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Sample records for high-quality graphene pnp

  1. Ballistic transport of graphene pnp junctions with embedded local gates

    Nam, Seung-Geol; Ki, Dong-Keun; Kim, Youngwook; Kim, Jun Sung; Lee, Hu-Jong; Park, Jong Wan

    2011-01-01

    We fabricated graphene pnp devices, by embedding pre-defined local gates in an oxidized surface layer of a silicon substrate. With neither deposition of dielectric material on the graphene nor electron-beam irradiation, we obtained high-quality graphene pnp devices without degradation of the carrier mobility even in the local-gate region. The corresponding increased mean free path leads to the observation of ballistic and phase-coherent transport across a local gate 130 nm wide, which is about an order of magnitude wider than reported previously. Furthermore, in our scheme, we demonstrated independent control of the carrier density in the local-gate region, with a conductance map very much distinct from those of top-gated devices. This was caused by the electric field arising from the global back gate being strongly screened by the embedded local gate. Our scheme allows the realization of ideal multipolar graphene junctions with ballistic carrier transport.

  2. Formation of p-n-p junction with ionic liquid gate in graphene

    He, Xin; Tang, Ning; Duan, Junxi; Zhang, Yuewei; Lu, Fangchao; Xu, Fujun; Yang, Xuelin; Gao, Li; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo; Ge, Weikun

    2014-01-01

    Ionic liquid gating is a technique which is much more efficient than solid gating to tune carrier density. To observe the electronic properties of such a highly doped graphene device, a top gate made of ionic liquid has been used. By sweeping both the top and back gate voltage, a p-n-p junction has been created. The mechanism of forming the p-n-p junction has been discussed. Tuning the carrier density by ionic liquid gate can be an efficient method to be used in flexible electronics

  3. Method for synthesis of high quality graphene

    Lanzara, Alessandra [Piedmont, CA; Schmid, Andreas K [Berkeley, CA; Yu, Xiaozhu [Berkeley, CA; Hwang, Choonkyu [Albany, CA; Kohl, Annemarie [Beneditkbeuern, DE; Jozwiak, Chris M [Oakland, CA

    2012-03-27

    A method is described herein for the providing of high quality graphene layers on silicon carbide wafers in a thermal process. With two wafers facing each other in close proximity, in a first vacuum heating stage, while maintained at a vacuum of around 10.sup.-6 Torr, the wafer temperature is raised to about 1500.degree. C., whereby silicon evaporates from the wafer leaving a carbon rich surface, the evaporated silicon trapped in the gap between the wafers, such that the higher vapor pressure of silicon above each of the wafers suppresses further silicon evaporation. As the temperature of the wafers is raised to about 1530.degree. C. or more, the carbon atoms self assemble themselves into graphene.

  4. High-quality uniform dry transfer of graphene to polymers.

    Lock, Evgeniya H; Baraket, Mira; Laskoski, Matthew; Mulvaney, Shawn P; Lee, Woo K; Sheehan, Paul E; Hines, Daniel R; Robinson, Jeremy T; Tosado, Jacob; Fuhrer, Michael S; Hernández, Sandra C; Walton, Scott G

    2012-01-11

    In this paper we demonstrate high-quality, uniform dry transfer of graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil to polystyrene. The dry transfer exploits an azide linker molecule to establish a covalent bond to graphene and to generate greater graphene-polymer adhesion compared to that of the graphene-metal foil. Thus, this transfer approach provides a novel alternative route for graphene transfer, which allows for the metal foils to be reused. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. A roadmap to high quality chemically prepared graphene

    Gengler, Regis Y N; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Rudolf, Petra, E-mail: r.gengler@rug.n, E-mail: p.rudolf@rug.n [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2010-09-22

    Graphene was discovered half a decade ago and proved the existence of a two-dimensional system which becomes stable as a result of 3D corrugation. It appeared very quickly that this exceptional material had truly outstanding electronic, mechanical, thermal and optical properties. Consequently a broad range of applications appeared, as the graphene science speedily moved forward. Since then, a lot of effort has been devoted not only to the study of graphene but also to its fabrication. Here we review the chemical approaches to graphene production, their advantages as well as their downsides. Our aim is to draw a roadmap of today's most reliable path to high quality graphene via chemical preparation.

  6. A roadmap to high quality chemically prepared graphene

    Gengler, Regis Y N; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Rudolf, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Graphene was discovered half a decade ago and proved the existence of a two-dimensional system which becomes stable as a result of 3D corrugation. It appeared very quickly that this exceptional material had truly outstanding electronic, mechanical, thermal and optical properties. Consequently a broad range of applications appeared, as the graphene science speedily moved forward. Since then, a lot of effort has been devoted not only to the study of graphene but also to its fabrication. Here we review the chemical approaches to graphene production, their advantages as well as their downsides. Our aim is to draw a roadmap of today's most reliable path to high quality graphene via chemical preparation.

  7. Supercapacitors based on high-quality graphene scrolls

    Zeng, Fanyan; Kuang, Yafei; Liu, Gaoqin; Liu, Rui; Huang, Zhongyuan; Fu, Chaopeng; Zhou, Haihui

    2012-06-01

    High-quality graphene scrolls (GSS) with a unique scrolled topography are designed using a microexplosion method. Their capacitance properties are investigated by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrical impedance spectroscopy. Compared with the specific capacity of 110 F g-1 for graphene sheets, a remarkable capacity of 162.2 F g-1 is obtained at the current density of 1.0 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous solution owing to the unique scrolled structure of GSS. The capacity value is increased by about 50% only because of the topological change of graphene sheets. Meanwhile, GSS exhibit excellent long-term cycling stability along with 96.8% retained after 1000 cycles at 1.0 A g-1. These encouraging results indicate that GSS based on the topological structure of graphene sheets are a kind of promising material for supercapacitors.

  8. High-quality AlN films grown on chemical vapor-deposited graphene films

    Chen Bin-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the growth of high-quality AlN films on graphene. The graphene films were synthesized by CVD and then transferred onto silicon substrates. Epitaxial aluminum nitride films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on both graphene as an intermediate layer and silicon as a substrate. The structural characteristics of the AlN films and graphene were investigated. Highly c-axis-oriented AlN crystal structures are investigated based on the XRDpatterns observations.

  9. Isolation of high quality graphene from Ru by solution phase intercalation

    Koren, E.; Sutter, E.; Bliznakov, S.; Ivars-Barcelo, F.; Sutter, P.

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a method for isolating graphene grown on epitaxial Ru(0001)/α-Al2O3. The strong graphene/Ru(0001) coupling is weakened by electrochemically driven intercalation of hydrogen underpotentially deposited in aqueous KOH solution, which allows the penetration of water molecules at the graphene/Ru(0001) interface. Following these electrochemically driven processes, the graphene can be isolated by electrochemical hydrogen evolution and transferred to arbitrary supports. Raman and transport measurements demonstrate the high quality of the transferred graphene. Our results show that intercalation, typically carried out in vacuum, can be extended to solution environments for graphene processing under ambient conditions.

  10. Identifying suitable substrates for high-quality graphene-based heterostructures

    Banszerus, L.; Janssen, H.; Otto, M.; Epping, A.; Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Beschoten, B.; Neumaier, D.; Stampfer, C.

    2017-06-01

    We report on a scanning confocal Raman spectroscopy study investigating the strain-uniformity and the overall strain and doping of high-quality chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene-based heterostuctures on a large number of different substrate materials, including hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), transition metal dichalcogenides, silicon, different oxides and nitrides, as well as polymers. By applying a hBN-assisted, contamination free, dry transfer process for CVD graphene, high-quality heterostructures with low doping densities and low strain variations are assembled. The Raman spectra of these pristine heterostructures are sensitive to substrate-induced doping and strain variations and are thus used to probe the suitability of the substrate material for potential high-quality graphene devices. We find that the flatness of the substrate material is a key figure for gaining, or preserving high-quality graphene.

  11. The effect of magnetic field on chiral transmission in p-n-p graphene junctions

    Li, Yuan; Wan, Qi; Peng, Yingzi; Wang, Guanqing; Qian, Zhenghong; Zhou, Guanghui; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate Klein tunneling in graphene heterojunctions under the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field via the non-equilibrium Green’s function method. We find that the angular dependence of electron transmission is deflected sideways, resulting in the suppression of normally incident electrons and overall decrease in conductance. The off-normal symmetry axis of the transmission profile was analytically derived. Overall tunneling conductance decreases to almost zero regardless of the potential barrier height when the magnetic field (B-field) exceeds a critical value, thus achieving effective confinement of Dirac fermions. The critical field occurs when the width of the magnetic field region matches the diameter of the cyclotron orbit. The potential barrier also induces distinct Fabry-Pérot fringe patterns, with a “constriction region” of low transmission when is close to the Fermi energy. Application of B-field deflects the Fabry-Pérot interference pattern to an off-normal angle. Thus, the conductance of the graphene heterojunctions can be sharply modulated by adjusting the B-field strength and the potential barrier height relative to the Fermi energy.

  12. The effect of magnetic field on chiral transmission in p-n-p graphene junctions.

    Li, Yuan; Wan, Qi; Peng, Yingzi; Wang, Guanqing; Qian, Zhenghong; Zhou, Guanghui; Jalil, Mansoor B A

    2015-12-18

    We investigate Klein tunneling in graphene heterojunctions under the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field via the non-equilibrium Green's function method. We find that the angular dependence of electron transmission is deflected sideways, resulting in the suppression of normally incident electrons and overall decrease in conductance. The off-normal symmetry axis of the transmission profile was analytically derived. Overall tunneling conductance decreases to almost zero regardless of the potential barrier height V0 when the magnetic field (B-field) exceeds a critical value, thus achieving effective confinement of Dirac fermions. The critical field occurs when the width of the magnetic field region matches the diameter of the cyclotron orbit. The potential barrier also induces distinct Fabry-Pérot fringe patterns, with a "constriction region" of low transmission when V0 is close to the Fermi energy. Application of B-field deflects the Fabry-Pérot interference pattern to an off-normal angle. Thus, the conductance of the graphene heterojunctions can be sharply modulated by adjusting the B-field strength and the potential barrier height relative to the Fermi energy.

  13. Side-gate modulation effects on high-quality BN-Graphene-BN nanoribbon capacitors

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Xiaolong; Ye, Weiguang; Wu, Zefei; Han, Yu; Han, Tianyi; He, Yuheng; Cai, Yuan; Wang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    High-quality BN-Graphene-BN nanoribbon capacitors with double side-gates of graphene have been experimentally realized. The double side-gates can effectively modulate the electronic properties of graphene nanoribbon capacitors. By applying anti-symmetric side-gate voltages, we observed significant upward shifting and flattening of the V-shaped capacitance curve near the charge neutrality point. Symmetric side-gate voltages, however, only resulted in tilted upward shifting along the opposite direction of applied gate voltages. These modulation effects followed the behavior of graphene nanoribbons predicted theoretically for metallic side-gate modulation. The negative quantum capacitance phenomenon predicted by numerical simulations for graphene nanoribbons modulated by graphene side-gates was not observed, possibly due to the weakened interactions between the graphene nanoribbon and side-gate electrodes caused by the Ga + beam etching process

  14. A roadmap to high quality chemically prepared graphene

    Gengler, Regis Y. N.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Rudolf, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Graphene was discovered half a decade ago and proved the existence of a two-dimensional system which becomes stable as a result of 3D corrugation. It appeared very quickly that this exceptional material had truly outstanding electronic, mechanical, thermal and optical properties. Consequently a

  15. High Yield Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of High Quality Large-Area AB Stacked Bilayer Graphene

    Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hailong; Cheng, Rui; Yu, Woo Jong; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Yu; Shaw, Jonathan; Zhong, Xing; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    Bernal stacked (AB stacked) bilayer graphene is of significant interest for functional electronic and photonic devices due to the feasibility to continuously tune its band gap with a vertical electrical field. Mechanical exfoliation can be used to produce AB stacked bilayer graphene flakes but typically with the sizes limited to a few micrometers. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been recently explored for the synthesis of bilayer graphene but usually with limited coverage and a mixture of AB and randomly stacked structures. Herein we report a rational approach to produce large-area high quality AB stacked bilayer graphene. We show that the self-limiting effect of graphene growth on Cu foil can be broken by using a high H2/CH4 ratio in a low pressure CVD process to enable the continued growth of bilayer graphene. A high temperature and low pressure nucleation step is found to be critical for the formation of bilayer graphene nuclei with high AB stacking ratio. A rational design of a two-step CVD process is developed for the growth of bilayer graphene with high AB stacking ratio (up to 90 %) and high coverage (up to 99 %). The electrical transport studies demonstrated that devices made of the as-grown bilayer graphene exhibit typical characteristics of AB stacked bilayer graphene with the highest carrier mobility exceeding 4,000 cm2/V·s at room temperature, comparable to that of the exfoliated bilayer graphene. PMID:22906199

  16. Fast Batch Production of High-Quality Graphene Films in a Sealed Thermal Molecular Movement System.

    Xu, Jianbao; Hu, Junxiong; Li, Qi; Wang, Rubing; Li, Weiwei; Guo, Yufen; Zhu, Yongbo; Liu, Fengkui; Ullah, Zaka; Dong, Guocai; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Liwei

    2017-07-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of high-quality graphene has emerged as the most promising technique in terms of its integrated manufacturing. However, there lacks a controllable growth method for producing high-quality and a large-quantity graphene films, simultaneously, at a fast growth rate, regardless of roll-to-roll (R2R) or batch-to-batch (B2B) methods. Here, a stationary-atmospheric-pressure CVD (SAPCVD) system based on thermal molecular movement, which enables fast B2B growth of continuous and uniform graphene films on tens of stacked Cu(111) foils, with a growth rate of 1.5 µm s -1 , is demonstrated. The monolayer graphene of batch production is found to nucleate from arrays of well-aligned domains, and the films possess few defects and exhibit high carrier mobility up to 6944 cm 2 V -1 s -1 at room temperature. The results indicate that the SAPCVD system combined with single-domain Cu(111) substrates makes it possible to realize fast batch-growth of high-quality graphene films, which opens up enormous opportunities to use this unique 2D material for industrial device applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. High-quality PVD graphene growth by fullerene decomposition on Cu foils.

    Azpeitia, J; Otero-Irurueta, G; Palacio, I; Martinez, J I; Del Árbol, N Ruiz; Santoro, G; Gutiérrez, A; Aballe, L; Foerster, M; Kalbac, M; Vales, V; Mompeán, F J; García-Hernández, M; Martín-Gago, J A; Munuera, C; López, M F

    2017-08-01

    We present a new protocol to grow large-area, high-quality single-layer graphene on Cu foils at relatively low temperatures. We use C 60 molecules evaporated in ultra high vacuum conditions as carbon source. This clean environment results in a strong reduction of oxygen-containing groups as depicted by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Unzipping of C 60 is thermally promoted by annealing the substrate at 800ºC during evaporation. The graphene layer extends over areas larger than the Cu crystallite size, although it is changing its orientation with respect to the surface in the wrinkles and grain boundaries, producing a modulated ring in the low energy electron diffraction (LEED) pattern. This protocol is a self-limiting process leading exclusively to one single graphene layer. Raman spectroscopy confirms the high quality of the grown graphene. This layer exhibits an unperturbed Dirac-cone with a clear n-doping of 0.77 eV, which is caused by the interaction between graphene and substrate. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that this interaction can be induced by a coupling between graphene and substrate at specific points of the structure leading to a local sp 3 configuration, which also contribute to the D-band in the Raman spectra.

  18. Near-equilibrium chemical vapor deposition of high-quality single-crystal graphene directly on various dielectric substrates.

    Chen, Jianyi; Guo, Yunlong; Jiang, Lili; Xu, Zhiping; Huang, Liping; Xue, Yunzhou; Geng, Dechao; Wu, Bin; Hu, Wenping; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi

    2014-03-05

    By using near-equilibrium chemical vapor deposition, it is demonstrated that high-quality single-crystal graphene can be grown on dielectric substrates. The maximum size is about 11 μm. The carrier mobility can reach about 5650 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , which is comparable to those of some metal-catalyzed graphene crystals, reflecting the good quality of the graphene lattice. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Controllable Edge Oxidation and Bubbling Exfoliation Enable the Fabrication of High Quality Water Dispersible Graphene.

    Tian, Suyun; Sun, Jing; Yang, Siwei; He, Peng; Wang, Gang; Di, Zengfeng; Ding, Guqiao; Xie, Xiaoming; Jiang, Mianheng

    2016-09-26

    Despite significant progresses made on mass production of chemically exfoliated graphene, the quality, cost and environmental friendliness remain major challenges for its market penetration. Here, we present a fast and green exfoliation strategy for large scale production of high quality water dispersible few layer graphene through a controllable edge oxidation and localized gas bubbling process. Mild edge oxidation guarantees that the pristine sp 2 lattice is largely intact and the edges are functionalized with hydrophilic groups, giving rise to high conductivity and good water dispersibility at the same time. The aqueous concentration can be as high as 5.0 mg mL -1 , which is an order of magnitude higher than previously reports. The water soluble graphene can be directly spray-coated on various substrates, and the back-gated field effect transistor give hole and electron mobility of ~496 and ~676 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , respectively. These results achieved are expected to expedite various applications of graphene.

  20. Controllable Edge Oxidation and Bubbling Exfoliation Enable the Fabrication of High Quality Water Dispersible Graphene

    Tian, Suyun; Sun, Jing; Yang, Siwei; He, Peng; Wang, Gang; di, Zengfeng; Ding, Guqiao; Xie, Xiaoming; Jiang, Mianheng

    2016-09-01

    Despite significant progresses made on mass production of chemically exfoliated graphene, the quality, cost and environmental friendliness remain major challenges for its market penetration. Here, we present a fast and green exfoliation strategy for large scale production of high quality water dispersible few layer graphene through a controllable edge oxidation and localized gas bubbling process. Mild edge oxidation guarantees that the pristine sp2 lattice is largely intact and the edges are functionalized with hydrophilic groups, giving rise to high conductivity and good water dispersibility at the same time. The aqueous concentration can be as high as 5.0 mg mL-1, which is an order of magnitude higher than previously reports. The water soluble graphene can be directly spray-coated on various substrates, and the back-gated field effect transistor give hole and electron mobility of ~496 and ~676 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. These results achieved are expected to expedite various applications of graphene.

  1. Large scale commercial fabrication of high quality graphene-based assays for biomolecule detection

    Lerner, Mitchell; Gao, Yingning; Goldsmith, Brett; Barron, Francie

    Large numbers of high quality graphene transistors with mobility approximately 5000 cm2 / V * s were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition and packaged into ceramic carriers with an open cavity design. The ceramic carrier is compatible with standard electronics assembly, enabling the readout of graphene properties on the benchtop without large, expensive probing systems. After chemical functionalization, these sensors demonstrate sensitivity in the pM range and selectivity to many classes of biomolecules as a three terminal liquid-gated field effect transistor. High precision measurements of protein kinetics captured using this technology, commercially known as AGILE R100, are comparable and can exceed the capabilities of state-of-the-art biomolecule characterization tools. Recently published in Sensors and Actuators B

  2. Growing vertical ZnO nanorod arrays within graphite: efficient isolation of large size and high quality single-layer graphene.

    Ding, Ling; E, Yifeng; Fan, Louzhen; Yang, Shihe

    2013-07-18

    We report a unique strategy for efficiently exfoliating large size and high quality single-layer graphene directly from graphite into DMF dispersions by growing ZnO nanorod arrays between the graphene layers in graphite.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Mass Produced High Quality Few Layered Graphene Sheets via a Chemical Method

    Khenfouch, Mohammed

    2014-04-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional crystal of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice. It is a zero band gap semimetal with very unique physical and chemical properties which make it useful for many applications such as ultra-high-speed field-effect transistors, p-n junction diodes, terahertz oscillators, and low-noise electronic, NEMS and sensors. When the high quality mass production of this nanomaterial is still a big challenge, we developed a process which will be an important step to achieve this goal. Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Scanning tunneling microscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray system were investigated to characterize and examine the quality of this product.

  4. Salt-assisted direct exfoliation of graphite into high-quality, large-size, few-layer graphene sheets.

    Niu, Liyong; Li, Mingjian; Tao, Xiaoming; Xie, Zhuang; Zhou, Xuechang; Raju, Arun P A; Young, Robert J; Zheng, Zijian

    2013-08-21

    We report a facile and low-cost method to directly exfoliate graphite powders into large-size, high-quality, and solution-dispersible few-layer graphene sheets. In this method, aqueous mixtures of graphite and inorganic salts such as NaCl and CuCl2 are stirred, and subsequently dried by evaporation. Finally, the mixture powders are dispersed into an orthogonal organic solvent solution of the salt by low-power and short-time ultrasonication, which exfoliates graphite into few-layer graphene sheets. We find that the as-made graphene sheets contain little oxygen, and 86% of them are 1-5 layers with lateral sizes as large as 210 μm(2). Importantly, the as-made graphene can be readily dispersed into aqueous solution in the presence of surfactant and thus is compatible with various solution-processing techniques towards graphene-based thin film devices.

  5. Hydrogen assisted growth of high quality epitaxial graphene on the C-face of 4H-SiC

    Cai, Tuocheng; Jia, Zhenzhao; Yan, Baoming; Yu, Dapeng; Wu, Xiaosong, E-mail: xswu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-01-05

    We demonstrate hydrogen assisted growth of high quality epitaxial graphene on the C-face of 4H-SiC. Compared with the conventional thermal decomposition technique, the size of the growth domain by this method is substantially increased and the thickness variation is reduced. Based on the morphology of epitaxial graphene, the role of hydrogen is revealed. It is found that hydrogen acts as a carbon etchant. It suppresses the defect formation and nucleation of graphene. It also improves the kinetics of carbon atoms via hydrocarbon species. These effects lead to increase of the domain size and the structure quality. The consequent capping effect results in smooth surface morphology and suppression of multilayer growth. Our method provides a viable route to fine tune the growth kinetics of epitaxial graphene on SiC.

  6. Electrolytic exfoliation of graphite in water with multifunctional electrolytes: en route towards high quality, oxide-free graphene flakes.

    Munuera, J M; Paredes, J I; Villar-Rodil, S; Ayán-Varela, M; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2016-02-07

    Electrolytic--usually referred to as electrochemical--exfoliation of graphite in water under anodic potential holds enormous promise as a simple, green and high-yield method for the mass production of graphene, but currently suffers from several drawbacks that hinder its widespread adoption, one of the most critical being the oxidation and subsequent structural degradation of the carbon lattice that is usually associated with such a production process. To overcome this and other limitations, we introduce and implement the concept of multifunctional electrolytes. The latter are amphiphilic anions (mostly polyaromatic hydrocarbons appended with sulfonate groups) that play different relevant roles as (1) an intercalating electrolyte to trigger exfoliation of graphite into graphene flakes, (2) a dispersant to afford stable aqueous colloidal suspensions of the flakes suitable for further use, (3) a sacrificial agent to prevent graphene oxidation during exfoliation and (4) a linker to promote nanoparticle anchoring on the graphene flakes, yielding functional hybrids. The implementation of this strategy with some selected amphiphiles even furnishes anodically exfoliated graphenes of a quality similar to that of flakes produced by direct, ultrasound- or shear-induced exfoliation of graphite in the liquid phase (i.e., almost oxide- and defect-free). These high quality materials were used for the preparation of catalytically efficient graphene-Pt nanoparticle hybrids, as demonstrated by model reactions (reduction of nitroarenes). The multifunctional performance of these electrolytes is also discussed and rationalized, and a mechanistic picture of their oxidation-preventing ability is proposed. Overall, the present results open the prospect of anodic exfoliation as a competitive method for the production of very high quality graphene flakes.

  7. High-quality graphene flakes exfoliated on a flat hydrophobic polymer

    Pedrinazzi, Paolo; Caridad, José M.; Mackenzie, David M. A.

    2018-01-01

    the environment of the graphene flake is completely changed, by encapsulating preselected flakes between hexagonal boron nitride layers. The exfoliation of clean, pristine graphene layers directly on flat polymer substrates enables high performance, supported, and non-encapsulated graphene devices for flexible...

  8. Reliable Exfoliation of Large-Area High-Quality Flakes of Graphene and Other Two-Dimensional Materials.

    Huang, Yuan; Sutter, Eli; Shi, Norman N; Zheng, Jiabao; Yang, Tianzhong; Englund, Dirk; Gao, Hong-Jun; Sutter, Peter

    2015-11-24

    Mechanical exfoliation has been a key enabler of the exploration of the properties of two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, by providing routine access to high-quality material. The original exfoliation method, which remained largely unchanged during the past decade, provides relatively small flakes with moderate yield. Here, we report a modified approach for exfoliating thin monolayer and few-layer flakes from layered crystals. Our method introduces two process steps that enhance and homogenize the adhesion force between the outermost sheet in contact with a substrate: Prior to exfoliation, ambient adsorbates are effectively removed from the substrate by oxygen plasma cleaning, and an additional heat treatment maximizes the uniform contact area at the interface between the source crystal and the substrate. For graphene exfoliation, these simple process steps increased the yield and the area of the transferred flakes by more than 50 times compared to the established exfoliation methods. Raman and AFM characterization shows that the graphene flakes are of similar high quality as those obtained in previous reports. Graphene field-effect devices were fabricated and measured with back-gating and solution top-gating, yielding mobilities of ∼4000 and 12,000 cm(2)/(V s), respectively, and thus demonstrating excellent electrical properties. Experiments with other layered crystals, e.g., a bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide (BSCCO) superconductor, show enhancements in exfoliation yield and flake area similar to those for graphene, suggesting that our modified exfoliation method provides an effective way for producing large area, high-quality flakes of a wide range of 2D materials.

  9. High-quality PVD graphene growth by fullerene decomposition on Cu foils

    Azpeitia, J.; Otero-Irurueta, G.; Palacio, I.; Martinez, J. I.; Ruiz del Arbol, N.; Santoro, G.; Gutiérrez, A.; Aballe, L.; Foerster, M.; Kalbáč, Martin; Valeš, Václav; Mompean, F. J.; Garcia-Hernandez, M.; Martín-Gago, J.A.; Munuera, C.; Lopez, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 119, AUG 2017 (2017), s. 535-543 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1301 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 696656 - GrapheneCore1 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : functional perturbation- theory * epitaxial graphene * copper substrate * pt(111) surface * raman-spectrum * cvd-graphene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 6.337, year: 2016

  10. High-quality PVD graphene growth by fullerene decomposition on Cu foils

    Azpeitia, J.; Otero-Irurueta, G.; Palacio, I.; Martinez, J. I.; Ruiz del Arbol, N.; Santoro, G.; Gutiérrez, A.; Aballe, L.; Foerster, M.; Kalbáč, Martin; Valeš, Václav; Mompean, F. J.; Garcia-Hernandez, M.; Martín-Gago, J.A.; Munuera, C.; Lopez, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 119, AUG 2017 (2017), s. 535-543 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1301 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 696656 - GrapheneCore1 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : functional perturbation-theory * epitaxial graphene * copper substrate * pt(111) surface * raman-spectrum * cvd-graphene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 6.337, year: 2016

  11. Spontaneous doping on high quality talc-graphene-hBN van der Waals heterostructures

    Mania, E.; Alencar, A. B.; Cadore, A. R.; Carvalho, B. R.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Neves, B. R. A.; Chacham, H.; Campos, L. C.

    2017-09-01

    Steady doping, added to its remarkable electronic properties, would make graphene a valuable commodity in the solar cell market, as energy power conversion could be substantially increased. Here we report a graphene van der Waals heterostructure which is able to spontaneously dope graphene (p-type) up to n ~ 2.2  ×  1013 cm-2 while providing excellent charge mobility (μ ~ 25 000 cm2 V-1 s-1). Such properties are achieved via deposition of graphene on atomically flat layered talc, a natural and abundant dielectric crystal. Raman investigation shows a preferential charge accumulation on graphene-talc van der Waals heterostructures, which are investigated through the electronic properties of talc/graphene/hBN heterostructure devices. These heterostructures preserve graphene’s good electronic quality, verified by the observation of quantum Hall effect at low magnetic fields (B  =  0.4 T) at T  =  4.2 K. In order to investigate the physical mechanisms behind graphene-on-talc p-type doping, we performed first-principles calculations of their interface structural and electronic properties. In addition to potentially improving solar cell efficiency, graphene doping via van der Waals stacking is also a promising route towards controlling the band gap opening in bilayer graphene, promoting a steady n or p type doping in graphene and, eventually, providing a new path to access superconducting states in graphene, predicted to exist only at very high doping.

  12. Production of High-quality Few-layer Graphene Flakes by Intercalation and Exfoliation

    Alzahrani, Areej A.

    2017-11-30

    Graphene, a two-dimensional nanomaterial, has been given much attention since it was first isolated in 2004. Driving this intensive research effort are the unique properties of this one atom thick sheet of carbon, in particular its electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. While the technological applications proposed for graphene abound, its low-cost production in large scales is still a matter of interrogation. Simple methods to obtain few-layered graphene flakes of high structural quality are being investigated with the exfoliation of graphite taking a prominent place in this arena. From the many suggested approaches, the most promising involve the use of liquid media assisted by intercalants and shear forces acting on the basal layers of graphite. In this thesis, it is discussed how a novel method was developed to produce flakes with consistent lateral dimensions that are also few-layered and retain the expected structural and chemical characteristics of graphene. Here, the source material was a commercially available graphiteintercalated compound, also known as expandable graphite. Several exfoliation-inducing tools were investigated including the use of blenders, homogenizers, and ultrasonic processors. To aid in this process, various solvents and intercalants were explored under different reactive conditions. The more efficient approach in yielding defect-free thin flakes was the use of thermally expanded graphite in boiling dimethylformamide followed by ultrasonic processing and centrifugation. In parallel, a method to fraction the flakes as a function of their lateral size was developed. Ultimately, it was possible to obtain samples of graphene flakes with a lateral dimension of a few micrometers (<5 μm) and thickness of 1-3 nm (i.e. <10 layers).

  13. Tension-controlled single-crystallization of copper foils for roll-to-roll synthesis of high-quality graphene films

    Jo, Insu; Park, Subeom; Kim, Dongjin; San Moon, Jin; Park, Won Bae; Kim, Tae Hyeong; Hyoun Kang, Jin; Lee, Wonbae; Kim, Youngsoo; Lee, Dong Nyung; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Choi, Hyunchul; Kang, Inbyeong; Park, Jong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Soo; Hong, Byung Hee

    2018-04-01

    It has been known that the crystalline orientation of Cu substrates plays a crucial role in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis of high-quality graphene. In particular, Cu (1 1 1) surface showing the minimum lattice mismatch with graphene is expected to provide an ideal catalytic reactivity that can minimize the formation of defects, which also induces larger single-crystalline domain sizes of graphene. Usually, the Cu (1 1 1) substrates can be epitaxially grown on single-crystalline inorganic substrates or can be recrystallized by annealing for more than 12 h, which limits the cost and time-effective synthesis of graphene. Here, we demonstrate a new method to optimize the crystalline orientations of vertically suspended Cu foils by tension control during graphene growth, resulting in large-area recrystallization into Cu (1 1 1) surface as the applied tension activates the grain boundary energy of Cu and promotes its abnormal grain growth to single crystals. In addition, we found a clue that the formation of graphene cooperatively assists the recrystallization into Cu (1 1 1) by minimizing the surface energy of Cu. The domain sizes and charge carrier mobility of graphene grown on the single-crystalline Cu (1 1 1) are 5 times and ~50% increased, respectively, in comparison with those of graphene from Cu (1 0 0), indicating that the less lattice mismatch and the lower interaction energy between Cu (1 1 1) and graphene allows the growth of larger single-crystalline graphene with higher charge carrier mobility. Thus, we believe that our finding provides a crucial idea to design a roll-to-roll (R2R) graphene synthesis system where the tension control is inevitably involved, which would be of great importance for the continuous production of high-quality graphene in the future.

  14. High quality graphene synthesized by atmospheric pressure CVD on copper foil

    Trinsoutrot, Pierre; Rabot, Caroline; Vergnes, Hugues; Delamoreanu, Alexandru; Zenasni, Aziz; Caussat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Graphene was synthesized at 1000 °C by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition on copper foil from methane diluted in argon and hydrogen. The influence of the main synthesis parameters was studied on 2 × 2 cm2 foils in order to obtain continuous monolayer graphenewithout crystalline defect. The uniformity, crystal quality and number of layers of graphenewere analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and Scanning Electronic Microscopy. First, an increase of the annealing pr...

  15. Effect of friction on oxidative graphite intercalation and high-quality graphene formation.

    Seiler, Steffen; Halbig, Christian E; Grote, Fabian; Rietsch, Philipp; Börrnert, Felix; Kaiser, Ute; Meyer, Bernd; Eigler, Siegfried

    2018-02-26

    Oxidative wet-chemical delamination of graphene from graphite is expected to become a scalable production method. However, the formation process of the intermediate stage-1 graphite sulfate by sulfuric acid intercalation and its subsequent oxidation are poorly understood and lattice defect formation must be avoided. Here, we demonstrate film formation of micrometer-sized graphene flakes with lattice defects down to 0.02% and visualize the carbon lattice by transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution. Interestingly, we find that only well-ordered, highly crystalline graphite delaminates into oxo-functionalized graphene, whereas other graphite grades do not form a proper stage-1 intercalate and revert back to graphite upon hydrolysis. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that ideal stacking and electronic oxidation of the graphite layers significantly reduce the friction of the moving sulfuric acid molecules, thereby facilitating intercalation. Furthermore, the evaluation of the stability of oxo-species in graphite sulfate supports an oxidation mechanism that obviates intercalation of the oxidant.

  16. A fast transfer-free synthesis of high-quality monolayer graphene on insulating substrates by a simple rapid thermal treatment.

    Wu, Zefei; Guo, Yanqing; Guo, Yuzheng; Huang, Rui; Xu, Shuigang; Song, Jie; Lu, Huanhuan; Lin, Zhenxu; Han, Yu; Li, Hongliang; Han, Tianyi; Lin, Jiangxiazi; Wu, Yingying; Long, Gen; Cai, Yuan; Cheng, Chun; Su, Dangsheng; Robertson, John; Wang, Ning

    2016-02-07

    The transfer-free synthesis of high-quality, large-area graphene on a given dielectric substrate, which is highly desirable for device applications, remains a significant challenge. In this paper, we report on a simple rapid thermal treatment (RTT) method for the fast and direct growth of high-quality, large-scale monolayer graphene on a SiO2/Si substrate from solid carbon sources. The stack structure of a solid carbon layer/copper film/SiO2 is adopted in the RTT process. The inserted copper film does not only act as an active catalyst for the carbon precursor but also serves as a "filter" that prevents premature carbon dissolution, and thus, contributes to graphene growth on SiO2/Si. The produced graphene exhibits a high carrier mobility of up to 3000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature and standard half-integer quantum oscillations. Our work provides a promising simple transfer-free approach using solid carbon sources to obtain high-quality graphene for practical applications.

  17. High-quality graphene grown on polycrystalline PtRh{sub 20} alloy foils by low pressure chemical vapor deposition and its electrical transport properties

    Yang, He; Shen, Chengmin, E-mail: cmshen@iphy.ac.cn; Tian, Yuan; Bao, Lihong; Chen, Peng; Yang, Rong; Yang, Tianzhong; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi; Gao, Hong-Jun [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-02-08

    High-quality continuous uniform monolayer graphene was grown on polycrystalline PtRh{sub 20} alloy foils by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. The morphology of graphene was investigated by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Analysis results confirm that high quality single-layer graphene was fabricated on PtRh{sub 20} foil at 1050 °C using a lower flux of methane under low pressure. Graphene films were transferred onto the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate by the bubbling transfer method. The mobility of a test field effect transistor made of the graphene grown on PtRh{sub 20} was measured and reckoned at room temperature, showing that the carrier mobility was about 4000 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}. The results indicate that desired quality of single-layer graphene grown on PtRh{sub 20} foils can be obtained by tuning reaction conditions.

  18. Efficient etching-free transfer of high quality, large-area CVD grown graphene onto polyvinyl alcohol films

    Marta, Bogdan; Leordean, Cosmin; Istvan, Todor; Botiz, Ioan; Astilean, Simion

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • One-step dry transfer method of CVD grown graphene onto PVA films. • Investigation of graphene quality and number of layers of the synthesized and transferred graphene. • Promising scalability and good quality of transferred graphene onto flexible transparent polymers. - Abstract: Graphene transfer is a procedure of paramount importance for the production of graphene-based electronic devices. The transfer procedure can affect the electronic properties of the transferred graphene and can be detrimental for possible applications both due to procedure induced defects which can appear and due to scalability of the method. Hence, it is important to investigate new transfer methods for graphene that are less time consuming and show great promise. In the present study we propose an efficient, etching-free transfer method that consists in applying a thin polyvinyl alcohol layer on top of the CVD grown graphene on Cu and then peeling-off the graphene onto the polyvinyl alcohol film. We investigate the quality of the transferred graphene before and after the transfer, using Raman spectroscopy and imaging as well as optical and atomic force microscopy techniques. This simple transfer method is scalable and can lead to complete transfer of graphene onto flexible and transparent polymer support films without affecting the quality of the graphene during the transfer procedure.

  19. Efficient etching-free transfer of high quality, large-area CVD grown graphene onto polyvinyl alcohol films

    Marta, Bogdan; Leordean, Cosmin [Babes-Bolyai University, Interdisciplinary Research Institute in Bio-Nano-Sciences, Nanobiophotonics and Laser Microspectroscopy Center, Treboniu Laurian Str. 42, Cluj-Napoca 400271 (Romania); Istvan, Todor [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics, Biomolecular Physics Department, M Kogalniceanu Str. 1, Cluj-Napoca 400084 (Romania); Botiz, Ioan [Babes-Bolyai University, Interdisciplinary Research Institute in Bio-Nano-Sciences, Nanobiophotonics and Laser Microspectroscopy Center, Treboniu Laurian Str. 42, Cluj-Napoca 400271 (Romania); Astilean, Simion, E-mail: simion.astilean@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Babes-Bolyai University, Interdisciplinary Research Institute in Bio-Nano-Sciences, Nanobiophotonics and Laser Microspectroscopy Center, Treboniu Laurian Str. 42, Cluj-Napoca 400271 (Romania); Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics, Biomolecular Physics Department, M Kogalniceanu Str. 1, Cluj-Napoca 400084 (Romania)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • One-step dry transfer method of CVD grown graphene onto PVA films. • Investigation of graphene quality and number of layers of the synthesized and transferred graphene. • Promising scalability and good quality of transferred graphene onto flexible transparent polymers. - Abstract: Graphene transfer is a procedure of paramount importance for the production of graphene-based electronic devices. The transfer procedure can affect the electronic properties of the transferred graphene and can be detrimental for possible applications both due to procedure induced defects which can appear and due to scalability of the method. Hence, it is important to investigate new transfer methods for graphene that are less time consuming and show great promise. In the present study we propose an efficient, etching-free transfer method that consists in applying a thin polyvinyl alcohol layer on top of the CVD grown graphene on Cu and then peeling-off the graphene onto the polyvinyl alcohol film. We investigate the quality of the transferred graphene before and after the transfer, using Raman spectroscopy and imaging as well as optical and atomic force microscopy techniques. This simple transfer method is scalable and can lead to complete transfer of graphene onto flexible and transparent polymer support films without affecting the quality of the graphene during the transfer procedure.

  20. Fabrication of transparent, tough, and conductive shape-memory polyurethane films by incorporating a small amount of high-quality graphene.

    Jung, Yong Chae; Kim, Jin Hee; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2012-04-23

    We report a mechanically strong, electrically and thermally conductive, and optically transparent shape-memory polyurethane composite which was fabricated by introducing a small amount (0.1 wt%) of high-quality graphene as a filler. Geometrically large (≈4.6 μm(2)), but highly crystallized few-layer graphenes, verified by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, were prepared by the sonication of expandable graphite in an organic solvent. Oxygen- containing functional groups at the edge plane of graphene were crucial for an effective stress transfer from the graphene to polyurethane. Homogeneously dispersed few-layered graphene enabled polyurethane to have a high shape recovery force of 1.8 MPa cm(-3). Graphene, which is intrinsically stretchable up to 10%, will enable high-performance composites to be fabricated at relatively low cost and we thus envisage that such composites may replace carbon nanotubes for various applications in the near future. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. High quality sub-10 nm graphene nanoribbons by on-chip PS-b-PDMS block copolymer lithography

    Rasappa, Sozaraj; Caridad, Jose; Schulte, Lars

    2015-01-01

    block and the graphene under PS. Raman analysis supports the formation of graphene nanoribbons with an average distance between defects corresponding to the oxidized PDMS pitch, with no sign of defects generated in the ribbon channel. This suggests a high degree of protection of the nanoribbons...... by the hard oxidized PDMS mask formed in situ during oxygen plasma etching....

  2. Pressure-dependent synthesis of high-quality few-layer graphene by plasma-enhanced arc discharge and their thermal stability

    Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Dubey, Pawan Kumar; Kumar, Pradip; Tiwari, Radhey Shyam; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    In this article, a simple and cost-effective method to produce high-quality few-layer graphene (FLG) sheets (∼4 layers) have been achieved by the direct current arc discharge under argon atmosphere, using pure graphite rods as the electrodes. Ar was used as a buffer gas with pure graphite rods as anode and cathode electrodes. We explored the suitable conditions for producing FLG by changing the Ar gas pressure inside the arcing chamber. This method has several advantages over the previous methods to produce graphene for research applications. No toxic and hazardous intercalant was used for producing FLG in this process. The optimum Ar pressure was 500 Torr, for producing minimum number of FLG and this also shows the good thermal stability. The FLG product so obtained has been characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and electron microscopy, Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Thermal stabilities of FLG were determined by thermal gravimetric analysis

  3. Facile and Scalable Synthesis Method for High-Quality Few-Layer Graphene through Solution-Based Exfoliation of Graphite.

    Wee, Boon-Hong; Wu, Tong-Fei; Hong, Jong-Dal

    2017-02-08

    Here we describe a facile and scalable method for preparing defect-free graphene sheets exfoliated from graphite using the positively charged polyelectrolyte precursor poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV-pre) as a stabilizer in an aqueous solution. The graphene exfoliated by PPV-pre was apparently stabilized in the solution as a form of graphene/PPV-pre (denoted to GPPV-pre), which remains in a homogeneous dispersion over a year. The thickness values of 300 selected 76% GPPV-pre flakes ranged from 1 to 10 nm, corresponding to between one and a few layers of graphene in the lateral dimensions of 1 to 2 μm. Furthermore, this approach was expected to yield a marked decrease in the density of defects in the electronic conjugation of graphene compared to that of graphene oxide (GO) obtained by Hummers' method. The positively charged GPPV-pre was employed to fabricate a poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) electrode layer-by-layer with negatively charged GO, yielding (GPPV-pre/GO) n film electrode. The PPV-pre and GO in the (GPPV-pre/GO) n films were simultaneously converted using hydroiodic acid vapor to fully conjugated PPV and reduced graphene oxide (RGO), respectively. The electrical conductivity of (GPPV/RGO) 23 multilayer films was 483 S/cm, about three times greater than that of the (PPV/RGO) 23 multilayer films (166 S/cm) comprising RGO (prepared by Hummers method). Furthermore, the superior electrical properties of GPPV were made evident, when comparing the capacitive performances of two supercapacitor systems; (polyaniline PANi/RGO) 30 /(GPPV/RGO) 23 /PET (volumetric capacitance = 216 F/cm 3 ; energy density = 19 mWh/cm 3 ; maximum power density = 498 W/cm 3 ) and (PANi/RGO) 30 /(PPV/RGO) 23 /PET (152 F/cm 3 ; 9 mWh/cm 3 ; 80 W/cm 3 ).

  4. High-quality graphene on single crystal Ir(111) films on Si(111) wafers: Synthesis and multi-spectroscopic characterization

    Struzzi, C.; Verbitskiy, N. E.; Fedorov, A. V.; Nefedov, A.; Frank, Otakar; Kalbáč, Martin; Di Santo, G.; Panighel, M.; Goldoni, A.; Gärtner, J.; Weber, W.; Weinl, M.; Schreck, M.; Wöll, Ch.; Sachdev, H.; Grüneis, A.; Petaccia, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 81, JAN 2015 (2015), s. 167-173 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Project s: GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/12/1062 EU Project s: European Commission(XE) 312284 - CALIPSO Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : chemical vapor deposition * graphene * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.198, year: 2015

  5. FOCUS ON GRAPHENE

    Peres, N M R; Ribeiro, Ricardo M

    2009-01-01

    Balandin Calculation of the Raman G peak intensity in monolayer graphene: role of Ward identities D M Basko Electronic transport in bilayer graphene Mikito Koshino Magnetic Kronig-Penney model for Dirac electrons in single-layer graphene M Ramezani Masir, P Vasilopoulos and F M Peeters Electrical transport in high-quality graphene pnp junctions Jairo Velasco Jr, Gang Liu, Wenzhong Bao and Chun Ning Lau Local density of states and scanning tunneling currents in graphene N M R Peres, Ling Yang and Shan-Wen Tsai Gaps and tails in graphene and graphane B Dora and K Ziegler Quasi-ferromagnet spintronics in the graphene nanodisc-lead system Motohiko Ezawa Range and correlation effects in edge disordered graphene nanoribbons Alessandro Cresti and Stephan Roche Remarks on the tight-binding model of graphene Cristina Bena and Gilles Montambaux (editorial)

  6. High quality NMP exfoliated graphene nanosheet-SnO2 composite anode material for lithium ion battery.

    Ravikumar, Raman; Gopukumar, Sukumaran

    2013-03-21

    A graphene nanosheet-SnO(2) (GNS-SnO(2)) composite is prepared using N-methylpyrrolidone as a solvent to exfoliate graphene from graphite bar with the aid of CTAB by single phase co-precipitation method. The synthesized composites has been characterised physically by powder XRD which confirms the formation of the composite tetragonal SnO(2) crystal system with the low intense broad 002 plane for GNS. The sandwiched morphology of GNS-SnO(2) and the formation of nanosized particles (around 20 nm) have been confirmed by SEM and TEM images. The presence of sp(2) carbon in the GNS is clear by the highly intense G than D band in laser Raman spectroscopy analysis; furthermore, a single chemical shift has been observed at 132.14 ppm from solid-state (13)C NMR analysis. The synthesized composite has been electrochemically characterized using charge-discharge and EIS analysis. The capacity retentions at the end of the first 10 cycles is 57% (100 mA g(-1) rate), the second 10 cycles is 77.83% (200 mA g(-1)), and the final 10 cycles (300 mA g(-1)) is 81.5%. Moreover the impedance analysis clearly explains the low resistance pathway for Li(+) insertion after 30 cycles when compared with the initial cycle. This superior characteristic of GNS-SnO(2) composite suggests that it is a promising candidate for lithium ion battery anode.

  7. Diffusion pipes at PNP switching transistors

    Sachelarie, D.; Postolache, C.; Gaiseanu, F.

    1976-01-01

    The appearance of the ''diffusion pipes'' greatly affects the fabrication of the PNP high-frequency/very-fast-switching transistors. A brief review of the principal problems connected to the presence of these ''pipes'' is made. A research program is presented which permitted the fabrication of the PNP switching transistors at ICCE-Bucharest, with transition frequency fsub(T) = 1.2 GHz and storage time tsub(s) = 4.5 ns. (author)

  8. Facile and large-scale synthesis of high quality few-layered graphene nano-platelets via methane decomposition over unsupported iron family catalysts

    Awadallah, Ahmed E., E-mail: ahmedelsayed_epri@yahoo.com [Process Development Division, Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, 11727 Cairo (Egypt); Aboul-Enein, Ateyya A. [Process Development Division, Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, 11727 Cairo (Egypt); Kandil, Usama F. [Petroleum Application Department, Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, 11727 Cairo (Egypt); Taha, Mahmoud Reda [Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    High quality few-layered graphene nano-platelets (GNPs) were successfully prepared via catalytic chemical vapor deposition of methane under ambient pressure using substrate-free unsupported iron, cobalt, and nickel metallic sheets as catalysts. The bulk catalysts were prepared via combustion method using citric acid as a fuel. Various analytical techniques, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the fresh and reduced catalysts and to identify the morphological structure of the as-grown GNPs. TEM images of the reduced metal catalysts showed that polycrystalline metallic sheets were easily produced after complete reduction of unsupported metal oxides. The data demonstrated that the formation of zero-valent metallic sheets could effectively promote the growth of GNPs on their surfaces. The unsupported Ni catalyst exhibits higher catalytic growth activity in terms of GNPs yield (254 wt%) compared with all other catalysts. Raman spectra and TEM results established that a few layers of GNPs with high crystallinity and good graphitization were produced. TGA results further demonstrated that the as-grown GNPs exhibit significantly higher thermal stability in air atmosphere compared with other synthesis methods. - Highlights: • Few-layered graphene nanoplatelets were prepared via methane catalytic decomposition. • Metallic sheets of iron group metals were used as novel catalysts. • The surfaces of metallic sheets were found to be very effective for GNPs growth. • The number of layers is dependent on the morphological structure of the catalysts. • The unsupported metallic Ni catalyst exhibited higher catalytic growth activity.

  9. Surface plasmon resonance induced reduction of high quality Ag/graphene composite at water/toluene phase for reduction of H2O2

    Zhang Fengjun; Zhang Kehua; Xie Fazhi; Liu Jin; Dong Hongfei; Zhao Wei; Meng Zeda

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The Ag/graphene composites have been successfully synthesized in two-phase solvent. ► The surface plasmon resonance of Ag can reduce GO with high deoxygenation and low defect. ► The Ag particles were uniformly distributed on graphene surface. ► The Ag/graphene composites obtained show high superior electrical properties for reduction of H 2 O 2 . - Abstract: Surface plasmon resonance induced synthesis of Ag/graphene composites from Ag/graphene oxide (Ag/GO) in a two-phase (water–toluene) solvent was reported. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results revealed that the Ag nanoparticles with size of 5–8 nm were trimly distributed on reduced graphene oxide sheets. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have demonstrated low defect density and high deoxygenation degree of graphene in Ag/graphene composite. The excellent structure and morphology of Ag/graphene composites contributed to superior electrical properties for reduction of H 2 O 2 .

  10. Synthesis of high quality graphene on capped (1 1 1) Cu thin films obtained by high temperature secondary grain growth on c-plane sapphire substrates

    Kim, Youngwoo; Moyen, Eric; Yi, Hemian; Avila, José; Chen, Chaoyu; Asensio, Maria C.; Lee, Young Hee; Pribat, Didier

    2018-07-01

    We propose a novel growth technique, in which graphene is synthesized on capped Cu thin films deposited on c-plane sapphire. The cap is another sapphire plate which is just laid upon the Cu thin film, in direct contact with it. Thanks to this ‘contact cap’, Cu evaporation can be suppressed at high temperature and the 400 nm-thick Cu films can be annealed above 1000 °C, resulting in (1 1 1)-oriented grains of millimeter size. Following this high temperature annealing, graphene is grown by chemical vapor deposition during the same pump-down operation, without removing the contact cap. The orientation and doping type of the as-grown graphene were first studied, using low energy electron diffraction, as well as high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. In particular, the orientation relationships between the graphene and copper thin film with respect to the sapphire substrate were precisely determined. We find that the graphene sheets exhibit a minimal rotational disorder, with ~90% of the grains aligned along the copper high symmetry direction. Detailed transport measurements were also performed using field-effect transistor structures. Carrier mobility values as high as 8460 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 have been measured on top gate transistors fabricated directly on the sapphire substrate, by etching the Cu film from underneath the graphene sheets. This is by far the best carrier mobility value obtained to date for graphene sheets synthesized on a thin film-type metal substrate.

  11. Prototype plant for nuclear process heat (PNP)

    Duerrfeld, R.; Kraut-Giesen, G.

    1982-01-01

    1. Goals: Verification of owner's interests during experimental and engineering phase of nuclear coal gasification. 2. Method: 2.1 Witnessing and evaluating of experimental results from running test facilities. 2.2 Influencing experimental program. 2.3 Participation in important meetings of PNP-project. 3. Results: From present point of view the realization of nuclear coal gasification with a nuclear high temperature reactor (HTR) in accordance with the present technical status as well as meeting the existing safety regulations seems to be feasable. R+D-work will be needed for affirmation of design. The gasification of hard coal basing on the allothermal principal has proved to be possible. The examination of the gasifier on a pilot scale is not yet done. The design work for the pilot plant should be started immediately, particularly keeping in mind the decision for erection of PNP in 1990. The calculation of production costs in comparison to autothermal gasification processes is promising better economics, if uncertainties of investment calculation are deemed to be neglectable. (orig.) [de

  12. Achieving high-quality single-atom nitrogen doping of graphene/SiC(0001) by ion implantation and subsequent thermal stabilization

    Telychko, Mykola; Mutombo, Pingo; Ondráček, Martin; Hapala, Prokop; Bocquet, F.C.; Kolorenč, Jindřich; Vondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Švec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 7 (2014), 7318-7324 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02079S; GA MŠk(CZ) LG12003; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : graphene * doping * STM * DFT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 12.881, year: 2014

  13. A novel high-performance supercapacitor based on high-quality CeO2/nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite

    Heydari, Hamid; Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have developed a novel nanocomposite via deposition of ceria (CeO2) on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene (CeO2/NRGO). NRGO was synthesized through a facile, safe, and scalable method to achieve simultaneous thermal reduction along with nitrogen doping of graphene oxide (GO) in air at much lower reaction temperature. CeO2/NRGO was prepared via a sonochemical method in which ceria nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on NRGO sheets. The structure and morphology of CeO2/NRGO nanocomposites were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopy. Electrochemical properties of the proposed nanocomposite electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge, continuous cyclic voltammetry (CCV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. CeO2-NRGO nanocomposite electrodes showed excellent supercapacitive behavior, including much higher specific capacitance (230 F g-1 at 2 mV s-1) and higher rate capability compared to pure N-graphene. The cycling stability of the electrodes was measured by continues cyclic voltammetry (CCV) technique. The CCV showed that the specific capacitance of the CeO2/NRGO and NRGO nanocomposite maintained at 94.1 and 93.2% after 4000 cycles. The results suggest its promising potential as efficient electrode material for supercapacitors.

  14. Structural bioinformatics study of PNP from Schistosoma mansoni

    Silveira, Nelson Jose Freitas da; Uchoa, Hugo Brandao; Canduri, Fernanda; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Camera, Joao Carlos; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Palma, Mario Sergio; Santos, Diogenes Santiago; Filgueira de Azevedo, Walter

    2004-01-01

    The parasite Schistosoma mansoni lacks the de novo pathway for purine biosynthesis and depends on salvage pathways for its purine requirements. Schistosomiasis is endemic in 76 countries and territories and amongst the parasitic diseases ranks second after malaria in terms of social and economic impact and public health importance. The PNP is an attractive target for drug design and it has been submitted to extensive structure-based design. The atomic coordinates of the complex of human PNP with inosine were used as template for starting the modeling of PNP from S. mansoni complexed with inosine. Here we describe the model for the complex SmPNP-inosine and correlate the structure with differences in the affinity for inosine presented by human and S. mansoni PNPs

  15. Pnp gene modification for improved xylose utilization in Zymomonas

    Caimi, Perry G G; Qi, Min; Tao, Luan; Viitanen, Paul V; Yang, Jianjun

    2014-12-16

    The endogenous pnp gene encoding polynucleotide phosphorylase in the Zymomonas genome was identified as a target for modification to provide improved xylose utilizing cells for ethanol production. The cells are in addition genetically modified to have increased expression of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (RPI) activity, as compared to cells without this genetic modification, and are not limited in xylose isomerase activity in the absence of the pnp modification.

  16. Radiation effect of gate controlled lateral PNP BJTs

    Xi Shanbin; Zhou Dong; Lu Wu; Ren Diyuan; Wen Lin; Sun Jing; Wang Zhikuan

    2012-01-01

    Design and fabricate a new test structure of bipolar device: the gate controlled later PNP bipolar transistor (GCLPNP BJT), then sealed it together with the normal lateral PNP bipolar transistor which is made under the same manufacture process. Then 60 Co-γ radiation effects and annealing behaviors of these two structures are investigated. The results show that the response about base current, collector current, access base current and normalized current gain of GCLPNP bipolar transistor are almost identical to the normal one. Radiation induced defects in the GCLPNP bipolar transistor is separated quantitatively. Studying on the quantitative change of radiation induced defects in the domestic gate controlled bipolar transistor should be a useful way to research the change of radiation induced charges of normal PNP bipolar transistor. (authors)

  17. Efficient Fludarabine-Activating PNP From Archaea as a Guidance for Redesign the Active Site of E. Coli PNP.

    Cacciapuoti, Giovanna; Bagarolo, Maria Libera; Martino, Elisa; Scafuri, Bernardina; Marabotti, Anna; Porcelli, Marina

    2016-05-01

    The combination of the gene of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Escherichia coli and fludarabine represents one of the most promising systems in the gene therapy of solid tumors. The use of fludarabine in gene therapy is limited by the lack of an enzyme that is able to efficiently activate this prodrug which, consequently, has to be administered in high doses that cause serious side effects. In an attempt to identify enzymes with a better catalytic efficiency than E. coli PNP towards fludarabine to be used as a guidance on how to improve the activity of the bacterial enzyme, we have selected 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (SsMTAP) and 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase II (SsMTAPII), two PNPs isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. Substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency of SsMTAP and SsMTAPII for fludarabine were analyzed by kinetic studies and compared with E. coli PNP. SsMTAP and SsMTAPII share with E. coli PNP a comparable low affinity for the arabinonucleoside but are better catalysts of fludarabine cleavage with k(cat)/K(m) values that are 12.8-fold and 6-fold higher, respectively, than those reported for the bacterial enzyme. A computational analysis of the interactions of fludarabine in the active sites of E. coli PNP, SsMTAP, and SsMTAPII allowed to identify the crucial residues involved in the binding with this substrate, and provided structural information to improve the catalytic efficiency of E. coli PNP by enzyme redesign. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Electrocatalytic Azide Oxidation Mediated by a Rh(PNP) Pincer Complex

    Rebreyend, Christophe; Gloaguen, Yann; Lutz, Martin; Van Der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar; Siewert, Inke; Schneider, Sven; Bruin, Bas De

    2017-01-01

    One-electron oxidation of the rhodium(I) azido complex [Rh(N3)(PNP)] (5), bearing the neutral, pyridine-based PNP ligand 2,6-bis(di-tert-butylphosphinomethyl)pyridine, leads to instantaneous and selective formation of the mononuclear rhodium(I) dinitrogen complex [Rh(N2)(PNP)]+ (9+). Interestingly,

  19. Electrocatalytic Azide Oxidation Mediated by a Rh(PNP) Pincer Complex

    Rebreyend, C.; Gloaguen, Y.; Lutz, M.; van der Vlugt, J.I.; Siewert, I.; Schneider, S.; de Bruin, B.

    2017-01-01

    One-electron oxidation of the rhodium(I) azido complex [Rh(N3)(PNP)] ( 5 ), bearing the neutral, pyridine-based PNP ligand 2,6-bis(di-tert-butylphosphinomethyl)pyridine, leads to instantaneous and selective formation of the mononuclear rhodium(I) dinitrogen complex [Rh(N2)(PNP)]+ ( 9 +).

  20. The Preparation of Graphene

    Chen Yanyan

    2015-01-01

    Graphene has unique structure and possesses excellent physical and chemical properties, and it has received a great deal of attention in related research fields. The quality, quantity and application of graphene are related to its preparation methods. At present the bottleneck of graphene research is that both high-quality and large quantity of graphene could not be obtained simultaneously and the reason is that the basic mechanism of graphene formation has mot been wel understood.

  1. Towards understanding the E. coli PNP binding mechanism and FRET absence between E. coli PNP and formycin A.

    Prokopowicz, Małgorzata; Greń, Bartosz; Cieśla, Joanna; Kierdaszuk, Borys

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study is threefold: (1) augmentation of the knowledge of the E. coli PNP binding mechanism; (2) explanation of the previously observed 'lack of FRET' phenomenon and (3) an introduction of the correction (modified method) for FRET efficiency calculation in the PNP-FA complexes. We present fluorescence studies of the two E. coli PNP mutants (F159Y and F159A) with formycin A (FA), that indicate that the aromatic amino acid is indispensable in the nucleotide binding, additional hydroxyl group at position 159 probably enhances the strength of binding and that the amino acids pair 159-160 has a great impact on the spectroscopic properties of the enzyme. The experiments were carried out in hepes and phosphate buffers, at pH7 and 8.3. Two methods, a conventional and a modified one, that utilizes the dissociation constant, for calculations of the energy transfer efficiency (E) and the acceptor-to-donor distance (r) between FA and the Tyr (energy donor) were employed. Total difference spectra were calculated for emission spectra (λ ex 280nm, 295nm, 305nm and 313nm) for all studied systems. Time-resolved techniques allowed to conclude the existence of a specific structure formed by amino acids at positions 159 and 160. The results showed an unexpected pattern change of FRET in the mutants, when compared to the wild type enzyme and a probable presence of a structure created between 159 and 160 residue, that might influence the binding efficiency. Additionally, we confirmed the indispensable role of the modification of the FRET efficiency (E) calculation on the fraction of enzyme saturation in PNP-FA systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesize and preliminary biodistribution of 99Tcm(CO)3-PNP5

    Chu Jinfeng; Kong Dejing; Li Bin; Wang Xuebin

    2007-01-01

    99 Tc m (CO) 3 -PNP5 (PNP5: bis (dimethoxypropylphosphinoethyl) ethoxyethyl- amine) is synthesized through a simple two-step procedure by ligand exchange reaction and its biological characters are studied. Labelling conditions of 99 Tc m (CO) 3 -PNP5 are optimized. Its labelling yield and radio chemical purity are all over 90% determined by TLC. The results of partition coefficient, charge character and stability studies indicate that 99 Tc m (CO) 3 -PNP5 is a lipophilic cation ligand with complex with positiue charge and good stability. Biological properties of 99 Tc m (CO) 3 -PNP5 and 99 Tc m (CO) 3 -PNP5 (T) (adding Tween) are valued contrastively in mice. The results show that 99 Tc m (CO) 3 -PNP5(T) have higher myocardial uptake, lower liver uptake, and higher heart-to-liver ratio. It indicats that the biological properties of 99 Tc m (CO) 3 -PNP5 are improved obviously by adding Tween-80. (authors)

  3. Evaluation of temperature-enhanced gain degradation of verticle npn and lateral pnp bipolar transistors

    Witczak, S.C.; Lacoe, R.C.; Galloway, K.F.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of dose rate on radiation-induced gain degradation is compared for verticle npn and lateral pnp bipolar transistors. High dose rate irradiations at elevated temperatures are more effective at simulating low dose rate degradation in the lateral pnp transistors

  4. Analytical solution of the PNP equations at AC applied voltage

    Golovnev, Anatoly; Trimper, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    A symmetric binary polymer electrolyte subjected to an AC voltage is considered. The analytical solution of the Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations (PNP) is found and analyzed for small applied voltages. Three distinct time regimes offering different behavior can be discriminated. The experimentally realized stationary behavior is discussed in detail. An expression for the external current is derived. Based on the theoretical result a simple method is suggested of measuring the ion mobility and their concentration separately. -- Highlights: ► Analytical solution of Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations. ► Binary polymer electrolyte subjected to an external AC voltage. ► Three well separated time scales exhibiting different behavior. ► The experimentally realized stationary behavior is discussed in detail. ► A method is proposed measuring the mobility and the concentration separately.

  5. Forged hollows (alloy 617) for PNP-hot gas collectors

    Hofmann, F.

    1984-01-01

    When the partners in the PNP-Project decided to manufacture components, such as gas collectors, from material of type alloy 617, the problem arose that required semi-fabricated products, especially forged hollows weighing several tons each, were not available. As VDM (Vereinigte Deutsche Metallwerke AG) had already experience in production of other semi-fabricated products of this alloy, attempts were made based on this knowledge, to develop manufacturing methods for forged hollows. The aim was to produce hollows as long as possible, and to keep the welding cost minimum. Welded seams are always critical during fabrication, as well as during later inspection under actual operating conditions. The three stage plan used to perform the above task illustrates the development aims is described

  6. Elucidation of the Signal Transduction Pathways Activated by the Plant Natriuretic Peptide AtPNP-A

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-11-01

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) comprise a novel class of hormones that share some sequence similarity in the active site with their animal analogues that function as regulators of salt and water balance. A PNP present in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPNP-A) has been assigned a role in abiotic and biotic stress responses, and the recombinant protein has been demonstrated to elicit cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent stomatal guard cell opening, regulate ion movements, and induce osmoticum-dependent water uptake. Although the importance of the hormone in maintaining ion and fluid homeostasis has been established, key components of the AtPNP-A-dependent signal transduction pathway remain unknown. Since identification of the binding partners of AtPNP-A, including its receptor(s), is fundamental to understanding the mode of its action at the molecular level, comprehensive protein-protein interaction studies, involving yeast two-hybrid screening, affinity-based assays, protein cross-linking and co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric (MS) analyses have been performed. Several candidate binding partners of AtPNP-A identified with at least two independent methods were subsequently expressed as recombinant proteins, purified, and the specificity of their interactions with the recombinant AtPNP-A was verified using surface plasmon resonance. Several specific binary interactants of AtPNP-A were subjected to functional assays aimed at unraveling the consequences of the interactions in planta. These experiments have revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are novel secondary messengers involved in the transduction of AtPNP-A signal in suspension-cultured cells of A. thaliana (Col-0). Further insight into the AtPNP-A dependent signalling events occurring in suspension-cultured cells in ROS-dependent or ROS-independent manner have been obtained from the large-scale proteomics study employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labelling followed by MS analysis to

  7. EDITORIAL: Epitaxial graphene Epitaxial graphene

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire

    2012-04-01

    nanostructured without patterning the graphene itself. This method produces graphene nanostructures with atomically smooth edges that ultimately determine the transport properties of these structures. The coherent collection of papers in this special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics provides a snapshot of the current state of the art, presented by leading experts, highlighting various aspects of the science and technology of epitaxial graphene. This collection systematically addresses the production of epitaxial graphene on the two polar faces of silicon carbide, as well as the structural and electronic properties of the graphene films. Special attention is paid to the rapidly emerging field of chemically modified graphene, which promises to introduce a bandgap into the electronic structure of graphene, which is critical for many electronic applications. Also presented are methods to incorporate properties of the silicon carbide itself, as well as advanced methods to produce high-quality graphene and graphene nanostructures using structured growth methods.

  8. Electronic properties of mesoscopic graphene structures: Charge confinement and control of spin and charge transport

    Rozhkov, A.V., E-mail: arozhkov@gmail.co [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412, Moscow (Russian Federation); Giavaras, G. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bliokh, Yury P. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Freilikher, Valentin [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    This brief review discusses electronic properties of mesoscopic graphene-based structures. These allow controlling the confinement and transport of charge and spin; thus, they are of interest not only for fundamental research, but also for applications. The graphene-related topics covered here are: edges, nanoribbons, quantum dots, pn-junctions, pnp-structures, and quantum barriers and waveguides. This review is partly intended as a short introduction to graphene mesoscopics.

  9. The effects of gamma irradiation on neutron displacement sensitivity of lateral PNP bipolar transistors

    Wang, Chenhui; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yan; Jin, Xiaoming; Yang, Shanchao; Qi, Chao

    2016-01-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation on neutron displacement sensitivity of four types of lateral PNP bipolar transistors (LPNPs) with different neutral base widths, emitter widths and the doping concentrations of the epitaxial base region are studied. The physical mechanisms of the effects are explored by defect analysis using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) techniques and numerical simulations of recombination process in the base region of the lateral PNP bipolar transistors, and are verified by the experiments on gate-controlled lateral PNP bipolar transistors (GCLPNPs) manufactured in the identical commercial bipolar process with different gate bias voltage. The results indicate that gamma irradiation increases neutron displacement damage sensitivity of lateral PNP bipolar transistors and the mechanism of this phenomenon is that positive charge induced by gamma irradiation enhances the recombination process in the defects induced by neutrons in the base region, leading to larger recombination component of base current and greater gain degradation.

  10. The effects of gamma irradiation on neutron displacement sensitivity of lateral PNP bipolar transistors

    Wang, Chenhui, E-mail: wangchenhui@nint.ac.cn; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yan; Jin, Xiaoming; Yang, Shanchao; Qi, Chao

    2016-09-21

    The effects of gamma irradiation on neutron displacement sensitivity of four types of lateral PNP bipolar transistors (LPNPs) with different neutral base widths, emitter widths and the doping concentrations of the epitaxial base region are studied. The physical mechanisms of the effects are explored by defect analysis using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) techniques and numerical simulations of recombination process in the base region of the lateral PNP bipolar transistors, and are verified by the experiments on gate-controlled lateral PNP bipolar transistors (GCLPNPs) manufactured in the identical commercial bipolar process with different gate bias voltage. The results indicate that gamma irradiation increases neutron displacement damage sensitivity of lateral PNP bipolar transistors and the mechanism of this phenomenon is that positive charge induced by gamma irradiation enhances the recombination process in the defects induced by neutrons in the base region, leading to larger recombination component of base current and greater gain degradation.

  11. Mechanisms of ionizing-radiation-induced gain degradation in lateral PNP BJTs

    Schmidt, D.M.; Wu, A.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Pease, R.L.; Combs, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    The physical mechanisms for gain degradation in laterals PNP bipolar transistors are examined experimentally and through simulation. The effect of increased surface recombination velocity at the base surface is moderated by positive oxide charge

  12. The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response

    Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R.; Pease, R.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Kosier, S.L.

    1998-03-01

    Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps

  13. Elucidation of the Signal Transduction Pathways Activated by the Plant Natriuretic Peptide AtPNP-A

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) comprise a novel class of hormones that share some sequence similarity in the active site with their animal analogues that function as regulators of salt and water balance. A PNP present in Arabidopsis thaliana (At

  14. Graphene growth with ‘no’ feedstock

    Qing, Fangzhu; Jia, Ruitao; Li, Bao-Wen; Liu, Chunlin; Li, Congzhou; Peng, Bo; Deng, Longjiang; Zhang, Wanli; Li, Yanrong; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Li, Xuesong

    2017-06-01

    Synthesis of graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from hydrocarbons on Cu foil substrates can yield high quality and large area graphene films. In a typical CVD process, a hydrocarbon in the gas phase is introduced for graphene growth and hydrogen is usually required to achieve high quality graphene. We have found that in a low pressure CVD system equipped with an oil mechanical vacuum pump located downstream, graphene can be grown without deliberate introduction of a carbon feedstock but with only trace amounts of C present in the system, the origin of which we attribute to the vapor of the pump oil. This finding may help to rationalize the differences in graphene growth reported by different research groups. It should also help to gain an in-depth understanding of graphene growth mechanisms with the aim to improve the reproducibility and structure control in graphene synthesis, e.g. the formation of large area single crystal graphene and uniform bilayer graphene.

  15. Synthesis of graphene through direct decomposition of CO2 with the ...

    The obtained graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, and the results proved that high-quality graphene ... methanol storage materials [5], graphene with a large, high- .... trifuged. The result was filtered and washed with ethanol.

  16. A comparative study on electrical characteristics of 1-kV pnp and npn SiC bipolar junction transistors

    Okuda, Takafumi; Kimoto, Tsunenobu; Suda, Jun

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the electrical characteristics of 1-kV pnp SiC bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and compare them with those of npn SiC BJTs. The base resistance, current gain, and blocking capability are characterized. It is found that the base resistance of pnp SiC BJTs is two orders of magnitude lower than that of npn SiC BJTs. However, the obtained current gains are low below unity in pnp SiC BJTs, whereas npn SiC BJTs exhibit a current gain of 14 without surface passivation. The reason for the poor current gain of pnp SiC BJTs is discussed.

  17. Prototype plant for nuclear process heat (PNP), reference phase

    Fladerer, R.; Schrader, L.

    1982-07-01

    The coal gasification processes using nuclear process heat being developed within the framwork of the PNP project, have the advantages of saving feed coal, improving efficiency, reducing emissions, and stabilizing energy costs. One major gasification process is the hydrogasification of coal for producing SNG or gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; this process can also be applied in a conventional route. The first steps to develop this process were planning, construction and operation of a semi-technical pilot plant for hydrogasification of coal in a fluidized bed having an input of 100 kg C/h. Before the completion of the development phase (reference phase) describing here, several components were tested on part of which no operational experience had so far been gained; these were the newly developed devices, e.g. the inclined tube for feeding coal into the fluidized bed, and the raw gas/hydrogenation gas heat exchanger for utilizing the waste heat of the raw gas leaving the gasifier. Concept optimizing of the thoroughly tested equipment parts led to an improved operational behaviour. Between 1976 and 1980, the semi-technical pilot plant was operated for about 19,400 hours under test conditions, more than 7,400 hours of which it has worked under gasification conditions. During this time approx. 1,100 metric tons of dry brown coal and more than 13 metric tons of hard coal were gasified. The longest coherent operational phase under gasification conditions was 748 hours in which 85.4 metric tons of dry brown coal were gasified. Carbon gasification rates up to 82% and methane contents in the dry raw gas (free of N 2 ) up to 48 vol.% were obtained. A detailed evaluation of the test results provided information of the results obtained previously. For the completion of the test - primarily of long-term tests - the operation of the semi-technical pilot plant for hydrogasification of coal is to be continued up to September 1982. (orig.) [de

  18. Enabling graphene nanoelectronics.

    Pan, Wei; Ohta, Taisuke; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Gutierrez, Carlos; Nolen, C. M.; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; McCarty, Kevin F.; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2011-09-01

    Recent work has shown that graphene, a 2D electronic material amenable to the planar semiconductor fabrication processing, possesses tunable electronic material properties potentially far superior to metals and other standard semiconductors. Despite its phenomenal electronic properties, focused research is still required to develop techniques for depositing and synthesizing graphene over large areas, thereby enabling the reproducible mass-fabrication of graphene-based devices. To address these issues, we combined an array of growth approaches and characterization resources to investigate several innovative and synergistic approaches for the synthesis of high quality graphene films on technologically relevant substrate (SiC and metals). Our work focused on developing the fundamental scientific understanding necessary to generate large-area graphene films that exhibit highly uniform electronic properties and record carrier mobility, as well as developing techniques to transfer graphene onto other substrates.

  19. Synthesis and reactivity of TADDOL-based chiral Fe(II) PNP pincer complexes-solution equilibria between κ(2)P,N- and κ(3)P,N,P-bound PNP pincer ligands.

    Holzhacker, Christian; Stöger, Berthold; Carvalho, Maria Deus; Ferreira, Liliana P; Pittenauer, Ernst; Allmaier, Günter; Veiros, Luis F; Realista, Sara; Gil, Adrià; Calhorda, Maria José; Müller, Danny; Kirchner, Karl

    2015-08-07

    Treatment of anhydrous FeX2 (X = Cl, Br) with 1 equiv. of the asymmetric chiral PNP pincer ligands PNP-R,TAD (R = iPr, tBu) with an R,R-TADDOL (TAD) moiety afforded complexes of the general formula [Fe(PNP)X2]. In the solid state these complexes adopt a tetrahedral geometry with the PNP ligand coordinated in κ(2)P,N-fashion, as shown by X-ray crystallography and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Magnetization studies led to a magnetic moment very close to 4.9μB reflecting the expected four unpaired d-electrons (quintet ground state). In solution there are equilibria between [Fe(κ(3)P,N,P-PNP-R,TAD)X2] and [Fe(κ(2)P,N-PNP-R,TAD)X2] complexes, i.e., the PNP-R,TAD ligand is hemilabile. At -50 °C these equilibria are slow and signals of the non-coordinated P-TAD arm of the κ(2)P,N-PNP-R,TAD ligand can be detected by (31)P{(1)H} NMR spectroscopy. Addition of BH3 to a solution of [Fe(PNP-iPr,TAD)Cl2] leads to selective boronation of the pendant P-TAD arm shifting the equilibrium towards the four-coordinate complex [Fe(κ(2)P,N-PNP-iPr,TAD(BH3))Cl2]. DFT calculations corroborate the existence of equilibria between four- and five-coordinated complexes. Addition of CO to [Fe(PNP-iPr,TAD)X2] in solution yields the diamagnetic octahedral complexes trans-[Fe(κ(3)P,N,P-PNP-iPr,TAD)(CO)X2], which react further with Ag(+) salts in the presence of CO to give the cationic complexes trans-[Fe(κ(3)P,N,P-PNP-iPr,TAD)(CO)2X](+). CO addition most likely takes place at the five coordinate complex [Fe(κ(3)P,N,P-PNP-iPr,TAD)X2]. The mechanism for the CO addition was also investigated by DFT and the most favorable path obtained corresponds to the rearrangement of the pincer ligand first from a κ(2)P,N- to a κ(3)P,N,P-coordination mode followed by CO coordination to [Fe(κ(3)P,N,P-PNP-iPr,TAD)X2]. Complexes bearing tBu substituents do not react with CO. Moreover, in the solid state none of the tetrahedral complexes are able to bind CO.

  20. Unravelling The Mechanism of Basic Aqueous Methanol Dehydrogenation Catalyzed By Ru-PNP Pincer Complexes

    Alberico, Elisabetta; Lennox, Alastair J. J.; Vogt, Lydia K.

    2016-01-01

    Ruthenium PNP complex 1a (RuH(CO)Cl(HN(C2H4Pi-Pr2)2)) represents a state-of-the-art catalyst for low-temperature (methanol dehydrogenation to H2 and CO2. Herein, we describe an investigation that combines experiment, spectroscopy, and theory to provide a mechanistic rationale...

  1. De-embedding and Modelling of pnp SiGe HBTs

    Hadziabdic, Dzenan; Jiang, Chenhui; Johansen, Tom Keinicke

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present a direct parameter extraction procedure for SiGe pnp heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) large-signal and small-signal models. Test structure parasitics are removed from the measured small-signal parameters using an open-short de-embedding technique, improved to accoun...

  2. Delaminated Transfer of CVD Graphene

    Clavijo, Alexis; Mao, Jinhai; Tilak, Nikhil; Altvater, Michael; Andrei, Eva

    Single layer graphene is commonly synthesized by dissociation of a carbonaceous gas at high temperatures in the presence of a metallic catalyst in a process known as Chemical Vapor Deposition or CVD. Although it is possible to achieve high quality graphene by CVD, the standard transfer technique of etching away the metallic catalyst is wasteful and jeopardizes the quality of the graphene film by contamination from etchants. Thus, development of a clean transfer technique and preservation of the parent substrate remain prominent hurdles to overcome. In this study, we employ a copper pretreatment technique and optimized parameters for growth of high quality single layer graphene at atmospheric pressure. We address the transfer challenge by utilizing the adhesive properties between a polymer film and graphene to achieve etchant-free transfer of graphene films from a copper substrate. Based on this concept we developed a technique for dry delamination and transferring of graphene to hexagonal boron nitride substrates, which produced high quality graphene films while at the same time preserving the integrity of the copper catalyst for reuse. DOE-FG02-99ER45742, Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program.

  3. Selective exfoliation of single-layer graphene from non-uniform graphene grown on Cu

    Lim, Jae-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Jang, Hyeon-Sik; Whang, Dongmok; Joo, Won-Jae; Hwang, SungWoo

    2015-01-01

    Graphene growth on a copper surface via metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition has several advantages in terms of providing high-quality graphene with the potential for scale-up, but the product is usually inhomogeneous due to the inability to control the graphene layer growth. The non-uniform regions strongly affect the reliability of the graphene in practical electronic applications. Herein, we report a novel graphene transfer method that allows for the selective exfoliation of single-layer graphene from non-uniform graphene grown on a Cu foil. Differences in the interlayer bonding energy are exploited to mechanically separate only the top single-layer graphene and transfer this to an arbitrary substrate. The dry-transferred single-layer graphene showed electrical characteristics that were more uniform than those of graphene transferred using conventional wet-etching transfer steps. (paper)

  4. Suppression of intrinsic roughness in encapsulated graphene

    Thomsen, Joachim Dahl; Gunst, Tue; Gregersen, Søren Schou

    2017-01-01

    Roughness in graphene is known to contribute to scattering effects which lower carrier mobility. Encapsulating graphene in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) leads to a significant reduction in roughness and has become the de facto standard method for producing high-quality graphene devices. We have...... fabricated graphene samples encapsulated by hBN that are suspended over apertures in a substrate and used noncontact electron diffraction measurements in a transmission electron microscope to measure the roughness of encapsulated graphene inside such structures. We furthermore compare the roughness...... of these samples to suspended bare graphene and suspended graphene on hBN. The suspended heterostructures display a root mean square (rms) roughness down to 12 pm, considerably less than that previously reported for both suspended graphene and graphene on any substrate and identical within experimental error...

  5. Correlator receiver architecture with PnpN optical thyristor operating as optical hard-limiter

    Kang, Tae-Gu; Ho Lee, Su; Park, Soonchul

    2011-07-01

    We propose novel correlator receiver architecture with a PnpN optical thyristor operating as optical hard-limiter, and demonstrate a multiple-access interference rejection of the proposed correlator receiver. The proposed correlator receiver is composed of the 1×2 splitter, optical delay line, 2×1 combiner, and fabricated PnpN optical thyristor. The proposed correlator receiver enhances the system performance because it excludes some combinations of multiple-access interference patterns from causing errors as in optical code-division multiple access systems with conventional optical receiver shown in all previous works. It is found that the proposed correlator receiver can fully reject the interference signals generated by decoding processing and multiple access for two simultaneous users.

  6. What a difference a 5f element makes: trivalent and tetravalent uranium halide complexes supported by one and two bis[2-(diisopropylphosphino)-4-methylphenyl]amido (PNP) ligands.

    Cantat, Thibault; Scott, Brian L; Morris, David E; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2009-03-02

    The coordination behavior of the bis[2-(diisopropylphosphino)-4-methylphenyl]amido ligand (PNP) toward UI3(THF)4 and UCl4 has been investigated to access new uranium(III) and uranium(IV) halide complexes supported by one and two PNP ligands. The reaction between (PNP)K (6) and 1 equiv of UI3(THF)4 afforded the trivalent halide complex (PNP)UI2(4-tBu-pyridine)2 (7) in the presence of 4-tert-butylpyridine. The same reaction carried out with UCl4 and no donor ligand gave [(PNP)UCl3]2 (8), in which the uranium coordination sphere in the (PNP)UCl3 unit is completed by a bridging chloride ligand. When UCl4 is reacted with 1 equiv (PNP)K (6) in the presence of THF, trimethylphosphine oxide (TMPO), or triphenylphosphineoxide (TPPO), the tetravalent halide complexes (PNP)UCl3(THF) (9), (PNP)UCl3(TMPO)2 (10), and (PNP)UCl3(TPPO) (11), respectively, are formed in excellent yields. The bis(PNP) complexes of uranium(III), (PNP)2UI (12), and uranium(IV), (PNP)2UCl2 (13), were easily isolated from the analogous reactions between 2 equiv of 6 and UI3(THF)4 or UCl4, respectively. Complexes 12 and 13 represent the first examples of complexes featuring two PNP ligands coordinated to a single metal center. Complexes 7-13 have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. The X-ray structures demonstrate the ability of the PNP ligand to adopt new coordination modes upon coordination to uranium. The PNP ligand can adopt both pseudo-meridional and pseudo-facial geometries when it is kappa3-(P,N,P) coordinated, depending on the steric demand at the uranium metal center. Additionally, its hemilabile character was demonstrated with an unusual kappa2-(P,N) coordination mode that is maintained in both the solid-state and in solution. Comparison of the structures of the mono(PNP) and bis(PNP) complexes 7, 9, 11-13 with their respective C5Me5 analogues 1-4 undoubtedly show that a more sterically congested environment is provided by the PNP ligand. The

  7. Impact of doped boron concentration in emitter on high- and low-dose-rate damage in lateral PNP transistors

    Zheng Yuzhan; Lu Wu; Ren Diyuan; Wang Yiyuan; Wang Zhikuan; Yang Yonghui

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of radiation damage under a high or low dose rate in lateral PNP transistors with a heavily or lightly doped emitter is investigated. Experimental results show that as the total dose increases, the base current of transistors would increase and the current gain decreases. Furthermore, more degradation has been found in lightly-doped PNP transistors, and an abnormal effect is observed in heavily doped transistors. The role of radiation defects, especially the double effects of oxide trapped charge, is discussed in heavily or lightly doped transistors. Finally, through comparison between the high- and low-dose-rate response of the collector current in heavily doped lateral PNP transistors, the abnormal effect can be attributed to the annealing of the oxide trapped charge. The response of the collector current, in heavily doped PNP transistors under high- and low-dose-rate irradiation is described in detail. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  8. Fast High-Quality Noise

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Wyvill, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    At the moment the noise functions available in a graphics programmer's toolbox are either slow to compute or they involve grid-line artifacts making them of lower quality. In this paper we present a real-time noise computation with no grid-line artifacts or other regularity problems. In other words......, we put a new tool in the box that computes fast high-quality noise. In addition to being free of artifacts, the noise we present does not rely on tabulated data (everything is computed on the fly) and it is easy to adjust quality vs. quantity for the noise. The noise is based on point rendering (like...... spot noise), but it extends to more than two dimensions. The fact that it is based on point rendering makes art direction of the noise much easier....

  9. Implemented Crime Prevention Strategies of PNP in Salug Valley, Zamboanga Del Sur, Philippines

    Mark E. Patalinghug

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed primarily to determine the effectiveness of crime prevention strategies implemented by the Salug Valley Philippine National Police (PNP in terms of Police Integrated Patrol System, Barangay Peacekeeping Operation, Anti - Criminality Operation, Integrated Area Community Public Safety services, Bantay Turista and Scho ol Safety Project as evaluated by 120 inhabitants and 138 PNP officers from four Municipalities of Salug Valley Zamboanga del Sur. Stratified random sampling was utilized in determining the respondents. Index crime rate were correlated with the crime preve ntion strategies of the PNP in town of Salug Valley. A descriptive method of research was applied in this study utilizing self - made questionnaire. The data collected were analyzed using the main statistical tools like frequency count, percentage, mean com putation, Kruskal Wallis Analysis of Variance and simple correlation. Findings of the study revealed that the crime prevention strategies in four (4 municipalities were “much effective” to include Integrated Patrol System, Barangay Peace Keeping Operation s, Anti - Criminality Operations, Integrated Area Community Public Safety Services, Bantay Turista and School Safety Project in connection to the responses of 158 participants. There is a significant relationship between crime prevention strategies employed and index crime rate.

  10. AS3MT, GSTO, and PNP polymorphisms: impact on arsenic methylation and implications for disease susceptibility.

    Antonelli, Ray; Shao, Kan; Thomas, David J; Sams, Reeder; Cowden, John

    2014-07-01

    Oral exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with adverse health effects. Epidemiological studies suggest differences in susceptibility to these health effects, possibly due to genotypic variation. Genetic polymorphisms in iAs metabolism could lead to increased susceptibility by altering urinary iAs metabolite concentrations. To examine the impact of genotypic polymorphisms on iAs metabolism. We screened 360 publications from PubMed and Web of Science for data on urinary mono- and dimethylated arsenic (MMA and DMA) percentages and polymorphic genes encoding proteins that are hypothesized to play roles in arsenic metabolism. The genes we examined were arsenic (+3) methyltransferase (AS3MT), glutathione-s-transferase omega (GSTO), and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). Relevant data were pooled to determine which polymorphisms are associated across studies with changes in urinary metabolite concentration. In our review, AS3MT polymorphisms rs3740390, rs11191439, and rs11191453 were associated with statistically significant changes in percent urinary MMA. Studies of GSTO polymorphisms did not indicate statistically significant associations with methylation, and there are insufficient data on PNP polymorphisms to evaluate their impact on metabolism. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that AS3MT polymorphisms alter in vivo metabolite concentrations. Preliminary evidence suggests that AS3MT genetic polymorphisms may impact disease susceptibility. GSTO polymorphisms were not associated with iAs-associated health outcomes. Additional data are needed to evaluate the association between PNP polymorphisms and iAs-associated health outcomes. Delineation of these relationships may inform iAs mode(s) of action and the approach for evaluating low-dose health effects for iAs. Genotype impacts urinary iAs metabolite concentrations and may be a potential mechanism for iAs-related disease susceptibility. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Availability of high quality weather data measurements

    Andersen, Elsa; Johansen, Jakob Berg; Furbo, Simon

    In the period 2016-2017 the project “Availability of high quality weather data measurements” is carried out at Department of Civil Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark. The aim of the project is to establish measured high quality weather data which will be easily available...... for the building energy branch and the solar energy branch in their efforts to achieve energy savings and for researchers and students carrying out projects where measured high quality weather data are needed....

  12. Expansion and exfoliation of graphite to form graphene

    Patole, Shashikan P.

    2017-07-27

    Graphene production methods are described based on subjecting non- covalent graphite intercalated compounds, such as graphite bisulfate, to expansion conditions such as shocks of heat and/or microwaves followed by turbulence-assisted exfoliation to produce few-layer, high quality graphene flakes. Depending on the approach selected for the exfoliation step, free-flowing graphene powder, graphene slurry, or an aqueous graphene mixture can be obtained. Surfactants can aid in dispersion, and graphene inks can be formed. The parameters of the process are simple, efficient and low-cost enabling therefore the scale- up of production. Applications include electrodes and energy storage devices.

  13. The Aluminum-Free P-n-P InGaAsN Double Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors

    CHANG,PING-CHIH; LI,N.Y.; BACA,ALBERT G.; MONIER,C.; LAROCHE,J.R.; HOU,H.Q.; REN,F.; PEARTON,S.J.

    2000-08-01

    The authors have demonstrated an aluminum-free P-n-P GaAs/InGaAsN/GaAs double heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT). The device has a low turn-on voltage (V{sub ON}) that is 0.27 V lower than in a comparable P-n-p AlGaAs/GaAs HBT. The device shows near-ideal D. C. characteristics with a current gain ({beta}) greater than 45. The high-speed performance of the device are comparable to a similar P-n-p AlGaAs/GaAs HBT, with f{sub T} and f{sub MAX} values of 12 GHz and 10 GHz, respectively. This device is very suitable for low-power complementary HBT circuit applications, while the aluminum-free emitter structure eliminates issues typically associated with AlGaAs.

  14. Singlet-to-triplet ratio in the deuteron breakup reaction pd → pnp at 585 MeV

    Uzikov, Yu.N.; Komarov, V.I.; Rathmann, F.; Seyfarth, H.

    2001-01-01

    Available experimental data on the exclusive pd → pnp reaction at 585 MeV show a narrow peak in the proton-neutron final-state interaction region. It was supposed previously, on the basis of a phenomenological analysis of the shape of this peak, that the final spin-singlet pn state provided about one third of the observed cross section. By comparing the absolute value of the measured cross section with that of pd elastic scattering using the Faeldt-Wilkin extrapolation theorem, it is shown here that the pd → pnp data can be explained mainly by the spin-triplet final state with a singlet admixture of a few percent. The smallness of the singlet contribution is compatible with existing pN → pNπ data and the one-pion exchange mechanism of the pd → pnp reaction

  15. Promising applications of graphene and graphene-based nanostructures

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-06-01

    The present article is a review of research works on promising applications of graphene and graphene-based nanostructures. It contains five main scientific subjects. The first one is the research on graphene-based transparent and flexible conductive films for displays and electrodes: efficient method ensuring uniform and controllable deposition of reduced graphene oxide thin films over large areas, large-scale pattern growth of graphene films for stretchble transparent electrodes, utilization of graphene-based transparent conducting films and graphene oxide-based ones in many photonic and optoelectronic devices and equipments such as the window electrodes of inorganic, organic and dye-sensitized solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes, light-emitting electrochemical cells, touch screens, flexible smart windows, graphene-based saturated absorbers in laser cavities for ultrafast generations, graphene-based flexible, transparent heaters in automobile defogging/deicing systems, heatable smart windows, graphene electrodes for high-performance organic field-effect transistors, flexible and transparent acoustic actuators and nanogenerators etc. The second scientific subject is the research on conductive inks for printed electronics to revolutionize the electronic industry by producing cost-effective electronic circuits and sensors in very large quantities: preparing high mobility printable semiconductors, low sintering temperature conducting inks, graphene-based ink by liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in organic solutions, and developing inkjet printing technique for mass production of high-quality graphene patterns with high resolution and for fabricating a variety of good-performance electronic devices, including transparent conductors, embedded resistors, thin-film transistors and micro supercapacitors. The third scientific subject is the research on graphene-based separation membranes: molecular dynamics simulation study on the mechanisms of the transport of

  16. Crystal structures of carbamate kinase from Giardia lamblia bound with citric acid and AMP-PNP.

    Kap Lim

    Full Text Available The parasite Giardia lamblia utilizes the L-arginine dihydrolase pathway to generate ATP from L-arginine. Carbamate kinase (CK catalyzes the last step in this pathway, converting ADP and carbamoyl phosphate to ATP and ammonium carbamate. Because the L-arginine pathway is essential for G. lamblia survival and absent in high eukaryotes including humans, the enzyme is a potential target for drug development. We have determined two crystal structures of G. lamblia CK (glCK with bound ligands. One structure, in complex with a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog, adenosine 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP, was determined at 2.6 Å resolution. The second structure, in complex with citric acid bound in the postulated carbamoyl phosphate binding site, was determined in two slightly different states at 2.1 and 2.4 Å resolution. These structures reveal conformational flexibility of an auxiliary domain (amino acid residues 123-170, which exhibits open or closed conformations or structural disorder, depending on the bound ligand. The structures also reveal a smaller conformational change in a region associated the AMP-PNP adenine binding site. The protein residues involved in binding, together with a model of the transition state, suggest that catalysis follows an in-line, predominantly dissociative, phosphotransfer reaction mechanism, and that closure of the flexible auxiliary domain is required to protect the transition state from bulk solvent.

  17. The Arabidopsis thaliana natriuretic peptide AtPNP-A is a systemic regulator of leaf dark respiration and signals via the phloem

    Ruzvidzo, Oziniel; Donaldson, Lara Elizabeth; Valentine, Alex J.; Gehring, Christoph A

    2011-01-01

    -molar concentrations. Here we show that a recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A) rapidly increased the rate of dark respiration in treated leaves after 5 min. In addition, we observed increases in lower leaves, and with a lag time of 10 min, the effect spread

  18. Technique of forecasting the working capacity of horizontal p-n-p transistor for a given radiation level; Metodika prognozirovaniya rabotosposobnosti gorizontal`nogo p-n-p tranzistora na zadannyj uroven` izlucheniya

    Pershenkov, V S; Sevast` yanov, A V

    1994-12-31

    Methods of forecasting the degradation of horizontal p-n-p transistors under the effect of ionizing radiation based on the principles of invariant topological approach are presented. Results are presented and analysis of experimental investigations into the real test structures performed in the same process cycle as the integral circuit under development is given.

  19. Electrochemical oxidation of p-nitrophenol using graphene-modified electrodes, and a comparison to the performance of MWNT-based electrodes

    Arvinte, A.; Pinteala, M.; Mahosenaho, M.; Sesay, A.M.; Virtanen, V.

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of p-nitrophenol (p-NP) has been studied comparatively on a graphene modified electrode and a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) electrode by using cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. The sensors were fabricated by modifying screen-printed electrodes with graphene and MWNT nanomaterials, respectively, both dispersed in Nafion polymer. p-NP is irreversibly oxidized at +0. 9 V (vs. the Ag/AgCl) in solutions of pH 7. The height and potential of the peaks depend on pH in the range from 5 to 11. In acidic media, p-NP yields a well-defined oxidation peak at +0. 96 V which gradually increases in height with the concentration of the analyte. In case of differential pulse voltammetry in sulfuric acid solution, the sensitivity is practically the same for both electrodes. The modified electrodes display an unusually wide linear response (from 10 μM to 0. 62 mM of p-NP), with a detection limit of 0. 6 μM in case of the graphene electrode, and of 1. 3 μM in case of the MWNT electrode. (author)

  20. Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) Activity of Lymphocytes and T Cell Subsets in Peripheral Blood in Thyroid Tumors

    Kim, Dong Soo

    1992-01-01

    To elucidate alteration of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) activity of peripheral lymphocytes and helper/inducer and suppressor/cytototxic T cells in patients with thyroid tumors, the author examined PNP activity, and CD4 + and CD8 + cells of peripheral blood in 20 cases of simple goiter, 9 cases of thyroid adenoma and 20 cases of thyroid cancer as well as 11 cases of adult healthy subjects as control. Diagnoses were established on the basis of commonly accepted clinical and biochemical criteria in simple goiter and were confirmed histopathologically in thyroid adenoma and cancer. All blood was obtained from veins of the patients and control subjects in Pusan National University Hospital during the period of January to August, 1991. The results obtained were summarized as follows: 1) The PNP activity was significantly decreased or tended to be decreased in thyroid adenomas and cancers as compared with control subjects and simple goiters. 2) The percentage of CD8 cells was significantly decreased or tended to be decreased in thyroid cancers as compared with simple goiters, thyroid adenomas and control subjects. 3) The CD4/CD8 ratio was significantly increased or tended to be increased in thyroid cancer as compared with simple goiters, thyroid adenomas and control subjects. On the basis of the results, it can be suggested that the immunodysfunction in thyroid cancer may be due to decreased suppressor/cytotoxic T cells, and the estimation of PNP activity of peripheral lymphocyte is a helpful test in detecting the immune status in thyroid tumors.

  1. Ionizing/displacement synergistic effects induced by gamma and neutron irradiation in gate-controlled lateral PNP bipolar transistors

    Wang, Chenhui, E-mail: wangchenhui@nint.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Irradiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O. Box 69-10, Xi’an 710024 (China); Chen, Wei; Yao, Zhibin; Jin, Xiaoming; Liu, Yan; Yang, Shanchao [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Irradiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O. Box 69-10, Xi’an 710024 (China); Wang, Zhikuan [State Key Laboratory of Analog Integrated Circuit, Chongqing 400060 (China)

    2016-09-21

    A kind of gate-controlled lateral PNP bipolar transistor has been specially designed to do experimental validations and studies on the ionizing/displacement synergistic effects in the lateral PNP bipolar transistor. The individual and mixed irradiation experiments of gamma rays and neutrons are accomplished on the transistors. The common emitter current gain, gate sweep characteristics and sub-threshold sweep characteristics are measured after each exposure. The results indicate that under the sequential irradiation of gamma rays and neutrons, the response of the gate-controlled lateral PNP bipolar transistor does exhibit ionizing/displacement synergistic effects and base current degradation is more severe than the simple artificial sum of those under the individual gamma and neutron irradiation. Enough attention should be paid to this phenomenon in radiation damage evaluation. - Highlights: • A kind of gate-controlled lateral PNP bipolar transistor has been specially designed to facilitate the analysis of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects induced by the mixed irradiation of gamma and neutron. • The difference between ionizing/displacement synergistic effects and the simple sum of TID and displacement effects is analyzed. • The physical mechanisms of synergistic effects are explained.

  2. Investigations on accidents with massive water ingress exemplified by the pebble bed reactor PNP-500

    Moormann, R.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code is used for analyses of massive water ingress accidents in the High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor concept PNP-500 with pebble bed core. The analyses are mainly focussed on graphite corrosion processes. For the investigated accidents a correct reactor shut down in assumed. The mass of water ingressing into the primary circuit is varied between 1000 and 7500 kg (i.e., up to hypothetical values). The dependence of accident consequences on parameters such as intensity and starting time of the afterheat removal system or kinetic values of the chemical processes is examined. The results show that even under pessimistic assumptions the extent of the graphite corrosion is relatively low; significant damaging of fuel elements or graphite components does not occur. A primary circuit depressurization, combined with local burning of water gas, would probably not affect the fission product retention potential of the (gastight) containment. Summing up, the risk caused by these accidents remains small. (orig.) [de

  3. Final state interaction in the pd → pnp reaction at 1 GeV

    Deloff, A.

    1992-09-01

    The pd → pnp reaction at 1 GeV in both the direct and charge exchange channel has been investigated. The experimental data come from a line reversed beam-target experiment with 3.3 GeV/c deuterons incident on a proton target. In the direct channel data exhibit narrow structures in the np effective mass spectra: at threshold, at 2.02 GeV and at 2.12 GeV which have been seen before and we report on a new narrow enhancement at 1.95 GeV. In charge exchange channel the data show somewhat broader peak at 2.18 GeV. The data are explained by using a conventional approach, i.e. without sub-nucleonic degrees of freedom, but including the ΔN channel in NN scattering. 29 figs., 1 tab., 36 refs. (author)

  4. Interlayer quality dependent graphene spin valve

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Hussain, Ghulam; Siddique, Salma; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Murtaza, Ghulam; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood

    2017-01-01

    It is possible to utilize the new class of materials for emerging two-dimensional (2D) spintronic applications. Here, the role of defects in the graphene interlayer and its influence on the spin valve signal is reported. The emergence of D peak in Raman spectrum reveals defects in the graphene layer. The linear I-V curve for defective and non-defective graphene samples indicate the ohmic nature of NiFe and graphene contact. A non-uniform magnetoresistive effect with a bump is persistently observed for defective graphene device at various temperatures, while a smooth and symmetric signal is detected for non-defective graphene spin valve. Parallel and antiparallel alignments of magnetization of magnetic materials shows low and high resistance states, respectively. The magnetoresistance (MR) ratio for defective graphene NiFe/graphene/NiFe spin valve is measured to be ~0.16% at 300 K which progresses to ~0.39% for non-defective graphene device at the same temperature. Similarly at 4.2 K the MR ratios are reported to be ~0.41% and ~0.78% for defective and non-defective graphene devices, respectively. Our investigation provides an evidence for relatively better response of the spin valve signal with high quality graphene interlayer.

  5. Interlayer quality dependent graphene spin valve

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir, E-mail: zahir.upc@gmail.com [Faculty of Engineering Sciences, GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, 23640 Pakistan (Pakistan); Hussain, Ghulam [Faculty of Engineering Sciences, GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, 23640 Pakistan (Pakistan); Siddique, Salma [Department of Bioscience & Biotechnology, Sejong University, Seoul, 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas [Department of Physics, Riphah Institute of Computing and Applied Sciences (RICAS), Riphah International University, Lahore (Pakistan); Murtaza, Ghulam [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ramay, Shahid Mahmood [Physics & Astronomy Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-01-15

    It is possible to utilize the new class of materials for emerging two-dimensional (2D) spintronic applications. Here, the role of defects in the graphene interlayer and its influence on the spin valve signal is reported. The emergence of D peak in Raman spectrum reveals defects in the graphene layer. The linear I-V curve for defective and non-defective graphene samples indicate the ohmic nature of NiFe and graphene contact. A non-uniform magnetoresistive effect with a bump is persistently observed for defective graphene device at various temperatures, while a smooth and symmetric signal is detected for non-defective graphene spin valve. Parallel and antiparallel alignments of magnetization of magnetic materials shows low and high resistance states, respectively. The magnetoresistance (MR) ratio for defective graphene NiFe/graphene/NiFe spin valve is measured to be ~0.16% at 300 K which progresses to ~0.39% for non-defective graphene device at the same temperature. Similarly at 4.2 K the MR ratios are reported to be ~0.41% and ~0.78% for defective and non-defective graphene devices, respectively. Our investigation provides an evidence for relatively better response of the spin valve signal with high quality graphene interlayer.

  6. Structured epitaxial graphene: growth and properties

    Hu Yike; Ruan Ming; Guo Zelei; Dong Rui; Palmer, James; Hankinson, John; Berger, Claire; Heer, Walt A de

    2012-01-01

    Graphene is generally considered to be a strong candidate to succeed silicon as an electronic material. However, to date, it actually has not yet demonstrated capabilities that exceed standard semiconducting materials. Currently demonstrated viable graphene devices are essentially limited to micrometre-sized ultrahigh-frequency analogue field effect transistors and quantum Hall effect devices for metrology. Nanoscopically patterned graphene tends to have disordered edges that severely reduce mobilities thereby obviating its advantage over other materials. Here we show that graphene grown on structured silicon carbide surfaces overcomes the edge roughness and promises to provide an inroad into nanoscale patterning of graphene. We show that high-quality ribbons and rings can be made using this technique. We also report on the progress towards high-mobility graphene monolayers on silicon carbide for device applications. (paper)

  7. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Large Area Graphene

    Larsen, Martin Benjamin Barbour Spanget

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) is a viable technique for fabrication of large areas of graphene. CVD fabrication is the most prominent and common way of fabricating graphene in industry. In this thesis I have attempted to optimize a growth recipe and catalyst layer for CVD fabrication of uniform......, single layer, and high carrier mobility large area graphene. The main goals of this work are; (1) explore the graphene growth mechanics in a low pressure cold-wall CVD system on a copper substrate, and (2) optimize the process of growing high quality graphene in terms of carrier mobility, and crystal...... structure. Optimization of a process for graphene growth on commercially available copper foil is limited by the number of aluminium oxide particles on the surface of the catalyst. By replacing the copper foil with a thin deposited copper film on a SiO2/Si or c-plane sapphire wafer the particles can...

  8. Reliable processing of graphene using metal etchmasks

    Peltekis Nikos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Graphene exhibits exciting properties which make it an appealing candidate for use in electronic devices. Reliable processes for device fabrication are crucial prerequisites for this. We developed a large area of CVD synthesis and transfer of graphene films. With patterning of these graphene layers using standard photoresist masks, we are able to produce arrays of gated graphene devices with four point contacts. The etching and lift off process poses problems because of delamination and contamination due to polymer residues when using standard resists. We introduce a metal etch mask which minimises these problems. The high quality of graphene is shown by Raman and XPS spectroscopy as well as electrical measurements. The process is of high value for applications, as it improves the processability of graphene using high-throughput lithography and etching techniques.

  9. Surfactant mediated liquid phase exfoliation of graphene

    Narayan, Rekha; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-10-01

    Commercialization of graphene based applications inevitably requires cost effective mass production. From the early days of research on graphene, direct liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) of graphite has been considered as the most promising strategy to produce high-quality mono or few-layer graphene sheets in solvent dispersion forms. Substantial success has been achieved thus far in the LPE of graphene employing numerous solvent systems and suitable surfactants. This invited review article principally showcase the recent research progress as well as shortcomings of surfactant assisted LPE of graphene. In particular, a comprehensive assessment of the quality and yield of the graphene sheets produced by different categories of the surfactants are summarized. Future direction of LPE methods is also proposed for the eventual success of commercial applications.

  10. Facet-dependent study of efficient growth of graphene on copper

    The growth of graphene by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on copper is the most promising scalable method for high-quality graphene. The use of ethanol, an economic and safe precursor, for the fast growth of graphene on copper by a home-built CVD set-up was analysed. Full coverage of uniform single-layer ...

  11. High-frequency, scaled graphene transistors on diamond-like carbon

    Wu, Y.; Lin, Y.M.; Bol, A.A.; Jenkins, K.A.; Xia, F.; Farmer, D.B.; Zu, Y.; Avouris, Ph.

    2011-01-01

    Owing to its high carrier mobility and saturation velocity, graphene has attracted enormous attention in recent years In particular, high-performance graphene transistors for radio-frequency (r.f.) applications are of great interest. Synthesis of large-scale graphene sheets of high quality and at

  12. Graphene growth on Ge(100)/Si(100) substrates by CVD method.

    Pasternak, Iwona; Wesolowski, Marek; Jozwik, Iwona; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Lupina, Grzegorz; Dabrowski, Pawel; Baranowski, Jacek M; Strupinski, Wlodek

    2016-02-22

    The successful integration of graphene into microelectronic devices is strongly dependent on the availability of direct deposition processes, which can provide uniform, large area and high quality graphene on nonmetallic substrates. As of today the dominant technology is based on Si and obtaining graphene with Si is treated as the most advantageous solution. However, the formation of carbide during the growth process makes manufacturing graphene on Si wafers extremely challenging. To overcome these difficulties and reach the set goals, we proposed growth of high quality graphene layers by the CVD method on Ge(100)/Si(100) wafers. In addition, a stochastic model was applied in order to describe the graphene growth process on the Ge(100)/Si(100) substrate and to determine the direction of further processes. As a result, high quality graphene was grown, which was proved by Raman spectroscopy results, showing uniform monolayer films with FWHM of the 2D band of 32 cm(-1).

  13. Direct Synthesis of Co-doped Graphene on Dielectric Substrates Using Solid Carbon Sources

    Qi Wang; Pingping Zhang; Qiqi Zhuo; Xiaoxin Lv; Jiwei Wang; Xuhui Sun

    2015-01-01

    Direct synthesis of high-quality doped graphene on dielectric substrates without transfer is highly desired for simplified device processing in electronic applications.However,graphene synthesis directly on substrates suitable for device applications,though highly demanded,remains unattainable and challenging.Here,a simple and transfer-free synthesis of high-quality doped graphene on the dielectric substrate has been developed using a thin Cu layer as the top catalyst and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as both carbon precursors and doping sources.N-doped and N,F-co-doped graphene have been achieved using TPB and F16Cu Pc as solid carbon sources,respectively.The growth conditions were systematically optimized and the as-grown doped graphene were well characterized.The growth strategy provides a controllable transfer-free route for high-quality doped graphene synthesis,which will facilitate the practical applications of graphene.

  14. Graphene on graphene antidot lattices

    Gregersen, Søren Schou; Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Power, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Graphene bilayer systems are known to exhibit a band gap when the layer symmetry is broken by applying a perpendicular electric field. The resulting band structure resembles that of a conventional semiconductor with a parabolic dispersion. Here, we introduce a bilayer graphene heterostructure......, where single-layer graphene is placed on top of another layer of graphene with a regular lattice of antidots. We dub this class of graphene systems GOAL: graphene on graphene antidot lattice. By varying the structure geometry, band-structure engineering can be performed to obtain linearly dispersing...

  15. Fabrication of high-quality brazed joints

    Orlov, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    Problem of ensuring of joint high-quality when brazing different parts in power engineering is considered. To obtain high-quality joints it is necessary to correctly design brazed joint and to choose a gap width, overlap length and fillet radius; to clean up carefully the surfaces to be brazed and fix them properly one relative to another; to apply a solder so as to provide its flowing into the gap and sticking in it; to exactly regulate thermal conditions of brazing. High quality and reliability of brazed joints are ensured by the application of solders based on noble metals, and cheap solders based on nickel, manganese and copper. Joints brazed with nickel base solders may operate at temperatures as high as 888 deg C

  16. Catalytic mechanisms of direct pyrrole synthesis via dehydrogenative coupling mediated by PNP-Ir or PNN-Ru pincer complexes: Crucial role of proton-transfer shuttles in the PNP-Ir system

    Qu, Shuanglin

    2014-04-02

    Kempe et al. and Milstein et al. have recently advanced the dehydrogenative coupling methodology to synthesize pyrroles from secondary alcohols (e.g., 3) and β-amino alcohols (e.g., 4), using PNP-Ir (1) and PNN-Ru (2) pincer complexes, respectively. We herein present a DFT study to characterize the catalytic mechanism of these reactions. After precatalyst activation to give active 1A/2A, the transformation proceeds via four stages: 1A/2A-catalyzed alcohol (3) dehydrogenation to give ketone (11), base-facilitated C-N coupling of 11 and 4 to form an imine-alcohol intermediate (18), base-promoted cyclization of 18, and catalyst regeneration via H2 release from 1R/2R. For alcohol dehydrogenations, the bifunctional double hydrogen-transfer pathway is more favorable than that via β-hydride elimination. Generally, proton-transfer (H-transfer) shuttles facilitate various H-transfer processes in both systems. Notwithstanding, H-transfer shuttles play a much more crucial role in the PNP-Ir system than in the PNN-Ru system. Without H-transfer shuttles, the key barriers up to 45.9 kcal/mol in PNP-Ir system are too high to be accessible, while the corresponding barriers (<32.0 kcal/mol) in PNN-Ru system are not unreachable. Another significant difference between the two systems is that the addition of alcohol to 1A giving an alkoxo complex is endergonic by 8.1 kcal/mol, whereas the addition to 2A is exergonic by 8.9 kcal/mol. The thermodynamic difference could be the main reason for PNP-Ir system requiring lower catalyst loading than the PNN-Ru system. We discuss how the differences are resulted in terms of electronic and geometric structures of the catalysts and how to use the features in catalyst development. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  17. Producing high-quality slash pine seeds

    James Barnett; Sue Varela

    2003-01-01

    Slash pine is a desirable species. It serves many purposes and is well adapted to poorly drained flatwoods and seasonally flooded areas along the lower Coastal Plain of the Southeastern US. The use of high-quality seeds has been shown to produce uniform seedlings for outplanting, which is key to silvicultural success along the Coastal Plain and elsewhere. We present...

  18. Enhanced catalytic hydrogenation activity of Ni/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite prepared by a solid-state method

    Li, Yizhao; Cao, Yali; Jia, Dianzeng

    2018-01-01

    A simple solid-state method has been applied to synthesize Ni/reduced graphene oxide (Ni/rGO) nanocomposite under ambient condition. Ni nanoparticles with size of 10-30 nm supported on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets are obtained through one-pot solid-state co-reduction among nickel chloride, graphene oxide, and sodium borohydride. The Ni/rGO nanohybrid shows enhanced catalytic activity toward the reduction of p-nitrophenol (PNP) into p-aminophenol compared with Ni nanoparticles. The results of kinetic research display that the pseudo-first-order rate constant for hydrogenation reaction of PNP with Ni/rGO nanocomposite is 7.66 × 10-3 s-1, which is higher than that of Ni nanoparticles (4.48 × 10-3 s-1). It also presents superior turnover frequency (TOF, 5.36 h-1) and lower activation energy ( E a, 29.65 kJ mol-1) in the hydrogenation of PNP with Ni/rGO nanocomposite. Furthermore, composite catalyst can be magnetically separated and reused for five cycles. The large surface area and high electron transfer property of rGO support are beneficial for good catalytic performance of Ni/rGO nanocomposite. Our study demonstrates a simple approach to fabricate metal-rGO heterogeneous nanostructures with advanced functions.

  19. 4pnp J=0e-2e autoionizing series of calcium: experimental and theoretical analysis

    Bolovinos, A.; Luc-Koenig, E.; Assimopoulos, S.; Lyras, A.; Karapanagioti, N.E.; Crete Univ., Iraklion; Charalambidis, D.; Crete Univ., Iraklion; Aymar, M.

    1996-01-01

    The even parity 4pnp J=0, 1, 2 doubly excited autoionizing states of neutral calcium in an atomic beam are investigated by a two-step isolated core excitation (ICE) method using two different combinations of polarization of the laser beams. The different excited energy levels are assigned to nine autoionizing Rydberg series 4p 1/2,3/2 np J=0, 1, 2 for 8≤n≤22. The theoretical interpretation is achieved by a combination of the eigenchannel R-matrix theory and the multichannel quantum defect (MQDT) method. Two, five and six closed interacting channels are introduced for the J=0, J=1 and J=2 series respectively. Theoretical energy level positions, autoionization widths and excitation profiles are compared with the experimental data, confirming the identification of the observed structures and providing evidence of extended mixing between the 4p 1/2 np and 4p 3/2 np series. (orig.). With 9 figs., 3 tabs

  20. The edge- and basal-plane-specific electrochemistry of a single-layer graphene sheet

    Yuan, Wenjing; Zhou, Yu; Li, Yingru; Li, Chun; Peng, Hailin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Zhongfan; Dai, Liming; Shi, Gaoquan

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has a unique atom-thick two-dimensional structure and excellent properties, making it attractive for a variety of electrochemical applications, including electrosynthesis, electrochemical sensors or electrocatalysis, and energy conversion and storage. However, the electrochemistry of single-layer graphene has not yet been well understood, possibly due to the technical difficulties in handling individual graphene sheet. Here, we report the electrochemical behavior at single-layer graphene-based electrodes, comparing the basal plane of graphene to its edge. The graphene edge showed 4 orders of magnitude higher specific capacitance, much faster electron transfer rate and stronger electrocatalytic activity than those of graphene basal plane. A convergent diffusion effect was observed at the sub-nanometer thick graphene edge-electrode to accelerate the electrochemical reactions. Coupling with the high conductivity of a high-quality graphene basal plane, graphene edge is an ideal electrode for electrocatalysis and for the storage of capacitive charges. PMID:23896697

  1. Graphene aerogels

    Pauzauskie, Peter J; Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Biener, Juergen

    2015-03-31

    Graphene aerogels with high conductivity and surface areas including a method for making a graphene aerogel, including the following steps: (1) preparing a reaction mixture comprising a graphene oxide suspension and at least one catalyst; (2) curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; (3) drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel; and (4) pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a graphene aerogel. Applications include electrical energy storage including batteries and supercapacitors.

  2. High-quality compressive ghost imaging

    Huang, Heyan; Zhou, Cheng; Tian, Tian; Liu, Dongqi; Song, Lijun

    2018-04-01

    We propose a high-quality compressive ghost imaging method based on projected Landweber regularization and guided filter, which effectively reduce the undersampling noise and improve the resolution. In our scheme, the original object is reconstructed by decomposing of regularization and denoising steps instead of solving a minimization problem in compressive reconstruction process. The simulation and experimental results show that our method can obtain high ghost imaging quality in terms of PSNR and visual observation.

  3. Programmed synthesis of freestanding graphene nanomembrane arrays.

    Waduge, Pradeep; Larkin, Joseph; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Kar, Swastik; Wanunu, Meni

    2015-02-04

    Freestanding graphene membranes are unique materials. The combination of atomically thin dimensions, remarkable mechanical robustness, and chemical stability make porous and non-porous graphene membranes attractive for water purification and various sensing applications. Nanopores in graphene and other 2D materials have been identified as promising devices for next-generation DNA sequencing based on readout of either transverse DNA base-gated current or through-pore ion current. While several ground breaking studies of graphene-based nanopores for DNA analysis have been reported, all methods to date require a physical transfer of the graphene from its source of production onto an aperture support. The transfer process is slow and often leads to tears in the graphene that render many devices useless for nanopore measurements. In this work, we report a novel scalable approach for site-directed fabrication of pinhole-free graphene nanomembranes. Our approach yields high quality few-layer graphene nanomembranes produced in less than a day using a few steps that do not involve transfer. We highlight the functionality of these graphene devices by measuring DNA translocation through electron-beam fabricated nanopores in such membranes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. On the kinetic barriers of graphene homo-epitaxy

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Xinke; Xie, Ya-Hong; Cahyadi, Erica; Ratsch, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The diffusion processes and kinetic barriers of individual carbon adatoms and clusters on graphene surfaces are investigated to provide fundamental understanding of the physics governing epitaxial growth of multilayer graphene. It is found that individual carbon adatoms form bonds with the underlying graphene whereas the interaction between graphene and carbon clusters, consisting of 6 atoms or more, is very weak being van der Waals in nature. Therefore, small carbon clusters are quite mobile on the graphene surfaces and the diffusion barrier is negligibly small (∼6 meV). This suggests the feasibility of high-quality graphene epitaxial growth at very low growth temperatures with small carbon clusters (e.g., hexagons) as carbon source. We propose that the growth mode is totally different from 3-dimensional bulk materials with the surface mobility of carbon hexagons being the highest over graphene surfaces that gradually decreases with further increase in cluster size

  5. Graphene Coatings

    Stoot, Adam Carsten; Camilli, Luca; Bøggild, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its remarkable electrical and mechanical properties, graphene has been attracting tremendous interest in materials science. In particular, its chemical stability and impermeability make it a promising protective membrane. However, recent investigations reveal that single layer graphene...... cannot be used as a barrier in the long run, due to galvanic corrosion phenomena arising when oxygen or water penetrate through graphene cracks or domain boundaries. Here, we overcome this issue by using a multilayered (ML) graphene coating. Our lab- as well as industrial-scale tests demonstrate that ML...... graphene can effectively protect Ni in harsh environments, even after long term exposure. This is made possible by the presence of a high number of graphene layers, which can efficiently mask the cracks and domain boundaries defects found in individual layers of graphene. Our findings thus show...

  6. Graphene production by dissociation of camphor molecules on nickel substrate

    Ravani, Fotini [Foundation of Research and Technology — Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), 26504, Patras (Greece); Interdepartmental Program in Polymer Science and Technology, University of Patras, 26504, Patras (Greece); Papagelis, Konstantinos [Foundation of Research and Technology — Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), 26504, Patras (Greece); Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504, Patras (Greece); Dracopoulos, Vassileios; Parthenios, John [Foundation of Research and Technology — Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), 26504, Patras (Greece); Dassios, Konstantinos G. [Foundation of Research and Technology — Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), 26504, Patras (Greece); Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110, Ioannina (Greece); Siokou, Angeliki [Foundation of Research and Technology — Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), 26504, Patras (Greece); Galiotis, Costas, E-mail: c.galiotis@iceht.forth.gr [Foundation of Research and Technology — Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), 26504, Patras (Greece); Interdepartmental Program in Polymer Science and Technology, University of Patras, 26504, Patras (Greece); Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504, Patras (Greece)

    2013-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for the production of continuous-high quality-graphene layers based on camphor decomposition on polycrystalline Ni foil, is demonstrated. In situ X-ray diffraction at the pyrolysis temperature of the Ni foil indicates the presence of dominant Ni <111> grains which play an important role in the carbon nucleation and growth. The topography of the grown graphene layers is studied by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy which show that the Ni surface is covered by continuous and wrinkled graphene carpets. Raman spectroscopy reveals the high quality of the graphene film which appears to be only a few monolayers thick. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates the existence of graphitic layers and the absence of any spectral features associated with carbides (Ni{sub x}C). The proposed CVD process is a sufficient method for large scale production of graphene films. - Highlights: ► An inexpensive chemical vapor deposition method based on camphor is presented. ► Few-layer graphene carpets of high quality are produced on polycrystalline Ni. ► The working deposition temperature is decreased by about 15%. ► Natural cooling is employed for graphene production. ► Role of Ni surface texture upon the graphene growth process is demonstrated.

  7. Synthesis of graphene by MEVVA source ion implantation

    Ying, J.J.; Xiao, X.H.; Dai, Z.G.; Wu, W.; Li, W.Q.; Mei, F.; Cai, G.X.; Ren, F.; Jiang, C.Z.

    2013-01-01

    Ion implantation provides a new synthesis route for graphene, and few-layered graphene synthesis by ion implantation has been reported. Here we show the synthesis of a single layer of high-quality graphene by Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) source ion implantation. Polycrystalline nickel and copper thin films are implanted with MEVVA source carbon ions at 40 kV, followed by high-temperature thermal annealing and quenching. A Raman spectrum is applied to probe the quality and thickness of the prepared graphene. A single layer of high-quality graphene is grown on the nickel films, but not on the copper films. The growth mechanisms on the nickel and copper films are explained. MEVVA source ion implantation has been widely applied in industrial applications, demonstrating that this synthesis method can be generalized for industrial production

  8. A novel method for transferring graphene onto PDMS

    Hiranyawasit, Witchawate; Punpattanakul, Krirktakul; Pimpin, Alongkorn; Kim, Houngkyung; Jeon, Seokwoo; Srituravanich, Werayut

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A novel method for graphene transfer onto PDMS substrates established. • SU-8 layer is used to strengthen the adhesion between graphene and PDMS substrate. • A great potential for the development of graphene-based microfluidic devices. - Abstract: Graphene has been attracting great attention from scientific community due to its astonishing mechanical, optical, and electrical properties, especially, graphene films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method are large, uniform and high-quality. CVD-grown graphene films have been successfully transferred onto various kinds of substrates such as SiO 2 /Si, quartz, PET, and plastics. However, graphene transfer onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates for device development has been limited due to the very low surface energy of PDMS. Here, we present a novel method to transfer graphene onto PDMS substrates by utilizing a thin layer of SU-8 as an adhesion layer. The SU-8 adhesion layer significantly improves the adhesion between the graphene layer and the PDMS substrate resulting in successful graphene transfer onto the PDMS substrate. This opens up a great potential of using graphene on PDMS substrates for the development of a wide range of graphene-based transparent and flexible devices.

  9. A novel method for transferring graphene onto PDMS

    Hiranyawasit, Witchawate; Punpattanakul, Krirktakul; Pimpin, Alongkorn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Kim, Houngkyung; Jeon, Seokwoo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Srituravanich, Werayut, E-mail: werayut.s@chula.ac.th [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A novel method for graphene transfer onto PDMS substrates established. • SU-8 layer is used to strengthen the adhesion between graphene and PDMS substrate. • A great potential for the development of graphene-based microfluidic devices. - Abstract: Graphene has been attracting great attention from scientific community due to its astonishing mechanical, optical, and electrical properties, especially, graphene films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method are large, uniform and high-quality. CVD-grown graphene films have been successfully transferred onto various kinds of substrates such as SiO{sub 2}/Si, quartz, PET, and plastics. However, graphene transfer onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates for device development has been limited due to the very low surface energy of PDMS. Here, we present a novel method to transfer graphene onto PDMS substrates by utilizing a thin layer of SU-8 as an adhesion layer. The SU-8 adhesion layer significantly improves the adhesion between the graphene layer and the PDMS substrate resulting in successful graphene transfer onto the PDMS substrate. This opens up a great potential of using graphene on PDMS substrates for the development of a wide range of graphene-based transparent and flexible devices.

  10. High quality transportation fuels from renewable feedstock

    Lindfors, Lars Peter

    2010-09-15

    Hydrotreating of vegetable oils is novel process for producing high quality renewable diesel. Hydrotreated vegetable oils (HVO) are paraffinic hydrocarbons. They are free of aromatics, have high cetane numbers and reduce emissions. HVO can be used as component or as such. HVO processes can also be modified to produce jet fuel. GHG savings by HVO use are significant compared to fossil fuels. HVO is already in commercial production. Neste Oil is producing its NExBTL diesel in two plants. Production of renewable fuels will be limited by availability of sustainable feedstock. Therefore R and D efforts are made to expand feedstock base further.

  11. Boiling curve in high quality flow boiling

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Hein, R.A.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1980-01-01

    The post dry-out heat transfer regime of the flow boiling curve was investigated experimentally for high pressure water at high qualities. The test section was a short round tube located downstream of a hot patch created by a temperature controlled segment of tubing. Results from the experiment showed that the distance from the dryout point has a significant effect on the downstream temperatures and there was no unique boiling curve. The heat transfer coefficients measured sufficiently downstream of the dryout point could be correlated using the Heineman correlation for superheated steam, indicating that the droplet deposition effects could be neglected in this region

  12. Copper-vapor-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition of graphene on dielectric substrates

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Tianru; Wang, Haomin; Zhang, Xuefu; Shi, Zhiyuan; Xie, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    Direct synthesis of high-quality graphene on dielectric substrates is important for its application in electronics. In this work, we report the process of copper-vapor-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition of high-quality and large graphene domains on various dielectric substrates. The copper vapor plays a vital role on the growth of transfer-free graphene. Both single-crystal domains that are much larger than previous reports and high-coverage graphene films can be obtained by adjusting the growth duration. The quality of the obtained graphene was verified to be comparable with that of graphene grown on Cu foil. The progress reported in this work will aid the development of the application of transfer-free graphene in the future.

  13. Intercalation of metals and silicon at the interface of epitaxial graphene and its substrates

    Huang Li; Xu Wen-Yan; Que Yan-De; Mao Jin-Hai; Meng Lei; Pan Li-Da; Li Geng; Wang Ye-Liang; Du Shi-Xuan; Gao Hong-Jun; Liu Yun-Qi

    2013-01-01

    Intercalations of metals and silicon between epitaxial graphene and its substrates are reviewed. For metal intercalation, seven different metals have been successfully intercalated at the interface of graphene/Ru(0001) and form different intercalated structures. Meanwhile, graphene maintains its original high quality after the intercalation and shows features of weakened interaction with the substrate. For silicon intercalation, two systems, graphene on Ru(0001) and on Ir(111), have been investigated. In both cases, graphene preserves its high quality and regains its original superlative properties after the silicon intercalation. More importantly, we demonstrate that thicker silicon layers can be intercalated at the interface, which allows the atomic control of the distance between graphene and the metal substrates. These results show the great potential of the intercalation method as a non-damaging approach to decouple epitaxial graphene from its substrates and even form a dielectric layer for future electronic applications. (topical review - low-dimensional nanostructures and devices)

  14. Electron Interference in Ballistic Graphene Nanoconstrictions

    Baringhaus, Jens; Settnes, Mikkel; Aprojanz, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    We realize nanometer size constrictions in ballistic graphene nanoribbons grown on sidewalls of SiC mesa structures. The high quality of our devices allows the observation of a number of electronic quantum interference phenomena. The transmissions of Fabry-Perot-like resonances are probed...

  15. Relationships between acute toxicities of para nitrophenol (p-NP) and nitrobenzene (NB) to Daphnia magna and Photobacterium phosphoreum: Physicochemical properties and metabolites under anaerobic/aerobic sequentials

    Sponza, Delia Teresa, E-mail: delya.sponza@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eyluel University, Engineering Faculty, Environmental Engineering Department, Buca Kaynaklar Campus, Buca, Izmir (Turkey); Kuscu, Ozlem Selcuk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Engineering and Architecture Faculty, Sueleyman Demirel University, Cuenuer Campus, 32260 Isparta (Turkey)

    2011-01-30

    In this study, the acute toxicities of nitrobenzene (NB) and para nitrophenol (p-NP) were investigated in a high rate sequential anaerobic migrating blanket (AMBR)/aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) using Microtox and Daphnia magna tests. After sequential anaerobic and aerobic treatments, the inhibitions in the Microtox bacteria decreased from an initial 78.10-48.20% and 4.00%, respectively, in wastewater containing 40.00 mg/L p-NP. The inhibitions of the influent wastewater containing 60.00 mg/L NB decreased from 72.10% to 45.30% and to 4.00% after anaerobic and aerobic treatment, respectively. The acute toxicity removals were 94% and 93% in the effluent of the whole sequential system, for p-NP and NB, respectively. The acute toxicity in the influent was dependent on the parent NB and p-NP concentrations and ons their physicochemical properties such as hydrophobicity, octanol/water partition coefficient and vapour density for both Microtox bacteria and Daphnia magna while the toxicity in the effluent of the anaerobic reactor was strongly dependent on the metabolites of p-NP (p-amino phenol, phenol, NH{sub 4}-N) and NB (aniline) for Microtox test. This effluent was not toxic to Daphnia magna.

  16. Relationships between acute toxicities of para nitrophenol (p-NP) and nitrobenzene (NB) to Daphnia magna and Photobacterium phosphoreum: Physicochemical properties and metabolites under anaerobic/aerobic sequentials

    Sponza, Delia Teresa; Kuscu, Ozlem Selcuk

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the acute toxicities of nitrobenzene (NB) and para nitrophenol (p-NP) were investigated in a high rate sequential anaerobic migrating blanket (AMBR)/aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) using Microtox and Daphnia magna tests. After sequential anaerobic and aerobic treatments, the inhibitions in the Microtox bacteria decreased from an initial 78.10-48.20% and 4.00%, respectively, in wastewater containing 40.00 mg/L p-NP. The inhibitions of the influent wastewater containing 60.00 mg/L NB decreased from 72.10% to 45.30% and to 4.00% after anaerobic and aerobic treatment, respectively. The acute toxicity removals were 94% and 93% in the effluent of the whole sequential system, for p-NP and NB, respectively. The acute toxicity in the influent was dependent on the parent NB and p-NP concentrations and ons their physicochemical properties such as hydrophobicity, octanol/water partition coefficient and vapour density for both Microtox bacteria and Daphnia magna while the toxicity in the effluent of the anaerobic reactor was strongly dependent on the metabolites of p-NP (p-amino phenol, phenol, NH 4 -N) and NB (aniline) for Microtox test. This effluent was not toxic to Daphnia magna.

  17. Molecular beam epitaxy of graphene on mica

    Lippert, G.; Dabrowski, J.; Yamamoto, Y.; Mehr, W.; Lupina, G.; Herziger, F.; Maultzsch, J.; Baringhaus, J.; Tegenkamp, C.; Lemme, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Realization of graphene devices is often hindered by the fact that the known layer growth methods do not meet the requirements of the device fabrication in silicon mainstream technology. For example, the relatively straightforward method of decomposition of hexagonal SiC is not CMOS-compatible due to the high-thermal budget it requires [Moon et al., IEEE Electron Device Lett. 31, 260 (2010)]. Techniques based on layer transfer are restricted because of the uncertainty of residual metal contaminants, particles, and structural defects. Of interest is thus a method that would allow one to grow a graphene film directly in the device area where graphene is needed. Production of large area graphene is not necessarily required in this case, but high quality of the film and metal-free growth on an insulating substrate at temperatures below 1000 C are important requirements. We demonstrate direct growth of defect-free graphene on insulators at moderate temperatures by molecular beam epitaxy. The quality of the graphene was probed by high-resolution Raman spectroscopy, indicating a negligible density of defects. The spectra are compared with those from graphene flakes mechanically exfoliated from native graphite onto mica. These results are combined with insights from density functional theory calculations. A model of graphene growth on mica and similar substrates is proposed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Breeding and maintaining high-quality insects

    Jensen, Kim; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Insects have a large potential for sustainably enhancing global food and feed production, and commercial insect production is a rising industry of high economic value. Insects suitable for production typically have fast growth, short generation time, efficient nutrient utilization, high...... reproductive potential, and thrive at high density. Insects may cost-efficiently convert agricultural and industrial food by-products into valuable protein once the technology is finetuned. However, since insect mass production is a new industry, the technology needed to efficiently farm these animals is still...... in a starting phase. Here, we discuss the challenges and precautions that need to be considered when breeding and maintaining high-quality insect populations for food and feed. This involves techniques typically used in domestic animal breeding programs including maintaining genetically healthy populations...

  19. High Quality Virtual Reality for Architectural Exhibitions

    Kreutzberg, Anette

    2016-01-01

    This paper will summarise the findings from creating and implementing a visually high quality Virtual Reality (VR) experiment as part of an international architecture exhibition. It was the aim to represent the architectural spatial qualities as well as the atmosphere created from combining natural...... and artificial lighting in a prominent not yet built project. The outcome is twofold: Findings concerning the integration of VR in an exhibition space and findings concerning the experience of the virtual space itself. In the exhibition, an important aspect was the unmanned exhibition space, requiring the VR...... experience to be self-explanatory. Observations of different visitor reactions to the unmanned VR experience compared with visitor reactions at guided tours with personal instructions are evaluated. Data on perception of realism, spatial quality and light in the VR model were collected with qualitative...

  20. Aromatic graphene

    Das, D. K., E-mail: gour.netai@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Material Science Engineering, National Institute of Technology Durgapur-713209, West Bengal (India); Sahoo, S., E-mail: sukadevsahoo@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Durgapur-713209, West Bengal (India)

    2016-04-13

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  1. Aromatic graphene

    Das, D. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  2. Performance assessment of the (Th,U)O2 HTI-Biso coated particle under PNP/HHT irradiation conditions

    Kania, M.J.; Nickel, H.

    1980-11-01

    The HTI Biso Particle, Variant-I: consisting of a dense 400 μm-diameter (Th,U)O 2 -kernel with a Biso coating using a methane derived pyrocarbon layer (HTI), is a candidate fuel for the advanced PNP/HHT High Temperature Reactor systems. This report presents the results of a comprehensive performance assessment of Variant-I represented by six relevant particle batches irradiated in 12 accelerated irradiation experiments. Fuel performance was judged based upon PNP/HHT qualification requirements with regard to in-reactor operating conditions and end-of-life (EOL) coated particle failure fraction. Fuel operating conditions in each irradiation experiment were obtained from two sources: 1) a thorough review of all available irradiation data on each experiment; and 2) a two-dimensional (R,theta) thermal modeling computer code, R2KTMP, was developed to calculate fuel operating temperature distributions within spherical elements. End-of-life particle failure fractions were determined from: gaseous fission product release, based on in-reactor R/B measurements and postirradiation annealing and room temperature investigations; solid fission product release, from single particle 137 Cs release into fuel element matrix and hot-gaseous chlorine leaching; and visual and ceramographic examinations. Failure fractions determined by solid fission product release yielded values 2-35 times higher than those determined by gaseous fission product release. (orig.) [de

  3. Enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS) in a voltage comparator which only utilizes complementary vertical NPN and PNP transistors

    Krieg, J.F.; Titus, J.L.; Emily, D.; Gehlhausen, M.; Swonger, J.; Platteter, D.

    1999-01-01

    For the first time, enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS) is reported in a vertical bipolar process. A radiation hardness assurance (RHA) test method was successfully demonstrated on a linear circuit, the HS139RH quad comparator, and its discrete transistor elements. This circuit only uses vertical NPN and PNP transistors. Radiation tests on the HS139RH were performed at 25 C using dose rates of 50 rd(Si)/s, 100 mrd(Si)/s and 10 mrd(Si)/s, and at 100 C using a dose rate of 10 rd(Si)/s. Tests at dose rates of 50 rd(Si)/s at 25 C and 10 rd(Si)/s at 100 C were performed on discrete vertical NPN and PNP transistor elements which comprise the HS139RH. Transistor and circuit responses were evaluated. The die's passivation overcoat layers were varied to examine the effect of removing a nitride layer and thinning a deposited SiO 2 (silox) layer

  4. Low temperature synthesis and field emission characteristics of single to few layered graphene grown using PECVD

    Kumar, Avshish; Khan, Sunny; Zulfequar, M.; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid, E-mail: mush_reslab@rediffmail.com

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Graphene was synthesized by PECVD system at a low temperature of 600 °C. • From different characterization techniques, the presence of single and few layered graphene was confirmed. • X-ray diffraction pattern of the graphene showed single crystalline nature of the film. • The as-grown graphene films were observed extremely good field emitters with long term emission current stability. - Abstract: In this work, high-quality graphene has successfully been synthesized on copper (Cu) coated Silicon (Si) substrate at very large-area by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. This method is low cost and highly effective for synthesizing graphene relatively at low temperature of 600 °C. Electron microscopy images have shown that surface morphology of the grown samples is quite uniform consisting of single layered graphene (SLG) to few layered graphene (FLG). Raman spectra reveal that graphene has been grown with high-quality having negligible defects and the observation of G and G' peaks is also an indicative of stokes phonon energy shift caused due to laser excitation. Scanning probe microscopy image also depicts the synthesis of single to few layered graphene. The field emission characteristics of as-grown graphene samples were studied in a planar diode configuration at room temperature. The graphene samples were observed to be a good field emitter having low turn-on field, higher field amplification factor and long term emission current stability.

  5. The investigation on the structure, fabrication and applications of graphene

    Du, Donghe

    By investigating the structure of graphene oxide (GO), the long-wavelength photoluminescence of GO is evidenced to be originated from the excimer formation between GO basal plane and oxidative debris (ODs) attached on the GO sheets. The thermally unstable ODs would induce micro-explosion of GO upon heating. A novel method is developed to supress the explosion and achieve simultaneous thermal reduction and nitrogen doping of graphene oxide in air. The high quality N-doped graphene demonstrate excellent electrocatalytic property in oxygen reduction reaction. Furthermore, an electronic textile material is fabricated by coating chemically reduced GO on a piece of non-woven fabric (GNWF). GNWF can be applied as wearable sensors to detect physiological signals of human body. This research work deepens the understanding on the structure and property of graphene based materials and provides a cost-effective fabrication method for large scale production of graphene, and hence facilitates the commercialization of graphene.

  6. Investigation of the Reduction of Graphene Oxide by Lithium Triethylborohydride

    Guangyuan Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical reduction of a wet colloidal suspension of graphene oxide is a cost-effective and adaptable method for large scale production of “quasi” graphene for a wide variety of optoelectronic applications. In this study, modified Hummers’ procedure was used to synthesize high quality graphene oxide at 50°C. This modified protocol thus eliminates the potentially hazardous second high-temperature step in Hummers’ method for the production of GO. Furthermore, the reduction of graphene oxide by lithium triethylborohydride is demonstrated for the first time. According to FT-IR, UV-Vis, TGA, Raman, SEM/EDS, and AFM results, the reduced graphene oxide (LiEt3BH-RGO has properties comparable to other reduced graphene oxide products reported in the literature.

  7. Scalable graphene production from ethanol decomposition by microwave argon plasma torch

    Melero, C.; Rincón, R.; Muñoz, J.; Zhang, G.; Sun, S.; Perez, A.; Royuela, O.; González-Gago, C.; Calzada, M. D.

    2018-01-01

    A fast, efficient and simple method is presented for the production of high quality graphene on a large scale by using an atmospheric pressure plasma-based technique. This technique allows to obtain high quality graphene in powder in just one step, without the use of neither metal catalysts and nor specific substrate during the process. Moreover, the cost for graphene production is significantly reduced since the ethanol used as carbon source can be obtained from the fermentation of agricultural industries. The process provides an additional benefit contributing to the revalorization of waste in the production of a high-value added product like graphene. Thus, this work demonstrates the features of plasma technology as a low cost, efficient, clean and environmentally friendly route for production of high-quality graphene.

  8. Low Temperature Graphene Synthesis from Poly(methyl methacrylate) Using Microwave Plasma Treatment

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2013-11-01

    A graphene film having low sheet resistance (600 Ω/sq.) was synthesized at low temperatures of 280 °C. Utilizing microwave plasma treatment, graphene films were synthesized from a solid phase on a copper surface. The full width at half maximum of the 2D-band in the Raman spectrum indicated that a high quality graphene film was formed. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy observation revealed that the deposited graphene films consisted of single- or double-layer graphene flakes of nanometer order on the Cu surface, which agrees with the estimated number of layers from an average optical transmittance of 96%.

  9. Urea-assisted liquid-phase exfoliation of natural graphite into few-layer graphene

    Hou, Dandan; Liu, Qinfu; Wang, Xianshuai; Qiao, Zhichuan; Wu, Yingke; Xu, Bohui; Ding, Shuli

    2018-05-01

    The mass production of graphene with high quality is desirable for its wide applications. Here, we demonstrated a facile method to exfoliate natural graphite into graphene in organic solvent by assisting of urea. The exfoliation of graphite may originate from the "molecular wedge" effect of urea, which can intercalate into the edge of natural graphite, thus facilitating the production of graphene dispersion with a high concentration up to 1.2 mg/mL. The obtained graphene is non-oxidized with negligible defects. Therefore, this approach has great promise in bulk production of graphene with superior quality for a variety of applications.

  10. Direct deposition of aluminum oxide gate dielectric on graphene channel using nitrogen plasma treatment

    Lim, Taekyung; Kim, Dongchool; Ju, Sanghyun

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of high-quality dielectric on a graphene channel is an essential technology to overcome structural constraints for the development of nano-electronic devices. In this study, we investigated a method for directly depositing aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) on a graphene channel through nitrogen plasma treatment. The deposited Al 2 O 3 thin film on graphene demonstrated excellent dielectric properties with negligible charge trapping and de-trapping in the gate insulator. A top-gate-structural graphene transistor was fabricated using Al 2 O 3 as the gate dielectric with nitrogen plasma treatment on graphene channel region, and exhibited p-type transistor characteristics

  11. Graphene Nanodevices

    Calado, V.E.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes a divergent set of experiments on graphene, a one-atom thin sheet of carbon. We employ graphene’s unique properties to explore fundamental physics and novel applications. This is done by nano fabricating graphene to nanodevices, which are subject to experiments. Here we first

  12. Engineering Graphene Films from Coal

    Vijapur, Santosh H.

    Graphene is a unique material with remarkable properties suitable for a wide array of applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a simple technique for synthesis of large area and high quality graphene films on various metal substrates. Among the metal substrates, copper has been shown to be an excellent support for the growth of graphene films. Traditionally, hydrocarbon gases are used for the graphene synthesis via CVD. Unconventional solid carbon sources such as various polymers and food waste have also shown great potential for synthesis of graphene films. Coal is one such carbon enriched and abundantly available unconventional source. Utilization of coal as a carbon source to synthesize large area, transparent, and high quality few-layer graphene films via CVD has been demonstrated in the present work. Hydrocarbon gases are released as products of coal pyrolysis at temperatures ≥400 °C. This study hypothesized that, these hydrocarbon gases act as precursors for the synthesis of graphene films on the copper substrate. Hence, atmospheric pressure CVD and low temperature of 400 °C were utilized initially for the production of graphene films. These conditions were suitable for the formation of amorphous carbon (a-C) films but not crystalline graphene films that were the objective of this work. The synthesized a-C films on the copper substrate were shown to be uniform and transparent with large surface area. The thickness and surface roughness of the a-C films were determined to have typical values of 5 nm and 0.55 nm, respectively. The a-C film has >95 % optical transmittance and sheet resistivity of 0.6 MO sq-1. These values are comparable to other carbon thin films synthesized at higher temperatures. Further, the a-C films were transferred onto any type of substrate such as silicon wafer and titanium foil, and can be utilized for diverse applications. However, crystalline graphene films were not produced by implementing atmospheric pressure CVD and low

  13. Graphene Electrodes

    Pizzocchero, Filippo

    The production of graphene and the other 2D materials is presented in the beginning of this thesis. Micromechanical exfoliation is the best method for obtaining relatively small and top quality samples. The invention of Graphene Finder simplifies the procedure of finding the exfoliated flakes...... in copper thin films is studied and found to be detrimental for the growth of graphene. The modified synthesis of rGO is introduced, as rGO represents a cheap alternative to CVD for large scale production of graphene. The transfer of flakes is performed by several methods, such as with PVA/PMMA support, CAB...... wedging and the pick-up technique with hBN. Several important improvements of the pick-up technique are introduced. These allowed us to transfer any 2D crystals and patterned graphene flakes with PMMA residues. We also developed the drop-down technique, which is used to release any crystal on the surface...

  14. Alloyed surfaces: New substrates for graphene growth

    Tresca, C.; Verbitskiy, N. I.; Fedorov, A.; Grüneis, A.; Profeta, G.

    2017-11-01

    We report a systematic ab-initio density functional theory investigation of Ni(111) surface alloyed with elements of group IV (Si, Ge and Sn), demonstrating the possibility to use it to grow high quality graphene. Ni(111) surface represents an ideal substrate for graphene, due to its catalytic properties and perfect matching with the graphene lattice constant. However, Dirac bands of graphene growth on Ni(111) are completely destroyed due to the strong hybridization between carbon pz and Ni d orbitals. Group IV atoms, namely Si, Ge and Sn, once deposited on Ni(111) surface, form an ordered alloyed surface with √{ 3} ×√{ 3} -R30° reconstruction. We demonstrate that, at variance with the pure Ni(111) surface, alloyed surfaces effectively decouple graphene from the substrate, resulting unstrained due to the nearly perfect lattice matching and preserves linear Dirac bands without the strong hybridization with Ni d states. The proposed surfaces can be prepared before graphene growth without resorting on post-growth processes which necessarily alter the electronic and structural properties of graphene.

  15. State memory in solution gated epitaxial graphene

    Butko, A. V.; Butko, V. Y.; Lebedev, S. P.; Lebedev, A. A.; Davydov, V. Y.; Smirnov, A. N.; Eliseyev, I. A.; Dunaevskiy, M. S.; Kumzerov, Y. A.

    2018-06-01

    We studied electrical transport in transistors fabricated on a surface of high quality epitaxial graphene with density of defects as low as 5·1010 cm-2 and observed quasistatic hysteresis with a time constant in a scale of hours. This constant is in a few orders of magnitude greater than the constant previously reported in CVD graphene. The hysteresis observed here can be described as a shift of ∼+2V of the Dirac point measured during a gate voltage increase from the position of the Dirac point measured during a gate voltage decrease. This hysteresis can be characterized as a nonvolatile quasistatic state memory effect in which the state of the gated graphene is determined by its initial state prior to entering the hysteretic region. Due to this effect the difference in resistance of the gated graphene measured in the hysteretic region at the same applied voltages can be as high as 70%. The observed effect can be explained by assuming that charge carriers in graphene and oppositely charged molecular ions from the solution form quasistable interfacial complexes at the graphene interface. These complexes likely preserve the initial state by preventing charge carriers in graphene from discharging in the hysteretic region.

  16. Optical studies of high quality synthetic diamond

    Sharp, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the study of fundamental and defect induced optical properties of synthetic diamond grown using high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) synthesis or chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The primary technique used for investigation is cathodoluminescence (including imaging and decay-time measurements) in addition to other forms of optical spectroscopy. This thesis is timely in that the crystallinity and purity of synthetic diamond has increased ten fold over the last few years. The diamond exciton emission, which is easily quenched by the presence of defects, is studied in high quality samples in detail. In addition the ability now exists to engineer the isotopic content of synthetic diamond to a high degree of accuracy. The experimental chapters are divided as follows: Chapter 2: High resolution, low temperature spectra reveal a splitting of the free-exciton phonon recombination emission peaks and the bound-exciton zero phonon line. Included are measurements of the variation in intensity and decay-time as a function of temperature. Chapter 3: The shift in energy of the phonon-assisted free-exciton phonon replicas with isotopic content has been measured. The shift is in agreement with the results of interatomic force model for phonon scattering due to isotope disorder. Chapter 4: A study of the shift in energy with isotopic content of the diamond of the GR1 band due to the neutral vacancy has allowed a verification of the theoretical predictions due to the Jahn Teller effect. Chapter 5: The spatial distribution of the free-exciton luminescence is studied in HPHT synthetic and CVD diamond. A variation in intensity with distance from the surface is interpreted as a significant non-radiative loss of excitons to the surface. Chapter 6: The decay-times of all known self-interstitial related centres have been measured in order to calculate the concentration of these centres present in electron irradiated diamond. (author)

  17. High Quality Data for Grid Integration Studies

    Clifton, Andrew; Draxl, Caroline; Sengupta, Manajit; Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2017-01-22

    As variable renewable power penetration levels increase in power systems worldwide, renewable integration studies are crucial to ensure continued economic and reliable operation of the power grid. The existing electric grid infrastructure in the US in particular poses significant limitations on wind power expansion. In this presentation we will shed light on requirements for grid integration studies as far as wind and solar energy are concerned. Because wind and solar plants are strongly impacted by weather, high-resolution and high-quality weather data are required to drive power system simulations. Future data sets will have to push limits of numerical weather prediction to yield these high-resolution data sets, and wind data will have to be time-synchronized with solar data. Current wind and solar integration data sets are presented. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit is the largest and most complete grid integration data set publicly available to date. A meteorological data set, wind power production time series, and simulated forecasts created using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model run on a 2-km grid over the continental United States at a 5-min resolution is now publicly available for more than 126,000 land-based and offshore wind power production sites. The National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) is a similar high temporal- and spatial resolution database of 18 years of solar resource data for North America and India. The need for high-resolution weather data pushes modeling towards finer scales and closer synchronization. We also present how we anticipate such datasets developing in the future, their benefits, and the challenges with using and disseminating such large amounts of data.

  18. Defect-Free Graphene Synthesized Directly at 150 °C via Chemical Vapor Deposition with No Transfer.

    Park, Byeong-Ju; Choi, Jin-Seok; Eom, Ji-Ho; Ha, Hyunwoo; Kim, Hyun You; Lee, Seonhee; Shin, Hyunjung; Yoon, Soon-Gil

    2018-02-27

    Direct graphene synthesis on substrates via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is an attractive approach for manufacturing flexible electronic devices. The temperature for graphene synthesis must be below ∼200 °C to prevent substrate deformation while fabricating flexible devices on plastic substrates. Herein, we report a process whereby defect-free graphene is directly synthesized on a variety of substrates via the introduction of an ultrathin Ti catalytic layer, due to the strong affinity of Ti to carbon. Ti with a thickness of 10 nm was naturally oxidized by exposure to air before and after the graphene synthesis, and the various functions of neither the substrates nor the graphene were influenced. This report offers experimental evidence of high-quality graphene synthesis on Ti-coated substrates at 150 °C via CVD. The proposed methodology was applied to the fabrication of flexible and transparent thin-film capacitors with top electrodes of high-quality graphene.

  19. Layer-dependent supercapacitance of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition on nickel foam

    Chen, Wei; Fan, Zhongli; Zeng, Gaofeng; Lai, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    High-quality, large-area graphene films with few layers are synthesized on commercial nickel foams under optimal chemical vapor deposition conditions. The number of graphene layers is adjusted by varying the rate of the cooling process. It is found

  20. Transfer-free synthesis of doped and patterned graphene films.

    Zhuo, Qi-Qi; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Duo; Li, Qin-Liang; Gao, Chun-Hong; Sun, Yan-Qiu; Ding, Lei; Sun, Qi-Jun; Wang, Sui-Dong; Zhong, Jun; Sun, Xu-Hui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2015-01-27

    High-quality and wafer-scale graphene on insulating gate dielectrics is a prerequisite for graphene electronic applications. For such applications, graphene is typically synthesized and then transferred to a desirable substrate for subsequent device processing. Direct production of graphene on substrates without transfer is highly desirable for simplified device processing. However, graphene synthesis directly on substrates suitable for device applications, though highly demanded, remains unattainable and challenging. Here, we report a simple, transfer-free method capable of synthesizing graphene directly on dielectric substrates at temperatures as low as 600 °C using polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as the carbon source. Significantly, N-doping and patterning of graphene can be readily and concurrently achieved by this growth method. Remarkably, the graphene films directly grown on glass attained a small sheet resistance of 550 Ω/sq and a high transmittance of 91.2%. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) fabricated on N-doped graphene on glass achieved a current density of 4.0 mA/cm(2) at 8 V compared to 2.6 mA/cm(2) for OLEDs similarly fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass, demonstrating that the graphene thus prepared may have potential to serve as a transparent electrode to replace ITO.

  1. Superlubricating graphene and graphene oxide films

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Erdemir, Ali; Choi, Junho; Berman, Diana

    2018-02-13

    A system and method for forming at least one of graphene and graphene oxide on a substrate and an opposed wear member. The system includes graphene and graphene oxide formed by an exfoliation process or solution processing method to dispose graphene and/or graphene oxide onto a substrate. The system further includes an opposing wear member disposed on another substrate and a gas atmosphere of an inert gas like N2, ambient, a humid atmosphere and a water solution.

  2. Status of the R+D programme in the field of the heat carrying and heat transfer components of the PNP project

    Mausbeck, H.; Jansing, W.

    1984-01-01

    The PNP Project (Project Nuclear Process Heat) is described. It covers the status of research and development in the field of heat exchange and heat exchanger components; concept of plant for coal gasification; description of large scale test facilities and its components; and the time schedule for the project development

  3. A Novel Bis(phosphido)pyridine [PNP] 2− Pincer Ligand and Its Potassium and Bis(dimethylamido)zirconium(IV) Complexes

    Winston, Matthew S.

    2010-12-13

    A novel PNP bis(secondary phosphine)pyridine pincer ligand, 2,6-bis(2-(phenylphosphino)phenyl)pyridine, has been prepared in high yield, and the properties of the doubly deprotonated form as a ligand in K 4(PNP)2(THF)6 and (PNP)Zr(NMe2) 2 have been investigated. The neutral PNP ligand has been isolated as a mixture of noninterconverting diastereomers, due to the presence of two chirogenic phosphorus atoms of the secondary phopshines, but coordination of the dianionic form to potassium and zirconium allows for isolation of a single diastereomer in near-quantitative yield. The structure of a bis(dimethylamido) zirconium(IV) derivative of the bis(phosphido)pyridine ligand and DFT calculations suggest that the phosphides do not π-bond to early transition metals, likely due to geometric strain and possibly orbital size mismatch between phosphorus and zirconium. As a result, the soft phosphides are prone to formation of insoluble oligomers with substantial bridging of the phosphido lone pairs to other zirconium centers. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  4. The Arabidopsis thaliana natriuretic peptide AtPNP-A is a systemic regulator of leaf dark respiration and signals via the phloem

    Ruzvidzo, Oziniel

    2011-09-01

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) belong to a novel class of peptidic signaling molecules that share some structural similarity to the N-terminal domain of expansins and affect physiological processes such as water and ion homeostasis at nano-molar concentrations. Here we show that a recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A) rapidly increased the rate of dark respiration in treated leaves after 5 min. In addition, we observed increases in lower leaves, and with a lag time of 10 min, the effect spread to the upper leaves and subsequently (after 15 min) to the opposite leaves. This response signature is indicative of phloem mobility of the signal, a hypothesis that was further strengthened by the fact that cold girdling, which affects phloem but not xylem or apoplastic processes, delayed the long distance AtPNP-A effect. We conclude that locally applied AtPNP-A can induce a phloem-mobile signal that rapidly modifies plant homeostasis in distal parts. © 2011 Elsevier GmbH.

  5. Preparation and biological study of 99Tcm(N) (PNP6) (Cyc-RGD) for integrin αvβ3-positive tumor imaging

    Chen Baojun; Hu Ji; Liang Jixin; Li Hongyu; Luo Lianzhe; Shen Langtao; Luo Zhifu; Chen Yang

    2007-01-01

    The Cys-RGD peptide is labelled with 99 Tc m -nitrido core combined with PNP6 lig- and (PNP6=bis (diethoxypropylphosphino ethyl) ethoxy ethylamine) to investigate the possibility of radiolabelled RGD peptides for tumor α v β 3 integrin receptor scintigraphy. The radiochemical purity is measured with HPLC, the in vitro stability is investigated at room temperature and at 37 degree C incubated in the cystein and serum solution. Biodistribution studies and gamma camera imaging are performed in normal mice and nude mice bearing FWK-1 pancreatic tumor xenografts. More than 92% radiolabelling yield is achieved under optimized condition. The high in vitro stability is found for 99 Tc m (N) (PNP6) (Cys-RGD). In vivo biodistribution studies indicate the radiolabelled peptide is cleared rapidly from blood and mainly excreted via urinary system. Tumor uptake is 2.92 ± 0.71%/g at 1 h after injection. The uptake ratios of tumor to blood and tumor to muscle (T/NT) are 11.0 and 3. 1 at 4 h after injection, respectively. Scintigraphic imaging allows contrasting visualisation of α v β 3 -expressed tumors at 1 h after injection. The results suggest 99 Tc m (N) (PNP6) (Cys- RGD) may be the potential agent for α v β 3 -positive tumor imaging. (authors)

  6. A Novel Bis(phosphido)pyridine [PNP] 2− Pincer Ligand and Its Potassium and Bis(dimethylamido)zirconium(IV) Complexes

    Winston, Matthew S.; Bercaw, John E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel PNP bis(secondary phosphine)pyridine pincer ligand, 2,6-bis(2-(phenylphosphino)phenyl)pyridine, has been prepared in high yield, and the properties of the doubly deprotonated form as a ligand in K 4(PNP)2(THF)6 and (PNP)Zr(NMe2) 2 have been investigated. The neutral PNP ligand has been isolated as a mixture of noninterconverting diastereomers, due to the presence of two chirogenic phosphorus atoms of the secondary phopshines, but coordination of the dianionic form to potassium and zirconium allows for isolation of a single diastereomer in near-quantitative yield. The structure of a bis(dimethylamido) zirconium(IV) derivative of the bis(phosphido)pyridine ligand and DFT calculations suggest that the phosphides do not π-bond to early transition metals, likely due to geometric strain and possibly orbital size mismatch between phosphorus and zirconium. As a result, the soft phosphides are prone to formation of insoluble oligomers with substantial bridging of the phosphido lone pairs to other zirconium centers. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  7. Basic lay-out, arrangement and design criteria of heat components of the ''nuclear coal gasification prototype plant (PNP)''

    Pruschek, R.

    1980-01-01

    Since 1975, the companies Bergbau-Forschung GmbH, GHT Gesellschaft fuer Hochtemperaturreaktor-Technik mbH, Hochtemperatur-Reaktorbau GmbH, Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH und Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke AG are working jointly on the Project ''Prototype Plant Nuclear Process Heat (PNP)'', with promotion of the ''Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie'' and of the ''Minister fuer Wirtschaft, Mittelstand und Verkehr des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen''. The objectives of the project are the development of a high-temperature reactor, with a core outlet temperature of 950 0 C, suitable for various process heat applications, and the development and testing of the appropriate coal gasification technology. The applied gasifications methods comprise endothermal and exothermal reactions. Therefore, various heat transfer components are to be developed. In the context of this Specialists Meeting, only those components will be discussed by which heat is transferred from primary helium to secondary helium or from helium to the working or process fluid

  8. Avidin-biotin system: a small library of cysteine biotinylated derivatives designed for the [99mTc(N)(PNP)]2+ metal fragment

    Bolzati, Cristina; Caporale, Andrea; Agostini, Stefania; Carta, Davide; Cavazza-Ceccato, Mario; Refosco, Fiorenzo; Tisato, Francesco; Schievano, Elisabetta; Bandoli, Giuliano

    2007-01-01

    Using the avidin-biotin system as model, we investigate here the effective application of [Tc(N)L(PNP)] +/0 technology (L=N-functionalized cysteine [O - ,S - ]; PNP=aminodiphosphine) to the preparation of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. A series of 99m Tc-nitrido complexes containing functionalized biotin ligands was prepared and their biological profile was determined. To minimize the steric and the electronic influences of the Tc-carrying complex on the biotin-avidin receptor interaction, the following N-functionalized cysteine-biotin derivatives were synthesized: (1) Biot-CysOSH; (2) Biot-Abu-CysOSH; (3) Biot-Abz-CysOSH; (4) Biot-L-(Ac)Lys-CysOSH; (5) Biot-D-(Ac)Lys-CysOSH; (6) Biot-Glu-CysOSH. The asymmetrical nitrido-Tc(V) 99g/99m Tc(N)(Biot-X-CysOS)(PNP3) (X=spacer) complexes, where PNP3 was N,N-bis-[(dimethoxypropyl)phosphinoethyl] methoxy-ethylamine, were obtained by simultaneous addition of PNP3 and the relevant biotinylated ligand to a solution containing a 99m Tc-nitrido precursor (yields >95%). In all cases, a mixture of syn- and anti isomers was observed. In vitro challenge experiments with glutathione and cysteine indicated that no transchelation reactions occurred. Assessment of the in vitro binding to avidin of the complexes revealed that only the complexes containing Biot-Abu-CysOS and Biot-Glu-CysOS ligand maintained a good affinity for the concentrator. Stability studies carried out in human and mouse plasma as well as in rat and mouse liver homogenate evidenced a rapid enzymatic degradation for the 99m Tc(N)(Biot-Abu-CysOS)(PNP3) complex, whereas the 99m Tc(N)(Biot-Glu-CysOS)(PNP3) one was stable in all conditions. Tissue biodistribution in normal Balb/C mice of the most stable candidate showed a rapid clearance both from the blood and the other tissues. The activity was eliminated both through the hepatobiliary system and the urinary tract

  9. Melanoma targeting with [99mTc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogs: Effects of cyclization on the radiopharmaceutical properties

    Carta, Davide; Salvarese, Nicola; Morellato, Nicolò; Gao, Feng; Sihver, Wiebke; Pietzsch, Hans Jurgen; Biondi, Barbara; Ruzza, Paolo; Refosco, Fiorenzo; Carpanese, Debora; Rosato, Antonio; Bolzati, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of cyclization on the biological profile of a [ 99m Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analog. A lactam bridge-cyclized H-Cys-Ahx-βAla 3 -c[Lys 4 -Glu-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Glu 10 ]-Arg 11 -Pro-Val-NH 2 (NAP―NS2) and the corresponding linear H-Cys-Ahx-βAla-Nle-Asp-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Gly-NH 2 (NAP―NS1) peptide were synthetized, characterized by ESI-MS spectroscopy and their melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) binding affinity was determined in B16/F10 melanoma cells. The consistent [ 99m Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled compounds were readily obtained in high specific activity and their stability and biological properties were assessed. As an example, the chemical identity of [ 99m Tc(N)(NAP–NS1)(PNP3)] + was confirmed by carrier added experiments supported by radio/UV HPLC analysis combined with ESI(+)-MS. Compared with the linear peptide, cyclization negatively affected the biological properties of NAP–NS2 peptide by reducing its binding affinity for MC1R and by decreasing the overall excretion rate of the corresponding [ 99m Tc(N)(PNP3)]-labeled peptide from the body as well as its in vivo stability. [ 99m Tc(N)(NAP–NS1)(PNP3)] + was evaluated for its potential as melanoma imaging probe in murine melanoma model. Data from in vitro and in vivo studies on B16/F10 melanoma model of [ 99m Tc(N)(NAP–NS1)(PNP3)] + clearly evidenced that the radiolabeled linear peptide keeps its biological properties up on the conjugation to the [ 99m Tc(N)(PNP3)]-building block. The progressive increase of the tumor-to-nontarget ratios over the time indicates a quite stable interaction between the radio-complex and the MC1R.

  10. Substrate considerations for graphene synthesis on thin copper films

    Howsare, Casey A; Robinson, Joshua A; Weng Xiaojun; Bojan, Vince; Snyder, David

    2012-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition on copper substrates is a primary technique for synthesis of high quality graphene films over large areas. While well-developed processes are in place for catalytic growth of graphene on bulk copper substrates, chemical vapor deposition of graphene on thin films could provide a means for simplified device processing through the elimination of the layer transfer process. Recently, it was demonstrated that transfer-free growth and processing is possible on SiO 2 . However, the Cu/SiO 2 /Si material system must be stable at high temperatures for high quality transfer-free graphene. This study identifies the presence of interdiffusion at the Cu/SiO 2 interface and investigates the influence of metal (Ni, Cr, W) and insulating (Si 3 N 4 , Al 2 O 3 , HfO 2 ) diffusion barrier layers on Cu–SiO 2 interdiffusion, as well as graphene structural quality. Regardless of barrier choice, we find the presence of Cu diffusion into the silicon substrate as well as the presence of Cu–Si–O domains on the surface of the copper film. As a result, we investigate the choice of a sapphire substrate and present evidence that it is a robust substrate for synthesis and processing of high quality, transfer-free graphene. (paper)

  11. The CVD graphene transfer procedure introduces metallic impurities which alter the graphene electrochemical properties.

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-01-07

    High quality graphene films can be fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Ni and Cu as catalytic substrates. Such a synthesis procedure always requires a subsequent transfer process to be performed in order to eliminate the metallic substrate and transfer the graphene onto the desired surface. We show here that such a transfer process causes significant contamination of the graphene film with residual Fe and Ni metal impurities. Fe contamination derives from the use of Fe-based etching solutions to dissolve Ni (or Cu) substrates, while residual Ni (or Cu) is due to an incomplete metal substrate etching. The presence of these metallic impurities within the transferred graphene film affects tremendously its electrochemical behavior when adopted as an electrode material.

  12. Rebar Graphene

    2015-01-01

    As the cylindrical sp2-bonded carbon allotrope, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely used to reinforce bulk materials such as polymers, ceramics, and metals. However, both the concept demonstration and the fundamental understanding on how 1D CNTs reinforce atomically thin 2D layered materials, such as graphene, are still absent. Here, we demonstrate the successful synthesis of CNT-toughened graphene by simply annealing functionalized CNTs on Cu foils without needing to introduce extraneous carbon sources. The CNTs act as reinforcing bar (rebar), toughening the graphene through both π–π stacking domains and covalent bonding where the CNTs partially unzip and form a seamless 2D conjoined hybrid as revealed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis. This is termed rebar graphene. Rebar graphene can be free-standing on water and transferred onto target substrates without needing a polymer-coating due to the rebar effects of the CNTs. The utility of rebar graphene sheets as flexible all-carbon transparent electrodes is demonstrated. The in-plane marriage of 1D nanotubes and 2D layered materials might herald an electrical and mechanical union that extends beyond carbon chemistry. PMID:24694285

  13. Epitaxial graphene

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire; Wu, Xiaosong; First, Phillip N.; Conrad, Edward H.; Li, Xuebin; Li, Tianbo; Sprinkle, Michael; Hass, Joanna; Sadowski, Marcin L.; Potemski, Marek; Martinez, Gérard

    2007-07-01

    Graphene multilayers are grown epitaxially on single crystal silicon carbide. This system is composed of several graphene layers of which the first layer is electron doped due to the built-in electric field and the other layers are essentially undoped. Unlike graphite the charge carriers show Dirac particle properties (i.e. an anomalous Berry's phase, weak anti-localization and square root field dependence of the Landau level energies). Epitaxial graphene shows quasi-ballistic transport and long coherence lengths; properties that may persist above cryogenic temperatures. Paradoxically, in contrast to exfoliated graphene, the quantum Hall effect is not observed in high-mobility epitaxial graphene. It appears that the effect is suppressed due to the absence of localized states in the bulk of the material. Epitaxial graphene can be patterned using standard lithography methods and characterized using a wide array of techniques. These favorable features indicate that interconnected room temperature ballistic devices may be feasible for low-dissipation high-speed nanoelectronics.

  14. Advanced Asymmetrical Supercapacitors Based on Graphene Hybrid Materials

    Wang, Hailiang; Liang, Yongye; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Chen, Zhuo; Casalongue, Hernan Sanchez; Dai, Hongjie

    2011-01-01

    Supercapacitors operating in aqueous solutions are low cost energy storage devices with high cycling stability and fast charging and discharging capabilities, but have suffered from low energy densities. Here, we grow Ni(OH)2 nanoplates and RuO2 nanoparticles on high quality graphene sheets to maximize the specific capacitances of these materials. We then pair up a Ni(OH)2/graphene electrode with a RuO2/graphene electrode to afford a high performance asymmetrical supercapacitor with high ener...

  15. Graphene growth process modeling: a physical-statistical approach

    Wu, Jian; Huang, Qiang

    2014-09-01

    As a zero-band semiconductor, graphene is an attractive material for a wide variety of applications such as optoelectronics. Among various techniques developed for graphene synthesis, chemical vapor deposition on copper foils shows high potential for producing few-layer and large-area graphene. Since fabrication of high-quality graphene sheets requires the understanding of growth mechanisms, and methods of characterization and control of grain size of graphene flakes, analytical modeling of graphene growth process is therefore essential for controlled fabrication. The graphene growth process starts with randomly nucleated islands that gradually develop into complex shapes, grow in size, and eventually connect together to cover the copper foil. To model this complex process, we develop a physical-statistical approach under the assumption of self-similarity during graphene growth. The growth kinetics is uncovered by separating island shapes from area growth rate. We propose to characterize the area growth velocity using a confined exponential model, which not only has clear physical explanation, but also fits the real data well. For the shape modeling, we develop a parametric shape model which can be well explained by the angular-dependent growth rate. This work can provide useful information for the control and optimization of graphene growth process on Cu foil.

  16. Visualizing copper assisted graphene growth in nanoscale

    Rosmi, Mohamad Saufi; Yusop, Mohd Zamri; Kalita, Golap; Yaakob, Yazid; Takahashi, Chisato; Tanemura, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Control synthesis of high quality large-area graphene on transition metals (TMs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most fascinating approach for practical device applications. Interaction of carbon atoms and TMs is quite critical to obtain graphene with precise layer number, crystal size and structure. Here, we reveal a solid phase reaction process to achieve Cu assisted graphene growth in nanoscale by in-situ transmission electron microscope (TEM). Significant structural transformation of amorphous carbon nanofiber (CNF) coated with Cu is observed with an applied potential in a two probe system. The coated Cu particle recrystallize and agglomerate toward the cathode with applied potential due to joule heating and large thermal gradient. Consequently, the amorphous carbon start crystallizing and forming sp2 hybridized carbon to form graphene sheet from the tip of Cu surface. We observed structural deformation and breaking of the graphene nanoribbon with a higher applied potential, attributing to saturated current flow and induced Joule heating. The observed graphene formation in nanoscale by the in-situ TEM process can be significant to understand carbon atoms and Cu interaction. PMID:25523645

  17. Layer-dependent supercapacitance of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition on nickel foam

    Chen, Wei

    2013-03-01

    High-quality, large-area graphene films with few layers are synthesized on commercial nickel foams under optimal chemical vapor deposition conditions. The number of graphene layers is adjusted by varying the rate of the cooling process. It is found that the capacitive properties of graphene films are related to the number of graphene layers. Owing to the close attachment of graphene films on the nickel substrate and the low charge-transfer resistance, the specific capacitance of thinner graphene films is almost twice that of the thicker ones and remains stable up to 1000 cycles. These results illustrate the potential for developing high-performance graphene-based electrical energy storage devices. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Direct Growth of Graphene on Silicon by Metal-Free Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Tai, Lixuan; Zhu, Daming; Liu, Xing; Yang, Tieying; Wang, Lei; Wang, Rui; Jiang, Sheng; Chen, Zhenhua; Xu, Zhongmin; Li, Xiaolong

    2018-06-01

    The metal-free synthesis of graphene on single-crystal silicon substrates, the most common commercial semiconductor, is of paramount significance for many technological applications. In this work, we report the growth of graphene directly on an upside-down placed, single-crystal silicon substrate using metal-free, ambient-pressure chemical vapor deposition. By controlling the growth temperature, in-plane propagation, edge-propagation, and core-propagation, the process of graphene growth on silicon can be identified. This process produces atomically flat monolayer or bilayer graphene domains, concave bilayer graphene domains, and bulging few-layer graphene domains. This work would be a significant step toward the synthesis of large-area and layer-controlled, high-quality graphene on single-crystal silicon substrates. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Catalyst-Free Growth of Three-Dimensional Graphene Flakes and Graphene/g-C₃N₄ Composite for Hydrocarbon Oxidation.

    Chen, Ke; Chai, Zhigang; Li, Cong; Shi, Liurong; Liu, Mengxi; Xie, Qin; Zhang, Yanfeng; Xu, Dongsheng; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Liu, Zhongfan

    2016-03-22

    Mass production of high-quality graphene flakes is important for commercial applications. Graphene microsheets have been produced on an industrial scale by chemical and liquid-phase exfoliation of graphite. However, strong-interaction-induced interlayer aggregation usually leads to the degradation of their intrinsic properties. Moreover, the crystallinity or layer-thickness controllability is not so perfect to fulfill the requirement for advanced technologies. Herein, we report a quartz-powder-derived chemical vapor deposition growth of three-dimensional (3D) high-quality graphene flakes and demonstrate the fabrication and application of graphene/g-C3N4 composites. The graphene flakes obtained after the removal of growth substrates exhibit the 3D curved microstructure, controllable layer thickness, good crystallinity, as well as weak interlayer interactions suitable for preventing the interlayer stacking. Benefiting from this, we achieved the direct synthesis of g-C3N4 on purified graphene flakes to form the uniform graphene/g-C3N4 composite, which provides efficient electron transfer interfaces to boost its catalytic oxidation activity of cycloalkane with relatively high yield, good selectivity, and reliable stability.

  20. Electric field modulation of Schottky barrier height in graphene/MoSe2 van der Waals heterointerface

    Sata, Yohta; Moriya, Rai; Morikawa, Sei; Yabuki, Naoto; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a vertical field-effect transistor based on a graphene/MoSe2 van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure. The vdW interface between the graphene and MoSe2 exhibits a Schottky barrier with an ideality factor of around 1.3, suggesting a high-quality interface. Owing to the low density of states in graphene, the position of the Fermi level in the graphene can be strongly modulated by an external electric field. Therefore, the Schottky barrier height at the graphene/MoSe2 vdW interface is ...

  1. Performance-Enhanced Activated Carbon Electrodes for Supercapacitors Combining Both Graphene-Modified Current Collectors and Graphene Conductive Additive.

    Wang, Rubing; Qian, Yuting; Li, Weiwei; Zhu, Shoupu; Liu, Fengkui; Guo, Yufen; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Qi; Liu, Liwei

    2018-05-15

    Graphene has been widely used in the active material, conductive agent, binder or current collector for supercapacitors, due to its large specific surface area, high conductivity, and electron mobility. However, works simultaneously employing graphene as conductive agent and current collector were rarely reported. Here, we report improved activated carbon (AC) electrodes (AC@G@NiF/G) simultaneously combining chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene-modified nickel foams (NiF/Gs) current collectors and high quality few-layer graphene conductive additive instead of carbon black (CB). The synergistic effect of NiF/Gs and graphene additive makes the performances of AC@G@NiF/G electrodes superior to those of electrodes with CB or with nickel foam current collectors. The performances of AC@G@NiF/G electrodes show that for the few-layer graphene addition exists an optimum value around 5 wt %, rather than a larger addition of graphene, works out better. A symmetric supercapacitor assembled by AC@G@NiF/G electrodes exhibits excellent cycling stability. We attribute improved performances to graphene-enhanced conductivity of electrode materials and NiF/Gs with 3D graphene conductive network and lower oxidation, largely improving the electrical contact between active materials and current collectors.

  2. Performance-Enhanced Activated Carbon Electrodes for Supercapacitors Combining Both Graphene-Modified Current Collectors and Graphene Conductive Additive

    Wang, Rubing; Qian, Yuting; Li, Weiwei; Zhu, Shoupu; Liu, Fengkui; Guo, Yufen; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Qi; Liu, Liwei

    2018-01-01

    Graphene has been widely used in the active material, conductive agent, binder or current collector for supercapacitors, due to its large specific surface area, high conductivity, and electron mobility. However, works simultaneously employing graphene as conductive agent and current collector were rarely reported. Here, we report improved activated carbon (AC) electrodes (AC@G@NiF/G) simultaneously combining chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene-modified nickel foams (NiF/Gs) current collectors and high quality few-layer graphene conductive additive instead of carbon black (CB). The synergistic effect of NiF/Gs and graphene additive makes the performances of AC@G@NiF/G electrodes superior to those of electrodes with CB or with nickel foam current collectors. The performances of AC@G@NiF/G electrodes show that for the few-layer graphene addition exists an optimum value around 5 wt %, rather than a larger addition of graphene, works out better. A symmetric supercapacitor assembled by AC@G@NiF/G electrodes exhibits excellent cycling stability. We attribute improved performances to graphene-enhanced conductivity of electrode materials and NiF/Gs with 3D graphene conductive network and lower oxidation, largely improving the electrical contact between active materials and current collectors. PMID:29762528

  3. A Klein-tunneling transistor with ballistic graphene

    Wilmart, Quentin; Fève, Gwendal; Berroir, Jean-Marc; Plaçais, Bernard; Berrada, Salim; Hung Nguyen, V; Dollfus, Philippe; Torrin, David

    2014-01-01

    Today, the availability of high mobility graphene up to room temperature makes ballistic transport in nanodevices achievable. In particular, p-n-p transistors in the ballistic regime give access to Klein tunneling physics and allow the realization of devices exploiting the optics-like behavior of Dirac Fermions (DFs) as in the Veselago lens or the Fabry–Pérot cavity. Here we propose a Klein tunneling transistor based on the geometrical optics of DFs. We consider the case of a prismatic active region delimited by a triangular gate, where total internal reflection may occur, which leads to the tunable suppression of transistor transmission. We calculate the transmission and the current by means of scattering theory and the finite bias properties using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) simulation. (letter)

  4. A Klein-tunneling transistor with ballistic graphene

    Wilmart, Quentin; Fève, Gwendal; Berroir, Jean-Marc; Plaçais, Bernard [Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, Ecole Normale Supérieure, CNRS (UMR 8551), Université P et M Curie, Université D Diderot, 24, rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Berrada, Salim; Hung Nguyen, V; Dollfus, Philippe [Institute of Fundamental Electronics, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, Orsay (France); Torrin, David [Département de Physique, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-06-15

    Today, the availability of high mobility graphene up to room temperature makes ballistic transport in nanodevices achievable. In particular, p-n-p transistors in the ballistic regime give access to Klein tunneling physics and allow the realization of devices exploiting the optics-like behavior of Dirac Fermions (DFs) as in the Veselago lens or the Fabry–Pérot cavity. Here we propose a Klein tunneling transistor based on the geometrical optics of DFs. We consider the case of a prismatic active region delimited by a triangular gate, where total internal reflection may occur, which leads to the tunable suppression of transistor transmission. We calculate the transmission and the current by means of scattering theory and the finite bias properties using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) simulation. (letter)

  5. P-nitrophenol degradation using N-doped reduced graphene-CdS nanocomposites

    Gharedaghi, Sepideh [Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kimiagar, Salimeh [Nano Research Lab (NRL), Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Safa, Saeed [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2018-02-15

    A series of nitrogen doped reduce graphene-CdS (NRGC) nanocomposites were successfully synthesized by using hydrothermal method. The structure and morphology of the samples were characterized by using FTIR, XRD, SEM, and PL. Photocatalytic activity of the nanocomposites for removing P-nitrophenol (PNP) pollutant was studied under both ultra-violet (UV) and visible light irradiation. The results show that NRGC nanocomposites exhibited higher photocatalytic activity than pure CdS. The degradation rate significantly increased to 50 and 70% by the addition of nitrogen doped reduced graphene oxide (NRGO) to CdS under UV and visible irradiation, respectively. Higher photocatalytic activity of the nanocomposites was due to the role of NRGO as an excellent electron acceptor and transporter. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Facile synthesis of graphene on dielectric surfaces using a two-temperature reactor CVD system

    Zhang, C; Man, B Y; Yang, C; Jiang, S Z; Liu, M; Chen, C S; Xu, S C; Sun, Z C; Gao, X G; Chen, X J

    2013-01-01

    Direct deposition of graphene on a dielectric substrate is demonstrated using a chemical vapor deposition system with a two-temperature reactor. The two-temperature reactor is utilized to offer sufficient, well-proportioned floating Cu atoms and to provide a temperature gradient for facile synthesis of graphene on dielectric surfaces. The evaporated Cu atoms catalyze the reaction in the presented method. C atoms and Cu atoms respectively act as the nuclei for forming graphene film in the low-temperature zone and the zones close to the high-temperature zones. A uniform and high-quality graphene film is formed in an atmosphere of sufficient and well-proportioned floating Cu atoms. Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirm the presence of uniform and high-quality graphene. (paper)

  7. Direct CVD Graphene Growth on Semiconductors and Dielectrics for Transfer-Free Device Fabrication.

    Wang, Huaping; Yu, Gui

    2016-07-01

    Graphene is the most broadly discussed and studied two-dimensional material because of its preeminent physical, mechanical, optical, and thermal properties. Until now, metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been widely employed for the scalable production of high-quality graphene. However, in order to incorporate the graphene into electronic devices, a transfer process from metal substrates to targeted substrates is inevitable. This process usually results in contamination, wrinkling, and breakage of graphene samples - undesirable in graphene-based technology and not compatible with industrial production. Therefore, direct graphene growth on desired semiconductor and dielectric substrates is considered as an effective alternative. Over the past years, there have been intensive investigations to realize direct graphene growth using CVD methods without the catalytic role of metals. Owing to the low catalytic activity of non-metal substrates for carbon precursor decomposition and graphene growth, several strategies have been designed to facilitate and engineer graphene fabrication on semiconductors and insulators. Here, those developed strategies for direct CVD graphene growth on semiconductors and dielectrics for transfer-free fabrication of electronic devices are reviewed. By employing these methods, various graphene-related structures can be directly prepared on desired substrates and exhibit excellent performance, providing versatile routes for varied graphene-based materials fabrication. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Fabrication of high-quality single-crystal Cu thin films using radio-frequency sputtering.

    Lee, Seunghun; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Tae-Woo; Kim, Won-Kyung; Kim, Bum-Su; Park, Ji Hun; Bae, Jong-Seong; Cho, Yong Chan; Kim, Jungdae; Oh, Min-Wook; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Se-Young

    2014-08-29

    Copper (Cu) thin films have been widely used as electrodes and interconnection wires in integrated electronic circuits, and more recently as substrates for the synthesis of graphene. However, the ultra-high vacuum processes required for high-quality Cu film fabrication, such as molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), restricts mass production with low cost. In this work, we demonstrated high-quality Cu thin films using a single-crystal Cu target and radio-frequency (RF) sputtering technique; the resulting film quality was comparable to that produced using MBE, even under unfavorable conditions for pure Cu film growth. The Cu thin film was epitaxially grown on an Al2O3 (sapphire) (0001) substrate, and had high crystalline orientation along the (111) direction. Despite the 10(-3) Pa vacuum conditions, the resulting thin film was oxygen free due to the high chemical stability of the sputtered specimen from a single-crystal target; moreover, the deposited film had >5× higher adhesion force than that produced using a polycrystalline target. This fabrication method enabled Cu films to be obtained using a simple, manufacturing-friendly process on a large-area substrate, making our findings relevant for industrial applications.

  9. A novel synthesis of graphene nanoscrolls with tunable dimension at a large scale

    Chen Xuli; Li Li; Sun Xuemei; Peng Huisheng; Kia, Hamid G

    2012-01-01

    Graphene nanoscrolls which could overcome the chirality dependence of metallic or semiconducting behavior in carbon nanotubes have been recently investigated and proposed for a wide variety of applications. In order to further improve their practical applications, a variety of synthetic approaches have been widely explored but with various limitations. For instance, it remains challenging to produce graphene nanoscrolls with tunable dimensions and high quantity, which greatly hinders their potential applications. Herein, we report a new and general approach to synthesize graphene nanoscrolls with accurately tunable widths and lengths at a large scale. The resulting high-quality graphene nanoscrolls show promising applications in a wide variety of electronic devices. (paper)

  10. Quantum Dots Embedded in Graphene Nanoribbons by Chemical Substitution

    Carbonell-Sanroma, Eduard; Brandimarte, Pedro; Balog, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Bottom-up chemical reactions of selected molecular precursors on a gold surface can produce high quality graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Here, we report on the formation of quantum dots embedded in an armchair GNR by substitutional inclusion of pairs of boron atoms into the GNR backbone. The boron...

  11. High-resolution patterning of graphene by screen printing with a silicon stencil for highly flexible printed electronics.

    Hyun, Woo Jin; Secor, Ethan B; Hersam, Mark C; Frisbie, C Daniel; Francis, Lorraine F

    2015-01-07

    High-resolution screen printing of pristine graphene is introduced for the rapid fabrication of conductive lines on flexible substrates. Well-defined silicon stencils and viscosity-controlled inks facilitate the preparation of high-quality graphene patterns as narrow as 40 μm. This strategy provides an efficient method to produce highly flexible graphene electrodes for printed electronics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Core-shell SrTiO3/graphene structure by chemical vapor deposition for enhanced photocatalytic performance

    He, Chenye; Bu, Xiuming; Yang, Siwei; He, Peng; Ding, Guqiao; Xie, Xiaoming

    2018-04-01

    Direct growth of high quality graphene on the surface of SrTiO3 (STO) was realized through chemical vapor deposition (CVD), to construct few-layer 'graphene shell' on every STO nanoparticle. The STO/graphene composite shows significantly enhanced UV light photocatalytic activity compared with the STO/rGO reference. Mechanism analysis confirms the role of special core-shell structure and chemical bond (Tisbnd C) for rapid interfacial electron transfer and effective electron-hole separation.

  13. Actinide-pnictide (An-Pn) bonds spanning non-metal, metalloid, and metal combinations (An=U, Th; Pn=P, As, Sb, Bi)

    Rookes, Thomas M.; Wildman, Elizabeth P.; Gardner, Benedict M.; Wooles, Ashley J.; Gregson, Matthew; Tuna, Floriana; Liddle, Stephen T. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Balazs, Gabor; Scheer, Manfred [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2018-01-26

    The synthesis and characterisation is presented of the compounds [An(Tren{sup DMBS}){Pn(SiMe_3)_2}] and [An(Tren{sup TIPS}){Pn(SiMe_3)_2}] [Tren{sup DMBS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiMe{sub 2}Bu{sup t}){sub 3}, An=U, Pn=P, As, Sb, Bi; An=Th, Pn=P, As; Tren{sup TIPS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiPr{sup i}{sub 3}){sub 3}, An=U, Pn=P, As, Sb; An=Th, Pn=P, As, Sb]. The U-Sb and Th-Sb moieties are unprecedented examples of any kind of An-Sb molecular bond, and the U-Bi bond is the first two-centre-two-electron (2c-2e) one. The Th-Bi combination was too unstable to isolate, underscoring the fragility of these linkages. However, the U-Bi complex is the heaviest 2c-2e pairing of two elements involving an actinide on a macroscopic scale under ambient conditions, and this is exceeded only by An-An pairings prepared under cryogenic matrix isolation conditions. Thermolysis and photolysis experiments suggest that the U-Pn bonds degrade by homolytic bond cleavage, whereas the more redox-robust thorium compounds engage in an acid-base/dehydrocoupling route. (copyright 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA.)

  14. High-quality thorium TRISO fuel performance in HTGRs

    Verfondern, Karl [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Nabielek, Heinz; Kania, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    Thorium as a nuclear fuel has received renewed interest, because of its widespread availability and the good irradiation performance of Th and mixed (Th,U) oxide compounds as fuels in nuclear power systems. Early HTGR development employed thorium together with high-enriched uranium (HEU). After 1980, HTGR fuel systems switched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). After completing fuel development for the AVR and the THTR with BISO coated particles, the German program expanded its efforts utilizing thorium and HEU TRISO coated particles in advanced HTGR concepts for process heat applications (PNP) and direct-cycle electricity production (HHT). The combination of a low-temperature isotropic (LTI) inner and outer pyrocarbon layers surrounding a strong, stable SiC layer greatly improved manufacturing conditions and the subsequent contamination and defective particle fractions in production fuel elements. In addition, this combination provided improved mechanical strength and a higher degree of solid fission product retention, not known previously with high-temperature isotropic (HTI) BISO coatings. The improved performance of the HEU (Th, U)O{sub 2} TRISO fuel system was successfully demonstrated in three primary areas of development: manufacturing, irradiation testing under normal operating conditions, and accident simulation testing. In terms of demonstrating performance for advanced HTGR applications, the experimental failure statistic from manufacture and irradiation testing are significantly below the coated particle requirements specified for PNP and HHT designs at the time. Covering a range to 1300 C in normal operations and 1600 C in accidents, with burnups to 13% FIMA and fast fluences to 8 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E> 16 fJ), the performance results exceed the design limits on manufacturing and operational requirements for the German HTR-Modul concept, which are 6.5 x 10{sup -5} for manufacturing, 2 x 10{sup -4} for normal operating conditions, and 5 x 10{sup -4

  15. High-quality thorium TRISO fuel performance in HTGRs

    Verfondern, Karl; Allelein, Hans-Josef; Nabielek, Heinz; Kania, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Thorium as a nuclear fuel has received renewed interest, because of its widespread availability and the good irradiation performance of Th and mixed (Th,U) oxide compounds as fuels in nuclear power systems. Early HTGR development employed thorium together with high-enriched uranium (HEU). After 1980, HTGR fuel systems switched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). After completing fuel development for the AVR and the THTR with BISO coated particles, the German program expanded its efforts utilizing thorium and HEU TRISO coated particles in advanced HTGR concepts for process heat applications (PNP) and direct-cycle electricity production (HHT). The combination of a low-temperature isotropic (LTI) inner and outer pyrocarbon layers surrounding a strong, stable SiC layer greatly improved manufacturing conditions and the subsequent contamination and defective particle fractions in production fuel elements. In addition, this combination provided improved mechanical strength and a higher degree of solid fission product retention, not known previously with high-temperature isotropic (HTI) BISO coatings. The improved performance of the HEU (Th, U)O 2 TRISO fuel system was successfully demonstrated in three primary areas of development: manufacturing, irradiation testing under normal operating conditions, and accident simulation testing. In terms of demonstrating performance for advanced HTGR applications, the experimental failure statistic from manufacture and irradiation testing are significantly below the coated particle requirements specified for PNP and HHT designs at the time. Covering a range to 1300 C in normal operations and 1600 C in accidents, with burnups to 13% FIMA and fast fluences to 8 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E> 16 fJ), the performance results exceed the design limits on manufacturing and operational requirements for the German HTR-Modul concept, which are 6.5 x 10 -5 for manufacturing, 2 x 10 -4 for normal operating conditions, and 5 x 10 -4 for accident conditions. These

  16. Analysis of high-quality modes in open chaotic microcavities

    Fang, W.; Yamilov, A.; Cao, H.

    2005-01-01

    We present a numerical study of the high-quality modes in two-dimensional dielectric stadium microcavities. Although the classical ray mechanics is fully chaotic in a stadium billiard, all of the high-quality modes show a 'strong scar' around unstable periodic orbits. When the deformation (ratio of the length of the straight segments over the diameter of the half circles) is small, the high-quality modes correspond to whispering-gallery-type trajectories and their quality factors decrease monotonically with increasing deformation. At large deformation, each high-quality mode is associated with multiple unstable periodic orbits. Its quality factor changes nonmonotonically with the deformation, and there exists an optimal deformation for each mode at which its quality factor reaches a local maximum. This unusual behavior is attributed to the interference of waves propagating along different constituent orbits that could minimize light leakage out of the cavity

  17. Innovative and high quality education through Open Education and OER

    Stracke, Christian M.

    2017-01-01

    Online presentation and webinar by Stracke, C. M. (2017, 18 December) on "Innovative and high quality education through Open Education and OER" for the Belt and Road Open Education Learning Week by the Beijing Normal University, China.

  18. Improving high quality, equitable maternal health services in Malawi ...

    Improving high quality, equitable maternal health services in Malawi (IMCHA) ... In response, the Ministry of Health implemented a Standards-Based Management and Recognition for Reproductive Health initiative to improve ... Total funding.

  19. High Quality Education and Learning for All through Open Education

    Stracke, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    Keynote at the International Lensky Education Forum 2016, Yakutsk, Republic of Sakha, Russian Federation, by Stracke, C. M. (2016, 16 August): "High Quality Education and Learning for All through Open Education"

  20. Production of High-quality Few-layer Graphene Flakes by Intercalation and Exfoliation

    Alzahrani, Areej A.

    2017-01-01

    , the source material was a commercially available graphiteintercalated compound, also known as expandable graphite. Several exfoliation-inducing tools were investigated including the use of blenders, homogenizers, and ultrasonic processors. To aid

  1. Low-temperature graphene synthesis using microwave plasma CVD

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Kim, Jaeho; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    The graphene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique at substrate temperatures around 300 °C by a microwave plasma sustained by surface waves (surface wave plasma chemical vapour deposition, SWP-CVD) is discussed. A low-temperature, large-area and high-deposition-rate CVD process for graphene films was developed. It was found from Raman spectra that the deposited films on copper (Cu) substrates consisted of high-quality graphene flakes. The fabricated graphene transparent conductive electrode showed uniform optical transmittance and sheet resistance, which suggests the possibility of graphene for practical electrical and optoelectronic applications. It is intriguing that graphene was successfully deposited on aluminium (Al) substrates, for which we did not expect the catalytic effect to decompose hydrocarbon and hydrogen molecules. We developed a roll-to-roll SWP-CVD system for continuous graphene film deposition towards industrial mass production. A pair of winder and unwinder systems of Cu film was installed in the plasma CVD apparatus. Uniform Raman spectra were confirmed over the whole width of 297 mm of Cu films. We successfully transferred the deposited graphene onto PET films, and confirmed a transmittance of about 95% and a sheet resistance of less than 7 × 10 5 Ω/sq.

  2. Low-temperature graphene synthesis using microwave plasma CVD

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Kim, Jaeho; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2013-02-01

    The graphene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique at substrate temperatures around 300 °C by a microwave plasma sustained by surface waves (surface wave plasma chemical vapour deposition, SWP-CVD) is discussed. A low-temperature, large-area and high-deposition-rate CVD process for graphene films was developed. It was found from Raman spectra that the deposited films on copper (Cu) substrates consisted of high-quality graphene flakes. The fabricated graphene transparent conductive electrode showed uniform optical transmittance and sheet resistance, which suggests the possibility of graphene for practical electrical and optoelectronic applications. It is intriguing that graphene was successfully deposited on aluminium (Al) substrates, for which we did not expect the catalytic effect to decompose hydrocarbon and hydrogen molecules. We developed a roll-to-roll SWP-CVD system for continuous graphene film deposition towards industrial mass production. A pair of winder and unwinder systems of Cu film was installed in the plasma CVD apparatus. Uniform Raman spectra were confirmed over the whole width of 297 mm of Cu films. We successfully transferred the deposited graphene onto PET films, and confirmed a transmittance of about 95% and a sheet resistance of less than 7 × 105 Ω/sq.

  3. CVD-graphene growth on different polycrystalline transition metals

    M. P. Lavin-Lopez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical vapor deposition (CVD graphene growth on two polycrystalline transition metals (Ni and Cu was investigated in detail using Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy as a way to synthesize graphene of the highest quality (i.e. uniform growth of monolayer graphene, which is considered a key issue for electronic devices. Key CVD process parameters (reaction temperature, CH4/H2flow rate ratio, total flow of gases (CH4+H2, reaction time were optimized for both metals in order to obtain the highest graphene uniformity and quality. The conclusions previously reported in literature about the performance of low and high carbon solubility metals in the synthesis of graphene and their associated reaction mechanisms, i.e. surface depositionand precipitation on cooling, respectively, was not corroborated by the results obtained in this work. Under the optimal reaction conditions, a large percentage of monolayer graphene was obtained over the Ni foil since the carbon saturation was not complete, allowing carbon atoms to be stored in the bulk metal, which could diffuse forming high quality monolayer graphene at the surface. However, under the optimal reaction conditions, the formation of a non-uniform mixture of few layers and multilayer graphene on the Cu foil was related to the presence of an excess of active carbon atoms on the Cu surface.

  4. A systematic study of atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of large-area monolayer graphene.

    Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hailong; Cheng, Rui; Chen, Yu; Lin, Yung-Chen; Qu, Yongquan; Bai, Jingwei; Ivanov, Ivan A; Liu, Gang; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-28

    Graphene has attracted considerable interest as a potential material for future electronics. Although mechanical peel is known to produce high quality graphene flakes, practical applications require continuous graphene layers over a large area. The catalyst-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising synthetic method to deliver wafer-sized graphene. Here we present a systematic study on the nucleation and growth of crystallized graphene domains in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process. Parametric studies show that the mean size of the graphene domains increases with increasing growth temperature and CH 4 partial pressure, while the density of domains decreases with increasing growth temperature and is independent of the CH 4 partial pressure. Our studies show that nucleation of graphene domains on copper substrate is highly dependent on the initial annealing temperature. A two-step synthetic process with higher initial annealing temperature but lower growth temperature is developed to reduce domain density and achieve high quality full-surface coverage of monolayer graphene films. Electrical transport measurements demonstrate that the resulting graphene exhibits a high carrier mobility of up to 3000 cm 2 V -1 s -1 at room temperature.

  5. Single crystalline electronic structure and growth mechanism of aligned square graphene sheets

    H. F. Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, commercially available copper foil has become an efficient and inexpensive catalytic substrate for scalable growth of large-area graphene films for fundamental research and applications. Interestingly, despite its hexagonal honeycomb lattice, graphene can be grown into large aligned square-shaped sheets on copper foils. Here, by applying angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with submicron spatial resolution (micro-ARPES to study the three-dimensional electronic structures of square graphene sheets grown on copper foils, we verified the high quality of individual square graphene sheets as well as their merged regions (with aligned orientation. Furthermore, by simultaneously measuring the graphene sheets and their substrate copper foil, we not only established the (001 copper surface structure but also discovered that the square graphene sheets’ sides align with the ⟨110⟩ copper direction, suggesting an important role of copper substrate in the growth of square graphene sheets—which will help the development of effective methods to synthesize high-quality large-size regularly shaped graphene sheets for future applications. This work also demonstrates the effectiveness of micro-ARPES in exploring low-dimensional materials down to atomic thickness and sub-micron lateral size (e.g., besides graphene, it can also be applied to transition metal dichalcogenides and various van der Waals heterostructures

  6. Clean Transfer of Large Graphene Single Crystals for High-Intactness Suspended Membranes and Liquid Cells.

    Zhang, Jincan; Lin, Li; Sun, Luzhao; Huang, Yucheng; Koh, Ai Leen; Dang, Wenhui; Yin, Jianbo; Wang, Mingzhan; Tan, Congwei; Li, Tianran; Tan, Zhenjun; Liu, Zhongfan; Peng, Hailin

    2017-07-01

    The atomically thin 2D nature of suspended graphene membranes holds promising in numerous technological applications. In particular, the outstanding transparency to electron beam endows graphene membranes great potential as a candidate for specimen support of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, major hurdles remain to be addressed to acquire an ultraclean, high-intactness, and defect-free suspended graphene membrane. Here, a polymer-free clean transfer of sub-centimeter-sized graphene single crystals onto TEM grids to fabricate large-area and high-quality suspended graphene membranes has been achieved. Through the control of interfacial force during the transfer, the intactness of large-area graphene membranes can be as high as 95%, prominently larger than reported values in previous works. Graphene liquid cells are readily prepared by π-π stacking two clean single-crystal graphene TEM grids, in which atomic-scale resolution imaging and temporal evolution of colloid Au nanoparticles are recorded. This facile and scalable production of clean and high-quality suspended graphene membrane is promising toward their wide applications for electron and optical microscopy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Single crystalline electronic structure and growth mechanism of aligned square graphene sheets

    Yang, H. F.; Chen, C.; Wang, H.; Liu, Z. K.; Zhang, T.; Peng, H.; Schröter, N. B. M.; Ekahana, S. A.; Jiang, J.; Yang, L. X.; Kandyba, V.; Barinov, A.; Chen, C. Y.; Avila, J.; Asensio, M. C.; Peng, H. L.; Liu, Z. F.; Chen, Y. L.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, commercially available copper foil has become an efficient and inexpensive catalytic substrate for scalable growth of large-area graphene films for fundamental research and applications. Interestingly, despite its hexagonal honeycomb lattice, graphene can be grown into large aligned square-shaped sheets on copper foils. Here, by applying angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with submicron spatial resolution (micro-ARPES) to study the three-dimensional electronic structures of square graphene sheets grown on copper foils, we verified the high quality of individual square graphene sheets as well as their merged regions (with aligned orientation). Furthermore, by simultaneously measuring the graphene sheets and their substrate copper foil, we not only established the (001) copper surface structure but also discovered that the square graphene sheets' sides align with the ⟨110⟩ copper direction, suggesting an important role of copper substrate in the growth of square graphene sheets—which will help the development of effective methods to synthesize high-quality large-size regularly shaped graphene sheets for future applications. This work also demonstrates the effectiveness of micro-ARPES in exploring low-dimensional materials down to atomic thickness and sub-micron lateral size (e.g., besides graphene, it can also be applied to transition metal dichalcogenides and various van der Waals heterostructures)

  8. 1.45 A resolution crystal structure of recombinant PNP in complex with a pM multisubstrate analogue inhibitor bearing one feature of the postulated transition state

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Breer, Katarzyna; Narczyk, Marta; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Czapinska, Honorata; Hashimoto, Mariko; Hikishima, Sadao; Yokomatsu, Tsutomu; Bochtler, Matthias; Girstun, Agnieszka; Staron, Krzysztof; Bzowska, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Low molecular mass purine nucleoside phosphorylases (PNPs, E.C. 2.4.2.1) are homotrimeric enzymes that are tightly inhibited by immucillins. Due to the positive charge on the ribose like part (iminoribitol moiety) and protonation of the N7 atom of the purine ring, immucillins are believed to act as transition state analogues. Over a wide range of concentrations, immucillins bind with strong negative cooperativity to PNPs, so that only every third binding site of the enzyme is occupied (third-of-the-sites binding). 9-(5',5'-difluoro-5'-phosphonopentyl)-9-deazaguanine (DFPP-DG) shares with immucillins the protonation of the N7, but not the positive charge on the ribose like part of the molecule. We have previously shown that DFPP-DG interacts with PNPs with subnanomolar inhibition constant. Here, we report additional biochemical experiments to demonstrate that the inhibitor can be bound with the same K d (∼190 pM) to all three substrate binding sites of the trimeric PNP, and a crystal structure of PNP in complex with DFPP-DG at 1.45 A resolution, the highest resolution published for PNPs so far. The crystals contain the full PNP homotrimer in the asymmetric unit. DFPP-DG molecules are bound in superimposable manner and with full occupancies to all three PNP subunits. Thus the postulated third-of-the-sites binding of immucillins should be rather attribute to the second feature of the transition state, ribooxocarbenium ion character of the ligand or to the coexistence of both features characteristic for the transition state. The DFPP-DG/PNP complex structure confirms the earlier observations, that the loop from Pro57 to Gly66 covering the phosphate-binding site cannot be stabilized by phosphonate analogues. The loop from Glu250 to Gln266 covering the base-binding site is organized by the interactions of Asn243 with the Hoogsteen edge of the purine base of analogues bearing one feature of the postulated transition state (protonated N7 position).

  9. Microbial reduction of graphene oxide by Escherichia coli: a green chemistry approach.

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Eppakayala, Vasuki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2013-02-01

    Graphene and graphene related materials are an important area of research in recent years due to their unique properties. The extensive industrial application of graphene and related compounds has led researchers to devise novel and simple methods for the synthesis of high quality graphene. In this paper, we developed an environment friendly, cost effective, simple method and green approaches for the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using Escherichia coli biomass. In biological method, we can avoid use of toxic and environmentally harmful reducing agents commonly used in the chemical reduction of GO to obtain graphene. The biomass of E. coli reduces exfoliated GO to graphene at 37°C in an aqueous medium. The E. coli reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) was characterized with UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle analyzer, high resolution X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Besides the reduction potential, the biomass could also play an important role as stabilizing agent, in which synthesized graphene exhibited good stability in water. This method can open up the new avenue for preparing graphene in cost effective and large scale production. Our findings suggest that GO can be reduced by simple eco-friendly method by using E. coli biomass to produce water dispersible graphene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Low-Temperature and Rapid Growth of Large Single-Crystalline Graphene with Ethane.

    Sun, Xiao; Lin, Li; Sun, Luzhao; Zhang, Jincan; Rui, Dingran; Li, Jiayu; Wang, Mingzhan; Tan, Congwei; Kang, Ning; Wei, Di; Xu, H Q; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan

    2018-01-01

    Future applications of graphene rely highly on the production of large-area high-quality graphene, especially large single-crystalline graphene, due to the reduction of defects caused by grain boundaries. However, current large single-crystalline graphene growing methodologies are suffering from low growth rate and as a result, industrial graphene production is always confronted by high energy consumption, which is primarily caused by high growth temperature and long growth time. Herein, a new growth condition achieved via ethane being the carbon feedstock to achieve low-temperature yet rapid growth of large single-crystalline graphene is reported. Ethane condition gives a growth rate about four times faster than methane, achieving about 420 µm min -1 for the growth of sub-centimeter graphene single crystals at temperature about 1000 °C. In addition, the temperature threshold to obtain graphene using ethane can be reduced to 750 °C, lower than the general growth temperature threshold (about 1000 °C) with methane on copper foil. Meanwhile ethane always keeps higher graphene growth rate than methane under the same growth temperature. This study demonstrates that ethane is indeed a potential carbon source for efficient growth of large single-crystalline graphene, thus paves the way for graphene in high-end electronical and optoelectronical applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. A green synthetic approach to graphene nanosheets for hydrogen adsorption

    Yuan Wenhui; Li Baoqing; Li Li

    2011-01-01

    A green and facile strategy of preparing graphene by reducing exfoliated graphite oxide (GO) with glucose was developed in this study. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Atomic force microscopy (AFM). The characterization results indicated that the graphene sheets (GS) were of high quality with smooth surface, rich pore structure and few layer graphene. The samples have a BET specific surface area of 1205.8 m 2 g -1 measured by N 2 adsorption at 77 K. The hydrogen storage capacity of 2.7 wt.% at 298 K and 25 bar demonstrated that the as-prepared graphene employing glucose as reductant is supposed to be a promising material with outstanding property for hydrogen storage.

  12. Oxidation-assisted graphene heteroepitaxy on copper foil.

    Reckinger, Nicolas; Tang, Xiaohui; Joucken, Frédéric; Lajaunie, Luc; Arenal, Raul; Dubois, Emmanuel; Hackens, Benoît; Henrard, Luc; Colomer, Jean-François

    2016-11-10

    We propose an innovative, easy-to-implement approach to synthesize aligned large-area single-crystalline graphene flakes by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil. This method doubly takes advantage of residual oxygen present in the gas phase. First, by slightly oxidizing the copper surface, we induce grain boundary pinning in copper and, in consequence, the freezing of the thermal recrystallization process. Subsequent reduction of copper under hydrogen suddenly unlocks the delayed reconstruction, favoring the growth of centimeter-sized copper (111) grains through the mechanism of abnormal grain growth. Second, the oxidation of the copper surface also drastically reduces the nucleation density of graphene. This oxidation/reduction sequence leads to the synthesis of aligned millimeter-sized monolayer graphene domains in epitaxial registry with copper (111). The as-grown graphene flakes are demonstrated to be both single-crystalline and of high quality.

  13. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    Schmid, Silvan; Guillermo Villanueva, Luis; Amato, Bartolo; Boisen, Anja [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Building 345 East, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil; Sørensen, Anders S.; Usami, Koji; Polzik, Eugene S. [QUANTOP, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Taylor, Jacob M. [Joint Quantum Institute/NIST, College Park, Maryland 20899 (United States); Herring, Patrick K.; Cassidy, Maja C. [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Marcus, Charles M. [Center for Quantum Devices, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Cheol Shin, Yong; Kong, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization of such membranes would enable an electronic integration with the prospect for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling of graphene covered membranes is found to be equal to a perfectly conductive membrane, without significantly adding mass, decreasing the superior mechanical quality factor or affecting the optical properties of pure SiN micromembranes. The concept of graphene-SiN resonators allows a broad range of new experiments both in applied physics and fundamental basic research, e.g., for the mechanical, electrical, or optical characterization of graphene.

  14. Quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene with permanent magnets.

    Parmentier, F D; Cazimajou, T; Sekine, Y; Hibino, H; Irie, H; Glattli, D C; Kumada, N; Roulleau, P

    2016-12-06

    We have observed the well-kown quantum Hall effect (QHE) in epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide (SiC) by using, for the first time, only commercial NdFeB permanent magnets at low temperature. The relatively large and homogeneous magnetic field generated by the magnets, together with the high quality of the epitaxial graphene films, enables the formation of well-developed quantum Hall states at Landau level filling factors v = ±2, commonly observed with superconducting electro-magnets. Furthermore, the chirality of the QHE edge channels can be changed by a top gate. These results demonstrate that basic QHE physics are experimentally accessible in graphene for a fraction of the price of conventional setups using superconducting magnets, which greatly increases the potential of the QHE in graphene for research and applications.

  15. Quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene with permanent magnets

    Parmentier, F. D.; Cazimajou, T.; Sekine, Y.; Hibino, H.; Irie, H.; Glattli, D. C.; Kumada, N.; Roulleau, P.

    2016-12-01

    We have observed the well-kown quantum Hall effect (QHE) in epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide (SiC) by using, for the first time, only commercial NdFeB permanent magnets at low temperature. The relatively large and homogeneous magnetic field generated by the magnets, together with the high quality of the epitaxial graphene films, enables the formation of well-developed quantum Hall states at Landau level filling factors v = ±2, commonly observed with superconducting electro-magnets. Furthermore, the chirality of the QHE edge channels can be changed by a top gate. These results demonstrate that basic QHE physics are experimentally accessible in graphene for a fraction of the price of conventional setups using superconducting magnets, which greatly increases the potential of the QHE in graphene for research and applications.

  16. A manufacturable process integration approach for graphene devices

    Vaziri, Sam; Lupina, Grzegorz; Paussa, Alan; Smith, Anderson D.; Henkel, Christoph; Lippert, Gunther; Dabrowski, Jarek; Mehr, Wolfgang; Östling, Mikael; Lemme, Max C.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we propose an integration approach for double gate graphene field effect transistors. The approach includes a number of process steps that are key for future integration of graphene in microelectronics: bottom gates with ultra-thin (2 nm) high-quality thermally grown SiO2 dielectrics, shallow trench isolation between devices and atomic layer deposited Al2O3 top gate dielectrics. The complete process flow is demonstrated with fully functional GFET transistors and can be extended to wafer scale processing. We assess, through simulation, the effects of the quantum capacitance and band bending in the silicon substrate on the effective electric fields in the top and bottom gate oxide. The proposed process technology is suitable for other graphene-based devices such as graphene-based hot electron transistors and photodetectors.

  17. Graphene prehistory

    Geim, A K

    2012-01-01

    After the 2010 Nobel Prize recognized the research breakthrough reported by our group in a 2004 paper, I feel that, as my contribution to the proceedings of the Nobel symposium held earlier in 2010, it is both appropriate and important to review pre-2004 scientific literature and acknowledge early ideas. With the benefit of hindsight, I also try to analyze why our first graphene paper has attracted so much interest.

  18. Graphene and Graphene Metamaterials for Terahertz Absorbers

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Booth, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Graphene, due to the possibility to tune its conductivity, is the promising material for a range of the terahertz (THz) applications, such as tunable reflectors, absorbers, modulators, filters and polarization converters. Subwavelength structuring of graphene in order to form metamaterials allows...... for even more control over the THz waves. In this poster presentation I will show an elegant way to describe the graphene metamaterials and the design of graphene based absorbers. I will also present our recent experimental results on the graphene absorbers characterization....

  19. Fabrication of oxide-free graphene suspension and transparent thin films using amide solvent and thermal treatment

    Oh, Se Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Chi, Yong Seung; Kang, Tae Jin

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: New methodology for suspended graphene sheets of high-quality (oxide-free), high-yield (high concentration) using amide solvent exfoliation and thermal treatment at 800 °C. We confirmed that the van der Waals force between the graphene layers decreases as increasing thermal treatment temperatures as shown XRD data (b). Highlights: ► Propose of new methodology to prepare oxide-free graphene sheets suspension. ► The graphene suspension concentration is enhanced by thermal treatment. ► Decrease of van der Waals force between the graphene layers by high temperature and pressure. ► This method has the potential as technology for mass production. ► It could be applied in transparent and flexible electronic devices. - Abstract: High quality graphene sheets were produced from graphite by liquid phase exfoliation using N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and a subsequent thermal treatment to enhance the exfoliation. The exfoliation was enhanced by treatment with organic solvent and high thermal expansion producing high yields of the high-quality and defect-free graphene sheets. The graphene was successfully deposited on a flexible and transparent polymer film using the vacuum filtration method. SEM images of thin films of graphene treated at 800 °C showed uniform structure with no defects commonly found in films made of graphene produced by other techniques. Thin films of graphene prepared at higher temperatures showed superior transmittance and conductivity. The sheet-resistance of the graphene film treated at 800 °C was 2.8 × 10 3 kΩ/□ with 80% transmittance.

  20. Concrete Waste Recycling Process for High Quality Aggregate

    Ishikura, Takeshi; Fujii, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Large amount of concrete waste generates during nuclear power plant (NPP) dismantling. Non-contaminated concrete waste is assumed to be disposed in a landfill site, but that will not be the solution especially in the future, because of decreasing tendency of the site availability and natural resources. Concerning concrete recycling, demand for roadbeds and backfill tends to be less than the amount of dismantled concrete generated in a single rural site, and conventional recycled aggregate is limited of its use to non-structural concrete, because of its inferior quality to ordinary natural aggregate. Therefore, it is vital to develop high quality recycled aggregate for general uses of dismantled concrete. If recycled aggregate is available for high structural concrete, the dismantling concrete is recyclable as aggregate for industry including nuclear field. Authors developed techniques on high quality aggregate reclamation for large amount of concrete generated during NPP decommissioning. Concrete of NPP buildings has good features for recycling aggregate; large quantity of high quality aggregate from same origin, record keeping of the aggregate origin, and little impurities in dismantled concrete such as wood and plastics. The target of recycled aggregate in this development is to meet the quality criteria for NPP concrete as prescribed in JASS 5N 'Specification for Nuclear Power Facility Reinforced Concrete' and JASS 5 'Specification for Reinforced Concrete Work'. The target of recycled aggregate concrete is to be comparable performance with ordinary aggregate concrete. The high quality recycled aggregate production techniques are assumed to apply for recycling for large amount of non-contaminated concrete. These techniques can also be applied for slightly contaminated concrete dismantled from radiological control area (RCA), together with free release survey. In conclusion: a technology on dismantled concrete recycling for high quality aggregate was developed

  1. Achieving Ohmic Contact for High-quality MoS2 Devices on Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Cui, Xu

    highly stable device performance, even at elevated temperatures. Both optical and electrical characterization confirms our high quality devices, including an ultra-clean interface, a record-high Hall mobility reaching 34,000 cm. 2/Vs, and first observation of Shubnikov–de Haas oscillations. The development of Ohmic contact and fabrication of high quality devices are critical to MoS2 application and studying its intrinsic properties. Therefore, the progress made in this work will facilitate efforts to study novel physical phenomena of MoS2 that were not accessible before.

  2. Review on mechanism of directly fabricating wafer-scale graphene on dielectric substrates by chemical vapor deposition

    Ning, Jing; Wang, Dong; Chai, Yang; Feng, Xin; Mu, Meishan; Guo, Lixin; Zhang, Jincheng; Hao, Yue

    2017-07-01

    To date, chemical vapor deposition on transition metal catalysts is a potential way to achieve low cost, high quality and uniform wafer-scale graphene. However, the removal and transfer process of the annoying catalytic metals underneath can bring large amounts of uncertain factors causing the performance deterioration of graphene, such as the pollution of surface polymeric residues, unmentioned doping and structural damages. Thus, to develop a technique of directly fabricating graphene on dielectric substrates is quite meaningful. In this review, we will present specific methods of catalyst- or transfer-free techniques for graphene growth and discuss the diversity of growth mechanisms.

  3. Micro- and nanoscale electrical characterization of large-area graphene transferred to functional substrates

    Gabriele Fisichella

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical vapour deposition (CVD on catalytic metals is one of main approaches for high-quality graphene growth over large areas. However, a subsequent transfer step to an insulating substrate is required in order to use the graphene for electronic applications. This step can severely affect both the structural integrity and the electronic properties of the graphene membrane. In this paper, we investigated the morphological and electrical properties of CVD graphene transferred onto SiO2 and on a polymeric substrate (poly(ethylene-2,6-naphthalene dicarboxylate, briefly PEN, suitable for microelectronics and flexible electronics applications, respectively. The electrical properties (sheet resistance, mobility, carrier density of the transferred graphene as well as the specific contact resistance of metal contacts onto graphene were investigated by using properly designed test patterns. While a sheet resistance Rsh ≈ 1.7 kΩ/sq and a specific contact resistance ρc ≈ 15 kΩ·μm have been measured for graphene transferred onto SiO2, about 2.3× higher Rsh and about 8× higher ρc values were obtained for graphene on PEN. High-resolution current mapping by torsion resonant conductive atomic force microscopy (TRCAFM provided an insight into the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for the very high ρc in the case of graphene on PEN, showing a ca. 10× smaller “effective” area for current injection than in the case of graphene on SiO2.

  4. Rapid growth of single-layer graphene on the insulating substrates by thermal CVD

    Chen, C.Y. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Dai, D.; Chen, G.X.; Yu, J.H. [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Nishimura, K. [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Advanced Nano-processing Engineering Lab, Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kogakuin University (Japan); Lin, C.-T. [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Jiang, N., E-mail: jiangnan@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zhan, Z.L., E-mail: zl_zhan@sohu.com [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • A rapid thermal CVD process has been developed to directly grow graphene on the insulating substrates. • The treating time consumed is ≈25% compared to conventional CVD procedure. • Single-layer and few-layer graphene can be formed on quartz and SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates, respectively. • The formation of thinner graphene at the interface is due to the fast precipitation rate of carbon atoms during cooling. - Abstract: The advance of CVD technique to directly grow graphene on the insulating substrates is particularly significant for further device fabrication. As graphene is catalytically grown on metal foils, the degradation of the sample properties is unavoidable during transfer of graphene on the dielectric layer. Moreover, shortening the treatment time as possible, while achieving single-layer growth of graphene, is worthy to be investigated for promoting the efficiency of mass production. Here we performed a rapid heating/cooling process to grow graphene films directly on the insulating substrates by thermal CVD. The treating time consumed is ≈25% compared to conventional CVD procedure. In addition, we found that high-quality, single-layer graphene can be formed on quartz, but on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate only few-layer graphene can be obtained. The pronounced substrate effect is attributed to the different dewetting behavior of Ni films on the both substrates at 950 °C.

  5. Probing the interaction of noble gases with pristine and nitrogen-doped graphene through Raman spectroscopy

    Cunha, Renato; Perea-López, Néstor; Elías, Ana Laura; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Carozo, Victor; Feng, Simin; Lv, Ruitao; dos Santos, Maria Cristina; Terrones, Mauricio; Araujo, Paulo T.

    2018-05-01

    The interactions of adsorbates with graphene have received increasing attention due to its importance in the development of applications involving graphene-based coatings. Here, we present a study of the adsorption of noble gases on pristine and nitrogen-doped graphene. Single-layer graphene samples were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and transferred to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Several noble gases were allowed to adsorb on the suspended graphene substrate at very low temperatures. Raman spectra show distinct frequency blue shifts in both the 2D and G bands, which are induced by gas adsorption onto high quality single layer graphene (1LG). These shifts, which we associate with compressive biaxial strain in the graphene layers induced by the noble gases, are negligible for nitrogen-doped graphene. Additionally, a thermal depinning transition, which is related to the desorption of a noble gas layer from the graphene surface at low temperatures (ranging from 20 to 35 K), was also observed at different transition temperatures for different noble gases. These transition temperatures were found to be 25 K for argon and 35 K for xenon. Moreover, we were able to obtain values for the compressive biaxial strain in graphene induced by the adsorbed layer of noble gases, using Raman spectroscopy. Ab initio calculations confirmed the correlation between the noble gas-induced strain and the changes in the Raman features observed.

  6. Soluble Graphene Nanosheets from Recycled Graphite of Spent Lithium Ion Batteries

    Zhao, Liangliang; Liu, Xiya; Wan, Chuanyun; Ye, Xiangrong; Wu, Fanhong

    2018-02-01

    Soluble graphene nanosheets are fabricated from recycled graphite of spent lithium ion batteries through a modified Hammers process followed by deoxygenation with NaOH-KOH eutectic. Ultrasonic exfoliation in N-methyl-pyrrolidone indicates the loosened graphene layers in recycled graphite are prone to exfoliation. Reduction of the exfoliated graphene oxide sheets was conducted in molten NaOH-KOH eutectic at different temperatures. The results show that molten NaOH-KOH effectively eliminates the unsaturated oxygen-containing moieties from the exfoliated graphene oxide sheets while creating more hydroxyl functional groups. Higher temperature treatment is more prone to remove hydroxyls while producing the shrinkage on the surface of graphene sheets. Graphene sheet with a good solubility is produced when the graphene oxide is heat-treated at 220 °C for 10 h. After reduction, the graphene oxide sheets exhibit excellent dispersibility or solubility in water, ethanol and other polar solvents, therefore being highly desirable for solution processing of graphene materials. Such study not only identifies a high-quality stockpile to prepare soluble graphene but also paves a feasible alternative of graphite recycling from spent lithium batteries.

  7. Nondegradative Dielectric Coating of Graphene using Thermal Evaporation of SiO

    Suzuki, Seiya; Lee, Chien-Chung; Nagamori, Takashi; Schibli, Thomas; Yoshimura, Masamichi

    2013-03-01

    Deposition of dielectrics onto graphene is a challenging technique due to the difficulties of fabricating high quality oxide on pristine graphene without introducing atomic defects. Here we report on a novel method to fabricate silicon oxide layer on graphene by vacuum thermal evaporation of silicon monoxide (SiO). Raman spectroscopy and mapping showed the present method did not degrade graphene, in contrast to the e-beam evaporated SiO2 coating method previously reported. We fabricated graphene field effect transistor devices with four metal electrodes to measure gate voltage dependence of sheet resistance of the graphene, and deposited a top coating of SiO on the graphene channel. The electrical measurements before and after the top-coating revealed that the top coating suppressed chemical shift of the graphene from strong p-dope to nearly undoped. Since SiO is transparent for visible and infrared light, the coating can be available as a protection layer for optical devices of graphene such as photodetectors and electro-optic modulators. Since the SiO top coating is a simple vacuum evaporation, it is much easier than atomic-layer-deposition which requires additional functionalization of graphene, and compatible with industrial use. This research was supported in part by Toyoaki Scholarship Foundation

  8. Learning Disabilities and Achieving High-Quality Education Standards

    Gartland, Debi; Strosnider, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    This is an official document of the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (NJCLD), of which Council for Learning Disabilities is a long-standing, active member. With this position paper, NJCLD advocates for the implementation of high-quality education standards (HQES) for students with learning disabilities (LD) and outlines the…

  9. extraction of high quality dna from polysaccharides-secreting ...

    cistvr

    A DNA extraction method using CTAB was used for the isolation of genomic DNA from ten. Xanthomonas campestris pathovars, ten isolates of Xanthomonas albilineans and one isolate of. Pseudomonas rubrisubalbicans. High quality DNA was obtained that was ideal for molecular analy- ses. Extracellular polysaccharides ...

  10. Negative Binomial charts for monitoring high-quality processes

    Albers, Willem/Wim

    Good control charts for high quality processes are often based on the number of successes between failures. Geometric charts are simplest in this respect, but slow in recognizing moderately increased failure rates p. Improvement can be achieved by waiting until r > 1 failures have occurred, i.e. by

  11. Adoption and impact of high quality bambara flour (HQBF ...

    Adoption and impact of high quality bambara flour (HQBF) technology in the ... consumer acceptability/quality of products, credit, availability of raw materials, and ... as a result of 12.5 per cent increase in demand for bambara-based products.

  12. Synthesis and spectroscopic study of high quality alloy Cdx S ...

    Wintec

    In the present study, we report the synthesis of high quality CdxZn1–xS nanocrystals alloy at. 150°C with .... (XRD) using a Siemens model D 500, powder X-ray ... decays were analysed using IBH DAS6 software. 3. ... This alloying process is.

  13. Factores que influyen en la definición del perfil profesional del egresado de la ETS-PNP y el desempeño laboral.

    García Casas, Oswaldo German

    2015-01-01

    El presente trabajo de investigación se ha centrado en la Escuela Técnico Superior de la Policía Nacional del Perú de Puente Piedra (ETS-PNPPP), teniendo como unidad de análisis los cadetes del último año de egreso. El objetivo principal ha sido establecer los factores que influyen en la definición del perfil profesional del egresado de la ETS-PNP-Puente Piedra; considerando que Lima Metropolitana en particular viene soportando un clima de inseguridad, debido al crecimiento de la criminali...

  14. Chemical vapour deposition growth and Raman characterization of graphene layers and carbon nanotubes

    Lai, Y.-C.; Rafailov, P. M.; Vlaikova, E.; Marinova, V.; Lin, S. H.; Yu, P.; Yu, S.-C.; Chi, G. C.; Dimitrov, D.; Sveshtarov, P.; Mehandjiev, V.; Gospodinov, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    Single-layer graphene films were grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on Cu foil. The CVD process was complemented by plasma enhancement to grow also vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes using Ni nanoparticles as catalyst. The obtained samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy analysis. Nature of defects in the samples and optimal growth conditions leading to achieve high quality of graphene and carbon nanotubes are discussed.

  15. Density functional theory calculations on alkali and the alkaline Ca atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Valdez, Danielle; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade; Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin

    2017-01-01

    properties could be well-described by specific DFT functionals paired with high-quality adatom basis sets. For Li, K, and Na adsorbed on graphene, increased adatom surface coverage weakens the adatom-graphene interaction. However, this statement does not apply for Ca adsorbed on graphene. In this case, the Ca adsorption strength, which is stronger at higher coverages, is opposite to increases in the Ca–4s orbital population.

  16. Density functional theory calculations on alkali and the alkaline Ca atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    Dimakis, Nicholas, E-mail: nicholas.dimakis@utrgv.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX (United States); Valdez, Danielle; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX (United States); Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin [Robert Vela High School, Edinburg, TX (United States)

    2017-08-15

    properties could be well-described by specific DFT functionals paired with high-quality adatom basis sets. For Li, K, and Na adsorbed on graphene, increased adatom surface coverage weakens the adatom-graphene interaction. However, this statement does not apply for Ca adsorbed on graphene. In this case, the Ca adsorption strength, which is stronger at higher coverages, is opposite to increases in the Ca–4s orbital population.

  17. Nanotoxicity of graphene and graphene oxide.

    Seabra, Amedea B; Paula, Amauri J; de Lima, Renata; Alves, Oswaldo L; Durán, Nelson

    2014-02-17

    Graphene and its derivatives are promising candidates for important biomedical applications because of their versatility. The prospective use of graphene-based materials in a biological context requires a detailed comprehension of the toxicity of these materials. Moreover, due to the expanding applications of nanotechnology, human and environmental exposures to graphene-based nanomaterials are likely to increase in the future. Because of the potential risk factors associated with the manufacture and use of graphene-related materials, the number of nanotoxicological studies of these compounds has been increasing rapidly in the past decade. These studies have researched the effects of the nanostructural/biological interactions on different organizational levels of the living system, from biomolecules to animals. This review discusses recent results based on in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies of graphene-related materials and critically examines the methodologies employed to evaluate their toxicities. The environmental impact from the manipulation and application of graphene materials is also reported and discussed. Finally, this review presents mechanistic aspects of graphene toxicity in biological systems. More detailed studies aiming to investigate the toxicity of graphene-based materials and to properly associate the biological phenomenon with their chemical, structural, and morphological variations that result from several synthetic and processing possibilities are needed. Knowledge about graphene-based materials could ensure the safe application of this versatile material. Consequently, the focus of this review is to provide a source of inspiration for new nanotoxicological approaches for graphene-based materials.

  18. Spin transport and relaxation in graphene

    Han Wei; McCreary, K.M.; Pi, K.; Wang, W.H.; Li Yan; Wen, H.; Chen, J.R.; Kawakami, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    the use of graphene for spin-based logic and information storage applications. - Highlights: → We review recent advances in graphene spintronics. → Gate tunable spin transport is observed at room temperature. → The development of high quality tunneling contacts greatly improves spin injection efficiency into graphene. → Long spin lifetimes are observed in single layer and bilayer graphene. → Contrasting spin relaxation mechanisms are observed for single layer and bilayer graphene.

  19. Three-Dimensional Printed Graphene Foams.

    Sha, Junwei; Li, Yilun; Villegas Salvatierra, Rodrigo; Wang, Tuo; Dong, Pei; Ji, Yongsung; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Zhang, Chenhao; Zhang, Jibo; Smith, Robert H; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun; Zhao, Naiqin; Tour, James M

    2017-07-25

    An automated metal powder three-dimensional (3D) printing method for in situ synthesis of free-standing 3D graphene foams (GFs) was successfully modeled by manually placing a mixture of Ni and sucrose onto a platform and then using a commercial CO 2 laser to convert the Ni/sucrose mixture into 3D GFs. The sucrose acted as the solid carbon source for graphene, and the sintered Ni metal acted as the catalyst and template for graphene growth. This simple and efficient method combines powder metallurgy templating with 3D printing techniques and enables direct in situ 3D printing of GFs with no high-temperature furnace or lengthy growth process required. The 3D printed GFs show high-porosity (∼99.3%), low-density (∼0.015g cm -3 ), high-quality, and multilayered graphene features. The GFs have an electrical conductivity of ∼8.7 S cm -1 , a remarkable storage modulus of ∼11 kPa, and a high damping capacity of ∼0.06. These excellent physical properties of 3D printed GFs indicate potential applications in fields requiring rapid design and manufacturing of 3D carbon materials, for example, energy storage devices, damping materials, and sound absorption.

  20. Highly Enhanced Electromechanical Stability of Large-Area Graphene with Increased Interfacial Adhesion Energy by Electrothermal-Direct Transfer for Transparent Electrodes.

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Gi Gyu; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2016-09-07

    Graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms in a hexagonal lattice structure, has been extensively investigated for research and industrial applications as a promising material with outstanding electrical, mechanical, and chemical properties. To fabricate graphene-based devices, graphene transfer to the target substrate with a clean and minimally defective surface is the first step. However, graphene transfer technologies require improvement in terms of uniform transfer with a clean, nonfolded and nontorn area, amount of defects, and electromechanical reliability of the transferred graphene. More specifically, uniform transfer of a large area is a key challenge when graphene is repetitively transferred onto pretransferred layers because the adhesion energy between graphene layers is too low to ensure uniform transfer, although uniform multilayers of graphene have exhibited enhanced electrical and optical properties. In this work, we developed a newly suggested electrothermal-direct (ETD) transfer method for large-area high quality monolayer graphene with less defects and an absence of folding or tearing of the area at the surface. This method delivers uniform multilayer transfer of graphene by repetitive monolayer transfer steps based on high adhesion energy between graphene layers and the target substrate. To investigate the highly enhanced electromechanical stability, we conducted mechanical elastic bending experiments and reliability tests in a highly humid environment. This ETD-transferred graphene is expected to replace commercial transparent electrodes with ETD graphene-based transparent electrodes and devices such as a touch panels with outstanding electromechanical stability.

  1. Next Generation High Quality Videoconferencing Service for the LHC

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    In recent times, we have witnessed an explosion of video initiatives in the industry worldwide. Several advancements in video technology are currently improving the way we interact and collaborate. These advancements are forcing tendencies and overall experiences: any device in any network can be used to collaborate, in most cases with an overall high quality. To cope with this technology progresses, CERN IT Department has taken the leading role to establish strategies and directions to improve the user experience in remote dispersed meetings and remote collaboration at large in the worldwide LHC communities. Due to the high rate of dispersion in the LHC user communities, these are critically dependent of videoconferencing technology, with a need of robustness and high quality for the best possible user experience. We will present an analysis of the factors that influenced the technical and strategic choices to improve the reliability, efficiency and overall quality of the LHC remote sessions. In particular, ...

  2. Wellbeing Understanding in High Quality Healthcare Informatics and Telepractice.

    Fiorini, Rodolfo A; De Giacomo, Piero; L'Abate, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    The proper use of healthcare informatics technology and multidimensional conceptual clarity are fundamental to create and boost outstanding clinical and telepractice results. Avoiding even terminology ambiguities is mandatory for high quality of care service. For instance, well-being or wellbeing is a different way to write the same concept only, or there is a good deal of ambiguity around the meanings of these terms the way they are written. In personal health, healthcare and healthcare informatics, this kind of ambiguity and lack of conceptual clarity has been called out repeatedly over the past 50 years. It is time to get the right, terse scenario. We present a brief review to develop and achieve ultimate wellbeing understanding for practical high quality healthcare informatics and telepractice application. This article presents an innovative point of view on deeper wellbeing understanding towards its increased clinical effective application.

  3. Graphene for Space

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Individual talks by JPL and Caltech experts on graphene to present the different ambits of application in which graphene is currently being used on campus,...

  4. Extrinsic morphology of graphene

    Li, Teng

    2011-01-01

    Graphene is intrinsically non-flat and corrugates randomly. Since the corrugating physics of atomically thin graphene is strongly tied to its electronics properties, randomly corrugating morphology of graphene poses a significant challenge to its application in nanoelectronic devices for which precise (digital) control is the key. Recent studies revealed that the morphology of substrate-supported graphene is regulated by the graphene–substrate interaction, thus is distinct from the random intrinsic morphology of freestanding graphene. The regulated extrinsic morphology of graphene sheds light on new pathways to fine tune the properties of graphene. To guide further research to explore these fertile opportunities, this paper reviews recent progress on modeling and experimental studies of the extrinsic morphology of graphene under a wide range of external regulation, including two-dimensional and one-dimensional substrate surface features and one-dimensional and zero-dimensional nanoscale scaffolds (e.g. nanowires and nanoparticles)

  5. Methods and systems for fabricating high quality superconducting tapes

    Majkic, Goran; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2018-02-13

    An MOCVD system fabricates high quality superconductor tapes with variable thicknesses. The MOCVD system can include a gas flow chamber between two parallel channels in a housing. A substrate tape is heated and then passed through the MOCVD housing such that the gas flow is perpendicular to the tape's surface. Precursors are injected into the gas flow for deposition on the substrate tape. In this way, superconductor tapes can be fabricated with variable thicknesses, uniform precursor deposition, and high critical current densities.

  6. Process to Continuously Melt, Refine and Cast High Quality Steel

    None

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to conduct research and development targeted at designing a revolutionary steelmaking process. This process will deliver high quality steel from scrap to the casting mold in one continuous process and will be safer, more productive, and less capital intensive to build and operate than conventional steelmaking. The new process will produce higher quality steel faster than traditional batch processes while consuming less energy and other resources.

  7. Multilayer graphene growth on polar dielectric substrates using chemical vapour deposition

    Karamat, S.; Çelik, K.; Shah Zaman, S.; Oral, A.

    2018-06-01

    High quality of graphene is necessary for its applications at industrial scale production. The most convenient way is its direct growth on dielectrics which avoid the transfer route of graphene from metal to dielectric substrate usually followed by graphene community. The choice of a suitable dielectric for the gate material which can replace silicon dioxide (SiO2) is in high demand. Various properties like permittivity, thermodynamic stability, film morphology, interface quality, bandgap and band alignment of other dielectrics with graphene needs more exploration. A potential dielectric material is required which could be used to grow graphene with all these qualities. Direct growth of graphene on magnesium oxide (MgO) substrates is an interesting idea and will be a new addition in the library of 2D materials. The present work is about the direct growth of graphene on MgO substrates by an ambient pressure chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. We address the surface instability issue of the polar oxides which is the most challenging factor in MgO. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements showed the topographical features of the graphene coated on MgO. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study is carried out to extract information regarding the presence of necessary elements, their bonding with substrates and to confirm the sp-2 hybridization of carbon, which is a characteristic feature of graphene film. The chemical shift is due to the surface reconstruction of MgO in the prepared samples. For graphene-MgO interface, valence band offset (VBO) and conduction band offset (CBO) extracted from valence band spectra reported. Further, we predicted the energy band diagram for single layer and thin film of graphene. By using the room-temperature energy band gap values of MgO and graphene, the CBO is calculated to be 6.85 eV for single layer and 5.66 eV for few layer (1-3) of graphene layers.

  8. High quality digital holographic reconstruction on analog film

    Nelsen, B.; Hartmann, P.

    2017-05-01

    High quality real-time digital holographic reconstruction, i.e. at 30 Hz frame rates, has been at the forefront of research and has been hailed as the holy grail of display systems. While these efforts have produced a fascinating array of computer algorithms and technology, many applications of reconstructing high quality digital holograms do not require such high frame rates. In fact, applications such as 3D holographic lithography even require a stationary mask. Typical devices used for digital hologram reconstruction are based on spatial-light-modulator technology and this technology is great for reconstructing arbitrary holograms on the fly; however, it lacks the high spatial resolution achievable by its analog counterpart, holographic film. Analog holographic film is therefore the method of choice for reconstructing highquality static holograms. The challenge lies in taking a static, high-quality digitally calculated hologram and effectively writing it to holographic film. We have developed a theoretical system based on a tunable phase plate, an intensity adjustable high-coherence laser and a slip-stick based piezo rotation stage to effectively produce a digitally calculated hologram on analog film. The configuration reproduces the individual components, both the amplitude and phase, of the hologram in the Fourier domain. These Fourier components are then individually written on the holographic film after interfering with a reference beam. The system is analogous to writing angularly multiplexed plane waves with individual component phase control.

  9. Long quantum channels for high-quality entanglement transfer

    Banchi, L; Apollaro, T J G; Cuccoli, A; Verrucchi, P; Vaia, R

    2011-01-01

    High-quality quantum-state and entanglement transfer can be achieved in an unmodulated spin bus operating in the ballistic regime, which occurs when the endpoint qubits A and B are nonperturbatively coupled to the chain by a suitable exchange interaction j 0 . Indeed, the transition amplitude characterizing the transfer quality exhibits a maximum for a finite optimal value j opt 0 (N), where N is the channel length. We show that j opt 0 (N) scales as N -1/6 for large N and that it ensures a high-quality entanglement transfer even in the limit of arbitrarily long channels, almost independently of the channel initialization. For instance, for any chain length the average quantum-state transmission fidelity exceeds 90% and decreases very little in a broad neighbourhood of j opt 0 (N). We emphasize that, taking the reverse point of view, should j 0 be experimentally constrained, high-quality transfer can still be obtained by adjusting the channel length to its optimal value. (paper)

  10. High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation: current and future directions.

    Abella, Benjamin S

    2016-06-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) represents the cornerstone of cardiac arrest resuscitation care. Prompt delivery of high-quality CPR can dramatically improve survival outcomes; however, the definitions of optimal CPR have evolved over several decades. The present review will discuss the metrics of CPR delivery, and the evidence supporting the importance of CPR quality to improve clinical outcomes. The introduction of new technologies to quantify metrics of CPR delivery has yielded important insights into CPR quality. Investigations using CPR recording devices have allowed the assessment of specific CPR performance parameters and their relative importance regarding return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge. Additional work has suggested new opportunities to measure physiologic markers during CPR and potentially tailor CPR delivery to patient requirements. Through recent laboratory and clinical investigations, a more evidence-based definition of high-quality CPR continues to emerge. Exciting opportunities now exist to study quantitative metrics of CPR and potentially guide resuscitation care in a goal-directed fashion. Concepts of high-quality CPR have also informed new approaches to training and quality improvement efforts for cardiac arrest care.

  11. Integration study of high quality teaching resources in universities

    Honglu Liu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The development level and quality of education depend on the merits and efficiency in the use of teaching resources, especially in the case of obvious contradiction between the demand and supply of teaching resources. So to integrate teaching resources, improve the efficiency in the use of high quality teaching resources, and take the road of content development to enhance the competitiveness of education has become very important and urgent.Design/methodology/approach: On the basis of analysis on the teaching resources of universities and the problems they faced, this paper introduced the basic concepts of cloud storage, and built the integration architecture of high quality teaching resources in universities based on the cloud storage.Findings and Originality/value: The HDFS-based cloud storage proposed in this paper is a dynamically adjustable and Internet-based storage solution, and the users can access storage targets using the network through a common and easy-to-use protocol and application programming interfaces. This new technology is useful for end users benefits. With the continuous development and improvement of cloud storage, it will necessarily result in more and more applications in the institutions of higher learning and education network.Originality/value: This paper introduced the cloud storage into the integration of high quality teaching resources in universities first and as a new form of service, it can be a good solution.

  12. Mechanical exfoliation of epitaxial graphene on Ir(111) enabled by Br2 intercalation.

    Herbig, Charlotte; Kaiser, Markus; Bendiab, Nedjma; Schumacher, Stefan; Förster, Daniel F; Coraux, Johann; Meerholz, Klaus; Michely, Thomas; Busse, Carsten

    2012-08-08

    We show here that Br(2) intercalation is an efficient method to enable exfoliation of epitaxial graphene on metals by adhesive tape. We exemplify this method for high-quality graphene of macroscopic extension on Ir(111). The sample quality and the transfer process are monitored using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The developed process provides an opportunity for preparing graphene of strictly monatomic thickness and well-defined orientation including the transfer to poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) foil.

  13. Transfer-free electrical insulation of epitaxial graphene from its metal substrate.

    Lizzit, Silvano; Larciprete, Rosanna; Lacovig, Paolo; Dalmiglio, Matteo; Orlando, Fabrizio; Baraldi, Alessandro; Gammelgaard, Lauge; Barreto, Lucas; Bianchi, Marco; Perkins, Edward; Hofmann, Philip

    2012-09-12

    High-quality, large-area epitaxial graphene can be grown on metal surfaces, but its transport properties cannot be exploited because the electrical conduction is dominated by the substrate. Here we insulate epitaxial graphene on Ru(0001) by a stepwise intercalation of silicon and oxygen, and the eventual formation of a SiO(2) layer between the graphene and the metal. We follow the reaction steps by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and demonstrate the electrical insulation using a nanoscale multipoint probe technique.

  14. Transfer-Free Electrical Insulation of Epitaxial Graphene from its Metal Substrate

    Lizzit, Silvano; Larciprete, Rosanna; Lacovig, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    High-quality, large-area epitaxial graphene can be grown on metal surfaces, but its transport properties cannot be exploited because the electrical conduction is dominated by the substrate. Here we insulate epitaxial graphene on Ru(0001) by a stepwise intercalation of silicon and oxygen......, and the eventual formation of a SiO2 layer between the graphene and the metal. We follow the reaction steps by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and demonstrate the electrical insulation using a nanoscale multipoint probe technique....

  15. Clean-lifting transfer of large-area residual-free graphene films.

    Wang, Di-Yan; Huang, I-Sheng; Ho, Po-Hsun; Li, Shao-Sian; Yeh, Yun-Chieh; Wang, Duan-Wei; Chen, Wei-Liang; Lee, Yu-Yang; Chang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Chia-Chun; Liang, Chi-Te; Chen, Chun-Wei

    2013-08-27

    A unique "clean-lifting transfer" (CLT) technique that applies a controllable electrostatic force to transfer large-area and high-quality CVD-grown graphene onto various rigid or flexible substrates is reported. The CLT technique without using any organic support or adhesives can produce residual-free graphene films with large-area processability, and has great potential for future industrial production of graphene-based electronics or optoelectronics. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Growth mechanism of graphene on platinum: Surface catalysis and carbon segregation

    Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Yurgens, August; Nam, Youngwoo; Cole, Matthew T.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Woo Park, Yung

    2014-01-01

    A model of the graphene growth mechanism of chemical vapor deposition on platinum is proposed and verified by experiments. Surface catalysis and carbon segregation occur, respectively, at high and low temperatures in the process, representing the so-called balance and segregation regimes. Catalysis leads to self-limiting formation of large area monolayer graphene, whereas segregation results in multilayers, which evidently “grow from below.” By controlling kinetic factors, dominantly monolayer graphene whose high quality has been confirmed by quantum Hall measurement can be deposited on platinum with hydrogen-rich environment, quench cooling, tiny but continuous methane flow and about 1000 °C growth temperature

  17. Interlayer catalytic exfoliation realizing scalable production of large-size pristine few-layer graphene

    Geng, Xiumei; Guo, Yufen; Li, Dongfang; Li, Weiwei; Zhu, Chao; Wei, Xiangfei; Chen, Mingliang; Gao, Song; Qiu, Shengqiang; Gong, Youpin; Wu, Liqiong; Long, Mingsheng; Sun, Mengtao; Pan, Gebo; Liu, Liwei

    2013-01-01

    Mass production of reduced graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets has recently been achieved. However, a great challenge still remains in realizing large-quantity and high-quality production of large-size thin few-layer graphene (FLG). Here, we create a novel route to solve the issue by employing one-time-only interlayer catalytic exfoliation (ICE) of salt-intercalated graphite. The typical FLG with a large lateral size of tens of microns and a thickness less than 2?nm have been obtained b...

  18. Dirac Material Graphene

    Sheka, Elena F.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the author view on spin-rooted properties of graphene supported by numerous experimental and calculation evidences. Dirac fermions of crystalline graphene and local spins of graphene molecules are suggested to meet a strict demand - different orbitals for different spins- which leads to a large spectrum of effects caused by spin polarization of electronic states. The consequent topological non-triviality, making graphene topological insulator, and local spins, imaging graph...

  19. Graphene quantum dots

    Güçlü, Alev Devrim; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    This book reflects the current status of theoretical and experimental research of graphene based nanostructures, in particular quantum dots, at a level accessible to young researchers, graduate students, experimentalists and theorists. It presents the current state of research of graphene quantum dots, a single or few monolayer thick islands of graphene. It introduces the reader to the electronic and optical properties of graphite, intercalated graphite and graphene, including Dirac fermions, Berry's phase associated with sublattices and valley degeneracy, covers single particle properties of

  20. Low-temperature synthesis of graphene on nickel foil by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Kim, Y.; Song, W.; Lee, S. Y.; Jeon, C.; Jung, W.; Kim, M.; Park, C.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) was employed to synthesize high quality centimeter scale graphene film at low temperatures. Monolayer graphene was obtained by varying the gas mixing ratio of hydrogen and methane to 80:1. Using advantages of MPCVD, the synthesis temperature was decreased from 750 deg. C down to 450 deg. C. Optical microscopy and Raman mapping images exhibited that a large area monolayer graphene was synthesized regardless of the temperatures. Since the overall transparency of 89% and low sheet resistances ranging from 590 to 1855 Ω/sq of graphene films were achieved at considerably low synthesis temperatures, MPCVD can be adopted in manufacturing future large-area electronic devices based on graphene film.

  1. Low-temperature synthesis of graphene on nickel foil by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Kim, Y.; Song, W.; Lee, S. Y.; Jeon, C.; Jung, W.; Kim, M.; Park, C.-Y.

    2011-06-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) was employed to synthesize high quality centimeter scale graphene film at low temperatures. Monolayer graphene was obtained by varying the gas mixing ratio of hydrogen and methane to 80:1. Using advantages of MPCVD, the synthesis temperature was decreased from 750 °C down to 450 °C. Optical microscopy and Raman mapping images exhibited that a large area monolayer graphene was synthesized regardless of the temperatures. Since the overall transparency of 89% and low sheet resistances ranging from 590 to 1855 Ω/sq of graphene films were achieved at considerably low synthesis temperatures, MPCVD can be adopted in manufacturing future large-area electronic devices based on graphene film.

  2. Growth of graphene from SiC{0001} surfaces and its mechanisms

    Norimatsu, Wataru; Kusunoki, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Graphene, a one-atom-layer carbon material, can be grown by thermal decomposition of SiC. On Si-terminated SiC(0001), graphene nucleates at steps and grows layer-by-layer, and as a result a homogeneous monolayer or bilayer can be obtained. We demonstrate this mechanism both experimentally and theoretically. On the C-face (000 1-bar ), multilayer graphene nucleates not only at steps, but also on the terraces. These differences reflect the distinct differences in the reactivity of these faces. Due to its high quality and structural controllability, graphene on SiC{0001} surfaces will be a platform for high-speed graphene device applications. (paper)

  3. Effects of graphene imperfections on the structure of self-assembled pentacene films

    Jung, W; Ahn, S J; Lee, S Y; Kim, Y; Shin, H-C; Moon, Y; Park, C-Y; Ahn, J R; Woo, S H

    2015-01-01

    The quality of pentacene films in pentacene-based devices significantly affects their performance. In this report, the effects of various defects in graphene on a pentacene film were studied with scanning tunneling microscopy. The two most common defects found in the epitaxial graphene grown on SiC(0 0 0 1) substrates were subsurface carbon nanotube (CNT) defects and step edges. The most significant perturbation of the pentacene films was induced by step edges between single-layer and bilayer graphene domains, while the effect of step edges between single-layer domains was marginal. The subsurface CNT defects slightly distorted the structure of the single-layer pentacene, but the influence of such defects decreased as the thickness of the pentacene film increased. These results suggest that the uniformity of the graphene layer is the most important parameter in the growth of high-quality pentacene films on graphene. (paper)

  4. Electric field modulation of Schottky barrier height in graphene/MoSe2 van der Waals heterointerface

    Sata, Yohta; Moriya, Rai; Morikawa, Sei; Yabuki, Naoto; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a vertical field-effect transistor based on a graphene/MoSe 2 van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure. The vdW interface between the graphene and MoSe 2 exhibits a Schottky barrier with an ideality factor of around 1.3, suggesting a high-quality interface. Owing to the low density of states in graphene, the position of the Fermi level in the graphene can be strongly modulated by an external electric field. Therefore, the Schottky barrier height at the graphene/MoSe 2 vdW interface is also modulated. We demonstrate a large current ON-OFF ratio of 10 5 . These results point to the potential high performance of the graphene/MoSe 2 vdW heterostructure for electronics applications

  5. Deterministic patterned growth of high-mobility large-crystal graphene: a path towards wafer scale integration

    Miseikis, Vaidotas; Bianco, Federica; David, Jérémy; Gemmi, Mauro; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Romagnoli, Marco; Coletti, Camilla

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate rapid deterministic (seeded) growth of large single-crystals of graphene by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) utilising pre-patterned copper substrates with chromium nucleation sites. Arrays of graphene single-crystals as large as several hundred microns are grown with a periodicity of up to 1 mm. The graphene is transferred to target substrates using aligned and contamination- free semi-dry transfer. The high quality of the synthesised graphene is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and transport measurements, demonstrating room-temperature carrier mobility of 21 000 cm2 V-1 s-1 when transferred on top of hexagonal boron nitride. By tailoring the nucleation of large single-crystals according to the desired device geometry, it will be possible to produce complex device architectures based on single-crystal graphene, thus paving the way to the adoption of CVD graphene in wafer-scale fabrication.

  6. Non-vacuum growth of graphene films using solid carbon source

    Nguyen, Ba-Son; Lin, Jen-Fin; Perng, Dung-Ching

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that air annealing can grow high-quality graphene films on the surface of polycrystalline nickel film with the help of an effective SiO 2 capping layer. The number of graphene layers can be modulated by the amount of carbon embedded in the Ni film before annealing. Raman analysis results, transmission electron microscopy images, and electron diffraction patterns of the samples confirm that graphene films can be grown in air with an oxygen blocking layer and a 10 °C/s cooling rate in an open-vented rapid thermal annealing chamber or an open tube furnace. The high-quality low-defect air-annealing grown graphene is comparable to commercially available graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition. The proposed graphene growth using air annealing technique is simple and low-cost, making it highly attractive for mass production. It is transfer-free to a silicon substrate and can speed up graphene development, opening up new applications

  7. Non-vacuum growth of graphene films using solid carbon source

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Mechatronics – Electronics, Lac Hong University, 10 Huynh Van Nghe Road, Bienhoa (Viet Nam); Lin, Jen-Fin, E-mail: jflin@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: jflin@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-01

    This study demonstrates that air annealing can grow high-quality graphene films on the surface of polycrystalline nickel film with the help of an effective SiO{sub 2} capping layer. The number of graphene layers can be modulated by the amount of carbon embedded in the Ni film before annealing. Raman analysis results, transmission electron microscopy images, and electron diffraction patterns of the samples confirm that graphene films can be grown in air with an oxygen blocking layer and a 10 °C/s cooling rate in an open-vented rapid thermal annealing chamber or an open tube furnace. The high-quality low-defect air-annealing grown graphene is comparable to commercially available graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition. The proposed graphene growth using air annealing technique is simple and low-cost, making it highly attractive for mass production. It is transfer-free to a silicon substrate and can speed up graphene development, opening up new applications.

  8. Tungsten oxide nanowires grown on graphene oxide sheets as high-performance electrochromic material

    Chang, Xueting; Sun, Shibin; Dong, Lihua; Hu, Xiong; Yin, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Electrochromic mechanism of tungsten oxide nanowires-reduced graphene oxide composite. - Highlights: • A novel inorganic-nano-carbon hybrid composite was prepared. • The hybrid composite has sandwich-like structure. • The hybrid composite exhibited high-quality electrohcromic performance. - Abstract: In this work, we report the synthesis of a novel hybrid electrochromic composite through nucleation and growth of ultrathin tungsten oxide nanowires on graphene oxide sheets using a facile solvothermal route. The competition between the growth of tungsten oxide nanowires and the reduction of graphene oxide sheets leads to the formation of sandwich-structured tungsten oxide-reduced graphene oxide composite. Due to the strongly coupled effect between the ultrathin tungsten oxide nanowires and the reduced graphene oxide nanosheets, the novel electrochromic composite exhibited high-quality electrochromic performance with fast color-switching speed, good cyclic stability, and high coloration efficiency. The present tungsten oxide-reduced graphene oxide composite represents a new approach to prepare other inorganic-reduced graphene oxide hybrid materials for electrochemical applications

  9. Understanding the reaction kinetics to optimize graphene growth on Cu by chemical vapor deposition

    Kraus, Juergen; Boebel, Lena; Zwaschka, Gregor; Guenther, Sebastian [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Zentralinstitut fuer Katalyseforschung, Chemie Department, Physikalische Chemie mit Schwerpunkt Katalyse, Garching (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Understanding and controlling the growth kinetics of graphene is a prerequisite to synthesize this highly wanted material by chemical vapor deposition on Cu, e.g. for the construction of ultra-stable electron transparent membranes. It is reviewed that Cu foils contain a considerable amount of carbon in the bulk which significantly exceeds the expected amount of thermally equilibrated dissolved carbon in Cu and that this carbon must be removed before any high quality graphene may be grown. Starting with such conditioned Cu foils, systematic studies of the graphene growth kinetics in a reactive CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} atmosphere allow to extract the following meaningful data: prediction of the equilibrium constant of the graphene formation reaction within a precision of a factor of two, the confirmation that the graphene growth proceeds from a C(ad)-phase on Cu which is in thermal equilibrium with the reactive gas phase, its apparent activation barrier and finally the prediction of the achievable growth velocity of the growing graphene flakes during chemical vapor deposition. As a result of the performed study, growth parameters are identified for the synthesis of high quality monolayer graphene with single crystalline domains of 100-1000 μm in diameter within a reasonable growth time. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Exfoliation of graphite into graphene in aqueous solutions of inorganic salts.

    Parvez, Khaled; Wu, Zhong-Shuai; Li, Rongjin; Liu, Xianjie; Graf, Robert; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-04-23

    Mass production of high-quality graphene sheets is essential for their practical application in electronics, optoelectronics, composite materials, and energy-storage devices. Here we report a prompt electrochemical exfoliation of graphene sheets into aqueous solutions of different inorganic salts ((NH4)2SO4, Na2SO4, K2SO4, etc.). Exfoliation in these electrolytes leads to graphene with a high yield (>85%, ≤3 layers), large lateral size (up to 44 μm), low oxidation degree (a C/O ratio of 17.2), and a remarkable hole mobility of 310 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Further, highly conductive graphene films (11 Ω sq(-1)) are readily fabricated on an A4-size paper by applying brush painting of a concentrated graphene ink (10 mg mL(-1), in N,N'-dimethylformamide). All-solid-state flexible supercapacitors manufactured on the basis of such graphene films deliver a high area capacitance of 11.3 mF cm(-2) and an excellent rate capability of 5000 mV s(-1). The described electrochemical exfoliation shows great promise for the industrial-scale synthesis of high-quality graphene for numerous advanced applications.

  11. Improvement of the quality of graphene-capped InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    Othmen, Riadh, E-mail: othmenriadh@yahoo.fr; Rezgui, Kamel; Ajlani, Hosni; Oueslati, Meherzi [Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, Campus, 2092 El Manar Tunis (Tunisia); Cavanna, Antonella; Madouri, Ali [CNRS/LPN, Route de Nozay, F-91460 Marcoussis (France); Arezki, Hakim; Gunes, Fethullah [Laboratoire de Génie Electrique de Paris, 11, rue Joliot Curie Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2014-06-07

    In this paper, we study the transfer of graphene onto InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs). The graphene is first grown on Cu foils by chemical vapor deposition and then polymer Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) is deposited on the top of graphene/Cu. High quality graphene sheet has been obtained by lowering the dissolving rate of PMMA using vapor processing. Uncapped as well as capped graphene InAs/GaAs QDs have been studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. We gather from this that the average shifts Δω of QDs Raman peaks are reduced compared to those previously observed in graphene and GaAs capped QDs. The encapsulation by graphene makes the indium atomic concentration intact in the QDs by the reduction of the strain effect of graphene on QDs and the migration of In atoms towards the surface. This gives us a new hetero-structure graphene–InAs/GaAs QDs wherein the graphene plays a key role as a cap layer.

  12. Environmental Synthesis of Few Layers Graphene Sheets Using Ultrasonic Exfoliation with Enhanced Electrical and Thermal Properties.

    Monir Noroozi

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report how few layers graphene that can be produced in large quantity with low defect ratio from exfoliation of graphite by using a high intensity probe sonication in water containing liquid hand soap and PVP. It was founded that the graphene powder obtained by this simple exfoliation method after the heat treatment had an excellent exfoliation into a single or layered graphene sheets. The UV-visible spectroscopy, FESEM, TEM, X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy was used to analyse the graphene product. The thermal diffusivity of the samples was analysed using a highly accurate thermal-wave cavity photothermal technique. The data obtained showed excellent enhancement in the thermal diffusivity of the graphene dispersion. This well-dispersed graphene was then used to fabricate an electrically conductive polymer-graphene film composite. The results demonstrated that this low cost and environmental friendly technique allowed to the production of high quality layered graphene sheets, improved the thermal and electrical properties. This may find use in the wide range of applications based on graphene.

  13. Control of thickness uniformity and grain size in graphene films for transparent conductive electrodes

    Wu Wei; Yu Qingkai; Pei, Shin-Shem; Peng Peng; Bao Jiming; Liu Zhihong

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale and transferable graphene films grown on metal substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) still hold great promise for future nanotechnology. To realize the promise, one of the key issues is to further improve the quality of graphene, e.g., uniform thickness, large grain size, and low defects. Here we grow graphene films on Cu foils by CVD at ambient pressure, and study the graphene nucleation and growth processes under different concentrations of carbon precursor. On the basis of the results, we develop a two-step ambient pressure CVD process to synthesize continuous single-layer graphene films with large grain size (up to hundreds of square micrometers). Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy characterizations confirm the film thickness and uniformity. The transferred graphene films on cover glass slips show high electrical conductivity and high optical transmittance that make them suitable as transparent conductive electrodes. The growth mechanism of CVD graphene on Cu is also discussed, and a growth model has been proposed. Our results provide important guidance toward the synthesis of high quality uniform graphene films, and could offer a great driving force for graphene based applications. (paper)

  14. Direct transfer and Raman characterization of twisted graphene bilayer

    Othmen, R.; Arezki, H.; Boutchich, M.; Ajlani, H.; Oueslati, M.; Cavanna, A.; Madouri, A.

    2015-01-01

    Twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) is constituted of a two-graphene layer with a mismatch angle θ between the two hexagonal structures. It has recently attracted much attention—thanks to its diverse electronic and optical properties. Here, we study the tBLG fabricated by the direct transfer of graphene monolayer prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto another CVD graphene layer remaining attached to the copper foil. We show that high quality and homogeneous tBLG can be obtained by the direct transfer which prevents interface contamination. In this situation, the top graphene layer plays a supporting mechanical role to the bottom graphene layer as confirmed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The effect of annealing tBLG was also investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra exhibit a splitting of the G peak as well as a change in the 2D band shape indicating a possible decoupling of the two monolayers. We attribute these changes to the different interactions of the top and bottom layers with the substrate

  15. New synthesis method for the growth of epitaxial graphene

    Yu, X.Z. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Laboratory of Condensed Matter Spectroscopy and Opto-Electronic Physics, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Hua Shan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Hwang, C.G.; Jozwiak, C.M.; Koehl, A. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schmid, A.K. [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States); Lanzara, A., E-mail: ALanzara@lbl.gov [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} We report a new straightforward method for the synthesis of micrometer scale graphene sheets. {yields} The process is based on a face to face mehtod in which two SiC substrates are placed one on top of the other and are heated simultaneously, leading to highly homogeneous samples. {yields} The number of graphene layers is determined by the annealing temperature. - Abstract: As a viable candidate for an all-carbon post-CMOS electronics revolution, epitaxial graphene has attracted significant attention. To realize its application potential, reliable methods for fabricating large-area single-crystalline graphene domains are required. A new way to synthesize high quality epitaxial graphene, namely 'face-to-face' method, has been reported in this paper. The structure and morphologies of the samples are characterized by low-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The grown samples show better quality and larger length scales than samples grown through conventional thermal desorption. Moreover, the graphene thickness can be easily controlled by changing annealing temperature.

  16. Graphene Synthesis & Graphene/Polymer Nanocomposites

    Liao, Ken-Hsuan

    We successfully developed a novel, fast, hydrazine-free, high-yield method for producing single-layered graphene. Graphene sheets were formed from graphite oxide by reduction with de-ionized water at 130 ºC. Over 65% of the sheets are single graphene layers. A dehydration reaction of exfoliated graphene oxide was utilized to reduce oxygen and transform C-C bonds from sp3 to sp2. The reduction appears to occur in large uniform interconnected oxygen-free patches so that despite the presence of residual oxygen the sp2 carbon bonds formed on the sheets are sufficient to provide electronic properties comparable to reduced graphene sheets obtained using other methods. Cytotoxicity of aqueous graphene was investigated with Dr. Yu-Shen Lin by measuring mitochondrial activity in adherent human skin fibroblasts using two assays. The methyl-thiazolyl-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, a typical nanotoxicity assay, fails to predict the toxicity of graphene oxide and graphene toxicity because of the spontaneous reduction of MTT by graphene and graphene oxide, resulting in a false positive signal. An appropriate alternate assessment, using the water soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-8) assay, reveals that the compacted graphene sheets are more damaging to mammalian fibroblasts than the less densely packed graphene oxide. Clearly, the toxicity of graphene and graphene oxide depends on the exposure environment (i.e. whether or not aggregation occurs) and mode of interaction with cells (i.e. suspension versus adherent cell types). Ultralow percolation concentration of 0.15 wt% graphene, as determined by surface resistance and modulus, was observed from in situ polymerized thermally reduced graphene (TRG)/ poly-urethane-acrylate (PUA) nanocomposite. A homogeneous dispersion of TRG in PUA was revealed by TEM images. The aspect ratio of dispersed TRG, calculated from percolation concentration and modulus, was found to be equivalent to the reported aspect ratio of single

  17. Chirality-Assisted Electronic Cloaking of Confined States in Bilayer Graphene

    Gu, Nan; Rudner, Mark; Levitov, Leonid

    2011-10-01

    We show that the strong coupling of pseudospin orientation and charge carrier motion in bilayer graphene has a drastic effect on transport properties of ballistic p-n-p junctions. Electronic states with zero momentum parallel to the barrier are confined under it for one pseudospin orientation, whereas states with the opposite pseudospin tunnel through the junction totally uninfluenced by the presence of confined states. We demonstrate that the junction acts as a cloak for confined states, making them nearly invisible to electrons in the outer regions over a range of incidence angles. This behavior is manifested in the two-terminal conductance as transmission resonances with non-Lorentzian, singular peak shapes. The response of these phenomena to a weak magnetic field or electric-field-induced interlayer gap can serve as an experimental fingerprint of electronic cloaking.

  18. Low Temperature Graphene Growth and Its Applications in Electronic and Optical Devices

    Chugh, Sunny

    Graphene, a two dimensional allotrope of carbon in a honeycomb lattice, has gathered wide attention due to its excellent electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical properties. It has extremely high electron/hole mobility, very high thermal conductivity and fascinating optical properties, and combined with its mechanical strength and elasticity, graphene is believed to find commercial applications in existing as well as novel technologies. One of the biggest reasons behind the rapid development in graphene research during the last decade is the fact that laboratory procedures to obtain high quality graphene are rather cheap and simple. However, any new material market is essentially driven by the progress in its large scale commercial production with minimal costs, with properties that are suited for different applications. And it is in this aspect that graphene is still required to make a huge progress before its commercial benefits can be derived. Laboratory graphene synthesis techniques such as mechanical exfoliation, liquid phase exfoliation and SiC graphene growth pose several challenges in terms of cost, reliability and scalability. To this end, Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) growth of graphene has emerged as a widely used synthesis method that overcomes these problems. Unfortunately, conventional thermal CVD requires a high temperature of growth and a catalytic metal substrate, making the undesirable step of graphene transfer a necessity. Besides requiring a catalyst, the high temperature of growth also limits the range of growth substrates. In this work, I have successfully demonstrated low temperature ( 550 °C) growth of graphene directly on dielectric materials using a Plasma-Enhanced CVD (PECVD) process. The PECVD technique described here solves the issues faced by conventional CVD methods and provides a direct route for graphene synthesis on arbitrary materials at relatively low temperatures. Detailed growth studies, as described here, illustrate the

  19. Superlubric sliding of graphene nanoflakes on graphene.

    Feng, Xiaofeng; Kwon, Sangku; Park, Jeong Young; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-02-26

    The lubricating properties of graphite and graphene have been intensely studied by sliding a frictional force microscope tip against them to understand the origin of the observed low friction. In contrast, the relative motion of free graphene layers remains poorly understood. Here we report a study of the sliding behavior of graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) on a graphene surface. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we found that the GNFs show facile translational and rotational motions between commensurate initial and final states at temperatures as low as 5 K. The motion is initiated by a tip-induced transition of the flakes from a commensurate to an incommensurate registry with the underlying graphene layer (the superlubric state), followed by rapid sliding until another commensurate position is reached. Counterintuitively, the average sliding distance of the flakes is larger at 5 K than at 77 K, indicating that thermal fluctuations are likely to trigger their transitions from superlubric back to commensurate ground states.

  20. Permeation through graphene ripples

    Liang, Tao; He, Guangyu; Wu, Xu; Ren, Jindong; Guo, Hongxuan; Kong, Yuhan; Iwai, Hideo; Fujita, Daisuke; Gao, Hongjun; Guo, Haiming; Liu, Yingchun; Xu, Mingsheng

    2017-06-01

    Real graphene sheets show limited anti-permeation performance deviating from the ideally flat honeycomb carbon lattice that is impermeable to gases. Ripples in graphene are prevalent and they could significantly influence carrier transport. However, little attention has been paid to the role of ripples in the permeation properties of graphene. Here, we report that gases can permeate through graphene ripples at room temperature. The feasibility of gas permeation through graphene ripples is determined by detecting the initial oxidation sites of Cu surface covered with isolated graphene domain. Nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations demonstrate that the oxygen atom permeation occurs via the formation of C-O-C bond, in which process the energy barrier through the rippled graphene lattice is much smaller than that through a flat graphene lattice, rendering permeation through ripples more favorable. Combining with the recent advances in atoms intercalation between graphene and metal substrate for transfer-free and electrically insulated graphene, this discovery provides new perspectives regarding graphene’s limited anti-permeation performance and evokes for rational design of graphene-based encapsulation for barrier and selective gas separation applications through ripple engineering.

  1. Key factors for a high-quality VR experience

    Champel, Mary-Luc; Doré, Renaud; Mollet, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    For many years, Virtual Reality has been presented as a promising technology that could deliver a truly new experience to users. The media and entertainment industry is now investigating the possibility to offer a video-based VR 360 experience. Nevertheless, there is a substantial risk that VR 360 could have the same fate as 3DTV if it cannot offer more than just being the next fad. The present paper aims at presenting the various quality factors required for a high-quality VR experience. More specifically, this paper will focus on the main three VR quality pillars: visual, audio and immersion.

  2. Anti-Stokes Luminescence in High Quality Quantum Wells

    Vinattieri, A.; Bogani, F.; Miotto, A.; Ceccherini, S.

    1997-11-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the anti-Stokes (AS) luminescence which originates from exciton recombination when below gap excitation is used, in a set of high quality quantum well structures. We observe strong excitonic resonances in the AS signal as measured from photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectra. We demonstrate that neither the electromagnetic coupling between the wells nor the morphological disorder can explain this up-conversion effect. Time-resolved luminescence data after ps excitation and fs correlation spectroscopy results provide clear evidence of the occurrence of a two-step absorption which is assisted by the exciton population resonantly excited by the first photon.

  3. Methods and systems for fabricating high quality superconducting tapes

    Majkic, Goran; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2018-02-13

    An MOCVD system fabricates high quality superconductor tapes with variable thicknesses. The MOCVD system can include a gas flow chamber between two parallel channels in a housing. A substrate tape is heated and then passed through the MOCVD housing such that the gas flow is perpendicular to the tape's surface. Precursors are injected into the gas flow for deposition on the substrate tape. In this way, superconductor tapes can be fabricated with variable thicknesses, uniform precursor deposition, and high critical current densities.

  4. Nonlinear graphene plasmonics

    Ooi, Kelvin J. A.; Tan, Dawn T. H.

    2017-10-01

    The rapid development of graphene has opened up exciting new fields in graphene plasmonics and nonlinear optics. Graphene's unique two-dimensional band structure provides extraordinary linear and nonlinear optical properties, which have led to extreme optical confinement in graphene plasmonics and ultrahigh nonlinear optical coefficients, respectively. The synergy between graphene's linear and nonlinear optical properties gave rise to nonlinear graphene plasmonics, which greatly augments graphene-based nonlinear device performance beyond a billion-fold. This nascent field of research will eventually find far-reaching revolutionary technological applications that require device miniaturization, low power consumption and a broad range of operating wavelengths approaching the far-infrared, such as optical computing, medical instrumentation and security applications.

  5. X-ray diffraction patterns of thermally-reduced graphenes

    Ju, Hae-Mi; Choi, Sung-Ho; Huh, Seung-Hun

    2010-01-01

    Thermally-reduced graphenes (GPs) from graphene oxides (GOs) in the range of 200 - 800 .deg. C have been investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The temperature-dependent evolutions of the (002) peaks show that exfoliation of GO sheets occurs, along with wrinkling, at ∼200 .deg. C and that high-quality GPs are produced at ∼ 600 .deg. C (GP 600 ). These phenomena are explained by the vaporization of intercalated water molecules and the effective removal of the oxide groups of GO by thermal annealing, respectively. GP 600 exhibited a clean and sharp (002) peak corresponding to an interlayer distance of 3.392 A, which is close to that of conventional graphene (∼3.4 A). The structure of GP 600 is further discussed.

  6. Graphene transfer process and optimization of graphene coverage

    Sabki Syarifah Norfaezah; Shamsuri Shafiq Hafly; Fauzi Siti Fazlina; Chon-Ki Meghashama Lim; Othman Noraini

    2017-01-01

    Graphene grown on transition metal is known to be high in quality due to its controlled amount of defects and potentially used for many electronic applications. The transfer process of graphene grown on transition metal to a new substrate requires optimization in order to ensure that high graphene coverage can be obtained. In this work, an improvement in the graphene transfer process is performed from graphene grown on copper foil. It has been observed that the graphene coverage is affected b...

  7. Atomic and electronic structure of a copper/graphene interface as prepared and 1.5 years after

    Boukhvalov, D. W.; Bazylewski, P. F.; Kukharenko, A. I.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Ponosov, Yu. S.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Cholakh, S. O.; Lee, Y. H.; Chang, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    We report the results of X-ray spectroscopy and Raman measurements of as-prepared graphene on a high quality copper surface and the same materials after 1.5 years under different conditions (ambient and low humidity). The obtained results were compared with density functional theory calculations of the formation energies and electronic structures of various structural defects in graphene/Cu interfaces. For evaluation of the stability of the carbon cover, we propose a two-step model. The first step is oxidation of the graphene, and the second is perforation of graphene with the removal of carbon atoms as part of the carbon dioxide molecule. Results of the modeling and experimental measurements provide evidence that graphene grown on high-quality copper substrate becomes robust and stable in time (1.5 years). However, the stability of this interface depends on the quality of the graphene and the number of native defects in the graphene and substrate. The effect of the presence of a metallic substrate with defects on the stability and electronic structure of graphene is also discussed

  8. Percutaneous vertebroplasty with a high-quality rotational angiographic unit

    Pedicelli, Alessandro [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Policl. A.Gemelli, l.go Gemelli 1, 00168 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: apedicelli@rm.unicatt.it; Rollo, Massimo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Policl. A.Gemelli, l.go Gemelli 1, 00168 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: mrollo@rm.unicatt.it; Piano, Mariangela [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Policl. A.Gemelli, l.go Gemelli 1, 00168 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: mariangela.piano@gmail.com; Re, Thomas J. [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Policl. A.Gemelli, l.go Gemelli 1, 00168 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: tomjre@gmail.com; Cipriani, Maria C. [Department of Gerontology, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Policl. A.Gemelli, l.go Gemelli 1, 00168 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: alexped@yahoo.com; Colosimo, Cesare [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Policl. A.Gemelli, l.go Gemelli 1, 00168 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: colosimo@rm.unicatt.it; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Policl. A.Gemelli, l.go Gemelli 1, 00168 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: lbonomo@rm.unicatt.it

    2009-02-15

    We evaluated the reliability of a rotational angiographic unit (RA) with flat-panel detector as a single technique to guide percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) and for post-procedure assessment by 2D and 3D reformatted images. Fifty-five consecutive patients (104 vertebral bodies) were treated under RA fluoroscopy. Rotational acquisitions with 2D and 3D reconstruction were obtained in all patients for immediate post-procedure assessment. In complex cases, this technique was also used to evaluate the needle position during the procedure. All patients underwent CT scan after the procedure. RA and CT findings were compared. In all cases, a safe trans-pedicular access and an accurate control of the bone-cement injection were successfully performed with high-quality fluoroscopy, even at the thoracic levels and in case of vertebra plana. 2D and 3D rotational reconstructions permitted CT-like images that clearly showed needle position and were similar to CT findings in depicting intrasomatic implant-distribution. RA detected 40 cement leakages compared to 42 demonstrated by CT and showed overall 95% sensitivity and 100% specificity compared to CT for final post-procedure assessment. Our preliminary results suggest that high-quality RA is reliable and safe as a single technique for PVP guidance, control and post-procedure assessment. It permits fast and cost-effective procedures avoiding multi-modality imaging.

  9. Computer-aided control of high-quality cast iron

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses the possibility of control of the high-quality grey cast iron and ductile iron using the author’s genuine computer programs. The programs have been developed with the help of algorithms based on statistical relationships that are said to exist between the characteristic parameters of DTA curves and properties, like Rp0,2, Rm, A5 and HB. It has been proved that the spheroidisation and inoculation treatment of cast iron changes in an important way the characteristic parameters of DTA curves, thus enabling a control of these operations as regards their correctness and effectiveness, along with the related changes in microstructure and mechanical properties of cast iron. Moreover, some examples of statistical relationships existing between the typical properties of ductile iron and its control process were given for cases of the melts consistent and inconsistent with the adopted technology.A test stand for control of the high-quality cast iron and respective melts has been schematically depicted.

  10. High quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator

    Wiggins, S M; Issac, R C; Welsh, G H; Brunetti, E; Shanks, R P; Anania, M P; Cipiccia, S; Manahan, G G; Aniculaesei, C; Ersfeld, B; Islam, M R; Burgess, R T L; Vieux, G; Jaroszynski, D A [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Gillespie, W A [SUPA, Division of Electronic Engineering and Physics, University of Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); MacLeod, A M [School of Computing and Creative Technologies, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); Van der Geer, S B; De Loos, M J, E-mail: m.wiggins@phys.strath.ac.u [Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    High quality electron beams have been produced in a laser-plasma accelerator driven by femtosecond laser pulses with a peak power of 26 TW. Electrons are produced with an energy up to 150 MeV from the 2 mm gas jet accelerator and the measured rms relative energy spread is less than 1%. Shot-to-shot stability in the central energy is 3%. Pepper-pot measurements have shown that the normalized transverse emittance is {approx}1{pi} mm mrad while the beam charge is in the range 2-10 pC. The generation of high quality electron beams is understood from simulations accounting for beam loading of the wakefield accelerating structure. Experiments and self-consistent simulations indicate that the beam peak current is several kiloamperes. Efficient transportation of the beam through an undulator is simulated and progress is being made towards the realization of a compact, high peak brilliance free-electron laser operating in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelength ranges.

  11. PNP2 calculus programme for interpretation of the experimental data by pulsed source neutrons methods. (Pt. 1). [Fortran IV for ICT 1900

    Fratiloiu, C; Cristea, Gh

    1975-01-01

    PNP2 is a calculation programme destined to the interpretation of the experimental data by the pulsed source neutrons method on multiplyer environments into critic or subcritic state, populated with thermal neutrons. The programme is elaborate in the FORTRAN IV language of the ICT 1900 computer. The variation form in time of the thermal neutrons population for the multiplyer environments as a result of this whipping to the moments t=KT, with pockets of neutrons, appearing in the simplified theory of the pulsed source neutrons method. By this process are determinated the quantities Nsub(..cap alpha..), ..cap alpha.., Nsub(r) and B as well as empiric variants which affect these magnitudes. With these quantities is calculated the reactivity in relative units.

  12. Control of the nucleation and quality of graphene grown by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition with acetylene

    Yang, Meng; Sasaki, Shinichirou; Suzuki, Ken; Miura, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • For the first time, we succeeded in the LPCVD growth of monolayer graphene using acetylene as the precursor gas. • The growth rate is very high when acetylene is used as the source gas. Our process has exhibited the potential to shorten the growth time of CVD graphene. • We found that the domain size, defects density, layer number and the sheet resistance of graphene can be changed by changing the acetylene flow rates. • We found that it is also possible to form bilayer graphene using acetylene. However, further study are necessary to reduce the defects density. - Abstract: Although many studies have reported the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of large-area monolayer graphene from methane, synthesis of graphene using acetylene as the source gas has not been fully explored. In this study, the low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) growth of graphene from acetylene was systematically investigated. We succeeded in regulating the domain size, defects density, layer number and the sheet resistance of graphene by changing the acetylene flow rates. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were employed to confirm the layer number, uniformity and quality of the graphene films. It is found that a low flow rate of acetylene (0.28 sccm) is required to form high-quality monolayer graphene in our system. On the other hand, the high acetylene flow rate (7 sccm) will induce the growth of the bilayer graphene domains with high defects density. On the basis of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, the as-grown monolayer graphene domains were analyzed to be polycrystal. We also discussed the relation between the sheet resistacne and defects density in graphene. Our results provide great insights into the understanding of the CVD growth of monolayer and bilayer graphene from acetylene.

  13. Control of the nucleation and quality of graphene grown by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition with acetylene

    Yang, Meng, E-mail: youmou@rift.mech.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Nanomechanics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Sasaki, Shinichirou [Department of Nanomechanics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Suzuki, Ken; Miura, Hideo [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • For the first time, we succeeded in the LPCVD growth of monolayer graphene using acetylene as the precursor gas. • The growth rate is very high when acetylene is used as the source gas. Our process has exhibited the potential to shorten the growth time of CVD graphene. • We found that the domain size, defects density, layer number and the sheet resistance of graphene can be changed by changing the acetylene flow rates. • We found that it is also possible to form bilayer graphene using acetylene. However, further study are necessary to reduce the defects density. - Abstract: Although many studies have reported the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of large-area monolayer graphene from methane, synthesis of graphene using acetylene as the source gas has not been fully explored. In this study, the low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) growth of graphene from acetylene was systematically investigated. We succeeded in regulating the domain size, defects density, layer number and the sheet resistance of graphene by changing the acetylene flow rates. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were employed to confirm the layer number, uniformity and quality of the graphene films. It is found that a low flow rate of acetylene (0.28 sccm) is required to form high-quality monolayer graphene in our system. On the other hand, the high acetylene flow rate (7 sccm) will induce the growth of the bilayer graphene domains with high defects density. On the basis of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, the as-grown monolayer graphene domains were analyzed to be polycrystal. We also discussed the relation between the sheet resistacne and defects density in graphene. Our results provide great insights into the understanding of the CVD growth of monolayer and bilayer graphene from acetylene.

  14. A systematic study of the controlled generation of crystalline iron oxide nanoparticles on graphene using a chemical etching process

    Peter Krauß

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical vapor deposition (CVD of carbon precursors employing a metal catalyst is a well-established method for synthesizing high-quality single-layer graphene. Yet the main challenge of the CVD process is the required transfer of a graphene layer from the substrate surface onto a chosen target substrate. This process is delicate and can severely degrade the quality of the transferred graphene. The protective polymer coatings typically used generate residues and contamination on the ultrathin graphene layer. In this work, we have developed a graphene transfer process which works without a coating and allows the transfer of graphene onto arbitrary substrates without the need for any additional post-processing. During the course of our transfer studies, we found that the etching process that is usually employed can lead to contamination of the graphene layer with the Faradaic etchant component FeCl3, resulting in the deposition of iron oxide FexOy nanoparticles on the graphene surface. We systematically analyzed the removal of the copper substrate layer and verified that crystalline iron oxide nanoparticles could be generated in controllable density on the graphene surface when this process is optimized. It was further confirmed that the FexOy particles on graphene are active in the catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes when employing a water-assisted CVD process.

  15. Thermal bubble inkjet printing of water-based graphene oxide and graphene inks on heated substrate

    Huang, Simin; Shen, Ruoxi; Qian, Bo; Li, Lingying; Wang, Wenhao; Lin, Guanghui; Zhang, Xiaofei; Li, Peng; Xie, Yonglin

    2018-04-01

    Stable-jetting water-based graphene oxide (GO) and graphene (GR) inks without any surfactant or stabilizer are prepared from an unstable-jetting water-based starting solvent, with many thermal bubble inkjet satellite drops, by simply increasing the material concentration. The concentration-dependent thermal bubble inkjet droplet generation process is studied in detail. To overcome the low concentration properties of water-based thermal bubble inkjet inks, the substrate temperature is tuned below 60 °C to achieve high-quality print lines. Due to the difference in hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of the 2D materials, the printed GO lines show a different forming mechanism from that of the GR lines. The printed GO lines are reduced by thermal annealing and by ascorbic acid, respectively. The reduced GO lines exhibit electrical conductivity of the same order of magnitude as that of the GR lines.

  16. Smooth Growth of Organic Semiconductor Films on Graphene for High-Efficiency Electronics

    Hlawacek, G.; Khokhar, F.S.; van Gastel, Raoul; Poelsema, Bene; Teichert, Christian

    2011-01-01

    High-quality thin films of conjugated molecules with smooth interfaces are important to assist the advent of organic electronics. Here, we report on the layer-by-layer growth of the organic semiconductor molecule p-sexiphenyl (6P) on the transparent electrode material graphene. Low energy electron

  17. Interlayer catalytic exfoliation realizing scalable production of large-size pristine few-layer graphene

    Geng, Xiumei; Guo, Yufen; Li, Dongfang; Li, Weiwei; Zhu, Chao; Wei, Xiangfei; Chen, Mingliang; Gao, Song; Qiu, Shengqiang; Gong, Youpin; Wu, Liqiong; Long, Mingsheng; Sun, Mengtao; Pan, Gebo; Liu, Liwei

    2013-01-01

    Mass production of reduced graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets has recently been achieved. However, a great challenge still remains in realizing large-quantity and high-quality production of large-size thin few-layer graphene (FLG). Here, we create a novel route to solve the issue by employing one-time-only interlayer catalytic exfoliation (ICE) of salt-intercalated graphite. The typical FLG with a large lateral size of tens of microns and a thickness less than 2 nm have been obtained by a mild and durative ICE. The high-quality graphene layers preserve intact basal crystal planes owing to avoidance of the degradation reaction during both intercalation and ICE. Furthermore, we reveal that the high-quality FLG ensures a remarkable lithium-storage stability (>1,000 cycles) and a large reversible specific capacity (>600 mAh g-1). This simple and scalable technique acquiring high-quality FLG offers considerable potential for future realistic applications.

  18. Graphene device and method of using graphene device

    Bouchiat, Vincent; Girit, Caglar; Kessler, Brian; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2015-08-11

    An embodiment of a graphene device includes a layered structure, first and second electrodes, and a dopant island. The layered structure includes a conductive layer, an insulating layer, and a graphene layer. The electrodes are coupled to the graphene layer. The dopant island is coupled to an exposed surface of the graphene layer between the electrodes. An embodiment of a method of using a graphene device includes providing the graphene device. A voltage is applied to the conductive layer of the graphene device. Another embodiment of a method of using a graphene device includes providing the graphene device without the dopant island. A dopant island is placed on an exposed surface of the graphene layer between the electrodes. A voltage is applied to the conductive layer of the graphene device. A response of the dopant island to the voltage is observed.

  19. Enhance the Pyroelectricity of Polyvinylidene Fluoride by Graphene-Oxide Doping

    Yuh-Chung Hu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The high quality properties and benefits of graphene-oxide have generated an active area of research where many investigations have shown potential applications in various technological fields. This paper proposes a methodology for enhancing the pyro-electricity of PVDF by graphene-oxide doping. The PVDF film with graphene-oxide is prepared by the sol-gel method. Firstly, PVDF and graphene-oxide powders are dispersed into dimethylformamide as solvent to form a sol solution. Secondly, the sol solution is deposited on a flexible ITO/PET substrate by spin-coating. Thirdly, the particles in the sol solution are polymerized through baking off the solvent to produce a gel in a state of a continuous network of PVDF and graphene-oxide. The final annealing process pyrolyzes the gel and form a β-phase PVDF film with graphene-oxide doping. A complete study on the process of the graphene oxide doping of PVDF is accomplished. Some key points about the process are addressed based on experiments. The solutions to some key issues are found in this work, such as the porosity of film, the annealing temperature limitation by the use of flexible PET substrate, and the concentrations of PVDF and graphene-oxide.

  20. The effect of copper substrate’s roughness on graphene growth process via PECVD

    Fan, Tengfei; Yan, Cuixia; Lu, Jianchen; Zhang, Lianchang; Cai, Jinming

    2018-04-01

    Despite many excellent properties, the synthesis of high quality graphene with low-cost way is still a challenge, thus many different factors have been researched. In this work, the effect of surface roughness to the graphene quality was studied. Graphene was synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method on copper substrates with different roughness from 0.074 μm to 0.339 μm, which were prepared via annealing, corrosion or polishing, respectively. Ar+ plasma cleaning was applied before graphene growth in order to accommodate similar surface chemical reactivity to each other. Scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscope were employed to investigate the effect of surface roughness, which reveals that the graphene quality decrease first and then increase again according to the ratio of ID/IG in Raman spectroscopy. When the ratio of ID/IG reaches the largest number, the substrate roughness is 0.127 μm, where is the graphene quality changing point. First principle calculation was applied to explain the phenomenon and revealed that it is strongly affected by the graphene grain size and quantity which can induce defects. This strategy is expected to guide the industrial production of graphene.

  1. High quality diesel fuels by VO-LSGO hydrotreatment

    Stanica-Ezeanu, Dorin; Juganaru, Traian [Petroleum and Gas Univ. of Ploiesti (Romania)

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to obtain a high quality Diesel fuel by hydro-deoxigenation of vegetable oils (VO) mixed with a low sulfur gasoil (LSGO). The process is possible by using a bi-functional catalyst Ni-Mo supported by an activated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} containing 2% Ultrastable Y-zeolite. The experimental conditions were: T =340 - 380 C, Pressure = 50 bar, LHSV = 1,5 h{sup -1}, H{sub 2}/Feed ratio = 15 mole H{sub 2} /mole liquid feed. The liquid product was separated in two fractions: a light distillate (similar to gasoline) and a heavy distillate (boiling point > 200 C) with very good characteristics for Diesel engines. The reaction chemistry is very complex, but the de-oxygenation process is decisive for the chemical structure of hydrocarbons from final product. Finally, a schema for the reaction mechanism is proposed. (orig.)

  2. High quality flux control system for electron gun evaporation

    Appelbloom, A.M.; Hadley, P.; van der Marel, D.; Mooij, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a high quality flux control system for electron gun evaporation developed and tested for the MBE growth of high temperature superconductors. The system can be applied to any electron gun without altering the electron gun itself. Essential elements of the system are a high bandwidth mass spectrometer, control electronics and a high voltage modulator to sweep the electron beam over the melt at high frequencies. the sweep amplitude of the electron beam is used to control the evaporation flux at high frequencies. The feedback loop of the system has a bandwidth of over 100 Hz, which makes it possible to grow superlattices and layered structures in a fast and precisely controlled manner

  3. Quality management manual for production of high quality cassava flour

    Dziedzoave, Nanam Tay; Abass, Adebayo Busura; Amoa-Awua, Wisdom K.

    The high quality cassava flour (HQCF) industry has just started to evolve in Africa and elsewhere. The sustainability of the growing industry, the profitability of small- and medium-scale enterprises (SMEs) that are active in the industry and good-health of consumers can best be guaranteed through...... the adoption of proper quality and food safety procedures. Cassava processing enterprises involved in the productionof HQCF must therefore be commited to the quality and food safety of the HQCF. They must have the right technology, appropriate processing machhinery, standard testing instruments...... and the necessary technical expertise. This quality manual was therefore developed to guide small- to medium-scale cassava in the design and implematation of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) system and Good manufacturing Practices (GMP) plans for HQCF production. It describes the HQCF production...

  4. CHOREOGRAPHIC METHODS FOR CREATING NOVEL, HIGH QUALITY DANCE

    David Kirsh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We undertook a detailed ethnographic study of the dance creation process of a noted choreographer and his distinguished troupe. All choreographer dancer interactions were videoed, the choreographer and dancers were interviewed extensively each day, as well as other observations and tests performed. The choreographer used three main methods to produce high quality and novel content: showing, making-on, and tasking. We present, analyze and evaluate these methods, and show how these approaches allow the choreographer to increase the creative output of the dancers and him. His methods, although designed for dance, apply more generally to other creative endeavors, especially where brainstorming is involved, and where the creative process is distributed over many individuals. His approach is also a case study in multi-modal direction, owing to the range of mechanisms he uses to communicate and direct.

  5. Biotransformation of Organic Waste into High Quality Fertilizer

    Bryndum, Sofie

    Agriculture faces several challenges of future provision of nutrients such as limited P reserves and increasing prices of synthetic fertilizers and recycling of nutrients from organic waste can be an important strategy for the long-term sustainability of the agricultural systems. Organically...... and S, is often low; and (3) the unbalanced composition of nutrients rarely matches crop demands. Therefore the objective of this project was to investigate the potential for (1) recycling nutrients from agro-industrial wastes and (2) compost biotransformation into high-quality organic fertilizers...... other uses into fertilizer use would be unlikely. An estimated ~50 % of the total organic waste pool, primarily consisting of animal manure and waste from the processing of sugar cane, coffee, oil palm and oranges, is currently being re-used as “fertilizers”, meaning it is eventually returned...

  6. Automated Theorem Proving in High-Quality Software Design

    Schumann, Johann; Swanson, Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The amount and complexity of software developed during the last few years has increased tremendously. In particular, programs are being used more and more in embedded systems (from car-brakes to plant-control). Many of these applications are safety-relevant, i.e. a malfunction of hardware or software can cause severe damage or loss. Tremendous risks are typically present in the area of aviation, (nuclear) power plants or (chemical) plant control. Here, even small problems can lead to thousands of casualties and huge financial losses. Large financial risks also exist when computer systems are used in the area of telecommunication (telephone, electronic commerce) or space exploration. Computer applications in this area are not only subject to safety considerations, but also security issues are important. All these systems must be designed and developed to guarantee high quality with respect to safety and security. Even in an industrial setting which is (or at least should be) aware of the high requirements in Software Engineering, many incidents occur. For example, the Warshaw Airbus crash, was caused by an incomplete requirements specification. Uncontrolled reuse of an Ariane 4 software module was the reason for the Ariane 5 disaster. Some recent incidents in the telecommunication area, like illegal "cloning" of smart-cards of D2GSM handies, or the extraction of (secret) passwords from German T-online users show that also in this area serious flaws can happen. Due to the inherent complexity of computer systems, most authors claim that only a rigorous application of formal methods in all stages of the software life cycle can ensure high quality of the software and lead to real safe and secure systems. In this paper, we will have a look, in how far automated theorem proving can contribute to a more widespread application of formal methods and their tools, and what automated theorem provers (ATPs) must provide in order to be useful.

  7. Synchronous exfoliation and assembly of graphene on 3D Ni(OH)2 for supercapacitors.

    Ma, Liguo; Zheng, Maojun; Liu, Shaohua; Li, Qiang; You, Yuxiu; Wang, Faze; Ma, Li; Shen, Wenzhong

    2016-11-08

    Nowadays, new approaches to fabricate high-performance electrode materials are of vital importance in the renewable energy field. Here, we present a facile synthesis procedure of 3D Ni(OH) 2 /graphene hybrids for supercapacitors via synchronous electrochemical-assisted exfoliation and assembly of graphene on 3D Ni(OH) 2 networks. With the assistance of an electric field, the electrochemically exfoliated high-quality graphene can be readily, uniformly assembled on the surfaces of 3D Ni(OH) 2 . When serving as electrode materials for supercapacitors, the resulting 3D Ni(OH) 2 /graphene composites exhibited excellent specific capacitance (263 mF cm -2 at 2 mA cm -2 ), remarkable rate capability and super-long cycle life (retention of 94.1% even after 10 000 continuous charge-discharge cycles), which may be attributed to their highly porous, stable 3D architecture as well as uniform, firm anchoring of ultrathin graphene on their surfaces. Therefore, our approach provides a facile strategy for the large-scale synthesis of high-quality graphene based composites towards various applications.

  8. Trifluoromethylation of graphene

    Lin Zhou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate trifluoromethylation of graphene by copper-catalyzed free radical reaction. The covalent addition of CF3 to graphene, which changes the carbon atom hybridization from sp2 to sp3, and modifies graphene in a homogeneous and nondestructive manner, was verified with Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that CF3 groups are grafted to the basal plane of graphene, with about 4 at. % CF3 coverage. After trifluoromethylation, the average resistance increases by nearly one order of magnitude, and an energy gap of about 98 meV appears. The noninvasive and mild reaction to synthesize trifluoromethylated graphene paves the way for graphene's applications in electronics and biomedical areas.

  9. Trifluoromethylation of graphene

    Zhou, Lin; Zhou, Lushan; Wang, Xi; Yu, Jingwen; Yang, Mingmei; Wang, Jianbo; Peng, Hailin, E-mail: zfliu@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: hlpeng@pku.edu.cn; Liu, Zhongfan, E-mail: zfliu@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: hlpeng@pku.edu.cn [Center for Nanochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate trifluoromethylation of graphene by copper-catalyzed free radical reaction. The covalent addition of CF{sub 3} to graphene, which changes the carbon atom hybridization from sp{sup 2} to sp{sup 3}, and modifies graphene in a homogeneous and nondestructive manner, was verified with Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that CF{sub 3} groups are grafted to the basal plane of graphene, with about 4 at. % CF{sub 3} coverage. After trifluoromethylation, the average resistance increases by nearly one order of magnitude, and an energy gap of about 98 meV appears. The noninvasive and mild reaction to synthesize trifluoromethylated graphene paves the way for graphene's applications in electronics and biomedical areas.

  10. Terahertz optoelectronics in graphene

    Otsuji, Taiichi

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has attracted considerable attention due to its extraordinary carrier transport, optoelectronic, and plasmonic properties originated from its gapless and linear energy spectra enabling various functionalities with extremely high quantum efficiencies that could never be obtained in any existing materials. This paper reviews recent advances in graphene optoelectronics particularly focused on the physics and device functionalities in the terahertz (THz) electromagnetic spectral range. Optical response of graphene is characterized by its optical conductivity and nonequilibrium carrier energy relaxation dynamics, enabling amplification of THz radiation when it is optically or electrically pumped. Current-injection THz lasing has been realized very recently. Graphene plasmon polaritons can greatly enhance the THz light and graphene matter interaction, enabling giant enhancement in detector responsivity as well as amplifier/laser gain. Graphene-based van der Waals heterostructures could give more interesting and energy-efficient functionalities. (author)

  11. Graphene based biosensors

    Gürel, Hikmet Hakan, E-mail: hhakan.gurel@kocaeli.edu.tr [Kocaeli University, Kocaeli (Turkey); Salmankurt, Bahadır [Sakarya University, Sakarya (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    Nanometer-sized graphene as a 2D material has unique chemical and electronic properties. Because of its unique physical, chemical, and electronic properties, its interesting shape and size make it a promising nanomaterial in many biological applications. It is expected that biomaterials incorporating graphene will be developed for the graphene-based drug delivery systems and biomedical devices. The interactions of biomolecules and graphene are long-ranged and very weak. Development of new techniques is very desirable for design of bioelectronics sensors and devices. In this work, we present first-principles calculations within density functional theory to calculate effects of charging on nucleobases on graphene. It is shown that how modify structural and electronic properties of nucleobases on graphene by applied charging.

  12. Graphene antidot lattice waveguides

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels

    2012-01-01

    We introduce graphene antidot lattice waveguides: nanostructured graphene where a region of pristine graphene is sandwiched between regions of graphene antidot lattices. The band gaps in the surrounding antidot lattices enable localized states to emerge in the central waveguide region. We model...... the waveguides via a position-dependent mass term in the Dirac approximation of graphene and arrive at analytical results for the dispersion relation and spinor eigenstates of the localized waveguide modes. To include atomistic details we also use a tight-binding model, which is in excellent agreement...... with the analytical results. The waveguides resemble graphene nanoribbons, but without the particular properties of ribbons that emerge due to the details of the edge. We show that electrons can be guided through kinks without additional resistance and that transport through the waveguides is robust against...

  13. Suspended graphene variable capacitor

    AbdelGhany, M.; Mahvash, F.; Mukhopadhyay, M.; Favron, A.; Martel, R.; Siaj, M.; Szkopek, T.

    2016-01-01

    The tuning of electrical circuit resonance with a variable capacitor, or varactor, finds wide application with the most important being wireless telecommunication. We demonstrate an electromechanical graphene varactor, a variable capacitor wherein the capacitance is tuned by voltage controlled deflection of a dense array of suspended graphene membranes. The low flexural rigidity of graphene monolayers is exploited to achieve low actuation voltage in an ultra-thin structure. Large arrays compr...

  14. Tuning metal–graphene interaction by non-metal intercalation: a case study of the graphene/oxygen/Ni (1 1 1) system

    Zhang, Wei-Bing; Chen, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Epitaxial growth of graphene on transition metal surfaces has been proposed as one of the most promising methods for large-scale preparation of high-quality graphene. However, the presence of the substrate could significantly affect the intrinsic electronic structure of graphene and intercalation of metals is an established route for decoupling the graphene from the substrate. Taking a graphene/Ni(1 1 1) surface as an example, we suggest reactive oxygen as an effective intercalation element to recover the linear dispersion of graphene based on density functional theory calculation, in which vdW interactions are treated using the optB88-vdW functional. The possible intercalation configurations at different coverage are considered and the geometry and electronic structure are analyzed in detail. Our results indicate that the energy favorable structures change from top-fcc to bridge-top configuration after oxygen intercalation and the binding between the graphene and the O/Ni(1 1 1) substrate becomes stronger at high oxygen coverage even than pure Ni(1 1 1) substrate. Most interestingly, the electronic structure of pristine graphene is found to be almost restored, especially for the bridge-top configuration after oxygen intercalation, and the Dirac points move towards the high energy region relative to the Fermi level. A graphene/oxygen/Ni (1 1 1) system is thus suggested as a p-type doped strongly bound Dirac system. Detailed analysis using projected energy band and differential charge density indicates that the intercalated oxygen atoms react with the Ni (1 1 1) surface strongly, which not only blocks the strong interaction between Ni and graphene but also passivates oxygen 2p states. The intercalation mechanisms distinguished from the conventional metal intercalation will be useful to understand other complex intercalation systems. (paper)

  15. Graphene: synthesis and applications

    Choi, Wonbong; Lee, Jo-won

    2012-01-01

    .... Suitable for researchers and graduate students, it provides a cohesive, critical review of graphene nanoscience and technology, offering valuable insight into how this material is made and used...

  16. Graphene ultracapacitors: structural impacts.

    Song, Weixin; Ji, Xiaobo; Deng, Wentao; Chen, Qiyuan; Shen, Chen; Banks, Craig E

    2013-04-07

    The structural effects of graphene on the electrochemical properties of graphene-based ultracapacitors are investigated for the first time, where the competitive impacts resulting from the edge content, specific surface area, edge/basal defects, oxygen-containing groups and metal oxides/surfactant impurities are taken into consideration, demonstrating that not one element, but all are responsible for the final behavior of graphene-based ultracapacitors. This work will be of wide importance to research producing graphene-based energy storage/generation devices.

  17. Graphene Conductance Uniformity Mapping

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a combination of micro four-point probe (M4PP) and non-contact terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) measurements for centimeter scale quantitative mapping of the sheet conductance of large area chemical vapor deposited graphene films. Dual configuration M4PP measurements......, demonstrated on graphene for the first time, provide valuable statistical insight into the influence of microscale defects on the conductance, while THz-TDS has potential as a fast, non-contact metrology method for mapping of the spatially averaged nanoscopic conductance on wafer-scale graphene with scan times......, dominating the microscale conductance of the investigated graphene film....

  18. Long-Term Stability of Photovoltaic Hybrid Perovskites achieved by Graphene Passivation via a Water- and Polymer-Free Graphene Transfer Method

    Tseng, W.-S.; Jao, M.-H.; Hsu, C.-C.; Wu, C.-I.; Yeh, N.-C.

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites such as CH3NH3PbX3 (X = I, Br) have been intensively studied in recent years because of their rapidly improving photovoltaic power conversion efficiency. However, severe instability of these materials in ambient environment has been a primary challenge for practical applications. To address this issue, we employ high-quality PECVD-grown graphene to passivate the hybrid perovskites. In contrast to existing processes for transferring graphene from the growth substrates to other surfaces that involve either polymer or water, which are incompatible with photovoltaic applications of these water-sensitive hybrid perovskites, we report here a new water- and polymer-free graphene transferring method. Studies of the Raman, x-ray and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) demonstrated excellent quality of monolayer PECVD-grown graphene samples after their transfer onto different substrates with the water- and polymer-free processing method. In particular, graphene was successfully transferred onto the surface of CH3NH3PbI3 thin films with sample quality intact. Moreover, XPS and UPS studies indicated that even after 3 months, the fully graphene-covered perovskite films remained spectroscopically invariant, which was in sharp contrast to the drastic changes, after merely one week, in both the XPS and UPS of a control CH3NH3PbI3 sample without graphene protection. Beckman Inst. in Caltech. Dragon Gate Program in Taiwan.

  19. Synthesis of few layer single crystal graphene grains on platinum by chemical vapour deposition

    S. Karamat

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present competition of graphene electronics demands an efficient route which produces high quality and large area graphene. Chemical vapour deposition technique, where hydrocarbons dissociate in to active carbon species and form graphene layer on the desired metal catalyst via nucleation is considered as the most suitable method. In this study, single layer graphene with the presence of few layer single crystal graphene grains were grown on Pt foil via chemical vapour deposition. The higher growth temperature changes the surface morphology of the Pt foil so a delicate process of hydrogen bubbling was used to peel off graphene from Pt foil samples with the mechanical support of photoresist and further transferred to SiO2/Si substrates for analysis. Optical microscopy of the graphene transferred samples showed the regions of single layer along with different oriented graphene domains. Two type of interlayer stacking sequences, Bernal and twisted, were observed in the graphene grains. The presence of different stacking sequences in the graphene layers influence the electronic and optical properties; in Bernal stacking the band gap can be tunable and in twisted stacking the overall sheet resistance can be reduced. Grain boundaries of Pt provides low energy sites to the carbon species, therefore the nucleation of grains are more at the boundaries. The stacking order and the number of layers in grains were seen more clearly with scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy showed high quality graphene samples due to very small D peak. 2D Raman peak for single layer graphene showed full width half maximum (FWHM value of 30 cm−1. At points A, B and C, Bernal stacked grain showed FWHM values of 51.22, 58.45 and 64.72 cm−1, while twisted stacked grain showed the FWHM values of 27.26, 28.83 and 20.99 cm−1, respectively. FWHM values of 2D peak of Bernal stacked grain showed an increase of 20–30 cm−1 as compare to single layer graphene

  20. Support-Free Transfer of Ultrasmooth Graphene Films Facilitated by Self-Assembled Monolayers for Electronic Devices and Patterns.

    Wang, Bin; Huang, Ming; Tao, Li; Lee, Sun Hwa; Jang, A-Rang; Li, Bao-Wen; Shin, Hyeon Suk; Akinwande, Deji; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2016-01-26

    We explored a support-free method for transferring large area graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition to various fluoric self-assembled monolayer (F-SAM) modified substrates including SiO2/Si wafers, polyethylene terephthalate films, and glass. This method yields clean, ultrasmooth, and high-quality graphene films for promising applications such as transparent, conductive, and flexible films due to the absence of residues and limited structural defects such as cracks. The F-SAM introduced in the transfer process can also lead to graphene transistors with enhanced field-effect mobility (up to 10,663 cm(2)/Vs) and resistance modulation (up to 12×) on a standard silicon dioxide dielectric. Clean graphene patterns can be realized by transfer of graphene onto only the F-SAM modified surfaces.

  1. Development of Biosensors From Graphene

    高瑞红; 孙红; 李霄寒; 于冲

    2017-01-01

    Graphene's success has stimulated great interest and research in the synthesis and characterization of graphene -like 2D materials, single and few -atom -thick layers of van der Waals materials, which show fascinating and technologically useful properties.This review presents an overview of recent electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on graphene and on graphene-like 2D materials.

  2. Graphene-based electrochemical supercapacitors

    WINTEC

    been great interest in graphene, which constitutes an entirely new class of carbon. Electrical characteriza- tion of single-layer graphene has been reported. 12,13. We have investigated the use of graphene as elec- trode material in electrochemical supercapacitors. For this purpose, we have employed graphene prepared.

  3. 76 FR 45397 - Export Inspection and Weighing Waiver for High Quality Specialty Grain Transported in Containers

    2011-07-29

    ...-AB18 Export Inspection and Weighing Waiver for High Quality Specialty Grain Transported in Containers... permanent a waiver due to expire on July 31, 2012, for high quality specialty grain exported in containers... of high quality specialty grain exported in containers are small entities that up until recently...

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Graphene

    Xu Man

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The homogeneous-dispersed graphene oxide was prepared by the improved Hummers method, which would be reduced to graphene with the reducing agent called hydrazine hydrate. The X-ray diffraction, Infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectra and Transmission electron microscopy were used to analysis the phase, morphology and structure of the graphene and graphene oxide. The results show that the graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide prepared via this method, whose degree of oxidation and reduction are high; Also obtained a higher well-disperses and less structural imperfection of the graphene that was manufactured in the reducing system that added ammonia reduction

  5. Electronic properties of rippled graphene

    Gui Gui; Ma Zhenqiang; Zhong Jianxin

    2012-01-01

    Short range periodic ripples in graphene have been modeled. The electronic properties of the rippled graphene have been investigated using first-principles calculations. Compared with flat graphene, there is a band gap opening in rippled graphene. Generally, the value of energy gaps increases as the height of ripples increase, but it decreases as the range of ripples enlarges. The maximum value of energy gaps in rippled graphene can reach several hundred meV, which turns rippled graphene into a good semiconductor. As a result, the magnitude of energy gaps can be tuned effectively by controlling the range and height of ripples in graphene.

  6. Fabrication of ATO/Graphene Multi-layered Transparent Conducting Thin Films

    Li, Na; Chen, Fei; Shen, Qiang; Wang, Chuanbin; Zhang, Lianmeng

    2013-03-01

    A novel transparent conducting oxide based on the ATO/graphene multi-layered thin films has been developed to satisfy the application of transparent conductive electrode in solar cells. The ATO thin films are prepared by pulsed laser deposition method with high quality, namely the sheet resistance of 49.5 Ω/sq and average transmittance of 81.9 %. The prepared graphene sheet is well reduced and shows atomically thin, spotty distributed appearance on the top of the ATO thin films. The XRD and optical micrographs are used to confirm the successfully preparation of the ATO/graphene multi-layered thin films. The Hall measurements and UV-Vis spectrophotometer are conducted to evaluate the sheet resistance and optical transmittance of the innovative structure. It is found that graphene can improve the electrical properties of the ATO thin films with little influence on the optical transmittance.

  7. Fabrication of ATO/Graphene Multi-layered Transparent Conducting Thin Films

    Li Na; Chen Fei; Shen Qiang; Wang Chuanbin; Zhang Lianmeng

    2013-01-01

    A novel transparent conducting oxide based on the ATO/graphene multi-layered thin films has been developed to satisfy the application of transparent conductive electrode in solar cells. The ATO thin films are prepared by pulsed laser deposition method with high quality, namely the sheet resistance of 49.5 Ω/sq and average transmittance of 81.9 %. The prepared graphene sheet is well reduced and shows atomically thin, spotty distributed appearance on the top of the ATO thin films. The XRD and optical micrographs are used to confirm the successfully preparation of the ATO/graphene multi-layered thin films. The Hall measurements and UV-Vis spectrophotometer are conducted to evaluate the sheet resistance and optical transmittance of the innovative structure. It is found that graphene can improve the electrical properties of the ATO thin films with little influence on the optical transmittance.

  8. High-Quality Seismic Observations of Sonic Booms

    Wurman, Gilead; Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Price, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The SonicBREWS project (Sonic Boom Resistant Earthquake Warning Systems) is a collaborative effort between Seismic Warning Systems, Inc. and NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. This project aims to evaluate the effects of sonic booms on Earthquake Warning Systems in order to prevent such systems from experiencing false alarms due to sonic booms. The airspace above the Antelope Valley, California includes the High Altitude Supersonic Corridor and the Black Mountain Supersonic Corridor. These corridors are among the few places in the US where supersonic flight is permitted, and sonic booms are commonplace in the Antelope Valley. One result of this project is a rich dataset of high-quality accelerometer records of sonic booms which can shed light on the interaction between these atmospheric phenomena and the solid earth. Nearly 100 sonic booms were recorded with low-noise triaxial MEMS accelerometers recording 1000 samples per second. The sonic booms had peak overpressures ranging up to approximately 10 psf and were recorded in three flight series in 2010 and 2011. Each boom was recorded with up to four accelerometers in various array configurations up to 100 meter baseline lengths, both in the built environment and the free field. All sonic booms were also recorded by nearby microphones. We present the results of the project in terms of the potential for sonic-boom-induced false alarms in Earthquake Warning Systems, and highlight some of the interesting features of the dataset.

  9. Construction of High-Quality Camel Immune Antibody Libraries.

    Romão, Ema; Poignavent, Vianney; Vincke, Cécile; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Muyldermans, Serge; Monsion, Baptiste

    2018-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies libraries of heavy-chain only immunoglobulins from camelids or shark are enriched for high-affinity antigen-specific binders by a short in vivo immunization. Thus, potent binders are readily retrieved from relatively small-sized libraries of 10 7 -10 8 individual transformants, mostly after phage display and panning on a purified target. However, the remaining drawback of this strategy arises from the need to generate a dedicated library, for nearly every envisaged target. Therefore, all the procedures that shorten and facilitate the construction of an immune library of best possible quality are definitely a step forward. In this chapter, we provide the protocol to generate a high-quality immune VHH library using the Golden Gate Cloning strategy employing an adapted phage display vector where a lethal ccdB gene has to be substituted by the VHH gene. With this procedure, the construction of the library can be shortened to less than a week starting from bleeding the animal. Our libraries exceed 10 8 individual transformants and close to 100% of the clones harbor a phage display vector having an insert with the length of a VHH gene. These libraries are also more economic to make than previous standard approaches using classical restriction enzymes and ligations. The quality of the Nanobodies that are retrieved from immune libraries obtained by Golden Gate Cloning is identical to those from immune libraries made according to the classical procedure.

  10. High-quality remote interactive imaging in the operating theatre

    Grimstead, Ian J.; Avis, Nick J.; Evans, Peter L.; Bocca, Alan

    2009-02-01

    We present a high-quality display system that enables the remote access within an operating theatre of high-end medical imaging and surgical planning software. Currently, surgeons often use printouts from such software for reference during surgery; our system enables surgeons to access and review patient data in a sterile environment, viewing real-time renderings of MRI & CT data as required. Once calibrated, our system displays shades of grey in Operating Room lighting conditions (removing any gamma correction artefacts). Our system does not require any expensive display hardware, is unobtrusive to the remote workstation and works with any application without requiring additional software licenses. To extend the native 256 levels of grey supported by a standard LCD monitor, we have used the concept of "PseudoGrey" where slightly off-white shades of grey are used to extend the intensity range from 256 to 1,785 shades of grey. Remote access is facilitated by a customized version of UltraVNC, which corrects remote shades of grey for display in the Operating Room. The system is successfully deployed at Morriston Hospital, Swansea, UK, and is in daily use during Maxillofacial surgery. More formal user trials and quantitative assessments are being planned for the future.

  11. Production of high quality water for oil sands application

    Beaudette-Hodsman, C.; Macleod, B. [Pall Corp., Mississauga, ON (Canada); Venkatadri, R. [Pall Corp., East Hills, NY (United States)

    2008-10-15

    This paper described a pressurized microfiltration membrane system installed at an oil sands extraction site in Alberta. The system was designed to complement a reverse osmosis (RO) system installed at the site to produce the high quality feed water required by the system's boilers. Groundwater in the region exhibited moderate total suspended solids and high alkalinity and hardness levels, and the RO system required feed water with a silt density index of 3 or less. The conventional pretreatment system used at the site was slowing down production due to the severe fouling of the RO membranes. The new microfiltration system contained an automated PVDF hollow fiber microfiltration membrane system contained in a trailer. Suspended particles and bacteria were captured within the filter, and permeate was sent to the RO unit. Within 6 hours of being installed, the unit was producing water with SDI values in the range of 1.0 to 2.5. It was concluded that the microfiltration system performed reliably regardless of wide variations in feed water quality and flow rates. 3 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  12. CCD Astrophotography High-Quality Imaging from the Suburbs

    Stuart, Adam

    2006-01-01

    This is a reference book for amateur astronomers who have become interested in CCD imaging. Those glorious astronomical images found in astronomy magazines might seem out of reach to newcomers to CCD imaging, but this is not the case. Great pictures are attainable with modest equipment. Adam Stuart’s many beautiful images, reproduced in this book, attest to the quality of – initially – a beginner’s efforts. Chilled-chip astronomical CCD-cameras and software are also wonderful tools for cutting through seemingly impenetrable light-pollution. CCD Astrophotography from the Suburbs describes one man’s successful approach to the problem of getting high-quality astronomical images under some of the most light-polluted conditions. Here is a complete and thoroughly tested program that will help every CCD-beginner to work towards digital imaging of the highest quality. It is equally useful to astronomers who have perfect observing conditions, as to those who have to observe from light-polluted city skies.

  13. Physics of graphene

    S Dresselhaus, Mildred

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a state of the art report of the results of graphene research, one of the fastest-moving topics on condensed-matter physics. Covers not only transport but optical and other properties of multilayer as well as monolayer graphene systems.

  14. Advances in graphene spintronics

    van Wees, Bart

    I will give an overview of the status of graphene spintronics, from both scientific as technological perspectives. In the introduction I will show that (single) layer graphene is the ideal host for electronic spins, allowing spin transport by diffusion over distances exceeding 20 micrometers at room temperature. I will show how by the use of carrier drift, induced by charge currents, effective spin relaxation lengths of 90 micrometer can be obtained in graphene encapsulated between boron-nitride layers. This also allows the controlled flow and guiding of spin currents, opening new avenues for spin logic devices based on lateral architectures. By preparing graphene on top of a ferromagnetic insulator (yttrium iron garnet (YIG)) we have shown that we can induce an exchange interaction in the graphene, thus effectively making the graphene magnetic. This allows for new ways to induce and control spin precession for new applications. Finally I will show how, by using two-layer BN tunnel barriers, spins can be injected from a ferromagnet into graphene with a spin polarization which can be tuned continuously from -80% to 40%, using a bias range from -0.3V to 0.3V across the barrier. These unique record values of the spin polarization are not yet understood, but they highlight the potential of Van der Waals stacking of graphene and related 2D materials for spintronics.

  15. Ultrathin Planar Graphene Supercapacitors

    Huang, Jingsong [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Ajayan, Pullikel M [Rice University; Yoo, Jung Joon [KAIST, Daejeon, Republic of Korea; Balakrishnan, Kaushik [Rice University; Srivastava, Anchal [Rice University; Conway, Michelle [Rice University; Reddy, Arava Leela Mohan [Rice University; Yu, Jin [Rice University; Vajtai, Robert [Rice University

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of atomically thin and flat layers of conducting materials such as graphene, new designs for thin film energy storage devices with good performance have become possible. Here, we report an in-plane fabrication approach for ultrathin supercapacitors based on electrodes comprised of pristine graphene and multi-layer reduced graphene oxide. The in-plane design is straightforward to implement and exploits efficiently the surface of each graphene layer for energy storage. The open architecture and the effect of graphene edges enable even the thinnest of devices, made from as grown 1-2 graphene layers, to reach specific capacities up to 80 Fcm-2. While, much higher (394 Fcm-2) specific capacities are observed in case of multi-layered graphene oxide electrodes, owing to the better utilization of the available electrochemical surface area. The performances of devices with pristine as well as thicker graphene based structures are examined using a combination of experiments and model calculations. The demonstrated all solid-state supercapacitors provide a prototype for a broad range of thin-film based energy storage devices.

  16. Raman spectroscopy in graphene

    Malard, L.M.; Pimenta, M.A.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent Raman scattering studies in different types of graphene samples are reviewed here. We first discuss the first-order and the double resonance Raman scattering mechanisms in graphene, which give rise to the most prominent Raman features. The determination of the number of layers in few-layer graphene is discussed, giving special emphasis to the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to distinguish a monolayer from few-layer graphene stacked in the Bernal (AB) configuration. Different types of graphene samples produced both by exfoliation and using epitaxial methods are described and their Raman spectra are compared with those of 3D crystalline graphite and turbostratic graphite, in which the layers are stacked with rotational disorder. We show that Resonance Raman studies, where the energy of the excitation laser line can be tuned continuously, can be used to probe electrons and phonons near the Dirac point of graphene and, in particular allowing a determination to be made of the tight-binding parameters for bilayer graphene. The special process of electron-phonon interaction that renormalizes the phonon energy giving rise to the Kohn anomaly is discussed, and is illustrated by gated experiments where the position of the Fermi level can be changed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the ability of distinguishing armchair and zig-zag edges by Raman spectroscopy and studies in graphene nanoribbons in which the Raman signal is enhanced due to resonance with singularities in the density of electronic states.

  17. GRAPHENE: A NEW MATERIAL

    Cătălin IANCU

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the properties of a new but allready known material – graphene. Graphene is a 2-dimensional network of carbon atoms. Are presented the estonished characteristics of this form of carbon, alongwith some interesting field of use.

  18. Quantum transport in graphene

    Oostinga, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    After the experimental discovery of graphene -a single atomic layer of graphite- a scientific rush started to explore graphene’s electronic behaviour. Graphene is a fascinating two-dimensional electronic system, because its electrons behave as relativistic particles. Moreover, it is a promising

  19. Unobtrusive graphene coatings

    Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2012-01-01

    The contact angle of water drops on substrates for which the wettability is dominated by van der Waals forces remains unchanged when the substrates are coated with a monolayer of graphene. Such 'wetting transparency' could lead to superior conducting and hydrophobic graphene-coated surfaces with

  20. Silicon graphene Bragg gratings.

    Capmany, José; Domenech, David; Muñoz, Pascual

    2014-03-10

    We propose the use of interleaved graphene sections on top of a silicon waveguide to implement tunable Bragg gratings. The filter central wavelength and bandwidth can be controlled changing the chemical potential of the graphene sections. Apodization techniques are also presented.

  1. Graphene heat dissipating structure

    Washburn, Cody M.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Wheeler, David R.; Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Railkar, Tarak A.

    2017-08-01

    Various technologies presented herein relate to forming one or more heat dissipating structures (e.g., heat spreaders and/or heat sinks) on a substrate, wherein the substrate forms part of an electronic component. The heat dissipating structures are formed from graphene, with advantage being taken of the high thermal conductivity of graphene. The graphene (e.g., in flake form) is attached to a diazonium molecule, and further, the diazonium molecule is utilized to attach the graphene to material forming the substrate. A surface of the substrate is treated to comprise oxide-containing regions and also oxide-free regions having underlying silicon exposed. The diazonium molecule attaches to the oxide-free regions, wherein the diazonium molecule bonds (e.g., covalently) to the exposed silicon. Attachment of the diazonium plus graphene molecule is optionally repeated to enable formation of a heat dissipating structure of a required height.

  2. Graphene mobility mapping

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2015-01-01

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly...... assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over...... graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties....

  3. Graphene-aluminum nanocomposites

    Bartolucci, Stephen F.; Paras, Joseph; Rafiee, Mohammad A.; Rafiee, Javad; Lee, Sabrina; Kapoor, Deepak; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We investigated the mechanical properties of aluminum and aluminum nanocomposites. → Graphene composite had lower strength and hardness compared to nanotube reinforcement. → Processing causes aluminum carbide formation at graphene defects. → The carbides in between grains is a source of weakness and lowers tensile strength. - Abstract: Composites of graphene platelets and powdered aluminum were made using ball milling, hot isostatic pressing and extrusion. The mechanical properties and microstructure were studied using hardness and tensile tests, as well as electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Compared to the pure aluminum and multi-walled carbon nanotube composites, the graphene-aluminum composite showed decreased strength and hardness. This is explained in the context of enhanced aluminum carbide formation with the graphene filler.

  4. Graphene Statistical Mechanics

    Bowick, Mark; Kosmrlj, Andrej; Nelson, David; Sknepnek, Rastko

    2015-03-01

    Graphene provides an ideal system to test the statistical mechanics of thermally fluctuating elastic membranes. The high Young's modulus of graphene means that thermal fluctuations over even small length scales significantly stiffen the renormalized bending rigidity. We study the effect of thermal fluctuations on graphene ribbons of width W and length L, pinned at one end, via coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics simulations and compare with analytic predictions of the scaling of width-averaged root-mean-squared height fluctuations as a function of distance along the ribbon. Scaling collapse as a function of W and L also allows us to extract the scaling exponent eta governing the long-wavelength stiffening of the bending rigidity. A full understanding of the geometry-dependent mechanical properties of graphene, including arrays of cuts, may allow the design of a variety of modular elements with desired mechanical properties starting from pure graphene alone. Supported by NSF grant DMR-1435794

  5. Propagation and excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jeppesen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the propagation of graphene plasmon polaritons in graphene nanoribbon waveguides and experimentally observe the excitation of the graphene plasmon polaritons in a continuous graphene monolayer. We show that graphene nanoribbon bends do not induce any additional loss...... and nanofocusing occurs in a tapered graphene nanoriboon, and we experimentally demonstrate the excitation of graphene plasmon polaritonss in a continuous graphene monolayer assisted by a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating....

  6. Recruiting and retaining high-quality teachers in rural areas.

    Monk, David H

    2007-01-01

    In examining recruitment and retention of teachers in rural areas, David Monk begins by noting the numerous possible characteristics of rural communities--small size, sparse settlement, distance from population concentrations, and an economic reliance on agricultural industries that are increasingly using seasonal and immigrant workers to minimize labor costs. Many, though not all, rural areas, he says, are seriously impoverished. Classes in rural schools are relatively small, and teachers tend to report satisfaction with their work environments and relatively few problems with discipline. But teacher turnover is often high, and hiring can be difficult. Monk observes that rural schools have a below-average share of highly trained teachers. Compensation in rural schools tends to be low, perhaps because of a lower fiscal capacity in rural areas, thus complicating efforts to attract and retain teachers. Several student characteristics, including relatively large shares of students with special needs and with limited English skills and lower shares of students attending college, can also make it difficult to recruit and retain high-quality teachers. Other challenges include meeting the needs of highly mobile children of low-income migrant farm workers. With respect to public policy, Monk asserts a need to focus on a subcategory of what might be called hard-to-staff rural schools rather than to develop a blanket set of policies for all rural schools. In particular, he recommends a focus on such indicators as low teacher qualifications, teaching in fields far removed from the area of training, difficulty in hiring, high turnover, a lack of diversity among teachers in the school, and the presence of migrant farm workers' children. Successful efforts to stimulate economic growth in these areas would be highly beneficial. He also calls attention to the potential for modern telecommunication and computing technologies to offset some of the drawbacks associated with teaching

  7. High-quality endoscope reprocessing decreases endoscope contamination.

    Decristoforo, P; Kaltseis, J; Fritz, A; Edlinger, M; Posch, W; Wilflingseder, D; Lass-Flörl, C; Orth-Höller, D

    2018-02-24

    Several outbreaks of severe infections due to contamination of gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopes, mainly duodenoscopes, have been described. The rate of microbial endoscope contamination varies dramatically in literature. The aim of this multicentre prospective study was to evaluate the hygiene quality of endoscopes and automated endoscope reprocessors (AERs) in Tyrol/Austria. In 2015 and 2016, a total of 463 GI endoscopes and 105 AERs from 29 endoscopy centres were analysed by a routine (R) and a combined routine and advanced (CRA) sampling procedure and investigated for microbial contamination by culture-based and molecular-based analyses. The contamination rate of GI endoscopes was 1.3%-4.6% according to the national guideline, suggesting that 1.3-4.6 patients out of 100 could have had contacts with hygiene-relevant microorganisms through an endoscopic intervention. Comparison of R and CRA sampling showed 1.8% of R versus 4.6% of CRA failing the acceptance criteria in phase I and 1.3% of R versus 3.0% of CRA samples failing in phase II. The most commonly identified indicator organism was Pseudomonas spp., mainly Pseudomonas oleovorans. None of the tested viruses were detected in 40 samples. While AERs in phase I failed (n = 9, 17.6%) mainly due to technical faults, phase II revealed lapses (n = 6, 11.5%) only on account of microbial contamination of the last rinsing water, mainly with Pseudomonas spp. In the present study the contamination rate of endoscopes was low compared with results from other European countries, possibly due to the high quality of endoscope reprocessing, drying and storage. Copyright © 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition setup for fast synthesis of graphene patterns

    Zhang, Chentao; Zhang, Jianhuan; Lin, Kun; Huang, Yuanqing

    2017-05-01

    An automatic setup based on the laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition method has been developed for the rapid synthesis of graphene patterns. The key components of this setup include a laser beam control and focusing unit, a laser spot monitoring unit, and a vacuum and flow control unit. A laser beam with precision control of laser power is focused on the surface of a nickel foil substrate by the laser beam control and focusing unit for localized heating. A rapid heating and cooling process at the localized region is induced by the relative movement between the focalized laser spot and the nickel foil substrate, which causes the decomposing of gaseous hydrocarbon and the out-diffusing of excess carbon atoms to form graphene patterns on the laser scanning path. All the fabrication parameters that affect the quality and number of graphene layers, such as laser power, laser spot size, laser scanning speed, pressure of vacuum chamber, and flow rates of gases, can be precisely controlled and monitored during the preparation of graphene patterns. A simulation of temperature distribution was carried out via the finite element method, providing a scientific guidance for the regulation of temperature distribution during experiments. A multi-layer graphene ribbon with few defects was synthesized to verify its performance of the rapid growth of high-quality graphene patterns. Furthermore, this setup has potential applications in other laser-based graphene synthesis and processing.

  9. Effect of copper surface pre-treatment on the properties of CVD grown graphene

    Min-Sik Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the synthesis of high quality monolayer graphene on the pre-treated copper (Cu foil by chemical vapor deposition method. The pre-treatment process, which consists of pre-annealing in a hydrogen ambient, followed by diluted nitric acid etching of Cu foil, helps in removing impurities. These impurities include native copper oxide and rolling lines that act as a nucleation center for multilayer graphene. Raman mapping of our graphene grown on pre-treated Cu foil primarily consisted of ∼98% a monolayer graphene with as compared to 75 % for the graphene grown on untreated Cu foil. A high hydrogen flow rate during the pre-annealing process resulted in an increased I2D/IG ratio of graphene up to 3.55. Uniform monolayer graphene was obtained with a I2D/IG ratio and sheet resistance varying from 1.84 – 3.39 and 1110 – 1290 Ω/□, respectively.

  10. Growing three-dimensional biomorphic graphene powders using naturally abundant diatomite templates towards high solution processability.

    Chen, Ke; Li, Cong; Shi, Liurong; Gao, Teng; Song, Xiuju; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Zou, Zhiyu; Deng, Bing; Ji, Qingqing; Ma, Donglin; Peng, Hailin; Du, Zuliang; Rümmeli, Mark Hermann; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2016-11-07

    Mass production of high-quality graphene with low cost is the footstone for its widespread practical applications. We present herein a self-limited growth approach for producing graphene powders by a small-methane-flow chemical vapour deposition process on naturally abundant and industrially widely used diatomite (biosilica) substrates. Distinct from the chemically exfoliated graphene, thus-produced biomorphic graphene is highly crystallized with atomic layer-thickness controllability, structural designability and less noncarbon impurities. In particular, the individual graphene microarchitectures preserve a three-dimensional naturally curved surface morphology of original diatom frustules, effectively overcoming the interlayer stacking and hence giving excellent dispersion performance in fabricating solution-processible electrodes. The graphene films derived from as-made graphene powders, compatible with either rod-coating, or inkjet and roll-to-roll printing techniques, exhibit much higher electrical conductivity (∼110,700 S m -1 at 80% transmittance) than previously reported solution-based counterparts. This work thus puts forward a practical route for low-cost mass production of various powdery two-dimensional materials.

  11. Growing three-dimensional biomorphic graphene powders using naturally abundant diatomite templates towards high solution processability

    Chen, Ke; Li, Cong; Shi, Liurong; Gao, Teng; Song, Xiuju; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Zou, Zhiyu; Deng, Bing; Ji, Qingqing; Ma, Donglin; Peng, Hailin; Du, Zuliang; Rümmeli, Mark Hermann; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2016-11-01

    Mass production of high-quality graphene with low cost is the footstone for its widespread practical applications. We present herein a self-limited growth approach for producing graphene powders by a small-methane-flow chemical vapour deposition process on naturally abundant and industrially widely used diatomite (biosilica) substrates. Distinct from the chemically exfoliated graphene, thus-produced biomorphic graphene is highly crystallized with atomic layer-thickness controllability, structural designability and less noncarbon impurities. In particular, the individual graphene microarchitectures preserve a three-dimensional naturally curved surface morphology of original diatom frustules, effectively overcoming the interlayer stacking and hence giving excellent dispersion performance in fabricating solution-processible electrodes. The graphene films derived from as-made graphene powders, compatible with either rod-coating, or inkjet and roll-to-roll printing techniques, exhibit much higher electrical conductivity (~110,700 S m-1 at 80% transmittance) than previously reported solution-based counterparts. This work thus puts forward a practical route for low-cost mass production of various powdery two-dimensional materials.

  12. On-line monitoring of base current and forward emitter current gain of the voltage regulator's serial pnp transistor in a radiation environment

    Vukić Vladimir Đ.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of on-line monitoring of the low-dropout voltage regulator's operation in a radiation environment is developed in this paper. The method had to enable detection of the circuit's degradation during exploitation, without terminating its operation in an ionizing radiation field. Moreover, it had to enable automatic measurement and data collection, as well as the detection of any considerable degradation, well before the monitored voltage regulator's malfunction. The principal parameters of the voltage regulator's operation that were monitored were the serial pnp transistor's base current and the forward emitter current gain. These parameters were procured indirectly, from the data on the voltage regulator's load and quiescent currents. Since the internal consumption current in moderately and heavily loaded devices was used, the quiescent current of a negligibly loaded voltage regulator of the same type served as a reference. Results acquired by on-line monitoring demonstrated marked agreement with the results acquired from examinations of the voltage regulator's maximum output current and minimum dropout voltage in a radiation environment. The results were particularly consistent in tests with heavily loaded devices. Results obtained for moderately loaded voltage regulators and the risks accompanying the application of the presented method, were also analyzed.

  13. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene.

    Fei, Z; Iwinski, E G; Ni, G X; Zhang, L M; Bao, W; Rodin, A S; Lee, Y; Wagner, M; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Goldflam, M D; Thiemens, M; Keilmann, F; Lau, C N; Castro-Neto, A H; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2015-08-12

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At subnanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nanoimaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene, yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers.

  14. Probing the Gas-Phase Dynamics of Graphene Chemical Vapour Deposition using in-situ UV Absorption Spectroscopy

    Shivayogimath, Abhay; Mackenzie, David; Luo, Birong

    2017-01-01

    The processes governing multilayer nucleation in the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene are important for obtaining high-quality monolayer sheets, but remain poorly understood. Here we show that higher-order carbon species in the gas-phase play a major role in multilayer nucleation...

  15. In situ growth of capping-free magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on liquid-phase exfoliated graphene

    Tsoufis, T.; Syrgiannis, Z.; Akhtar, N.; Prato, M.; Katsaros, F.; Sideratou, Z.; Kouloumpis, A.; Gournis, D.; Rudolf, P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a facile approach for the in situ synthesis of very small iron oxide nanoparticles on the surface of high-quality graphene sheets. Our synthetic strategy involved the direct, liquid-phase exfoliation of highly crystalline graphite (avoiding any oxidation treatment) and the subsequent

  16. New developments in high quality grey cast irons

    Iulian Riposan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews original data obtained by the present authors, revealed in recent separate publications, describing specific procedures for high quality grey irons, and reflecting the forecast needs of the worldwide iron foundry industry. High power, medium frequency coreless induction furnaces are commonly used in electric melting grey iron foundries. This has resulted in low sulphur (1,500 °C, contributing to unfavourable conditions for graphite nucleation. Thin wall castings are increasingly produced by these electric melt shops with a risk of greater eutectic undercooling during solidification. The paper focused on two groups of grey cast irons and their specific problems: carbides and graphite morphology control in lower carbon equivalent high strength irons (CE=3.4%-3.8%, and austenite dendrite promotion in eutectic and slightly hypereutectic irons (CE=4.1%-4.5%, in order to increase their strength characteristics. There are 3 stages and 3 steps involving graphite formation, iron chemistry and iron processing that appear to be important. The concept in the present paper sustains a threestage model for nucleating flake graphite [(Mn,XS type nuclei]. There are three important groups of elements (deoxidizer, Mn/S, and inoculant and three technological stages in electric melting of iron (superheat, pre-conditioning of base iron, final inoculation. Attention is drawn to a control factor (%Mn x (%S ensuring it equals to 0.03 – 0.06, accompanied by 0.005wt.%–0.010wt.% Al and/or Zr content in inoculated irons. It was found that iron powder addition promotes austenite dendrite formation in eutectic and slightly eutectic, acting as reinforcement for the eutectic cells. But, there is an accompanying possible negative influence on the characteristics of the (Mn,XS type graphite nuclei (change the morphology of nuclei from polygonal compact to irregular polygonal, and therefore promote chill tendency in treated irons. A double addition (iron

  17. High quality protein microarray using in situ protein purification

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the postgenomic era, high throughput protein expression and protein microarray technologies have progressed markedly permitting screening of therapeutic reagents and discovery of novel protein functions. Hexa-histidine is one of the most commonly used fusion tags for protein expression due to its small size and convenient purification via immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC. This purification process has been adapted to the protein microarray format, but the quality of in situ His-tagged protein purification on slides has not been systematically evaluated. We established methods to determine the level of purification of such proteins on metal chelate-modified slide surfaces. Optimized in situ purification of His-tagged recombinant proteins has the potential to become the new gold standard for cost-effective generation of high-quality and high-density protein microarrays. Results Two slide surfaces were examined, chelated Cu2+ slides suspended on a polyethylene glycol (PEG coating and chelated Ni2+ slides immobilized on a support without PEG coating. Using PEG-coated chelated Cu2+ slides, consistently higher purities of recombinant proteins were measured. An optimized wash buffer (PBST composed of 10 mM phosphate buffer, 2.7 mM KCl, 140 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween 20, pH 7.4, further improved protein purity levels. Using Escherichia coli cell lysates expressing 90 recombinant Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins, 73 proteins were successfully immobilized, and 66 proteins were in situ purified with greater than 90% purity. We identified several antigens among the in situ-purified proteins via assays with anti-S. pneumoniae rabbit antibodies and a human patient antiserum, as a demonstration project of large scale microarray-based immunoproteomics profiling. The methodology is compatible with higher throughput formats of in vivo protein expression, eliminates the need for resin-based purification and circumvents

  18. High quality mask storage in an advanced Logic-Fab

    Jähnert, Carmen; Fritsche, Silvio

    2012-02-01

    High efficient mask logistics as well as safe and high quality mask storage are essential requirements within an advanced lithography area of a modern logic waferfab. Fast operational availability of the required masks at the exposure tool with excellent mask condition requires a safe mask handling, safeguarding of high mask quality over the whole mask usage time without any quality degradation and an intelligent mask logistics. One big challenge is the prevention of haze on high advanced phase shift masks used in a high volume production line for some thousands of 248nm or 193nm exposures. In 2008 Infineon Dresden qualified a customer specific developed semi-bare mask storage system from DMSDynamic Micro Systems in combination with a high advanced mask handling and an interconnected complex logistic system. This high-capacity mask storage system DMS M1900.22 for more than 3000 masks with fully automated mask and box handling as well as full-blown XCDA purge has been developed and adapted to the Infineon Lithotoollandscape using Nikon and SMIF reticle cases. Advanced features for ESD safety and mask security, mask tracking via RFID and interactions with the exposure tools were developed and implemented. The stocker is remote controlled by the iCADA-RSM system, ordering of the requested mask directly from the affected exposure tool allows fast access. This paper discusses the advantages and challenges for this approach as well as the practical experience gained during the implementation of the new system which improves the fab performance with respect to mask quality, security and throughput. Especially the realization of an extremely low and stable humidity level in addition with a well controlled air flow at each mask surface, preventing masks from haze degradation and particle contamination, turns out to be a notable technical achievement. The longterm stability of haze critical masks has been improved significantly. Relevant environmental parameters like

  19. Lattice Transparency of Graphene.

    Chae, Sieun; Jang, Seunghun; Choi, Won Jin; Kim, Youn Sang; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Tae Il; Lee, Jeong-O

    2017-03-08

    Here, we demonstrated the transparency of graphene to the atomic arrangement of a substrate surface, i.e., the "lattice transparency" of graphene, by using hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods as a model system. The growth behaviors of ZnO nanocrystals on graphene-coated and uncoated substrates with various crystal structures were investigated. The atomic arrangements of the nucleating ZnO nanocrystals exhibited a close match with those of the respective substrates despite the substrates being bound to the other side of the graphene. By using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we confirmed the energetic favorability of the nucleating phase following the atomic arrangement of the substrate even with the graphene layer present in between. In addition to transmitting information about the atomic lattice of the substrate, graphene also protected its surface. This dual role enabled the hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanorods on a Cu substrate, which otherwise dissolved in the reaction conditions when graphene was absent.

  20. Photosensitive graphene transistors.

    Li, Jinhua; Niu, Liyong; Zheng, Zijian; Yan, Feng

    2014-08-20

    High performance photodetectors play important roles in the development of innovative technologies in many fields, including medicine, display and imaging, military, optical communication, environment monitoring, security check, scientific research and industrial processing control. Graphene, the most fascinating two-dimensional material, has demonstrated promising applications in various types of photodetectors from terahertz to ultraviolet, due to its ultrahigh carrier mobility and light absorption in broad wavelength range. Graphene field effect transistors are recognized as a type of excellent transducers for photodetection thanks to the inherent amplification function of the transistors, the feasibility of miniaturization and the unique properties of graphene. In this review, we will introduce the applications of graphene transistors as photodetectors in different wavelength ranges including terahertz, infrared, visible, and ultraviolet, focusing on the device design, physics and photosensitive performance. Since the device properties are closely related to the quality of graphene, the devices based on graphene prepared with different methods will be addressed separately with a view to demonstrating more clearly their advantages and shortcomings in practical applications. It is expected that highly sensitive photodetectors based on graphene transistors will find important applications in many emerging areas especially flexible, wearable, printable or transparent electronics and high frequency communications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Reduction of Graphene Oxide to Graphene by Using Gamma Irradiation

    Shamellia Sharin; Irman Abdul Rahman; Ainee Fatimah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to gauge the ability of gamma radiation to induce the reduction of graphene oxide to graphene. Graphene oxide powders were dispersed into a mixture of alcohol and deionized water, and the mixture was then irradiated with a "6"0Co source using a GammaCell 220 Excel irradiator at absorbed doses of 0, 5, 15, 20 and 35 kGy. According to characterization using Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), it can be seen that almost every oxygen-containing functional group has been removed after irradiation of the graphene oxide mixture. Reduction of graphene oxide was also proven from the characterization using UV-Vis Spectroscopy, in which the wavelength of graphene oxide at 237 nm was red-shifted to 277 nm after being irradiated and the peak at 292 nm, (indicating the carboxyl group) disappears in the UV-Vis spectrum of reduced graphene oxide. Morphology of graphene oxide also changed from a smooth and flat surface to crumpled. The ratio of carbon/ oxygen in the graphene oxide was lower than the carbon/ oxygen of reduced graphene oxide. At the end of the experiment, it can be deduced that graphene oxide underwent reduction, characterized before and after irradiation using Emission Scanned Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray, Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy and UV-Vis Spectroscopy. Therefore, we postulate that the irradiation technique that induces reduction, can be used to obtain reduced graphene oxide from graphene oxide. (author)

  2. Friedel oscillations in graphene

    Lawlor, J. A.; Power, S. R.; Ferreira, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Symmetry breaking perturbations in an electronically conducting medium are known to produce Friedel oscillations in various physical quantities of an otherwise pristine material. Here we show in a mathematically transparent fashion that Friedel oscillations in graphene have a strong sublattice...... asymmetry. As a result, the presence of impurities and/or defects may impact the distinct graphene sublattices very differently. Furthermore, such an asymmetry can be used to explain the recent observations that nitrogen atoms and dimers are not randomly distributed in graphene but prefer to occupy one...

  3. Graphene field-effect devices

    Echtermeyer, T. J.; Lemme, M. C.; Bolten, J.; Baus, M.; Ramsteiner, M.; Kurz, H.

    2007-09-01

    In this article, graphene is investigated with respect to its electronic properties when introduced into field effect devices (FED). With the exception of manual graphene deposition, conventional top-down CMOS-compatible processes are applied. Few and monolayer graphene sheets are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The electrical properties of monolayer graphene sandwiched between two silicon dioxide films are studied. Carrier mobilities in graphene pseudo-MOS structures are compared to those obtained from double-gated Graphene-FEDs and silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs).

  4. Graphene-Based Integrated Photovoltaic Energy Harvesting/Storage Device.

    Chien, Chih-Tao; Hiralal, Pritesh; Wang, Di-Yan; Huang, I-Sheng; Chen, Chia-Chun; Chen, Chun-Wei; Amaratunga, Gehan A J

    2015-06-24

    Energy scavenging has become a fundamental part of ubiquitous sensor networks. Of all the scavenging technologies, solar has the highest power density available. However, the energy source is erratic. Integrating energy conversion and storage devices is a viable route to obtain self-powered electronic systems which have long-term maintenance-free operation. In this work, we demonstrate an integrated-power-sheet, consisting of a string of series connected organic photovoltaic cells (OPCs) and graphene supercapacitors on a single substrate, using graphene as a common platform. This results in lighter and more flexible power packs. Graphene is used in different forms and qualities for different functions. Chemical vapor deposition grown high quality graphene is used as a transparent conductor, while solution exfoliated graphene pastes are used as supercapacitor electrodes. Solution-based coating techniques are used to deposit the separate components onto a single substrate, making the process compatible with roll-to-roll manufacture. Eight series connected OPCs based on poly(3-hexylthiophene)(P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC60 BM) bulk-heterojunction cells with aluminum electrodes, resulting in a ≈5 V open-circuit voltage, provide the energy harvesting capability. Supercapacitors based on graphene ink with ≈2.5 mF cm(-2) capacitance provide the energy storage capability. The integrated-power-sheet with photovoltaic (PV) energy harvesting and storage functions had a mass of 0.35 g plus the substrate. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Scalable shear-exfoliation of high-quality phosphorene nanoflakes with reliable electrochemical cycleability in nano batteries

    Xu, Feng; Min, Huihua; Zhu, Chongyang; Xia, Weiwei; Li, Zhengrui; Li, Shengli; Yu, Kaihao; Sun, Litao; Ge, Binghui; Chen, Jing; Cui, Yiping; Nathan, Arokia; Xin, Linhuo L; Ma, Hongyu; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Yimei

    2016-01-01

    Atomically thin black phosphorus (called phosphorene) holds great promise as an alternative to graphene and other two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). However, bulk black phosphorus (BP) suffers from rapid capacity fading and poor rechargeable performance. This work reports for the first time the use of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to construct nanoscale phosphorene LIBs. This enables direct visualization of the mechanisms underlying capacity fading in thick multilayer phosphorene through real-time capture of delithiation-induced structural decomposition, which serves to reduce electrical conductivity thus causing irreversibility of the lithiated phases. We further demonstrate that few-layer-thick phosphorene successfully circumvents the structural decomposition and holds superior structural restorability, even when subject to multi-cycle lithiation/delithiation processes and concomitant huge volume expansion. This finding provides breakthrough insights into thickness-dependent lithium diffusion kinetics in phosphorene. More importantly, a scalable liquid-phase shear exfoliation route has been developed to produce high-quality ultrathin phosphorene using simple means such as a high-speed shear mixer or even a household kitchen blender with the shear rate threshold of ∼1.25 × 10 4 s −1 . The results reported here will pave the way for industrial-scale applications of rechargeable phosphorene LIBs. (paper)

  6. High quality single atomic layer deposition of hexagonal boron nitride on single crystalline Rh(111) four-inch wafers

    Hemmi, A.; Bernard, C.; Cun, H.; Roth, S.; Klöckner, M.; Kälin, T.; Osterwalder, J.; Greber, T., E-mail: greber@physik.uzh.ch [Physik-Institut, Universität Zürich, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Weinl, M.; Gsell, S.; Schreck, M. [Institut für Physik, Universität Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    The setup of an apparatus for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and its characterization on four-inch wafers in ultra high vacuum (UHV) environment is reported. It provides well-controlled preparation conditions, such as oxygen and argon plasma assisted cleaning and high temperature annealing. In situ characterization of a wafer is accomplished with target current spectroscopy. A piezo motor driven x-y stage allows measurements with a step size of 1 nm on the complete wafer. To benchmark the system performance, we investigated the growth of single layer h-BN on epitaxial Rh(111) thin films. A thorough analysis of the wafer was performed after cutting in atmosphere by low energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, and ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. The apparatus is located in a clean room environment and delivers high quality single layers of h-BN and thus grants access to large area UHV processed surfaces, which had been hitherto restricted to expensive, small area single crystal substrates. The facility is versatile enough for customization to other UHV-CVD processes, e.g., graphene on four-inch wafers.

  7. CuNiO nanoparticles assembled on graphene as an effective platform for enzyme-free glucose sensing

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Liao, Qingliang; Liu, Shuo; Xu, Wei; Liu, Yichong; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrothermal CuNiO nanoparticles assembled on CVD synthesized graphene. • CuNiO–graphene nanocomposite was applied to construct nonenzymatic glucose sensor. • Wide linear range up to 16 mM, good selectivity and stability were achieved. - Abstract: We utilized CuNiO nanoparticles modified graphene sheets (CuNiO–graphene) to the application of enzymeless glucose sensing. The hydrothermal synthesized CuNiO nanoparticles were successfully assembled on graphene sheets. Distinct from general method, the high quality pristine graphene was produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and bubbling transferred on the electrode. Incorporating the excellent electronic transport of graphene and high electrocatalytic activity of CuNiO nanoparticles, the CuNiO–graphene nanocomposite modified electrode possessed strong electrocatalytic ability toward glucose in alkaline media. The proposed nonenzymatic glucose sensor exhibited wide linear range up to 16 mM (two parts, from 0.05 to 6.9 mM and 6.9–16 mM) and high sensitivity (225.75 μA mM −1 cm −2 and 32.44 μA mM −1 cm −2 , respectively). Excellent selectivity and acceptable stability were also achieved. Such an electrode would be attractive to sensor construction for its good properties, simple operation and low expense

  8. Manufacturing High-Quality Carbon Nanotubes at Lower Cost

    Benavides, Jeanette M.; Lidecker, Henning

    2004-01-01

    A modified electric-arc welding process has been developed for manufacturing high-quality batches of carbon nanotubes at relatively low cost. Unlike in some other processes for making carbon nanotubes, metal catalysts are not used and, consequently, it is not necessary to perform extensive cleaning and purification. Also, unlike some other processes, this process is carried out at atmospheric pressure under a hood instead of in a closed, pressurized chamber; as a result, the present process can be implemented more easily. Although the present welding-based process includes an electric arc, it differs from a prior electric-arc nanotube-production process. The welding equipment used in this process includes an AC/DC welding power source with an integral helium-gas delivery system and circulating water for cooling an assembly that holds one of the welding electrodes (in this case, the anode). The cathode is a hollow carbon (optionally, graphite) rod having an outside diameter of 2 in. (approximately equal to 5.1 cm) and an inside diameter of 5/8 in. (approximately equal to 1.6 cm). The cathode is partly immersed in a water bath, such that it protrudes about 2 in. (about 5.1 cm) above the surface of the water. The bottom end of the cathode is held underwater by a clamp, to which is connected the grounding cable of the welding power source. The anode is a carbon rod 1/8 in. (approximately equal to 0.3 cm) in diameter. The assembly that holds the anode includes a thumbknob- driven mechanism for controlling the height of the anode. A small hood is placed over the anode to direct a flow of helium downward from the anode to the cathode during the welding process. A bell-shaped exhaust hood collects the helium and other gases from the process. During the process, as the anode is consumed, the height of the anode is adjusted to maintain an anode-to-cathode gap of 1 mm. The arc-welding process is continued until the upper end of the anode has been lowered to a specified height

  9. Local organization of graphene network inside graphene / polymer composites

    Alekseev, A.; Chen, D.; Tkalya, E.; Gomes Ghislandi, M.; Syurik, Y.V.; Ageev, O.A.; Loos, J.; With, de G.

    2012-01-01

    The local electrical properties of a conductive graphene/polystyrene (PS) composite sample are studied by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) applying various methods for electrical properties investigation. We show that the conductive graphene network can be separated from electrically isolated

  10. Graphene and graphene oxide: biofunctionalization and applications in biotechnology.

    Wang, Ying; Li, Zhaohui; Wang, Jun; Li, Jinghong; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-05-01

    Graphene is the basic building block of 0D fullerene, 1D carbon nanotubes, and 3D graphite. Graphene has a unique planar structure, as well as novel electronic properties, which have attracted great interests from scientists. This review selectively analyzes current advances in the field of graphene bioapplications. In particular, the biofunctionalization of graphene for biological applications, fluorescence-resonance-energy-transfer-based biosensor development by using graphene or graphene-based nanomaterials, and the investigation of graphene or graphene-based nanomaterials for living cell studies are summarized in more detail. Future perspectives and possible challenges in this rapidly developing area are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Controlled synthesis of graphene nanoribbons for field effect transistors

    Zhang, Jun; Huang, Lihai [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, 310018 (China); Zhang, Yupeng, E-mail: ypzhang018@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Xue, Yunzhou, E-mail: yunzhou.xue@monash.edu [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Zhang, Erpan [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, 310018 (China); Wang, Hongbo [College of Automation, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, 310018 (China); Kong, Zhe; Xi, Junhua; Ji, Zhenguo [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, 310018 (China)

    2015-11-15

    In this work, a template CVD method to produce graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) was developed with Cu nanoribbons as catalyst. Appropriate temperature, growth time and cooling rate were investigated and displayed the great importance for obtaining GNRs. The morphology, thickness and crystalline quality of the GNRs were characterized by the SEM, AFM, TEM (HRTEM and TEM diffraction), and Raman spectroscopy respectively, which indicated the GNRs had much narrower width, less layer numbers, smooth edges and higher crystalline compared to previous ones. Moreover, the electrical properties of the GNRs were measured and the mobilities reach 80–300 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}. This research provides a new type of GNRs experimentally, which is of great importance for the graphene applications. - Graphical abstract: Graphene nanoribbons obtained via CVD method show high quality, small width and smooth edges and were used to fabricated FETs with extracted mobilities of 80–300 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}. Highlights: • Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) were obtained via a template CVD method. • The GNRs have narrower width, less layer numbers and smooth edges. • The mobilities of the GNRs reach 80–300 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}.

  12. Epitaxial-graphene/graphene-oxide junction: an essential step towards epitaxial graphene electronics.

    Wu, Xiaosong; Sprinkle, Mike; Li, Xuebin; Ming, Fan; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A

    2008-07-11

    Graphene-oxide (GO) flakes have been deposited to bridge the gap between two epitaxial-graphene electrodes to produce all-graphene devices. Electrical measurements indicate the presence of Schottky barriers at the graphene/graphene-oxide junctions, as a consequence of the band gap in GO. The barrier height is found to be about 0.7 eV, and is reduced after annealing at 180 degrees C, implying that the gap can be tuned by changing the degree of oxidation. A lower limit of the GO mobility was found to be 850 cm2/V s, rivaling silicon. In situ local oxidation of patterned epitaxial graphene has been achieved.

  13. Graphene based quantum dots.

    Zhang, H G; Hu, H; Pan, Y; Mao, J H; Gao, M; Guo, H M; Du, S X; Greber, T; Gao, H-J

    2010-08-04

    Laterally localized electronic states are identified on a single layer of graphene on ruthenium by low temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The individual states are separated by 3 nm and comprise regions of about 90 carbon atoms. This constitutes a highly regular quantum dot-array with molecular precision. It is evidenced by quantum well resonances (QWRs) with energies that relate to the corrugation of the graphene layer. The dI/dV conductance spectra are modeled by a layer height dependent potential-well with a delta-function potential that describes the barrier for electron penetration into graphene. The resulting QWRs are strongest and lowest in energy on the isolated 'hill' regions with a diameter of 2 nm, where the graphene is decoupled from the surface.

  14. Graphene Chemical Sensor Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop graphene based miniaturized chemical sensors that will be able to detect gaseous and volatile molecules with high sensitivity, good reproducibility and wide...

  15. Graphene Chemical Sensor

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop graphene based miniaturized chemical sensors that will be able to detect gaseous and volatile molecules with high sensitivity, good reproducibility and wide...

  16. Water on graphene surfaces

    Gordillo, M C [Departamento de Sistemas Fisicos, Quimicos y Naturales, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Carretera de Utrera, km 1, E-41013 Sevilla (Spain); Marti, J, E-mail: cgorbar@upo.e, E-mail: jordi.marti@upc.ed [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, B4-B5 Campus Nord, E-08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-07-21

    In this paper, we summarize the main results obtained in our group about the behavior of water confined inside or close to different graphene surfaces by means of molecular dynamics simulations. These include the inside and outside of carbon nanotubes, and the confinement inside a slit pore or a single graphene sheet. We paid special attention to some thermodynamical (binding energies), structural (hydrogen-bond distributions) and dynamic (infrared spectra) properties, and their comparison to their bulk counterparts.

  17. Graphene-based Nanoelectronics

    2013-02-01

    Electrodes were fabricated by drop casting solutions containing the graphene oxide (GO)/CNT/MnAc materials onto titanium (Ti) or stainless steel current...silicon carbide (SiC) substrate can induce a splitting of up to 0.3 eV between the maximum of the valence and minimum of the conduction bands at the...simultaneously hinders the formation of multilayer graphene domains. These results are based on a diffusion-segregation model for carbon precipitation on a Ni

  18. Graphene for future electronics

    Pasanen, Pirjo; Voutilainen, Martti; Helle, Meri; Song Xuefeng; Hakonen, Pertti J

    2012-01-01

    We discuss some aspects of how graphene could be used in mainstream electronic devices. The main focus is on signal processing applications in high-volume, industrially manufactured battery-powered devices, e.g. mobile phones and laptop computers, but we will also discuss applicability to other components like interconnects, wireless communication antennae and camera sensors, as well as novel types of signal processing devices, based on the unique physical properties of graphene.

  19. Influence of Mg doping on ZnO nanoparticles decorated on graphene oxide (GO) crumpled paper like sheet and its high photo catalytic performance under sunlight

    Labhane, P. K.; Sonawane, S. H.; Sonawane, G. H.; Patil, S. P.; Huse, V. R.

    2018-03-01

    Mg doped ZnO nanoparticles decorated on graphene oxide (GO) sheets were synthesized by a wet impregnation method. The effect of Mg doping on ZnO and ZnO-GO composite has been evaluated by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), Williamson-Hall Plot (Wsbnd H Plot), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The physical parameters of as-prepared samples were estimated by XRD data. FESEM and HR-TEM images showed the uniform distribution of nanoparticles on GO crumpled paper like sheet. Solar light photocatalytic activities of samples were evaluated spectrophotometrically by the degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) and indigo carmine (IC) solution. Mgsbnd ZnO decorated on GO sheets exhibit excellent catalytic efficiency compared to all other prepared samples under identical conditions, degrading PNP and IC nearly 99% within 60 min under sunlight. The effective degradation by Mgsbnd ZnO decorated on GO sheet would be due to extended solar light absorption, enhanced adsorptivity on the composite catalyst surface and efficient charge separation of photo-induced electrons. Finally, plausible mechanism was suggested with the help of scavengers study.

  20. Selective Electroless Silver Deposition on Graphene Edges

    Durhuus, D.; Larsen, M. V.; Andryieuski, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a method of electroless selective silver deposition on graphene edges or between graphene islands without covering the surface of graphene. Modifications of the deposition recipe allow for decoration of graphene edges with silver nanoparticles or filling holes in damaged graphene...... on silica substrate and thus potentially restoring electric connectivity with minimal influence on the overall graphene electrical and optical properties. The presented technique could find applications in graphene based transparent conductors as well as selective edge functionalization and can be extended...

  1. Terahertz carrier dynamics in graphene and graphene nanostructures

    Jensen, Søren A.; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Tielrooij, Klaas Jan

    2014-01-01

    Photoexcited charge carriers in 2D graphene and in 1D graphene nanostructures were studied with optical pump-THz probe spectroscopy. We find efficient hot-carrier multiplication in 2D graphene, and predominantly free carrier early time response in 1D nanostructures. © 2014 OSA....

  2. Intrinsic structure and friction properties of graphene and graphene

    In this paper, atomic structure of single-layered graphene oxide (GO) and chemically reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) nanosheets was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelingmicroscopy (AFM and STM). Furthermore, friction properties of the graphene and GO nanosheets were studied by ...

  3. Vibrational stability of graphene

    Yangfan Hu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical stability of graphene as temperature rises is analyzed based on three different self-consistent phonon (SCP models. Compared with three-dimensional (3-D materials, the critical temperature Ti at which instability occurs for graphene is much closer to its melting temperature Tm obtained from Monte Carlo simulation (Ti ≃ 2Tm, K. V. Zakharchenko, A. Fasolino, J. H. Los, and M. I. Katsnelson, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 23, 202202. This suggests that thermal vibration plays a significant role in melting of graphene while melting for 3-D materials is often dominated by topologic defects. This peculiar property of graphene derives from its high structural anisotropy, which is characterized by the vibrational anisotropic coefficient (VAC, defined upon its Lindermann ratios in different directions. For any carbon based material with a graphene-like structure, the VAC value must be smaller than 5.4 to maintain its stability. It is also found that the high VAC value of graphene is responsible for its negative thermal expansion coefficient at low temperature range. We believe that the VAC can be regarded as a new criterion concerning the vibrational stability of any low-dimensional (low-D materials.

  4. Pharmaceutical applications of graphene

    Justyna Żwawiak

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, dynamic development in nanotechnological sciences is observed. Nanoparticles are frequently used in medicine and pharmacy as delivery systems for different kinds of active substances. One of the latest developed substances, with an unusually wide scope of utility, is graphene. The ways of its use in different fields of industry, not only pharmaceutical and medical, have been a subject of study for many research groups since the moment of its development in 2004. Graphene in pure form is highly hydrophobic. However, the presence of defects on its surface allows chemical modifications to be made, e.g. introduction of oxygen groups by covalent bonding. Also, non-covalent modifications are extensively used, including van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonding, coordination bonds, electrostatic and π-π stacking interactions. Due to the large surface area, graphene can be used in combination therapy, consisting in simultaneous administration of two or more pharmacologically active agents. Another interesting approach is gene therapy. Application of the PEI-graphene oxide system increased the efficacy of transfection. Possibilities of graphene and graphene oxide are not limited to their use as active substance delivery systems. These compounds by themselves were also found to be bacteriostatic and antibacterial agents.

  5. Publishing high-quality climate data on the semantic web

    Woolf, Andrew; Haller, Armin; Lefort, Laurent; Taylor, Kerry

    2013-04-01

    The effort over more than a decade to establish the semantic web [Berners-Lee et. al., 2001] has received a major boost in recent years through the Open Government movement. Governments around the world are seeking technical solutions to enable more open and transparent access to Public Sector Information (PSI) they hold. Existing technical protocols and data standards tend to be domain specific, and so limit the ability to publish and integrate data across domains (health, environment, statistics, education, etc.). The web provides a domain-neutral platform for information publishing, and has proven itself beyond expectations for publishing and linking human-readable electronic documents. Extending the web pattern to data (often called Web 3.0) offers enormous potential. The semantic web applies the basic web principles to data [Berners-Lee, 2006]: using URIs as identifiers (for data objects and real-world 'things', instead of documents) making the URIs actionable by providing useful information via HTTP using a common exchange standard (serialised RDF for data instead of HTML for documents) establishing typed links between information objects to enable linking and integration Leading examples of 'linked data' for publishing PSI may be found in both the UK (http://data.gov.uk/linked-data) and US (http://www.data.gov/page/semantic-web). The Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) is Australia's national meteorological agency, and has a new mandate to establish a national environmental information infrastructure (under the National Plan for Environmental Information, NPEI [BoM, 2012a]). While the initial approach is based on the existing best practice Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) architecture, linked-data is being explored as a technological alternative that shows great promise for the future. We report here the first trial of government linked-data in Australia under data.gov.au. In this initial pilot study, we have taken BoM's new high-quality reference surface

  6. Graphene cantilever under Casimir force

    Derras-Chouk, Amel; Chudnovsky, Eugene M.; Garanin, Dmitry A.; Jaafar, Reem

    2018-05-01

    The stability of graphene cantilever under Casimir attraction to an underlying conductor is investigated. The dependence of the instability threshold on temperature and flexural rigidity is obtained. Analytical work is supplemented by numerical computation of the critical temperature above which the graphene cantilever irreversibly bends down and attaches to the conductor. The geometry of the attachment and exfoliation of the graphene sheet is discussed. It is argued that graphene cantilever can be an excellent tool for precision measurements of the Casimir force.

  7. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    Schmid, Silvan; Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization of such membranes would enable an electronic integration with the prospect...... for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling...

  8. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Mishra, Himanshu; Bonn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measuring the mass of water vapor adsorbing to graphene flakes of different thickness at different relative humidities. Our experiments unambiguously show that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water, from which it follows that the contact angle of water on these flakes is ~180o. Thicker flakes of graphene nanopowder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. A calculation of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions that dominate the adsorption in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between a single atomic layer of graphene and water are so weak that graphene is superhydrophobic. The observations are confirmed in an independent experiment on graphene-coated water droplets that shows that it is impossible to make liquid 'marbles' with molecularly thin graphene.

  9. Anisotropic spin relaxation in graphene

    Tombros, N.; Tanabe, S.; Veligura, A.; Jozsa, C.; Popinciuc, M.; Jonkman, H. T.; van Wees, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    Spin relaxation in graphene is investigated in electrical graphene spin valve devices in the nonlocal geometry. Ferromagnetic electrodes with in-plane magnetizations inject spins parallel to the graphene layer. They are subject to Hanle spin precession under a magnetic field B applied perpendicular

  10. Electrochemical method for transferring graphene

    2015-01-01

    The present application discloses a method for separating a graphene-support layer laminate from a conducting substrate-graphene-support layer laminate, using a gentle, controllable electrochemical method. In this way, substrates which are fragile, expensive or difficult to manufacture can be used...... - and even re-used - without damage or destruction of the substrate or the graphene....

  11. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    Bera, Bijoyendra

    2016-11-28

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measuring the mass of water vapor adsorbing to graphene flakes of different thickness at different relative humidities. Our experiments unambiguously show that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water, from which it follows that the contact angle of water on these flakes is ~180o. Thicker flakes of graphene nanopowder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. A calculation of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions that dominate the adsorption in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between a single atomic layer of graphene and water are so weak that graphene is superhydrophobic. The observations are confirmed in an independent experiment on graphene-coated water droplets that shows that it is impossible to make liquid \\'marbles\\' with molecularly thin graphene.

  12. Nanoselective area growth of GaN by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on 4H-SiC using epitaxial graphene as a mask

    Puybaret, Renaud; Jordan, Matthew B.; Voss, Paul L.; Ougazzaden, Abdallah; Patriarche, Gilles; Sundaram, Suresh; El Gmili, Youssef; Salvestrini, Jean-Paul; Heer, Walt A. de; Berger, Claire

    2016-01-01

    We report the growth of high-quality triangular GaN nanomesas, 30-nm thick, on the C-face of 4H-SiC using nanoselective area growth (NSAG) with patterned epitaxial graphene grown on SiC as an embedded mask. NSAG alleviates the problems of defects in heteroepitaxy, and the high mobility graphene film could readily provide the back low-dissipative electrode in GaN-based optoelectronic devices. A 5–8 graphene-layer film is first grown on the C-face of 4H-SiC by confinement-controlled sublimation of silicon carbide. Graphene is then patterned and arrays of 75-nm-wide openings are etched in graphene revealing the SiC substrate. A 30-nm-thick GaN is subsequently grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. GaN nanomesas grow epitaxially with perfect selectivity on SiC, in the openings patterned through graphene. The up-or-down orientation of the mesas on SiC, their triangular faceting, and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that they are biphasic. The core is a zinc blende monocrystal surrounded with single-crystal wurtzite. The GaN crystalline nanomesas have no threading dislocations or V-pits. This NSAG process potentially leads to integration of high-quality III-nitrides on the wafer scalable epitaxial graphene/silicon carbide platform.

  13. Nanoselective area growth of GaN by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on 4H-SiC using epitaxial graphene as a mask

    Puybaret, Renaud; Jordan, Matthew B.; Voss, Paul L.; Ougazzaden, Abdallah, E-mail: aougazza@georgiatech-metz.fr [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); CNRS UMI 2958, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2 Rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Patriarche, Gilles [CNRS, Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Sundaram, Suresh; El Gmili, Youssef [CNRS UMI 2958, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2 Rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Salvestrini, Jean-Paul [Université de Lorraine, CentraleSupélec, LMOPS, EA4423, 57070 Metz (France); Heer, Walt A. de [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Berger, Claire [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); CNRS, Institut Néel, BP166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2016-03-07

    We report the growth of high-quality triangular GaN nanomesas, 30-nm thick, on the C-face of 4H-SiC using nanoselective area growth (NSAG) with patterned epitaxial graphene grown on SiC as an embedded mask. NSAG alleviates the problems of defects in heteroepitaxy, and the high mobility graphene film could readily provide the back low-dissipative electrode in GaN-based optoelectronic devices. A 5–8 graphene-layer film is first grown on the C-face of 4H-SiC by confinement-controlled sublimation of silicon carbide. Graphene is then patterned and arrays of 75-nm-wide openings are etched in graphene revealing the SiC substrate. A 30-nm-thick GaN is subsequently grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. GaN nanomesas grow epitaxially with perfect selectivity on SiC, in the openings patterned through graphene. The up-or-down orientation of the mesas on SiC, their triangular faceting, and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that they are biphasic. The core is a zinc blende monocrystal surrounded with single-crystal wurtzite. The GaN crystalline nanomesas have no threading dislocations or V-pits. This NSAG process potentially leads to integration of high-quality III-nitrides on the wafer scalable epitaxial graphene/silicon carbide platform.

  14. Graphene crystal growth by thermal precipitation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon precursor via patterned-iron thin layers

    Rius Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, relevant advances on graphene as a building block of integrated circuits (ICs have been demonstrated. Graphene growth and device fabrication related processing has been steadily and intensively powered due to commercial interest; however, there are many challenges associated with the incorporation of graphene into commercial applications which includes challenges associated with the synthesis of this material. Specifically, the controlled deposition of single layer large single crystal graphene on arbitrary supports, is particularly challenging. Previously, we have reported the first demonstration of the transformation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon (FIBID-C into patterned graphitic layers by metal-assisted thermal treatment (Ni foils. In this present work, we continue exploiting the FIBID-C approach as a route for graphene deposition. Here, thin patterned Fe layers are used for the catalysis of graphenization and graphitization. We demonstrate the formation of high quality single and few layer graphene, which evidences, the possibility of using Fe as a catalyst for graphene deposition. The mechanism is understood as the minute precipitation of atomic carbon after supersaturation of some iron carbides formed under a high temperature treatment. As a consequence of the complete wetting of FIBID-C and patterned Fe layers, which enable graphene growth, the as-deposited patterns do not preserve their original shape after the thermal treatment

  15. Inequality in Preschool Quality? Community-Level Disparities in Access to High-Quality Learning Environments

    Bassok, Daphna; Galdo, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, unequal access to high-quality preschool has emerged as a growing public policy concern. Because of data limitations, it is notoriously difficult to measure disparities in access to early learning opportunities across communities and particularly challenging to quantify gaps in access to "high-quality" programs. Research…

  16. Probing graphene defects and estimating graphene quality with optical microscopy

    Lai, Shen; Kyu Jang, Sung; Jae Song, Young; Lee, Sungjoo

    2014-01-01

    We report a simple and accurate method for detecting graphene defects that utilizes the mild, dry annealing of graphene/Cu films in air. In contrast to previously reported techniques, our simple approach with optical microscopy can determine the density and degree of dislocation of defects in a graphene film without inducing water-related damage or functionalization. Scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman and atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis were performed to demonstrate that our nondestructive approach to characterizing graphene defects with optimized thermal annealing provides rapid and comprehensive determinations of graphene quality

  17. Conversion of Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers and bilayers of poly(amic acid) through polyimide to graphene

    Jo, Hye Jin; Lyu, Ji Hong; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Lim, Hyunseob; In Yoon, Seong; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Tae Joo; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2017-03-01

    Various solid carbon sources, particularly poly(methyl methacrylate), have been used as precursors to graphene. The corresponding growth process generally involves the decomposition of the solids to hydrocarbon gases followed by their adsorption on metallic substrates (e.g., Cu). We report a different approach that uses a thermally-resistant polyimide (PI) as a carbon precursor. Langmuir-Blodgett films of poly(amic acid) (PAA) were transferred to copper foils and then converted to graphene via a PI intermediate. The Cu foil substrate was also discovered to facilitate the orientation of aromatic moieties upon carbonization process of the PI. As approximately 50% of the initial quantity of the PAA was found to remain at 1000 °C, thermally-stable polymers may reduce the quantity of starting material required to prepare high quality films of graphene. Graphene grown using this method featured a relatively large domain size and an absence of adventitious adlayers.

  18. Selective LPCVD growth of graphene on patterned copper and its growth mechanism

    Zhang, M.; Huang, B.-C.; Wang, Y.; Woo, J. C. S.

    2016-12-01

    Copper-catalyzed graphene low-pressure chemical-vapor deposition (LPCVD) growth has been regarded as a viable solution towards its integration to CMOS technology, and the wafer-bonding method provides a reliable alternative for transferring the selective graphene grown on a patterned metal film for IC manufacturing. In this paper, selective LPCVD graphene growth using patterned copper dots has been studied. The Raman spectra of grown films have demonstrated large dependence on the growth conditions. To explain the results, the growth mechanisms based on surface adsorption and copper-vapor-assisted growth are investigated by the comparison between the blanket copper films with/without the additional copper source. The copper vapor density is found to be critical for high-quality graphene growth. In addition, the copper-vapor-assisted growth is also evidenced by the carbon deposition on the SiO2 substrate of the patterned-copper-dot sample and chamber wall during graphene growth. This growth mechanism explains the correlation between the growth condition and Raman spectrum for films on copper dots. The study on the copper-catalyzed selective graphene growth on the hard substrate paves the way for the synthesis and integration of the 2D material in VLSI.

  19. Chemical preparation of graphene-based nanomaterials and their applications in chemical and biological sensors.

    Jiang, Hongji

    2011-09-05

    Graphene is a flat monolayer of carbon atoms packed tightly into a 2D honeycomb lattice that shows many intriguing properties meeting the key requirements for the implementation of highly excellent sensors, and all kinds of proof-of-concept sensors have been devised. To realize the potential sensor applications, the key is to synthesize graphene in a controlled way to achieve enhanced solution-processing capabilities, and at the same time to maintain or even improve the intrinsic properties of graphene. Several production techniques for graphene-based nanomaterials have been developed, ranging from the mechanical cleavage and chemical exfoliation of high-quality graphene to direct growth onto different substrates and the chemical routes using graphite oxide as a precusor to the newly developed bottom-up approach at the molecular level. The current review critically explores the recent progress on the chemical preparation of graphene-based nanomaterials and their applications in sensors. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Layer-selective synthesis of bilayer graphene via chemical vapor deposition

    Yang, Ning; Choi, Kyoungjun; Robertson, John; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2017-09-01

    A controlled synthesis of high-quality AB-stacked bilayer graphene by chemical vapor deposition demands a detailed understanding of the mechanism and kinetics. By decoupling the growth of the two layers via a growth-and-regrowth scheme, we report the kinetics and termination mechanisms of the bilayer graphene growth on copper. We observe, for the first time, that the secondary layer growth follows Gompertzian kinetics. Our observations affirm the postulate of a time-variant transition from a mass-transport-limited to a reaction-limited regimes and identify the mechanistic disparity between the monolayer growth and the secondary-layer expansion underneath the monolayer cover. It is the continuous carbon supply that drives the expansion of the graphene secondary layer, rather than the initially captured carbon amount, suggesting an essential role of the surface diffusion of reactant adsorbates in the interspace between the top graphene layer and the underneath copper surface. We anticipate that the layer selectivity of the growth relies on the entrance energetics of the adsorbed reactants to the graphene-copper interspace across the primary-layer edge, which could be engineered by tailoring the edge termination state. The temperature-reliant saturation area of the secondary-layer expansion is understood as a result of competitive attachment of carbon and hydrogen adatoms to the secondary-layer graphene edge.

  1. Field Emission of Wet Transferred Suspended Graphene Fabricated on Interdigitated Electrodes.

    Xu, Ji; Wang, Qilong; Tao, Zhi; Qi, Zhiyang; Zhai, Yusheng; Wu, Shengqi; Zhang, Xiaobing; Lei, Wei

    2016-02-10

    Suspended graphene (SG) membranes could enable strain-engineering of ballistic Dirac fermion transport and eliminate the extrinsic bulk disorder by annealing. When freely suspended without contact to any substrates, graphene could be considered as the ultimate two-dimensional (2D) morphology, leading to special field characteristics with the 2D geometrical effect and effectively utilized as an outstanding structure to explore the fundamental electronic or optoelectronic mechanism. In this paper, we report field emission characterization on an individual suspended few-layer graphene. A controllable wet transfer method is used to obtain the continuous and suspended graphene membrane on interdigitated gold electrodes. This suspended structure displays an overall field emission from the entirely surface, except for the variation in the emitting positions, acquiring a better enhancement than the exfoliated graphene on the conventional flat substrate. We also observe the transition process from space charge flow at low bias to the Fowler-Nordheim theory at high current emission regime. It could enable theoretical and experimental investigation of the typical electron emission properties of the 2D regime. Numerical simulations are also carried out to study the electrical properties of the suspended structure. Further improvement on the fabrication would realize low disorder, high quality, and large-scale suspended graphene devices.

  2. Exfoliation of non-oxidized graphene flakes for scalable conductive film.

    Park, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Bo Hyun; Song, Sung Ho; Kwon, Jiyoung; Kong, Byung Seon; Kang, Kisuk; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2012-06-13

    The increasing demand for graphene has required a new route for its mass production without causing extreme damages. Here we demonstrate a simple and cost-effective intercalation based exfoliation method for preparing high quality graphene flakes, which form a stable dispersion in organic solvents without any functionalization and surfactant. Successful intercalation of alkali metal between graphite interlayers through liquid-state diffusion from ternary KCl-NaCl-ZnCl(2) eutectic system is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy. Chemical composition and morphology analyses prove that the graphene flakes preserve their intrinsic properties without any degradation. The graphene flakes remain dispersed in a mixture of pyridine and salts for more than 6 months. We apply these results to produce transparent conducting (∼930 Ω/□ at ∼75% transmission) graphene films using the modified Langmuir-Blodgett method. The overall results suggest that our method can be a scalable (>1 g/batch) and economical route for the synthesis of nonoxidized graphene flakes.

  3. Large-scale modulation of left-handed passband in hybrid graphene/dielectric metasurface

    Liu, Chuanbao; Bai, Yang; Qiao, Lijie [Key Laboratory of Environmental Fracture (Ministry of Education), University of Science and Technology Beijing (China); Zhou, Ji [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Zhao, Qian [State Kay Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2017-08-15

    Large-scale modulation of the left-handed transmission with a high quality factor is greatly desired by high-performance optical devices, but the requirements are hard to be satisfied simultaneously. This paper presents a hybrid graphene/dielectric metasurface to realize a large transmission modulation for the left-handed passband at near-infrared frequencies via tuning the Fermi energy of graphene. By splitting the nanoblocks, i.e. introducing an additional symmetry breaking in the unit cell, the metasurface demonstrates an ultrahigh quality factor (Q ∼ 550) of Fano resonance with near-unity transmission and full 2π phase coverage due to the interference between Mie-type magnetic and electric resonances, which induces the negative refraction property. Besides, the split in the nanoblock greatly enhances the local field by increasing the critical coupling area, so the light-graphene interaction is promoted intensively. When the surface conductivity of graphene is electrically tuned, the hybrid graphene/dielectric metasurface exhibits a deep modulation of 85% for the left-handed passband, which is robust even for the highest loss of graphene. Moreover, the simple configuration remarkably reduces the fabrication requirements to facilitate the widespread applications. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. The impact of hydrogen and oxidizing impurities in chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper

    Choubak, Saman

    Graphene, the single-atom layer of carbon, has attracted scientists and technologists due to its outstanding physical and opto/electronic properties. The use of graphene in practical applications requires a reliable and cost-effective method to produce large area graphene films with low defects and controlled thicknesses. Direct growth of graphene using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper, in which carbonaceous gaseous species react with the metal substrate in the presence of hydrogen at high temperatures (850-1100° C), led to high coverage of high quality graphene, opening up a promising future for methods of this type and a large step towards commercial realization of graphene products. The present thesis deals with the synthesis of graphene via low pressure CVD (LP-CVD) on copper catalyst using methane as the carbon precursor. The focus is mainly on the determination of the role of hydrogen and oxidizing impurities during graphene formation with an ultimate purpose: to elucidate a viable and reproducible method for the production of high quality graphene films compatible with industrial manufacturing processes. The role of molecular hydrogen in graphene CVD is explored in the first part of the thesis. Few studies claimed that molecular hydrogen etches graphene films on copper by conducting annealing experiments. On the other hand, we speculated that this graphene etching reaction is due to the presence of trace amount of oxygen in the furnace atmosphere. Thus, we took another approach and designed systematic annealing experiments to investigate the role of hydrogen in the etching reaction of graphene on copper foils. No evidence of graphene etching on copper was observed when purified ultra high purity (UHP) hydrogen was used at 825 °C and 500 mTorr. Nevertheless, graphene films exposed to the unpurified UHP hydrogen were etched due to the presence of oxidizing impurities. Our results show that hydrogen is not responsible for graphene etching reaction

  5. Mass spectrometry of graphene and graphene oxide

    Kolarova, L.; Mawale, R.; Pazdera, P.; Havel, J.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the ionization of graphene (G) and graphene oxide (GO) by laser desorption ionization MS equipped with a combination of quadrupole ion trap and time-of flight 140 analyser was studied. The purpose was to understand processes of GO ionisation. This knowledge might help to understand the structure of GO. In conclusion, it was found that GO preparative consist of many various sizes GO fragments forming a complex aggregate of single layers of GO 'leaves' which are incorporating various GO molecules in between the layers and carrying varied number of oxo, hydroxyl or carboxyl groups. Some of GO fragments can be exfoliated using different solvents. In addition, carbon clusters C n (n up to 350) were observed. The(authors)

  6. Turbulence-assisted shear exfoliation of graphene using household detergent and a kitchen blender

    Varrla, Eswaraiah; Paton, Keith R.; Backes, Claudia; Harvey, Andrew; Smith, Ronan J.; McCauley, Joe; Coleman, Jonathan N.

    2014-09-01

    To facilitate progression from the lab to commercial applications, it will be necessary to develop simple, scalable methods to produce high quality graphene. Here we demonstrate the production of large quantities of defect-free graphene using a kitchen blender and household detergent. We have characterised the scaling of both graphene concentration and production rate with the mixing parameters: mixing time, initial graphite concentration, rotor speed and liquid volume. We find the production rate to be invariant with mixing time and to increase strongly with mixing volume, results which are important for scale-up. Even in this simple system, concentrations of up to 1 mg ml-1 and graphene masses of >500 mg can be achieved after a few hours mixing. The maximum production rate was ~0.15 g h-1, much higher than for standard sonication-based exfoliation methods. We demonstrate that graphene production occurs because the mean turbulent shear rate in the blender exceeds the critical shear rate for exfoliation.To facilitate progression from the lab to commercial applications, it will be necessary to develop simple, scalable methods to produce high quality graphene. Here we demonstrate the production of large quantities of defect-free graphene using a kitchen blender and household detergent. We have characterised the scaling of both graphene concentration and production rate with the mixing parameters: mixing time, initial graphite concentration, rotor speed and liquid volume. We find the production rate to be invariant with mixing time and to increase strongly with mixing volume, results which are important for scale-up. Even in this simple system, concentrations of up to 1 mg ml-1 and graphene masses of >500 mg can be achieved after a few hours mixing. The maximum production rate was ~0.15 g h-1, much higher than for standard sonication-based exfoliation methods. We demonstrate that graphene production occurs because the mean turbulent shear rate in the blender exceeds

  7. Graphene grown out of diamond

    Gu, Changzhi; Li, Wuxia; Xu, Jing; Xu, Shicong; Lu, Chao; Xu, Lifang; Li, Junjie; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-10-01

    Most applications of graphene need a suitable support substrate to present its excellent properties. But transferring graphene onto insulators or growing graphene on foreign substrates could cause properties diminishing. This paper reports the graphene growth directly out of diamond (111) by B doping, guided by first-principles calculations. The spontaneous graphene formation occurred due to the reconstruction of the diamond surface when the B doping density and profile are adequate. The resulting materials are defect free with high phase purity/carrier mobility, controllable layer number, and good uniformity, which can be potentially used directly for device fabrication, e.g., high-performance devices requiring good thermal conductivity.

  8. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  9. Graphene-based structure, method of suspending graphene membrane, and method of depositing material onto graphene membrane

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Meyer, Jannik Christian

    2013-04-02

    An embodiment of a method of suspending a graphene membrane across a gap in a support structure includes attaching graphene to a substrate. A pre-fabricated support structure having the gap is attached to the graphene. The graphene and the pre-fabricated support structure are then separated from the substrate which leaves the graphene membrane suspended across the gap in the pre-fabricated support structure. An embodiment of a method of depositing material includes placing a support structure having a graphene membrane suspended across a gap under vacuum. A precursor is adsorbed to a surface of the graphene membrane. A portion of the graphene membrane is exposed to a focused electron beam which deposits a material from the precursor onto the graphene membrane. An embodiment of a graphene-based structure includes a support structure having a gap, a graphene membrane suspended across the gap, and a material deposited in a pattern on the graphene membrane.

  10. Contact doping, Klein tunneling, and asymmetry of shot noise in suspended graphene

    Laitinen, Antti; Paraoanu, G. S.; Oksanen, Mika; Craciun, Monica F.; Russo, Saverio; Sonin, Edouard; Hakonen, Pertti

    2016-01-01

    The inherent asymmetry of the electric transport in graphene is attributed to Klein tunneling across barriers defined by p n interfaces between positively and negatively charged regions. By combining conductance and shot noise experiments, we determine the main characteristics of the tunneling barrier (height and slope) in a high-quality suspended sample with Au/Cr/Au contacts. We observe an asymmetric resistance Rodd=100 -70 Ω across the Dirac point of the suspended graphene at carrier density | nG|=(0.3 -4 ) × 1011cm-2 , while the Fano factor displays a nonmonotonic asymmetry in the range Fodd˜0.03 -0.1. Our findings agree with analytical calculations based on the Dirac equation with a trapezoidal barrier. Comparison between the model and the data yields the barrier height for tunneling, an estimate of the thickness of the p n interface d graphene.

  11. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers

    Cunning, Benjamin V; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Kermany, Atieh Ranjbar; Iacopi, Francesca; Wood, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices. (paper)

  12. Wafer scale millimeter-wave integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene in high data rate communication.

    Habibpour, Omid; He, Zhongxia Simon; Strupinski, Wlodek; Rorsman, Niklas; Zirath, Herbert

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the demand for high data rate wireless communications has increased dramatically, which requires larger bandwidth to sustain multi-user accessibility and quality of services. This can be achieved at millimeter wave frequencies. Graphene is a promising material for the development of millimeter-wave electronics because of its outstanding electron transport properties. Up to now, due to the lack of high quality material and process technology, the operating frequency of demonstrated circuits has been far below the potential of graphene. Here, we present monolithic integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene operating at unprecedented high frequencies (80-100 GHz). The demonstrated circuits are capable of encoding/decoding of multi-gigabit-per-second information into/from the amplitude or phase of the carrier signal. The developed fabrication process is scalable to large wafer sizes.

  13. From diffusive to ballistic transport in etched graphene constrictions and nanoribbons

    Somanchi, Sowmya; Peiro, Julian; Staggenborg, Maximilian; Beschoten, Bernd [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Terres, Bernat; Stampfer, Christoph [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-9), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    Graphene nanoribbons and constrictions are envisaged as fundamental components of future carbon-based nanoelectronic and spintronic devices. At nanoscale, electronic effects in these devices depend heavily on the dimensions of the active channel and the nature of edges. Hence, controlling both these parameters is crucial to understand the physics in such systems. This review is about the recent progress in the fabrication of graphene nanoribbons and constrictions in terms of low temperature quantum transport. In particular, recent advancements using encapsulated graphene allowing for quantized conductance and future experiments towards exploring spin effects in these devices are presented. The influence of charge carrier inhomogeneity and the important length scales which play a crucial role for transport in high quality samples are also discussed. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Wafer scale millimeter-wave integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene in high data rate communication

    Habibpour, Omid; He, Zhongxia Simon; Strupinski, Wlodek; Rorsman, Niklas; Zirath, Herbert

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the demand for high data rate wireless communications has increased dramatically, which requires larger bandwidth to sustain multi-user accessibility and quality of services. This can be achieved at millimeter wave frequencies. Graphene is a promising material for the development of millimeter-wave electronics because of its outstanding electron transport properties. Up to now, due to the lack of high quality material and process technology, the operating frequency of demonstrated circuits has been far below the potential of graphene. Here, we present monolithic integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene operating at unprecedented high frequencies (80-100 GHz). The demonstrated circuits are capable of encoding/decoding of multi-gigabit-per-second information into/from the amplitude or phase of the carrier signal. The developed fabrication process is scalable to large wafer sizes.

  15. Polycylcic carbon molecules with zigzag edges as sources of defects in graphene on a metal

    Artaud, Alexandre; Magaud, Laurence; Ratter, Kitti; Guisset, Valérie; David, Philippe; Gilles, Bruno; Coraux, Johann; Chapelier, Claude

    Unlike the armchair edge, the zigzag edge of graphene breaks the equivalence of its two constituting carbon sub-lattices. Uncompensated magnetic moments are thus expected for such edges. For the same reason, dense polycyclic molecules (PCMs) terminated by zigzag edges are predicted to host net magnetic moments. Unfortunately, their synthesis is challenging. One approach relies on the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons, catalyzed by a transition metal. Here we investigate this little-explored approach, and put in evidence the formation of a series of highly symmetric zigzag edge PCMs onto Re (0001), among which phenalene, coronene and sumanene. We also address the relationship between the preparation of such molecules and graphene, which both form following hydrocarbon pyrolysis. We establish that the PCMs are unexpected obstacles towards high quality graphene.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of [{sup 188}Re(N)(cys{approx})(PNP)]{sup +/0} mixed-ligand complexes as prototypes for the development of {sup 188}Re(N)-based target-specific radiopharmaceuticals

    Thieme, Stefan [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510 119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Agostini, Stefania [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 5, 35131 Padova (Italy); Bergmann, Ralf; Pietzsch, Jens; Pietzsch, Hans-Juergen [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510 119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Carta, Davide; Salvarese, Nicola [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 5, 35131 Padova (Italy); Refosco, Fiorenzo [ICIS-CNR, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Bolzati, Cristina, E-mail: bolzati@icis.cnr.i [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 5, 35131 Padova (Italy); ICIS-CNR, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    We report on an efficient procedure for the preparation of [{sup 188}Re(N)(PNP)]-based complexes (where PNP is diphosphinoamine) useful in the development of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. The radiochemical yield of the compounds was optimized considering such reaction parameters as nature of the nitrido nitrogen donor, reaction times and pH level. The chemical identity of the {sup 188}Re agents was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography comparison with the corresponding well-characterized cold Re compounds. {sup 188}Re(N) mixed compounds have been evaluated with regard to stability toward transchelation with GSH and degradation by serum enzymes. The clearance of selected radiocompounds from normal tissues and their in vivo stability were evaluated in rats by biodistribution and imaging studies. [{sup 188}Re(N)(cys{approx})(PNP)]{sup +/0} mixed-ligand compounds were efficiently prepared in aqueous solution from perrhenate using a multistep procedure based on the preliminary formation of the labile {sup 188}Re{sup III}-EDTA species, which easily undergo oxidation/ligand exchange reaction to afford the [{sup 188}Re{sup V{identical_to}}N]{sup 2+} core in the presence of dithiocarbazate. The final mixed-ligand compounds were obtained, at 100{sup o}C, by adding the two bidentate ligands to the buffered [{sup 188}Re{sup V{identical_to}}N]{sup 2+} solution (pH 3.2-3.6). However, a relatively high amount of cys{approx} ligand was required to obtain a quantitative radiochemical yield. The complexes were stable toward reoxidation to perrhenate and ligand exchange reactions. In vivo studies showed rapid distribution and elimination of the complexes from the body. No specific uptakes in sensitive tissues/organs were detected. A positive correlation of the distribution of the complexes estimated with biodistribution studies (%ID) and with micro-SPECT semiquantification imaging analysis (standard uptake values) was observed. These results support the

  17. Reducing the layer number of AB stacked multilayer graphene grown on nickel by annealing at low temperature.

    Velasco, J Marquez; Giamini, S A; Kelaidis, N; Tsipas, P; Tsoutsou, D; Kordas, G; Raptis, Y S; Boukos, N; Dimoulas, A

    2015-10-09

    Controlling the number of layers of graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition is crucial for large scale graphene application. We propose here an etching process of graphene which can be applied immediately after growth to control the number of layers. We use nickel (Ni) foil at high temperature (T = 900 °C) to produce multilayer-AB-stacked-graphene (MLG). The etching process is based on annealing the samples in a hydrogen/argon atmosphere at a relatively low temperature (T = 450 °C) inside the growth chamber. The extent of etching is mainly controlled by the annealing process duration. Using Raman spectroscopy we demonstrate that the number of layers was reduced, changing from MLG to few-layer-AB-stacked-graphene and in some cases to randomly oriented few layer graphene near the substrate. Furthermore, our method offers the significant advantage that it does not introduce defects in the samples, maintaining their original high quality. This fact and the low temperature our method uses make it a good candidate for controlling the layer number of already grown graphene in processes with a low thermal budget.

  18. Graphene for Multi-purpose Applications

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2015-01-01

    As a future direction, this thesis also discusses potential of graphene growth on electrochemically deposited metallic seed layers and consequential usage in stretchable and transparent graphene antenna development for fully flexible only graphene based integrated electronic system integration.

  19. Water tribology on graphene.

    N'guessan, Hartmann E; Leh, Aisha; Cox, Paris; Bahadur, Prashant; Tadmor, Rafael; Patra, Prabir; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Wasnik, Priyanka

    2012-01-01

    Classical experiments show that the force required to slide liquid drops on surfaces increases with the resting time of the drop, t(rest), and reaches a plateau typically after several minutes. Here we use the centrifugal adhesion balance to show that the lateral force required to slide a water drop on a graphene surface is practically invariant with t(rest). In addition, the drop's three-phase contact line adopts a peculiar micrometric serrated form. These observations agree well with current theories that relate the time effect to deformation and molecular re-orientation of the substrate surface. Such molecular re-orientation is non-existent on graphene, which is chemically homogenous. Hence, graphene appears to provide a unique tribological surface test bed for a variety of liquid drop-surface interactions.

  20. Graphene quantum interference photodetector

    Mahbub Alam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a graphene quantum interference (QI photodetector was simulated in two regimes of operation. The structure consists of a graphene nanoribbon, Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI, which exhibits a strongly resonant transmission of electrons of specific energies. In the first regime of operation (that of a linear photodetector, low intensity light couples two resonant energy levels, resulting in scattering and differential transmission of current with an external quantum efficiency of up to 5.2%. In the second regime of operation, full current switching is caused by the phase decoherence of the current due to a strong photon flux in one or both of the interferometer arms in the same MZI structure. Graphene QI photodetectors have several distinct advantages: they are of very small size, they do not require p- and n-doped regions, and they exhibit a high external quantum efficiency.

  1. Graphene in turbine blades

    Das, D. K.; Swain, P. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-07-01

    Graphene, the two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, draws interest of several researchers due to its many superior properties. It has extensive applications in numerous fields. A turbine is a hydraulic machine which extracts energy from a fluid and converts it into useful work. Recently, Gudukeya and Madanhire have tried to increase the efficiency of Pelton turbine. Beucher et al. have also tried the same by reducing friction between fluid and turbine blades. In this paper, we study the advantages of using graphene as a coating on Pelton turbine blades. It is found that the efficiency of turbines increases, running and maintenance cost is reduced with more power output. By the application of graphene in pipes, cavitation will be reduced, durability of pipes will increase, operation and maintenance cost of water power plants will be less.

  2. Acoustoelectric photoresponse in graphene

    Poole, T.; Bandhu, L.; Nash, G. R., E-mail: g.r.nash@exeter.ac.uk [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QF Exeter (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-30

    The acoustoelectric current in graphene has been investigated as a function of illumination, using blue (450 nm) and red (735 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and surface acoustic wave (SAW) intensity and frequency. The measured acoustoelectric current increases with illumination, more than the measured change in the conductivity of the graphene, whilst retaining a linear dependence on the SAW intensity. The latter is consistent with the interaction between the carriers and SAWs being described by a relatively simple classical relaxation model suggesting that the change in the acoustoelectric current is caused by the effect of the illumination on the electronic properties of the graphene. The increase in the acoustoelectric current is greatest under illumination with the blue LED, consistent with the creation of a hot electron distribution.

  3. Real-World Solutions for Developing High-Quality PHP Frameworks and Applications

    Bergmann, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Learn to develop high-quality applications and frameworks in PHP Packed with in-depth information and step-by-step guidance, this book escorts you through the process of creating, maintaining and extending sustainable software of high quality with PHP. World-renowned PHP experts present real-world case studies for developing high-quality applications and frameworks in PHP that can easily be adapted to changing business requirements. . They offer different approaches to solving  typical development and quality assurance problems that every developer needs to know and master.Details the process

  4. Engineered piezoelectricity in graphene.

    Ong, Mitchell T; Reed, Evan J

    2012-02-28

    We discover that piezoelectric effects can be engineered into nonpiezoelectric graphene through the selective surface adsorption of atoms. Our calculations show that doping a single sheet of graphene with atoms on one side results in the generation of piezoelectricity by breaking inversion symmetry. Despite their 2D nature, piezoelectric magnitudes are found to be comparable to those in 3D piezoelectric materials. Our results elucidate a designer piezoelectric phenomenon, unique to the nanoscale, that has potential to bring dynamical control to nanoscale electromechanical devices.

  5. Graphene ground states

    Friedrich, Manuel; Stefanelli, Ulisse

    2018-06-01

    Graphene is locally two-dimensional but not flat. Nanoscale ripples appear in suspended samples and rolling up often occurs when boundaries are not fixed. We address this variety of graphene geometries by classifying all ground-state deformations of the hexagonal lattice with respect to configurational energies including two- and three-body terms. As a consequence, we prove that all ground-state deformations are either periodic in one direction, as in the case of ripples, or rolled up, as in the case of nanotubes.

  6. Graphene for Expandable Space Structures, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Graphene's tightly bonded impermeable single atomic layer of carbon offers unrivalled potential for lightweight flexible gas barrier applications. Graphene has been...

  7. Graphene nanophotonics: From fundamentals to applications

    Xiao, Sanshui

    With unique possibilities for controlling light in nanoscale devices, graphene has opened new perspectives to the nanophotonics community with potential applications in metamaterials, modulators, photodetectors, and sensors. Following a brief introduction of graphene, I will address some...... fundamentals, such as excitation of graphene plasmon polartions [1], pushing graphene plasmons to low wavelengths, and investigating of graphene plasmon-phonon interactions [2] and light-matter interactions in graphene-metal hybrid structures [3]. Then I will discuss graphene-based optical modulators......, particularly focusing on graphene-silicon platforms for electro-absorption modulating...

  8. Production of high quality sodium iodide preparations labelled with carrier free iodine-125

    Abdukayumov, M.N.; Chistyakov, P.G.; Shilin, E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Work is related to the problem of high-quality Sodium Iodide preparation production and to the choice of the peptids iodination methods with the purpose of control test developing to determine the Biological activity of the above mentioned preparation

  9. The Role of Dosimetry in High-Quality EMI Risk Assessment

    2006-01-01

    The Final Proceedings for The role of EMF dosimetry in high quality risk assessment 13 September 2006 - 15 September 2006 In the last three decades the use of devices that emit electromagnetic fields (EMF...

  10. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    N-C Yeh; C-C Hsu; M L Teague; J-Q Wang; D A Boyd; C-C Chen

    2016-01-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simula-tions and nano-fabrication technology.

  11. Graphene: from functionalization to devices

    Tejeda, Antonio; Soukiassian, Patrick G.

    2014-03-01

    The year 2014 marks the first decade of the rise of graphene. Graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon atoms in sp2 bonding configuration having a honeycomb structure, has now become a well-known and well-established material. Among some of its many outstanding fundamental properties, one can mention a very high carrier mobility, a very large spin diffusion length, unsurpassed mechanical properties as graphene is the strongest material ever measured and an exceptional thermal conductivity scaling more than one order of magnitude above that of copper. After the first years of the graphene rush, graphene growth is now well controlled using various methods like epitaxial growth on silicon carbide substrate, chemical vapour deposition (CVD) or plasma techniques on metal, insulator or semiconductor substrates. More applied research is now taking over the initial studies on graphene production. Indeed, graphene is a promising material for many advanced applications such as, but not limited to, electronic, spintronics, sensors, photonics, micro/nano-electromechanical (MEMS/NEMS) systems, super-capacitors or touch-screen technologies. In this context, this Special Issue of the Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics on graphene reviews some of the recent achievements, progress and prospects in this field. It includes a collection of seventeen invited articles covering the current status and future prospects of some selected topics of strong current interest. This Special Issue is organized in four sections. The first section is dedicated to graphene devices, and opens with an article by de Heer et al on an investigation of integrating graphene devices with silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Then, a study by Svintsov et al proposes a lateral all-graphene tunnel field-effect transistor (FET) with a high on/off current switching ratio. Next, Tsukagoshi et al present how a band-gap opening occurs in a graphene bilayer by using a perpendicular

  12. Universal and rapid salt-extraction of high quality genomic DNA for PCR-based techniques.

    Aljanabi, S M; Martinez, I

    1997-01-01

    A very simple, fast, universally applicable and reproducible method to extract high quality megabase genomic DNA from different organisms is described. We applied the same method to extract high quality complex genomic DNA from different tissues (wheat, barley, potato, beans, pear and almond leaves as well as fungi, insects and shrimps' fresh tissue) without any modification. The method does not require expensive and environmentally hazardous reagents and equipment. It can be performed even i...

  13. [Quality management is associated with high quality services in health care].

    Nielsen, Tenna Hassert; Riis, Allan; Mainz, Jan; Jensen, Anne-Louise Degn

    2013-12-09

    In these years, quality management has been the focus in order to meet high quality services for the patients in Danish health care. This article provides information on quality management and quality improvement and it evaluates its effectiveness in achieving better organizational structures, processes and results in Danish health-care organizations. Our findings generally support that quality management is associated with high quality services in health care.

  14. Lithium Mediated Benzene Adsorption on Graphene and Graphene Nanoribbons

    Krepel, Dana; Hod, Oded

    2013-01-01

    The anchoring of benzene molecules on lithium adsorption sites at the surface of graphene and nanoribbons thereof are investigated. The effects of adsorbate densities, specific adsorption locations, and spin states on the structural stability and electronic properties of the underlying graphene derivatives are revealed. At sufficiently high densities, bare lithium adsorption turns armchair graphene nanoribbons metallic and their zigzag counterparts half-metallic due to charge transfer from th...

  15. Effect of Graphene-EC on Ag NW-Based Transparent Film Heaters: Optimizing the Stability and Heat Dispersion of Films.

    Cao, Minghui; Wang, Minqiang; Li, Le; Qiu, Hengwei; Yang, Zhi

    2018-01-10

    To optimize the performance of silver nanowire (Ag NW) film heaters and explore the effect of graphene on a film, we introduced poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and graphene modified with ethyl cellulose (graphene-EC) into the film. The high-quality and well-dispersed graphene-EC was synthesized from graphene obtained by electrochemical exfoliation as a precursor. The transparent film heaters were fabricated via spin-coating. With the assistance of graphene-EC, the stability of film heaters was greatly improved, and the conductivity was optimized by adjusting the Ag NW concentration. The film heaters exhibited a fast and accurate response to voltage, accompanied by excellent environmental endurance, and there was no significant performance degradation after being operated for a long period of time. These results indicate that graphene-EC plays a crucial role in optimizing film stability and heat dispersion in the film. The Ag NW/PEDOT:PSS-doped graphene-EC film heaters show a great potential in low-cost indium-tin-oxide-free flexible transparent electrodes, heating systems, and transparent film heaters.

  16. Mechanical cleaning of graphene

    Goossens, A.M.; Calado, V.E.; Barreiro, A.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.

    2012-01-01

    Contamination of graphene due to residues from nanofabrication often introduces background doping and reduces electron mobility. For samples of high electronic quality, post-lithography cleaning treatments are therefore needed. We report that mechanical cleaning based on contact mode atomic force

  17. Bubbles in graphene

    Settnes, Mikkel; Power, Stephen; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Strain-induced deformations in graphene are predicted to give rise to large pseudomagnetic fields. We examine theoretically the case of gas-inflated bubbles to determine whether signatures of such fields are present in the local density of states. Sharp-edged bubbles are found to induce Friedel...

  18. Nanostructured graphene for spintronics

    Gregersen, Søren Schou; Power, Stephen; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2017-01-01

    Zigzag edges of the honeycomb structure of graphene exhibit magnetic polarization, making them attractive as building blocks for spintronic devices. Here, we show that devices with zigzag-edged triangular antidots perform essential spintronic functionalities, such as spatial spin splitting or spin...

  19. Graphene Synthesis and Characterization

    2015-04-08

    aplications in devices, because can be properly scaled to industrial level. It was studied the experimental parameters involved in the growth of graphene...Balakrishnan, T. Lei, H. R. Kim, Y. I. Song, Y.-J. Kim, K. S. Kim, B. Özyilmaz, J:-H Ahn, B. H. Hong and S. Iijima, Nature Nanotechnology , 5, 574, 2010. Roll

  20. Graphene oxide for gas detection under standard humidity conditions

    Donarelli, Maurizio; Prezioso, Stefano; Perrozzi, Francesco; Ottaviano, Luca; Giancaterini, Luca; Cantalini, Carlo; Treossi, Emanuele; Palermo, Vincenzo; Santucci, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) synthesis is the easiest way to functionalize graphene, preserving the high graphene surface to volume ratio. Therefore, GO is a promising candidate for gas sensing applications. In this paper, an easy-to-fabricate and high sensitivity GO-based gas sensor is proposed. The device is fabricated by drop-casting a solution of GO flakes dispersed in water on a prepatterned Si 3 N 4 substrate with 30 μm spaced Pt electrodes. The sensing material has been studied using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The large lateral dimensions of the flakes (tens of microns) allow single GO flake to bridge adjacent electrodes. The high quality of the synthesized flakes results in the gas sensor high sensitivity to and low detection limit (20 ppb) of NO 2 . The gas sensor response to NO 2 has been studied in various relative humidity environments and it is demonstrated not to be affected by the presence of water vapor. Finally, the gas sensor responses to acetone, toluene, ethanol, and ammonia are reported. (paper)

  1. Plasmon polaritons in nanostructured graphene

    Xiao, Sanshui

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has attracted considerable attention due to its unique electronic and optical properties. When graphene is electrically/chemically doped, it can support surface plasmon where the light propagates along the surface with a very short wavelength and an extremely small mode volume. The optical...... properties of graphene can be tuned by electrical gating, thus proving a promising way to realize a tunable plasmonic material. We firstly investigate the performance of bends and splitters in graphene nanoribbon waveguides, and show that bends and splitters do not induce any additional loss provided...... that the nanoribbon width is sub-wavelength. Then we experimentally demonstrate the excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons in a continuous graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating. The silicon grating is realized by a nanosphere lithography technique with a self...

  2. Graphene-ionic liquid composites

    Aksay, Ilhan A.; Korkut, Sibel; Pope, Michael; Punckt, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Method of making a graphene-ionic liquid composite. The composite can be used to make elec-trodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and supercapacitors. Dis-closed and claimed herein is method of making a graphene-ionic liquid com-posite, comprising combining a graphene source with at least one ionic liquid and heating the combination at a temperature of at least about 130 .degree. C.

  3. Screening in graphene antidot lattices

    Schultz, Marco Haller; Jauho, A. P.; Pedersen, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    We compute the dynamical polarization function for a graphene antidot lattice in the random-phase approximation. The computed polarization functions display a much more complicated structure than what is found for pristine graphene (even when evaluated beyond the Dirac-cone approximation...... the plasmon dispersion law and find an approximate square-root dependence with a suppressed plasmon frequency as compared to doped graphene. The plasmon dispersion is nearly isotropic and the developed approximation schemes agree well with the full calculation....

  4. From graphene synthesis to applications

    Cirillo, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    2012-2013 Graphene is the first two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystal available to us. Since its discovery in 2004, graphene has captured the attention and the imagination of worldwide researchers thank to its supreme properties. Catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) is a widely employed method to synthesize large areas graphene on metal foil or to cover nanoparticles (NPs) with carbon coating. Exfoliation of graphite is largely used for the massive production of flak...

  5. Metal-assisted exfoliation (MAE): green, roll-to-roll compatible method for transferring graphene to flexible substrates

    Zaretski, Aliaksandr V; Moetazedi, Herad; Kong, Casey; Sawyer, Eric J; Savagatrup, Suchol; Valle, Eduardo; O’Connor, Timothy F; Printz, Adam D; Lipomi, Darren J

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is expected to play a significant role in future technologies that span a range from consumer electronics, to devices for the conversion and storage of energy, to conformable biomedical devices for healthcare. To realize these applications, however, a low-cost method of synthesizing large areas of high-quality graphene is required. Currently, the only method to generate large-area single-layer graphene that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing destroys approximately 300 kg of copper foil (thickness = 25 μm) for every 1 g of graphene produced. This paper describes a new environmentally benign and scalable process of transferring graphene to flexible substrates. The process is based on the preferential adhesion of certain thin metallic films to graphene; separation of the graphene from the catalytic copper foil is followed by lamination to a flexible target substrate in a process that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing. The copper substrate is indefinitely reusable and the method is substantially greener than the current process that uses relatively large amounts of corrosive etchants to remove the copper. The sheet resistance of the graphene produced by this new process is unoptimized but should be comparable in principle to that produced by the standard method, given the defects observable by Raman spectroscopy and the presence of process-induced cracks. With further improvements, this green, inexpensive synthesis of single-layer graphene could enable applications in flexible, stretchable, and disposable electronics, low-profile and lightweight barrier materials, and in large-area displays and photovoltaic modules. (paper)

  6. Metal-assisted exfoliation (MAE): green, roll-to-roll compatible method for transferring graphene to flexible substrates

    Zaretski, Aliaksandr V.; Moetazedi, Herad; Kong, Casey; Sawyer, Eric J.; Savagatrup, Suchol; Valle, Eduardo; O'Connor, Timothy F.; Printz, Adam D.; Lipomi, Darren J.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is expected to play a significant role in future technologies that span a range from consumer electronics, to devices for the conversion and storage of energy, to conformable biomedical devices for healthcare. To realize these applications, however, a low-cost method of synthesizing large areas of high-quality graphene is required. Currently, the only method to generate large-area single-layer graphene that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing destroys approximately 300 kg of copper foil (thickness = 25 μm) for every 1 g of graphene produced. This paper describes a new environmentally benign and scalable process of transferring graphene to flexible substrates. The process is based on the preferential adhesion of certain thin metallic films to graphene; separation of the graphene from the catalytic copper foil is followed by lamination to a flexible target substrate in a process that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing. The copper substrate is indefinitely reusable and the method is substantially greener than the current process that uses relatively large amounts of corrosive etchants to remove the copper. The sheet resistance of the graphene produced by this new process is unoptimized but should be comparable in principle to that produced by the standard method, given the defects observable by Raman spectroscopy and the presence of process-induced cracks. With further improvements, this green, inexpensive synthesis of single-layer graphene could enable applications in flexible, stretchable, and disposable electronics, low-profile and lightweight barrier materials, and in large-area displays and photovoltaic modules.

  7. Dry-cleaning of graphene

    Algara-Siller, Gerardo; Lehtinen, Ossi; Kaiser, Ute; Turchanin, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the structural and electronic properties of graphene in its pristine state are hindered by hydrocarbon contamination on the surfaces. Also, in many applications, contamination reduces the performance of graphene. Contamination is introduced during sample preparation and is adsorbed also directly from air. Here, we report on the development of a simple dry-cleaning method for producing large atomically clean areas in free-standing graphene. The cleanness of graphene is proven using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy

  8. Dry-cleaning of graphene

    Algara-Siller, Gerardo [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, Group of Electron Microscopy of Materials Science, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Technical University Ilmenau, Weimarer Strasse 25, Ilmenau 98693 (Germany); Lehtinen, Ossi; Kaiser, Ute, E-mail: ute.kaiser@uni-ulm.de [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, Group of Electron Microscopy of Materials Science, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Turchanin, Andrey [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld, Universitätsstr. 25, Bielefeld 33615 (Germany)

    2014-04-14

    Studies of the structural and electronic properties of graphene in its pristine state are hindered by hydrocarbon contamination on the surfaces. Also, in many applications, contamination reduces the performance of graphene. Contamination is introduced during sample preparation and is adsorbed also directly from air. Here, we report on the development of a simple dry-cleaning method for producing large atomically clean areas in free-standing graphene. The cleanness of graphene is proven using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy.

  9. Graphene-based photonic crystal

    Berman, Oleg L.; Boyko, Vladimir S.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Kolesnikov, Anton A.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of photonic crystal formed by embedding a periodic array of constituent stacks of alternating graphene and dielectric discs into a background dielectric medium is proposed. The photonic band structure and transmittance of such photonic crystal are calculated. The graphene-based photonic crystals can be used effectively as the frequency filters and waveguides for the far infrared region of electromagnetic spectrum. Due to substantial suppression of absorption of low-frequency radiation in doped graphene the damping and skin effect in the photonic crystal are also suppressed. The advantages of the graphene-based photonic crystal are discussed.

  10. Graphene hyperlens for terahertz radiation

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Chigrin, Dmitry N.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a graphene hyperlens for the terahertz (THz) range. We employ and numerically examine a structured graphene-dielectric multilayered stack that is an analog of a metallic wire medium. As an example of the graphene hyperlens in action, we demonstrate an imaging of two point sources...... separated by a distance λ0/5. An advantage of such a hyperlens as compared to a metallic one is the tunability of its properties by changing the chemical potential of graphene. We also propose a method to retrieve the hyperbolic dispersion, check the effective medium approximation, and retrieve...

  11. An Introduction to Graphene Plasmonics

    Gonçalves, P.A.D.; Peres, N. M. R.

    This book is meant as an introduction to graphene plasmonics and aims at the advanced undergraduate and graduate students entering the field of plasmonics in graphene. In it different theoretical methods are introduced, starting with an elementary description of graphene plasmonics and evolving...... the chapters to get acquainted with the field of plasmonics in graphene or reading the chapters and studying the appendices to get a working knowledge of the topic. The study of the material in this book will bring the students to the forefront of the research in this field....

  12. Graphene-based energy devices

    Yusoff, A Rashid bin Mohd

    2015-01-01

    This first book dedicated to the topic provides an up-to-date account of the many opportunities graphene offers for robust, workable energy generation and storage devices. Following a brief overview of the fundamentals of graphene, including the main synthesis techniques, characterization methods and properties, the first part goes on to deal with graphene for energy storage applications, such as lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors and hydrogen storage. The second part is concerned with graphene-based energy-generation devices, in particular conventional as well as microbial and enzymatic f

  13. Three-dimensional graphene based passively mode-locked fiber laser.

    Yang, Y; Loeblein, M; Tsang, S H; Chow, K K; Teo, E H T

    2014-12-15

    We present an all-fiber passively mode-locked fiber laser incorporating three-dimensional (3D) graphene as a saturable absorber (SA) for the first time to the best of our knowledge. The 3D graphene is synthesized by template-directed chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The SA is then simply formed by sandwiching the freestanding 3D graphene between two conventional fiber connectors without any deposition process. It is demonstrated that such 3D graphene based SA is capable to produce high quality mode-locked pulses. A passively mode-locked fiber laser is constructed and stable output pulses with a fundamental repetition rate of ~9.9 MHz and a pulse width of ~1 ps are generated from the fiber laser. The average output power of the laser is ~10.5 mW while the output pulse is operating at single pulse region. The results imply that the freestanding 3D graphene can be applied as an effective saturable absorption material for passively mode-locked lasers.

  14. Defect mediated van der Waals epitaxy of hexagonal boron nitride on graphene

    Heilmann, M.; Bashouti, M.; Riechert, H.; Lopes, J. M. J.

    2018-04-01

    Van der Waals heterostructures comprising of hexagonal boron nitride and graphene are promising building blocks for novel two-dimensional devices such as atomically thin transistors or capacitors. However, demonstrators of those devices have been so far mostly fabricated by mechanical assembly, a non-scalable and time-consuming method, where transfer processes can contaminate the surfaces. Here, we investigate a direct growth process for the fabrication of insulating hexagonal boron nitride on high quality epitaxial graphene using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Samples were grown at varying temperatures and times and studied using atomic force microscopy, revealing a growth process limited by desorption at high temperatures. Nucleation was mostly commencing from morphological defects in epitaxial graphene, such as step edges or wrinkles. Raman spectroscopy combined with x-ray photoelectron measurements confirm the formation of hexagonal boron nitride and prove the resilience of graphene against the nitrogen plasma used during the growth process. The electrical properties and defects in the heterostructures were studied with high lateral resolution by tunneling current and Kelvin probe force measurements. This correlated approach revealed a nucleation apart from morphological defects in epitaxial graphene, which is mediated by point defects. The presented results help understanding the nucleation and growth behavior during van der Waals epitaxy of 2D materials, and point out a route for a scalable production of van der Waals heterostructures.

  15. Generalized syntheses of nanocrystal-graphene hybrids in high-boiling-point organic solvents.

    Pang, Danny Wei-Ping; Yuan, Fang-Wei; Chang, Yan-Cheng; Li, Guo-An; Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    2012-08-07

    Nanocrystal-graphene have been proposed as a new kind of promising hybrid for a wide range of application areas including catalysts, electronics, sensors, biomedicine, and energy storage, etc. Although a variety of methods have been developed for the preparation of hybrids, a facile and general synthetic approach is still highly required. In this study, nanocrystal-graphene hybrids were successfully synthesized in high-boiling-point organic solvents. Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were modified by oleylamine (OLA) to form a OLA-GO complex in order to be readily incorporated into hydrophobic synthesis. A rich library of highly crystalline nanocrystals, with types including noble metal, metal oxide, magnetic material and semiconductor were successfully grown on chemically converted graphene (CCG), which is simultaneously reduced from GO during the synthesis. High boiling-point solvents afford sufficient thermal energy to assure the high-quality crystalline nature of NCs, therefore the post-annealing process is obviated. Controlled experiments revealed that OLA-GO triggers heterogeneous nucleation and serves as excellent nuclei anchorage media. The protocol developed here brings one step closer to achieve "unity in diversity" on the preparation of nanocrystal-graphene hybrids.

  16. In-situ sequential laser transfer and laser reduction of graphene oxide films

    Papazoglou, S.; Petridis, C.; Kymakis, E.; Kennou, S.; Raptis, Y. S.; Chatzandroulis, S.; Zergioti, I.

    2018-04-01

    Achieving high quality transfer of graphene on selected substrates is a priority in device fabrication, especially where drop-on-demand applications are involved. In this work, we report an in-situ, fast, simple, and one step process that resulted in the reduction, transfer, and fabrication of reduced graphene oxide-based humidity sensors, using picosecond laser pulses. By tuning the laser illumination parameters, we managed to implement the sequential printing and reduction of graphene oxide flakes. The overall process lasted only a few seconds compared to a few hours that our group has previously published. DC current measurements, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Raman Spectroscopy were employed in order to assess the efficiency of our approach. To demonstrate the applicability and the potential of the technique, laser printed reduced graphene oxide humidity sensors with a limit of detection of 1700 ppm are presented. The results demonstrated in this work provide a selective, rapid, and low-cost approach for sequential transfer and photochemical reduction of graphene oxide micro-patterns onto various substrates for flexible electronics and sensor applications.

  17. Fluorescent biosensors enabled by graphene and graphene oxide.

    Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Honglu; Aldalbahi, Ali; Zuo, Xiaolei; Fan, Chunhai; Mi, Xianqiang

    2017-03-15

    During the past few years, graphene and graphene oxide (GO) have attracted numerous attentions for the potential applications in various fields from energy technology, biosensing to biomedical diagnosis and therapy due to their various functionalization, high volume surface ratio, unique physical and electrical properties. Among which, graphene and graphene oxide based fluorescent biosensors enabled by their fluorescence-quenching properties have attracted great interests. The fluorescence of fluorophore or dye labeled on probes (such as molecular beacon, aptamer, DNAzymes and so on) was quenched after adsorbed on to the surface of graphene. While in the present of the targets, due to the strong interactions between probes and targets, the probes were detached from the surface of graphene, generating dramatic fluorescence, which could be used as signals for detection of the targets. This strategy was simple and economy, together with great programmable abilities of probes; we could realize detection of different kinds of species. In this review, we first briefly introduced the history of graphene and graphene oxide, and then summarized the fluorescent biosensors enabled by graphene and GO, with a detailed account of the design mechanism and comparison with other nanomaterials (e.g. carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles). Following that, different sensing platforms for detection of DNAs, ions, biomolecules and pathogens or cells as well as the cytotoxicity issue of graphene and GO based in vivo biosensing were further discussed. We hope that this review would do some help to researchers who are interested in graphene related biosening research work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. EDITORIAL: Special issue on Graphene Special issue on Graphene

    Morpurgo, Alberto F.; Trauzettel, Björn

    2010-03-01

    Since the revolutionary experimental discovery of graphene in the year 2004, research on this new two-dimensional carbon allotrope has progressed at a spectacular pace. The impact of graphene on different areas of research— including physics, chemistry, and applied sciences— is only now starting to be fully appreciated. There are different factors that make graphene a truly impressive system. Regarding nano-electronics and related fields, for instance, it is the exceptional electronic and mechanical properties that yield very high room-temperature mobility values, due to the particular band structure, the material `cleanliness' (very low-concentration of impurities), as well as its stiffness. Also interesting is the possibility to have a high electrical conductivity and optical transparency, a combination which cannot be easily found in other material systems. For other fields, other properties could be mentioned, many of which are currently being explored. In the first years following this discovery, research on graphene has mainly focused on the fundamental physics aspects, triggered by the fact that electrons in graphene behave as Dirac fermions due to their interaction with the ions of the honeycomb lattice. This direction has led to the discovery of new phenomena such as Klein tunneling in a solid state system and the so-called half-integer quantum Hall effect due to a special type of Berry phase that appears in graphene. It has also led to the appreciation of thicker layers of graphene, which also have outstanding new properties of great interest in their own right (e.g., bilayer graphene, which supports chiral quasiparticles that, contrary to Dirac electrons, are not massless). Now the time is coming to deepen our knowledge and improve our control of the material properties, which is a key aspect to take one step further towards applications. The articles in the Semiconductor Science and Technology Graphene special issue deal with a diversity of topics

  19. Interlayer shear of nanomaterials: Graphene-graphene, boron nitride-boron nitride and graphene-boron nitride

    Yinfeng Li; Weiwei Zhang; Bill Guo; Dibakar Datta

    2017-01-01

    In this paper,the interlayer sliding between graphene and boron nitride (h-BN) is studied by molecular dynamics simulations.The interlayer shear force between h-BN/h-BN is found to be six times higher than that of graphene/graphene,while the interlayer shear between graphene/h-BN is approximate to that of graphene/graphene.The graphene/h-BN heterostructure shows several anomalous interlayer shear characteristics compared to its bilayer counterparts.For graphene/graphene and h-BN/h-BN,interlayer shears only exit along the sliding direction while interlayer shear for graphene/h-BN is observed along both the translocation and perpendicular directions.Our results provide significant insight into the interlayer shear characteristics of 2D nanomaterials.

  20. Solvent exfoliated graphene for reinforcement of PMMA composites prepared by in situ polymerization

    Wang, Jialiang; Shi, Zixing; Ge, Yu; Wang, Yan; Fan, Jinchen; Yin, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Graphene (GP)-based polymer nanocomposites have attracted considerable scientific attention due to its pronounced improvement in mechanical, thermal and electrical properties compared with pure polymers. However, the preparation of well-dispersed and high-quality GP reinforced polymer composites remains a challenge. In this paper, a simple and facile approach for preparation of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) functionalized GP (GPMMA) via in situ free radical polymerization is reported. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), Raman, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) are used to confirm the successful grafting of PMMA chains onto the GP sheets. Composite films are prepared by incorporating different amounts of GPMMA into the PMMA matrix through solution-casting method. Compared with pure PMMA, PMMA/GPMMA composites show simultaneously improved Young's modulus, tensile stress, elongation at break and thermal stability by addition of only 0.5 wt% GPMMA. The excellent reinforcement is attributed to good dispersion of high-quality GPMMA and strong interfacial adhesion between GPMMA and PMMA matrix as evidenced by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the fracture surfaces. Consequently, this simple protocol has great potential in the preparation of various high-performance polymer composites. Highlights: ► Functionalization of solvent exfoliated graphene by in situ polymerization. ► A simple and scalable method for preparing high-quality graphene. ► Functionalized graphene can be well-dispersed and have a strong interfacial adhesion with the polymer matrix. ► The nanocomposites exhibit a remarkable improvement of thermal and mechanical properties.

  1. Combustion synthesis of graphene and ultracapacitor performance

    Graphene sheets are synthesized by a simple method starting from graphitic oxide as a precursor. Reaction of graphitic oxide at 250 °C with a combustion mixture of urea and ammonium nitrate results in the formation of thin graphene sheets. Graphene formation is characterized by XRD, TGA, XPS and TEM. Graphene ...

  2. PHYTOTOXICOLOGICAL TESTS - APPLICATIONS OF FOILS BASED ON GRAPHENE (GRAPHENE OXIDE

    Petra ROUPCOVÁ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the problematics of phytotoxicity of chemicals. It mainly focuses on the phytotoxicity of nanomaterials made of graphene. It describes phytotoxicological tests performed with foils from materials belonging to the graphene family. It also describes testing the influence of plants on these films. Furthermore, the paper discusses the issues of mutual influence between plants and tested nanomaterials.

  3. Optimization of Graphene Conductive Ink with 73 wt% Graphene Contents.

    Xu, Chang-Yan; Shi, Xiao-Mei; Guo, Lu; Wang, Xi; Wang, Xin-Yi; Li, Jian-Yu

    2018-06-01

    With the pace of development accelerating in printed electronics, the fabrication and application of conductive ink have been brought into sharp focus in recent years. The discovery of graphene also unfolded a vigorous research campaign. In this paper, we prepared graphene conductive ink and explored the feasibility of applying the ink to flexible paper-based circuit. Since experimental study concentrating upon ink formulation was insufficient, orthogonal test design was used in the optimization of preparation formula of conductive ink for the first time. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of constituent dosage on conductivity of graphene conductive ink, so as to obtain the optimized formula and prepare graphene conductive ink with good conductivity. Characterization of optimized graphene conductive ink we fabricated showed good adhesion to substrate and good resistance to acid and water. The graphene concentration of the optimized ink reached 73.17 wt% solid content. Particle size distribution of graphene conductive ink was uniform, which was about 1940 nm. Static surface tension was 28.9 mN/m and equilibrium contact angle was 23°, demonstrating that conductive ink had good wettability. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis was also investigated, moreover, the feasibility of lightening a light-emitting diode (LED) light was verified. The graphene conductive ink with optimized formula can be stored for almost eight months, which had potential applications in flexible paper-based circuit in the future.

  4. Application of graphene oxide in water treatment

    Liu, Yongchen

    2017-11-01

    Graphene oxide has good hydrophilicity and has been tried to use it into thin films for water treatment in recent years. In this paper, the preparation methods of graphene oxide membrane are reviewed, including vacuum suction filtration, spray coating, spin coating, dip coating and the layer by layer method. Secondly, the mechanism of mass transfer of graphene membrane is introduced in detail. The application of the graphene oxide membrane, modified graphene oxide membrane and graphene hybrid membranes were discussed in RO, vaporization, nanofiltration and other aspects. Finally, the development and application of graphene membrane in water treatment were discussed.

  5. Graphene energy storage and conversion applications

    Liu, Zhaoping

    2014-01-01

    Series PrefacePrefaceAuthorsGraphene Overview; Xufeng Zhou, Wei Wang, and Zhaoping LiuSynthesis of Graphene; Wei Wang, Hailiang Cao, Xufeng Zhou, and Zhaoping LiuApplications of Graphene in Lithium Ion Batteries; Xufeng Zhou and Zhaoping LiuApplications of Graphene in New-Concept Batteries; Xufeng Zhou and Zhaoping LiuApplications of Graphene in Supercapacitors; Chao Zheng, Xufeng Zhou, Hailiang Cao, and Zhaoping LiuApplications of Graphene in Solar Cells; Fuqiang Huang, Dongyun Wan, Hui Bi, and Tianquan LinApplications of Graphene in Fuel Cells; Xuejun Zhou, Jinli Qiao, and Yuyu LiuIndex.

  6. Preparation of dispersible graphene through organic functionalization of graphene using a zwitterion intermediate cycloaddition approach

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2012-01-01

    Highly functionalized graphene were obtained through a zwitterion intermediate cycloaddition onto exfoliated graphene flakes under new reaction conditions. The functionalized graphene obtained formed stable dispersions in common solvents, including dimethylformamide (DMF), CHCl3 and water. Its

  7. Graphene/Pentacene Barristor with Ion-Gel Gate Dielectric: Flexible Ambipolar Transistor with High Mobility and On/Off Ratio.

    Oh, Gwangtaek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeon, Ji Hoon; Won, EunA; Son, Jong Wan; Lee, Duk Hyun; Kim, Cheol Kyeom; Jang, Jingon; Lee, Takhee; Park, Bae Ho

    2015-07-28

    High-quality channel layer is required for next-generation flexible electronic devices. Graphene is a good candidate due to its high carrier mobility and unique ambipolar transport characteristics but typically shows a low on/off ratio caused by gapless band structure. Popularly investigated organic semiconductors, such as pentacene, suffer from poor carrier mobility. Here, we propose a graphene/pentacene channel layer with high-k ion-gel gate dielectric. The graphene/pentacene device shows both high on/off ratio and carrier mobility as well as excellent mechanical flexibility. Most importantly, it reveals ambipolar behaviors and related negative differential resistance, which are controlled by external bias. Therefore, our graphene/pentacene barristor with ion-gel gate dielectric can offer various flexible device applications with high performances.

  8. One-step synthesis of graphene-Au nanoparticle hybrid materials from metal salt-loaded micelles

    Liu, X; Zhang, X W; Meng, J H; Wang, H L; Yin, Z G; Wu, J L; Gao, H L

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present a facile one-step method to synthesize graphene-Au nanoparticle (NP) hybrid materials by using HAuCl 4 -loaded poly(styrene)-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-P2VP) micelles as solid carbon sources. N-doped graphene with controllable thickness can be grown from PS-P2VP micelles covered by a Ni capping layer by an annealing process; simultaneously, the HAuCl 4 in the micelles were reduced into Au NPs under a reductive atmosphere to form Au NPs on graphene. The decoration of Au NPs leads to an obviously enhanced electrical conductivity and a slightly increased work function of graphene due to the electron transfer effect. The graphene-Au NP hybrid materials also exhibit a localized surface plasmon resonance feature of Au NPs. This work provides a novel and accessible route for the one-step synthesis of graphene-Au NP hybrid materials with high quality, which might be useful for future applications in optoelectronic devices. (paper)

  9. Graphene interfaced perovskite solar cells: Role of graphene flake size

    Sakorikar, Tushar; Kavitha, M. K.; Tong, Shi Wun; Vayalamkuzhi, Pramitha; Loh, Kian Ping; Jaiswal, Manu

    2018-04-01

    Graphene interfaced inverted planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells are fabricated by facile solution method and studied its potential as hole conducting layer. Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with small and large flake size and Polyethylenedioxythiophene:polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) are utilized as hole conducting layers in different devices. For the solar cell employing PEDOT:PSS as hole conducting layer, 3.8 % photoconversion efficiency is achieved. In case of solar cells fabricated with rGO as hole conducting layer, the efficiency of the device is strongly dependent on flake size. With all other fabrication conditions kept constant, the efficiency of graphene-interfaced solar cell improves by a factor of 6, by changing the flake size of graphene oxide. We attribute this effect to uniform coverage of graphene layer and improved electrical percolation network.

  10. Anomalous friction of graphene nanoribbons on waved graphenes

    Jun Fang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Friction plays a critical role in the function and maintenance of small-scale structures, where the conventional Coulomb friction law often fails. To probe the friction at small scales, here we present a molecular dynamics study on the process of dragging graphene nanoribbons on waved graphene substrates. The simulation shows that the induced friction on graphene with zero waviness is ultra-low and closely related to the surface energy barrier. On waved graphenes, the friction generally increases with the amplitude of the wave at a fixed period, but anomalously increases and then decreases with the period at a fixed amplitude. These findings provide insights into the ultra-low friction at small scales, as well as some guidelines into the fabrication of graphene-based nano-composites with high performance.

  11. Chemical Functionalization of Graphene Family Members

    Vacchi, Isabella Anna; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Bianco, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Thanks to their outstanding physicochemical properties, graphene and its derivatives are interesting nanomaterials with a high potential in several fields. Graphene, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide, however, differ partially in their characteristics due to their diverse surface composition. Those differences influence the chemical reactivity of these materials. In the following chapter the reactivity and main functionalization reactions performed on graphene, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide are discussed. A part is also dedicated to the main analytical techniques used for characterization of these materials. Functionalization of graphene and its derivatives is highly important to modulate their characteristics and design graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. Functionalization can be covalent by forming strong and stable bonds with the graphene surface, or non-covalent via π-π, electrostatic, hydrophobic, and/or van der Waals interactions. Both types of functionalization are currently exploited.

  12. Thermal conductivity of graphene with defects induced by electron beam irradiation

    Malekpour, Hoda; Ramnani, Pankaj; Srinivasan, Srilok; Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Nika, Denis L.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Lake, Roger K.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is analyzed using the Boltzmann transport equation and molecular dynamics simulations. The results are important for understanding phonon - point defect scattering in two-dimensional systems and for practical applications of graphene in thermal management.We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is

  13. Doped graphene supercapacitors

    Ashok Kumar, Nanjundan; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-12-01

    Heteroatom-doped graphitic frameworks have received great attention in energy research, since doping endows graphitic structures with a wide spectrum of properties, especially critical for electrochemical supercapacitors, which tend to complement or compete with the current lithium-ion battery technology/devices. This article reviews the latest developments in the chemical modification/doping strategies of graphene and highlights the versatility of such heteroatom-doped graphitic structures. Their role as supercapacitor electrodes is discussed in detail. This review is specifically focused on the concept of material synthesis, techniques for electrode fabrication and metrics of performance, predominantly covering the last four years. Challenges and insights into the future research and perspectives on the development of novel electrode architectures for electrochemical supercapacitors based on doped graphene are also discussed.

  14. Doped graphene supercapacitors

    Kumar, Nanjundan Ashok; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Heteroatom-doped graphitic frameworks have received great attention in energy research, since doping endows graphitic structures with a wide spectrum of properties, especially critical for electrochemical supercapacitors, which tend to complement or compete with the current lithium-ion battery technology/devices. This article reviews the latest developments in the chemical modification/doping strategies of graphene and highlights the versatility of such heteroatom-doped graphitic structures. Their role as supercapacitor electrodes is discussed in detail. This review is specifically focused on the concept of material synthesis, techniques for electrode fabrication and metrics of performance, predominantly covering the last four years. Challenges and insights into the future research and perspectives on the development of novel electrode architectures for electrochemical supercapacitors based on doped graphene are also discussed. (topical review)

  15. Electromechanics of graphene spirals

    Korhonen, Topi; Koskinen, Pekka, E-mail: pekka.koskinen@iki.fi [NanoScience Center, Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, 40014 Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2014-12-15

    Among the most fascinating nanostructure morphologies are spirals, hybrids of somewhat obscure topology and dimensionality with technologically attractive properties. Here, we investigate mechanical and electromechanical properties of graphene spirals upon elongation by using density-functional tight-binding, continuum elasticity theory, and classical force field molecular dynamics. It turns out that electronic properties are governed by interlayer interactions as opposed to strain effects. The structural behavior is governed by van der Waals interaction: in its absence spirals unfold with equidistant layer spacings, ripple formation at spiral perimeter, and steadily increasing axial force; in its presence, on the contrary, spirals unfold via smooth local peeling, complex geometries, and nearly constant axial force. These electromechanical trends ought to provide useful guidelines not only for additional theoretical investigations but also for forthcoming experiments on graphene spirals.

  16. High Quality RNA Isolation from Leaf, Shell, Root Tissues and Callus of Hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.

    Hossein Khosravi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of high quality RNA is a critical step in molecular genetics studies. Hazelnut is one of the most important nuts plants in the world. The presence of the taxol and other taxanes in hazelnut plant necessitates explaining their biosynthesis pathway and identifying the candidate genes. Therefore, an easy and practical method is necessary for RNA extraction from hazelnuts. Hazelnut has high levels of phenolic compounds. High amounts of polyphenolic and polysaccharide compounds in plants could be causing problems in RNA extraction procedures.  To avoid these problems, a simple and efficient method can be used based on cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB extraction buffer and lithium chloride for extraction of high quality RNA from different parts of hazelnut plant. Using this method, a high-quality RNA sample (light absorbed in the A260/A280 was 2.04

  17. Development of a high-quality cut-off wall using electrophoresis

    Kawachi, T.; Murahashi, H.

    1991-01-01

    Techniques to build a high-quality cut-off wall have been developed for storage facilities of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) as an emergency measures to prevent leakages. The cut-off wall is highly impermeable, nucleid-adsorptive and have long-term durability. Electrophoresis is used to form impermeable membrane of bentonite as main features of the cut-off wall. First of all, laboratory tests have been conducted to study ways of building barriers on site and to collect data on the barriers properties. Afterwards, on-site construction tests of a high-quality cut-off wall have been carried out. In this paper, we describe the process and results on the studies of the high-quality cut-off wall using electrophoresis

  18. KOH modified graphene nanosheets for supercapacitor electrodes

    Li, Yueming; van Zijll, Marshall; Chiang, Shirley; Pan, Ning

    Chemical modification of graphene nanosheets by KOH was examined as a way to enhance the specific capacity of graphene nanosheets in supercapacitor. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to investigate the effects of the treatment on the surface of the graphene nanosheets. The specific capacitance of 136 F g -1 was obtained for KOH treated graphene by integration of the cyclic voltammogram, an increase of about 35% compared with that for the pristine graphene nanosheets.

  19. Fabrication of Graphene by Cleaving Graphite Chemically

    ZHAO Shu-hua; ZHAO Xiao-ting; FAN Hou-gang; YANG Li-li; ZHANG Yong-jun; YANG Jing-hai

    2011-01-01

    Graphite was chemically cleaved to graphene by Billups Reaction,and the morphologies and microstructures of graphene were characterized by SEM,Raman and AFM.The results show that the graphite was first functionalized by l-iodododecane,which led to the cleavage of the graphene layer in the graphite.The second decoration cleaved the graphite further and graphene was obtained.The heights of the graphene layer were larger than 1 nm due to the organic decoration.

  20. Applications of graphene an overview

    Wolf, Edward L

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is presented and analyzed as a replacement for silicon. The Primary focus is on solar cell and CMOS device technologies, with attention to the fabrication methods, including extensions needed, in each case. Specialized applications for graphene within the existing silicon technology are discussed and found to be promising.

  1. Graphene Nanoplatelet Reinforced Tantalum Carbide

    2015-08-27

    properties of nanocomposites at low graphene content, ACS Nano 3 (2009) 3884–3890. [4] S. Yang, G. Cui, S. Pang, Q. Cao, U. Kolb , X. Feng, et al...2010;20:2801–6. [9] Yang S, Cui G, Pang S, Cao Q, Kolb U, Feng X, et al. Fabrication of cobalt and cobalt oxide/graphene composites: towards high

  2. Nonlinear terahertz conductivity in graphene

    Mics, Zoltán; Bonn, Mischa; Tielrooij, Klaas Jan

    2013-01-01

    Graphene is a unique conductor, where charge is transported by massless carriers. Remarkably, the THz response of carriers strongly depends on the driving field.......Graphene is a unique conductor, where charge is transported by massless carriers. Remarkably, the THz response of carriers strongly depends on the driving field....

  3. Tuning Fano Resonances with Graphene

    Emani, Naresh K.; Chung, Ting-Fung; Prokopeva, Ludmila

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate strong electrical control of plasmonic Fano resonances in dolmen structures using tunable interband transitions in graphene. Such graphene-plasmonic hybrid devices can have applications in light modulation and sensing. OCIS codes: (250.5403) Plasmonics; (160.4670) Optical materials...

  4. Terahertz Photoconductivity of Graphene Nanostructures

    Jensen, Søren A.; Ulbricht, Ronald; Narita, Akimitsu

    2013-01-01

    The photoconductive properties of graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes were studied using optical pump-THz probe spectroscopy. A reduction in conductivity of GNRs compared to CNTs was observed.......The photoconductive properties of graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes were studied using optical pump-THz probe spectroscopy. A reduction in conductivity of GNRs compared to CNTs was observed....

  5. Graphene hyperlens for terahertz radiation

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Chigrin, D.; Novitsky, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    We propose the structured graphene terahertz hyperlens that allows overcoming natural diffraction limit and resolving subwavelength features. The proposed hyperlens can have applications in terahertz spectroscopy and imaging.......We propose the structured graphene terahertz hyperlens that allows overcoming natural diffraction limit and resolving subwavelength features. The proposed hyperlens can have applications in terahertz spectroscopy and imaging....

  6. Raman spectra of graphene ribbons

    Saito, R; Furukawa, M; Dresselhaus, G; Dresselhaus, M S

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectra of graphene nanoribbons with zigzag and armchair edges are calculated within non-resonant Raman theory. Depending on the edge structure and polarization direction of the incident and scattered photon beam relative to the edge direction, a symmetry selection rule for the phonon type appears. These Raman selection rules will be useful for the identification of the edge structure of graphene nanoribbons.

  7. Diffusive charge transport in graphene

    Chen, Jianhao

    The physical mechanisms limiting the mobility of graphene on SiO 2 are studied and printed graphene devices on a flexible substrate are realized. Intentional addition of charged scattering impurities is used to study the effects of charged impurities. Atomic-scale defects are created by noble-gas ions irradiation to study the effect of unitary scatterers. The results show that charged impurities and atomic-scale defects both lead to conductivity linear in density in graphene, with a scattering magnitude that agrees quantitatively with theoretical estimates. While charged impurities cause intravalley scattering and induce a small change in the minimum conductivity, defects in graphene scatter electrons between the valleys and suppress the minimum conductivity below the metallic limit. Temperature-dependent measurements show that longitudinal acoustic phonons in graphene produce a small resistivity which is linear in temperature and independent of carrier density; at higher temperatures, polar optical phonons of the SiO2 substrate give rise to an activated, carrier density-dependent resistivity. Graphene is also made into high mobility transparent and flexible field effect device via the transfer-printing method. Together the results paint a complete picture of charge carrier transport in graphene on SiO2 in the diffusive regime, and show the promise of graphene as a novel electronic material that have potential applications not only on conventional inorganic substrates, but also on flexible substrates.

  8. Hyperelastic tension of graphene

    Saavedra Flores, E. I., E-mail: erick.saavedra@usach.cl [Departamento de Ingeniería en Obras Civiles, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Ecuador 3659, Santiago (Chile); Ajaj, R. M. [Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Southampton, Southampton SO171BJ (United Kingdom); Adhikari, S.; Dayyani, I.; Friswell, M. I. [College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Castro-Triguero, Rafael [Department of Mechanics, University of Cordoba, Campus de Rabanales, Cordoba CP 14071 (Spain)

    2015-02-09

    In this paper, we investigate the hyperelastic tensile behaviour of single layer graphene sheets (SLGSs). A one-term incompressible Ogden-type hyperelastic model is chosen to describe the mechanical response of C-C bonds. By establishing equality between the Ogden strain-energy and the variation of the Tersoff-Brenner interatomic potential, three different geometries of SLGSs are studied under tensile loading. We compute the Young's modulus, the finite-deformation Poisson's ratio, ultimate strains, total reactions, and the variation of the potential energy per carbon atom for large strains. Numerical simulations are compared with results obtained by molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations, finite elements, continuum mechanics theory, and experiments. Our predictions are validated, revealing the potential predictive capabilities of the present hyperelastic framework for the analysis of graphene in the context of infinitesimal and large deformations. The good agreement found between our calculations and the published data suggests that graphene may be described as a hyperelastic material.

  9. Stainless steel fabrication for high quality requirements in the nuclear industry

    Wareing, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the author explains the welding procedures and practices adopted within the nuclear industry to achieve the high quality and standards of welds required. The changeover to mechanised welding, orbital TIG welding and synergic MIG welding, has resulted in consistent achievement of high quality standards as well as optimising the productivity. However, the use of mechanised welding machines does require the welder operating them to be fully trained and qualified. The formally organised training courses are described and the cost savings and production rates achieved by utilising the mechanised method are discussed. (author)

  10. Molecular theory of graphene oxide.

    Sheka, Elena F; Popova, Nadezhda A

    2013-08-28

    Applied to graphene oxide, the molecular theory of graphene considers its oxide as a final product in the succession of polyderivatives related to a series of oxidation reactions involving different oxidants. The graphene oxide structure is created in the course of a stepwise computational synthesis of polyoxides of the (5,5) nanographene molecule governed by an algorithm that takes into account the molecule's natural radicalization due to the correlation of its odd electrons, the extremely strong influence of the structure on properties, and a sharp response of the molecule behavior on small actions of external factors. Taking these together, the theory has allowed for a clear, transparent and understandable explanation of the hot points of graphene oxide chemistry and suggesting reliable models of both chemically produced and chemically reduced graphene oxides.

  11. Energy, fine structure, and hyperfine structure of the core-excited states 1s2s2pnp 5P (n = 2-5) and 1s2p2mp 5S (m = 2-5) for Li- ion

    Wang, Z.B.; Gou, B.C.; Chen, F.

    2006-01-01

    The relativistic energies, the oscillator strength, and the lifetimes of high-lying core-excited states 1s2s2pnp 5 P (n=2-5) and 1s2p 2 mp 5 S 0 (m=2-5) of Li - ion are calculated with the saddle-point variational method and restricted variation method. The fine structure and the hyperfine structure of the core-excited states for this system are also explored. The results are compared with other theoretical and experimental data in the literature. The energy obtained in this work are much lower than the others previously published whereas the wavelengths and radiative life-times are in agreement

  12. Direct Growth of High Mobility and Low-Noise Lateral MoS2 -Graphene Heterostructure Electronics.

    Behranginia, Amirhossein; Yasaei, Poya; Majee, Arnab K; Sangwan, Vinod K; Long, Fei; Foss, Cameron J; Foroozan, Tara; Fuladi, Shadi; Hantehzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Hersam, Mark C; Aksamija, Zlatan; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2017-08-01

    Reliable fabrication of lateral interfaces between conducting and semiconducting 2D materials is considered a major technological advancement for the next generation of highly packed all-2D electronic circuitry. This study employs seed-free consecutive chemical vapor deposition processes to synthesize high-quality lateral MoS 2 -graphene heterostructures and comprehensively investigated their electronic properties through a combination of various experimental techniques and theoretical modeling. These results show that the MoS 2 -graphene devices exhibit an order of magnitude higher mobility and lower noise metrics compared to conventional MoS 2 -metal devices as a result of energy band rearrangement and smaller Schottky barrier height at the contacts. These findings suggest that MoS 2 -graphene in-plane heterostructures are promising materials for the scale-up of all-2D circuitry with superlative electrical performance. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Effects of UV light intensity on electrochemical wet etching of SiC for the fabrication of suspended graphene

    O, Ryong-Sok; Takamura, Makoto; Furukawa, Kazuaki; Nagase, Masao; Hibino, Hiroki

    2015-03-01

    We report on the effects of UV light intensity on the photo assisted electrochemical wet etching of SiC(0001) underneath an epitaxially grown graphene for the fabrication of suspended structures. The maximum etching rate of SiC(0001) was 2.5 µm/h under UV light irradiation in 1 wt % KOH at a constant current of 0.5 mA/cm2. The successful formation of suspended structures depended on the etching rate of SiC. In the Raman spectra of the suspended structures, we did not observe a significant increase in the intensity of the D peak, which originates from defects in graphene sheets. This is most likely explained by the high quality of the single-crystalline graphene epitaxially grown on SiC.

  14. A Scalable Route to Nanoporous Large-Area Atomically Thin Graphene Membranes by Roll-to-Roll Chemical Vapor Deposition and Polymer Support Casting.

    Kidambi, Piran R; Mariappan, Dhanushkodi D; Dee, Nicholas T; Vyatskikh, Andrey; Zhang, Sui; Karnik, Rohit; Hart, A John

    2018-03-28

    Scalable, cost-effective synthesis and integration of graphene is imperative to realize large-area applications such as nanoporous atomically thin membranes (NATMs). Here, we report a scalable route to the production of NATMs via high-speed, continuous synthesis of large-area graphene by roll-to-roll chemical vapor deposition (CVD), combined with casting of a hierarchically porous polymer support. To begin, we designed and built a two zone roll-to-roll graphene CVD reactor, which sequentially exposes the moving foil substrate to annealing and growth atmospheres, with a sharp, isothermal transition between the zones. The configurational flexibility of the reactor design allows for a detailed evaluation of key parameters affecting graphene quality and trade-offs to be considered for high-rate roll-to-roll graphene manufacturing. With this system, we achieve synthesis of uniform high-quality monolayer graphene ( I D / I G casting and postprocessing, show size-selective molecular transport with performance comparable to that of membranes made from conventionally synthesized graphene. Therefore, this work establishes the feasibility of a scalable manufacturing process of NATMs, for applications including protein desalting and small-molecule separations.

  15. A single-stage functionalization and exfoliation method for the production of graphene in water: stepwise construction of 2D-nanostructured composites with iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Ihiawakrim, Dris; Ersen, Ovidiu; Melin, Frédéric; Hellwig, Petra; Janowska, Izabela; Begin, Dominique; Baaziz, Walid; Begin-Colin, Sylvie; Pham-Huu, Cuong; Baati, Rachid

    2013-10-07

    A practically simple top-down process for the exfoliation of graphene (GN) and few-layer graphene (FLG) from graphite is described. We have discovered that a biocompatible amphiphilic pyrene-based hexahistidine peptide is able to exfoliate, functionalize, and dissolve few layer graphene flakes in pure water under exceptionally mild, sustainable and virtually innocuous low intensity cavitation conditions. Large area functionalized graphene flakes with the hexahistidine oligopeptide (His₆-TagGN = His₆@GN) have been produced efficiently at room temperature and characterized by TEM, Raman, and UV spectroscopy. Conductivity experiments carried out on His₆-TagGN samples revealed superior electric performances as compared to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and non-functionalized graphene, demonstrating the non-invasive features of our non-covalent functionalization process. We postulated a rational exfoliation mechanism based on the intercalation of the peptide amphiphile under cavitational chemistry. We also demonstrated the ability of His6-TagGN nanoassemblies to self-assemble spontaneously with inorganic iron oxide nanoparticles generating magnetic two-dimensional (2D) His₆-TagGN/Fe₃O₄ nanocomposites under mild and non-hydrothermal conditions. The set of original experiments described here open novel perspectives in the facile production of water dispersible high quality GN and FLG sheets that will improve and facilitate the interfacing, processing and manipulation of graphene for promising applications in catalysis, nanocomposite construction, integrated nanoelectronic devices and bionanotechnology.

  16. A review of theoretical study of graphene chemical vapor deposition synthesis on metals: nucleation, growth, and the role of hydrogen and oxygen

    Rezwan Habib, Mohammad; Liang, Tao; Yu, Xuegong; Pi, Xiaodong; Liu, Yingchun; Xu, Mingsheng

    2018-03-01

    Graphene has attracted intense research interest due to its extraordinary properties and great application potential. Various methods have been proposed for the synthesis of graphene, among which chemical vapor deposition has drawn a great deal of attention for synthesizing large-area and high-quality graphene. Theoretical understanding of the synthesis mechanism is crucial for optimizing the experimental design for desired graphene production. In this review, we discuss the three fundamental steps of graphene synthesis in details, i.e. (1) decomposition of carbon feedstocks and formation of various active carbon species, (2) nucleation, and (3) attachment and extension. We provide a complete scenario of graphene synthesis on metal surfaces at atomistic level by means of density functional theory, molecular dynamics (MD), Monte Carlo (MC) and their combination and interface with other simulation methods such as quantum mechanical molecular dynamics, density functional tight binding molecular dynamics, and combination of MD and MC. We also address the latest investigation of the influences of the hydrogen and oxygen on the synthesis and the quality of the synthesized graphene.

  17. Study of magnetic properties of graphene nanostructures and graphene nanoribbons

    F Fazileh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of graphene and its remarkable electronic and magnetic properties has initiated great research interest in this material. Furthermore, there are many derivatives in these graphene related materials among which graphene nanoribbons and graphene nanofragments are candidates for future carbon-based nanoelectronics and spintronics. Theoretical studies have shown that magnetism can arise in various situations such as point defects, disorder and reduced dimensionality. Using a mean field Hubbard model, we studied the appearance of magnetic textures in zero-dimensional graphene nanofragments and one-dimensional graphene zigzag nanoribbons. Among nanofragments, triangular shape, bowtie and coronene were studied. We explain how the shape of these materials, the imbalance in the number of atoms belonging to the graphene sublattices, the existence of zero-energy states and the total and local magnetic moments were related. At the end, we focused on the effects of a model disorder potential (Anderson-type, and illustrate how density of states of zigzag nanoribbons was affected.

  18. Study of mechanism involved in synthesis of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide from graphene nanoplatelets

    Sharma, Bhasha; Shekhar, Shashank; Malik, Parul; Jain, Purnima

    2018-06-01

    Graphene, a wonder material has inspired quest among researchers due to its numerous applications and exceptional properties. This paper highlights the mechanism and chemistry behind the fabrication of graphene oxide by using phosphoric acid. Chemical functionalization is of prime importance which avoids agglomeration of nanoparticles to attain inherent properties. As non-homogeneous dispersion limits its utilization due to interfacial interactions which restrict reactive sites to produce intercalated network. Thus, chemically functionalized graphene leads to stable dispersion and enhances thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of the resultant polymer composite materials. Solubility of graphene in aqueous solution is the major issue because graphene is hydrophobic, to rectify this oxygen containing hydrophilic groups must be introduced to make it compatible and this can be attained by covalent functionalization. Among all nanofiller GO has shown average particle size i.e. 95 nm and highest surface charge density. The characteristic changes were estimated using Raman spectra.

  19. Observing Graphene Grow: Catalyst–Graphene Interactions during Scalable Graphene Growth on Polycrystalline Copper

    2013-01-01

    Complementary in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffractometry, and environmental scanning electron microscopy are used to fingerprint the entire graphene chemical vapor deposition process on technologically important polycrystalline Cu catalysts to address the current lack of understanding of the underlying fundamental growth mechanisms and catalyst interactions. Graphene forms directly on metallic Cu during the high-temperature hydrocarbon exposure, whereby an upshift in the binding energies of the corresponding C1s XPS core level signatures is indicative of coupling between the Cu catalyst and the growing graphene. Minor carbon uptake into Cu can under certain conditions manifest itself as carbon precipitation upon cooling. Postgrowth, ambient air exposure even at room temperature decouples the graphene from Cu by (reversible) oxygen intercalation. The importance of these dynamic interactions is discussed for graphene growth, processing, and device integration. PMID:24041311

  20. Raman enhancement on ultra-clean graphene quantum dots produced by quasi-equilibrium plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Liu, Donghua; Chen, Xiaosong; Hu, Yibin; Sun, Tai; Song, Zhibo; Zheng, Yujie; Cao, Yongbin; Cai, Zhi; Cao, Min; Peng, Lan; Huang, Yuli; Du, Lei; Yang, Wuli; Chen, Gang; Wei, Dapeng; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Wei, Dacheng

    2018-01-15

    Graphene is regarded as a potential surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate. However, the application of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) has had limited success due to material quality. Here, we develop a quasi-equilibrium plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method to produce high-quality ultra-clean GQDs with sizes down to 2 nm directly on SiO 2 /Si, which are used as SERS substrates. The enhancement factor, which depends on the GQD size, is higher than conventional graphene sheets with sensitivity down to 1 × 10 -9  mol L -1 rhodamine. This is attributed to the high-quality GQDs with atomically clean surfaces and large number of edges, as well as the enhanced charge transfer between molecules and GQDs with appropriate diameters due to the existence of Van Hove singularities in the electronic density of states. This work demonstrates a sensitive SERS substrate, and is valuable for applications of GQDs in graphene-based photonics and optoelectronics.