant growth. However, collecting such measurements using commonly used manual field measurements is inefficient. 3D point clouds generated from unmanned aerial systems (UAS) images using Structure from Motion (SfM) techniques offer a new option for efficiently deriving in-field crop height data. This study evaluated UAS/SfM for multitemporal 3D crop modelling and developed and assessed a methodology for estimating plant height data from point clouds generated using SfM. High-resolution images in visible spectrum were collected weekly across 12 dates from April (planting) to July (harvest) 2016 over 288 maize (Zea mays L.) and 460 sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) plots using a DJI Phantom 3 Professional UAS. The study compared SfM point clouds with terrestrial lidar (TLS) at two dates to evaluate the ability of SfM point clouds to accurately capture ground surfaces and crop canopies, both of which are critical for plant height estimation. Extended plant height comparisons were carried out between SfM plant height (the 90th, 95th, 99th percentiles and maximum height) per plot and field plant height measurements at six dates throughout the growing season to test the repeatability and consistency of SfM estimates. High correlations were observed between SfM and TLS data (R2 = 0.88-0.97, RMSE = 0.01-0.02 m and R2 = 0.60-0.77 RMSE = 0.12-0.16 m for the ground surface and canopy comparison, respectively). Extended height comparisons also showed strong correlations (R2 = 0.42-0.91, RMSE = 0.11-0.19 m for maize and R2 = 0.61-0.85, RMSE = 0.12-0.24 m for sorghum). In general, the 90th, 95th and 99th percentile height metrics had higher correlations to field measurements than the maximum metric though differences among them were not statistically significant. The

  16. Reproducible metacarpal joint space width measurements using 3D analysis of images acquired with high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabe, Cheryl; Buie, Helen; Kan, Michelle; Szabo, Eva; Barr, Susan G; Martin, Liam; Boyd, Steven K

    2013-10-01

    Joint space narrowing is an important feature of progressive joint damage and functional impairment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods to provide a continuous measurement of joint space width have not been adopted in research or clinical settings. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) (Scanco Medical AG, Brüttisellen, Switzerland) accurately and reproducibly images bone microstructure at a nominal isotropic voxel dimension of 82 μm. Given the ability of HR-pQCT to detect bone margins with high precision, we developed methodology to measure a three-dimensional (3D) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint space width and tested the reproducibility of the scan protocol with hand repositioning. Consecutive HR-pQCT scans of the 2nd and 3rd MCP joints of ten subjects with early RA (70% female, mean age 45 years), with repositioning between scans, were obtained. The periosteal edges of the metacarpal head and proximal phalanx base were detected using the μCT Evaluation Program V6.0 (Scanco Medical AG). Using the method of 'fitting maximal spheres', the joint space width and distribution of joint space thickness was estimated. The mean minimum joint space width of the 2nd MCP was 1.82 mm (SD 0.20) and of the 3rd MCP 1.84 mm (SD 0.23). Reproducibility with repositioning was reliable, with overlapping filtered histograms and a root square mean coefficient of variance of 4.8%. We provide reproducible methodology for evaluating the joint space width of the MCP joints. When combined with the assessment of erosions and periarticular bone density, HR-pQCT may be the ideal technology to assess disease activity and progression in RA. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 3D assessment of cortical bone porosity and tissue mineral density using high-resolution µCT: effects of resolution and threshold method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio-Mancheno, Paolo E; Larriera, Adriana I; Doty, Stephen B; Cardoso, Luis; Fritton, Susannah P

    2014-01-01

    Current micro-computed tomography (µCT) systems allow scanning bone at resolutions capable of three-dimensional (3D) characterization of intracortical vascular porosity and osteocyte lacunae. However, the scanning and reconstruction parameters along with the image segmentation method affect the accuracy of the measurements. In this study, the effects of scanning resolution and image threshold method in quantifying small features of cortical bone (vascular porosity, vascular canal diameter and separation, lacunar porosity and density, and tissue mineral density) were analyzed. Cortical bone from the tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats was scanned at 1-µm and 4-µm resolution, reconstructions were density-calibrated, and volumes of interest were segmented using approaches based on edge-detection or histogram analysis. In 1-µm resolution scans, the osteocyte lacunar spaces could be visualized, and it was possible to separate the lacunar porosity from the vascular porosity. At 4-µm resolution, the vascular porosity and vascular canal diameter were underestimated, and osteocyte lacunae were not effectively detected, whereas the vascular canal separation and tissue mineral density were overestimated compared to 1-µm resolution. Resolution had a much greater effect on the measurements than did threshold method, showing partial volume effects at resolutions coarser than 2 µm in two separate analyses, one of which assessed the effect of resolution on an object of known size with similar architecture to a vascular pore. Although there was little difference when using the edge-detection versus histogram-based threshold approaches, edge-detection was somewhat more effective in delineating canal architecture at finer resolutions (1-2 µm). In addition, use of a high-resolution (1 µm) density-based threshold on lower resolution (4 µm) density-calibrated images was not effective in improving the lower-resolution measurements. In conclusion, if measuring cortical vascular

  18. Improved border sharpness of post-infarct scar by a novel self-navigated free-breathing high-resolution 3D whole-heart inversion recovery magnetic resonance approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutz, Tobias; Piccini, Davide; Coppo, Simone; Chaptinel, Jerome; Ginami, Giulia; Vincenti, Gabriella; Stuber, Matthias; Schwitter, Juerg

    2016-12-01

    The border zone of post-infarction myocardial scar as identified by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) has been identified as a substrate for arrhythmias and consequently, high-resolution 3D scar information is potentially useful for planning of electrophysiological interventions. This study evaluates the performance of a novel high-resolution 3D self-navigated free-breathing inversion recovery magnetic resonance pulse sequence (3D-SN-LGE) vs. conventional 2D breath-hold LGE (2D-LGE) with regard to sharpness of borders (SBorder) of post-infarction scar. Patients with post-infarction scar underwent two magnetic resonance examinations for conventional 2D-LGE and high-resolution 3D-SN-LGE acquisitions (both 15 min after 0.2 mmol/kg Gadobutrol IV) at 1.5T. In the prototype 3D-SN-LGE sequence, each ECG-triggered radial steady-state-free-precession read-out segment is preceded by a non-slice-selective inversion pulse. Scar volume and SBorder were assessed on 2D-LGE and matching reconstructed high-resolution 3D-SN-LGE short-axis slices. In 16 patients (four females, 58 ± 10y) all scars visualized by 2D-LGE could be identified on 3D-SN-LGE (time between 2D-LGE and 3D-SN-LGE 48 ± 53 days). A good agreement of scar volume by 3D-SN-LGE vs. 2D-LGE was found (Bland-Altman: -3.7 ± 3.4 ml, correlation: r = 0.987, p scar volume (20.5 (15.8, 35.2) ml vs. 24.5 (20.0, 41.9)) ml, respectively, p = 0.002] and a good intra- and interobserver variability (1.1 ± 4.1 and -1.1 ± 11.9 ml, respectively). SBorder of border "scar to non-infarcted myocardium" was superior on 3D-SN-LGE vs. 2D-LGE: 0.180 ± 0.044 vs. 0.083 ± 0.038, p scar by 3D-SN-LGE is feasible and accurate in comparison to 2D-LGE. The high spatial resolution of the 3D sequence improves delineation of scar borders.

  19. Marker-referred movement measurement with grey-scale coordinate extraction for high-resolution real-time 3D at 100 Hz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furnée, E.H.; Jobbá, A.; Sabel, J.C.; Veenendaal, H.L.J. van; Martin, F.; Andriessen, D.C.W.G.

    1997-01-01

    A review of early history in photography highlights the origin of cinefilm as a scientific tool for image-based measurement of human and animal motion. The paper is concerned with scanned-area video sensors (CCD) and a computer interface for the real-time, high-resolution extraction of image

  20. Objective assessment and design improvement of a staring, sparse transducer array by the spatial crosstalk matrix for 3D photoacoustic tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Wong

    Full Text Available Accurate reconstruction of 3D photoacoustic (PA images requires detection of photoacoustic signals from many angles. Several groups have adopted staring ultrasound arrays, but assessment of array performance has been limited. We previously reported on a method to calibrate a 3D PA tomography (PAT staring array system and analyze system performance using singular value decomposition (SVD. The developed SVD metric, however, was impractical for large system matrices, which are typical of 3D PAT problems. The present study consisted of two main objectives. The first objective aimed to introduce the crosstalk matrix concept to the field of PAT for system design. Figures-of-merit utilized in this study were root mean square error, peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean absolute error, and a three dimensional structural similarity index, which were derived between the normalized spatial crosstalk matrix and the identity matrix. The applicability of this approach for 3D PAT was validated by observing the response of the figures-of-merit in relation to well-understood PAT sampling characteristics (i.e. spatial and temporal sampling rate. The second objective aimed to utilize the figures-of-merit to characterize and improve the performance of a near-spherical staring array design. Transducer arrangement, array radius, and array angular coverage were the design parameters examined. We observed that the performance of a 129-element staring transducer array for 3D PAT could be improved by selection of optimal values of the design parameters. The results suggested that this formulation could be used to objectively characterize 3D PAT system performance and would enable the development of efficient strategies for system design optimization.

  1. Objective assessment and design improvement of a staring, sparse transducer array by the spatial crosstalk matrix for 3D photoacoustic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Philip; Kosik, Ivan; Raess, Avery; Carson, Jeffrey J L

    2015-01-01

    Accurate reconstruction of 3D photoacoustic (PA) images requires detection of photoacoustic signals from many angles. Several groups have adopted staring ultrasound arrays, but assessment of array performance has been limited. We previously reported on a method to calibrate a 3D PA tomography (PAT) staring array system and analyze system performance using singular value decomposition (SVD). The developed SVD metric, however, was impractical for large system matrices, which are typical of 3D PAT problems. The present study consisted of two main objectives. The first objective aimed to introduce the crosstalk matrix concept to the field of PAT for system design. Figures-of-merit utilized in this study were root mean square error, peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean absolute error, and a three dimensional structural similarity index, which were derived between the normalized spatial crosstalk matrix and the identity matrix. The applicability of this approach for 3D PAT was validated by observing the response of the figures-of-merit in relation to well-understood PAT sampling characteristics (i.e. spatial and temporal sampling rate). The second objective aimed to utilize the figures-of-merit to characterize and improve the performance of a near-spherical staring array design. Transducer arrangement, array radius, and array angular coverage were the design parameters examined. We observed that the performance of a 129-element staring transducer array for 3D PAT could be improved by selection of optimal values of the design parameters. The results suggested that this formulation could be used to objectively characterize 3D PAT system performance and would enable the development of efficient strategies for system design optimization.

  2. Initial high-resolution microscopic mapping of active and inactive regulatory sequences proves non-random 3D arrangements in chromatin domain clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Marion; Schmid, Volker J; Kraus, Felix; Markaki, Yolanda; Hellmann, Ines; Maiser, Andreas; Leonhardt, Heinrich; John, Sam; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Cremer, Thomas

    2017-08-07

    The association of active transcription regulatory elements (TREs) with DNAse I hypersensitivity (DHS[+]) and an 'open' local chromatin configuration has long been known. However, the 3D topography of TREs within the nuclear landscape of individual cells in relation to their active or inactive status has remained elusive. Here, we explored the 3D nuclear topography of active and inactive TREs in the context of a recently proposed model for a functionally defined nuclear architecture, where an active and an inactive nuclear compartment (ANC-INC) form two spatially co-aligned and functionally interacting networks. Using 3D structured illumination microscopy, we performed 3D FISH with differently labeled DNA probe sets targeting either sites with DHS[+], apparently active TREs, or DHS[-] sites harboring inactive TREs. Using an in-house image analysis tool, DNA targets were quantitatively mapped on chromatin compaction shaped 3D nuclear landscapes. Our analyses present evidence for a radial 3D organization of chromatin domain clusters (CDCs) with layers of increasing chromatin compaction from the periphery to the CDC core. Segments harboring active TREs are significantly enriched at the decondensed periphery of CDCs with loops penetrating into interchromatin compartment channels, constituting the ANC. In contrast, segments lacking active TREs (DHS[-]) are enriched toward the compacted interior of CDCs (INC). Our results add further evidence in support of the ANC-INC network model. The different 3D topographies of DHS[+] and DHS[-] sites suggest positional changes of TREs between the ANC and INC depending on their functional state, which might provide additional protection against an inappropriate activation. Our finding of a structural organization of CDCs based on radially arranged layers of different chromatin compaction levels indicates a complex higher-order chromatin organization beyond a dichotomic classification of chromatin into an 'open,' active and 'closed

  3. A novel profile/view ordering with a non-convex star shutter for high-resolution 3D volumetric T1 mapping under multiple breath-holds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sui-Cheng; Patel, Amit R; Tanaka, Akiko; Wang, Hui; Ota, Takeyoshi; Lang, Roberto M; Carroll, Timothy J; Kawaji, Keigo

    2017-06-01

    To examine a novel non-convex star ordering/shutter for reducing the number of breath-holds in cardiac three-dimensional (3D) T1 Mapping MRI with multiple breath-holds. A novel ordering, Non-Convex Star (NCS) was designed to acquire 3D volumes in a modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) T1 mapping sequence to provide more spatial resolution and coverage in fewer breath-holds. The proposed 3D-MOLLI approach using NCS was first validated in two phantoms using artifact power (AP) measurement against the fully sampled phantom. This was followed by an in vivo study in seven swine, in which the T1 values of the left ventricular (LV) myocardium divided into the American Heart Association (AHA) 16-segment model was compared against the reference multislice two-dimensional (2D) clinical reference and 3D volume without NCS breath-hold reduction. NCS breath-hold reduction yielded less AP compared with the matched SENSE accelerated phantom volume (P T1 values from 3D in vivo volumes with/without NCS were comparable in all AHA segments (P = NS), whereas 3D-NCS yielded significantly higher T1 values than 2D at midslice of the LV myocardium in each AHA segment (P T1 mapping acquisition requiring fewer breath-holds. Magn Reson Med 77:2215-2224, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. High resolution earthquake source mechanisms in a subduction zone: 3-D waveform simulations of aftershocks from the 2010 Mw 8.8 Chile rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Stephen; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The earthquake rupture process is extremely heterogeneous. For subduction zone earthquakes in particular, it is vital to understand how structural variations in the overriding plate and downgoing slab may control slip style. The large-scale 3-D geometry of subduction plate boundaries is rapidly becoming well understood (e.g. Hayes et al., 2012); however, the nature of slip style along any finer-scale structures remains elusive. Regional earthquake moment tensor (RMT) inversion can shed light on faulting mechanisms. However, many traditional regional moment tensor inversions use simplified (1-D) Earth models (e.g. Agurto et al., 2012; Hayes et al., 2013) that only use the lowest frequency parts of the waveform, which may mask source complexity. As a result, we may have to take care when making small-scale interpretations about the causative fault and its slip style. This situation is compounded further by strong lateral variations in subsurface geology, as well as poor station coverage for recording offshore subduction earthquakes. A formal assessment of the resolving capability of RMT inversions in subduction zones is challenging and the application of 3-D waveform simulation techniques in highly heterogeneous media is needed. We generate 3-D waveform simulations of aftershocks from a large earthquake that struck Chile in 2010. The Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake is the sixth largest earthquake ever recorded. Following the earthquake, there was an international deployment of seismic stations in the rupture area, making this one of the best observed aftershock sequences to date. We therefore have a unique opportunity to compare recorded waveforms with simulated waveforms for many earthquakes, shedding light on the effect of 3-D heterogeneity on source imaging. We perform forward simulations using the spectral element wave propagation code, SPEFEM3D (e.g. Komatitsch et al., 2010) for a set of moderate-sized aftershocks (Mw 4.0-5.5). A detailed knowledge of velocity structure

  5. Application of 3D documentation and geometric reconstruction methods in traffic accident analysis: with high resolution surface scanning, radiological MSCT/MRI scanning and real data based animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Ursula; Naether, Silvio; Braun, Marcel; Bolliger, Stephan; Friederich, Hans; Jackowski, Christian; Aghayev, Emin; Christe, Andreas; Vock, Peter; Dirnhofer, Richard; Thali, Michael J

    2007-07-20

    The examination of traffic accidents is daily routine in forensic medicine. An important question in the analysis of the victims of traffic accidents, for example in collisions between motor vehicles and pedestrians or cyclists, is the situation of the impact. Apart from forensic medical examinations (external examination and autopsy), three-dimensional technologies and methods are gaining importance in forensic investigations. Besides the post-mortem multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the documentation and analysis of internal findings, highly precise 3D surface scanning is employed for the documentation of the external body findings and of injury-inflicting instruments. The correlation of injuries of the body to the injury-inflicting object and the accident mechanism are of great importance. The applied methods include documentation of the external and internal body and the involved vehicles and inflicting tools as well as the analysis of the acquired data. The body surface and the accident vehicles with their damages were digitized by 3D surface scanning. For the internal findings of the body, post-mortem MSCT and MRI were used. The analysis included the processing of the obtained data to 3D models, determination of the driving direction of the vehicle, correlation of injuries to the vehicle damages, geometric determination of the impact situation and evaluation of further findings of the accident. In the following article, the benefits of the 3D documentation and computer-assisted, drawn-to-scale 3D comparisons of the relevant injuries with the damages to the vehicle in the analysis of the course of accidents, especially with regard to the impact situation, are shown on two examined cases.

  6. Mistic winds, a microsatellite constellation approach to high-resolution observations of the atmosphere using infrared sounding and 3d winds measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschhoff, K. R.; Polizotti, J. J.; Aumann, H. H.; Susskind, J.

    2016-10-01

    MISTiC Winds is an approach to improve short-term weather forecasting based on a miniature high resolution, wide field, thermal emission spectrometry instrument that will provide global tropospheric vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity at high (3-4 km) horizontal and vertical ( 1 km) spatial resolution. MISTiC's extraordinarily small size, payload mass of less than 15 kg, and minimal cooling requirements can be accommodated aboard a 27U-class CubeSat or an ESPA-Class micro-satellite. Low fabrication and launch costs enable a LEO sunsynchronous sounding constellation that would collectively provide frequent IR vertical profiles and vertically resolved atmospheric motion vector wind observations in the troposphere. These observations are highly complementary to present and emerging environmental observing systems, and would provide a combination of high vertical and horizontal resolution not provided by any other environmental observing system currently in operation. The spectral measurements that would be provided by MISTiC Winds are similar to those of NASA's AIRS that was built by BAE Systems and operates aboard the AQUA satellite. These new observations, when assimilated into high resolution numerical weather models, would revolutionize short-term and severe weather forecasting, save lives, and support key economic decisions in the energy, air transport, and agriculture arenas-at much lower cost than providing these observations from geostationary orbit. In addition, this observation capability would be a critical tool for the study of transport processes for water vapor, clouds, pollution, and aerosols. Key remaining technical risks are being reduced through laboratory and airborne testing under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program.

  7. MISTiC Winds, a Micro-Satellite Constellation Approach to High Resolution Observations of the Atmosphere using Infrared Sounding and 3D Winds Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschhoff, K. R.; Polizotti, J. J.; Susskind, J.; Aumann, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    MISTiCTM Winds is an approach to improve short-term weather forecasting based on a miniature high resolution, wide field, thermal emission spectrometry instrument that will provide global tropospheric vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity at high (3-4 km) horizontal and vertical ( 1 km) spatial resolution. MISTiC's extraordinarily small size, payload mass of less than 15 kg, and minimal cooling requirements can be accommodated aboard a 27U-class CubeSat or an ESPA-Class micro-satellite. Low fabrication and launch costs enable a LEO sun-synchronous sounding constellation that would collectively provide frequent IR vertical profiles and vertically resolved atmospheric motion vector wind observations in the troposphere. These observations are highly complementary to present and emerging environmental observing systems, and would provide a combination of high vertical and horizontal resolution not provided by any other environmental observing system currently in operation. The spectral measurements that would be provided by MISTiC Winds are similar to those of NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder that was built by BAE Systems and operates aboard the AQUA satellite. These new observations, when assimilated into high resolution numerical weather models, would revolutionize short-term and severe weather forecasting, save lives, and support key economic decisions in the energy, air transport, and agriculture arenas-at much lower cost than providing these observations from geostationary orbit. In addition, this observation capability would be a critical tool for the study of transport processes for water vapor, clouds, pollution, and aerosols. Key technical risks are being reduced through laboratory and airborne testing under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program.

  8. MISTiC Winds: A micro-satellite constellation approach to high resolution observations of the atmosphere using infrared sounding and 3D winds measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschhoff, K. R.; Polizotti, J. J.; Aumann, H. H.; Susskind, J.

    2016-09-01

    MISTiCTM Winds is an approach to improve short-term weather forecasting based on a miniature high resolution, wide field, thermal emission spectrometry instrument that will provide global tropospheric vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity at high (3-4 km) horizontal and vertical ( 1 km) spatial resolution. MISTiC's extraordinarily small size, payload mass of less than 15 kg, and minimal cooling requirements can be accommodated aboard a 27U-class CubeSat or an ESPA-Class micro-satellite. Low fabrication and launch costs enable a LEO sunsynchronous sounding constellation that would collectively provide frequent IR vertical profiles and vertically resolved atmospheric motion vector wind observations in the troposphere. These observations are highly complementary to present and emerging environmental observing systems, and would provide a combination of high vertical and horizontal resolution not provided by any other environmental observing system currently in operation. The spectral measurements that would be provided by MISTiC Winds are similar to those of NASA's AIRS that was built by BAE Systems and operates aboard the AQUA satellite. These new observations, when assimilated into high resolution numerical weather models, would revolutionize short-term and severe weather forecasting, save lives, and support key economic decisions in the energy, air transport, and agriculture arenas-at much lower cost than providing these observations from geostationary orbit. In addition, this observation capability would be a critical tool for the study of transport processes for water vapor, clouds, pollution, and aerosols. Key remaining technical risks are being reduced through laboratory and airborne testing under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program.

  9. MISTiC Winds, a Micro-Satellite Constellation Approach to High Resolution Observations of the Atmosphere Using Infrared Sounding and 3D Winds Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschhoff, K. R.; Polizotti, J. J.; Aumann, H. H.; Susskind, J.

    2016-01-01

    MISTiC(TM) Winds is an approach to improve short-term weather forecasting based on a miniature high resolution, wide field, thermal emission spectrometry instrument that will provide global tropospheric vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity at high (3-4 km) horizontal and vertical ( 1 km) spatial resolution. MISTiCs extraordinarily small size, payload mass of less than 15 kg, and minimal cooling requirements can be accommodated aboard a 27U-class CubeSat or an ESPA-Class micro-satellite. Low fabrication and launch costs enable a LEO sunsynchronous sounding constellation that would collectively provide frequent IR vertical profiles and vertically resolved atmospheric motion vector wind observations in the troposphere. These observations are highly complementary to present and emerging environmental observing systems, and would provide a combination of high vertical and horizontal resolution not provided by any other environmental observing system currently in operation. The spectral measurements that would be provided by MISTiC Winds are similar to those of NASA's AIRS that was built by BAE Systems and operates aboard the AQUA satellite. These new observations, when assimilated into high resolution numerical weather models, would revolutionize short-term and severe weather forecasting, save lives, and support key economic decisions in the energy, air transport, and agriculture arenasat much lower cost than providing these observations from geostationary orbit. In addition, this observation capability would be a critical tool for the study of transport processes for water vapor, clouds, pollution, and aerosols. Key remaining technical risks are being reduced through laboratory and airborne testing under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program.

  10. Efficient training of convolutional deep belief networks in the frequency domain for application to high-resolution 2D and 3D images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosch, Tom; Tam, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Deep learning has traditionally been computationally expensive, and advances in training methods have been the prerequisite for improving its efficiency in order to expand its application to a variety of image classification problems. In this letter, we address the problem of efficient training of convolutional deep belief networks by learning the weights in the frequency domain, which eliminates the time-consuming calculation of convolutions. An essential consideration in the design of the algorithm is to minimize the number of transformations to and from frequency space. We have evaluated the running time improvements using two standard benchmark data sets, showing a speed-up of up to 8 times on 2D images and up to 200 times on 3D volumes. Our training algorithm makes training of convolutional deep belief networks on 3D medical images with a resolution of up to 128×128×128 voxels practical, which opens new directions for using deep learning for medical image analysis.

  11. Towards high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations: preliminary comparison of retrieval techniques and models within MESCLA project

    OpenAIRE

    B. Buongiorno Nardelli; S. Guinehut; Pascual, A.; Drillet, Y.; Ruiz, S.; Mulet, S.

    2012-01-01

    Within the MyOcean R&D project MESCLA (MEsoSCale dynamical Analysis through combined model, satellite and in situ data), different estimates of the vertical velocities derived from observations have been compared. Two main approaches have been considered, one based on the retrieval of 3-D fields from the observations alone and one based on the analyses provided by MyOcean MERCATOR models. The motivation for this double approach is that, while data assimilation in numerical models is cruci...

  12. Reducing Uncertainty in the Distribution of Hydrogeologic Units within Volcanic Composite Units of Pahute Mesa Using High-Resolution 3-D Resistivity Methods, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Brian D.; Sweetkind, Don; Burton, Bethany L.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at their Nevada Site Office (NSO) are addressing groundwater contamination resulting from historical underground nuclear testing through the Environmental Management program and, in particular, the Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. From 1951 to 1992, 828 underground nuclear tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) northwest of Las Vegas (DOE UGTA, 2003). Most of these tests were conducted hundreds of feet above the groundwater table; however, more than 200 of the tests were near, or within, the water table. This underground testing was limited to specific areas of the NTS including Pahute Mesa, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Frenchman Flat, and Yucca Flat. Volcanic composite units make up much of the area within the Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit (CAU) at the NTS, Nevada. The extent of many of these volcanic composite units extends throughout and south of the primary areas of past underground testing at Pahute and Rainier Mesas. As situated, these units likely influence the rate and direction of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Currently, these units are poorly resolved in terms of their hydrologic properties introducing large uncertainties into current CAU-scale flow and transport models. In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with DOE and NNSA-NSO acquired three-dimensional (3-D) tensor magnetotelluric data at the NTS in Area 20 of Pahute Mesa CAU. A total of 20 magnetotelluric recording stations were established at about 600-m spacing on a 3-D array and were tied to ER20-6 well and other nearby well control (fig. 1). The purpose of this survey was to determine if closely spaced 3-D resistivity measurements can be used to characterize the distribution of shallow (600- to 1,500-m-depth range) devitrified rhyolite lava-flow aquifers (LFA) and zeolitic tuff confining units (TCU) in areas of limited drill hole control on

  13. Towards automated firearm identification based on high resolution 3D data: rotation-invariant features for multiple line-profile-measurement of firing pin shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Robert; Vielhauer, Claus

    2015-03-01

    Understanding and evaluation of potential evidence, as well as evaluation of automated systems for forensic examinations currently play an important role within the domain of digital crime scene analysis. The application of 3D sensing and pattern recognition systems for automatic extraction and comparison of firearm related tool marks is an evolving field of research within this domain. In this context, the design and evaluation of rotation-invariant features for use on topography data play a particular important role. In this work, we propose and evaluate a 3D imaging system along with two novel features based on topography data and multiple profile-measurement-lines for automatic matching of firing pin shapes. Our test set contains 72 cartridges of three manufactures shot by six different 9mm guns. The entire pattern recognition workflow is addressed. This includes the application of confocal microscopy for data acquisition, preprocessing covers outlier handling, data normalization, as well as necessary segmentation and registration. Feature extraction involves the two introduced features for automatic comparison and matching of 3D firing pin shapes. The introduced features are called `Multiple-Circle-Path' (MCP) and `Multiple-Angle-Path' (MAP). Basically both features are compositions of freely configurable amounts of circular or straight path-lines combined with statistical evaluations. During the first part of evaluation (E1), we examine how well it is possible to differentiate between two 9mm weapons of the same mark and model. During second part (E2), we evaluate the discrimination accuracy regarding the set of six different 9mm guns. During the third part (E3), we evaluate the performance of the features in consideration of different rotation angles. In terms of E1, the best correct classification rate is 100% and in terms of E2 the best result is 86%. The preliminary results for E3 indicate robustness of both features regarding rotation. However, in future

  14. High-Resolution Imaged-Based 3D Reconstruction Combined with X-Ray CT Data Enables Comprehensive Non-Destructive Documentation and Targeted Research of Astromaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, E. H.; Evans, C. A.; Oshel, E. R.; Liddle, D. A.; Beaulieu, K.; Zeigler, R. A.; Righter, K.; Hanna, R. D.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Providing web-based data of complex and sensitive astromaterials (including meteorites and lunar samples) in novel formats enhances existing preliminary examination data on these samples and supports targeted sample requests and analyses. We have developed and tested a rigorous protocol for collecting highly detailed imagery of meteorites and complex lunar samples in non-contaminating environments. These data are reduced to create interactive 3D models of the samples. We intend to provide these data as they are acquired on NASA's Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation website at http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/.

  15. Collaborative Project. 3D Radiative Transfer Parameterization Over Mountains/Snow for High-Resolution Climate Models. Fast physics and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, Kuo-Nan [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Under the support of the aforementioned DOE Grant, we have made two fundamental contributions to atmospheric and climate sciences: (1) Develop an efficient 3-D radiative transfer parameterization for application to intense and intricate inhomogeneous mountain/snow regions. (2) Innovate a stochastic parameterization for light absorption by internally mixed black carbon and dust particles in snow grains for understanding and physical insight into snow albedo reduction in climate models. With reference to item (1), we divided solar fluxes reaching mountain surfaces into five components: direct and diffuse fluxes, direct- and diffuse-reflected fluxes, and coupled mountain-mountain flux. “Exact” 3D Monte Carlo photon tracing computations can then be performed for these solar flux components to compare with those calculated from the conventional plane-parallel (PP) radiative transfer program readily available in climate models. Subsequently, Parameterizations of the deviations of 3D from PP results for five flux components are carried out by means of the multiple linear regression analysis associated with topographic information, including elevation, solar incident angle, sky view factor, and terrain configuration factor. We derived five regression equations with high statistical correlations for flux deviations and successfully incorporated this efficient parameterization into WRF model, which was used as the testbed in connection with the Fu-Liou-Gu PP radiation scheme that has been included in the WRF physics package. Incorporating this 3D parameterization program, we conducted simulations of WRF and CCSM4 to understand and evaluate the mountain/snow effect on snow albedo reduction during seasonal transition and the interannual variability for snowmelt, cloud cover, and precipitation over the Western United States presented in the final report. With reference to item (2), we developed in our previous research a geometric-optics surface-wave approach (GOS) for the

  16. 3D geometry and kinematic evolution of the Wadi Mayh sheath fold, Oman, using detailed mapping from high-resolution photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Sam; Searle, Mike

    2017-08-01

    The Wadi Mayh sheath fold in north-eastern Oman is one of the largest and best-exposed sheath folds known, and presents a unique opportunity to better understand this somewhat enigmatic style of deformation. We undertook high-resolution photographic surveying along Wadi Mayh to document the sheath fold in 61 georeferenced panoramic photomerges. Here we present ten such images that provide a structural interpretation of the sheath fold and surrounding structure. We resolve this structure in a simplified three-dimensional model and in two orthogonal cross sections, and propose a kinematic evolution to explain the geometry. The Wadi Mayh sheath fold is the most prominent example within what we suggest is a composite sequence of sheath folds, which is itself enclosed within a SSW-closing recumbent syncline at the base of the major Saih Hatat nappe. Sheath folding is accommodated within Permian Saiq Formation limestones showing carpholite assemblages (6-8 kbar; 275-375 °C). A major discontinuity separates this sequence from enveloping older rock units. The sequence formed during progressive top-to-north, ductile shearing as the overlying nappe migrated northwards with respect to the underthrusting Hulw unit. This process occurred during SSW-directed exhumation of partially subducted continental crust in NE Oman, approximately 15 Ma after obduction of the Oman ophiolite initiated.

  17. Cetacean brain evolution: Dwarf sperm whale (Kogia sima) and common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) - An investigation with high-resolution 3D MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelschläger, H H A; Ridgway, S H; Knauth, M

    2010-01-01

    This study compares a whole brain of the dwarf sperm whale (Kogia sima) with that of a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The Kogia brain was scanned with a Siemens Trio Magnetic Resonance scanner in the three main planes. As in the common dolphin and other marine odontocetes, the brain of the dwarf sperm whale is large, with the telencephalic hemispheres remarkably dominating the brain stem. The neocortex is voluminous and the cortical grey matter thin but expansive and densely convoluted. The corpus callosum is thin and the anterior commissure hard to detect whereas the posterior commissure is well-developed. There is consistency as to the lack of telencephalic structures (olfactory bulb and peduncle, olfactory ventricular recess) and neither an occipital lobe of the telencephalic hemisphere nor the posterior horn of the lateral ventricle are present. A pineal organ could not be detected in Kogia. Both species show a tiny hippocampus and thin fornix and the mammillary body is very small whereas other structures of the limbic system are well-developed. The brain stem is thick and underlies a large cerebellum, both of which, however, are smaller in Kogia. The vestibular system is markedly reduced with the exception of the lateral (Deiters') nucleus. The visual system, although well-developed in both species, is exceeded by the impressive absolute and relative size of the auditory system. The brainstem and cerebellum comprise a series of structures (elliptic nucleus, medial accessory inferior olive, paraflocculus and posterior interpositus nucleus) showing characteristic odontocete dimensions and size correlations. All these structures seem to serve the auditory system with respect to echolocation, communication, and navigation. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Feasibility of rigid 3D image registration of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography images of healing distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Joost J A; Christen, Patrik; Plett, Ryan M; Chapurlat, Roland; Geusens, Piet P; van den Bergh, Joop P W; Müller, Ralph; van Rietbergen, Bert

    2017-01-01

    For accurate analysis of bone formation and resorption during fracture healing, correct registration of follow-up onto baseline image is required. A per-fragment approach could improve alignment compared to standard registration based on the whole fractured region. In this exploratory study, we tested the effect of fragment size and displacement on a per-fragment registration, and compared the results of this per-fragment registration to the results of the standard registration in two stable fractures and one unstable fracture. To test the effect of fragment size and displacement, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) scans of three unfractured radii were divided into subvolumes. Different displacements in x-, y, or z-direction or rotations around each axis were applied, and each subvolume was registered onto the initial volume to realign it. Next, registration of follow-up onto baseline scan was performed in two stable and one unstable fracture. After coarsely aligning the follow-up onto the baseline scan, a more accurate registration was performed of the whole fracture, i.e. the standard registration, and of each fracture fragment separately, i.e. per-fragment registration. Alignment was checked using overlay images showing baseline, follow-up and overlap between these scans, and by comparing correlation coefficients between the standard and per-fragment registration. Generally, subvolumes as small as 300 mm3 that were displaced up to 0.82 mm in x- or y-, or up to 1.64 mm in z-direction could be realigned correctly. For the fragments of all fractures, correlation coefficients were higher after per-fragment registration compared to standard registration. Most improvement was found in the unstable fracture and one fragment of the unstable fracture did not align correctly. This exploratory study showed that image registration of individual subvolumes, such as fracture fragments, is feasible in both stable and unstable fractures, and

  19. Feasibility of rigid 3D image registration of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography images of healing distal radius fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost J A de Jong

    Full Text Available For accurate analysis of bone formation and resorption during fracture healing, correct registration of follow-up onto baseline image is required. A per-fragment approach could improve alignment compared to standard registration based on the whole fractured region. In this exploratory study, we tested the effect of fragment size and displacement on a per-fragment registration, and compared the results of this per-fragment registration to the results of the standard registration in two stable fractures and one unstable fracture. To test the effect of fragment size and displacement, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT scans of three unfractured radii were divided into subvolumes. Different displacements in x-, y, or z-direction or rotations around each axis were applied, and each subvolume was registered onto the initial volume to realign it. Next, registration of follow-up onto baseline scan was performed in two stable and one unstable fracture. After coarsely aligning the follow-up onto the baseline scan, a more accurate registration was performed of the whole fracture, i.e. the standard registration, and of each fracture fragment separately, i.e. per-fragment registration. Alignment was checked using overlay images showing baseline, follow-up and overlap between these scans, and by comparing correlation coefficients between the standard and per-fragment registration. Generally, subvolumes as small as 300 mm3 that were displaced up to 0.82 mm in x- or y-, or up to 1.64 mm in z-direction could be realigned correctly. For the fragments of all fractures, correlation coefficients were higher after per-fragment registration compared to standard registration. Most improvement was found in the unstable fracture and one fragment of the unstable fracture did not align correctly. This exploratory study showed that image registration of individual subvolumes, such as fracture fragments, is feasible in both stable and

  20. 3D-localized, high-resolution, non-perturbing, vectorizable magnetic field diagnostic using two-photon Doppler-free laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young Dae; Bellan, Paul M.

    2017-10-01

    A detailed description of a new plasma magnetic field diagnostic using Doppler-free two-photon laser-induced fluorescence is presented. The diagnostic is based on a method previously developed in the context of rubidium vapor experiments. Two counter-propagating diode laser beams at 394nm are directed into an argon plasma to excite Ar-II ions from the metastable level 3s2 3p4 4 p4D7 / 2 ⟶ 3s2 3p4 4 p4D5/ 2 o ⟶ 3s2 3p4 5 s2P3 / 2 . The levels involve two similar (394.43nm and 393.31nm) transition wavelengths, so the two counter-propagating beams effectively cancel out the Doppler effect. The excited ions then decay to the 3s2 3p4 4 p2D5/ 2 o level, emitting a 410.38nm line which is to be detected by a photomultiplier tube. The Zeeman splitting - normally unobservable because of the large Doppler broadening - of the resultant fluorescence is then to be analyzed, yielding the magnetic field of the particular location. This method is expected to provide 3D localized, non-perturbing vector measurements of the magnetic field. The resolution of the diagnostic is only limited by the cross-section of the laser beam, which can easily be as small as hundreds of microns wide. An experimental implementation is currently in progress.

  1. Forward modelling of global gravity fields with 3D density structures and an application to the high-resolution ( 2 km) gravity fields of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šprlák, M.; Han, S.-C.; Featherstone, W. E.

    2017-12-01

    Rigorous modelling of the spherical gravitational potential spectra from the volumetric density and geometry of an attracting body is discussed. Firstly, we derive mathematical formulas for the spatial analysis of spherical harmonic coefficients. Secondly, we present a numerically efficient algorithm for rigorous forward modelling. We consider the finite-amplitude topographic modelling methods as special cases, with additional postulates on the volumetric density and geometry. Thirdly, we implement our algorithm in the form of computer programs and test their correctness with respect to the finite-amplitude topography routines. For this purpose, synthetic and realistic numerical experiments, applied to the gravitational field and geometry of the Moon, are performed. We also investigate the optimal choice of input parameters for the finite-amplitude modelling methods. Fourth, we exploit the rigorous forward modelling for the determination of the spherical gravitational potential spectra inferred by lunar crustal models with uniform, laterally variable, radially variable, and spatially (3D) variable bulk density. Also, we analyse these four different crustal models in terms of their spectral characteristics and band-limited radial gravitation. We demonstrate applicability of the rigorous forward modelling using currently available computational resources up to degree and order 2519 of the spherical harmonic expansion, which corresponds to a resolution of 2.2 km on the surface of the Moon. Computer codes, a user manual and scripts developed for the purposes of this study are publicly available to potential users.

  2. SU-F-J-93: Automated Segmentation of High-Resolution 3D WholeBrain Spectroscopic MRI for Glioblastoma Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreibmann, E; Shu, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Cordova, J; Gurbani, S; Holder, C; Cooper, L; Shim, H [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We report on an automated segmentation algorithm for defining radiation therapy target volumes using spectroscopic MR images (sMRI) acquired at nominal voxel resolution of 100 microliters. Methods: Wholebrain sMRI combining 3D echo-planar spectroscopic imaging, generalized auto-calibrating partially-parallel acquisitions, and elliptical k-space encoding were conducted on 3T MRI scanner with 32-channel head coil array creating images. Metabolite maps generated include choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), as well as Cho/NAA, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cr ratio maps. Automated segmentation was achieved by concomitantly considering sMRI metabolite maps with standard contrast enhancing (CE) imaging in a pipeline that first uses the water signal for skull stripping. Subsequently, an initial blob of tumor region is identified by searching for regions of FLAIR abnormalities that also display reduced NAA activity using a mean ratio correlation and morphological filters. These regions are used as starting point for a geodesic level-set refinement that adapts the initial blob to the fine details specific to each metabolite. Results: Accuracy of the segmentation model was tested on a cohort of 12 patients that had sMRI datasets acquired pre, mid and post-treatment, providing a broad range of enhancement patterns. Compared to classical imaging, where heterogeneity in the tumor appearance and shape across posed a greater challenge to the algorithm, sMRI’s regions of abnormal activity were easily detected in the sMRI metabolite maps when combining the detail available in the standard imaging with the local enhancement produced by the metabolites. Results can be imported in the treatment planning, leading in general increase in the target volumes (GTV60) when using sMRI+CE MRI compared to the standard CE MRI alone. Conclusion: Integration of automated segmentation of sMRI metabolite maps into planning is feasible and will likely streamline acceptance of this

  3. [Controlled evaluation of a high-resolution three-dimensional magnetic detector system (3D-MAGMA) as a proof of concept - examination of healthy volunteers before and after application of Metoclopramide (MCP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, V Y P; Stallmach, A; Felber, J

    2016-06-01

    Changes in gastric and small bowel motility are a common clinical problem. Currently diagnostic options are limited because each method harbors certain disadvantages. It has been shown that the high-resolution three-dimensional magnetic detector system 3D-MAGMA is capable of reliably measuring gastric and small intestine motor activity. This system allows precise localization of a small magnetic marker and determination of its three-dimensional orientation inside a human body. The aim of the current study was to determine if 3D-MAGMA is reliably able to detect changes in gastric and small bowel motility under controlled conditions. MCP was used as a well known prokinetic agent to shorten the gastric and small bowel passage. 8 healthy volunteers (fasting) underwent motility testing of the stomach and small bowel by 3D-MAGMA with and without administration of MCP (10 mg orally). Among other data the time the capsule needed to pass through the stomach and the duodenum and the time the capsule needed to pass through the first 50 cm of the jejunum were recorded. The retention time of the capsule in the stomach under physiological conditions was 49.1 minutes (median; min. 18 min; max. 88.8 min). The median time the capsule needed to pass through the duodenum was 13.8 minutes (median; min. 1.7 min; max. 24.8 min). The time the capsule needed to pass through the first 50 cm of the jejunum under physiological conditions was 33.0 minutes (median; min. 20.2 min; max. 67.2 min). The retention time of the capsule in the stomach decreased significantly after administration of MCP to 20.9 minutes (median; min. 1.7 min; max. 62.8 min; p = 0.008). The time the capsule needed to pass through the duodenum was also reduced to 7.1 minutes (median; min. 3.1 min; max. 18.3 min; p = 0.055). The time the capsule needed to pass through the first 50 cm of the jejunum was also reduced to 21.7 minutes (median; min. 10.7 min; max. 31.2 min; p = 0.069). 3D-MAGMA is able

  4. Lunaserv Global Explorer, 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miconi, C. E.; Estes, N. M.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Robinson, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    Lunaserv Global Explorer 3D is a platform independent, planetary data visualization application, which serves high resolution base-map imagery and terrain from web map service data sources, and displays it on a 3D spinning-globe interface.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging using an 8-beam Fabry-Perot scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Nam; Ogunlade, Olumide; Zhang, Edward; Cox, Ben; Beard, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The planar Fabry Perot (FP) photoacoustic scanner has been shown to provide exquisite high resolution 3D images of soft tissue structures in vivo to depths up to approximately 10mm. However a significant limitation of current embodiments of the concept is low image acquisition speed. To increase acquisition speed, a novel multi-beam scanner architecture has been developed. This enables a line of equally spaced 8 interrogation beams to be scanned simultaneously across the FP sensor and the photoacoustic signals detected in parallel. In addition, an excitation laser operating at 200Hz was used. The combination of parallelising the detection and the high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the excitation laser has enabled dramatic reductions in image acquisition time to be achieved. A 3D image can now be acquired in 10 seconds and 2D images at video rates are now possible.

  6. Three-dimensional (3D) microarchitecture correlations with 2D projection image gray-level variations assessed by trabecular bone score using high-resolution computed tomographic acquisitions: effects of resolution and noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzenrieth, Renaud; Michelet, Franck; Hans, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the level of correlation between the 3-dimensional (3D) characteristics of trabecular bone microarchitecture, as evaluated using microcomputed tomography (μCT) reconstruction, and trabecular bone score (TBS), as evaluated using 2D projection images directly derived from 3D μCT reconstruction (TBSμCT). Moreover, we have evaluated the effects of image degradation (resolution and noise) and X-ray energy of projection on these correlations. Thirty human cadaveric vertebrae were acquired on a microscanner at an isotropic resolution of 93 μm. The 3D microarchitecture parameters were obtained using MicroView (GE Healthcare, Wauwatosa, MI). The 2D projections of these 3D models were generated using the Beer-Lambert law at different X-ray energies. Degradation of image resolution was simulated (from 93 to 1488 μm). Relationships between 3D microarchitecture parameters and TBSμCT at different resolutions were evaluated using linear regression analysis. Significant correlations were observed between TBSμCT and 3D microarchitecture parameters, regardless of the resolution. Correlations were detected that were strongly to intermediately positive for connectivity density (0.711 ≤ r² ≤ 0.752) and trabecular number (0.584 ≤ r² ≤ 0.648) and negative for trabecular space (-0.407 ≤ r² ≤ -0.491), up to a pixel size of 1023 μm. In addition, TBSμCT values were strongly correlated between each other (0.77 ≤ r² ≤ 0.96). Study results show that the correlations between TBSμCT at 93 μm and 3D microarchitecture parameters are weakly impacted by the degradation of image resolution and the presence of noise. Copyright © 2013 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. First spatial and high-resolution imaging in perfused pig heart: intracellular 3D monitoring of myoglobin, cytochromes, and subcellular structures of myocytes by use of EMPHO-Oxyscan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Robert; Boehnert, Markus; Mahlke, Christine; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2001-05-01

    Living tissue of mammals contains a large amount of subcellular particles like mitochondria that are involved in light scattering. Since these particles correlate in a certain way with the functional status of cells, light scattering may be useful for monitoring of functional tissue state. With EMPHO SSK Oxyscan we investigated functional parameters in a new kind of isolated perfused pig heart model. In this perfusion model we use organs obtained from the abattoir that are reperfused by use of a heart-lung machine. By creating 3D images of tissue light scattering we found an interesting relation between morphological structures of myocardium and the patterns of the 3D images. Additionally, we created 3D images of myoglobin oxygenation. Furthermore, we got spectra showing the redox state of cytochromes. We believe that this new kind of tissue imaging method will give us the opportunity to get new insights into myocardial function.

  8. Fast MR Imaging of the Paediatric Abdomen with CAIPIRINHA-Accelerated T1w 3D FLASH and with High-Resolution T2w HASTE: A Study on Image Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengxia Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the applicability of fast MR techniques to routine paediatric abdominopelvic MRI at 1.5 Tesla. “Controlled Aliasing in Parallel Imaging Results in Higher Acceleration-” (CAIPIRINHA- accelerated contrast-enhanced-T1w 3D FLASH imaging was compared to standard T1w 2D FLASH imaging with breath-holding in 40 paediatric patients and to respiratory-triggered T1w TSE imaging in 10 sedated young children. In 20 nonsedated patients, we compared T2w TIRM to fat-saturated T2w HASTE imaging. Two observers performed an independent and blinded assessment of overall image quality. Acquisition time was reduced by the factor of 15 with CAIPIRINHA-accelerated T1w FLASH and by 7 with T2w HASTE. With CAIPIRINHA and with HASTE, there were significantly less motion artefacts in nonsedated patients. In sedated patients, respiratory-triggered T1w imaging in general showed better image quality. However, satisfactory image quality was achieved with CAIPIRINHA in two sedated patients where respiratory triggering failed. In summary, fast scanning with CAIPIRINHA and HASTE presents a reliable high quality alternative to standard sequences in paediatric abdominal MRI. Paediatric patients, in particular, benefit greatly from fast image acquisition with less breath-hold cycles or shorter sedation.

  9. Fluids emission and gas chimneys imaged in high-resolution 3D seismic: Investigating the role of sedimentary structures in controlling vertical fluid migration (offshore of Ceará-Potiguar sub-basin, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestrelli, Daniele; Iacopini, David; Vittorio, Maselli

    2017-04-01

    Fluid emissions at seabed have been widely investigated during last years due to their potential in detecting new petroleum provinces and to their role in monitoring the environmental risk associated to CO2 storage and hydrocarbon leakage from the overburden. Fluid emission appears to be characterized by a variety of different processes and genetic mechanisms, and has been reported in different geological settings. We investigated a 45 by 25 km 3D seismic dataset located in the offshore Ceará state (Brazil), imaging the submarine slope system of the Potiguar sub-basin, part of the Ceará basin. The Paleogene sequence is characterized by a series of steep canyons acting as slope-bypass systems that force the transport of sediment basinward and promote the deposition in deepwater settings. The whole area seems to be affected by gravity driven processes in the form of turbidites and hyperpycnal flows that probably are responsible of the main submarine landslides observed and of the evolution of the canyons themselves. Bottom currents seem to play a key role in shaping the margin as well, by promoting the formation of sediment ridges and fields of sediment waves. In this setting, a series of widely distributed active pockmarks are observed both at the seabed and as paleo-pockmarks in the seismic subsurface, testifying the upward fluid migration and emission along gas chimneys and conduits. Active or recent pockmark varies from tens of meters up to about 2 km in diameters and are mainly circular to elliptical. A preliminary systematic mapping of those fluid escape features shows the strong control of the chutes and pools generated by fast turbidity currents on the chimney geometry pattern and fluid conduit. This evidence may suggest that the erosional/depositional features associated to turbidite sedimentation strongly control lateral permeability variations and, consequently, the vertical fluid migration.

  10. Reliable planning and monitoring tools by dismantling 3D photographic image of high resolution and document management systems. Application MEDS system; Planificacion fiable y seguimiento del desmantelamiento mediante herramientas 3D, imagen fotografica de alta resolucion y sistemas de gestion documental. Aplicacion del sistema MEDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela Morales, F.

    2010-07-01

    MEDS system (Metric Environment Documentation System) is a method developed by CT3 based engineering documentation generation metric of a physical environment using measurement tools latest technology and high precision, such as the Laser Scanner. With this equipment it is possible to obtain three-dimensional information of a physical environment through the 3D coordinates of millions of points. This information is processed by software that is very useful tool for modeling operations and 3D simulations.

  11. High Resolution Elevation Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset contains contours generated from high resolution data sources such as LiDAR. Generally speaking this data is 2 foot or less contour interval.

  12. An Interdisciplinary Method for the Visualization of Novel High-Resolution Precision Photography and Micro-XCT Data Sets of NASA's Apollo Lunar Samples and Antarctic Meteorite Samples to Create Combined Research-Grade 3D Virtual Samples for the Benefit of Astromaterials Collections Conservation, Curation, Scientific Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, E. H.; Evans, C. A.; Oshel, E. R.; Liddle, D. A.; Beaulieu, K.; Zeigler, R. A.; Hanna, R. D.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    New technologies make possible the advancement of documentation and visualization practices that can enhance conservation and curation protocols for NASA's Astromaterials Collections. With increasing demands for accessibility to updated comprehensive data, and with new sample return missions on the horizon, it is of primary importance to develop new standards for contemporary documentation and visualization methodologies. Our interdisciplinary team has expertise in the fields of heritage conservation practices, professional photography, photogrammetry, imaging science, application engineering, data curation, geoscience, and astromaterials curation. Our objective is to create virtual 3D reconstructions of Apollo Lunar and Antarctic Meteorite samples that are a fusion of two state-of-the-art data sets: the interior view of the sample by collecting Micro-XCT data and the exterior view of the sample by collecting high-resolution precision photography data. These new data provide researchers an information-rich visualization of both compositional and textural information prior to any physical sub-sampling. Since January 2013 we have developed a process that resulted in the successful creation of the first image-based 3D reconstruction of an Apollo Lunar Sample correlated to a 3D reconstruction of the same sample's Micro- XCT data, illustrating that this technique is both operationally possible and functionally beneficial. In May of 2016 we began a 3-year research period during which we aim to produce Virtual Astromaterials Samples for 60 high-priority Apollo Lunar and Antarctic Meteorite samples and serve them on NASA's Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation website. Our research demonstrates that research-grade Virtual Astromaterials Samples are beneficial in preserving for posterity a precise 3D reconstruction of the sample prior to sub-sampling, which greatly improves documentation practices, provides unique and novel visualization of the sample's interior and

  13. An Interdisciplinary Method for the Visualization of Novel High-Resolution Precision Photography and Micro-XCT Data Sets of NASA's Apollo Lunar Samples and Antarctic Meteorite Samples to Create Combined Research-Grade 3D Virtual Samples for the Benefit of Astromaterials Collections Conservation, Curation, Scientific Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, E. H.; Evans, C. A.; Zeigler, R. A.; Righter, K.; Beaulieu, K. R.; Oshel, E. R.; Liddle, D. A.; Hanna, R.; Ketcham, R. A.; Todd, N. S.

    2016-12-01

    New technologies make possible the advancement of documentation and visualization practices that can enhance conservation and curation protocols for NASA's Astromaterials Collections. With increasing demands for accessibility to updated comprehensive data, and with new sample return missions on the horizon, it is of primary importance to develop new standards for contemporary documentation and visualization methodologies. Our interdisciplinary team has expertise in the fields of heritage conservation practices, professional photography, photogrammetry, imaging science, application engineering, data curation, geoscience, and astromaterials curation. Our objective is to create virtual 3D reconstructions of Apollo Lunar and Antarctic Meteorite samples that are a fusion of two state-of-the-art data sets: the interior view of the sample by collecting Micro-XCT data and the exterior view of the sample by collecting high-resolution precision photography data. These new data provide researchers an information-rich visualization of both compositional and textural information prior to any physical sub-sampling. Since January 2013 we have developed a process that resulted in the successful creation of the first image-based 3D reconstruction of an Apollo Lunar Sample correlated to a 3D reconstruction of the same sample's Micro-XCT data, illustrating that this technique is both operationally possible and functionally beneficial. In May of 2016 we began a 3-year research period during which we aim to produce Virtual Astromaterials Samples for 60 high-priority Apollo Lunar and Antarctic Meteorite samples and serve them on NASA's Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation website. Our research demonstrates that research-grade Virtual Astromaterials Samples are beneficial in preserving for posterity a precise 3D reconstruction of the sample prior to sub-sampling, which greatly improves documentation practices, provides unique and novel visualization of the sample's interior and

  14. Locoregional deformation pattern of the patellar cartilage after different loading types. High-resolution 3D-MRI volumetry at 3 T in-vivo; Lokoregionaere Deformationsmuster im Patellarknorpel nach unterschiedlichen Belastungsparadigmen. Hochaufloesende 3-D-MR-Volumetrie bei 3 T in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horng, Annie [University Hospital LMU Munich, Muenchen (Germany). Radiology; Raya, J. [New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (United States). Center of Biomedical Imaging; Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshadern (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Zscharn, M. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshadern (DE). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie] (and others)

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: To analyze locoregional deformation patterns indicative of contact areas in patellar cartilage after different loading exercises. Materials and Methods: 7 healthy patellae were examined in-vivo before and immediately after standardized loading (kneeling, squatting or knee bends) and after 90 minutes of rest using a sagittal 3D-T1-w FLASH WE sequence (22 msec/ 9.8msec/ 15 / 0.3 x 0.3 x 1.5 mm{sup 3}) at 3 T. After cartilage segmentation and 3D reconstruction, voxel-based and global precision errors (PR) were calculated. The former were used to determine significant differences in local cartilage thickness. Voxel-based 2{sigma}-thickness difference maps were calculated to visualize locoregional deformation patterns. Global changes in volume (Vol), mean thickness (mTh) and cartilage-bone-interface area (CBIA) were calculated. Results: The voxel-based PR depended on cartilage thickness (D) ranging from 0.12 - 0.35 mm. For D {>=} 1 mm the RF was < 0.31 mm (< voxel size), and for D {>=} 2 mm, the RF was < 0.22 mm. The global PR was 83 mm{sup 3} (2.4 %) for Vol, 0.06 mm (2.0 %) for mTh and 16 mm{sup 2} (1.4 %) for CBIA. The focal cartilage deformation equaled 14 % of the local thickness reduction. The deformation areas were oval and located in the peripheral medial (more vertically oriented, all exercises) and caudo-lateral (more horizontally oriented, kneeling and knee bends) aspects of the patella and were least pronounced in knee bends. Significant changes for Vol/mTh ranged from 2.1 to 3.7 %. Conclusion: This MRI-based study is the first to identify in-vivo voxel-based patellar cartilage deformation patterns indicating contact and loading zones after kneeling and squatting. These zones are anatomically and functionally plausible and may represent areas where stress induced degeneration and subsequent OA can originate. The data may facilitate understanding of individual knee loading properties and help to improve and validate biomechanical models for the knee

  15. Ultra high resolution tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  16. In vivo sub-femtoliter resolution photoacoustic microscopy with higher frame rates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Szu-Yu; Lai, Yu-Hung; Huang, Kai-Chih; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Tseng, Tzu-Fang; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    .... In this paper, based on the two-photon photoacoustic mechanism, we demonstrated a in vivo label free laser-scanning photoacoustic imaging modality featuring high frame rates and sub-femtoliter 3D...

  17. Advanced 3D Object Identification System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optra will build an Advanced 3D Object Identification System utilizing three or more high resolution imagers spaced around a launch platform. Data from each imager...

  18. 3D printing of functional structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    The technology colloquial known as ‘3D printing’ has developed in such diversity in printing technologies and application fields that meanwhile it seems anything is possible. However, clearly the ideal 3D Printer, with high resolution, multi-material capability, fast printing, etc. is yet to be

  19. Directional light scanning 3-D display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yoji; Horimai, Hideyoshi; Lim, Pang Boey; Watanabe, Kenjiro; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a new Three-Dimensional display method, so called Directional Light Scanning 3D display. By using holographic screen as a beam scanner and high frame rate Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), this method requires only one SLM but can display high resolution 3D images, solving the usual problem of lack of resolution.

  20. Photoacoustic image patterns of breast carcinoma and comparisons with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and vascular stained histopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijblom, M.; Piras, D.; Brinkhuis, M.; van Hespen, Johannes C.G.; van den Engh, F.M.; van der Schaaf, M.; Klaase, J.M.; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (optoacoustic) imaging can visualize vasculature deep in tissue using the high contrast of hemoglobin to light, with the high-resolution possible with ultrasound detection. Since angiogenesis, one of the hallmarks of cancer, leads to increased vascularity, photoacoustics holds promise

  1. Imaging nonmelanoma skin cancers with combined ultrasound-photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunar, Ulas; Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Morgan, Janet; Zeitouni, Natalie

    2013-03-01

    PDT has become a treatment of choice especially for the cases with multiple sites and large areas. However, the efficacy of PDT is limited for thicker and deeper tumors. Depth and size information as well as vascularity can provide useful information to clinicians for planning and evaluating PDT. High-resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging can provide information regarding skin structure and vascularity. We utilized combined ultrasound-photoacoustic microscopy for imaging a basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tumor pre-PDT and the results indicate that combined ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging can be useful tool for PDT planning by providing both structural and functional contrasts.

  2. Hybrid Photoacoustic/Ultrasound Tomograph for Real-Time Finger Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeri, Milan; Bost, Wolfgang; Sénégond, Nicolas; Tretbar, Steffen; Fournelle, Marc

    2017-10-01

    We report a target-enclosing, hybrid tomograph with a total of 768 elements based on capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer technology and providing fast, high-resolution 2-D/3-D photoacoustic and ultrasound tomography tailored to finger imaging. A freely programmable ultrasound beamforming platform sampling data at 80 MHz was developed to realize plane wave transmission under multiple angles. A multiplexing unit enables the connection and control of a large number of elements. Fast image reconstruction is provided by GPU processing. The tomograph is composed of four independent and fully automated movable arc-shaped transducers, allowing imaging of all three finger joints. The system benefits from photoacoustics, yielding high optical contrast and enabling visualization of finger vascularization, and ultrasound provides morphologic information on joints and surrounding tissue. A diode-pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used to broaden the spectrum of emitted wavelengths to provide multispectral imaging. Custom-made optical fiber bundles enable illumination of the region of interest in the plane of acoustic detection. Precision in positioning of the probe in motion is ensured by use of a motor-driven guide slide. The current position of the probe is encoded by the stage and used to relate ultrasound and photoacoustic signals to the corresponding region of interest of the suspicious finger joint. The system is characterized in phantoms and a healthy human finger in vivo. The results obtained promise to provide new opportunities in finger diagnostics and establish photoacoustic/ultrasound-tomography in medical routine. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 3D Bioprinting for Engineering Complex Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition...

  4. Making 3D movies of Northern Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hivon, Eric; Mouette, Jean; Legault, Thierry

    2017-10-01

    We describe the steps necessary to create three-dimensional (3D) movies of Northern Lights or Aurorae Borealis out of real-time images taken with two distant high-resolution fish-eye cameras. Astrometric reconstruction of the visible stars is used to model the optical mapping of each camera and correct for it in order to properly align the two sets of images. Examples of the resulting movies can be seen at http://www.iap.fr/aurora3d

  5. High-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg

    2014-03-15

    An ultracompact high-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscope with a femtosecond near infrared fiber laser has been utilized to study the cellular autofluorescence during freezing and thawing of cells. Cooling resulted in an increase of the intracellular fluorescence intensity followed by morphological modifications at temperatures below -10 °C, depending on the application of the cryoprotectant DMSO and the cooling rate. Furthermore, fluorescence lifetime imaging revealed an increase of the mean lifetime with a decrease in temperature. Non-destructive, label-free optical biopsies of biomaterial in ice can be obtained with sub-20 mW mean powers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Imaging a Sustainable Future in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kanngieser, E.

    2012-07-01

    It is the intention of this paper, to contribute to a sustainable future by providing objective object information based on 3D photography as well as promoting 3D photography not only for scientists, but also for amateurs. Due to the presentation of this article by CIPA Task Group 3 on "3D Photographs in Cultural Heritage", the presented samples are masterpieces of historic as well as of current 3D photography concentrating on cultural heritage. In addition to a report on exemplarily access to international archives of 3D photographs, samples for new 3D photographs taken with modern 3D cameras, as well as by means of a ground based high resolution XLITE staff camera and also 3D photographs taken from a captive balloon and the use of civil drone platforms are dealt with. To advise on optimum suited 3D methodology, as well as to catch new trends in 3D, an updated synoptic overview of the 3D visualization technology, even claiming completeness, has been carried out as a result of a systematic survey. In this respect, e.g., today's lasered crystals might be "early bird" products in 3D, which, due to lack in resolution, contrast and color, remember to the stage of the invention of photography.

  7. Stereolithographic hydrogel printing of 3D culture chips with biofunctionalized complex 3D perfusion networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Rujing; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2017-01-01

    the required freedom in design, detail and chemistry for fabricating truly 3D constructs have remained limited. Here, we report a stereolithographic high-resolution 3D printing technique utilizing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA, MW 700) to manufacture diffusion-open and mechanically stable hydrogel...... and material flexibility by embedding a highly compliant cell-laden gelatin hydrogel within the confines of a 3D printed resilient PEGDA hydrogel chip of intermediate compliance. Overall, our proposed strategy represents an automated, cost-effective and high resolution technique to manufacture complex 3D......Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models capturing both the structural and dynamic complexity of the in vivo situation are in great demand as an alternative to animal models. Despite tremendous progress in engineering complex tissue/organ models in the past decade, approaches that support...

  8. 3D Animation Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  9. 3D video

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Laurent; Loscos, Céline

    2013-01-01

    While 3D vision has existed for many years, the use of 3D cameras and video-based modeling by the film industry has induced an explosion of interest for 3D acquisition technology, 3D content and 3D displays. As such, 3D video has become one of the new technology trends of this century.The chapters in this book cover a large spectrum of areas connected to 3D video, which are presented both theoretically and technologically, while taking into account both physiological and perceptual aspects. Stepping away from traditional 3D vision, the authors, all currently involved in these areas, provide th

  10. High Resolution, Radiation Tolerant Focal Plane Array for Lunar And Deep Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerius Photonics and its partners propose the development of a high resolution, radiation hardened 3-D FLASH Focal Plane Array (FPA), with performance expected to be...

  11. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  12. High-resolution three-dimensional diffusion-weighted imaging of middle ear cholesteatoma at 3.0 T MRI: usefulness of 3D turbo field-echo with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation (TFE-DSDE) compared to single-shot echo-planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Obara, Makoto; Togao, Osamu; Matsumoto, Nozomu; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    To prospectively evaluate the usefulness of a newly developed high-resolution three-dimensional diffusion-weighted imaging method, turbo field-echo with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium (TFE-DSDE) in diagnosing middle-ear cholesteatoma by comparing it to conventional single-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging (SS-EP DWI). Institutional review board approval and informed consent from all participants were obtained. We studied 30 patients with preoperatively suspected acquired cholesteatoma. Each patient underwent an MR examination including both SS-EP DWI and DSDE-TFE using a 3.0 T MR scanner. Images of the 30 patients (60 temporal bones including 30 with and 30 without cholesteatoma) were reviewed by two independent neuroradiologists. The confidence level for the presence of cholesteatoma was graded on a scale of 0-2 (0=definite absence, 1=equivocal, 2=definite presence). Interobserver agreement as well as sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for detection were assessed for the two reviewers. Excellent interobserver agreement was shown for TFE-DSDE (κ=0.821) whereas fair agreement was obtained for SS-EP DWI (κ=0.416). TFE-DSDE was associated with significantly higher sensitivity (83.3%) and accuracy (90.0%) compared to SS-EP DWI (sensitivity=35.0%, accuracy=66.7%; p<0.05). No significant difference was found in specificity (96.7% for TFE-DSDE, 98.3% for SS-EP DWI) CONCLUSION: With increased spatial resolution and reduced susceptibility artifacts, TFE-DSDE improves the accuracy in diagnosing acquired middle ear cholesteatomas compared to SS-EP DWI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 Å TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron® accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  14. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  15. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  16. EUROPEANA AND 3D

    OpenAIRE

    D. Pletinckx

    2012-01-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There ar...

  17. Three-dimensional photoacoustic endoscopic imaging of the rabbit esophagus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Mo Yang

    Full Text Available We report photoacoustic and ultrasonic endoscopic images of two intact rabbit esophagi. To investigate the esophageal lumen structure and microvasculature, we performed in vivo and ex vivo imaging studies using a 3.8-mm diameter photoacoustic endoscope and correlated the images with histology. Several interesting anatomic structures were newly found in both the in vivo and ex vivo images, which demonstrates the potential clinical utility of this endoscopic imaging modality. In the ex vivo imaging experiment, we acquired high-resolution motion-artifact-free three-dimensional photoacoustic images of the vasculatures distributed in the walls of the esophagi and extending to the neighboring mediastinal regions. Blood vessels with apparent diameters as small as 190 μm were resolved. Moreover, by taking advantage of the dual-mode high-resolution photoacoustic and ultrasound endoscopy, we could better identify and characterize the anatomic structures of the esophageal lumen, such as the mucosal and submucosal layers in the esophageal wall, and an esophageal branch of the thoracic aorta. In this paper, we present the first photoacoustic images showing the vasculature of a vertebrate esophagus and discuss the potential clinical applications and future development of photoacoustic endoscopy.

  18. High-resolution x-ray photoemission spectra of silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrie, A.; Christensen, N. E.

    1976-01-01

    An electron spectrometer fitted with an x-ray monochromator for Al Kα1,2 radiation (1486.6 eV) has been used to record high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectra for the 4d valence band as well as the 3d spin doublet in silver. The core-level spectrum has a line shape that can be described...

  19. Submicron-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of endogenous light-absorbing biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi

    Photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine has the unique advantage of probing endogenous light absorbers at various length scales with a 100% relative sensitivity. Among the several modalities of photoacoustic imaging, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) can achieve high spatial resolution, on the order of optical wavelength, at targets fluorescent markers, label-free PAM avoids the major concerns that the fluorescent labeling probes may disturb the function of biomolecules and may have an insufficient density. This dissertation aims to advance label-free OR-PAM to the subcellular scale. The first part of this dissertation describes the technological advancement of PAM yielding high spatial resolution in 3D. The lateral resolution was improved by using optical objectives with high numerical apertures for optical focusing. The axial resolution was improved by using broadband ultrasonic transducers for ultrasound detection. We achieved 220 nm lateral resolution in transmission mode, 0.43 microm lateral resolution in reflection mode, 7.6 microm axial resolution in normal tissue, and 5.8 microm axial resolution with silicone oil immersion/injection. The achieved lateral resolution and axial resolution were the finest reported at the time. With high-resolution in 3D, PAM was demonstrated to resolve cellular and subcellular structures in vivo, such as red blood cells and melanosomes in melanoma cells. Compared with previous PAM systems, our high-resolution PAM could resolve capillaries in mouse ears more clearly. As an example application, we demonstrated intracellular temperature imaging, assisted by fluorescence signal detection, with sub-degree temperature resolution and sub-micron lateral resolution. The second part of this dissertation describes the exploration of endogenous light-absorbing biomolecules for PAM. We demonstrated cytochromes and myoglobin as new absorption contrasts for PAM and identified the corresponding optimal wavelengths for imaging

  20. CO laser photoacoustic spectra and vibrational modes of heroin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Heroin, morphine and narcotine are very large molecules having 50, 40 and 53 atoms respectively. Moderately high resolution photoacoustic (PA) spectra have been recorded in 9.6 µm and 10.6 µm regions of CO2 laser. It is very difficult to assign the modes of vibrations for PA bands by comparison with ...

  1. laser photoacoustic spectra and vibrational modes of heroin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heroin, morphine and narcotine are very large molecules having 50, 40 and 53 atoms respectively. Moderately high resolution photoacoustic (PA) spectra have been recorded in 9.6 m and 10.6 m regions of CO2 laser. It is very difficult to assign the modes of vibrations for PA bands by comparison with conventional low ...

  2. Imaging of Small Vessels Using Photoacoustics: An In Vivo Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siphanto, Ronald I.; Kolkman, R.G.M.; Huisjes, A.; Pilatou, M.H.; de Mul, F.F.M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Adrichem, Leon N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Background and Objectives The ability to correctly visualize the architectural arrangement of microvasculature is valuable to many diverse fields in medicine. In this study, we applied photoacoustics (PA) to obtain high-resolution images of submillimeter blood vessels. - Study Design/Materials and

  3. Europeana and 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  4. EUROPEANA AND 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pletinckx

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  5. High-resolution infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Charles M.

    2010-08-01

    The hands and mind of an artist are intimately involved in the creative process of image formation, intrinsically making paintings significantly more complex than photographs to analyze. In spite of this difficulty, several years ago the artist David Hockney and I identified optical evidence within a number of paintings that demonstrated artists began using optical projections as early as c1425 - nearly 175 years before Galileo - as aids for producing portions of their images. In the course of our work, Hockney and I developed insights that I have been applying to a new approach to computerized image analysis. Recently I developed and characterized a portable high resolution infrared for capturing additional information from paintings. Because many pigments are semi-transparent in the IR, in a number of cases IR photographs ("reflectograms") have revealed marks made by the artists that had been hidden under paint ever since they were made. I have used this IR camera to capture photographs ("reflectograms") of hundreds of paintings in over a dozen museums on three continents and, in some cases, these reflectograms have provided new insights into decisions the artists made in creating the final images that we see in the visible.

  6. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  7. Temporal evolution of low-coherence reflectometry signals in photoacoustic remote sensing microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Kevan L.; Reza, Parsin H.; Shi, Wei; Zemp, Roger J.

    2017-03-01

    We recently discovered that strong reflectivity modulations occur when a pulsed laser excites an absorption interface with an existing refractive index contrast. These modulations are observed using a low-coherence interrogation beam co-focused and co-scanned with an excitation beam to form high-resolution all-optical photoacoustic images. We call this new form of microscopy Photoacoustic Remote Sensing (PARS). To better understand the mechanism, analytical models were created of the time-evolution of these PARS signals. Shock waves propagating from the absorption interface create refractive index steps that form a time-varying multi-layer etalon. Besides an initial-pressure reflectivity change, GHz-modulations are predicted due to the propagating etalon effect. The characteristics of these modulations are related to the optical coherence length of the probe beam and the intrinsic optical properties of the sample. 1D plane-wave and 3D Mie-theory-based analytical models are compared with finite-difference time-domain simulations and experiments involving phantoms with different absorption- and refractive-index interfaces. Experimentally-observed modulations are detected with extremely high signal-to-noise ratios in phantoms and animal models. The newly predicted modulation mechanism offers a promising signature for deep all-optical absorption-contrast imaging with high fidelity.

  8. Evaluation of Advanced Bionics high resolution mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechner, Andreas; Frohne-Buechner, Carolin; Gaertner, Lutz; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Lenarz, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the advantages of the Advanced Bionic high resolution mode for speech perception, through a retrospective analysis. Forty-five adult subjects were selected who had a minimum experience of three months' standard mode (mean of 10 months) before switching to high resolution mode. Speech perception was tested in standard mode immediately before fitting with high resolution mode, and again after a maximum of six months high resolution mode usage (mean of two months). A significant improvement was found, between 11 and 17%, depending on the test material. The standard mode preference does not give any indication about the improvement when switching to high resolution. Users who are converted within any study achieve a higher performance improvement than those converted in the clinical routine. This analysis proves the significant benefits of high resolution mode for users, and also indicates the need for guidelines for individual optimization of parameter settings in a high resolution mode program.

  9. 3-D imaging of the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, V M; Gelblum, D Y; Wood, M L

    1990-01-01

    3-D gradient echo techniques, and in particular FLASH, represent a significant advance in MR imaging strategy allowing thin section, high resolution imaging through a large region of interest. Anatomical areas of application include the brain, spine, and extremities, although the majority of work to date has been performed in the brain. Superior T1 contrast and thus sensitivity to the presence of GdDTPA is achieved with 3-D FLASH when compared to 2-D spin echo technique. There is marked arterial and venous enhancement following Gd DTPA administration on 3-D FLASH, a less common finding with 2-D spin echo. Enhancement of the falx and tentorium is also more prominent. From a single data acquisition, requiring less than 11 min of scan time, high resolution reformatted sagittal, coronal, and axial images can obtained in addition to sections in any arbitrary plane. Tissue segmentation techniques can be applied and lesions displayed in three dimensions. These results may lead to the replacement of 2-D spin echo with 3-D FLASH for high resolution T1-weighted MR imaging of the CNS, particularly in the study of mass lesions and structural anomalies. The application of similar T2-weighted gradient echo techniques may follow, however the signal-to-noise ratio which can be achieved remains a potential limitation.

  10. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hee-Joong [California Institute of Technology,Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dimofte, Tudor [Institute for Advanced Study,Einstein Dr., Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Gukov, Sergei [California Institute of Technology,Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik,Vivatsgasse 7, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Sułkowski, Piotr [California Institute of Technology,Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  11. Optical diffraction tomography for high resolution live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yongjin; Choi, Wonshik; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    We report the experimental implementation of optical diffraction tomography for quantitative 3D mapping of refractive index in live biological cells. Using a heterodyne Mach-Zehnder interferometer, we record complex field images of light transmitted through a sample with varying directions of illumination. To quantitatively reconstruct the 3D map of complex refractive index in live cells, we apply optical diffraction tomography based on the Rytov approximation. In this way, the effect of diffraction is taken into account in the reconstruction process and diffraction-free high resolution 3D images are obtained throughout the entire sample volume. The quantitative refractive index map can potentially serve as an intrinsic assay to provide the molecular concentrations without the addition of exogenous agents and also to provide a method for studying the light scattering properties of single cells. PMID:19129896

  12. Photoacoustic characterization of ovarian tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Andres; Gamelin, John; Guo, Puyun; Yan, Shikui; Sanders, Mary; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2009-02-01

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers with a five-year survival rate of only 30%. Because current imaging techniques (ultrasound, CT, MRI, PET) are not capable of detecting ovarian cancer early, most diagnoses occur in later stages (III/IV). Thus many women are not correctly diagnosed until the cancer becomes widely metastatic. On the other hand, while the majority of women with a detectable ultrasound abnormality do not harbor a cancer, they all undergo unnecessary oophorectomy. Hence, new imaging techniques that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed for improving the specificity of ovarian cancer detection and characterization. One such technique is photoacoustic imaging, which has great potential to reveal early tumor angiogenesis through intrinsic optical absorption contrast from hemoglobin or extrinsic contrast from conjugated agents binding to appropriate molecular receptors. To better understand the cancer disease process of ovarian tissue using photoacoustic imaging, it is necessary to first characterize the properties of normal ovarian tissue. We have imaged ex-vivo ovarian tissue using a 3D co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system. The system is capable of volumetric imaging by means of electronic focusing. Detecting and visualizing small features from multiple viewing angles is possible without the need for any mechanical movement. The results show strong optical absorption from vasculature, especially highly vascularized corpora lutea, and low absorption from follicles. We will present correlation of photoacoustic images from animals with histology. Potential application of this technology would be the noninvasive imaging of the ovaries for screening or diagnostic purposes.

  13. Photoacoustic and Colorimetric Visualization of Latent Fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Huang, Peng; Yi, Chenglin; Ning, Bo; Hu, Song; Nie, Liming; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Nie, Zhihong

    2015-12-22

    There is a high demand on a simple, rapid, accurate, user-friendly, cost-effective, and nondestructive universal method for latent fingerprint (LFP) detection. Herein, we describe a combination imaging strategy for LFP visualization with high resolution using poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride)-b-polystyrene (PSMA-b-PS) functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs). This general approach integrates the merits of both colorimetric imaging and photoacoustic imaging. In comparison with the previous methods, our strategy is single-step and does not require the signal amplification by silver staining. The PSMA-b-PS functionalized GNPs have good stability, tunable color, and high affinity for universal secretions (proteins/polypeptides/amino acids), which makes our approach general and flexible for visualizing LFPs on different substrates (presumably with different colors) and from different people. Moreover, the unique optical property of GNPs enables the photoacoustic imaging of GNPs-deposited LFPs with high resolution. This allows observation of level 3 hyperfine features of LFPs such as the pores and ridge contours by photoacoustic imaging. This technique can potentially be used to identify chemicals within LFP residues. We believe that this dual-modality imaging of LFPs will find widespread use in forensic investigations and medical diagnostics.

  14. Optimizing ultrasound detection for sensitive 3D photoacoustic breast tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, W.

    2013-01-01

    The standard modality for breast cancer detection is X-ray imaging. Diagnosis is performed after the triple assessment of X-ray mammography assisted by ultrasonog- raphy and biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is sometimes used in specific problem solving such as contradictory results are

  15. 3D and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  16. Making 3D movies of Northern Lights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hivon Eric

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the steps necessary to create three-dimensional (3D movies of Northern Lights or Aurorae Borealis out of real-time images taken with two distant high-resolution fish-eye cameras. Astrometric reconstruction of the visible stars is used to model the optical mapping of each camera and correct for it in order to properly align the two sets of images. Examples of the resulting movies can be seen at http://www.iap.fr/aurora3d.

  17. Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI) develops novel technologies for studying biological processes at unprecedented speed and resolution. Research...

  18. Refined 3d-3d correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alday, Luis F.; Genolini, Pietro Benetti; Bullimore, Mathew; van Loon, Mark

    2017-04-01

    We explore aspects of the correspondence between Seifert 3-manifolds and 3d N = 2 supersymmetric theories with a distinguished abelian flavour symmetry. We give a prescription for computing the squashed three-sphere partition functions of such 3d N = 2 theories constructed from boundary conditions and interfaces in a 4d N = 2∗ theory, mirroring the construction of Seifert manifold invariants via Dehn surgery. This is extended to include links in the Seifert manifold by the insertion of supersymmetric Wilson-'t Hooft loops in the 4d N = 2∗ theory. In the presence of a mass parameter cfor the distinguished flavour symmetry, we recover aspects of refined Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group, and in particular construct an analytic continuation of the S-matrix of refined Chern-Simons theory.

  19. TEHNOLOGIJE 3D TISKALNIKOV

    OpenAIRE

    Kolar, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Diplomsko delo predstavi razvoj tiskanja skozi čas. Podrobneje so opisani 3D tiskalniki, ki uporabljajo različne tehnologije 3D tiskanja. Predstavljene so različne tehnologije 3D tiskanja, njihova uporaba in narejeni prototipi oz. končni izdelki. Diplomsko delo opiše celoten postopek, od zamisli, priprave podatkov in tiskalnika do izdelave prototipa oz. končnega izdelka.

  20. Nanoworld in 3-D

    OpenAIRE

    Torrisi, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The 3-D version of James Cameron’s last movie, “Avatar”, has been considered a breakthrough in the cinematographic world and I, personally, still remember the strong impact of the experience of watching this film at the IMAX-3D cinema. The 3-D movies must all be grateful to the advent of stereoscopic photography, which dates back to 1838, when Sir Charles Wheatstone invented the first 3-D stereoscope. Stereoscopy creates an illusion of depth by using eyeglasses to combine two perspectives (2-...

  1. High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo [Jianghan Petroleum Institute, Hubei (China)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

  2. High resolution multiplexed functional imaging in live embryos (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongli; Zhou, Weibin; Peng, Leilei

    2017-02-01

    Fourier multiplexed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) scanning laser optical tomography (FmFLIM-SLOT) combines FmFLIM and Scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) to perform multiplexed 3D FLIM imaging of live embryos. The system had demonstrate multiplexed functional imaging of zebrafish embryos genetically express Foster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors. However, previous system has a 20 micron resolution because the focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focused plane, makes it difficult to achieve high resolution imaging over a long projection depth. Here, we present a high-resolution FmFLIM-SLOT system with achromatic Bessel beam, which achieves 3 micron resolution in 3D deep tissue imaging. In Bessel-FmFLIM-SLOT, multiple laser excitation lines are firstly intensity modulated by a Michelson interferometer with a spinning polygon mirror optical delay line, which enables Fourier multiplexed multi-channel lifetime measurements. Then, a spatial light modulator and a prism are used to transform the modulated Gaussian laser beam to an achromatic Bessel beam. The achromatic Bessel beam scans across the whole specimen with equal angular intervals as sample rotated. After tomography reconstruction and the frequency domain lifetime analysis method, both the 3D intensity and lifetime image of multiple excitation-emission can be obtained. Using Bessel-FmFLIM-SLOT system, we performed cellular-resolution FLIM tomography imaging of live zebrafish embryo. Genetically expressed FRET sensors in these embryo will allow non-invasive observation of multiple biochemical processes in vivo.

  3. In situ repair of bone and cartilage defects using 3D scanning and 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Yu, Fei; Shi, Jianping; Shen, Sheng; Teng, Huajian; Yang, Jiquan; Wang, Xingsong; Jiang, Qing

    2017-08-25

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a rapidly emerging technology that promises to transform tissue engineering into a commercially successful biomedical industry. However, the use of robotic bioprinters alone is not sufficient for disease treatment. This study aimed to report the combined application of 3D scanning and 3D printing for treating bone and cartilage defects. Three different kinds of defect models were created to mimic three orthopedic diseases: large segmental defects of long bones, free-form fracture of femoral condyle, and International Cartilage Repair Society grade IV chondral lesion. Feasibility of in situ 3D bioprinting for these diseases was explored. The 3D digital models of samples with defects and corresponding healthy parts were obtained using high-resolution 3D scanning. The Boolean operation was used to achieve the shape of the defects, and then the target geometries were imported in a 3D bioprinter. Two kinds of photopolymerized hydrogels were synthesized as bioinks. Finally, the defects of bone and cartilage were restored perfectly in situ using 3D bioprinting. The results of this study suggested that 3D scanning and 3D bioprinting could provide another strategy for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  4. 3D virtuel udstilling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tournay, Bruno; Rüdiger, Bjarne

    2006-01-01

    3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s.......3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s....

  5. Photoacoustic remote sensing microscopy with lock-in amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Hajireza, Parsin; Bell, Kevan; Zemp, Roger

    2017-03-01

    High sensitive detection with lock-in amplification can provide high signal noise ratio even when noise is in orders of magnitude higher than the signal. Here we report to combine lock-in amplification with a novel photoacoustic remote sensing (PARS) technology to achieve high resolution, high contrast, all optical non-contact photoacoustic imaging at depth beyond optical scattering limitation. We demonstrate phantom measurements from PARS with lock-in technology were several orders of magnitude more sensitive than those from PARS with the broadband detection techniques.

  6. Ultra-compact, High Resolution, LADAR System for 3D Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA requires a small, lower power "ranging" sensor that produces a depth map of the scene (the exterior of the Space Shuttle, the International Space Station or a...

  7. A 3D CZT high resolution detector for x- and gamma-ray astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Zappettini, A.

    2014-01-01

    distribution of the photon produced ionization charge. The main sources of noise contribution of the drift signals are the leakage current between the strips and the strip capacitance. For the leakage current, we used a metallization process that reduces the leakage current by means of a high resistive thin...... orthogonal to the anode strips. The position resolutions are at low energies dominated by the electronic noise and improve therefore with increased signal to noise ratio as the energy increases. The achievable position resolution at higher energies will however be dominated by the extended spatial...

  8. High-Resolution 3-D Mapping of Soil Texture in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette Balslev

    2013-01-01

    , silt, fine sand, and coarse sand content at six standard soil depths of GlobalSoilMap project (0–5, 5–15, 15–30, 30–60, 60–100, and 100–200 cm) via regression rules using the Cubist data mining tool. Seventeen environmental variables were used as predictors and their strength of prediction was also...... calculated. For example, in the prediction of silt content at 0 to 5 cm depth, factors that registered a higher level of importance included the soil map scored (90%), landscape types (54%), and landuse (27%), while factors with lower scores were direct insolation (17%) and slope aspect (14%). Model...... validation (20% of the data selected randomly) showed a higher prediction performance in the upper depth intervals but increasing prediction error in the lower depth intervals (e.g., R2 = 0.54, RMSE = 33.7 g kg−1 for silt 0–5 cm and R2 = 0.29, RMSE = 38.8 g kg−1 from 100–200 cm). Danish soils have a high...

  9. High-Resolution 3D MR Microangiography of the Rat Ocular Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Eric R.; De La Garza, Bryan H.; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop high-spatial-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) microangiography techniques to image the rat ocular circulation. Materials and Methods: Animal experiments were performed with institutional Animal Care Committee approval. MR microangiography (resolution, 84 × 84 × 84 μm or 42 × 42 × 84 μm) of the rat eye (eight rats) was performed by using a custom-made small circular surface coil with an 11.7-T MR unit before and after monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticle (MION) injection. MR microangiography measurements were made during air, oxygen, and carbogen inhalation. From three-dimensional MR microangiography, the retina was virtually flattened to enable en face views of various retinal depths, including the retinal and choroidal vascular layers. Signal intensity changes within the retinal or choroidal arteries and veins associated with gas challenges were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed by using paired t tests, with P < .05 considered to indicate a significant difference. Bonferroni correction was used to adjust for multiple comparisons. Results: The central retinal artery, long posterior ciliary arteries, and choroidal vasculature could be distinguished on MR microangiograms of the eye. With MR microangiography, retinal arteries and veins could be distinguished on the basis of blood oxygen level–dependent contrast. Carbogen inhalation–enhanced MR microangiography signal intensity in both the retina (P = .001) and choroid (P = .027) compared with oxygen inhalation. Carbogen inhalation showed significantly higher signal intensity changes in the retinal arteries (P = .001, compared with oxygen inhalation), but not in the veins (P = .549). With MION administration, MR microangiography depicted retinal arterial vasoconstriction when the animals were breathing oxygen (P = .02, compared with animals breathing air). Conclusion: MR microangiography of the eye allows depth-resolved imaging of small angiographic details of the ocular circulation. This approach may prove useful in studying microvascular pathologic findings and neurovascular dysfunction in the eye and retina. © RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.12112033/-/DC1 PMID:22523323

  10. Towards high-resolution 3D flow field measurements at cubic meter scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schanz, Daniel; Huhn, Florian; Gesemann, Sebastian; Dierksheide, Uwe; van de Meerendonk, R.; Manovski, P.; Schröder, A.

    We present results from two large-volume volumetric flow experiments. The first of these, investigating a thermal plume at low velocities (up to 0.35 m/s) demonstrates the abilities and requirements to reach volume sizes up to and probably beyond one cubic meter. It is shown that the use of Helium

  11. GPU-assisted high-resolution, real-time 3-D shape measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Royer, Dale; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)-assisted real-time three-dimensional shape measurement system. Our experiments demonstrated that the absolute coordinates calculation and rendering speed of a GPU is more than four times faster than that of a dual CPU workstation with the same graphics card. By implementing the GPU into our system, we realized simultaneous absolute coordinate acquisition, reconstruction and display at 30 frames per second with a resolution of approximately 266K points per frame. Moreover, a 2+1 phase-shifting algorithm was employed to alleviate the measurement error caused by motion. Applications of the system include medical imaging, manufacturing, entertainment, and security.

  12. High Resolution Electron Microbeam Examination and 3D Reconstruction of Alligator Gar Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-27

    Abstract and Presentation: Symposium: Biomineralization Abstract Title: Nanoscale Investigation of Hydroxylapatite Formation in Alligator Gar Fish Scale...zones within the collagen fibrils. The high calcium and oxygen bands that run horizontally in this image correspond to the gap zone of the collagen...while the high carbon bands correspond to the overlap zone. However, these bands do not correspond to collections of HAp crystals, but to regions of

  13. Tracking Solid Oxide Cell Microstructure Evolution by High Resolution 3D Nano-Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Angelis, Salvatore

    Solid oxide cells (SOCs) oer great prospects for the ecient and reversible conversion of chemical to electrical energy. Therefore, they are expected to play a key role in the renewable energy landscape. However, their limited lifetime under operating conditions hinders their widespread usage...... tomography is applied. Preliminary results show rapid kinetics for the two reactions. During oxidation, void formation in metallic particles is observed. During reduction, the nickel oxide particles rst evolve to a nano-porous system of nickel crystallites and then coarsen towards dense nickel particles....

  14. Miniaturized photoacoustic spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat; Robinson, Alex; Nielson, Gregory N.; Resnick, Paul J.

    2016-08-09

    A low-power miniaturized photoacoustic sensor uses an optical microphone made by semiconductor fabrication techniques, and optionally allows for all-optical communication to and from the sensor. This allows integration of the photoacoustic sensor into systems with special requirements, such as those that would be reactive in an electrical discharge condition. The photoacoustic sensor can also be operated in various other modes with wide application flexibility.

  15. High-Resolution Reciprocal Space Mapping for Characterizing Deformation Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Wolfgang; Wejdemann, Christian; Jakobsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    With high-angular resolution three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD), quantitative information is gained about dislocation structures in individual grains in the bulk of a macroscopic specimen by acquiring reciprocal space maps. In high-resolution 3D reciprocal space maps of tensile...... dynamics is followed in situ during varying loading conditions by reciprocal space mapping: during uninterrupted tensile deformation, formation of subgrains is observed concurrently with broadening of Bragg reflections shortly after the onset of plastic deformation. When the traction is terminated, stress...

  16. Blender 3D cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Valenza, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book is aimed at the professionals that already have good 3D CGI experience with commercial packages and have now decided to try the open source Blender and want to experiment with something more complex than the average tutorials on the web. However, it's also aimed at the intermediate Blender users who simply want to go some steps further.It's taken for granted that you already know how to move inside the Blender interface, that you already have 3D modeling knowledge, and also that of basic 3D modeling and rendering concepts, for example, edge-loops, n-gons, or samples. In any case, it'

  17. Real-time photoacoustic tomography of cortical hemodynamics in small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changhui; Aguirre, Andres; Gamelin, John; Maurudis, Anastasios; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, the hemodynamics within the entire cerebral cortex of a mouse were studied by using photoacoustic tomography (PAT) in real time. The PAT system, based on a 512-element full-ring ultrasound array, received photoacoustic signals primarily from a slice of 2-mm thickness. This system can provide high-resolution brain vasculature images. We also monitored the fast wash-in process of a photoacoustic contrast agent in the mouse brain. Our results demonstrated that PAT is a powerful imaging modality that can be potentially used to study small animal neurofunctional activities.

  18. Stereolithographic hydrogel printing of 3D microfluidic cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Rujing

    that support the required freedom in design, detail and chemistry for fabricating truly 3D constructs have remained limited. Here, we report a stereolithographic high-resolution 3D printing technique utilizing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA, MW 700) to manufacture diffusion-open and mechanically...... and material flexibility by embedding a highly compliant cell-laden gelatin hydrogel within the confines of a 3D printed resilient PEGDA hydrogel chip of intermediate compliance. Overall, our proposed strategy represents an automated, cost-effective and high resolution technique to manufacture complex 3D...... epoxy component as structural supports interfacing the external world as well as compliant PEGDA component as microfluidic channels have been manufactured and perfused. Although still in the preliminary stage, this dual-material printing approach shows the potential for constructing complex 3D...

  19. DELTA 3D PRINTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ȘOVĂILĂ Florin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing is a very used process in industry, the generic name being “rapid prototyping”. The essential advantage of a 3D printer is that it allows the designers to produce a prototype in a very short time, which is tested and quickly remodeled, considerably reducing the required time to get from the prototype phase to the final product. At the same time, through this technique we can achieve components with very precise forms, complex pieces that, through classical methods, could have been accomplished only in a large amount of time. In this paper, there are presented the stages of a 3D model execution, also the physical achievement after of a Delta 3D printer after the model.

  20. 3D heart reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Roxo, Diogo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to achieve a 3D reconstruction of the four heart chambers using 2D echocardiographic images. A level set algorithm based on the phase symmetry approach and on a new logarithmic based stopping function was used to extract simultaneously the four heart cavities from these images in a fully automatic way. However to proceed to the 3D reconstruction using the segmented images, it was first necessary to satisfy clinical practise requirements. This means that the algo...

  1. AE3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  2. VT Hydrography Dataset - High Resolution NHD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The Vermont Hydrography Dataset (VHD) is compliant with the local resolution (also known as High Resolution) National Hydrography Dataset (NHD)...

  3. High Resolution Silicon Deformable Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal we describe a plan to build a deformable mirror suitable for space-based operation in systems for high-resolution imaging. The prototype DM will be...

  4. High Resolution Silicon Deformable Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes a plan to build a prototype small stroke, high precision deformable mirror suitable for space-based operation in systems for high-resolution...

  5. Structure of high-resolution NMR spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Corio, PL

    2012-01-01

    Structure of High-Resolution NMR Spectra provides the principles, theories, and mathematical and physical concepts of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.The book presents the elementary theory of magnetic resonance; the quantum mechanical theory of angular momentum; the general theory of steady state spectra; and multiple quantum transitions, double resonance and spin echo experiments.Physicists, chemists, and researchers will find the book a valuable reference text.

  6. Three-dimensional integral television using extremely high-resolution video system with 4,000 scanning lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Fumio; Kawakita, Masahiro; Arai, Jun; Sasaki, Hisayuki; Yamashita, Takayuki; Sato, Masahito; Suehiro, Koya; Haino, Yasuyuki

    2007-09-01

    The integral method enables observers to see 3D images like real objects. It requires extremely high resolution for both capture and display stages. We present an experimental 3D television system based on the integral method using an extremely high-resolution video system. The video system has 4,000 scanning lines using the diagonal offset method for two green channels. The number of elemental lenses in the lens array is 140 (vertical) × 182 (horizontal). The viewing zone angle is wider than 20 degrees in practice. This television system can capture 3D objects and provides full color and full parallax 3D images in real time.

  7. 3D Bioprinting for Vascularized Tissue Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Dylan; Jia, Jia; Yost, Michael; Markwald, Roger; Mei, Ying

    2017-01-01

    3D bioprinting holds remarkable promise for rapid fabrication of 3D tissue engineering constructs. Given its scalability, reproducibility, and precise multi-dimensional control that traditional fabrication methods do not provide, 3D bioprinting provides a powerful means to address one of the major challenges in tissue engineering: vascularization. Moderate success of current tissue engineering strategies have been attributed to the current inability to fabricate thick tissue engineering constructs that contain endogenous, engineered vasculature or nutrient channels that can integrate with the host tissue. Successful fabrication of a vascularized tissue construct requires synergy between high throughput, high-resolution bioprinting of larger perfusable channels and instructive bioink that promotes angiogenic sprouting and neovascularization. This review aims to cover the recent progress in the field of 3D bioprinting of vascularized tissues. It will cover the methods of bioprinting vascularized constructs, bioink for vascularization, and perspectives on recent innovations in 3D printing and biomaterials for the next generation of 3D bioprinting for vascularized tissue fabrication.

  8. ASSESSING 3D PHOTOGRAMMETRY TECHNIQUES IN CRANIOMETRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Moshobane

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Morphometrics (the measurement of morphological features has been revolutionized by the creation of new techniques to study how organismal shape co-varies with several factors such as ecophenotypy. Ecophenotypy refers to the divergence of phenotypes due to developmental changes induced by local environmental conditions, producing distinct ecophenotypes. None of the techniques hitherto utilized could explicitly address organismal shape in a complete biological form, i.e. three-dimensionally. This study investigates the use of the commercial software, Photomodeler Scanner® (PMSc® three-dimensional (3D modelling software to produce accurate and high-resolution 3D models. Henceforth, the modelling of Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis and Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella skulls which could allow for 3D measurements. Using this method, sixteen accurate 3D skull models were produced and five metrics were determined. The 3D linear measurements were compared to measurements taken manually with a digital caliper. In addition, repetitive measurements were recorded by varying researchers to determine repeatability. To allow for comparison straight line measurements were taken with the software, assuming that close accord with all manually measured features would illustrate the model’s accurate replication of reality. Measurements were not significantly different demonstrating that realistic 3D skull models can be successfully produced to provide a consistent basis for craniometrics, with the additional benefit of allowing non-linear measurements if required.

  9. Comparison of three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and high resolution photography for art conservation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Desmond C; Stenger, Jens; Gorczynska, Iwona; Lie, Henry; Hensick, Teri; Spronk, Ron; Wolohojian, Stephan; Khandekar, Narayan; Jiang, James Y; Barry, Scott; Cable, Alex E; Huber, Robert; Fujimoto, James G

    2007-11-26

    Gold punchwork and underdrawing in Renaissance panel paintings are analyzed using both three-dimensional swept source / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) and high resolution digital photography. 3D-OCT can generate en face images with micrometer-scale resolutions at arbitrary sectioning depths, rejecting out-of-plane light by coherence gating. Therefore 3D-OCT is well suited for analyzing artwork where a surface layer obscures details of interest. 3D-OCT also enables cross-sectional imaging and quantitative measurement of 3D features such as punch depth, which is beneficial for analyzing the tools and techniques used to create works of art. High volumetric imaging speeds are enabled by the use of a Fourier domain mode locked (FDML) laser as the 3D-OCT light source. High resolution infrared (IR) digital photography is shown to be particularly useful for the analysis of underdrawing, where the materials used for the underdrawing and paint layers have significantly different IR absrption properties. In general, 3D-OCT provides a more flexible and comprehensive analysis of artwork than high resolution photography, but also requires more complex instrumentation and data analysis.

  10. Multiscale photoacoustic microscopy and computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is probably the fastest growing biomedical imaging technology owing to its capability of high-resolution sensing of rich optical contrast in vivo at depths beyond the optical transport mean free path (~1 mm in the skin). Existing high-resolution optical imaging technologies, such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, have fundamentally impacted biomedicine but cannot reach such depths. Taking advantage of low ultrasonic scattering, PAT indirectly improves tissue transparency by 100 to 1000 fold and consequently enables deeply penetrating functional and molecular imaging at high spatial resolution. Further, PAT holds the promise of in vivo imaging at multiple length scales ranging from subcellular organelles to organs with the same contrast origin, an important application in multiscale systems biology research. PMID:20161535

  11. Stereolithographic hydrogel printing of 3D culture chips with biofunctionalized complex 3D perfusion networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rujing; Larsen, Niels B

    2017-12-05

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models capturing both the structural and dynamic complexity of the in vivo situation are in great demand as an alternative to animal models. Despite tremendous progress in engineering complex tissue/organ models in the past decade, approaches that support the required freedom in design, detail and chemistry for fabricating truly 3D constructs have remained limited. Here, we report a stereolithographic high-resolution 3D printing technique utilizing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA, MW 700) to manufacture diffusion-open and mechanically stable hydrogel constructs as self-contained chips, where confined culture volumes are traversed and surrounded by perfusable vascular-like networks. An optimized resin formulation enables printing of hydrogel chips holding perfusable microchannels with a cross-section as small as 100 μm × 100 μm, and the printed microchannels can be steadily perfused for at least one week. In addition, the integration of multiple independently perfusable and structurally stable channel systems further allows for easy combination of different bulk material volumes at exact relative spatial positions. We demonstrate this structural and material flexibility by embedding a highly compliant cell-laden gelatin hydrogel within the confines of a 3D printed resilient PEGDA hydrogel chip of intermediate compliance. Overall, our proposed strategy represents an automated, cost-effective and high resolution technique to manufacture complex 3D constructs containing microfluidic perfusion networks for advanced in vitro models.

  12. Three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging and inversion for accurate quantification of chromophore distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Martina; Malone, Emma; Lucka, Felix; Ellwood, Rob; An, Lu; Arridge, Simon; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography can, in principle, provide quantitatively accurate, high-resolution, images of chromophore distributions in 3D in vivo. However, achieving this goal requires not only dealing with the optical fluence-related spatial and spectral distortion but also having access to high quality, calibrated, measurements and using image reconstruction algorithms free from inaccurate assumptions. Furthermore, accurate knowledge of experimental parameters, such as the positions of the ultrasound detectors and the illumination pattern, is necessary for the reconstruction step. A meticulous and rigorous experimental phantom study was conducted to show that highly-resolved 3D estimation of chromophore distributions can be achieved: a crucial step towards in vivo implementation. The phantom consisted of four 580 μm diameter tubes with different ratios of copper sulphate and nickel sulphate as hemoglobin analogues, submersed in a background medium of intralipid and india ink. The optical absorption, scattering, photostability, and Grüneisen parameter were characterised for all components independently. A V-shaped imaging scanner enabled 3D imaging with the high resolution, high sensitivity, and wide bandwidth characteristic of Fabry-Pérot ultrasound sensors, but without the limited-view disadvantage of single-plane scanners. The optical beam profile and position were determined experimentally. Nine wavelengths between 750 and 1110 nm were used. The images of the chromophore concentrations were obtained using a model-based, two-step, procedure, that did not require image segmentation. First, the acoustic reconstruction was solved with an iterative time-reversal algorithm to obtain images of the initial acoustic pressure at each of the nine wavelengths for an 18×17×13 mm3 volume with 50μm voxels. Then, 3D high resolution estimates of the chromophore concentrations were obtained by using a diffusion model of light transport in an iterative nonlinear optimisation

  13. 3D Digital Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøl, Jesper

    wave of new building information modelling tools demands further investigation, not least because of industry representatives' somewhat coarse parlance: Now the word is spreading -3D digital modelling is nothing less than a revolution, a shift of paradigm, a new alphabet... Research qeustions. Based...... on empirical probes (interviews, observations, written inscriptions) within the Danish construction industry this paper explores the organizational and managerial dynamics of 3D Digital Modelling. The paper intends to - Illustrate how the network of (non-)human actors engaged in the promotion (and arrest) of 3...... important to appreciate the analysis. Before turning to the presentation of preliminary findings and a discussion of 3D digital modelling, it begins, however, with an outline of industry specific ICT strategic issues. Paper type. Multi-site field study...

  14. 3D Projection Installations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halskov, Kim; Johansen, Stine Liv; Bach Mikkelsen, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional projection installations are particular kinds of augmented spaces in which a digital 3-D model is projected onto a physical three-dimensional object, thereby fusing the digital content and the physical object. Based on interaction design research and media studies, this article...... contributes to the understanding of the distinctive characteristics of such a new medium, and identifies three strategies for designing 3-D projection installations: establishing space; interplay between the digital and the physical; and transformation of materiality. The principal empirical case, From...... Fingerplan to Loop City, is a 3-D projection installation presenting the history and future of city planning for the Copenhagen area in Denmark. The installation was presented as part of the 12th Architecture Biennale in Venice in 2010....

  15. 3-D Banegenerator

    OpenAIRE

    Majidian, Peshko

    2014-01-01

    Denne oppgaven har gått ut på å lage en banegenerator som simulerer banen til et fartøy i 3-D. Den spesifikke kraften og vinkelhastigheten har blitt regnet ut for å simulere akselerometer og gyroskop og ved å implementere et treghetsnavigasjonssystem (TNS), har det vært mulig å beregne banen til fartøyet ved å bruke sensordataene i navigasjonslikningene. En sirkelbane ble brukt til å verifisere TNS systemet før 3-D banen ble testet uten støy. Deretter skulle det legges til hvit og farget støy...

  16. 3D ARCHITECTURAL VIDEOMAPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Catanese

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D architectural mapping is a video projection technique that can be done with a survey of a chosen building in order to realize a perfect correspondence between its shapes and the images in projection. As a performative kind of audiovisual artifact, the real event of the 3D mapping is a combination of a registered video animation file with a real architecture. This new kind of visual art is becoming very popular and its big audience success testifies new expressive chances in the field of urban design. My case study has been experienced in Pisa for the Luminara feast in 2012.

  17. Herramientas SIG 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R. Feito Higueruela

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications of Geographical Information Systems on several Archeology fields have been increasing during the last years. Recent avances in these technologies make possible to work with more realistic 3D models. In this paper we introduce a new paradigm for this system, the GIS Thetrahedron, in which we define the fundamental elements of GIS, in order to provide a better understanding of their capabilities. At the same time the basic 3D characteristics of some comercial and open source software are described, as well as the application to some samples on archeological researchs

  18. Tangible 3D Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejlesen, Aske K.; Ovesen, Nis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental approach to teaching 3D modelling techniques in an Industrial Design programme. The approach includes the use of tangible free form models as tools for improving the overall learning. The paper is based on lecturer and student experiences obtained through facil...

  19. 3D Wire 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordi, Moréton; F, Escribano; J. L., Farias

    This document is a general report on the implementation of gamification in 3D Wire 2015 event. As the second gamification experience in this event, we have delved deeply in the previous objectives (attracting public areas less frequented exhibition in previous years and enhance networking) and have...

  20. 3D Imaging Millimeter Wave Circular Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyuan Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new millimeter wave 3D imaging radar is proposed. The user just needs to move the radar along a circular track, and high resolution 3D imaging can be generated. The proposed radar uses the movement of itself to synthesize a large aperture in both the azimuth and elevation directions. It can utilize inverse Radon transform to resolve 3D imaging. To improve the sensing result, the compressed sensing approach is further investigated. The simulation and experimental result further illustrated the design. Because a single transceiver circuit is needed, a light, affordable and high resolution 3D mmWave imaging radar is illustrated in the paper.

  1. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Photoacoustic imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lihong

    2009-01-01

    Photoacoustics promises to revolutionize medical imaging and may well make as dramatic a contribution to modern medicine as the discovery of the x-ray itself once did. Combining electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves synergistically, photoacoustics can provide deep speckle-free imaging with high electromagnetic contrast at high ultrasonic resolution and without any health risk. While photoacoustic imaging is probably the fastest growing biomedical imaging technology, this book is the first comprehensive volume in this emerging field covering both the physics and the remarkable noninvasive applic

  3. Bilateral Mesiodens in Monozygotic Twins: 3D Diagnostic and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Vecchione Gurgel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesiodens is the most frequent type of supernumerary tooth and may occur in several forms, causing different local disorders, such as impaction of the anterior permanent teeth. High-resolution three-dimensional (3D images have improved the diagnosis and treatment plan of patients with impacted and supernumerary teeth. The purpose of this paper was to report a case of two mesiodens in monozygotic twin boys with appropriate 3D diagnostic and treatment plan.

  4. Bilateral Mesiodens in Monozygotic Twins: 3D Diagnostic and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchione Gurgel, Carla; Soares Cota, Ana Lídia; Yuriko Kobayashi, Tatiana; Moura Bonifácio Silva, Salete; Aparecida Andrade Moreira Machado, Maria; Rios, Daniela; Garib, Daniela Gamba; Marchini Oliveira, Thais

    2013-01-01

    Mesiodens is the most frequent type of supernumerary tooth and may occur in several forms, causing different local disorders, such as impaction of the anterior permanent teeth. High-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images have improved the diagnosis and treatment plan of patients with impacted and supernumerary teeth. The purpose of this paper was to report a case of two mesiodens in monozygotic twin boys with appropriate 3D diagnostic and treatment plan.

  5. Qualitative interpretation of high resolution aeromagnetic (HRAM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Qualitative interpretation of high resolution aeromagnetic (HRAM) data from some parts of offshore Niger delta, Nigeria. ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... The original raster map, obtained from the Nigeria Geological Survey Agency (NGSA) in half degree sheet, was subjected to qualitative data analysis using the ...

  6. A High-Resolution Stopwatch for Cents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingl, Z.; Kopasz, K.

    2011-01-01

    A very low-cost, easy-to-make stopwatch is presented to support various experiments in mechanics. The high-resolution stopwatch is based on two photodetectors connected directly to the microphone input of a sound card. Dedicated free open-source software has been developed and made available to download. The efficiency is demonstrated by a free…

  7. Compressive sensing for high resolution radar imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present some preliminary results on the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) to high resolution radar imaging. CS is a recently developed theory which allows reconstruction of sparse signals with a number of measurements much lower than what is required by the Shannon sampling

  8. Compact high-resolution spectral phase shaper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, S.; van der Walle, P.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    2005-01-01

    The design and operation of a high-resolution spectral phase shaper with a footprint of only 7×10 cm2 is presented. The liquid-crystal modulator has 4096 elements. More than 600 independent degrees of freedom can be positioned with a relative accuracy of 1 pixel. The spectral shaping of pulses from

  9. High resolution analysis of interphase chromosome domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A. E.; Jaunin, F.; Fakan, S.; Aten, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome territories need to be well defined at high resolution before functional aspects of chromosome organization in interphase can be explored. To visualize chromosomes by electron microscopy (EM), the DNA of Chinese hamster fibroblasts was labeled in vivo with thymidine analogue BrdU. Labeled

  10. A Texture Analysis of 3D Radar Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deiana, D.; Yarovoy, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a texture feature coding method to be applied to high-resolution 3D radar images in order to improve target detection is developed. An automatic method for image segmentation based on texture features is proposed. The method has been able to automatically detect weak targets which

  11. Photoacoustic imaging: a potential new platform for assessment of bone health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ting; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Xu, Guan; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Deng, Cheri X.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-02-01

    The ultimate goal of this work is to develop a novel photoacoustic (QPA) platform for highly-sensitive and quantitative assessment of bone health. First, the feasibility to perform 3D photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of bone was investigated. Then another two techniques, including thermal photoacoustic measurement (TPAM) and photoacoustic spectral analysis (PASA), both being able to achieve quantitative results were investigated for bone characterization. TPAM, by evaluating the dependence of photoacoustic signal amplitude on the sample temperature, is sensitive to the chemical constituents in tissue and holds promise for assessment of bone mineral density (BMD). PASA characterizes micron size physical features in tissue, and has shown feasibility for objective assessment of bone microarchitecture (BMA). This integrated QPA platform can assess both bone mass and microstructure simultaneously without involving invasive biopsy or ionizing radiation. Since QPA is non-ionizing, non-invasive, and has sufficient penetration in both soft tissue and bone, it has unique advantages for clinical translation.

  12. High-resolution ZTE imaging of human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiger, Markus; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Bracher, Anna-Katinka; Köhler, Sascha; Lehmann, Volker; Wolfram, Uwe; Hennel, Franciszek; Rasche, Volker

    2012-10-01

    MRI with zero echo time (ZTE) is achieved by 3D radial centre-out encoding and hard-pulse RF excitation while the projection gradient is already on. Targeting short-T(2) samples, the efficient, robust and silent ZTE approach was implemented for high-bandwidth high-resolution imaging requiring particularly rapid transmit-receive switching and algebraic image reconstruction. The ZTE technique was applied to image extracted human teeth at 11.7T field strength, yielding detailed depictions with very good delineation of the mineralised dentine and enamel layers. ZTE results are compared with UTE (ultra-short echo time) MRI and micro-computed tomography (μCT), revealing significant differences in SNR and CNR yields. Compared to μCT, ZTE MRI appears to be less susceptible to artefacts caused by dental fillings and to offer superior sensitivity for the detection of early demineralisation and caries lesions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Characterization of ceramic archaeological by high resolution X ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Alessandra C.; Freitas, Renato; Calza, Cristiane F.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Lima, Inaya, E-mail: alecastro@lin.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Carvalho, Daniele D.; Gaspar, Maria D. [Museu Nacional (MN/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of ceramic fragments is a very important area of research in art and archeometry area because it enables a greater understanding of how ancient civilizations behave and what were their traditions and customs. Petrography and chemical analyses are commonly used, but these techniques are destructive, which is not interesting for this type of sample. Through the exchange of multidisciplinary scientific knowledge and new partnerships, high resolution X-ray microtomography has been introduced in archaeological area as a great possibility of 3D inspection in a non-destructive way. The goal of this work is to investigate the internal microstructures of four samples of archeological ceramic, from the Archaeological Site of Macacu - RJ. The X-ray microtomography were performed in a high resolution setup, and can be used to infer the nature of organic temper even with all plant remains completely burnt out during the firing process and also to ensure the homogeneity of samples envisaged for geochemical analyses, especially with respect to the distribution of chemically diverse fabric compounds. In this way this study intends to contribute to our understanding of the archaeological and historical formations of this region. (author)

  14. 3D CAPABILITIES OF PLEIADES SATELLITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bernard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available End of 2011 a new optical satellite, called Pléiades, was launched by the French space agency (CNES. It provides 20 km x 20 km images at 0.5 meters. This agile acquisition system is able to relocate very rapidly and scan the earth in any direction. The agility of the system offers the ability to acquire multi viewing angle images of the same area during the same orbit. This ability to capture, from a single stereoscopic pair, to a sequence of 25 images, allows enhancing the quality and the completeness of automatically extracted 3D maps. The aim of the study is to validate and quantify the capacity of the Pléiades system to perform 3D mapping. The analysis explores the advantages in terms of quality and automatism to use more than 2 stereoscopic images. In the last 10 years, automatic 3D processing of digital images became more and more popular and efficient. Thanks to aerial images with very large overlap and very high resolution satellite images, new methodologies and algorithms have been implemented to improve the quality and accuracy of automatic 3D processing. We propose to experiment the same type of approaches using Pléiades images to produce digital elevation models (DEM. A focus is made on analysing the 3D processing using video like (multi viewing acquisitions. Different reference sites with very accurate 3D control points are used to quantify the quality of the Pléiades DEM. Different acquisition modes are explored from a single stereo pair to a sequence of 17 images.

  15. High resolution technology for FPD lithography tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabu, Nobuhiko; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Tomura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro

    2013-06-01

    As the resolution of LCD panels adapted for Smartphone and Tablet PC rapidly becomes higher, the performance needed for lithography tools to produce them also becomes higher than ever. To respond to such needs, we have developed new lithography tools for mass production of high resolution LCD panels. We have executed various exposure tests to evaluate their performance. In this paper, we present the results of these tests. By employing higher NA projection optics, high resolution (2.0μm and under) has been achieved. We also present the effect of special illumination and the difference in profile between kinds of photoresist. Furthermore, we also refer what will be needed for masks and blanks in the next generation. To achieve even higher resolution, it is necessary for masks and blanks to have high flatness, low level of defects and small linewidth error.

  16. Radiation length imaging with high resolution telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Stolzenberg, U.; Frey, A.; Schwenker, B; Wieduwilt, P.; Marinas, C; Lütticke, F.

    2016-01-01

    The construction of low mass vertex detectors with a high level of system integration is of great interest for next generation collider experiments. Radiation length images with a sufficient spatial resolution can be used to measure and disentangle complex radiation length $X$/$X_0$ profiles and contribute to the understanding of vertex detector systems. Test beam experiments with multi GeV particle beams and high-resolution tracking telescopes provide an opportunity to obtain precise 2D imag...

  17. High Resolution Spectra of HE Detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-07

    region. We shall assume for present purposes that the emissivity of the detonation products of a 50 to 100 lb HE explosion is also in the viciity of... speed . Incorporated in the emulsion layers are dye forming coup- lers which react simultaneously during I , developmentto produce a separate dye S...Best Available Cop 1~EV~ AFTAC-TR-80-24 HIGH RESOLUTION SPECTRA OF HE DETONATIONS HSS Inc 2 Alfred Circle Bedford, MA 01730 7 JULY 1980 AUG 4 9D

  18. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    1969-01-01

    High Resolution NMR: Theory and Chemical Applications focuses on the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as chemical shifts, lattices, and couplings. The book first offers information on the theory of NMR, including nuclear spin and magnetic moment, spin lattice relaxation, line widths, saturation, quantum mechanical description of NMR, and ringing. The text then ponders on instrumentation and techniques and chemical shifts. Discussions focus on the origin of chemical shifts, reference compounds, empirical correlations of chemical shifts, modulation and phase detection,

  19. High Resolution Autostereoscopic Cockpit Display Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this Phase II program Dimension Technologies Inc. (DTI) proposes to design and build an autostereoscopic (glasses-free 3D) LCD based aircraft cockpit display...

  20. High Resolution Autostereoscopic Cockpit Display Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The utility of stereoscopic 3D image representation in many applications is now well established. It is not just a matter of stereo being better than 2D, but of...

  1. Shaping 3-D boxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenholt, Rasmus; Madsen, Claus B.

    2011-01-01

    Enabling users to shape 3-D boxes in immersive virtual environments is a non-trivial problem. In this paper, a new family of techniques for creating rectangular boxes of arbitrary position, orientation, and size is presented and evaluated. These new techniques are based solely on position data......F) docking experiment against an existing technique, which requires the user to perform the rotation and scaling of the box explicitly. The precision of the users' box construction is evaluated by a novel error metric measuring the difference between two boxes. The results of the experiment strongly indicate...... that for precision docking of 9 DoF boxes, some of the proposed techniques are significantly better than ones with explicit rotation and scaling. Another interesting result is that the number of DoF simultaneously controlled by the user significantly influences the precision of the docking....

  2. Study of photoacoustic measurement of bone health based on clinically relevant models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ting; Kozloff, Ken; Cao, Meng; Cheng, Qian; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) technique involving both ultrasound and light has been explored for potential application in the assessment of bone health. The optical and ultrasound penetration in bone have been studied. The feasibility of conducting 3D PA imaging of bone, and performing quantitative evaluation of bone microstructures by using photoacoustic spectrum analysis (PASA) has also been investigated. The findings from the experiments demonstrate that PA measurement could offer information of bone mineral density and bone microstructure, both relevant to bone health.

  3. Molecular photoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frogh Jafarian Dehkordi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hybrid imaging modalities which simultaneously benefit from capabilities of combined modalities provides an opportunity to modify quality of the images which can be obtained by each of the combined imaging systems. One of the imaging modalities, emerged in medical research area as a hybrid of ultrasound imaging and optical imaging, is photoacoustic imaging which apply ultrasound wave generated by tissue, after receiving laser pulse, to produce medical images. Materials and Methods: In this review, using keywords such as photoacoustic, optoacoustic, laser-ultrasound, thermoacoustic at databases such as PubMed and ISI, studies performed in the field of photoacoustic and related findings were evaluated. Results: Photoacoustic imaging, acquiring images with high contrast and desired resolution, provides an opportunity to perform physiologic and anatomic studies. Because this technique does not use ionizing radiation, it is not restricted by the limitation of the ionizing-based imaging systems therefore it can be used noninvasively to make images from cell, vessels, whole body imaging of the animal and distinguish tumor from normal tissue. Conclusion: Photoacoustic imaging is a new method in preclinical researches which can be used in various physiologic and anatomic studies. This method, because of application of non-ionizing radiation, may resolve limitation of radiation based method in diagnostic assessments.

  4. 3D-ICONS Ireland – fulfilling the potential of a rich 3D resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Corns

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As a partner in the EU co-funded 3D-ICONS project, the Discovery Programme undertook the 3D documentation of some of the most iconic cultural heritage sites in Ireland. This pan-European project aimed to establish a complete pipeline for the production of 3D replicas of archaeological monuments and historic buildings, and to publish the content to Europeana for public access. The list of Irish icons range from wider cultural landscapes to smaller ornately carved stones and includes a wide range of chronological periods: from Neolithic rock art from 2500 BC to Derry's 17th-century fortifications. The primary digitisation methods include airborne laser scanning (ALS, phase-based terrestrial laser scanning (Faro Focus 3D and close range structured light scanning (Artec EVA. These are now mainstream approaches for surveying historic landscapes, structures and objects, generating precise, high-resolution point cloud data, primarily for viewing and interaction in proprietary software applications. The challenge was to convert these complex high-volume datasets into textured 3D models, retaining the geometric integrity of the original data. The article highlights the development of a pipeline to produce a lightweight 3D model that enables the public to interact with a photorealistic model based upon accurate survey and texture data. 3D-ICONS ended in January 2015, but a new website 3dicons.ie was launched to offer continued access to the Irish 3D models and associated content and media generated during the project. The article will consider the impact of this online content, particularly how it has been used as a teaching aid in secondary schools and how this may be extended in the future. It will also demonstrate how content from the project has been remodelled to develop an interactive and immersive experience for the great mound at Knowth, a development in partnership with the operators of the Brú na Bóinne visitor centre.

  5. A System for High-Resolution Topology Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Dick, Christian; Westermann, Rudiger

    2016-03-01

    A key requirement in 3D fabrication is to generate objects with individual exterior shapes and their interior being optimized to application-specific force constraints and low material consumption. Accomplishing this task is challenging on desktop computers, due to the extreme model resolutions that are required to accurately predict the physical shape properties, requiring memory and computational capacities going beyond what is currently available. Moreover, fabrication-specific constraints need to be considered to enable printability. To address these challenges, we present a scalable system for generating 3D objects using topology optimization, which allows to efficiently evolve the topology of high-resolution solids towards printable and light-weight-high-resistance structures. To achieve this, the system is equipped with a high-performance GPU solver which can efficiently handle models comprising several millions of elements. A minimum thickness constraint is built into the optimization process to automatically enforce printability of the resulting shapes. We further shed light on the question how to incorporate geometric shape constraints, such as symmetry and pattern repetition, in the optimization process. We analyze the performance of the system and demonstrate its potential by a variety of different shapes such as interior structures within closed surfaces, exposed support structures, and surface models.

  6. Structure recognition from high resolution images of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Loring, Burlen; Bale, Hrishikesh; Parkinson, Dilworth; Sethian, James

    2015-01-05

    Fibers provide exceptional strength-to-weight ratio capabilities when woven into ceramic composites, transforming them into materials with exceptional resistance to high temperature, and high strength combined with improved fracture toughness. Microcracks are inevitable when the material is under strain, which can be imaged using synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography (mu-CT) for assessment of material mechanical toughness variation. An important part of this analysis is to recognize fibrillar features. This paper presents algorithms for detecting and quantifying composite cracks and fiber breaks from high-resolution image stacks. First, we propose recognition algorithms to identify the different structures of the composite, including matrix cracks and fibers breaks. Second, we introduce our package F3D for fast filtering of large 3D imagery, implemented in OpenCL to take advantage of graphic cards. Results show that our algorithms automatically identify micro-damage and that the GPU-based implementation introduced here takes minutes, being 17x faster than similar tools on a typical image file.

  7. High resolution transmission spectroscopy as a diagnostic for Jovian exoplanet atmospheres: constraints from theoretical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112 (United States); Perna, Rosalba [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Heng, Kevin, E-mail: kemptone@grinnell.edu [University of Bern, Center for Space and Habitability, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-11-01

    We present high resolution transmission spectra of giant planet atmospheres from a coupled three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model that includes Doppler shifts which arise from winds and planetary motion. We model Jovian planets covering more than two orders of magnitude in incident flux, corresponding to planets with 0.9-55 day orbital periods around solar-type stars. The results of our 3D dynamical models reveal certain aspects of high resolution transmission spectra that are not present in simple one-dimensional (1D) models. We find that the hottest planets experience strong substellar to anti-stellar (SSAS) winds, resulting in transmission spectra with net blueshifts of up to 3 km s{sup –1}, whereas less irradiated planets show almost no net Doppler shifts. We find only minor differences between transmission spectra for atmospheres with temperature inversions and those without. Compared to 1D models, peak line strengths are significantly reduced for the hottest atmospheres owing to Doppler broadening from a combination of rotation (which is faster for close-in planets under the assumption of tidal locking) and atmospheric winds. Finally, high resolution transmission spectra may be useful in studying the atmospheres of exoplanets with optically thick clouds since line cores for very strong transitions should remain optically thick to very high altitude. High resolution transmission spectra are an excellent observational test for the validity of 3D atmospheric dynamics models, because they provide a direct probe of wind structures and heat circulation. Ground-based exoplanet spectroscopy is currently on the verge of being able to verify some of our modeling predictions, most notably the dependence of SSAS winds on insolation. We caution that interpretation of high resolution transmission spectra based on 1D atmospheric models may be inadequate, as 3D atmospheric motions can produce a noticeable effect on the absorption

  8. Intraoral 3D scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  9. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-07-13

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  10. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  11. 3D printing for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hausman, Kalani Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Get started printing out 3D objects quickly and inexpensively! 3D printing is no longer just a figment of your imagination. This remarkable technology is coming to the masses with the growing availability of 3D printers. 3D printers create 3-dimensional layered models and they allow users to create prototypes that use multiple materials and colors.  This friendly-but-straightforward guide examines each type of 3D printing technology available today and gives artists, entrepreneurs, engineers, and hobbyists insight into the amazing things 3D printing has to offer. You'll discover methods for

  12. Ultra-high resolution coded wavefront sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Congli

    2017-06-08

    Wavefront sensors and more general phase retrieval methods have recently attracted a lot of attention in a host of application domains, ranging from astronomy to scientific imaging and microscopy. In this paper, we introduce a new class of sensor, the Coded Wavefront Sensor, which provides high spatio-temporal resolution using a simple masked sensor under white light illumination. Specifically, we demonstrate megapixel spatial resolution and phase accuracy better than 0.1 wavelengths at reconstruction rates of 50 Hz or more, thus opening up many new applications from high-resolution adaptive optics to real-time phase retrieval in microscopy.

  13. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-09-23

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling.

  14. Detailed mitochondrial phenotyping by high resolution metabolomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Roede

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial phenotype is complex and difficult to define at the level of individual cell types. Newer metabolic profiling methods provide information on dozens of metabolic pathways from a relatively small sample. This pilot study used "top-down" metabolic profiling to determine the spectrum of metabolites present in liver mitochondria. High resolution mass spectral analyses and multivariate statistical tests provided global metabolic information about mitochondria and showed that liver mitochondria possess a significant phenotype based on gender and genotype. The data also show that mitochondria contain a large number of unidentified chemicals.

  15. A Portable, High Resolution, Surface Measurement Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Burns, Bradley M.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution, portable, surface measurement device has been demonstrated to provide micron-resolution topographical plots. This device was specifically developed to allow in-situ measurements of defects on the Space Shuttle Orbiter windows, but is versatile enough to be used on a wide variety of surfaces. This paper discusses the choice of an optical sensor and then the decisions required to convert a lab bench optical measurement device into an ergonomic portable system. The necessary trade-offs between performance and portability are presented along with a description of the device developed to measure Orbiter window defects.

  16. High resolution IVEM tomography of biological specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedat, J.W.; Agard, D.A. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Electron tomography is a powerful tool for elucidating the three-dimensional architecture of large biological complexes and subcellular organelles. The introduction of intermediate voltage electron microscopes further extended the technique by providing the means to examine very large and non-symmetrical subcellular organelles, at resolutions beyond what would be possible using light microscopy. Recent studies using electron tomography on a variety of cellular organelles and assemblies such as centrosomes, kinetochores, and chromatin have clearly demonstrated the power of this technique for obtaining 3D structural information on non-symmetric cell components. When combined with biochemical and molecular observations, these 3D reconstructions have provided significant new insights into biological function.

  17. 3D Bioprinting for Organ Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haitao; Nowicki, Margaret; Fisher, John P; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-01-01

    Regenerative medicine holds the promise of engineering functional tissues or organs to heal or replace abnormal and necrotic tissues/organs, offering hope for filling the gap between organ shortage and transplantation needs. Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is evolving into an unparalleled biomanufacturing technology due to its high-integration potential for patient-specific designs, precise and rapid manufacturing capabilities with high resolution, and unprecedented versatility. It enables precise control over multiple compositions, spatial distributions, and architectural accuracy/complexity, therefore achieving effective recapitulation of microstructure, architecture, mechanical properties, and biological functions of target tissues and organs. Here we provide an overview of recent advances in 3D bioprinting technology, as well as design concepts of bioinks suitable for the bioprinting process. We focus on the applications of this technology for engineering living organs, focusing more specifically on vasculature, neural networks, the heart and liver. We conclude with current challenges and the technical perspective for further development of 3D organ bioprinting. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  19. Principles of high resolution NMR in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Mehring, Michael

    1983-01-01

    The field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has developed at a fascinating pace during the last decade. It always has been an extremely valuable tool to the organic chemist by supplying molecular "finger print" spectra at the atomic level. Unfortunately the high resolution achievable in liquid solutions could not be obtained in solids and physicists and physical chemists had to live with unresolved lines open to a wealth of curve fitting procedures and a vast amount of speculations. High resolution NMR in solids seemed to be a paradoxon. Broad structure­ less lines are usually encountered when dealing with NMR in solids. Only with the recent advent of mUltiple pulse, magic angle, cross-polarization, two-dimen­ sional and multiple-quantum spectroscopy and other techniques during the last decade it became possible to resolve finer details of nuclear spin interactions in solids. I have felt that graduate students, researchers and others beginning to get involved with these techniques needed a book which trea...

  20. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  1. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  2. The Future Is 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Luke

    2015-01-01

    3D printers are a way of producing a 3D model of an item from a digital file. The model builds up in successive layers of material placed by the printer controlled by the information in the computer file. In this article the author argues that 3D printers are one of the greatest technological advances of recent times. He discusses practical uses…

  3. The 3D additivist cookbook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allahyari, Morehshin; Rourke, Daniel; Rasch, Miriam

    The 3D Additivist Cookbook, devised and edited by Morehshin Allahyari & Daniel Rourke, is a free compendium of imaginative, provocative works from over 100 world-leading artists, activists and theorists. The 3D Additivist Cookbook contains .obj and .stl files for the 3D printer, as well as critical

  4. The Future Is 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Luke

    3D printers are a way of producing a 3D model of an item from a digital file. The model builds up in successive layers of material placed by the printer controlled by the information in the computer file. In this article the author argues that 3D printers are one of the greatest technological advances of recent times. He discusses practical uses…

  5. Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2010-12-28

    A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

  6. EMODnet High Resolution Seabed Mapping - further developing a high resolution digital bathymetry for European seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Dick M. A.; Schmitt, Thierry

    2017-04-01

    Access to marine data is a key issue for the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive and the EU Marine Knowledge 2020 agenda and includes the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODnet) initiative. EMODnet aims at assembling European marine data, data products and metadata from diverse sources in a uniform way. The EMODnet data infrastructure is developed through a stepwise approach in three major phases. Currently EMODnet is entering its 3rd phase with operational portals providing access to marine data for bathymetry, geology, physics, chemistry, biology, seabed habitats and human activities, complemented by checkpoint projects, analysing the fitness for purpose of data provision. The EMODnet Bathymetry project has developed Digital Terrain Models (DTM) for the European seas. These have been produced from survey and aggregated data sets that are indexed with metadata by adopting the SeaDataNet Catalogue services. SeaDataNet is a network of major oceanographic data centres around the European seas that manage, operate and further develop a pan-European infrastructure for marine and ocean data management. The latest EMODnet Bathymetry DTM release has a resolution of 1/8 arcminute * 1/8 arcminute and covers all European sea regions. Use has been made of circa 7800 gathered survey datasets and composite DTMs from 27 European data providers from 15 countries. For areas without coverage use has been made of the latest GEBCO DTM. The catalogue services and the generated EMODnet DTM have been published at the dedicated EMODnet Bathymetry portal which includes a versatile DTM viewing service that also supports downloading in various formats. End December 2016 the Bathymetry project has been succeeded by EMODnet High Resolution Seabed Mapping (HRSM) as part of the third phase of EMODnet. This new project will continue gathering of bathymetric in-situ data sets with extra efforts for near coastal waters and coastal zones. In addition Satellite Derived Bathymetry

  7. A Miniaturized QEPAS Trace Gas Sensor with a 3D-Printed Acoustic Detection Module

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaotao Yang; Youhong Xiao; Yufei Ma; Ying He; Tittel, Frank K.

    2017-01-01

    A 3D printing technique was introduced to a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor and is reported for the first time. The acoustic detection module (ADM) was designed and fabricated using the 3D printing technique and the ADM volume was compressed significantly. Furthermore, a small grin lens was used for laser focusing and facilitated the beam adjustment in the 3D-printed ADM. A quartz tuning fork (QTF) with a low resonance frequency of 30.72 kHz was used as the acoustic ...

  8. Compact photoacoustic tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalva, Sandeep Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a non-ionizing biomedical imaging modality which finds applications in brain imaging, tumor angiogenesis, monitoring of vascularization, breast cancer imaging, monitoring of oxygen saturation levels etc. Typical PAT systems uses Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light illumination, single element large ultrasound transducer (UST) as detector. By holding the UST in horizontal plane and moving it in a circular motion around the sample in full 2π radians photoacoustic data is collected and images are reconstructed. The horizontal positioning of the UST make the scanning radius large, leading to larger water tank and also increases the load on the motor that rotates the UST. To overcome this limitation, we present a compact photoacoustic tomographic (ComPAT) system. In this ComPAT system, instead of holding the UST in horizontal plane, it is held in vertical plane and the photoacoustic waves generated at the sample are detected by the UST after it is reflected at 45° by an acoustic reflector attached to the transducer body. With this we can reduce the water tank size and load on the motor, thus overall PAT system size can be reduced. Here we show that with the ComPAT system nearly similar PA images (phantom and in vivo data) can be obtained as that of the existing PAT systems using both flat and cylindrically focused transducers.

  9. High resolution remote sensing of water surface patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodget, A.; Visser, F.; Maddock, I.; Carbonneau, P.

    2012-12-01

    The assessment of in-stream habitat availability within fluvial environments in the UK traditionally includes the mapping of patterns which appear on the surface of the water, known as 'surface flow types' (SFTs). The UK's River Habitat Survey identifies ten key SFTs, including categories such as rippled flow, upwelling, broken standing waves and smooth flow. SFTs result from the interaction between the underlying channel morphology, water depth and velocity and reflect the local flow hydraulics. It has been shown that SFTs can be both biologically and hydraulically distinct. SFT mapping is usually conducted from the river banks where estimates of spatial coverage are made by eye. This approach is affected by user subjectivity and inaccuracies in the spatial extent of mapped units. Remote sensing and specifically the recent developments in unmanned aerial systems (UAS) may now offer an alternative approach for SFT mapping, with the capability for rapid and repeatable collection of very high resolution imagery from low altitudes, under bespoke flight conditions. This PhD research is aimed at investigating the mapping of SFTs using high resolution optical imagery (less than 10cm) collected from a helicopter-based UAS flown at low altitudes (less than 100m). This paper presents the initial findings from a series of structured experiments on the River Arrow, a small lowland river in Warwickshire, UK. These experiments investigate the potential for mapping SFTs from still and video imagery of different spatial resolutions collected at different flying altitudes and from different viewing angles (i.e. vertical and oblique). Imagery is processed using 3D mosaicking software to create orthophotos and digital elevation models (DEM). The types of image analysis which are tested include a simple, manual visual assessment undertaken in a GIS environment, based on the high resolution optical imagery. In addition, an object-based image analysis approach which makes use of the

  10. High-Resolution Broadband Spectral Interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J

    2002-08-09

    We demonstrate solar spectra from a novel interferometric method for compact broadband high-resolution spectroscopy. The spectral interferometer (SI) is a hybrid instrument that uses a spectrometer to externally disperse the output of a fixed-delay interferometer. It also has been called an externally dispersed interferometer (EDI). The interferometer can be used with linear spectrometers for imaging spectroscopy or with echelle spectrometers for very broad-band coverage. EDI's heterodyning technique enhances the spectrometer's response to high spectral-density features, increasing the effective resolution by factors of several while retaining its bandwidth. The method is extremely robust to instrumental insults such as focal spot size or displacement. The EDI uses no moving parts, such as purely interferometric FTS spectrometers, and can cover a much wider simultaneous bandpass than other internally dispersed interferometers (e.g. HHS or SHS).

  11. Development of New High Resolution Neutron Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostella, L. D., III; Rajabali, M.; Loureiro, D. P.; Grzywacz, R.

    2017-09-01

    Beta-delayed neutron emission is a prevalent form of decay for neutron-rich nuclei. This occurs when an unstable nucleus undergoes beta decay, but produces a daughter nucleus in an excited state above the neutron separation energy. The daughter nucleus then de-excites by ejecting one or more neutrons. We wish to map the states from which these nuclei decay via neutron spectroscopy using NEXT, a new high resolution neutron detector. NEXT utilizes silicon photomultipliers and 6 mm thick pulse-shape discriminating plastic scintillators, allowing for smaller and more compact modular geometries in the NEXT array. Timing measurements for the detector were performed and a resolution of 893 ps (FWHM) has been achieved so far. Aspects of the detector that were investigated and will be presented here include scintillator geometry, wrapping materials, fitting functions for the digitized signals, and electronic components coupled to the silicon photomultipliers for signal shaping.

  12. High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries presented at the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video (HHV) Workshop are compiled. HHV system is intended for future use on the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. The Workshop was held for the dual purpose of: (1) allowing potential scientific users to assess the utility of the proposed system for monitoring microgravity science experiments; and (2) letting technical experts from industry recommend improvements to the proposed near-term HHV system. The following topics are covered: (1) State of the art in the video system performance; (2) Development plan for the HHV system; (3) Advanced technology for image gathering, coding, and processing; (4) Data compression applied to HHV; (5) Data transmission networks; and (6) Results of the users' requirements survey conducted by NASA.

  13. High Resolution Regional Climate Simulations over Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, A. J.; Clark, M. P.; Arnold, J.; Newman, A. J.; Musselman, K. N.; Barlage, M. J.; Xue, L.; Liu, C.; Gutmann, E. D.; Rasmussen, R.

    2016-12-01

    In order to appropriately plan future projects to build and maintain infrastructure (e.g., dams, dikes, highways, airports), a number of U.S. federal agencies seek to better understand how hydrologic regimes may shift across the country due to climate change. Building on the successful completion of a series of high-resolution WRF simulations over the Colorado River Headwaters and contiguous USA, our team is now extending these simulations over the challenging U.S. States of Alaska and Hawaii. In this presentation we summarize results from a newly completed 4-km resolution WRF simulation over Alaska spanning 2002-2016 at 4-km spatial resolution. Our aim is to gain insight into the thermodynamics that drive key precipitation processes, particularly the extremes that are most damaging to infrastructure.

  14. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 micron, 4.6 micron, 12 micron, and 22 micron. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  15. High-Resolution Movement EEG Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Štastný

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the contribution is to analyze possibilities of high-resolution movement classification using human EEG. For this purpose, a database of the EEG recorded during right-thumb and little-finger fast flexion movements of the experimental subjects was created. The statistical analysis of the EEG was done on the subject's basis instead of the commonly used grand averaging. Statistically significant differences between the EEG accompanying movements of both fingers were found, extending the results of other so far published works. The classifier based on hidden Markov models was able to distinguish between movement and resting states (classification score of 94–100%, but it was unable to recognize the type of the movement. This is caused by the large fraction of other (nonmovement related EEG activities in the recorded signals. A classification method based on advanced EEG signal denoising is being currently developed to overcome this problem.

  16. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  17. High resolution multimodal clinical ophthalmic imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujat, Mircea; Ferguson, R Daniel; Patel, Ankit H; Iftimia, Nicusor; Lue, Niyom; Hammer, Daniel X

    2010-05-24

    We developed a multimodal adaptive optics (AO) retinal imager which is the first to combine high performance AO-corrected scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and swept source Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) imaging modes in a single compact clinical prototype platform. Such systems are becoming ever more essential to vision research and are expected to prove their clinical value for diagnosis of retinal diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinitis pigmentosa. The SSOCT channel operates at a wavelength of 1 microm for increased penetration and visualization of the choriocapillaris and choroid, sites of major disease activity for DR and wet AMD. This AO system is designed for use in clinical populations; a dual deformable mirror (DM) configuration allows simultaneous low- and high-order aberration correction over a large range of refractions and ocular media quality. The system also includes a wide field (33 deg.) line scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) for initial screening, target identification, and global orientation, an integrated retinal tracker (RT) to stabilize the SLO, OCT, and LSO imaging fields in the presence of lateral eye motion, and a high-resolution LCD-based fixation target for presentation of visual cues. The system was tested in human subjects without retinal disease for performance optimization and validation. We were able to resolve and quantify cone photoreceptors across the macula to within approximately 0.5 deg (approximately 100-150 microm) of the fovea, image and delineate ten retinal layers, and penetrate to resolve features deep into the choroid. The prototype presented here is the first of a new class of powerful flexible imaging platforms that will provide clinicians and researchers with high-resolution, high performance adaptive optics imaging to help guide therapies, develop new drugs, and improve patient outcomes.

  18. High-resolution transcriptome of human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Beyer

    Full Text Available Macrophages are dynamic cells integrating signals from their microenvironment to develop specific functional responses. Although, microarray-based transcriptional profiling has established transcriptional reprogramming as an important mechanism for signal integration and cell function of macrophages, current knowledge on transcriptional regulation of human macrophages is far from complete. To discover novel marker genes, an area of great need particularly in human macrophage biology but also to generate a much more thorough transcriptome of human M1- and M1-like macrophages, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq of human macrophages. Using this approach we can now provide a high-resolution transcriptome profile of human macrophages under classical (M1-like and alternative (M2-like polarization conditions and demonstrate a dynamic range exceeding observations obtained by previous technologies, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the transcriptome of human macrophages. Using this approach, we identify important gene clusters so far not appreciated by standard microarray techniques. In addition, we were able to detect differential promoter usage, alternative transcription start sites, and different coding sequences for 57 gene loci in human macrophages. Moreover, this approach led to the identification of novel M1-associated (CD120b, TLR2, SLAMF7 as well as M2-associated (CD1a, CD1b, CD93, CD226 cell surface markers. Taken together, these data support that high-resolution transcriptome profiling of human macrophages by RNA-seq leads to a better understanding of macrophage function and will form the basis for a better characterization of macrophages in human health and disease.

  19. High-Resolution Transcriptome of Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jia; Staratschek-Jox, Andrea; Vorholt, Daniela; Krebs, Wolfgang; Sommer, Daniel; Sander, Jil; Mertens, Christina; Nino-Castro, Andrea; Schmidt, Susanne V.; Schultze, Joachim L.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are dynamic cells integrating signals from their microenvironment to develop specific functional responses. Although, microarray-based transcriptional profiling has established transcriptional reprogramming as an important mechanism for signal integration and cell function of macrophages, current knowledge on transcriptional regulation of human macrophages is far from complete. To discover novel marker genes, an area of great need particularly in human macrophage biology but also to generate a much more thorough transcriptome of human M1- and M1-like macrophages, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of human macrophages. Using this approach we can now provide a high-resolution transcriptome profile of human macrophages under classical (M1-like) and alternative (M2-like) polarization conditions and demonstrate a dynamic range exceeding observations obtained by previous technologies, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the transcriptome of human macrophages. Using this approach, we identify important gene clusters so far not appreciated by standard microarray techniques. In addition, we were able to detect differential promoter usage, alternative transcription start sites, and different coding sequences for 57 gene loci in human macrophages. Moreover, this approach led to the identification of novel M1-associated (CD120b, TLR2, SLAMF7) as well as M2-associated (CD1a, CD1b, CD93, CD226) cell surface markers. Taken together, these data support that high-resolution transcriptome profiling of human macrophages by RNA-seq leads to a better understanding of macrophage function and will form the basis for a better characterization of macrophages in human health and disease. PMID:23029029

  20. Improving 2D change detection by using available 3D data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Sande, C.J.; Zanoni, M.; Gorte, B.G.H.

    2008-01-01

    Change detection with very high resolution imagery is difficult, because 3D objects as buildings appear differently in 2D imagery due to varying viewing angles and sun positions. This research proposes a method to improve change detection by using simple 3D models of buildings. Buildings have been

  1. Modelling soil erosion risk based on RUSLE-3D using GIS in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The RUSLE-3D (Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation-3D) model was implemented in geographic infor- mation system (GIS) for predicting ... High resolution remote sensing data (IKONOS and IRS LISS-IV) were used to prepare land use/land .... 3.1 Materials. IKONOS 1 m resolution digital satellite data of. November 2004 ...

  2. Generation of a National Virtual 3D City and Landscape Model for the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elberink, S.; Stoter, J.; Ledoux, H.; Commandeur, T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the generation of a national three-dimensional (3D) dataset representing the virtual and landscape model. The 3D model is produced automatically by fusing a two-dimensional (2D) national object-oriented database describing the physical landscape and the national high-resolution

  3. Photoacoustic image patterns of breast carcinoma and comparisons with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and vascular stained histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijblom, M.; Piras, D.; Brinkhuis, M.; van Hespen, J. C. G.; van den Engh, F. M.; van der Schaaf, M.; Klaase, J. M.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-07-01

    Photoacoustic (optoacoustic) imaging can visualize vasculature deep in tissue using the high contrast of hemoglobin to light, with the high-resolution possible with ultrasound detection. Since angiogenesis, one of the hallmarks of cancer, leads to increased vascularity, photoacoustics holds promise in imaging breast cancer as shown in proof-of-principle studies. Here for the first time, we investigate if there are specific photoacoustic appearances of breast malignancies which can be related to the tumor vascularity, using an upgraded research imaging system, the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope. In addition to comparisons with x-ray and ultrasound images, in subsets of cases the photoacoustic images were compared with MR images, and with vascular staining in histopathology. We were able to identify lesions in suspect breasts at the expected locations in 28 of 29 cases. We discovered generally three types of photoacoustic appearances reminiscent of contrast enhancement types reported in MR imaging of breast malignancies, and first insights were gained into the relationship with tumor vascularity.

  4. Photoacoustic image patterns of breast carcinoma and comparisons with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and vascular stained histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijblom, M.; Piras, D.; Brinkhuis, M.; van Hespen, J. C. G.; van den Engh, F. M.; van der Schaaf, M.; Klaase, J. M.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (optoacoustic) imaging can visualize vasculature deep in tissue using the high contrast of hemoglobin to light, with the high-resolution possible with ultrasound detection. Since angiogenesis, one of the hallmarks of cancer, leads to increased vascularity, photoacoustics holds promise in imaging breast cancer as shown in proof-of-principle studies. Here for the first time, we investigate if there are specific photoacoustic appearances of breast malignancies which can be related to the tumor vascularity, using an upgraded research imaging system, the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope. In addition to comparisons with x-ray and ultrasound images, in subsets of cases the photoacoustic images were compared with MR images, and with vascular staining in histopathology. We were able to identify lesions in suspect breasts at the expected locations in 28 of 29 cases. We discovered generally three types of photoacoustic appearances reminiscent of contrast enhancement types reported in MR imaging of breast malignancies, and first insights were gained into the relationship with tumor vascularity. PMID:26159440

  5. Towards non-contact photo-acoustic endoscopy using speckle pattern analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengenfelder, Benjamin; Mehari, Fanuel; Tang, Yuqi; Klämpfl, Florian; Zalevsky, Zeev; Schmidt, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic Tomography combines the advantages of optical and acoustic imaging as it makes use of the high optical contrast of tissue and the high resolution of ultrasound. Furthermore, high penetration depths in tissue in the order of several centimeters can be achieved by the combination of these modalities. Extensive research is being done in the field of miniaturization of photoacoustic devices, as photoacoustic imaging could be of significant benefits for the physician during endoscopic interventions. All the existing miniature systems are based on contact transducers for signal detection that are placed at the distal end of an endoscopic device. This makes the manufacturing process difficult and impedance matching to the inspected surface a requirement. The requirement for contact limits the view of the physician during the intervention. Consequently, a fiber based non-contact optical sensing technique would be highly beneficial for the development of miniaturized photoacoustic endoscopic devices. This work demonstrates the feasibility of surface displacement detection using remote speckle-sensing using a high speed camera and an imaging fiber bundle that is used in commercially available video endoscopes. The feasibility of displacement sensing is demonstrated by analysis of phantom vibrations which are induced by loudspeaker membrane oscillations. Since the usability of the remote speckle-sensing for photo-acoustic signal detection was already demonstrated, the fiber bundle approach demonstrates the potential for non-contact photoacoustic detections during endoscopy.

  6. High Resolution PET Imaging Probe for the Detection, Molecular Characterization and Treatment Monitoring of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    for testing predictions of high-resolution PET performance and a full 3D volume PET algorithm based on a list-mode maximum likelihood formulation . A...feature of the 2D formulation is that it can asymptotically achieve the limiting noise level at any reconstructed spatial resolution (although...four 128-channel VATA GP7 ASICs (Gamma- Medica Ideas, Northridge, CA, USA). Each channel of the ASIC has a fast (150 ns) shaper and leading-edge

  7. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) using 23Na and proton MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Milton L.; Harrington, Michael G.; Schepkin, Victor D.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2014-10-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/h concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1 T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8 × 0.8 × 0.8 mm3 and imaging matrices of 60 × 60 × 60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/.

  8. Sodium 3D COncentration MApping (COMA 3D) using (23)Na and proton MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Milton L; Harrington, Michael G; Schepkin, Victor D; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-10-01

    Functional changes of sodium 3D MRI signals were converted into millimolar concentration changes using an open-source fully automated MATLAB toolbox. These concentration changes are visualized via 3D sodium concentration maps, and they are overlaid over conventional 3D proton images to provide high-resolution co-registration for easy correlation of functional changes to anatomical regions. Nearly 5000/h concentration maps were generated on a personal computer (ca. 2012) using 21.1T 3D sodium MRI brain images of live rats with spatial resolution of 0.8×0.8×0.8 mm(3) and imaging matrices of 60×60×60. The produced concentration maps allowed for non-invasive quantitative measurement of in vivo sodium concentration in the normal rat brain as a functional response to migraine-like conditions. The presented work can also be applied to sodium-associated changes in migraine, cancer, and other metabolic abnormalities that can be sensed by molecular imaging. The MATLAB toolbox allows for automated image analysis of the 3D images acquired on the Bruker platform and can be extended to other imaging platforms. The resulting images are presented in a form of series of 2D slices in all three dimensions in native MATLAB and PDF formats. The following is provided: (a) MATLAB source code for image processing, (b) the detailed processing procedures, (c) description of the code and all sub-routines, (d) example data sets of initial and processed data. The toolbox can be downloaded at: http://www.vuiis.vanderbilt.edu/~truongm/COMA3D/. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 3D confocal imaging in CUBIC-cleared mouse heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nehrhoff, I.; Bocancea, D.; Vaquero, J.; Vaquero, J.J.; Lorrio, M.T.; Ripoll, J.; Desco, M.; Gomez-Gaviro, M.V.

    2016-07-01

    Acquiring high resolution 3D images of the heart enables the ability to study heart diseases more in detail. Here, the CUBIC (clear, unobstructed brain imaging cocktails and computational analysis) clearing protocol was adapted for thick mouse heart sections to increase the penetration depth of the confocal microscope lasers into the tissue. The adapted CUBIC clearing of the heart lets the antibody penetrate deeper into the tissue by a factor of five. The here shown protocol enables deep 3D highresolution image acquisition in the heart. This allows a much more accurate assessment of the cellular and structural changes that underlie heart diseases. (Author)

  10. Simulating hyperspectral images for Martian 3D scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douté, S.

    2017-09-01

    We present a tool for simulating hyperspectral images for 3D Martian scenes. Several lines of development are considered for achieving a high degree of realism : high resolution digital elevation models, description of material distribution with fractal characteristics, bidirectional reflectance measured in the laboratory as a function of geometry and wavelength for a series analogue materials, mixing of spectral signatures at different scales, 3D radiative transfer between atmosphere and surface. The simulator addresses two main needs (i) developing and testing methods for the correction of atmospheric and photometric effects images taken by orbiter around Mars (ii) developing and testing methods for the linear and nonlinear spectral unmixing applied to hyperspectral images.

  11. 3D bioprinting and its in vivo applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nhayoung; Yang, Gi-Hoon; Lee, JaeHwan; Kim, GeunHyung

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of 3D bioprinting technology is to design and create functional 3D tissues or organs in situ for in vivo applications. 3D cell-printing, or additive biomanufacturing, allows the selection of biomaterials and cells (bioink), and the fabrication of cell-laden structures in high resolution. 3D cell-printed structures have also been used for applications such as research models, drug delivery and discovery, and toxicology. Recently, numerous attempts have been made to fabricate tissues and organs by using various 3D printing techniques. However, challenges such as vascularization are yet to be solved. This article reviews the most commonly used 3D cell-printing techniques with their advantages and drawbacks. Furthermore, up-to-date achievements of 3D bioprinting in in vivo applications are introduced, and prospects for the future of 3D cell-printing technology are discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 444-459, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Integrated High Resolution Monitoring of Mediterranean vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaraccio, Carla; Piga, Alessandra; Ventura, Andrea; Arca, Angelo; Duce, Pierpaolo; Mereu, Simone

    2017-04-01

    The study of the vegetation features in a complex and highly vulnerable ecosystems, such as Mediterranean maquis, leads to the need of using continuous monitoring systems at high spatial and temporal resolution, for a better interpretation of the mechanisms of phenological and eco-physiological processes. Near-surface remote sensing techniques are used to quantify, at high temporal resolution, and with a certain degree of spatial integration, the seasonal variations of the surface optical and radiometric properties. In recent decades, the design and implementation of global monitoring networks involved the use of non-destructive and/or cheaper approaches such as (i) continuous surface fluxes measurement stations, (ii) phenological observation networks, and (iii) measurement of temporal and spatial variations of the vegetation spectral properties. In this work preliminary results from the ECO-SCALE (Integrated High Resolution Monitoring of Mediterranean vegetation) project are reported. The project was manly aimed to develop an integrated system for environmental monitoring based on digital photography, hyperspectral radiometry , and micrometeorological techniques during three years of experimentation (2013-2016) in a Mediterranean site of Italy (Capo Caccia, Alghero). The main results concerned the analysis of chromatic coordinates indices from digital images, to characterized the phenological patterns for typical shrubland species, determining start and duration of the growing season, and the physiological status in relation to different environmental drought conditions; then the seasonal patterns of canopy phenology, was compared to NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange) patterns, showing similarities. However, maximum values of NEE and ER (Ecosystem respiration), and short term variation, seemed mainly tuned by inter annual pattern of meteorological variables, in particular of temperature recorded in the months preceding the vegetation green-up. Finally, green signals

  13. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hau, Ionel Dragos [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on 6LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, α) reactions with fast neutrons in 6Li and 10B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies kBT on the order of μeV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution ΔE ~ (kBT2C)1/2, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB2 absorber using thermal neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in 7Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a 6Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the 6Li(n, α)3H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  14. 3D IBFV : Hardware-Accelerated 3D Flow Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, Alexandru; Wijk, Jarke J. van

    2003-01-01

    We present a hardware-accelerated method for visualizing 3D flow fields. The method is based on insertion, advection, and decay of dye. To this aim, we extend the texture-based IBFV technique for 2D flow visualization in two main directions. First, we decompose the 3D flow visualization problem in a

  15. Using 3D in Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Jo; Kirschenbauer, Sabine; Döllner, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    to display 3D imagery. The extra cartographic degree of freedom offered by using 3D is explored and offered as a motivation for employing 3D in visualization. The use of VR and the construction of virtual environments exploit navigational and behavioral realism, but become most usefil when combined...... with abstracted representations embedded in a 3D space. The interactions between development of geovisualization, the technology used to implement it and the theory surrounding cartographic representation are explored. The dominance of computing technologies, driven particularly by the gaming industry...

  16. 3D for Graphic Designers

    CERN Document Server

    Connell, Ellery

    2011-01-01

    Helping graphic designers expand their 2D skills into the 3D space The trend in graphic design is towards 3D, with the demand for motion graphics, animation, photorealism, and interactivity rapidly increasing. And with the meteoric rise of iPads, smartphones, and other interactive devices, the design landscape is changing faster than ever.2D digital artists who need a quick and efficient way to join this brave new world will want 3D for Graphic Designers. Readers get hands-on basic training in working in the 3D space, including product design, industrial design and visualization, modeling, ani

  17. 3D Bayesian contextual classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    We extend a series of multivariate Bayesian 2-D contextual classifiers to 3-D by specifying a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for the feature vectors as well as a prior distribution of the class variables of a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours.......We extend a series of multivariate Bayesian 2-D contextual classifiers to 3-D by specifying a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for the feature vectors as well as a prior distribution of the class variables of a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours....

  18. 3-D printers for libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Griffey, Jason

    2014-01-01

    As the maker movement continues to grow and 3-D printers become more affordable, an expanding group of hobbyists is keen to explore this new technology. In the time-honored tradition of introducing new technologies, many libraries are considering purchasing a 3-D printer. Jason Griffey, an early enthusiast of 3-D printing, has researched the marketplace and seen several systems first hand at the Consumer Electronics Show. In this report he introduces readers to the 3-D printing marketplace, covering such topics asHow fused deposition modeling (FDM) printing workBasic terminology such as build

  19. Regional High Resolution Reanalysis Covered European North East Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdalle-Badie, R.; Benkiran, M.; Chanut, J.; Drillet, Y.; Reffray, G.

    2011-12-01

    Mercator-Ocean has developed a regional forecasting system at 1/12° resolution over the North East Atlantic (IBI: Iberia, Biscay and Irish), taking advantage of the recent developments in NEMO. This regional forecasting system uses boundary conditions from the Mercator-Ocean global reanalysis (GLORYS: Global Ocean ReanalYses and Simulations). The assimilation component of the Mercator Ocean system, is based on a reduced-order Kalman filter (the SEEK or Singular Extended Evolutive Kalman filter). An IAU method (Incremental Analysis Updates) is used to apply the increments in the system. The error statistics are represented in a sub-space spanned by a small number of dominant 3D error directions. The data assimilation system allows to constrain the model in a multivariate way with Sea Surface Temperature (AVHRR + Multi-satellite High resolution), together with all available satellite Sea Level Anomalies, and with in situ observations from the CORA-03 data base, including ARGO floats temperature and salinity measurements. This reanalysis covers the period from January 2002 to December 2009. In this presentation, the results obtained with this reanalysis system (1/12°) are compared to the GLORYS ones. A special focus will be made on the gain thanks to the higher resolution of the model and higher resolution of the SST assimilated in this reanalysis.

  20. High-resolution multimodal clinical multiphoton tomography of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    This review focuses on multimodal multiphoton tomography based on near infrared femtosecond lasers. Clinical multiphoton tomographs for 3D high-resolution in vivo imaging have been placed into the market several years ago. The second generation of this Prism-Award winning High-Tech skin imaging tool (MPTflex) was introduced in 2010. The same year, the world's first clinical CARS studies have been performed with a hybrid multimodal multiphoton tomograph. In particular, non-fluorescent lipids and water as well as mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen has been imaged with submicron resolution in patients suffering from psoriasis. Further multimodal approaches include the combination of multiphoton tomographs with low-resolution wide-field systems such as ultrasound, optoacoustical, OCT, and dermoscopy systems. Multiphoton tomographs are currently employed in Australia, Japan, the US, and in several European countries for early diagnosis of skin cancer, optimization of treatment strategies, and cosmetic research including long-term testing of sunscreen nanoparticles as well as anti-aging products.

  1. High resolution measurement of the glycolytic rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla X Bittner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The glycolytic rate is sensitive to physiological activity, hormones, stress, aging and malignant transformation. Standard techniques to measure the glycolytic rate are based on radioactive isotopes, are not able to resolve single cells and have poor temporal resolution, limitations that hamper the study of energy metabolism in the brain and other organs. A new method is described in this article, which makes use of a recently-developed FRET glucose nanosensor to measure the rate of glycolysis in single cells with high temporal resolution. Used in cultured astrocytes, the method showed for the first time that glycolysis can be activated within seconds by a combination of glutamate and K+, supporting a role for astrocytes in neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling in the brain. It was also possible to make a direct comparison of metabolism in neurons and astrocytes lying in close proximity, paving the way to a high-resolution characterization of brain energy metabolism. Single-cell glycolytic rates were also measured in fibroblasts, adipocytes, myoblasts and tumor cells, showing higher rates for undifferentiated cells and significant metabolic heterogeneity within cell types. This method should facilitate the investigation of tissue metabolism at the single-cell level and is readily adaptable for high-throughput analysis.

  2. High resolution quantum metrology via quantum interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajoy, Ashok; Liu, Yixiang; Saha, Kasturi; Marseglia, Luca; Jaskula, Jean-Christophe; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are a promising platform for quantum metrology - in particular for nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging to determine high resolution structures of single molecules placed outside the diamond. The conventional technique for sensing of external nuclear spins involves monitoring the effects of the target nuclear spins on the NV center coherence under dynamical decoupling (the CPMG/XY8 pulse sequence). However, the nuclear spin affects the NV coherence only at precise free evolution times - and finite timing resolution set by hardware often severely limits the sensitivity and resolution of the method. In this work, we overcome this timing resolution barrier by developing a technique to supersample the metrology signal by effectively implementing a quantum interpolation of the spin system dynamics. This method will enable spin sensing at high magnetic fields and high repetition rate, allowing significant improvements in sensitivity and spectral resolution. We experimentally demonstrate a resolution boost by over a factor of 100 for spin sensing and AC magnetometry. The method is shown to be robust, versatile to sensing normal and spurious signal harmonics, and ultimately limited in resolution only by the number of pulses that can be applied.

  3. AIRBORNE HIGH-RESOLUTION DIGITAL IMAGING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prado-Molina, J.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost airborne digital imaging system capable to perform aerial surveys with small-format cameras isintroduced. The equipment is intended to obtain high-resolution multispectral digital photographs constituting so aviable alternative to conventional aerial photography and satellite imagery. Monitoring software handles all theprocedures involved in image acquisition, including flight planning, real-time graphics for aircraft position updatingin a mobile map, and supervises the main variables engaged in the imaging process. This software also creates fileswith the geographical position of the central point of every image, and the flight path followed by the aircraftduring the entire survey. The cameras are mounted on a three-axis stabilized platform. A set of inertial sensorsdetermines platform's deviations independently from the aircraft and an automatic control system keeps thecameras at a continuous nadir pointing and heading, with a precision better than ± 1 arc-degree in three-axis. Thecontrol system is also in charge of saving the platform’s orientation angles when the monitoring software triggersthe camera. These external orientation parameters, together with a procedure for camera calibration give theessential elements for image orthocorrection. Orthomosaics are constructed using commercial GIS software.This system demonstrates the feasibility of large area coverage in a practical and economical way using smallformatcameras. Monitoring and automatization reduce the work while increasing the quality and the amount ofuseful images.

  4. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of nude mice vasculature using a photoacoustic imaging system based on a commercial ultrasound scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Ladislav; Shahzad, Khalid; Wang, Yao; Burcher, Michael; Scholle, Frank-Detlef; Hauff, Peter; Mofina, Sabine; Skobe, Mihaela

    2008-02-01

    In-vivo photoacoustic/ultrasound (PA/US) imaging of nude mice was investigated using a photoacoustic imaging system based on a commercial ultrasound scanner HDI-5000. Raw per-channel data was captured and beamformed to generate each individual photoacoustic image with a single laser shot. An ultra-broadband CL15-7 linear array with a center frequency of 8 MHz, combined with a Schott Glass fiber bundle, was used as a compact high resolution imaging probe, with lateral and axial PA resolutions of about 300µm and 200µm, respectively. The imaging system worked in a dual PA-US mode, with the ultrasound outlining the tissue structure and the photoacoustic image showing the blood vessels. PA signals were generated by exposing mice to ultra-short optical pulses from a Nd:YAG-pumped OPO laser operating in a wavelength range of 700-950nm. The corresponding ultrasound images were generated in the regular B-mode with standard delay-and-sum beamforming algorithm. The system resolution was sufficiently high to identify and clearly distinguish the dorsal artery and the two lateral veins in the mouse tail. Both the saphena artery and the ischiatic vein on the cross-section of the mouse leg were clearly outlined in the PA images and correctly overlaid on the ultrasound image of the tissue structure. Similarly, cross-section PA images of the mouse abdomen revealed mesenteric vasculatures located below the abdominal wall. Finally, a successful PA imaging of the mouse thoracic cavity unveiled the ascending and descending aorta. These initial results demonstrate a great potential for a dual photoacoustic/ultrasound imaging modality implemented on a commercial ultrasound imaging scanner.

  5. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  6. 3D printing in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  7. Fundamental constants and high-resolution spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, P.; Rahmani, H.; Whitmore, J. B.; Wendt, M.; Centurion, M.; Molaro, P.; Srianand, R.; Murphy, M. T.; Petitjean, P.; Agafonova, I. I.; D'Odorico, S.; Evans, T. M.; Levshakov, S. A.; Lopez, S.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Reimers, D.; Vladilo, G.

    2014-01-01

    Absorption-line systems detected in high resolution quasar spectra can be used to compare the value of dimensionless fundamental constants such as the fine-structure constant, α, and the proton-to-electron mass ratio, μ = m_p/m_e, as measured in remote regions of the Universe to their value today on Earth. In recent years, some evidence has emerged of small temporal and also spatial variations in α on cosmological scales which may reach a fractional level of ≈ 10 ppm (parts per million). We are conducting a Large Programme of observations with the Very Large Telescope's Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES), and are obtaining high-resolution ({R ≈ 60 000}) and high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≈ 100) spectra calibrated specifically to study the variations of the fundamental constants. We here provide a general overview of the Large Programme and report on the first results for these two constants, discussed in detail in Molaro et al. (2013) and Rahmani et al. (2013). A stringent bound for Δα/α is obtained for the absorber at z_abs = 1.6919 towards HE 2217-2818. The absorption profile is complex with several very narrow features, and is modeled with 32 velocity components. The relative variation in α in this system is +1.3± 2.4_stat ± 1.0_sys ppm if Al II λ 1670 Å and three Fe II transitions are used, and +1.1 ± 2.6_stat ppm in a slightly different analysis with only Fe II transitions used. This is one of the tightest bounds on α-variation from an individual absorber and reveals no evidence for variation in α at the 3-ppm precision level (1σ confidence). The expectation at this sky position of the recently-reported dipolar variation of α is (3.2-5.4)±1.7 ppm depending on dipole model used and this constraint of Δα/α at face value is not supporting this expectation but not inconsistent with it at the 3σ level. For the proton-to-electron mass ratio the analysis of the H_2 absorption lines of the z_abs ≈ 2.4018 damped Lyα system

  8. Photoacoustic computed microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lei; Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is emerging as a powerful technique for imaging microvasculature at depths beyond the ~1 mm depth limit associated with confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy and optical coherence tomography. PAM, however, is currently qualitative in nature and cannot quantitatively measure important functional parameters including oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), deoxyhemoglobin (HbR), oxygen saturation (sO2), blood flow (BF) and rate of oxygen metabolism (MRO2). Here we describe a new photoacoustic microscopic method, termed photoacoustic computed microscopy (PACM) that combines current PAM technique with a model-based inverse reconstruction algorithm. We evaluate the PACM approach using tissue-mimicking phantoms and demonstrate its in vivo imaging ability of quantifying HbO2, HbR, sO2, cerebral BF and cerebral MRO2 at the small vessel level in a rodent model. This new technique provides a unique tool for neuroscience research and for visualizing microvasculature dynamics involved in tumor angiogenesis and in inflammatory joint diseases.

  9. High-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Esther; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Bowman, Brett; Schwientek, Patrick; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Gies, Esther; Hallam, Steve; Tringe, Susannah; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The representation of bacterial and archaeal genome sequences is strongly biased towards cultivated organisms, which belong to merely four phylogenetic groups. Functional information and inter-phylum level relationships are still largely underexplored for candidate phyla, which are often referred to as microbial dark matter. Furthermore, a large portion of the 16S rRNA gene records in the GenBank database are labeled as environmental samples and unclassified, which is in part due to low read accuracy, potential chimeric sequences produced during PCR amplifications and the low resolution of short amplicons. In order to improve the phylogenetic classification of novel species and advance our knowledge of the ecosystem function of uncultivated microorganisms, high-throughput full length 16S rRNA gene sequencing methodologies with reduced biases are needed. We evaluated the performance of PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing in high-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling. For this purpose, we compared PacBio and Illumina metagenomic shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of a mock community as well as of an environmental sample from Sakinaw Lake, British Columbia. Sakinaw Lake is known to contain a large age of microbial species from candidate phyla. Sequencing results show that community structure based on PacBio shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequences is highly similar in both the mock and the environmental communities. Resolution power and community representation accuracy from SMRT sequencing data appeared to be independent of GC content of microbial genomes and was higher when compared to Illumina-based metagenome shotgun and 16S rRNA gene (iTag) sequences, e.g. full-length sequencing resolved all 23 OTUs in the mock community, while iTags did not resolve closely related species. SMRT sequencing hence offers various potential benefits when characterizing uncharted microbial communities.

  10. High resolution CT findings of pseudoalveolar sarcoidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Eun; Park, Jun Gyun; Choe, Kyu Ok; Kim, Sang Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Young Hoon; Im, Jung Gi [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo [Sungkunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Koun Sik [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyae Young [National Cancer Centar, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    To determine the specific high-resolution CT features of sarcoidosis in which the observed pattern is predominantly pseudoalveolar. We retrospectively reviewed the HRCT findings in 15 cases in which chest radiography demonstrated pseudoalveolar consolidation. In all 15, sarcoidosis was pathologically proven. The distribution and characterization of the following CT features was meticulously scrutinized: distribution and characterization of pseudoalveolar lesions, air-bronchograms, micronodules, thickening of bronchovascular bundles and interlobular septa, lung distortion, ground-glass opacities and combined hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Follow-up CT scans were available in three cases after corticosteroid administration. Between one and 12 (mean, 5.6) pseudoalveolar lesions appeared as dense homogeneous or inhomogeneous opacities 1-4.5 cm in diameter and with an irregular margin located either at the lung periphery adjacent to the pleural surface or along the bronchovascular bundles, with mainly bilateral distribution (n=14, 93%). An air-bronchogram was observed in ten cases. Micronodules were observed at the periphery of the lesion or surrounding lung, which along with a thickened bronchovascular bundle was a consistent feature in all cases. Additional CT features included hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy (n=14, 93%), thickened interlobular septa (n=12, 80%), and ground-glass opacity (n=10, 67%). Lung distortion was noted in only one case (7%). After steroid administration pseudoalveolar lesions decreased in number and size in all three cases in which follow-up CT was available. The consistent HRCT features of pseudoalveolar sarcoidosis are bilateral multifocal dense homogenous or inhomogenous opacity and an irregular margin located either at the lung periphery adjacent to the pleural surface or along the bronchovascular bundles. Micronodules are present at the periphery of the lesion or surrounding lung. The features are reversible administration.

  11. High-resolution downscaling for hydrological management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Uwe; Rust, Henning; Meredith, Edmund; Kpogo-Nuwoklo, Komlan; Vagenas, Christos

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological modellers and water managers require high-resolution climate data to model regional hydrologies and how these may respond to future changes in the large-scale climate. The ability to successfully model such changes and, by extension, critical infrastructure planning is often impeded by a lack of suitable climate data. This typically takes the form of too-coarse data from climate models, which are not sufficiently detailed in either space or time to be able to support water management decisions and hydrological research. BINGO (Bringing INnovation in onGOing water management; ) aims to bridge the gap between the needs of hydrological modellers and planners, and the currently available range of climate data, with the overarching aim of providing adaptation strategies for climate change-related challenges. Producing the kilometre- and sub-daily-scale climate data needed by hydrologists through continuous simulations is generally computationally infeasible. To circumvent this hurdle, we adopt a two-pronged approach involving (1) selective dynamical downscaling and (2) conditional stochastic weather generators, with the former presented here. We take an event-based approach to downscaling in order to achieve the kilometre-scale input needed by hydrological modellers. Computational expenses are minimized by identifying extremal weather patterns for each BINGO research site in lower-resolution simulations and then only downscaling to the kilometre-scale (convection permitting) those events during which such patterns occur. Here we (1) outline the methodology behind the selection of the events, and (2) compare the modelled precipitation distribution and variability (preconditioned on the extremal weather patterns) with that found in observations.

  12. High Resolution Global View of Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Io, the most volcanic body in the solar system is seen in the highest resolution obtained to date by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The smallest features that can be discerned are 2.5 kilometers in size. There are rugged mountains several kilometers high, layered materials forming plateaus, and many irregular depressions called volcanic calderas. Several of the dark, flow-like features correspond to hot spots, and may be active lava flows. There are no landforms resembling impact craters, as the volcanism covers the surface with new deposits much more rapidly than the flux of comets and asteroids can create large impact craters. The picture is centered on the side of Io that always faces away from Jupiter; north is to the top.Color images acquired on September 7, 1996 have been merged with higher resolution images acquired on November 6, 1996 by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The color is composed of data taken, at a range of 487,000 kilometers, in the near-infrared, green, and violet filters and has been enhanced to emphasize the extraordinary variations in color and brightness that characterize Io's face. The high resolution images were obtained at ranges which varied from 245,719 kilometers to 403,100 kilometers.Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  13. 3D myocardial T1 mapping using saturation recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordio, Giovanna; Henningsson, Markus; Chiribiri, Amedeo; Villa, Adriana D M; Schneider, Torben; Botnar, René M

    2017-07-01

    To propose a 3D quantitative high-resolution T1 mapping technique, called 3D SASHA (saturation-recovery single-shot acquisition), which combines a saturation recovery pulse with 1D-navigator-based-respiratory motion compensation to acquire the whole volume of the heart in free breathing. The sequence was tested and validated both in a T1 phantom and in healthy subjects. The 3D SASHA method was implemented on a 1.5T scanner. A diaphragmatic navigator was used to allow free-breathing acquisition and the images were acquired with a resolution of 1.4 × 1.4 × 8 mm(3) . For assessment of accuracy and precision the sequence was compared with the reference gold-standard inversion-recovery spin echo (IRSE) pulse sequence in a T1 phantom, while for the in vivo studies (10 healthy volunteers) 3D SASHA was compared with the clinically used 2D MOLLI (3-3-5) and 2D SASHA protocols. There was good agreement between the T1 values measured in a T1 phantom with 3D SASHA and the reference IRSE pulse sequences (1111.6 ± 31 msec vs. 1123.6 ± 8 msec, P = 0.9947). Mean and standard deviation of the myocardial T1 values in healthy subjects measured with 2D MOLLI, 2D SASHA, and 3D SASHA sequences were 881 ± 40 msec, 1181.3 ± 32 msec, and 1153.6 ± 28 msec respectively. The proposed 3D SASHA sequence allows for high-resolution free-breathing whole-heart T1 -mapping with T1 values in good agreement with the 2D SASHA and improved precision. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:218-227. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. BLIPPED (BLIpped Pure Phase EncoDing) high resolution MRI with low amplitude gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2017-12-01

    MRI image resolution is proportional to the maximum k-space value, i.e. the temporal integral of the magnetic field gradient. High resolution imaging usually requires high gradient amplitudes and/or long spatial encoding times. Special gradient hardware is often required for high amplitudes and fast switching. We propose a high resolution imaging sequence that employs low amplitude gradients. This method was inspired by the previously proposed PEPI (π Echo Planar Imaging) sequence, which replaced EPI gradient reversals with multiple RF refocusing pulses. It has been shown that when the refocusing RF pulse is of high quality, i.e. sufficiently close to 180°, the magnetization phase introduced by the spatial encoding magnetic field gradient can be preserved and transferred to the following echo signal without phase rewinding. This phase encoding scheme requires blipped gradients that are identical for each echo, with low and constant amplitude, providing opportunities for high resolution imaging. We now extend the sequence to 3D pure phase encoding with low amplitude gradients. The method is compared with the Hybrid-SESPI (Spin Echo Single Point Imaging) technique to demonstrate the advantages in terms of low gradient duty cycle, compensation of concomitant magnetic field effects and minimal echo spacing, which lead to superior image quality and high resolution. The 3D imaging method was then applied with a parallel plate resonator RF probe, achieving a nominal spatial resolution of 17 μm in one dimension in the 3D image, requiring a maximum gradient amplitude of only 5.8 Gauss/cm.

  15. High-resolution CT with histopathological correlates of the classic metaphyseal lesion of infant abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Andy; Kleinman, Paul K. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); McDonald, Anna G. [Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Boston, MA (United States); Rosenberg, Andrew E. [University of Miami Hospital, Department of Pathology, Miami, FL (United States); Gupta, Rajiv [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The classic metaphyseal lesion (CML) is a common high specificity indicator of infant abuse and its imaging features have been correlated histopathologically in infant fatalities. High-resolution CT imaging and histologic correlates were employed to (1) characterize the normal infant anatomy surrounding the chondro-osseous junction, and (2) confirm the 3-D model of the CML previously inferred from planar radiography and histopathology. Long bone specimens from 5 fatally abused infants, whose skeletal survey showed definite or suspected CMLs, were studied postmortem. After skeletal survey, selected specimens were resected and imaged with high-resolution digital radiography. They were then scanned with micro-CT (isotropic resolution of 45 μm{sup 3}) or with high-resolution flat-panel CT (isotropic resolutions of 200 μm{sup 3}). Visualization of the bony structures was carried out using image enhancement, segmentation and isosurface extraction, together with volume rendering and multiplanar reformatting. These findings were then correlated with histopathology. Study of normal infant bone clarifies the 3-D morphology of the subperiosteal bone collar (SPBC) and the radiographic zone of provisional calcification (ZPC). Studies on specimens with CML confirm that this lesion is a fracture extending in a planar fashion through the metaphysis, separating a mineralized fragment. This disk-like mineralized fragment has two components: (1) a thick peripheral component encompassing the SPBC; and (2) a thin central component comprised predominantly of the radiologic ZPC. By manipulating the 3-D model, the varying appearances of the CML are displayed. High-resolution CT coupled with histopathology provides elucidation of the morphology of the CML, a strong indicator of infant abuse. This new information may prove useful in assessing the biomechanical factors that produce this strong indicator of abusive assaults in infants. (orig.)

  16. High-resolution CT with histopathological correlates of the classic metaphyseal lesion of infant abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Andy; McDonald, Anna G; Rosenberg, Andrew E; Gupta, Rajiv; Kleinman, Paul K

    2014-02-01

    The classic metaphyseal lesion (CML) is a common high specificity indicator of infant abuse and its imaging features have been correlated histopathologically in infant fatalities. High-resolution CT imaging and histologic correlates were employed to (1) characterize the normal infant anatomy surrounding the chondro-osseous junction, and (2) confirm the 3-D model of the CML previously inferred from planar radiography and histopathology. Long bone specimens from 5 fatally abused infants, whose skeletal survey showed definite or suspected CMLs, were studied postmortem. After skeletal survey, selected specimens were resected and imaged with high-resolution digital radiography. They were then scanned with micro-CT (isotropic resolution of 45 μm(3)) or with high-resolution flat-panel CT (isotropic resolutions of 200 μm(3)). Visualization of the bony structures was carried out using image enhancement, segmentation and isosurface extraction, together with volume rendering and multiplanar reformatting. These findings were then correlated with histopathology. Study of normal infant bone clarifies the 3-D morphology of the subperiosteal bone collar (SPBC) and the radiographic zone of provisional calcification (ZPC). Studies on specimens with CML confirm that this lesion is a fracture extending in a planar fashion through the metaphysis, separating a mineralized fragment. This disk-like mineralized fragment has two components: (1) a thick peripheral component encompassing the SPBC; and (2) a thin central component comprised predominantly of the radiologic ZPC. By manipulating the 3-D model, the varying appearances of the CML are displayed. High-resolution CT coupled with histopathology provides elucidation of the morphology of the CML, a strong indicator of infant abuse. This new information may prove useful in assessing the biomechanical factors that produce this strong indicator of abusive assaults in infants.

  17. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  18. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  19. Fat suppression techniques for obtaining high resolution dynamic contrast enhanced bilateral breast MR images at 7T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, Tijl A; Schmitz, Alexander M Th; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G A; Veldhuis, Wouter B; Luijten, Peter R; Boer, Vincent O; Klomp, DWJ

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare water selective excitation (WSE) and Dixon fat suppression in the context of high-resolution dynamic contrast enhanced MRI of the breast at 7T. METHODS: Ten healthy volunteers and one patient with a malignant breast lesion were scanned at 7T. The MRI protocol contained 3D

  20. ADT-3D Tumor Detection Assistant in 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Lazcano Bello

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The present document describes ADT-3D (Three-Dimensional Tumor Detector Assistant, a prototype application developed to assist doctors diagnose, detect and locate tumors in the brain by using CT scan. The reader may find on this document an introduction to tumor detection; ADT-3D main goals; development details; description of the product; motivation for its development; result’s study; and areas of applicability.

  1. Managing the explosion of high resolution topography in the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Christopher; Nandigam, Viswanath; Arrowsmith, Ramon; Phan, Minh; Gross, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Centimeter to decimeter-scale 2.5 to 3D sampling of the Earth surface topography coupled with the potential for photorealistic coloring of point clouds and texture mapping of meshes enables a wide range of science applications. Not only is the configuration and state of the surface as imaged valuable, but repeat surveys enable quantification of topographic change (erosion, deposition, and displacement) caused by various geologic processes. We are in an era of ubiquitous point clouds that come from both active sources such as laser scanners and radar as well as passive scene reconstruction via structure from motion (SfM) photogrammetry. With the decreasing costs of high-resolution topography (HRT) data collection, via methods such as SfM and UAS-based laser scanning, the number of researchers collecting these data is increasing. These "long-tail" topographic data are of modest size but great value, and challenges exist to making them widely discoverable, shared, annotated, cited, managed and archived. Presently, there are no central repositories or services to support storage and curation of these datasets. The U.S. National Science Foundation funded OpenTopography (OT) Facility employs cyberinfrastructure including large-scale data management, high-performance computing, and service-oriented architectures, to provide efficient online access to large HRT (mostly lidar) datasets, metadata, and processing tools. With over 225 datasets and 15,000 registered users, OT is well positioned to provide curation for community collected high-resolution topographic data. OT has developed a "Community DataSpace", a service built on a low cost storage cloud (e.g. AWS S3) to make it easy for researchers to upload, curate, annotate and distribute their datasets. The system's ingestion workflow will extract metadata from data uploaded; validate it; assign a digital object identifier (DOI); and create a searchable catalog entry, before publishing via the OT portal. The OT Community

  2. Handbook of 3D integration

    CERN Document Server

    Garrou , Philip; Ramm , Peter

    2014-01-01

    Edited by key figures in 3D integration and written by top authors from high-tech companies and renowned research institutions, this book covers the intricate details of 3D process technology.As such, the main focus is on silicon via formation, bonding and debonding, thinning, via reveal and backside processing, both from a technological and a materials science perspective. The last part of the book is concerned with assessing and enhancing the reliability of the 3D integrated devices, which is a prerequisite for the large-scale implementation of this emerging technology. Invaluable reading fo

  3. Tuotekehitysprojekti: 3D-tulostin

    OpenAIRE

    Pihlajamäki, Janne

    2011-01-01

    Opinnäytetyössä tutustuttiin 3D-tulostamisen teknologiaan. Työssä käytiin läpi 3D-tulostimesta tehty tuotekehitysprojekti. Sen lisäksi esiteltiin yleisellä tasolla tuotekehitysprosessi ja syntyneiden tulosten mahdollisia suojausmenetelmiä. Tavoitteena tässä työssä oli kehittää markkinoilta jo löytyvää kotitulostin-tasoista 3D-laiteteknologiaa lähemmäksi ammattilaistason ratkaisua. Tavoitteeseen pyrittiin keskittymällä parantamaan laitteella saavutettavaa tulostustarkkuutta ja -nopeutt...

  4. HIGH RESOLUTION AIRBORNE SHALLOW WATER MAPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Steinbacher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD, authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperation with the Bavarian Water Authority (WWA Weilheim a pilot project was initiated by the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck and RIEGL Laser Measurement Systems exploiting the possibilities of a new LIDAR measurement system with high spatial resolution and high measurement rate to capture about 70 km of riverbed and foreland for the river Loisach in Bavaria/Germany and the estuary and parts of the shoreline (about 40km in length of lake Ammersee. The entire area surveyed was referenced to classic terrestrial cross-section surveys with the aim to derive products for the monitoring and managing needs of the inland water bodies forced by the EU-WFD. The survey was performed in July 2011 by helicopter and airplane and took 3 days in total. In addition, high resolution areal images were taken to provide an optical reference, offering a wide range of possibilities on further research, monitoring, and managing responsibilities. The operating altitude was about 500 m to maintain eye-safety, even for the aided eye, the airspeed was about 55 kts for the helicopter and 75 kts for the aircraft. The helicopter was used in the alpine regions while the fixed wing aircraft was used in the plains and the urban area, using appropriate scan rates to receive evenly distributed point clouds. The resulting point density ranged from 10 to 25 points per square meter. By carefully selecting days with optimum water quality, satisfactory penetration down to the river

  5. High Resolution Airborne Shallow Water Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbacher, F.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Aufleger, M.; Ullrich, A.

    2012-07-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperation with the Bavarian Water Authority (WWA Weilheim) a pilot project was initiated by the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck and RIEGL Laser Measurement Systems exploiting the possibilities of a new LIDAR measurement system with high spatial resolution and high measurement rate to capture about 70 km of riverbed and foreland for the river Loisach in Bavaria/Germany and the estuary and parts of the shoreline (about 40km in length) of lake Ammersee. The entire area surveyed was referenced to classic terrestrial cross-section surveys with the aim to derive products for the monitoring and managing needs of the inland water bodies forced by the EU-WFD. The survey was performed in July 2011 by helicopter and airplane and took 3 days in total. In addition, high resolution areal images were taken to provide an optical reference, offering a wide range of possibilities on further research, monitoring, and managing responsibilities. The operating altitude was about 500 m to maintain eye-safety, even for the aided eye, the airspeed was about 55 kts for the helicopter and 75 kts for the aircraft. The helicopter was used in the alpine regions while the fixed wing aircraft was used in the plains and the urban area, using appropriate scan rates to receive evenly distributed point clouds. The resulting point density ranged from 10 to 25 points per square meter. By carefully selecting days with optimum water quality, satisfactory penetration down to the river bed was achieved

  6. Femtosecond photoacoustics: integrated two-photon fluorescence and photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Raaij, Martijn E.; Lee, Mike; Chérin, Emmanuel; Stefanovic, Bojana; Foster, F. Stuart

    2010-02-01

    Conventional photoacoustic imaging systems excite a photoacoustic wave by illuminating an area on the order of square centimeters with millijoule laser pulses. Spatial resolution is then determined by the ultrasound transducer and is typically on the order of 100 μm. We report on a system that focuses femtosecond, nanojoule pulses to a spot with a diameter of ~ 1 μm to perform laser-scanning photoacoustics with micrometer resolution. Near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses with a pulse energy of 2.4 nanojoules excite a train of photoacoustic waves at the repetition rate of the pulsed laser (80 MHz). These photoacoustic waves are detected by an unfocused single-element ultrasound transducer tuned to 80 MHz. A radiofrequency lock-in amplifier recovers the amplitude of the frequency component of the photoacoustic signal at the pulse repetition frequency. This amplitude is an indicator of the absorption coefficient of the sample at the laser focus and at the laser wavelength. Initial experiments using a graphite rod as absorber reproducibly yield signals in the 0.2 - 2 microvolt range with a signal-to-noise ratio of 18 dB, recovered from 10 mV of broadband noise. The photoacoustic imaging system is integrated in a commercial laser-scanning two-photon fluorescence microscope, enabling simultaneous three-dimensional fluorescence- and photoacoustic imaging. One major application will be to image both morphology and oxygen saturation of microvasculature in the cerebral cortex of anesthetized rodents in vivo in the context of tumor angiogenesis. In this paper we describe the physics of femtosecond photoacoustics and demonstrate initial results.

  7. 3D Models of Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This collaborative grant is developing 3D models of both mouse and human biology to investigate aspects of therapeutic vaccination in order to answer key questions relevant to human cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Accepting the T3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  9. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    The main purpose of the PhD project was to develop methods that increase the 3-D ultrasound imaging quality available for the medical personnel in the clinic. Acquiring a 3-D volume gives the medical doctor the freedom to investigate the measured anatomy in any slice desirable after the scan has...... been completed. This allows for precise measurements of organs dimensions and makes the scan more operator independent. Real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging is still not as widespread in use in the clinics as 2-D imaging. A limiting factor has traditionally been the low image quality achievable using...... Field II simulations and measurements with the ultrasound research scanner SARUS and a 3.5MHz 1024 element 2-D transducer array. In all investigations, 3-D synthetic aperture imaging achieved a smaller main-lobe, lower sidelobes, higher contrast, and better signal to noise ratio than parallel...

  10. Combining 3D technologies for cultural heritage interpretation and entertainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Picard, Michel; El-Hakim, Sabry F.; Godin, Guy; Valzano, Virginia; Bandiera, Adriana

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the 3D modeling work that was accomplished in preparing multimedia products for cultural heritage interpretation and entertainment. The three cases presented are the Byzantine Crypt of Santa Cristina, Apulia, temple C of Selinunte, Sicily, and a bronze sculpture from the 6th century BC found in Ugento, Apulia. The core of the approach is based upon high-resolution photo-realistic texture mapping onto 3D models generated from range images. It is shown that three-dimensional modeling from range imaging is an effective way to present the spatial information for environments and artifacts. Spatial sampling and range measurement uncertainty considerations are addressed by giving the results of a number of tests on different range cameras. The integration of both photogrammetric and CAD modeling complements this approach. Results on a CDROM, a DVD, virtual 3D theatre, holograms, video animations and web pages have been prepared for these projects.

  11. Fabrication of fillable microparticles and other complex 3D microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Kevin J.; Nguyen, Thanh D.; Linehan, Allison R.; Yang, David; Behrens, Adam M.; Rose, Sviatlana; Tochka, Zachary L.; Tzeng, Stephany Y.; Norman, James J.; Anselmo, Aaron C.; Xu, Xian; Tomasic, Stephanie; Taylor, Matthew A.; Lu, Jennifer; Guarecuco, Rohiverth; Langer, Robert; Jaklenec, Ana

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) microstructures created by microfabrication and additive manufacturing have demonstrated value across a number of fields, ranging from biomedicine to microelectronics. However, the techniques used to create these devices each have their own characteristic set of advantages and limitations with regards to resolution, material compatibility, and geometrical constraints that determine the types of microstructures that can be formed. We describe a microfabrication method, termed StampEd Assembly of polymer Layers (SEAL), and create injectable pulsatile drug-delivery microparticles, pH sensors, and 3D microfluidic devices that we could not produce using traditional 3D printing. SEAL allows us to generate microstructures with complex geometry at high resolution, produce fully enclosed internal cavities containing a solid or liquid, and use potentially any thermoplastic material without processing additives.

  12. 3D Face Apperance Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Astrom, K

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations......We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations...

  13. 3D Face Appearance Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Åström, Kalle

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3d face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical jacobian of its resulting 2d rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations.}......We build a 3d face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical jacobian of its resulting 2d rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations.}...

  14. Plant tissues in 3D via X-ray tomography: simple contrasting methods allow high resolution imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Staedler, Yannick M; Masson, David; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    .... More efficient protocols to study plant material are therefore needed. Flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana and Marcgravia caudata were immersed in a selection of contrasting agents used to treat samples for transmission electron microscopy...

  15. Towards non-invasive high-resolution 3D nano-tomography by ultrasonic scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharahi, Hossein J.; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak; Egberts, Philip; Kim, Seonghwan

    2017-07-01

    Nanoscale imaging techniques that can be used to visualize and characterize local aggregations of the embedded nanoparticulates with sufficient resolution have attracted a great deal of interest. Ultrasonic scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and its derivatives are nondestructive techniques that can be used to elucidate subsurface nanoscale features and mechanical properties. Although many different ultrasonic methods have been used for subsurface imaging, the mechanisms and crucial parameters associated with the contrast formation in subsurface imaging are still unclear. Here, the impact of mechanical properties of the nanoparticulates/matrix, size of the nanoparticulates, buried depth of the nanoparticulates, and the ultrasonic excitation frequency on the developed ultrasonic SPM images have been investigated. To verify our theoretical model, experimental measurements of scanning near-field ultrasound holography (SNFUH) have been recreated in our theoretical analysis to reveal comparable variations in phase contrast measured in SNFUH while scanning over the nanoparticulates embedded in bacteria.

  16. A high resolution 3D velocity model beneath the Tokyo Metropolitan area by MeSO-net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, S.; Sakai, S.; Honda, R.; Kimura, H.; Hirata, N.

    2015-12-01

    Beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area, the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) subducts and causes devastating mega-thrust earthquakes, such as the 1703 Genroku earthquake (M8.0) and the 1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9). An M7 or greater (M7+) earthquake in this area at present has high potential to produce devastating serious loss of life and property with even greater global economic repercussions. The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates that an M7+ earthquake will cause 23,000 fatalities and 95 trillion yen (about 1 trillion US$) economic loss. We have launched the Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters in collaboration with scientists, engineers, and social-scientists in nationwide institutions since 2012. We analyze data from the dense seismic array called Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net), which has 296 seismic stations with spacing of 5 km (Sakai and Hirata, 2009; Kasahara et al., 2009). We applied the double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber, 2003) and estimated the velocity structure and the upper boundary of PSP (Nakagawa et al., 2010). The 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (M9.0) has activated seismicity also in Kanto region, providing better coverage of ray paths for tomographic analysis. We obtain much higher resolution velocity models from whole dataset observed by MeSO-net between 2008 and 2015. A detailed image of tomograms shows that PSP contacts Pacific plate at a depth of 50 km beneath northern Tokyo bay. A variation of velocity along the oceanic crust suggests dehydration reaction to produce seismicity in a slab, which may related to the M7+ earthquake. Acknowledgement: This study was supported by the Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters of MEXT, Japan and the Earthquake Research Institute cooperative research program.

  17. Historical soil erosion rates in rangelands of SW Spain determined using botanical evidences and high resolution 3D data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Susanne; Rubio-Delgado, Judit; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Álvaro

    2014-05-01

    The estimation of medium-term sheet erosion rates represents still a challenge in areas with long land use history. In the present paper, a new methodology for estimating medium-term sheet erosion rates is presented and applied in a wooded rangeland (dehesa). This human-induced semi-natural ecosystem is widespread in SW Iberian Peninsula and is characterized by centuries of agrosilvopastoral land use, being livestock breeding the most important economic activity at present. Vast areas are covered by shallow and poor soils, pointing to a long history of soil erosion. Research carried out in a representative area with open plots revealed low soil loss rates and degradation studies showed high spatial variation related with land use intensity. Knowledge on past soil erosion rates and its relation with land use is necessary in order to understand present soil properties and also for giving adequate advice on land management. The present paper presents results of a pilot study on historical soil erosion in Mediterranean wooded rangelands. The methodology is based on the analysis of the morphology of tree stems, exposed roots and surface micro-topography using data obtained with a Terrestrial Laser Scanner. Specifically, botanical evidences were used to estimate the antecedent level of the soil surface. Afterwards, previous and current surfaces were confronted in order to obtain a volume of soil loss in the area influenced by the tree canopy, as well as for the open spaces. On the other hand, the age of the trees in the study area was estimated by means of an existing tree growth model. Finally, soil erosion rates were calculated using the volume of soil loss and the estimated age of every tree. The sampling was carried out in a farm in the Spanish province of Cáceres, with a two-layered vegetation, of grasses and scattered trees (Quercus ilex). Climate is Mediterranean with mean annual temperature of 160C and an annual rainfall of 620 mm. Soils are very shallow, developed on schist, with low amounts of organic matter and classified as distric Leptosols. A representative hillslope was selected for the sampling, obtaining a point cloud of approximately 90 million points in an area of 44179 m2 and a mean slope of 10%. A total of 133 trees were processed, with ages ranging from 49 to 336 years. Mean soil loss rates below tree canopies and in the open spaces were 1.47 mm y-1 and 1.67 mm y-1, respectively. High soil erosion rates were estimated for young trees while lower rates resulted for the older ones. A negative relationship was obtained for soil erosion rates and tree ages, pointing out to land-use intensification during the past. The data reveals three different periods with distinct erosion rates, the first spanning from approximately 1660 to 1840 with very low values similar to natural rates, a second period until the beginning of the 20th century with 0.25 mm y-1 and the third one including approximately the last 100 years with 2.11 mm y-1. These results agree with historical information on deforestation and cultivation in the area. Research is being intensified in other study areas in order to prove these preliminary results and to improve the methodology.

  18. Utilization of high resolution satellite gravity over the Carlsberg Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Bhattacharyya, R.; Majumdar, T. J.

    2007-12-01

    The Carlsberg Ridge lies between the equator and the Owen fracture zone. It is the most prominent mid-ocean ridge segment of the western Indian Ocean, which contains a number of earthquake epicenters. Satellite altimetry can be used to infer subsurface geological structures analogous to gravity anomaly maps generated through ship-borne survey. In this study, free-air gravity and its 3D image have been generated over the Carlsberg Ridge using a very high resolution data base, as obtained from Geosat GM, ERS-1, Seasat and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data. As observed in this study, the Carlsberg Ridge shows a slow spreading characteristic with a deep and wide graben (average width ˜15 km). The transform fault spacing confirms variable slow to intermediate characteristics with first and second order discontinuities. The isostatically compensated region of the Carlsberg Ridge could be demarcated with near zero contour values in the free-air gravity anomaly images over and along the Carlsberg Ridge axes and over most of the fracture zone patterns. Few profiles have been generated across the Carlsberg Ridge and the characteristics of slow/intermediate spreading ridge of various orders of discontinuity could be identified. It has also been observed in zero contour image as well as in the characteristics of valley patterns along the ridge from NW to SE that different spreading rates, from slow to intermediate, are occurring in different parts of the Carlsberg ridge. It maintains the morphology of a slow spreading ridge in the NW, where the wide and deep axial valley (˜1.5 3 km) also implies the pattern of a slow spreading ridge. However, a change in the morphology/depth of the axial valley from NW to SE indicates the nature of the Carlsberg Ridge as a slow to intermediate spreading ridge.

  19. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machek, Pavel; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brüggmann, Ulf; Dräger, Günter; Fröba, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 μm thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5×1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  20. Optofluidic fabrication for 3D-shaped particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Kevin S.; di Carlo, Dino; Chung, Aram J.

    2015-04-01

    Complex three-dimensional (3D)-shaped particles could play unique roles in biotechnology, structural mechanics and self-assembly. Current methods of fabricating 3D-shaped particles such as 3D printing, injection moulding or photolithography are limited because of low-resolution, low-throughput or complicated/expensive procedures. Here, we present a novel method called optofluidic fabrication for the generation of complex 3D-shaped polymer particles based on two coupled processes: inertial flow shaping and ultraviolet (UV) light polymerization. Pillars within fluidic platforms are used to deterministically deform photosensitive precursor fluid streams. The channels are then illuminated with patterned UV light to polymerize the photosensitive fluid, creating particles with multi-scale 3D geometries. The fundamental advantages of optofluidic fabrication include high-resolution, multi-scalability, dynamic tunability, simple operation and great potential for bulk fabrication with full automation. Through different combinations of pillar configurations, flow rates and UV light patterns, an infinite set of 3D-shaped particles is available, and a variety are demonstrated.

  1. METRIC EVALUATION PIPELINE FOR 3D MODELING OF URBAN SCENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bosch

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Publicly available benchmark data and metric evaluation approaches have been instrumental in enabling research to advance state of the art methods for remote sensing applications in urban 3D modeling. Most publicly available benchmark datasets have consisted of high resolution airborne imagery and lidar suitable for 3D modeling on a relatively modest scale. To enable research in larger scale 3D mapping, we have recently released a public benchmark dataset with multi-view commercial satellite imagery and metrics to compare 3D point clouds with lidar ground truth. We now define a more complete metric evaluation pipeline developed as publicly available open source software to assess semantically labeled 3D models of complex urban scenes derived from multi-view commercial satellite imagery. Evaluation metrics in our pipeline include horizontal and vertical accuracy and completeness, volumetric completeness and correctness, perceptual quality, and model simplicity. Sources of ground truth include airborne lidar and overhead imagery, and we demonstrate a semi-automated process for producing accurate ground truth shape files to characterize building footprints. We validate our current metric evaluation pipeline using 3D models produced using open source multi-view stereo methods. Data and software is made publicly available to enable further research and planned benchmarking activities.

  2. Metric Evaluation Pipeline for 3d Modeling of Urban Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, M.; Leichtman, A.; Chilcott, D.; Goldberg, H.; Brown, M.

    2017-05-01

    Publicly available benchmark data and metric evaluation approaches have been instrumental in enabling research to advance state of the art methods for remote sensing applications in urban 3D modeling. Most publicly available benchmark datasets have consisted of high resolution airborne imagery and lidar suitable for 3D modeling on a relatively modest scale. To enable research in larger scale 3D mapping, we have recently released a public benchmark dataset with multi-view commercial satellite imagery and metrics to compare 3D point clouds with lidar ground truth. We now define a more complete metric evaluation pipeline developed as publicly available open source software to assess semantically labeled 3D models of complex urban scenes derived from multi-view commercial satellite imagery. Evaluation metrics in our pipeline include horizontal and vertical accuracy and completeness, volumetric completeness and correctness, perceptual quality, and model simplicity. Sources of ground truth include airborne lidar and overhead imagery, and we demonstrate a semi-automated process for producing accurate ground truth shape files to characterize building footprints. We validate our current metric evaluation pipeline using 3D models produced using open source multi-view stereo methods. Data and software is made publicly available to enable further research and planned benchmarking activities.

  3. Volumetric 3D Display System with Static Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current display technology has relied on flat, 2D screens that cannot truly convey the third dimension of visual information: depth. In contrast to conventional visualization that is primarily based on 2D flat screens, the volumetric 3D display possesses a true 3D display volume, and places physically each 3D voxel in displayed 3D images at the true 3D (x,y,z) spatial position. Each voxel, analogous to a pixel in a 2D image, emits light from that position to form a real 3D image in the eyes of the viewers. Such true volumetric 3D display technology provides both physiological (accommodation, convergence, binocular disparity, and motion parallax) and psychological (image size, linear perspective, shading, brightness, etc.) depth cues to human visual systems to help in the perception of 3D objects. In a volumetric 3D display, viewers can watch the displayed 3D images from a completely 360 view without using any special eyewear. The volumetric 3D display techniques may lead to a quantum leap in information display technology and can dramatically change the ways humans interact with computers, which can lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of learning and knowledge management processes. Within a block of glass, a large amount of tiny dots of voxels are created by using a recently available machining technique called laser subsurface engraving (LSE). The LSE is able to produce tiny physical crack points (as small as 0.05 mm in diameter) at any (x,y,z) location within the cube of transparent material. The crack dots, when illuminated by a light source, scatter the light around and form visible voxels within the 3D volume. The locations of these tiny voxels are strategically determined such that each can be illuminated by a light ray from a high-resolution digital mirror device (DMD) light engine. The distribution of these voxels occupies the full display volume within the static 3D glass screen. This design eliminates any moving screen seen in previous

  4. Clinical photoacoustic imaging of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valluru, Keerthi S.; Willmann, Juergen K. [Dept. of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid technique that shines laser light on tissue and measures optically induced ultrasound signal. There is growing interest in the clinical community over this new technique and its possible clinical applications. One of the most prominent features of photoacoustic imaging is its ability to characterize tissue, leveraging differences in the optical absorption of underlying tissue components such as hemoglobin, lipids, melanin, collagen and water among many others. In this review, the state-of-the-art photoacoustic imaging techniques and some of the key outcomes pertaining to different cancer applications in the clinic are presented.

  5. Deep in vivo photoacoustic imaging of mammalian tissues using a tyrosinase-based genetic reporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jathoul, Amit P.; Laufer, Jan; Ogunlade, Olumide; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Zhang, Edward; Johnson, Peter; Pizzey, Arnold R.; Philip, Brian; Marafioti, Teresa; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Pedley, R. Barbara; Pule, Martin A.; Beard, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging allows absorption-based high-resolution spectroscopic in vivo imaging at a depth beyond that of optical microscopy. Until recently, photoacoustic imaging has largely been restricted to visualizing the vasculature through endogenous haemoglobin contrast, with most non-vascularized tissues remaining invisible unless exogenous contrast agents are administered. Genetically encodable photoacoustic contrast is attractive as it allows selective labelling of cells, permitting studies of, for example, specific genetic expression, cell growth or more complex biological behaviours in vivo. In this study we report a novel photoacoustic imaging scanner and a tyrosinase-based reporter system that causes human cell lines to synthesize the absorbing pigment eumelanin, thus providing strong photoacoustic contrast. Detailed three-dimensional images of xenografts formed of tyrosinase-expressing cells implanted in mice are obtained in vivo to depths approaching 10 mm with a spatial resolution below 100 μm. This scheme is a powerful tool for studying cellular and genetic processes in deep mammalian tissues.

  6. 3D-mallinnus ja 3D-animaatiot biovoimalaitoksesta

    OpenAIRE

    Hiltula, Tytti

    2014-01-01

    Opinnäytetyössä tehtiin biovoimalaitoksen piirustuksista 3D-mallinnus ja animaatiot. Työn tarkoituksena oli saada valmiiksi Recwell Oy:lle markkinointiin tarkoitetut kuva- ja videomateriaalit. Työssä perehdyttiin 3D-mallintamisen perustietoihin ja lähtökohtiin sekä animaation laatimiseen. Työ laadittiin kokonaisuudessaan AutoCAD-ohjelmalla, ja työn aikana tutustuttiin huolellisesti myös ohjelman käyttöohjeisiin. Piirustusten mitoituksessa huomattiin jo alkuvaiheessa suuria puutteita, ...

  7. From 3D view to 3D print

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  8. Photoacoustic imaging in both soft and hard biological tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, T; Dewhurst, R J, E-mail: richard.dewhurst@manchester.ac.u [Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-01

    To date, most Photoacoustic (PA) imaging results have been from soft biotissues. In this study, a PA imaging system with a near-infrared pulsed laser source has been applied to obtain 2-D and 3-D images from both soft tissue and post-mortem dental samples. Imaging results showed that the PA technique has the potential to image human oral disease, such as early-stage teeth decay. For non-invasive photoacoustic imaging, the induced temperature and pressure rises within biotissues should not cause physical damage to the tissue. Several simulations based on the thermoelastic effect have been applied to predict initial temperature and pressure fields within a tooth sample. Predicted initial temperature and pressure rises are below corresponding safety limits.

  9. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  10. High Resolution Three-Dimensional MR Imaging of the Skull Base: Compartments, Boundaries, and Critical Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Ari Meir; Aygun, Nafi; Herzka, Daniel A; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution 3D MRI of the skull base allows for a more detailed and accurate assessment of normal anatomic structures as well as the location and extent of skull base pathologies than has previously been possible. This article describes the techniques employed for high-resolution skull base MRI including pre- and post-contrast constructive interference in the steady state (CISS) imaging and their utility for evaluation of the many small structures of the skull base, focusing on those regions and concepts most pertinent to localization of cranial nerve palsies and in providing pre-operative guidance and post-operative assessment. The concept of skull base compartments as a means of conceptualizing the various layers of the skull base and their importance in assessment of masses of the skull base is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gas scintillation glass GEM detector for high-resolution X-ray imaging and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, T., E-mail: fujiwara-t@aist.go.jp [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Mitsuya, Y. [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Fushie, T. [Radiment Lab. Inc., Setagaya, Tokyo 156-0044 (Japan); Murata, K.; Kawamura, A.; Koishikawa, A. [XIT Co., Naruse, Machida, Tokyo 194-0045 (Japan); Toyokawa, H. [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    A high-spatial-resolution X-ray-imaging gaseous detector has been developed with a single high-gas-gain glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), scintillation gas, and optical camera. High-resolution X-ray imaging of soft elements is performed with a spatial resolution of 281 µm rms and an effective area of 100×100 mm. In addition, high-resolution X-ray 3D computed tomography (CT) is successfully demonstrated with the gaseous detector. It shows high sensitivity to low-energy X-rays, which results in high-contrast radiographs of objects containing elements with low atomic numbers. In addition, the high yield of scintillation light enables fast X-ray imaging, which is an advantage for constructing CT images with low-energy X-rays.

  12. 3D future internet media

    CERN Document Server

    Dagiuklas, Tasos

    2014-01-01

    This book describes recent innovations in 3D media and technologies, with coverage of 3D media capturing, processing, encoding, and adaptation, networking aspects for 3D Media, and quality of user experience (QoE). The main contributions are based on the results of the FP7 European Projects ROMEO, which focus on new methods for the compression and delivery of 3D multi-view video and spatial audio, as well as the optimization of networking and compression jointly across the Future Internet (www.ict-romeo.eu). The delivery of 3D media to individual users remains a highly challenging problem due to the large amount of data involved, diverse network characteristics and user terminal requirements, as well as the user’s context such as their preferences and location. As the number of visual views increases, current systems will struggle to meet the demanding requirements in terms of delivery of constant video quality to both fixed and mobile users. ROMEO will design and develop hybrid-networking solutions that co...

  13. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  14. Materialedreven 3d digital formgivning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med forskningsprojektet er for det første at understøtte keramikeren i at arbejde eksperimenterende med digital formgivning, og for det andet at bidrage til en tværfaglig diskurs om brugen af digital formgivning. Forskningsprojektet fokuserer på 3d formgivning og derved på 3d digital...... formgivning og Rapid Prototyping (RP). RP er en fællesbetegnelse for en række af de teknikker, der muliggør at overføre den digitale form til 3d fysisk form. Forskningsprojektet koncentrerer sig om to overordnede forskningsspørgsmål. Det første handler om, hvordan viden og erfaring indenfor det keramiske...... fagområde kan blive udnyttet i forhold til 3d digital formgivning. Det andet handler om, hvad en sådan tilgang kan bidrage med, og hvordan den kan blive udnyttet i et dynamisk samspil med det keramiske materiale i formgivningen af 3d keramiske artefakter. Materialedreven formgivning er karakteriseret af en...

  15. Novel 3D media technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Dagiuklas, Tasos

    2015-01-01

    This book describes recent innovations in 3D media and technologies, with coverage of 3D media capturing, processing, encoding, and adaptation, networking aspects for 3D Media, and quality of user experience (QoE). The contributions are based on the results of the FP7 European Project ROMEO, which focuses on new methods for the compression and delivery of 3D multi-view video and spatial audio, as well as the optimization of networking and compression jointly across the future Internet. The delivery of 3D media to individual users remains a highly challenging problem due to the large amount of data involved, diverse network characteristics and user terminal requirements, as well as the user’s context such as their preferences and location. As the number of visual views increases, current systems will struggle to meet the demanding requirements in terms of delivery of consistent video quality to fixed and mobile users. ROMEO will present hybrid networking solutions that combine the DVB-T2 and DVB-NGH broadcas...

  16. Design and fabrication of a passive droplet dispenser for portable high resolution imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Tahseen; Watkins, Rachel; Cen, Zijian; Rubinstein, Jaden; Kong, Gary; Lee, Woei Ming

    2017-01-01

    Moldless lens manufacturing techniques using standard droplet dispensing technology often require precise control over pressure to initiate fluid flow and control droplet formation. We have determined a series of interfacial fluid parameters optimised using standard 3D printed tools to extract, dispense and capture a single silicone droplet that is then cured to obtain high quality lenses. The dispensing process relies on the recapitulation of liquid dripping action (Rayleigh-Plateau instability) and the capturing method uses the interplay of gravitational force, capillary forces and liquid pinning to control the droplet shape. The key advantage of the passive lens fabrication approach is rapid scale-up using 3D printing by avoiding complex dispensing tools. We characterise the quality of the lenses fabricated using the passive approach by measuring wavefront aberration and high resolution imaging. The fabricated lenses are then integrated into a portable imaging system; a wearable thimble imaging device with a detachable camera housing, that is constructed for field imaging. This paper provides the full exposition of steps, from lens fabrication to imaging platform, necessary to construct a standalone high resolution imaging system. The simplicity of our methodology can be implemented using a regular desktop 3D printer and commercially available digital imaging systems.

  17. Modification of 3D milling machine to 3D printer

    OpenAIRE

    Halamíček, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    Tato práce se zabývá přestavbou gravírovací frézky na 3D tiskárnu. V první části se práce zabývá možnými technologiemi 3D tisku a možností jejich využití u přestavby. Dále jsou popsány a vybrány vhodné součásti pro přestavbu. V další části je realizováno řízení ohřevu podložky, trysky a řízení posuvu drátu pomocí softwaru TwinCat od společnosti Beckhoff na průmyslovém počítači. Výsledkem práce by měla být oživená 3D tiskárna. This thesis deals with rebuilding of engraving machine to 3D pri...

  18. Aspects of defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, Dongmin [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo,Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Kim, Nakwoo [Department of Physics and Research Institute of Basic Science, Kyung Hee University,Seoul 02447 (Korea, Republic of); School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study,Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of); Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo,Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2016-10-12

    In this paper we study supersymmetric co-dimension 2 and 4 defects in the compactification of the 6d (2,0) theory of type A{sub N−1} on a 3-manifold M. The so-called 3d-3d correspondence is a relation between complexified Chern-Simons theory (with gauge group SL(N,ℂ)) on M and a 3d N=2 theory T{sub N}[M]. We study this correspondence in the presence of supersymmetric defects, which are knots/links inside the 3-manifold. Our study employs a number of different methods: state-integral models for complex Chern-Simons theory, cluster algebra techniques, domain wall theory T[SU(N)], 5d N=2 SYM, and also supergravity analysis through holography. These methods are complementary and we find agreement between them. In some cases the results lead to highly non-trivial predictions on the partition function. Our discussion includes a general expression for the cluster partition function, which can be used to compute in the presence of maximal and certain class of non-maximal punctures when N>2. We also highlight the non-Abelian description of the 3d N=2T{sub N}[M] theory with defect included, when such a description is available. This paper is a companion to our shorter paper http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1751-8113/49/30/30LT02, which summarizes our main results.

  19. High resolution X-ray diffraction studies on unirradiated and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction technique, employing a three-crystal monochromator–collimator ... observed by high-resolution electron microscopy in both ..... 1988 Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B34 228. Kato N 1992 J. Acta Crystallogr. A48 834. Kaur B, Bhat M, Licci F, Kumar R, Kotru P N and Bamzai K K. 2004 Nucl. Instrum. Meth ...

  20. Scalable Algorithms for Large High-Resolution Terrain Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Thomas; Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Arge, Lars Allan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that the technology required to perform typical GIS computations on very large high-resolution terrain models has matured enough to be ready for use by practitioners. We also demonstrate the impact that high-resolution data has on common problems. To our knowledge, so...

  1. Achieving sensitive, high-resolution laser spectroscopy at CRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groote, R. P. de [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Lynch, K. M., E-mail: kara.marie.lynch@cern.ch [EP Department, CERN, ISOLDE (Switzerland); Wilkins, S. G. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Collaboration: the CRIS collaboration

    2017-11-15

    The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment, located at the ISOLDE facility, has recently performed high-resolution laser spectroscopy, with linewidths down to 20 MHz. In this article, we present the modifications to the beam line and the newly-installed laser systems that have made sensitive, high-resolution measurements possible. Highlights of recent experimental campaigns are presented.

  2. High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Hornstrup, Allan; Schnopper, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the perfection of state-of-the-art multilayers are presented. Data were obtained using a triple-axis perfect-crystal X-ray diffractometer. Measurements reveal large-scale figure errors in the substrate. A high-resolution triple-axis set up is required...

  3. High resolution UV spectroscopy and laser-focused nanofabrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myszkiewicz, G.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis combines two at first glance different techniques: High Resolution Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) of small aromatic molecules and Laser Focusing of atoms for Nanofabrication. The thesis starts with the introduction to the high resolution LIF technique of small aromatic

  4. Achieving sensitive, high-resolution laser spectroscopy at CRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groote, R. P.; Lynch, K. M.; Wilkins, S. G.

    2017-11-01

    The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment, located at the ISOLDE facility, has recently performed high-resolution laser spectroscopy, with linewidths down to 20 MHz. In this article, we present the modifications to the beam line and the newly-installed laser systems that have made sensitive, high-resolution measurements possible. Highlights of recent experimental campaigns are presented.

  5. On the Design of High Resolution Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, A.; Reulke, R.

    2017-05-01

    The design of high-resolution systems is always a consideration of many parameters. Technological parameter of the imaging system, e.g. diameter of the imaging system, mass and power, as well as storage and data transfer, have an direct impact on spacecraft size and design. The paper describes the essential design parameters for the description of high-resolution systems.

  6. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K.; Johnson, Blake N.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and ‘living’ platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with

  7. Markerless 3D Face Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walder, Christian; Breidt, Martin; Bulthoff, Heinrich

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for the markerless tracking of deforming surfaces such as faces. We acquire a sequence of 3D scans along with color images at 40Hz. The data is then represented by implicit surface and color functions, using a novel partition-of-unity type method of efficiently...... the scanned surface, using the variation of both shape and color as features in a dynamic energy minimization problem. Our prototype system yields high-quality animated 3D models in correspondence, at a rate of approximately twenty seconds per timestep. Tracking results for faces and other objects...

  8. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V., E-mail: LHWANG@WUSTL.EDU [Optical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  9. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Liang Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM has gained considerable attention within the biomedical imaging community during the past decade. Detecting laser-induced photoacoustic waves by optical sensing techniques facilitates the idea of all-optical PAM (AOPAM, which is of particular interest as it provides unique advantages for achieving high spatial resolution using miniaturized embodiments of the imaging system. The review presents the technology aspects of optical-sensing techniques for ultrasound detection, such as those based on optical resonators, as well as system developments of all-optical photoacoustic systems including PAM, photoacoustic endoscopy, and multi-modality microscopy. The progress of different AOPAM systems and their representative applications are summarized.

  10. Photoacoustic Sounds from Meteors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; Conley, Benjamin; Hogan, Roy; Boslough, Mark; Gonzales, Gigi; Spurný, Pavel

    2017-02-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with -11 to -13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally. Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that -12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. The photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs.

  11. First results of high-resolution modeling of Cenozoic subduction orogeny in Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Sobolev, S. V.; Babeyko, A. Y.; Krueger, F.; Quinteros, J.; Popov, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Andean Orogeny is the result of the upper-plate crustal shortening during the Cenozoic Nazca plate subduction beneath South America plate. With up to 300 km shortening, the Earth's second highest Altiplano-Puna Plateau was formed with a pronounced N-S oriented deformation diversity. Furthermore, the tectonic shortening in the Southern Andes was much less intensive and started much later. The mechanism of the shortening and the nature of N-S variation of its magnitude remain controversial. The previous studies of the Central Andes suggested that they might be related to the N-S variation in the strength of the lithosphere, friction coupling at slab interface, and are probably influenced by the interaction of the climate and tectonic systems. However, the exact nature of the strength variation was not explored due to the lack of high numerical resolution and 3D numerical models at that time. Here we will employ large-scale subduction models with a high resolution to reveal and quantify the factors controlling the strength of lithospheric structures and their effect on the magnitude of tectonic shortening in the South America plate between 18°-35°S. These high-resolution models are performed by using the highly scalable parallel 3D code LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model). This code is based on finite difference staggered grid approach and employs massive linear and non-linear solvers within the PETSc library to complete high-performance MPI-based parallelization in geodynamic modeling. Currently, in addition to benchmark-models we are developing high-resolution (Paleozoic-Cenozoic sediments above the uppermost crust in the Subandean Ranges. Future work will be focused on the origin of different styles of deformation and topography evolution in Altiplano-Puna Plateau and Central-Southern Andes through 3D modeling of large-scale interaction of subducting and overriding plates.

  12. Tomographic 3D-PIV and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsinga, Gerrit E.; Wieneke, Bernhard; Scarano, Fulvio; Schröder, Andreas

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry is a 3D PIV technique based on the illumination, recording, reconstruction and analysis of tracer-particle motion within a three-dimensional measurement volume. The recently developed technique makes use of several simultaneous views of the illuminated particles, typically 4, and their three-dimensional reconstruction as a light-intensity distribution by means of optical tomography. The reconstruction is performed with the MART algorithm (multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique), yielding a 3D distribution of light intensity discretized over an array of voxels. The reconstructed tomogram pair is then analyzed by means of 3D crosscorrelation with an iterative multigrid volume-deformation technique, returning the three-component velocity vector distribution over the measurement volume. The implementation of the tomographic technique in time-resolved mode by means of high repetition rate PIV hardware has the capability to yield 4D velocity information. The first part of the chapter describes the operation principles and gives a detailed assessment of the tomographic reconstruction algorithm performance based upon a computer-simulated experiment. The second part of the chapter proposes four applications on two flow cases: 1. the transitional wake behind a circular cylinder; 2. the turbulent boundary layer developing over a flat plate. For the first case, experiments in air at ReD = 2700 are described together with the experimental assessment of the tomographic reconstruction accuracy. In this experiment a direct comparison is made between the results obtained by tomographic PIV and stereo-PIV. Experiments conducted in a water facility on the cylinder wake shows the extension of the technique to time-resolved measurements in water at ReD = 540 by means of a low repetition rate PIV system. A high data yield is obtained using high-resolution cameras (2k × 2k pixels) returning 650k vectors per volume. Measurements of the

  13. PHOTOACOUSTIC SPECTROSCOPY USING A SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JACKSON, R.S.; MICHAELIAN, K.H.; HOMES, C.C.

    2001-02-05

    We have investigated the use of a synchrotron as a source for infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. A synchrotron has an intrinsically high radiance, which is beneficial when photoacoustic spectroscopy is applied to small samples, especially at long wavelengths.

  14. Materialedreven 3d digital formgivning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2010-01-01

    formgivning og Rapid Prototyping (RP). RP er en fællesbetegnelse for en række af de teknikker, der muliggør at overføre den digitale form til 3d fysisk form. Forskningsprojektet koncentrerer sig om to overordnede forskningsspørgsmål. Det første handler om, hvordan viden og erfaring indenfor det keramiske...... animationsbaseret software Real Flow. Dynamics er en fællesbetegnelse for en række digitale redskaber i 3d software, der er beregnet til at simulere virkelighedsrelaterede fænomener som væsker, vind, tyngdekraft o. lign. For det første viser disse eksperimenter, at brugen af dynamics kan ses som et generativt og...... traditionel keramisk produktionssammenhæng. Problemstillingen opmuntrede endvidere til i et samarbejde med en programmør at udvikle et 3d digitalt redskab, der er blevet kaldt et digitalt interaktivt formgivningsredskab (DIF). Eksperimentet undersøger interaktive 3d digitale dynamiske systemer, der...

  15. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  16. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  17. 3D Printing of Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential benefits that could be derived if the science and technology of 3D printing were to be established have been the crux behind monumental efforts by governments, in most countries, that invest billions of dollars to develop this manufacturing technology.[...

  18. 3D terahertz beam profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Strikwerda, Andrew; Wang, Tianwu

    2013-01-01

    We present a characterization of THz beams generated in both a two-color air plasma and in a LiNbO3 crystal. Using a commercial THz camera, we record intensity images as a function of distance through the beam waist, from which we extract 2D beam profiles and visualize our measurements into 3D be...

  19. Filling gaps in cultural heritage documentation by 3D photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    This contribution promotes 3D photography as an important tool to obtain objective object information. Keeping mainly in mind World Heritage documentation as well as Heritage protection, it is another intention of this paper, to stimulate the interest in applications of 3D photography for professionals as well as for amateurs. In addition this is also an activity report of the international CIPA task group 3. The main part of this paper starts with "Digging the treasure of existing international 3D photography". This does not only belong to tangible but also to intangible Cultural Heritage. 3D photography clearly supports the recording, the visualization, the preservation and the restoration of architectural and archaeological objects. Therefore the use of 3D photography in C.H. should increase on an international level. The presented samples in 3D represent a voluminous, almost partly "forgotten treasure" of international archives for 3D photography. The next chapter is on "Promoting new 3D photography in Cultural Heritage". Though 3D photographs are a well-established basic photographic and photogrammetric tool, even suited to provide "near real" documentation, they are still a matter of research and improvement. Beside the use of 3D cameras even single lenses cameras are very much suited for photographic 3D documentation purposes in Cultural Heritage. Currently at the Faculty of Civil Engineering of the University of Applied Sciences Magdeburg-Stendal, low altitude aerial photography is exposed from a maximum height of 13m, using a hand hold carbon telescope rod. The use of this "huge selfie stick" is also an (international) recommendation, to expose high resolution 3D photography of monuments under expedition conditions. In addition to the carbon rod recently a captive balloon and a hexacopter UAV- platform is in use, mainly to take better synoptically (extremely low altitude, ground truth) aerial photography. Additional experiments with respect to "easy

  20. Filling gaps in cultural heritage documentation by 3D photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Schuhr

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This contribution promotes 3D photography as an important tool to obtain objective object information. Keeping mainly in mind World Heritage documentation as well as Heritage protection, it is another intention of this paper, to stimulate the interest in applications of 3D photography for professionals as well as for amateurs. In addition this is also an activity report of the international CIPA task group 3. The main part of this paper starts with “Digging the treasure of existing international 3D photography”. This does not only belong to tangible but also to intangible Cultural Heritage. 3D photography clearly supports the recording, the visualization, the preservation and the restoration of architectural and archaeological objects. Therefore the use of 3D photography in C.H. should increase on an international level. The presented samples in 3D represent a voluminous, almost partly “forgotten treasure” of international archives for 3D photography. The next chapter is on “Promoting new 3D photography in Cultural Heritage”. Though 3D photographs are a well-established basic photographic and photogrammetric tool, even suited to provide “near real” documentation, they are still a matter of research and improvement. Beside the use of 3D cameras even single lenses cameras are very much suited for photographic 3D documentation purposes in Cultural Heritage. Currently at the Faculty of Civil Engineering of the University of Applied Sciences Magdeburg-Stendal, low altitude aerial photography is exposed from a maximum height of 13m, using a hand hold carbon telescope rod. The use of this “huge selfie stick” is also an (international recommendation, to expose high resolution 3D photography of monuments under expedition conditions. In addition to the carbon rod recently a captive balloon and a hexacopter UAV- platform is in use, mainly to take better synoptically (extremely low altitude, ground truth aerial photography. Additional

  1. Multicore-based 3D-DWT video encoder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiano, Vicente; López-Granado, Otoniel; Malumbres, Manuel P.; Migallón, Hector

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional wavelet transform (3D-DWT) encoders are good candidates for applications like professional video editing, video surveillance, multi-spectral satellite imaging, etc. where a frame must be reconstructed as quickly as possible. In this paper, we present a new 3D-DWT video encoder based on a fast run-length coding engine. Furthermore, we present several multicore optimizations to speed-up the 3D-DWT computation. An exhaustive evaluation of the proposed encoder (3D-GOP-RL) has been performed, and we have compared the evaluation results with other video encoders in terms of rate/distortion (R/D), coding/decoding delay, and memory consumption. Results show that the proposed encoder obtains good R/D results for high-resolution video sequences with nearly in-place computation using only the memory needed to store a group of pictures. After applying the multicore optimization strategies over the 3D DWT, the proposed encoder is able to compress a full high-definition video sequence in real-time.

  2. Take Away Body Parts! An Investigation into the Use of 3D-Printed Anatomical Models in Undergraduate Anatomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire F.; Tollemache, Nicholas; Covill, Derek; Johnston, Malcolm

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the three-dimensional (3D) nature of the human form is imperative for effective medical practice and the emergence of 3D printing creates numerous opportunities to enhance aspects of medical and healthcare training. A recently deceased, un-embalmed donor was scanned through high-resolution computed tomography. The scan data underwent…

  3. Virtual reality 3D headset based on DMD light modulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Evans, Allan; Tang, Edward

    2014-06-13

    We present the design of an immersion-type 3D headset suitable for virtual reality applications based upon digital micro-mirror devices (DMD). Our approach leverages silicon micro mirrors offering 720p resolution displays in a small form-factor. Supporting chip sets allow rapid integration of these devices into wearable displays with high resolution and low power consumption. Applications include night driving, piloting of UAVs, fusion of multiple sensors for pilots, training, vision diagnostics and consumer gaming. Our design is described in which light from the DMD is imaged to infinity and the user’s own eye lens forms a real image on the user’s retina.

  4. Photoacoustic sensing with micro-tuning forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willer, U.; Köhring, M.; Mordmüller, M.; Schade, W.

    2015-06-01

    Different modifications of quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) are discussed. An analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio for the generated photoacoustic signal gives hints for an optimized geometry of tuning fork and acoustic resonator. Furthermore, simultaneous or alternate photoacoustic and electrical driving is discussed, leading the way to new detection schemes that are capable of measuring changes in molecular relaxation dynamics.

  5. 3D CISS, 3D MP-PAGE and 2D TSE for MRI prior to Cochlear implantation; 3D CISS, 3D MP-RAGE und 2D TSE fuer die praeoperative MRT vor Cochlea Implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, J.; Held, P.; Voelk, M.; Lenhart, M.; Strotzer, M. [Klinikum der Univ. Regensburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Waldeck, A. [Klinikum der Univ. Regensburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohrenheilkunde

    2000-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the presurgical predictive value of high resolution MRI in patients scheduled for chochlear implantation. Method and material: The presurgical MRI (3D CISS, 3D MP-RAGE with and without i.v. contrast medium, 2D TSE) findings of 54 patients and the intraoperative situation reported by the surgeon were compared retrospectively. The surgical and functional success of the cochlear implantation was evaluated. Results: We found a high degree of correlation between MRI and intraoperative findings concerning the patency of the whole cochlea and anomalies as well as in the diagnosis of pathology of the cochlear, vestibular and facial nerves and in anomalies of the internal auditory canal. However, in four out of 54 patients there was a false negative prediction regarding the patency of the cochlea. The sensitivity was 50% (4/8), the specificity 100% (46/46). Concerning the surgical success the accuracy was 100%. In all patients MRI gave sufficient anatomical information to the surgeon concerning the jugular bulb and the facial nerve. Conclusion: A high-resolution MRI protocol consisting of coronal 2D T2w TSE, 3D T2*w transverse CISS; plain and contrast enhanced sagittal T1w 3D MP-RAGE is recommended for the evaluation of candidates scheduled for cochlear implantation. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Das Ziel dieser Studie war, den praeoperativen Vorhersagewert der hochaufloesenden MRT bei Patienten, welche fuer ein Cochlea Implant vorgesehen sind, zu ermitteln. Material und Methode: Die praeoperativen Befunde der MRT (3D CISS, 3D MP-RAGE vor und nach i.v. Gabe von Gadolinium, 2D TSE) von 54 Patienten und die vom Operateur vorgefundenen intraoperativen Verhaeltnisse wurden verglichen. Sowohl der chirurgische Erfolg der Implantation als auch die Funktion des Cochlea Implants wurden evaluiert. Ergebnisse: Es zeigte sich eine hohe Uebereinstimmung der MRT-Befunde sowie der intraoperativ vorgefundenen Situation bezueglich der Offenheit der

  6. Towards biologically relevant synthetic designer matrices in 3D bioprinting for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    KAUST Repository

    Costa, Rúben M.

    2017-05-12

    3D bioprinting is one of the most promising technologies in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. As new printing techniques and bioinks are getting developed, new cellular constructs with high resolution and functionality arise. Different to bioinks of animal, algal or plant origin, synthesized bioinks are proposed as superior biomaterials because their characteristics are fully under control. In this review, we will highlight the potential of synthetic biomaterials to be used as bioinks in 3D bioprinting to produce functionally enhanced matrices.

  7. Multiphoton lithography of nanocrystalline platinum and palladium for site-specific catalysis in 3D microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzar, Lauren D; Swartzentruber, B S; Harper, Jason C; Dunphy, Darren R; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Aizenberg, Joanna; Kaehr, Bryan

    2012-03-07

    Integration of catalytic nanostructured platinum and palladium within 3D microscale structures or fluidic environments is important for systems ranging from micropumps to microfluidic chemical reactors and energy converters. We report a straightforward procedure to fabricate microscale patterns of nanocrystalline platinum and palladium using multiphoton lithography. These materials display excellent catalytic, electrical, and electrochemical properties, and we demonstrate high-resolution integration of catalysts within 3D defined microenvironments to generate directed autonomous particle and fluid transport. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  8. 3D View of Death Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This 3-D perspective view looking north over Death Valley, California, was produced by draping ASTER nighttime thermal infrared data over topographic data from the US Geological Survey. The ASTER data were acquired April 7, 2000 with the multi-spectral thermal infrared channels, and cover an area of 60 by 80 km (37 by 50 miles). Bands 13, 12, and 10 are displayed in red, green and blue respectively. The data have been computer enhanced to exaggerate the color variations that highlight differences in types of surface materials. Salt deposits on the floor of Death Valley appear in shades of yellow, green, purple, and pink, indicating presence of carbonate, sulfate, and chloride minerals. The Panamint Mtns. to the west, and the Black Mtns. to the east, are made up of sedimentary limestones, sandstones, shales, and metamorphic rocks. The bright red areas are dominated by the mineral quartz, such as is found in sandstones; green areas are limestones. In the lower center part of the image is Badwater, the lowest point in North America.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide

  9. A High-resolution Atlas and Statistical Model of the Vocal Tract from Structural MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jonghye; Lee, Junghoon; Murano, Emi Z; Xing, Fangxu; Al-Talib, Meena; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an essential tool in the study of muscle anatomy and functional activity in the tongue. Objective assessment of similarities and differences in tongue structure and function has been performed using unnormalized data, but this is biased by the differences in size, shape, and orientation of the structures. To remedy this, we propose a methodology to build a 3D vocal tract atlas based on structural MRI volumes from twenty normal subjects. We first constructed high-resolution volumes from three orthogonal stacks. We then removed extraneous data so that all 3D volumes contained the same anatomy. We used an unbiased diffeomorphic groupwise registration using a cross-correlation similarity metric. Principal component analysis was applied to the deformation fields to create a statistical model from the atlas. Various evaluations and applications were carried out to show the behaviour and utility of the atlas.

  10. Intensity-based image registration for 3D spatial compounding using a freehand 3D ultrasound system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoulatos, Niko; Haynor, David R.; Kim, Yongmin

    2002-04-01

    3D spatial compounding involves the combination of two or more 3D ultrasound (US) data sets, acquired under different insonation angles and windows, to form a higher quality 3D US data set. An important requirement for this method to succeed is the accurate registration between the US images used to form the final compounded image. We have developed a new automatic method for rigid and deformable registration of 3D US data sets, acquired using a freehand 3D US system. Deformation is provided by using a 3D thin-plate spline (TPS). Our method is fundamentally different from the previous ones in that the acquired scattered US 2D slices are registered and compounded directly into the 3D US volume. Our approach has several benefits over the traditional registration and spatial compounding methods: (i) we only peform one 3D US reconstruction, for the first acquired data set, therefore we save the computation time required to reconstruct subsequent acquired scans, (ii) for our registration we use (except for the first scan) the acquired high-resolution 2D US images rather than the 3D US reconstruction data which are of lower quality due to the interpolation and potential subsampling associated with 3D reconstruction, and (iii) the scans performed after the first one are not required to follow the typical 3D US scanning protocol, where a large number of dense slices have to be acquired; slices can be acquired in any fashion in areas where compounding is desired. We show that by taking advantage of the similar information contained in adjacent acquired 2D US slices, we can reduce the computation time of linear and nonlinear registrations by a factor of more than 7:1, without compromising registration accuracy. Furthermore, we implemented an adaptive approximation to the 3D TPS with local bilinear transformations allowing additional reduction of the nonlinear registration computation time by a factor of approximately 3.5. Our results are based on a commercially available

  11. Neurovascular photoacoustic tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Hu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurovascular coupling refers to the relationship between neuronal activities and downstream hemodynamic responses. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT, enabling comprehensive label-free imaging of hemodynamic activities with highly scalable penetration and spatial resolution, has great potential in the study of neurovascular coupling. In this review, we first introduce the technical basis of hemodynamic PAT—including label-free quantification of total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygenation, and blood flow—as well as its applications in hemodynamic monitoring. Then, we demonstrate the potential application of PAT in neurovascular imaging by highlighting representative studies on cerebral vascular responses to whisker stimulation and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, potential research directions and associated technical challenges are discussed.

  12. 3-D eye movement analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchowski, Andrew; Medlin, Eric; Cournia, Nathan; Murphy, Hunter; Gramopadhye, Anand; Nair, Santosh; Vorah, Jeenal; Melloy, Brian

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents a novel three-dimensional (3-D) eye movement analysis algorithm for binocular eye tracking within virtual reality (VR). The user's gaze direction, head position, and orientation are tracked in order to allow recording of the user's fixations within the environment. Although the linear signal analysis approach is itself not new, its application to eye movement analysis in three dimensions advances traditional two-dimensional approaches, since it takes into account the six degrees of freedom of head movements and is resolution independent. Results indicate that the 3-D eye movement analysis algorithm can successfully be used for analysis of visual process measures in VR. Process measures not only can corroborate performance measures, but also can lead to discoveries of the reasons for performance improvements. In particular, analysis of users' eye movements in VR can potentially lead to further insights into the underlying cognitive processes of VR subjects.

  13. 3D vector flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for 3D vector flow imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of velocity estimation in ultrasound, which plays an important role in the clinic. The velocity of blood has components in all three spatial dimensions, yet...... Oscillation (TO) method, which estimates both the axial and the lateral velocity components. The first part of the scientific contribution demonstrates that a commercial implementation of the TO method is feasible. Afterwards, the method is expanded to a phased array geometry, and performance metrics based......:1 parallel receive beamforming. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of the method. In the final part, an experimental investigation of the 3D TO method is presented. Velocity measurements of steady flow were conducted in a flow-rig system, and the data were acquired using an experimental...

  14. Mortars for 3D printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demyanenko Olga

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is aimed at developing scientifically proven compositions of mortars for 3D printing modified by a peat-based admixture with improved operational characteristics. The paper outlines the results of experimental research on hardened cement paste and concrete mixture with the use of modifying admixture MT-600 (thermally modified peat. It is found that strength of hardened cement paste increases at early age when using finely dispersed admixtures, which is the key factor for formation of construction and technical specifications of concrete for 3D printing technologies. The composition of new formations of hardened cement paste modified by MT-600 admixture were obtained, which enabled to suggest the possibility of their physico-chemical interaction while hardening.

  15. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  16. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  17. 3-D Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon

    ultrasonic vector flow estimation and bring it a step closer to a clinical application. A method for high frame rate 3-D vector flow estimation in a plane using the transverse oscillation method combined with a 1024 channel 2-D matrix array is presented. The proposed method is validated both through phantom......For the last decade, the field of ultrasonic vector flow imaging has gotten an increasingly attention, as the technique offers a variety of new applications for screening and diagnostics of cardiovascular pathologies. The main purpose of this PhD project was therefore to advance the field of 3-D...... hampers the task of real-time processing. In a second study, some of the issue with the 2-D matrix array are solved by introducing a 2-D row-column (RC) addressing array with only 62 + 62 elements. It is investigated both through simulations and via experimental setups in various flow conditions...

  18. 3D Printing A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zulkifl Hasan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Solid free fabrication SFF are produced to enhance the printing instrument utilizing distinctive strategies like Piezo spout control multi-spout injet printers or STL arrange utilizing cutting information. The procedure is utilized to diminish the cost and enhance the speed of printing. A few techniques take long at last because of extra process like dry the printing. This study will concentrate on SFFS utilizing UV gum for 3D printing.

  19. Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi; Vazquez, Patricia; Vedarethinam, Indumathi

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained...... showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared...

  20. 3D Graphics with Spreadsheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Benacka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the formulas for orthographic parallel projection of 3D bodies on computer screen are derived using secondary school vector algebra. The spreadsheet implementation is demonstrated in six applications that project bodies with increasing intricacy – a convex body (cube with non-solved visibility, convex bodies (cube, chapel with solved visibility, a coloured convex body (chapel with solved visibility, and a coloured non-convex body (church with solved visibility. The projections are revolvable in horizontal and vertical plane, and they are changeable in size. The examples show an unusual way of using spreadsheets as a 3D computer graphics tool. The applications can serve as a simple introduction to the general principles of computer graphics, to the graphics with spreadsheets, and as a tool for exercising stereoscopic vision. The presented approach is usable at visualising 3D scenes within some topics of secondary school curricula as solid geometry (angles and distances of lines and planes within simple bodies or analytic geometry in space (angles and distances of lines and planes in E3, and even at university level within calculus at visualising graphs of z = f(x,y functions. Examples are pictured.

  1. High resolution simulations of ignition capsule designs for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D S; Haan, S W; Cook, A W; Edwards, M J; Hammel, B A; Koning, J M; Marinak, M M

    2011-02-17

    Ignition capsule designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)] have continued to evolve in light of improved physical data inputs, improving simulation techniques, and - most recently - experimental data from a growing number of NIF sub-ignition experiments. This paper summarizes a number of recent changes to the cryogenic capsule design and some of our latest techniques in simulating its performance. Specifically, recent experimental results indicated harder x-ray drive spectra in NIF hohlraums than were predicted and used in previous capsule optimization studies. To accommodate this harder drive spectrum, a series of high-resolution 2-D simulations, resolving Legendre mode numbers as high as two thousand, were run and the germanium dopant concentration and ablator shell thicknesses re-optimized accordingly. Simultaneously, the possibility of cooperative or nonlinear interaction between neighboring ablator surface defects has motivated a series of fully 3-D simulations run with the massively parallel HYDRA code. These last simulations include perturbations seeded on all capsule interfaces and can use actual measured shell surfaces as initial conditions. 3-D simulations resolving Legendre modes up to two hundred on large capsule sectors have run through ignition and burn, and higher resolution simulations resolving as high as mode twelve hundred have been run to benchmark high-resolution 2-D runs. Finally, highly resolved 3-D simulations have also been run of the jet-type perturbation caused by the fill tube fitted to the capsule. These 3-D simulations compare well with the more typical 2-D simulations used in assessing the fill tube's impact on ignition. Coupled with the latest experimental inputs from NIF, our improving simulation capability yields a fuller and more accurate picture of NIF ignition capsule performance.

  2. Efficient methodologies for system matrix modelling in iterative image reconstruction for rotating high-resolution PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortuno, J E; Kontaxakis, G; Rubio, J L; Santos, A [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica (DIE), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Guerra, P [Networking Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: juanen@die.upm.es

    2010-04-07

    A fully 3D iterative image reconstruction algorithm has been developed for high-resolution PET cameras composed of pixelated scintillator crystal arrays and rotating planar detectors, based on the ordered subsets approach. The associated system matrix is precalculated with Monte Carlo methods that incorporate physical effects not included in analytical models, such as positron range effects and interaction of the incident gammas with the scintillator material. Custom Monte Carlo methodologies have been developed and optimized for modelling of system matrices for fast iterative image reconstruction adapted to specific scanner geometries, without redundant calculations. According to the methodology proposed here, only one-eighth of the voxels within two central transaxial slices need to be modelled in detail. The rest of the system matrix elements can be obtained with the aid of axial symmetries and redundancies, as well as in-plane symmetries within transaxial slices. Sparse matrix techniques for the non-zero system matrix elements are employed, allowing for fast execution of the image reconstruction process. This 3D image reconstruction scheme has been compared in terms of image quality to a 2D fast implementation of the OSEM algorithm combined with Fourier rebinning approaches. This work confirms the superiority of fully 3D OSEM in terms of spatial resolution, contrast recovery and noise reduction as compared to conventional 2D approaches based on rebinning schemes. At the same time it demonstrates that fully 3D methodologies can be efficiently applied to the image reconstruction problem for high-resolution rotational PET cameras by applying accurate pre-calculated system models and taking advantage of the system's symmetries.

  3. PHOTOGRAMMETRIC 3D BUILDING RECONSTRUCTION FROM THERMAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Maset

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of 3D building reconstruction from thermal infrared (TIR images. We show that a commercial Computer Vision software can be used to automatically orient sequences of TIR images taken from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV and to generate 3D point clouds, without requiring any GNSS/INS data about position and attitude of the images nor camera calibration parameters. Moreover, we propose a procedure based on Iterative Closest Point (ICP algorithm to create a model that combines high resolution and geometric accuracy of RGB images with the thermal information deriving from TIR images. The process can be carried out entirely by the aforesaid software in a simple and efficient way.

  4. 3D endoscopic imaging using structured illumination technique (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Nguyen, Hieu; Wang, Zhaoyang; Kang, Jin U.

    2017-02-01

    Surgeons have been increasingly relying on minimally invasive surgical guidance techniques not only to reduce surgical trauma but also to achieve accurate and objective surgical risk evaluations. A typical minimally invasive surgical guidance system provides visual assistance in two-dimensional anatomy and pathology of internal organ within a limited field of view. In this work, we propose and implement a structure illumination endoscope to provide a simple, inexpensive 3D endoscopic imaging to conduct high resolution 3D imagery for use in surgical guidance system. The system is calibrated and validated for quantitative depth measurement in both calibrated target and human subject. The system exhibits a depth of field of 20 mm, depth resolution of 0.2mm and a relative accuracy of 0.1%. The demonstrated setup affirms the feasibility of using the structured illumination endoscope for depth quantization and assisting medical diagnostic assessments

  5. Photogrammetric 3d Building Reconstruction from Thermal Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maset, E.; Fusiello, A.; Crosilla, F.; Toldo, R.; Zorzetto, D.

    2017-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of 3D building reconstruction from thermal infrared (TIR) images. We show that a commercial Computer Vision software can be used to automatically orient sequences of TIR images taken from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and to generate 3D point clouds, without requiring any GNSS/INS data about position and attitude of the images nor camera calibration parameters. Moreover, we propose a procedure based on Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm to create a model that combines high resolution and geometric accuracy of RGB images with the thermal information deriving from TIR images. The process can be carried out entirely by the aforesaid software in a simple and efficient way.

  6. Continuous Optical 3D Printing of Green Aliphatic Polyurethanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Sang-Hyun; Wang, Pengrui; Hwang, Henry H; Zhu, Wei; Warner, John; Chen, Shaochen

    2017-01-11

    Photosensitive diurethanes were prepared from a green chemistry synthesis pathway based on methacrylate-functionalized six-membered cyclic carbonate and biogenic amines. A continuous optical 3D printing method for the diurethanes was developed to create user-defined gradient stiffness and smooth complex surface microstructures in seconds. The green chemistry-derived polyurethane (gPU) showed high optical transparency, and we demonstrate the ability to tune the material stiffness of the printed structure along a gradient by controlling the exposure time and selecting various amine compounds. High-resolution 3D biomimetic structures with smooth curves and complex contours were printed using our gPU. High cell viability (over 95%) was demonstrated during cytocompatibility testing using C3H 10T1/2 cells seeded directly on the printed structures.

  7. High Resolution, Range/Range-Rate Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne proposes to develop a design for a small, lightweight, high resolution, in x, y, and z Doppler imager to assist in the guidance, navigation and control...

  8. Hurricane Satellite (HURSAT) from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Huricane Satellite (HURSAT)-Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is used to extend the HURSAT data set such that appling the Objective Dvorak technique...

  9. Methodology of high-resolution photography for mural condition database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, R.; Suzuki, T.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Digital documentation is one of the most useful techniques to record the condition of cultural heritage. Recently, high-resolution images become increasingly useful because it is possible to show general views of mural paintings and also detailed mural conditions in a single image. As mural paintings are damaged by environmental stresses, it is necessary to record the details of painting condition on high-resolution base maps. Unfortunately, the cost of high-resolution photography and the difficulty of operating its instruments and software have commonly been an impediment for researchers and conservators. However, the recent development of graphic software makes its operation simpler and less expensive. In this paper, we suggest a new approach to make digital heritage inventories without special instruments, based on our recent our research project in Üzümlü church in Cappadocia, Turkey. This method enables us to achieve a high-resolution image database with low costs, short time, and limited human resources.

  10. A Forward-Looking High-Resolution GPR System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kositsky, Joel; Milanfar, Peyman

    1999-01-01

    A high-resolution ground penetrating radar (GPR) system was designed to help define the optimal radar parameters needed for the efficient standoff detection of buried and surface-laid antitank mines...

  11. High Resolution Orthoimagery = Orthorectified Metro Areas: 2000 - Present

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — High resolution orthorectified images combine the image characteristics of an aerial photograph with the geometric qualities of a map. An orthoimage is a...

  12. Topological Data Analysis of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsteanu, Alin Andrei; Fernández Méndez, Félix; Vásquez Aguilar, Raciel

    2017-04-01

    This study applies topological data analysis (TDA) to the state space representations of high-resolution temporal rainfall intensity data from Iowa City (IIHR, U of Iowa). Using a sufficient embedding dimension, topological properties of the underlying manifold are depicted.

  13. NOAA High-Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Analysis Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archive covers two high resolution sea surface temperature (SST) analysis products developed using an optimum interpolation (OI) technique. The analyses have a...

  14. Quantitative ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging for the assessment of vascular parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Meiburger, Kristen M

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the development of quantitative techniques for ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging in the assessment of architectural and vascular parameters. It presents morphological vascular research based on the development of quantitative imaging techniques for the use of clinical B-mode ultrasound images, and preclinical architectural vascular investigations on quantitative imaging techniques for ultrasounds and photoacoustics. The book is divided into two main parts, the first of which focuses on the development and validation of quantitative techniques for the assessment of vascular morphological parameters that can be extracted from B-mode ultrasound longitudinal images of the common carotid artery. In turn, the second part highlights quantitative imaging techniques for assessing the architectural parameters of vasculature that can be extracted from 3D volumes, using both contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and photoacoustic imaging without the addition of any contrast agent. Sharing and...

  15. Analysis of vascular homogeneity and anisotropy on high-resolution primate brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, Pol; Fonta, Caroline; Guibert, Romain; Plouraboué, Franck

    2017-11-01

    Using a systematic investigation of brain blood volume, in high-resolution synchrotron 3D images of microvascular structures within cortical regions of a primate brain, we challenge several basic questions regarding possible vascular bias in high-resolution functional neuroimaging. We present a bilateral comparison of cortical regions, where we analyze relative vascular volume in voxels from 150 to 1000 μm side lengths in the white and grey matter. We show that, if voxel size reaches a scale smaller than 300 µm, the vascular volume can no longer be considered homogeneous, either within one hemisphere or in bilateral comparison between samples. We demonstrate that voxel size influences the comparison between vessel-relative volume distributions depending on the scale considered (i.e., hemisphere, lobe, or sample). Furthermore, we also investigate how voxel anisotropy and orientation can affect the apparent vascular volume, in accordance with actual fMRI voxel sizes. These findings are discussed from the various perspectives of high-resolution brain functional imaging. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5756-5777, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. High-resolution dynamic CE-MRA of the thorax enabled by iterative TWIST reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzl, Jens; Forman, Christoph; Wintersperger, Bernd J; D'Errico, Luigia; Schmidt, Michaela; Mailhe, Boris; Maier, Andreas; Stalder, Aurélien F

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical benefit of using a new iterative reconstruction technique fully integrated on a standard clinical scanner and reconstruction system using a TWIST acquisition for high-resolution dynamic three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA). Low-dose, high-resolution TWIST datasets of 11 patients were reconstructed using both standard GRAPPA-based reconstruction for reference and iterative reconstruction, which reduces the temporal footprint of reconstructed images. Image quality of both techniques was assessed by two experienced readers, as well as quantitatively evaluated using a time-signal curve analysis. Image quality scores consistently and significantly improved by using iterative reconstruction compared with the standard approach. Most notably, the delineation of small to mid-size vasculature improved from a mean Likert score between "nondiagnostic" and "poor" for standard to between "good" and "excellent" for iterative reconstruction. The full width at half maximum of the contrast agent bolus computed from the time-signal curve was also reduced by iterative reconstruction, allowing for more precise bolus timing. Iterative reconstruction can substantially improve high-resolution dynamic CE-MRA image quality, most notably in small to mid-size vasculature. Dynamic CE-MRA with iterative reconstruction could become an alternative to conventional static 3D CE-MRA, thus simplifying the clinical workflow. Magn Reson Med 77:833-840, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Developing Visual Editors for High-Resolution Haptic Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuartielles, David; Göransson, Andreas; Olsson, Tony

    2012-01-01

    In this article we give an overview of our iterative work in developing visual editors for creating high resolution haptic patterns to be used in wearable, haptic feedback devices. During the past four years we have found the need to address the question of how to represent, construct and edit high...... resolution haptic patterns so that they translate naturally to the user’s haptic experience. To solve this question we have developed and tested several visual editors...

  18. Automatic speed of sound correction with photoacoustic image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Meng; Cao, Meng; Feng, Ting; Yuan, Jie; Cheng, Qian; Liu, XIaojun; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Sound velocity measurement is of great importance to the application of biomedical especially in the research of acoustic detection and acoustic tomography. Using correct sound velocities in each medium other than one unified sound propagation speed, we can effectively enhance sound based imaging resolution. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), is defined as cross-sectional or three-dimensional (3D) imaging of a material based on the photoacoustic effect and it is a developing, non-invasive imaging method in biomedical research. This contribution proposes a method to concurrently calculate multiple acoustic speeds in different mediums. Firstly, we get the size of infra-structure of the target by B-mode ultrasonic imaging method. Then we build the photoacoustic (PA) image of the same target with different acoustic speed in different medium. By repeatedly evaluate the quality of reconstruct PA image, we dynamically calibrate the acoustic speeds in different medium to build a finest PA image. Thus, we take these speeds of sound as the correct acoustic propagation velocities in according mediums. Experiments show that our non-invasive method can yield correct speed of sound with less than 0.3% error which might benefit future research in biomedical science.

  19. Slab detachment in laterally varying subduction zones: 3-D numerical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duretz, T.; Gerya, T.V.; Spakman, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074103164

    Understanding the three-dimensional (3-D) dynamics of subduction-collision systems is a longstanding challenge in geodynamics. We investigate the impact of slab detachment in collision systems that are subjected to along-trench variations. High-resolution thermomechanical numerical models,

  20. Structured light 3D tracking system for measuring motions in PET brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Jørgensen, Morten Rudkjær; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2010-01-01

    with a DLP projector and a CCD camera is set up on a model of the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT). Methods to reconstruct 3D point clouds of simple surfaces based on phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) are demonstrated. The projector and camera are calibrated using a simple stereo vision procedure...

  1. Spatial resolution of the HRRT PET scanner using 3D-OSEM PSF reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sibomana, Merence; Keller, Sune Høgild

    2009-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) dedicated brain PET scanner installed at Copenhagen University Hospital (Rigshospitalet) was measured using a point-source phantom with high statistics. Further, it was demonstrated how the newly developed 3D-OSEM PSF...

  2. Towards 3D raster GIS : On developing a raster engine for spatial DBMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlatanova, S.; Nourian Ghadikolaee, P.; Goncalves, R.; Vo, A.V.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) raster are simple representations, which have long been used for modelling continuous phenomena such as geological and medical objects. However, they can result in large data sets when high resolution is used, which poses challenges to algorithms for vector-to-raster

  3. Do gender-specific and high-resolution three dimensional body charts facilitate the communication of pain for women?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Christensen, Trine Søby; Petersen, Ida Munk

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is more prevalent among women; however, the majority of standardized pain drawings are often collected using male-like androgynous body representations. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess whether gender-specific and high-resolution three-dimensional (3D......) body charts facilitate the communication of pain for women. METHODS: Using mixed-methods and a cross-over design, female patients with chronic pain were asked to provide detailed drawings of their current pain on masculine and feminine two-dimensional (2D) body schemas (N=41, Part I) or on female 2D...... and 3D high-resolution body schemas (N=41, Part II) on a computer tablet. The consistency of the drawings between body charts were assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. Semistructured interviews and a preference questionnaire were then used to obtain qualitative...

  4. High-resolution modeling assessment of tidal stream resource in Western Passage of Maine, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Feng, Xi; Xue, Huijie; Kilcher, Levi

    2017-04-01

    Although significant efforts have been taken to assess the maximum potential of tidal stream energy at system-wide scale, accurate assessment of tidal stream energy resource at project design scale requires detailed hydrodynamic simulations using high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) numerical models. Extended model validation against high quality measured data is essential to minimize the uncertainties of the resource assessment. Western Passage in the State of Maine in U.S. has been identified as one of the top ranking sites for tidal stream energy development in U.S. coastal waters, based on a number of criteria including tidal power density, market value and transmission distance. This study presents an on-going modeling effort for simulating the tidal hydrodynamics in Western Passage using the 3-D unstructured-grid Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). The model domain covers a large region including the entire the Bay of Fundy with grid resolution varies from 20 m in the Western Passage to approximately 1000 m along the open boundary near the mouth of Bay of Fundy. Preliminary model validation was conducted using existing NOAA measurements within the model domain. Spatial distributions of tidal power density were calculated and extractable tidal energy was estimated using a tidal turbine module embedded in FVCOM under different tidal farm scenarios. Additional field measurements to characterize resource and support model validation were discussed. This study provides an example of high resolution resource assessment based on the guidance recommended by the International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Specification.

  5. Random-Forest Classification of High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images and Ndsm Over Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X. F.; Lin, X. G.

    2017-09-01

    As an intermediate step between raw remote sensing data and digital urban maps, remote sensing data classification has been a challenging and long-standing research problem in the community of remote sensing. In this work, an effective classification method is proposed for classifying high-resolution remote sensing data over urban areas. Starting from high resolution multi-spectral images and 3D geometry data, our method proceeds in three main stages: feature extraction, classification, and classified result refinement. First, we extract color, vegetation index and texture features from the multi-spectral image and compute the height, elevation texture and differential morphological profile (DMP) features from the 3D geometry data. Then in the classification stage, multiple random forest (RF) classifiers are trained separately, then combined to form a RF ensemble to estimate each sample's category probabilities. Finally the probabilities along with the feature importance indicator outputted by RF ensemble are used to construct a fully connected conditional random field (FCCRF) graph model, by which the classification results are refined through mean-field based statistical inference. Experiments on the ISPRS Semantic Labeling Contest dataset show that our proposed 3-stage method achieves 86.9% overall accuracy on the test data.

  6. An efficient photogrammetric stereo matching method for high-resolution images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingsong; Zheng, Shunyi; Wang, Xiaonan; Ma, Hao

    2016-12-01

    Stereo matching of high-resolution images is a great challenge in photogrammetry. The main difficulty is the enormous processing workload that involves substantial computing time and memory consumption. In recent years, the semi-global matching (SGM) method has been a promising approach for solving stereo problems in different data sets. However, the time complexity and memory demand of SGM are proportional to the scale of the images involved, which leads to very high consumption when dealing with large images. To solve it, this paper presents an efficient hierarchical matching strategy based on the SGM algorithm using single instruction multiple data instructions and structured parallelism in the central processing unit. The proposed method can significantly reduce the computational time and memory required for large scale stereo matching. The three-dimensional (3D) surface is reconstructed by triangulating and fusing redundant reconstruction information from multi-view matching results. Finally, three high-resolution aerial date sets are used to evaluate our improvement. Furthermore, precise airborne laser scanner data of one data set is used to measure the accuracy of our reconstruction. Experimental results demonstrate that our method remarkably outperforms in terms of time and memory savings while maintaining the density and precision of the 3D cloud points derived.

  7. Regional geothermal 3D modelling in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, S. E.; Balling, N.; Bording, T. S.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2012-04-01

    In the pursuit of sustainable and low carbon emission energy sources, increased global attention has been given to the exploration and exploitation of geothermal resources within recent decades. In 2009 a national multi-disciplinary geothermal research project was established. As a significant part of this project, 3D temperature modelling is to be carried out, with special emphasis on temperatures of potential geothermal reservoirs in the Danish area. The Danish subsurface encompasses low enthalpy geothermal reservoirs of mainly Triassic and Jurassic age. Geothermal plants at Amager (Copenhagen) and Thisted (Northern Jutland) have the capacity of supplying the district heating network with up to 14 MW and 7 MW, respectively, by withdrawing warm pore water from the Gassum (Lower Jurassic/Upper Triassic) and Bunter (Lower Triassic) sandstone reservoirs, respectively. Explorative studies of the subsurface temperature regime typically are based on a combination of observations and modelling. In this study, the open-source groundwater modelling code MODFLOW is modified to simulate the subsurface temperature distribution in three dimensions by taking advantage of the mathematical similarity between saturated groundwater flow (Darcy flow) and heat conduction. A numerical model of the subsurface geology in Denmark is built and parameterized from lithological information derived from joint interpretation of seismic surveys and borehole information. Boundary conditions are constructed from knowledge about the heat flow from the Earth's interior and the shallow ground temperature. Matrix thermal conductivities have been estimated from analysis of high-resolution temperature logs measured in deep wells and porosity-depth relations are included using interpreted main lithologies. The model takes into account the dependency of temperature and pressure on thermal conductivity. Moreover, a transient model based correction of the paleoclimatic thermal disturbance caused by the

  8. Wireless 3D Chocolate Printer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FROILAN G. DESTREZA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is for the BSHRM Students of Batangas State University (BatStateU ARASOF for the researchers believe that the Wireless 3D Chocolate Printer would be helpful in their degree program especially on making creative, artistic, personalized and decorative chocolate designs. The researchers used the Prototyping model as procedural method for the successful development and implementation of the hardware and software.