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Sample records for high-power rf pulse

  1. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  2. Active high-power RF pulse compression using optically switched resonant delay lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantawi, S.G.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1996-11-01

    The authors present the design and a proof of principle experimental results of an optically controlled high power rf pulse compression system. The design should, in principle, handle few hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band. The system is based on the switched resonant delay line theory. It employs resonant delay lines as a means of storing rf energy. The coupling to the lines is optimized for maximum energy storage during the charging phase. To discharge the lines, a high power microwave switch increases the coupling to the lines just before the start of the output pulse. The high power microwave switch, required for this system, is realized using optical excitation of an electron-hole plasma layer on the surface of a pure silicon wafer. The switch is designed to operate in the TE 01 mode in a circular waveguide to avoid the edge effects present at the interface between the silicon wafer and the supporting waveguide; thus, enhancing its power handling capability

  3. High-power rf pulse compression with SLED-II at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nantista, C.

    1993-04-01

    Increasing the peak rf power available from X-band microwave tubes by means of rf pulse compression is envisioned as a way of achieving the few-hundred-megawatt power levels needed to drive a next-generation linear collider with 50--100 MW klystrons. SLED-II is a method of pulse compression similar in principal to the SLED method currently in use on the SLC and the LEP injector linac. It utilizes low-los resonant delay lines in place of the storage cavities of the latter. This produces the added benefit of a flat-topped output pulse. At SLAC, we have designed and constructed a prototype SLED-II pulse-compression system which operates in the circular TE 01 mode. It includes a circular-guide 3-dB coupler and other novel components. Low-power and initial high-power tests have been made, yielding a peak power multiplication of 4.8 at an efficiency of 40%. The system will be used in providing power for structure tests in the ASTA (Accelerator Structures Test Area) bunker. An upgraded second prototype will have improved efficiency and will serve as a model for the pulse compression system of the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator)

  4. Reduction of field emission in superconducting cavities with high power pulsed RF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, J.; Crawford, C.; Kirchgessner, J.; Padamsee, H.; Rubin, D.; Schmueser, P.

    1994-01-01

    A systematic study is presented of the effects of pulsed high power RF processing (HPP) as a method of reducing field emission (FE) in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to reach higher accelerating gradients for future particle accelerators. The processing apparatus was built to provide up to 150 kW peak RF power to 3 GHz cavities, for pulse lengths from 200 μs to 1 ms. Single-cell and nine-cell cavities were tested extensively. The thermal conductivity of the niobium for these cavities was made as high as possible to ensure stability against thermal breakdown of superconductivity. HPP proves to be a highly successful method of reducing FE loading in nine-cell SRF cavities. Attainable continuous wave (CW) fields increase by as much as 80% from their pre-HPP limits. The CW accelerating field achieved with nine-cell cavities improved from 8-15 MV/m with HPP to 14-20 MV/m. The benefits are stable with subsequent exposure to dust-free air. More importantly, HPP also proves effective against new field emission subsequently introduced by cold and warm vacuum ''accidents'' which admitted ''dirty'' air into the cavities. Clear correlations are obtained linking FE reduction with the maximum surface electric field attained during processing. In single cells the maximums reached were E peak =72 MV/m and H peak =1660 Oe. Thermal breakdown, initiated by accompanying high surface magnetic fields is the dominant limitation on the attainable fields for pulsed processing, as well as for final CW and long pulse operation. To prove that the surface magnetic field rather than the surface electric fields is the limitation to HPP effectiveness, a special two-cell cavity with a reduced magnetic to electric field ratio is successfully tested. During HPP, pulsed fields reach E peak =113 MV/m (H peak =1600 Oe) and subsequent CW low power measurement reached E peak =100 MV/m, the highest CW field ever measured in a superconducting accelerator cavity. ((orig.))

  5. High power RF oscillator with Marx generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Izumi

    1980-01-01

    A method to maintain RF oscillation by using many Marx generators was proposed and studied experimentally. Many charging circuits were connected to an oscillator circuit, and successive pulsed charging was made. This successive charging amplified and maintained the RF oscillation. The use of vacuum gaps and high power silicon diodes improved the characteristics of RF current cut-off of the circuit. The efficiency of the pulsed charging from Marx generators to a condenser was theoretically investigated. The theoretical result showed the maximum efficiency of 0.98. The practical efficiency obtained by using a proposed circuit with a high power oscillator was in the range 0.50 to 0.56. The obtained effective output power of the RF pulses was 11 MW. The maximum holding time of the RF pulses was about 21 microsecond. (Kato, T.)

  6. Development of high power CW and pulsed RF test facility based on 1 MW, 352.2 MHz klystron amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badapanda, M.K.; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Upadhyay, Rinki; Rao, J.N.; Tiwari, Ashish; Jain, Akhilesh; Lad, M.R.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    A high power 1 MW, 352.2 MHz RF Test facility having CW and Pulse capability is being developed at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore for performance evaluation of various RF components, accelerating structures and related subsystems. Thales make 1 MW, 352.2 MHz klystron amplifier (TH 2089) will be employed in this high power test facility, which is thoroughly tested for its performance parameters at rated operating conditions. Auxiliary power supplies like filament, electromagnet, ion pump and mod anode power supply as well as 200 W solid state driver amplifier necessary for this high power test facility have been developed. A high voltage floating platform is created for floating filament and mod anode power supplies. Interconnection of various power supplies and other subsystems of this test facility are being carried out. A high voltage 100 kV, 25 Amp DC crowbar less power supply and low conductivity water (LCW) plant required for this klystron amplifier are in advanced stage of development. NI make cRIO 9081 real time (RT) controller based control and interlock system has been developed to realize proper sequence of operation of various power supplies and to monitor the status of crucial parameters in this test facility. This RF test facility will provide confidence for development of RF System of future accelerators like SNS and ADSS. (author)

  7. High Power, Pulsed, RF Generation from Nonlinear Lumped Element Transmission Lines (NLETLs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-05

    in order to focus on the primary technology tinder consideration. Their practicality at very high powers and frequencies is questionable due to...also possessed suitably large CXL ratios. Measuring capacitive nonlinearity tinder high voltage proved to be more tricky than first imagi- ned

  8. Compression and radiation of high-power short rf pulses. II. A novel antenna array design with combined compressor/radiator elements

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn; Pazynin, Vadim L.; Sirenko, Yu K.; Bagci, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation of compressed high power short RF pulses using two different types of antennas: (i) A simple monopole antenna and (ii) a novel array design, where each of the elements is constructed by combining a compressor and a

  9. Compression and radiation of high-power short rf pulses. II. A novel antenna array design with combined compressor/radiator elements

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation of compressed high power short RF pulses using two different types of antennas: (i) A simple monopole antenna and (ii) a novel array design, where each of the elements is constructed by combining a compressor and a radiator. The studies on the monopole antenna demonstrate the possibility of a high power short RF pulse\\'s efficient radiation even using simple antennas. The studies on the novel array design demonstrate that a reduced size array with lower pulse distortion and power decay can be constructed by assembling the array from elements each of which integrates a compressor and a radiator. This design idea can be used with any type of antenna array; in this work it is applied to a phased array.

  10. Practical use of the amplitude and phase modulation of a high-power RF pulse via feed-forward control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Keigo; Kato, Ryukou; Irizawa, Akinori; Isoyama, Goro; Kashiwagi, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    A new feed-forward control system to precisely control the amplitude and phase of the pulsed RF power in an electron linear accelerator (linac) is developed to make the accelerating field constant. Fast variations and ripples in the amplitude and phase in the RF pulses are compensated by modulating the amplitude and phase in the low-level system with a variable attenuator and phase shifter. The system is innovated the overdrive technique, which is commonly used in analog circuits, to speed up the slow response of the phase shifter, while the control signals are digitally processed; thus, the method is a hybrid of analog and digital techniques. By using the new control system, we find that the peak-to-peak variations in the amplitude and phase are reduced from 11.6% to 0.4% and from 6.1 degrees to 0.3 degrees, respectively, in 7.6-μs-long RF pulses for the L-band electron linac at Osaka University. (author)

  11. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  12. Modeling high-power RF accelerator cavities with SPICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical interactions between RF accelerator cavities and high-power beams can be treated on personal computers using a lumped circuit element model and the SPICE circuit analysis code. Applications include studies of wake potentials, two-beam accelerators, microwave sources, and transverse mode damping. This report describes the construction of analogs for TM mn0 modes and the creation of SPICE input for cylindrical cavities. The models were used to study continuous generation of kA electron beam pulses from a vacuum cavity driven by a high-power RF source

  13. Review of pulsed rf power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    I am going to talk about pulsed high-power rf generation for normal-conducting electron and positron linacs suitable for applications to high-energy physics in the Next Linear Collider, or NLC. The talk will cover some basic rf system design issues, klystrons and other microwave power sources, rf pulse-compression devices, and test facilities for system-integration studies

  14. High power testing of a 17 GHz photocathode RF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.C.; Danly, B.G.; Gonichon, J.

    1995-01-01

    The physics and technological issues involved in high gradient particle acceleration at high microwave (RF) frequencies are under study at MIT. The 17 GHz photocathode RF gun has a 1 1/2 cell (π mode) room temperature cooper cavity. High power tests have been conducted at 5-10 MW levels with 100 ns pulses. A maximum surface electric field of 250 MV/m was achieved. This corresponds to an average on-axis gradient of 150 MeV/m. The gradient was also verified by a preliminary electron beam energy measurement. Even high gradients are expected in our next cavity design

  15. High Power RF Transmitters for ICRF Applications on EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yuzhou; Yuan Shuai; Zhao Yanping; Zhang Xinjun; Chen Gen; Cheng Yan; Wang Lei; Ju Songqing; Deng Xu; Qin Chengming; Yang Lei; Kumazawa, R.

    2013-01-01

    An Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) system with a radio frequency (RF) power of 4 × 1.5 MW was developed for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). High RF power transmitters were designed as a part of the research and development (R and D) for an ICRF system with long pulse operation at megawatt levels in a frequency range of 25 MHz to 70 MHz. Studies presented in this paper cover the following parts of the high power transmitter: the three staged high power amplifier, which is composed of a 5 kW wideband solid state amplifier, a 100 kW tetrode drive stage amplifier and a 1.5 MW tetrode final stage amplifier, and the DC high voltage power supply (HVPS). Based on engineering design and static examinations, the RF transmitters were tested using a matched dummy load where an RF output power of 1.5 MW was achieved. The transmitters provide 6 MW RF power in primary phase and will reach a level up to 12 MW after a later upgrade. The transmitters performed successfully in stable operations in EAST and HT-7 devices. Up to 1.8 MW of RF power was injected into plasmas in EAST ICRF heating experiments during the 2010 autumn campaign and plasma performance was greatly improved.

  16. High-power pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization

  17. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Yoon W; Campisi, Isidoro E; Champion, Mark; Crofford, Mark; Davis, Kirk; Drury, Michael A; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; McCarthy, Michael P; Powers, Tom; Shajedul Hasan, S M; Stirbet, Mircea; Stout, Daniel; Tang, Johnny Y; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V; Wezensky, Mark

    2005-01-01

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavitites have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducti...

  18. High power RF transmission line component development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Bae, Y. D.; Yoon, J. S.; Wang, S. J.; Gu, S. H.; Yang, J. R.; Hahm, Y. S.; Oh, G. S.; Lee, J. R.; Lee, W. I.; Park, S. H.; Kang, M. S.; Oh, S. H.; Lee, W.I.

    1999-12-01

    We developed the liquid stub and phase shifter which are the key high RF power transmission line components. They show reliable operation characteristics and increased insulation capability, and reduced the size by using liquid (silicon oil, dielectric constant ε=2.72) instead of gas for insulating dielectric material. They do not have finger stock for the electric contact so the local temperature rise due to irregular contact and RF breakdown due to scratch in conductor are prevented. They can be utilized in broadcasting, radar facility which require high RF power transmission. Moreover, they are key components in RF heating system for fusion reactor. (author)

  19. High power RF transmission line component development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Bae, Y. D.; Yoon, J. S.; Wang, S. J.; Gu, S. H.; Yang, J. R.; Hahm, Y. S.; Oh, G. S.; Lee, J. R.; Lee, W. I.; Park, S. H.; Kang, M. S.; Oh, S. H.; Lee, W.I

    1999-12-01

    We developed the liquid stub and phase shifter which are the key high RF power transmission line components. They show reliable operation characteristics and increased insulation capability, and reduced the size by using liquid (silicon oil, dielectric constant {epsilon}=2.72) instead of gas for insulating dielectric material. They do not have finger stock for the electric contact so the local temperature rise due to irregular contact and RF breakdown due to scratch in conductor are prevented. They can be utilized in broadcasting, radar facility which require high RF power transmission. Moreover, they are key components in RF heating system for fusion reactor. (author)

  20. High power RF systems for LEHIPA of ADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Sharma, Sonal; Rao, B.V.R.; Mishra, J.K.; Patel, Niranjan; Gupta, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS) has generated a huge interest for various reasons. In India, as a part of accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS) program, a normal conducting, low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA) of energy 20 MeV and beam current of 30 mA is being developed in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC). LEHIPA comprises of Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source (50 KeV), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator (3 MeV) and Drift tube Linac (DTL) 1 and 2 (10 MeV and 20 MeV respectively). As per the accelerator physics design, RFQ requires nearly 530 kW RF power while each of DTL need 900 kW. Each accelerating cavity will be driven by a one- megawatt (CW) klystron based high power RF (HPRF) system at 352.21 MHz. Three such RF systems will be developed. The RF system has been designed around five cavity klystron tube TH2089F (Thales make) capable of delivering 1 MW continuous wave power at 352.21 MHz. The klystron has a gain of 40 dB and efficiency around 62 %. Each of the RF system comprises of a low power solid state driver (∼ 100 W), klystron tube, harmonic filter, directional coupler, Y-junction circulator (AFT make), RF load and WR2300 wave guide based RF transmission line each of 1 MW capacity. It also includes other subsystems like bias supplies (high voltage (HV) and low voltage (LV)), HV interface system, interlock and protection circuits, dedicated low conductivity water-cooling, pulsing circuitry/mechanisms etc. WR 2300 based RF transmission line transmits and feeds the RE power from klystron source to respective accelerating cavity. This transmission line starts from second port of the circulator and consists of straight sections, full height to half height transition, magic Tee, termination load at the centre of magic tee, half height sections, directional couplers and RE windows. For X-ray shielding, klystron will be housed in a lead (3 mm) based shielded cage. This system set up has a

  1. Effect on antenna structure of high power rf during plasma operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haste, G.R.; Thomas, C.E.; Fadnek, A.; Carter, M.D.; Beaumont, B.; Becoulet, A.; Kuus, H.; Saoutic, B.

    1993-01-01

    High-power, long-pulse operation on the Tore Supra tokamak results in considerable stress on the plasma-facing components. The ICH antennas must deliver high-power rf(up to 4 MW per antenna) in this environment. The antenna structure is therefore subjected to the power flux resulting from the interaction between rf and the edge plasma. The structure's response during operation is described, as is the condition of the antenna after prolonged use

  2. Low reflectance high power RF load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M.

    2016-02-02

    A load for traveling microwave energy has an absorptive volume defined by cylindrical body enclosed by a first end cap and a second end cap. The first end cap has an aperture for the passage of an input waveguide with a rotating part that is coupled to a reflective mirror. The inner surfaces of the absorptive volume consist of a resistive material or are coated with a coating which absorbs a fraction of incident RF energy, and the remainder of the RF energy reflects. The angle of the reflector and end caps is selected such that reflected RF energy dissipates an increasing percentage of the remaining RF energy at each reflection, and the reflected RF energy which returns to the rotating mirror is directed to the back surface of the rotating reflector, and is not coupled to the input waveguide. Additionally, the reflector may have a surface which generates a more uniform power distribution function axially and laterally, to increase the power handling capability of the RF load. The input waveguide may be corrugated for HE11 mode input energy.

  3. Pulsed high-power beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reginato, L.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with nonlinear magnetic modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It is now possible to produce short-pulse electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients approaching 1-MeV/m, and with power efficiencies exceeding 50%. This paper reports on a 70-MeV, 3-kA induction accelerator (ETA II) constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that incorporates the pulse technology concepts that have evolved over the past several years. The ETA II is a linear induction accelerator and provides a test facility for demonstration of the high-average-power components and high-brightness sources used in such accelerators. The pulse drive of the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak-power capability, repetition rates exceeding 1 kHz, and excellent reliability

  4. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced

  5. Advances in high-power rf amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    Several powerful accelerators and storage rings are being considered that will require tens or even hundreds of megawatts of continuous rf power. The economics of such large machines can be dictated by the cost and efficiency of the rf amplifiers. The overall design and performance of such narrow-band amplifiers, operating in the 50- to 1500-MHz region, are being theoretically studied as a function of frequency to determine the optimum rf amplifier output power, gain, efficiency, and dc power requirements. The state of the art for three types of amplifiers (gridded tubes, klystrons, and gyrocons) is considered and the development work necessary to improve each is discussed. The gyrocon is a new device, hence its various embodiments are discussed in detail. The Soviet designs are reviewed and the gyrocon's strengths and weaknesses are compared to other types of microwave amplifiers. The primary advantages of the gyrocon are the very large amount of power available from a single device and the excellent efficiency and stable operation. The klystron however, has much greater gain and is simpler mechanically. At very low frequencies, the small size of the gridded tube makes it the optimum choice for all but the most powerful systems

  6. Binary rf pulse compression experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.; Spalek, G.; Farkas, Z.D.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    Using rf pulse compression it will be possible to boost the 50- to 100-MW output expected from high-power microwave tubes operating in the 10- to 20-GHz frequency range, to the 300- to 1000-MW level required by the next generation of high-gradient linacs for linear for linear colliders. A high-power X-band three-stage binary rf pulse compressor has been implemented and operated at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In each of three successive stages, the rf pulse-length is compressed by half, and the peak power is approximately doubled. The experimental results presented here have been obtained at low-power (1-kW) and high-power (15-MW) input levels in initial testing with a TWT and a klystron. Rf pulses initially 770 nsec long have been compressed to 60 nsec. Peak power gains of 1.8 per stage, and 5.5 for three stages, have been measured. This corresponds to a peak power compression efficiency of about 90% per stage, or about 70% for three stages, consistent with the individual component losses. The principle of operation of a binary pulse compressor (BPC) is described in detail elsewhere. We recently have implemented and operated at SLAC a high-power (high-vacuum) three-stage X-band BPC. First results from the high-power three-stage BPC experiment are reported here

  7. Superconductors for pulsed rf accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1985-04-01

    The choice of superconducting materials for accelerator rf cavities has been determined in the past only in part by basic properties of the superconductors, such as the critical field, and to a larger extent by criteria which include fabrication processes, surface conditions, heat transfer capabilities and so on. For cw operated cavities the trend has been toward choosing materials with higher critical temperatures and lower surface resistance, from Lead to Niobium, from Niobium to Nb 3 Sn. This trend has been dictated by the specific needs of storage ring cw system and by the relatively low fields which could be reached without breakdown. The work performed at SLAC on superconducting cavities using microsecond long high power rf pulses has shown that in Pb, Nb, and Nb 3 Sn fields close to the critical magnetic fields can be reached without magnetic breakdown

  8. Embedded control system for high power RF amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Deepak Kumar; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Jain, Akhilesh; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    RF power devices are usually very sensitive to overheat and reflected RF power; hence a protective interlock system is required to be embedded with high power solid state RF amplifiers. The solid state RF amplifiers have salient features of graceful degradation and very low mean time to repair (MTTR). In order to exploit these features in favour of lowest system downtime, a real-time control system is embedded with high power RF amplifiers. The control system is developed with the features of monitoring, measurement and network publishing of various parameters, historical data logging, alarm generation, displaying data to the operator and tripping the system in case of any interlock failure. This paper discusses the design philosophy, features, functions and implementation details of the embedded control system. (author)

  9. High power rf component testing for the NLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.

    1998-09-01

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC), the high power rf components must be capable of handling peak rf power levels in excess of 600 MW. In the current view of the NLC, even the rectangular waveguide components must transmit at least 300 MW rf power. At this power level, peak rf fields can greatly exceed 100 MV/m. The authors present recent results of high power tests performed at the Accelerator Structure Test Area (ASTA) at SLAC. These tests are designed to investigate the rf breakdown limits of several new components potentially useful for the NLC. In particular, the authors tested a new TE 01 --TE 10 circular to rectangular wrap-around mode converter, a modified (internal fin) Magic Tee hybrid, and an upgraded flower petal mode converter

  10. Long-pulse applications of pulse-forming lines for high-power linac application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeberling, R.F.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    The ever present demands for high efficiency in the RF power stations for particle accelerators have caused increased interest in longer RF pulses (ten's of microseconds) for linacs such as the Pion Generator for Medical Irradiation (PIGMI) and Free Electron Laser (FEL). For either RF power station, a fundamental decision is whether to use a modulating anode/hard-tube driver or pulsed cathode/line-type pulser configuration. The choices in the extremes of low power for very long pulses or for very-high-power, short pulses are, respectively, a modulated anode/hard tube modulator and pulsed cathode/pulse forming line. However, the demarcation between these two extremes is not clearcut. The criteria (cost, flexibility performance, reliability, efficiency) that resulted in the RF station definition of these two specific systems will be described

  11. Development and advances in conventional high power RF systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-06-01

    The development of rf systems capable of producing high peak power (hundreds of megawatts) at relatively short pulse lengths (0.1--5 microseconds) is currently being driven mainly by the requirements of future high energy linear colliders, although there may be applications to industrial, medical and research linacs as well. The production of high peak power rf typically involves four basic elements: a power supply to convert ac from the ''wall plug'' to dc; a modulator, or some sort of switching element, to produce pulsed dc power; an rf source to convert the pulsed dc to pulsed rf power; and possibly an rf pulse compression system to further enhance the peak rf power. Each element in this rf chain from wall plug to accelerating structure must perform with high efficiency in a linear collider application, such that the overall system efficiency is 30% or more. Basic design concepts are discussed for klystrons, modulators and rf pulse compression systems, and their present design status is summarized for applications to proposed linear colliders

  12. Pulsed rf operation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, M.; Cornacchia, M.

    1981-01-01

    The need for a very low final amplifier output impedance, always associated with class A operation, requires a very large power waste in the final tube. The recently suggested pulsed rf operation, while saving a large amount of power, increases the inherent final amplifier non linearity. A method is presented for avoiding the large signal non linear analysis and it is shown how each component of the beam induced voltage depends upon all the beam harmonics via some coupling coefficients which are evaluated

  13. High power RF systems for the BNL ERL project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2011-03-28

    The Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) project, now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires two high power RF systems. The first RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting electron gun. The RF power from this system is used to drive nearly half an Ampere of beam current to 2 MeV. There is no provision to recover any of this energy so the minimum amplifier power is 1 MW. It consists of 1 MW CW klystron, transmitter and power supplies, 1 MW circulator, 1 MW dummy load and a two-way power splitter. The second RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting cavity. The system accelerates the beam to 54.7 MeV and recovers this energy. It will provide up to 50 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. It consists of 50 kW transmitter, circulator, and dummy load. This paper describes the two high power RF systems and presents the test data for both.

  14. High power RF window deposition apparatus, method, and device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Lawrence R.; Lucovsky, Gerald; Zeller, Daniel

    2017-07-04

    A process for forming a coating for an RF window which has improved secondary electron emission and reduced multipactor for high power RF waveguides is formed from a substrate with low loss tangent and desirable mechanical characteristics. The substrate has an RPAO deposition layer applied which oxygenates the surface of the substrate to remove carbon impurities, thereafter has an RPAN deposition layer applied to nitrogen activate the surface of the substrate, after which a TiN deposition layer is applied using Titanium tert-butoxide. The TiN deposition layer is capped with a final RPAN deposition layer of nitridation to reduce the bound oxygen in the TiN deposition layer. The resulting RF window has greatly improved titanium layer adhesion, reduced multipactor, and is able to withstand greater RF power levels than provided by the prior art.

  15. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), the authors are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by X-band klystrons with rf pulse compression. The design of the linac rf system is based on X-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test - the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) - which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of rf pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by rf phase modulation, intra-pulse variations in the linac beam energy

  16. High power, repetitive stacked Blumlein pulse generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davanloo, F; Borovina, D L; Korioth, J L; Krause, R K; Collins, C B [Univ. of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States). Center for Quantum Electronics; Agee, F J [US Air Force Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Kingsley, L E [US Army CECOM, Ft. Monmouth, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The repetitive stacked Blumlein pulse power generators developed at the University of Texas at Dallas consist of several triaxial Blumleins stacked in series at one end. The lines are charged in parallel and synchronously commuted with a single switch at the other end. In this way, relatively low charging voltages are multiplied to give a high discharge voltage across an arbitrary load. Extensive characterization of these novel pulsers have been performed over the past few years. Results indicate that they are capable of producing high power waveforms with rise times and repetition rates in the range of 0.5-50 ns and 1-300 Hz, respectively, using a conventional thyratron, spark gap, or photoconductive switch. The progress in the development and use of stacked Blumlein pulse generators is reviewed. The technology and the characteristics of these novel pulsers driving flash x-ray diodes are discussed. (author). 4 figs., 5 refs.

  17. Glycol-Substitute for High Power RF Water Loads

    CERN Document Server

    Ebert, Michael

    2005-01-01

    In water loads for high power rf applications, power is dissipated directly into the coolant. Loads for frequencies below approx. 1GHz are ordinarily using an ethylene glycol-water mixture as coolant. The rf systems at DESY utilize about 100 glycol water loads with powers ranging up to 600kW. Due to the increased ecological awareness, the use of glycol is now considered to be problematic. In EU it is forbidden to discharge glycol into the waste water system. In case of cooling system leakages one has to make sure that no glycol is lost. Since it is nearly impossible to avoid any glycol loss in large rf systems, a glycol-substitute was searched for and found. The found sodium-molybdate based substitute is actually a additive for corrosion protection in water systems. Sodium-molybdate is ecologically harmless; for instance, it is also used as fertilizer in agriculture. A homoeopathic dose of 0.4% mixed into deionised water gives better rf absorption characteristics than a 30% glycol mixture. The rf coolant feat...

  18. High power tests of dressed supconducting 1.3 GHz RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocker, A.; Harms, E.R.; Lunin, A.; Sukhanov, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    A single-cavity test cryostat is used to conduct pulsed high power RF tests of superconducting 1.3 GHz RF cavities at 2 K. The cavities under test are welded inside individual helium vessels and are outfitted ('dressed') with a fundamental power coupler, higher-order mode couplers, magnetic shielding, a blade tuner, and piezoelectric tuners. The cavity performance is evaluated in terms of accelerating gradient, unloaded quality factor, and field emission, and the functionality of the auxiliary components is verified. Test results from the first set of dressed cavities are presented here.

  19. Development of new S-band RF window for stable high-power operation in linear accelerator RF system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Youngdo; Lee, Byung-Joon; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Kong, Hyung-Sup; Hwang, Woonha; Roh, Sungjoo; Ryu, Jiwan

    2017-09-01

    For stable high-power operation, a new RF window is developed in the S-band linear accelerator (Linac) RF systems of the Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) and the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free-Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL). The new RF window is designed to mitigate the strength of the electric field at the ceramic disk and also at the waveguide-cavity coupling structure of the conventional RF window. By replacing the pill-box type cavity in the conventional RF window with an overmoded cavity, the electric field component perpendicular to the ceramic disk that caused most of the multipacting breakdowns in the ceramic disk was reduced by an order of magnitude. The reduced electric field at the ceramic disk eliminated the Ti-N coating process on the ceramic surface in the fabrication procedure of the new RF window, preventing the incomplete coating from spoiling the RF transmission and lowering the fabrication cost. The overmoded cavity was coupled with input and output waveguides through dual side-wall coupling irises to reduce the electric field strength at the waveguide-cavity coupling structure and the possibility of mode competitions in the overmoded cavity. A prototype of the new RF window was fabricated and fully tested with the Klystron peak input power, pulse duration and pulse repetition rate of 75 MW, 4.5 μs and 10 Hz, respectively, at the high-power test stand. The first mass-produced new RF window installed in the PLS-II Linac is running in normal operation mode. No fault is reported to date. Plans are being made to install the new RF window to all S-band accelerator RF modules of the PLS-II and PAL-XFEL Linacs. This new RF window may be applied to the output windows of S-band power sources like Klystron as wells as the waveguide windows of accelerator facilities which operate in S-band.

  20. High power tests of X-band RF windows at KEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otake, Yuji [Earthquake Research Inst., Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Tokumoto, Shuichi; Kazakov, Sergei Yu.; Odagiri, Junichi; Mizuno, Hajime

    1997-04-01

    Various RF windows comprising a short pill-box, a long pill-box, a TW (traveling wave)-mode and three TE11-mode horn types have been developed for an X-band high-power pulse klystron with two output windows for JLC (Japan Linear Collider). The output RF power of the klystron is designed to be 130 MW with the 800 ns pulse duration. Since this X-band klystron has two output windows, the maximum RF power of the window must be over 85 MW. The design principle for the windows is to reduce the RF-power density and/or the electric-field strength at the ceramic part compared with that of an ordinary pill-box-type window. Their reduction is effective to increase the handling RF power of the window. To confirm that the difference among the electric-field strengths depends on their RF structures, High-power tests of the above-mentioned windows were successfully carried out using a traveling-wave resonator (TWR) for the horns and the TW-mode type and, installing them directly to klystron output waveguides for the short and long pill-box type. Based upon the operation experience of S-band windows, two kinds of ceramic materials were used for these tests. The TE11-mode 1/2{lambda}g-1 window was tested up to the RF peak-power of 84 MW with the 700 ns pulse duration in the TWR. (J.P.N)

  1. Spallation Neutron Source High Power RF Installation and Commissioning Progress

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Michael P; Bradley, Joseph T; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Hardek, Thomas; Kang, Yoon W; Rees, Daniel; Roybal, William; Young, Karen A

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac will provide a 1 GeV proton beam for injection into the accumulator ring. In the normal conducting (NC) section of this linac, the Radio Frequency Quadupole (RFQ) and six drift tube linac (DTL) tanks are powered by seven 2.5 MW, 402.5 MHz klystrons and the four coupled cavity linac (CCL) cavities are powered by four 5.0 MW, 805 MHz klystrons. Eighty-one 550 kW, 805 MHz klystrons each drive a single cavity in the superconducting (SC) section of the linac. The high power radio frequency (HPRF) equipment was specified and procured by LANL and tested before delivery to ensure a smooth transition from installation to commissioning. Installation of RF equipment to support klystron operation in the 350-meter long klystron gallery started in June 2002. The final klystron was set in place in September 2004. Presently, all RF stations have been installed and high power testing has been completed. This paper reviews the progression of the installation and testing of the HPRF Sys...

  2. HIGH POWER TESTS OF A MULTIMODE X-BAND RF DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantawi, S

    2004-01-01

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linacs operate at 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required which produce 400 ns pulses with 600 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 meters of accelerator structures. These rf units consist of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant delay line pulse compression system [1] that produce a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all over moded and most components are design to operate with two modes at the same time. This approach allows increasing the power handling capabilities of the system while maintain a compact inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. The high power testing of the system is verified using four 50-MW solenoid focused klystrons. These Klystrons should be able to push the system beyond NLC requirements

  3. Electron diode oscillators for high-power RF generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S.

    1989-01-01

    Feedback oscillators have been used since the invention of the vacuum tube. This paper describes the extension of these familiar circuits to the regime of relativistic electron beam diodes. Such devices have potential application for the generation of high power RF radiation in the range 50-250 MHz, 1-10 GW with 20-60% conversion efficiency. This paper reviews the theory of the oscillator and the results of a design study. Calculations for the four-electrode diode with EGUN and EBQ show that good modulations of 30 kA electron beam at 600 kV can be achieved with moderate field stress on the electrodes. Conditions for oscillation have been studied with an in-house transmission line code. A design for a 7.5 GW oscillator at 200 MHz with 25% conversion efficiency is presented

  4. High-power, solid-state rf source for accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, D.R.; Mols, G.E.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past few years the Defense and Electronics Center of Westinghouse Electric Corporation has developed a solid-state, 250-kW peak, rf amplifier for use with the SPS-40 radar system. This system has a pulse length of 60 μs and operates across the frequency band from 400 to 450 MHz. Because of the potential use of such a system as an rf source for accelerator applications, a collaborative experiment was initiated between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Westinghouse to simulate the resonant load conditions of an accelerator cavity. This paper describes the positive results of that experiment as well as the solid-state amplifier architecture. It also explores the future of high-power, solid-state amplifiers as rf sources for accelerator structures

  5. RF pulse compression development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1987-10-01

    The body of this paper discusses the theory and some rules for designing a multistage Binary Energy Compressor (BEC) including its response to nonstandard phase coding, describes some proof-of-principle experiments with a couple of low power BECs, presents the design parameters for some sample linear collider rf systems that could possibly use a BEC to advantage and outlines in the conclusion some planned R and D efforts. 8 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs

  6. LCLS-II high power RF system overview and progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeremian, Anahid Dian

    2015-10-07

    A second X-ray free electron laser facility, LCLS-II, will be constructed at SLAC. LCLS-II is based on a 1.3 GHz, 4 GeV, continuous-wave (CW) superconducting linear accelerator, to be installed in the first kilometer of the SLAC tunnel. Multiple types of high power RF (HPRF) sources will be used to power different systems on LCLS-II. The main 1.3 GHz linac will be powered by 280 1.3 GHz, 3.8 kW solid state amplifier (SSA) sources. The normal conducting buncher in the injector will use four more SSAs identical to the linac SSAs but run at 2 kW. Two 185.7 MHz, 60 kW sources will power the photocathode dual-feed RF gun. A third harmonic linac section, included for linearizing the bunch energy spread before the first bunch compressor, will require sixteen 3.9 GHz sources at about 1 kW CW. A description and an update on all the HPRF sources of LCLS-II and their implementation is the subject of this paper.

  7. High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Summers, D.; Norem, J.

    2002-01-01

    We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q 0 of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons

  8. Feasibility Study for High Power RF – Energy Recovery in Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Betz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    When dealing with particle accelerators, especially in systems with travelling wave structures and low beam loading, a substantial amount of RF power is dissipated in 50Ω termination loads. For the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at Cern this is 69 % of the incident RF power or about 1 MW. Different ideas, making use of that otherwise dissipated power, are presented and their feasibility is reviewed. The most feasible one, utilizing an array of semiconductor based RF/DC modules, is used to create a design concept for energy recovery in the SPS. The modules are required to operate at high power, high efficiency and with low harmonic radiation. Besides the actual RF rectifier, they contain additional components to ensure a graceful degradation of the overall system. Different rectifier architectures and semiconductor devices are compared and the most suitable ones are chosen. Two prototype devices were built and operated with up to 400 W of pulsed RF power. Broadband measurements – capturing all harmonics up ...

  9. Compulsator, a high power compensated pulsed alternator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weldon, W.F.; Bird, W.L.; Driga, M.D.; Rylander, H.G.; Tolk, K.M.; Woodson, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter describes a pulsed power supply utilizing inertial energy storage as a possible replacement for large capacitor banks. The compulsator overcomes many of the limitations of the pulsed homopolar generators previously developed by the Center for Electromechanics and elsewhere in that it offers high voltage (10's of kV) and consequently higher pulse rise times, is self commutating, and offers the possibility of generating repetitive pulses. The compulsator converts rotational inertial energy directly into electrical energy utilizing the principles of both magnetic induction and flux compression. The theory of operation, a prototype compulsator design, and advanced compulsator designs are discussed

  10. Development of a large proton accelerator for innovative researches; development of high power RF source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, K. H.; Lee, K. O.; Shin, H. M.; Chung, I. Y. [KAPRA, Seoul (Korea); Kim, D. I. [Inha University, Incheon (Korea); Noh, S. J. [Dankook University, Seoul (Korea); Ko, S. K. [Ulsan University, Ulsan (Korea); Lee, H. J. [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea); Choi, W. H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-05-01

    This study was performed with objective to design and develop the KOMAC proton accelerator RF system. For the development of the high power RF source for CCDTL(coupled cavity drift tube linac), the medium power RF system using the UHF klystron for broadcasting was integrated and with this RF system we obtained the basic design data, operation experience and code-validity test data. Based on the medium power RF system experimental data, the high power RF system for CCDTL was designed and its performed was analyzed. 16 refs., 64 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  11. Results of the SLAC LCLS Gun High-Power RF Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, D.H.; Jongewaard, E.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; Wang, J.; Lewandowski, J.; Vlieks, A.

    2007-01-01

    The beam quality and operational requirements for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) currently being constructed at SLAC are exceptional, requiring the design of a new RF photocathode gun for the electron source. Based on operational experience at SLAC's GTF and SDL and ATF at BNL as well as other laboratories, the 1.6cell s-band (2856MHz) gun was chosen to be the best electron source for the LCLS, however a significant redesign was necessary to achieve the challenging parameters. Detailed 3-D analysis and design was used to produce near-perfect rotationally symmetric rf fields to achieve the emittance requirement. In addition, the thermo-mechanical design allows the gun to operate at 120Hz and a 140MV/m cathode field, or to an average power dissipation of 4kW. Both average and pulsed heating issues are addressed in the LCLS gun design. The first LCLS gun is now fabricated and has been operated with high-power RF. The results of these high-power tests are presented and discussed

  12. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), we are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by X-band klystrons with rf pulse compression. The design of the linac rf system is based on X-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test---the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA)---which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of rf pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by rf phase modulation, intra-pulse variations in the linac beam energy. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  13. New high power 200 MHz RF system for the LANSCE drift tube linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyles, J.; Friedrichs, C.; Lynch, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linac provides an 800 MeV direct H + proton beam, and injects H - to the upgraded proton storage ring for charge accumulation for the Short Pulse Spallation Source. Accelerating these interlaced beams requires high average power from the 201.25 MHz drift tube linac (DTL) RF system. Three power amplifiers have operated at up to three Megawatts with 12% duty factor. The total number of electron power tubes in the RF amplifiers and their modulators has been reduced from fifty-two to twenty-four. The plant continues to utilize the original design of a tetrode driving a super power triode. Further increases in the linac duty factor are limited, in part, by the maximum dissipation ratings of the triodes. A description of the system modifications proposed to overcome these limitations includes new power amplifiers using low-level RF modulation for tank field control. The first high power Diacrode reg-sign is being delivered and a new amplifier cavity is being designed. With only eight power tubes, the new system will deliver both peak power and high duty factor, with lower mains power and cooling requirements. The remaining components needed for the new RF system will be discussed

  14. Pulsed rf excited spectrometer having improved pulse width control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    RF excitation for a spectrometer is obtained by pulse width modulating an RF carrier to produce the desired broadband RF exciting spectrum. The RF excitation includes a train of composite RF pulses, each composite pulse having a primary pulse portion of a first RF phase and a second pulse portion of a second RF phase opposite that of the first. In this manner, the finite rise and fall times of the primary pulse portion are compensated for by the corresponding rise and fall times of the secondary pulse portion. The primary pulse portion is lengthened by an amount equal to the secondary pulse portion so that the secondary pulse portion cancels the added primary pulse portion. In a spectrometer, the compensating second pulse component removes certain undesired side bands of the RF excitation caused by the finite rise and fall times of the applied RF pulses. The compensating second pulse component removes certain undesired side bands associated with each of the resonant lines of the excited resonance spectrum of the sample under analysis, particularly for wide band RF excitation

  15. High-Power Plasma Switch for 11.4 GHz Microwave Pulse Compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2010-01-01

    Results obtained in several experiments on active RF pulse compression at X-band using a magnicon as the high-power RF source are presented. In these experiments, microwave energy was stored in high-Q TE01 and TE02 modes of two parallel-fed resonators, and then discharged using switches activated with rapidly fired plasma discharge tubes. Designs and high-power tests of several versions of the compressor are described. In these experiments, coherent pulse superposition was demonstrated at a 5-9 MW level of incident power. The compressed pulses observed had powers of 50-70 MW and durations of 40-70 ns. Peak power gains were measured to be in the range of 7:1-11:1 with efficiency in the range of 50-63%.

  16. Development and performance test of a new high power RF window in S-band PLS-II LINAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Woon-Ha; Joo, Young-Do; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Choi, Jae-Young; Noh, Sung-Ju; Ryu, Ji-Wan; Cho, Young-Ki

    2017-12-01

    A prototype of RF window was developed in collaboration with the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) and domestic companies. High power performance tests of the single RF window were conducted at PAL to verify the operational characteristics for its application in the Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) linear accelerator (Linac). The tests were performed in the in-situ facility consisting of a modulator, klystron, waveguide network, vacuum system, cooling system, and RF analyzing equipment. The test results with Stanford linear accelerator energy doubler (SLED) have shown no breakdown up to 75 MW peak power with 4.5 μs RF pulse width at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The test results with the current operation level of PLS-II Linac confirm that the RF window well satisfies the criteria for PLS-II Linac operation.

  17. Survey on modern pulsed high power lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, K.J.

    1985-01-01

    The requirements to be met by lasers for particle acceleration are partially similar to those already known for fusion lasers. The power level wanted in both caes is up to 100 TW or even more. The pulse durations favourable for laser accelerators are in the range from 1 ps to 1000 ps whereas fusion lasers require several ns. The energy range for laser accelerators is thus correspondingly smaller than that for fusion lasers: 1-100 kJ versus several 100 kJ. The design criteria of lasers meeting the requirements are discussed in the following. The CO 2 , iodine, Nd:glass and excimer lasers are treated in detail. The high repetition rate aspect will not be particularly addressed since for the present generation of lasers the wanted rates of far above 1 Hz are completely out of scope. Moreover, for the demonstration of principle these rates are not needed. (orig./HSI)

  18. Measurement of high-power microwave pulse under intense ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. KALI-1000 pulse power system has been used to generate single pulse nanosecond duration high-power microwaves (HPM) from a virtual cathode oscillator. (VIRCATOR) device. HPM power measurements were carried out using a transmitting– receiving system in the presence of intense high frequency (a few ...

  19. Upgrade of the SLAC SLED II Pulse Compression System Based on Recent High Power Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.

    2011-01-01

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) it is expected that the high power rf components be able to handle peak power levels in excess of 400 MW. We present recent results of high power tests designed to investigate the RF breakdown limits of the X-band pulse compression system used at SLAC. (SLED-II). Results of these tests show that both the TE 01 -TE 10 mode converter and the 4-port hybrid have a maximum useful power limit of 220-250 MW. Based on these tests, modifications of these components have been undertaken to improve their peak field handling capability. Results of these modifications will be presented. As part of an international effort to develop a new 0.5-1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider for the 21st century, SLAC has been working towards a design, referred to as 'The Next Linear Collider' (NLC), which will operate at 11.424 GHz and utilize 50-75 MW klystrons as rf power sources. One of the major challenges in this design, or any other design, is how to generate and efficiently transport extremely high rf power from a source to an accelerator structure. SLAC has been investigating various methods of 'pulse compressing' a relatively wide rf pulse ((ge) 1 μs) from a klystron into a narrower, but more intense, pulse. Currently a SLED-II pulse compression scheme is being used at SLAC in the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and in the Accelerator Structures Test Area (ASTA) to provide high rf power for accelerator and component testing. In ASTA, a 1.05 μs pulse from a 50 MW klystron was successfully pulse compressed to 205 MW with a pulse width of 150 ns. Since operation in NLC will require generating and transporting rf power in excess of 400 MW it was decided to test the breakdown limits of the SLED-II rf components in ASTA with rf power up to the maximum available of 400 MW. This required the combining of power from two 50 MW klystrons and feeding the summed power into the SLED-II pulse compressor. Results from this experiment demonstrated that two of

  20. Development of C-band High-Power Mix-Mode RF Window

    CERN Document Server

    Michizono, S; Matsumoto, T; Nakao, K; Takenaka, T

    2004-01-01

    High power c-band (5712 MHz) rf system (40 MW, 2 μs, 50 Hz) is under consideration for the electron-linac upgrade aimed for the super KEKB project. An rf window, which isolates the vacuum and pass the rf power, is one of the most important components for the rf system. The window consists of a ceramic disk and a pill-box housing. The mix-mode rf window is designed so as to decrease the electric field on the periphery of the ceramic disk. A resonant ring is assembled in order to examine the high-power transmission test. The window was tested up to the transmission power of 160 MW. The rf losses are also measured during the rf operation.

  1. High-powered, solid-state rf systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past two years, the requirement to supply megawatts of rf power for space-based applications at uhf and L-band frequencies has caused dramatic increases in silicon solid-state power capabilities in the frequency range from 10 to 3000 MHz. Radar and communications requirements have caused similar increases in gallium arsenide solid-state power capabilities in the frequency ranges from 3000 to 10,000 MHz. This paper reviews the present state of the art for solid-state rf amplifiers for frequencies from 10 to 10,000 MHz. Information regarding power levels, size, weight, and cost will be given. Technical specifications regarding phase and amplitude stability, efficiency, and system architecture will be discussed. Solid-stage rf amplifier susceptibility to radiation damage will also be examined

  2. Summary of the 3rd workshop on high power RF-systems for accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigg, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this workshop was to bring together experts from the field of CW and high average power RF systems. The focus was on operational and reliability issues of high-power amplifiers using klystrons and tubes, large power supplies; as well as cavity design and low-level RF and feedback control systems. All these devices are used in synchrotron radiation facilities, high power linacs and collider rings, and cyclotrons. Furthermore, new technologies and their applications were introduced, amongst other: high power solid state amplifiers, IOT amplifiers, and high voltage power supplies employing solid state controllers/crowbars. Numerical methods for complete rf-field modeling of complex RF structures like cyclotrons were presented, as well as integrated RF-cavity designs (electro-magnetic fields and mechanical structure), using numerical methods. (author)

  3. Overview on thermal and mechanical challenges of high power RF electronic packaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, C.A.; Kregting, R.; Driel, W. van; Gielen, A.W.J.; Xiao, A.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    High Power RF electronics is one of the essential parts for wireless communication, including the personal communication, broadcasting, microwave radar, etc. Moreover, high efficient high power electronics has entered the ISM market, such as the power generator of microwave oven. Power electronics

  4. High-power RF cavity R ampersand D for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.; Lambertson, G.; Hodgson, J.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the development of a high-power test model of the 476 MHz RF cavity for the PEP-II B Factory. This cavity is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of a high-power design with higher-order mode (HOM) damping waveguides and the fabrication technologies involved, and it can also be used to evaluate aperture or loop couplers and various RF windows. Changes to the RF design to reduce peak surface heating are discussed and results of finite-element analyses of temperature and stress are presented. Fabrication methods for the prototype and subsequent production cavities are discussed

  5. Development of a high-power RF cavity for the PEP-II B factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Allen, M.A.; Saba, J.; Schwarz, H.

    1995-03-01

    The authors describe the development and fabrication of the first high-power RF cavity for PEP-II. Design choices and fabrication technologies for the first cavity and subsequent production cavities are described. Conditioning and high-power testing of the first and subsequent cavities are discussed, as well as integration of the cavity into modular RF systems for both high-energy and low-energy rings. Plans for installation of the cavity raft assemblies in the RF sections of the PEP tunnel are also considered

  6. A brief history of high power RF proton linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browne, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The first mention of linear acceleration was in a paper by G. Ising in 1924 in which he postulated the acceleration of positive ions induced by spark discharges which produced electric fields in gaps between a series of open-quotes drift tubesclose quotes. Ising apparently was not able to demonstrate his concept, most likely due to the limited state of electronic devices. Ising's work was followed by a seminal paper by R. Wideroe in 1928 in which he demonstrated the first linear accelerator. Wideroe was able to accelerate sodium or potassium ions to 50 keV of energy using drift tubes connected alternately to high frequency waves and to ground. Nuclear physics during this period was interested in accelerating protons, deuterons, electrons and alpha particles and not heavy ions like sodium or potassium. To accelerate the light ions required much higher frequencies than available at that time. So linear accelerators were not pursued heavily at that time. Research continued during the 1930s but the development of high frequency RF tubes for radar applications in World War 2 opened the potential for RF linear accelerators after the war. The Berkeley laboratory of E. 0. Lawrence under the leadership of Luis Alvarez developed a new linear proton accelerator concept that utilized drift tubes that required a full RF period to pass through as compared to the earlier concepts. This development resulted in the historic Berkeley 32 MeV proton linear accelerator which incorporated the open-quotes Alvarez drift tubeclose quotes as the basic acceleration scheme using surplus 200 MHz radar components

  7. High-power test of S-band klystron for long-pulse operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morii, Y.; Oshita, E.; Abe, S.; Keishi, T.; Tomimasu, T.; Ohkubo, Y.; Yoshinao, M.; Yonezawa, H.

    1994-01-01

    FELI(Free Electron Laser Research Institute, Inc.) is constructing a free electron laser facility covering from 20μm (infra red region) to 0.35μm (ultra violet region), using an S-band linac. The linac is commissioning now. An RF system of the linac for FELs is required of long pulse duration and high stability. S-band klystrons (TOSHIBA E3729) of the FELI linac are operated in three pulse operation modes (pulse width and peak RF power; 24μs-24MW, 12.5μs-34MW, 0.5μs-70MW). The S-band klystron and its modulator were combined to test their performance. The high power test results of the S-band klystron are summarized in this paper. (author)

  8. High power RF performance test of an improved SiC load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, W.H.; Kim, S.H.; Park, Y.J. [Pohang Accelerator Lab., Pohang Inst. of Sceince and Technology, Pohang (KR)] [and others

    1998-11-01

    Two prototypes of SiC loads sustaining a maximum peak power of 50 MW were fabricated by Nihon Koshuha Co. in Japan. The PAL conducted the high power RF performance tests of SiC loads to verify the operation characteristics for the application to the PLS Linac. The in-situ facility for the K 12 module was used for the test, which consists of a modulator and klystron system, waveguide network, vacuum and cooling system, and RF analyzing equipment. As the test results, no breakdown appeared up to 50 MW peak power of 1 {mu}s pulse width at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. However, as the peak power increased above 20 MW at 4 {mu}s with 10 Hz, the breakdown phenomena has been observed. Analysing the test results with the current operation power level of PLS Linac, it is confirmed that the SiC loads well satisfy the criteria of the PLS Linac operation. (author)

  9. Hollow-core fibers for high power pulse delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Jakobsen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate hollow-core fibers for fiber delivery of high power ultrashort laser pulses. We use numerical techniques to design an anti-resonant hollow-core fiber having one layer of non-touching tubes to determine which structures offer the best optical properties for the delivery of high power...... picosecond pulses. A novel fiber with 7 tubes and a core of 30 mu m was fabricated and it is here described and characterized, showing remarkable low loss, low bend loss, and good mode quality. Its optical properties are compared to both a 10 mu m and a 18 mu m core diameter photonic band gap hollow......-core fiber. The three fibers are characterized experimentally for the delivery of 22 picosecond pulses at 1032nm. We demonstrate flexible, diffraction limited beam delivery with output average powers in excess of 70W. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America...

  10. Control and performance improvements of a pulse compressor in use for testing accelerating structures at high power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Woolley

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available New developments relating to compact X-band, SLED-I type pulse compressors being developed at CERN for testing high gradient structures are described. Pulse compressors of interest take rf pulses from one or more high power klystrons with duration typically >1.5  μs and deliver up to 5 times the input power for a shorter duration <250  ns. Time domain models for pulse compressor operation with low level rf (LLRF control have been developed. Input drive amplitude and phase for each pulse is evolved with a control algorithm from the pulse compressor output for previous pulses. The goal is to deliver precise amplitude for pulses to test stands and precise amplitude and phase for pulses to accelerator systems. Control algorithms have been developed and validated experimentally.

  11. High power pulsed sources based on fiber amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canat, Guillaume; Jaouën, Yves; Mollier, Jean-Claude; Bouzinac, Jean-Pierre; Cariou, Jean-Pierre

    2017-11-01

    Cladding-pumped rare-earth-doped fiber laser technologies are currently among the best sources for high power applications. Theses extremely compact and robust sources appoint them as good candidate for aeronautical and space applications. The double-clad (DC) fiber converts the poor beamquality of high-power large-area pump diodes from the 1st cladding to laser light at another wavelength guided in an active single-mode core. High-power coherent MOPA (Master Oscillator Power Amplifier) sources (several 10W CW or several 100W in pulsed regime) will soon be achieved. Unfortunately it also brings nonlinear effects which quickly impairs output signal distortions. Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and optical parametric amplification (OPA) have been shown to be strong limitations. Based on amplifier modeling and experiments we discuss the performances of these sources.

  12. Pulsed rf systems for large storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1979-03-01

    The possibility is considered that by using a pulsed rf system a substantial reduction can be made in the rf power requirement for the next generation of large storage rings. For a ring with a sufficiently large circumference, the time between bunch passages, T/sub b/, can exceed the cavity filling time, T/sub f/. As the ratio T/sub b//T/sub f/ increases, it is clear that at some point the average power requirement can be reduced by pulsing the rf to the cavities. In this mode of operation, the rf power is turned on a filling time or so before the arrival of a bunch and is switched off again at the time of bunch passage. There is no rf energy in the accelerating structure, and hence no power dissipation, for most of the period between bunches

  13. Toward High-Power Klystrons With RF Power Conversion Efficiency on the Order of 90%

    CERN Document Server

    Baikov, Andrey Yu; Syratchev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The increase in efficiency of RF power generation for future large accelerators is considered a high priority issue. The vast majority of the existing commercial high-power RF klystrons operates in the electronic efficiency range between 40% and 55%. Only a few klystrons available on the market are capable of operating with 65% efficiency or above. In this paper, a new method to achieve 90% RF power conversion efficiency in a klystron amplifier is presented. The essential part of this method is a new bunching technique - bunching with bunch core oscillations. Computer simulations confirm that the RF production efficiency above 90% can be reached with this new bunching method. The results of a preliminary study of an L-band, 20-MW peak RF power multibeam klystron for Compact Linear Collider with the efficiency above 85% are presented.

  14. Pulsed rf superconductivity program at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-08-01

    Recent tests performed at SLAC on superconducting TM 010 caavities using short rf pulses (less than or equal to 2.5 μs) have established that at the cavity surface magnetic fields can be reached in the vicinity of the theoretical critical fields without an appreciable increase in average losses. Tests on niobium and lead cavities are reported. The pulse method seems to be best suited to study peak field properties of superconductors in the microwave band, without the limitations imposed by defects. The short pulses also seem to be more effective in decreasing the causes of field emission by rf processing. Applications of the pulsed rf superconductivity to high-gradient linear accelerators are also possible

  15. Interaction of high power ultrashort laser pulses with plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissler, M.

    2000-12-01

    The invention of short laser-pulses has opened a vast application range from testing ultra high-speed semiconductor devices to precision material processing, from triggering and tracing chemical reactions to sophisticated surgical applications in opthalmology and neurosurgery. In physical science, ultrashort light pulses enable researchers to follow ultrafast relaxation processes in the microcosm on time scale never before accessible and study light-matter-interactions at unprecedented intensity levels. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the interaction of ultrashort high power laser pulses with plasmas for a broad intensity range. First the ionization of atoms with intense laser fields is investigated. For sufficient strong and low frequent laser pulses, electrons can be removed from the core by a tunnel process through a potential barrier formed by the electric field of the laser. This mechanism is described by a well-established theory, but the interaction of few-cycle laser pulses with atoms can lead to regimes where the tunnel theory loses its validity. This regime is investigated and a new description of the ionization is found. Although the ionization plays a major role in many high-energy laser processes, there exist no simple and complete model for the evolution of laser pulses in field-ionizing media. A new propagation equation and the polarization response for field-ionizing media are presented and the results are compared with experimental data. Further the interaction of high power laser radiation with atoms result in nonlinear response of the electrons. The spectrum of this induced nonlinear dipole moment reaches beyond visible wavelengths into the x-ray regime. This effect is known as high harmonic generation (HHG) and is a promising tool for the generation of coherent shot wavelength radiation, but the conversions are still not efficient enough for most practical applications. Phase matching schemes to overcome the limitation are discussed

  16. Innovation on high-power long-pulse gyrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvak, Alexander; Sakamoto, Keishi; Thumm, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the worldwide development of high-power gyrotrons for magnetic confinement fusion plasma applications is described. After technology breakthroughs in research on gyrotron components in the 1990s, significant progress has been achieved in the last decade, in particular, in the field of long-pulse and continuous wave (CW) gyrotrons for a wide range of frequencies. At present, the development of 1 MW-class CW gyrotrons has been very successful; these are applicable for self-ignition experiments on fusion plasmas and their confinement in the tokamak ITER, for long-pulse confinement experiments in the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) and for EC H and CD in the future tokamak JT-60SA. For this progress in the field of high-power long-pulse gyrotrons, innovations such as the realization of high-efficiency stable oscillation in very high order cavity modes, the use of single-stage depressed collectors for energy recovery, highly efficient internal quasi-optical mode converters and synthetic diamond windows have essentially contributed. The total tube efficiencies are around 50% and the purity of the fundamental Gaussian output mode is 97% and higher. In addition, activities for advanced gyrotrons, e.g. a 2 MW gyrotron using a coaxial cavity, multi-frequency 1 MW gyrotrons and power modulation technology, have made progress.

  17. Compact rf polarizer and its application to pulse compression systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Franzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method of reducing the footprint and increasing the efficiency of the modern multi-MW rf pulse compressor. This system utilizes a high power rf polarizer to couple two circular waveguide modes in quadrature to a single resonant cavity in order to replicate the response of a traditional two cavity configuration using a 4-port hybrid. The 11.424 GHz, high-Q, spherical cavity has a 5.875 cm radius and is fed by the circularly polarized signal to simultaneously excite the degenerate TE_{114} modes. The overcoupled spherical cavity has a Q_{0} of 9.4×10^{4} and coupling factor (β of 7.69 thus providing a loaded quality factor Q_{L} of 1.06×10^{4} with a fill time of 150 ns. Cold tests of the polarizer demonstrated good agreement with the numerical design, showing transmission of -0.05  dB and reflection back to the input rectangular WR 90 waveguide less than -40  dB over a 100 MHz bandwidth. This novel rf pulse compressor was tested at SLAC using XL-4 Klystron that provided rf power up to 32 MW and generated peak output power of 205 MW and an average of 135 MW over the discharged signal. A general network analysis of the polarizer is discussed as well as the design and high power test of the rf pulse compressor.

  18. Ferroelectric switch for a high-power Ka-band active pulse compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-12-18

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW μs-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  19. High-power RF controls for the NBS-Los Alamos racetrack microtron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.M.; Biddl, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The high-power rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)-Los Alamos racetrack microtron (RTM) uses waveguide power splitters and waveguide phase shifters to distribute rf power from a single 500-kw cw klystron to four side-coupled accelerating structures. The amplitude and phase of each structure is controlled by a feedback system that uses the waveguide variable power splitters, waveguide phase shifters, and klystron drive as the active control elements. The feedback controls on the capture section use low-level rf amplitude and phase controls on the rf drive to the klystron. These controls are very fast with an open loop gain bandwidth of approximately 40 kHz. The feedback loop is identical to the feedback loop used in the chopper/buncher system described in another paper at this conference

  20. Pulsed RF Sources for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the workshop on pulsed RF sources for linear colliders. The workshop examined the performance of RF sources for possible future linear colliders. Important sources were presented on new type of klystrons, gyrotrons and gyroklystrons. A number of auxiliary topics were covered, including modulators, pulse compression, power extraction, windows, electron guns and gun codes. The workshop was sponsored by the International Committee for Future Accelerators(ICFA), the U.S. Department of Energy and the Center for Accelerator Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory. There were forty one papers presented at the workshop and all forty one have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  1. Development of high power pulsed CO2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Sadao; Matoba, Masafumi; Fujita, Hisanori; Daido, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Mitsuo

    1982-01-01

    The inertial nuclear fusion research using pellet implosion has rapidly progressed accompanying laser technique improvement and output increase. As the high output lasers for this purpose, Nd glass lasers or CO 2 lasers are used. The CO 2 lasers possess the characteristics required as reactor lasers, i.e., high efficiency, high frequency repetition, possibility of scale-up and economy. So, the technical development of high power CO 2 lasers assuming also as reactor drivers has been performed at a quick pace together with the research on the improvement of efficiency of pellet implosion by 10 μm laser beam. The Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, stated to build a laser system LEKKO No. 8 of 8 beams and 10 kJ based on the experiences in laser systems LEKKO No. 1 and LEKKO No. 2, and the system LEKKO No. 8 was completed in March, 1981. The operation tests for one year since then has indicated as the laser characteristics that the system performance was as designed initially. This paper reviews the structure, problems and present status of the large scale CO 2 lasers. In other words, the construction of laser system, CO 2 laser proper, oscillator, booster amplifier, prevention of parasitic oscillation, non-linear pulse propagation and fairing of output pulse form, system control and beam alignment, and high power problems are described. The results obtained are to be reported in subsequent issues. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. The UK High Power RF Faraday Partnership Industrial, Academia, and Public Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, A.D.R.; Carter, R.G.; Clunie, D.; Bowater, S.P.; Ellis, D.; Gamble, D.; Large, T.; Lucas, W.; Pettit, C.; Poole, M. W.; Smith, H.; Smith, P.W.; Wilcox, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    The High Power Radio Frequency (HPRF) Faraday Partnership is a UK technology forum for all users, designers, developers and researchers of RF and microwave devices and systems. High power RF and microwave engineering are key enabling technologies in a wide range of industrial sectors. Formed in October 2001 and funded initially by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, the purpose of the HPRF Faraday Partnership is the development of a vibrant research, development and manufacturing base capable of exploiting opportunities in high power radio-frequency engineering. The partnership includes the key UK industrial companies, research laboratories and university research groups. The number of partners is constantly growing and already numbers over thirty. The partnership provides the enabling technology for future high power RF systems and their power supplies through its research programme. It is training people for the sector through PhD studentships and employment as Research Associates. It is planned to develop a Masters Training program. Support and involvement in research for companies in the supply chain is provided through a Partnership Office, a web site and through a range of government funded research schemes. The HPRF Faraday Partnership is seeking to establish more long term international research and development collaborations

  3. A high-power rf linear accelerator for FELS [free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, R.L.; Watson, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a high average current rf linear accelerator suitable for driving short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FEL). It is concluded that the design of a room-temperature rf linear acelerator that can meet the stringent requirements of a high-power short-wavelength FEL appears possible. The accelerator requires the use of an advanced photoelectric injector that is under development; the accelerator components, however, do not require appreciable development. At these large beam currents, low-frequency, large-bore room-temperature cavities can be highly efficient and give all specified performance with minimal risk. 20 refs

  4. High power rf amplifiers for accelerator applications: The large orbit gyrotron and the high current, space charge enhanced relativistic klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringfield, R.M.; Fazio, M.V.; Rickel, D.G.; Kwan, T.J.T.; Peratt, A.L.; Kinross-Wright, J.; Van Haaften, F.W.; Hoeberling, R.F.; Faehl, R.; Carlsten, B.; Destler, W.W.; Warner, L.B.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos is investigating a number of high power microwave (HPM) sources for their potential to power advanced accelerators. Included in this investigation are the large orbit gyrotron amplifier and oscillator (LOG) and the relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA). LOG amplifier development is newly underway. Electron beam power levels of 3 GW, 70 ns duration, are planned, with anticipated conversion efficiencies into RF on the order of 20 percent. Ongoing investigations on this device include experimental improvement of the electron beam optics (to allow injection of a suitable fraction of the electron beam born in the gun into the amplifier structure), and computational studies of resonator design and RF extraction. Recent RKA studies have operated at electron beam powers into the device of 1.35 GW in microsecond duration pulses. The device has yielded modulated electron beam power approaching 300 MW using 3-5 kW of RF input drive. RF powers extracted into waveguide have been up to 70 MW, suggesting that more power is available from the device than has been converted to-date in the extractor

  5. Experimental study of rf pulsed heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Laurent

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop®, copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110°C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10×10^{6} rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.

  6. Electron beam gun with kinematic coupling for high power RF vacuum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchard, Philipp

    2016-11-22

    An electron beam gun for a high power RF vacuum device has components joined by a fixed kinematic coupling to provide both precise alignment and high voltage electrical insulation of the components. The kinematic coupling has high strength ceramic elements directly bonded to one or more non-ductile rigid metal components using a high temperature active metal brazing alloy. The ceramic elements have a convex surface that mates with concave grooves in another one of the components. The kinematic coupling, for example, may join a cathode assembly and/or a beam shaping focus electrode to a gun stem, which is preferably composed of ceramic. The electron beam gun may be part of a high power RF vacuum device such as, for example, a gyrotron, klystron, or magnetron.

  7. High-power CO laser with RF discharge for isotope separation employing condensation repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, I. Ya.; Koptev, A. V.

    2008-10-01

    High-power CO laser can be the effective tool in such applications as isotope separation using the free-jet CRISLA method. The way of transfer from CO small-scale experimental installation to industrial high-power CO lasers is proposed through the use of a low-current radio-frequency (RF) electric discharge in a supersonic stream without an electron gun. The calculation model of scaling CO laser with RF discharge in supersonic stream was developed. The developed model allows to calculate parameters of laser installation and optimize them with the purpose of reception of high efficiency and low cost of installation as a whole. The technical decision of industrial CO laser for isotope separation employing condensation repression is considered. The estimated cost of laser is some hundred thousand dollars USA and small sizes of laser head give possibility to install it in any place.

  8. High-power RF window and coupler development for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, M.; Fant, K.; Hodgson, J.; Judkins, J.; Schwarz, H.; Rimmer, R.A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and testing of the RF windows designed to transmit power to the PEP-II 476 MHz cavities. Design choices to maximize the reliability of the window are discussed. Fabrication technologies for the window are described and finite-element analysis of the assembly process is presented. Conditioning and high-power testing of the window are discussed. Design of the coupler assembly including the integration of the window and other components is reported

  9. High power pulsed magnetron sputtering of transparent conducting oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sittinger, V.; Ruske, F.; Werner, W.; Jacobs, C.; Szyszka, B.; Christie, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) has been used in order to study the deposition of transparent conducting oxides. We summarize the studies carried out on different materials (indium tin oxide-ITO and aluminium-doped zinc oxide-AZO) using rather different technological approaches, namely sputtering of ceramic targets and reactive sputtering. For the deposition of AZO reactive HPPMS for metallic targets has been used. A feedback control loop has been implemented in order to stabilize the discharge at any given setpoint on the hysteresis curve. The hysteresis was also found to have a rather untypical form. Reactive HPPMS was found to be a promising tool for obtaining high quality films of low total thickness. In the case of ITO deposition a ceramic target has been used. The process has been characterized in terms of its plasma emission and increasing indium ionization was found for higher peak power densities. The properties of the deposited films were compared to DC sputtered films. While for DC sputtering the choice of oxygen addition and shieldings is crucial for determining surface morphology and resistivity, in HPPMS sputtering peak power density has been found to be a good parameter for influencing the crystal structure. The morphologies obtained differ strongly from those seen in DC sputtering. At high power densities films with low surface roughness and excellent resistivity could be deposited without the use of shieldings

  10. Design of high power solid-state pulsed laser resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narro, R.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.

    2009-01-01

    Methods and configurations for the design of high power solid-state pulsed laser resonators, operating in free running, are presented. For fundamental mode high power resonators, a method is proposed for the design of a resonator with joined stability zones. In the case of multimode resonators, two configurations are introduced for maximizing the laser overall efficiency due to the compensation of the astigmatism induced by the excitation. The first configuration consists in a triangular ring resonator. The results for this configuration are discussed theoretically, showing that it is possible to compensate the astigmatism of the thermal lens virtually in a 100%; however this is only possible for a specific pumping power. The second configuration proposes a dual-active medium resonator, rotated 90 degree one from the other around the optical axis, where each active medium acts as an astigmatic lens of the same dioptric power. The reliability of this configuration is corroborated experimentally using a Nd:YAG dual-active medium resonator. It is found that in the pumping power range where the astigmatism compensation is possible, the overall efficiency is constant, even when increasing the excitation power with the consequent increase of the thermal lens dioptric power. (Author)

  11. Fast SMES for generation of high power pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juengst, K.P.; Salbert, H.

    1996-01-01

    A technique for generation of high power pulses based on a fast SMES has been developed and a model of a power modulator for linear accelerators was built. The basic function of the modulator that generates 2 ms long, approximately 1 MW power pulses at a repetition rate of 10 Hz is described in this paper. A modular construction of the SMES that consists of up to six coils has been chosen to meet the demands of several applications in high energy physics and energy distribution. The rate of change of magnetic field achieved during ramping of the magnet was more than 60 T/s without a quench. The magnet was designed with respect to the high AC losses during repetitive ramping of the SMES. The suitability of mixed matrix superconductors instead of more expensive net frequency wires for this kind of AC stress was investigated. The applied mixed matrix Cu/CuNi/NbTi wire and the construction of a single coil is described

  12. High-power rf controls for the NBS-Los Alamos racetrack microtron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.M.; Biddle, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The high-power rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)-Los Alamos racetrack microtron (RTM) uses waveguide power splitters and waveguide phase shifters to distribute rf power from a single 500-kW cw klystron to four side-coupled accelerating structures. The amplitude and phase of each structure is controlled by a feedback system that uses the waveguide variable power splitters, waveguide phase shifters, and klystron drive as the active control elements. A block diagram of this system is shown, as is a subset of the complete system on which the measurements reported in this paper were performed. The feedback controls on the capture section use low-level rf amplitude and phase controls on the rf drive to the klystron. These controls are very fast with an open loop gain bandwidth of approximately 40 kHz. The feedback loop is identical to the feedback loop used in the chopper/buncher system described in another paper at this conference. 4 refs., 8 figs

  13. Compact high efficiency, light weight 200-800 MHz high power RF source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrader, M.B.; Preist, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    There has long been a need for a new more efficient less bulky high power RF power source to drive accelerators in the 200 to 800 MHz region. Results on a recent 5-year EIMAC sponsored R and D program which have lead to the introduction of the Klystrode for UHF television and troposcatter applications indicate that at power levels of 1MW or more efficiencies in excess of 75% can be obtained at 450 MHz. Efficiencies of this order coupled with potential size and weight parameters which are a fraction of those of existing high power UHF generators open up new applications which heretofore would have been impractical if not impossible. Measurements at 470 MHz on existing Klystrodes are given. Projected operating conditions for a 1MW 450 MHz Klystrode having an overall length of 60 inches and a total tube, circuit, and magnet weight of 250 pounds is presented

  14. Analysis of RF section of 250 kW CW C-Band high power klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badola, Richa; Kaushik, Meenu; Baloda, Suman; Kirti; Vrati; Lamba, O.S.; Joshi, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Klystron is a microwave tube which is used as a power amplifier in various applications like radar, particle accelerators and thermonuclear reactors. The paper deals with the analysis of RF section of 250 kW CW C band high power klystron for 50 to 60 kV beam voltage The simulation is done using Poisson's superfish and AJ disk software's Design of cavity is done using superfish. The result of superfish is used to decide the dimensions of the geometry of the cavity and AJ disk is used to determined the centre to centre distances between the cavities in order to obtain the desired powers. (author)

  15. Experimental study of rf pulsed heating

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, L; Nantista, C; Dolgashev, V; Higashi, Y; Aicheler, M; Tantawi, S; Wuensch, W

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop (R), copper silver, and silver plated co...

  16. High power test of RF window and coaxial line in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, D.; Champion, M.; Gormley, M.; Kerns, Q.; Koepke, K.; Moretti, A.

    1993-01-01

    Primary rf input couplers for the superconducting accelerating cavities of the TESLA electron linear accelerator test to be performed at DESY, Hamburg, Germany are under development at both DESY and Fermilab. The input couplers consist of a WR650 waveguide to coaxial line transition with an integral ceramic window, a coaxial connection to the superconducting accelerating cavity with a second ceramic window located at the liquid nitrogen heat intercept location, and bellows on both sides of the cold window to allow for cavity motion during cooldown, coupling adjustments and easier assembly. To permit in situ high peak power processing of the TESLA superconducting accelerating cavities, the input couplers are designed to transmit nominally 1 ms long, 2 MW peak, 1.3 GHz rf pulses from the WR650 waveguide at room temperature to the cavities at 1.8 K. The coaxial part of the Fermilab TESLA input coupler design has been tested up to 1.7 MW using the prototype 805 MHz rf source located at the A0 service building of the Tevatron. The rf source, the testing system and the test results are described

  17. Role of advanced RF/microwave technology and high power switch technology for developing/upgrading compact/existing accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2001-01-01

    With the advances in high power microwave devices as well as in microwave technologies it has become possible to go on higher frequencies at higher powers as well as to go for newer devices which are more efficient and compact and hence reducing the power needs as well as space and weight requirement for accelerators. New devices are now available in higher frequency spectrum for example at C-Band, X-band and even higher. Also new devices like klystrodes/Higher Order Mode Inductive Output Tubes (HOM IOTs) are now becoming competitors for existing tubes which are in use at present accelerator complexes. The design/planning of the accelerators used for particle physics research, medical accelerators, industrial irradiation, or even upcoming Driver Accelerators for Sub Critical Reactors for nuclear power generation are being done taking into account the newer technologies. The accelerators which use magnetrons, klystrons and similar devices at S-Band can be modified/redesigned with devices at higher frequencies like X-Band. Pulsed accelerators need high power high voltage pulsed modulators whereas CW accelerators need high voltage power supplies for functioning of RF / Microwave tubes. There had been a remarkable growth in the development and availability of solid state switches both for switching the pulsed modulators for microwave tubes as well as for making high frequency switch mode power supplies. Present paper discusses some of the advanced devices/technologies in this field as well as their capability to make advanced/compact/reliable accelerators. Microwave systems developed/under development at Centre for Advanced Technology are also discussed briefly along with some of the efforts done to make them compact. An overview of state of art vacuum tube devices and solid state switch technologies is given. (author)

  18. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette Marie; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power pulsed laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kind of hollow core photonic band gap fibers......We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power pulsed laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kind of hollow core photonic band gap fibers...

  19. Design, Fabrication and High Power RF Test of a C-band Accelerating Structure for Feasibility Study of the SPARC photo-injector energy upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Alesini, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Di Raddo, R.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Lollo, V.; Marcellini, F.; Higo, T.; Kakihara, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Campogiani, G.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Persichelli, S.; Spizzo, V.; Verdú-Andrés, S.

    2011-01-01

    The energy upgrade of the SPARC photo-injector from 160 to more than 260 MeV will be done by replacing a low gradient 3m S-Band structure with two 1.4m high gradient C-band structures. The structures are travelling wave, constant impedance sections, have symmetric waveguide input couplers and have been optimized to work with a SLED RF input pulse. A prototype with a reduced number of cells has been fabricated and tested at high power in KEK (Japan) giving very good performances in terms of breakdown rates (10^6 bpp/m) at high accelerating gradient (>50 MV/m). The paper illustrates the design criteria of the structures, the fabrication procedure and the high power RF test results.

  20. High power pulsed neutron source for electronuclear installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenev, S.A.; Puzynin, I.V.; Samoilov, V.N.; Sissakian, A.N. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    The pulsed neutron source based on the reaction T(d,n)He is described in this report. The source consists of pulsed a pulsed Arkad`ev-Marx generator and a vacuum diode with explosive ion emission. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Design and development of power supplies for high power IOT based RF amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Yashwant; Kumari, S.; Ghosh, M.K.; Bera, A.; Sadhukhan, A.; Pal, S.S.; Khare, V.K.; Tiwari, T.P.; Thakur, S.K.; Saha, S.

    2013-01-01

    Design, development, circuit topology, function of system components and key system specifications of different power supplies for biasing electrodes of Thales Inductive Output Tube (IOT) based high power RF amplifier are presented in this paper. A high voltage power supply (-30 kV, 3.2A dc) with fast (∼microsecond) crowbar protection circuit is designed, developed and commissioned at VECC for testing the complete setup. Other power supplies for biasing grid electrode (300V, 0.5A dc) and Ion Pump (3 kV, 0.1mA dc) of IOT are also designed, developed and tested with actual load. A HV Deck (60kV Isolation) is specially designed in house to place these power supplies which are floating at 30 kV. All these power supplies are powered by an Isolation Transformer (5 kVA, 60 kV isolation) designed and developed in VECC. (author)

  2. Developments and directions in 200 MHz very high power RF at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliff, R.; Bush, E.D.; DeHaven, R.A.; Harris, H.W.; Parsons, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), is a linear particle accelerator a half-mile long. It produces an 800 million electron- volt hydrogen-ion beam at an average current of more than one milliamp. The first RF section of the accelerator consists of four Alvarez drift-tube structures. Each of these structures is excited by an amplifier module at a frequency of 201.25 MHz. These amplifiers operate at a duty of 13 percent or more and at peak pulsed power levels of about 2.5 million watts. The second RF accelerator section consists of forty-four side-coupled-cavity structures. Each of these is excited by an amplifier module at a frequency of 805 MHz. These amplifiers operate at a duty of up to 12 percent and at peak pulsed power levels of about 1.2 million watts. The relatively high average beam current in the accelerator places a heavy demand upon components in the RF systems. The 201-MHz modules have always required a large share of maintenance efforts. In recent years, the four 201.25 MHz modules have been responsible for more than twice as much accelerator down-time as have the forty-four 805 MHz modules. This paper reviews recent, ongoing, and planned improvements in the 201-MHz systems. The Burle Industries 7835 super power triode is used in the final power amplifiers of each of the 201-MHz modules. This tube has been modified for operation at LAMPF by the addition of Penning ion vacuum''pumps.'' This has enabled more effective tube conditioning and restarting. A calorimetry system of high accuracy is in development to monitor tube plate-power dissipation

  3. 1 ms pulse beam generation and acceleration by photo-cathode RF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Ken; Hayano, Hitoshi; Urakawa, Jyunji

    2012-01-01

    We report successful generation of 1 ms long pulse and multi-bunch electron beam by a normal conducting photo-cathode RF gun at KEK-STF (Superconducting accelerator Test Facility). The 1 ms long Pulse beam generated by the RF gun is delivered to the injection line to examine stable acceleration and precise RF control. The 1 ms pulse beam is also used to demonstrate high brightness X-ray generation by inverse laser Compton scattering which will be also carried out at STF, supported by MEXT Quantum Beam project. The RF gun cavity has been fabricated by DESY-FNAL-KEK collaboration. Performing high power RF process and ethanol rinse to the cavity, a stable operation of the cavity up to 4.0 MW RF input power with ∼1 ms pulse length was achieved by keeping even low dark current. The beam generation test has been started since February 2012, 1 ms pulse was generated in March 2012. We explain about the STF injector and report the basic property of this 1 ms beam generation. (author)

  4. Pulsed discharges produced by high-power surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhle, A.; Ivanov, O.; Kolisko, A.; Kortshagen, U.; Schlüter, H.; Vikharev, A.

    1996-02-01

    The mechanisms of the ionization front advance in surface-wave-produced discharges are investigated using two experimental set-ups. The high-power surface waves are excited in a 3 cm wavelength band by a surfaguide and a novel type of launcher (an E-plane junction). The ionization front velocity of the surface wave is measured for a wide range of gas pressures, incident microwave power and initial pre-ionization. The experimental results are compared with theoretical ones based on three different models. The comparison between theory and experiment allows one to suggest a new interpretation of the ionization front's advance. The ionization front velocity is determined by a breakdown wave or an ionization wave in the electric field of a high-power surface wave in the zone near the ionization front.

  5. High-power pre-chirp managed amplification of femtosecond pulses at high repetition rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Wenxue; Zhao, Jian; Bai, Dongbi; Luo, Daping; Zeng, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond pulses at 250 MHz repetition rate from a mode-locked fiber laser are amplified to high power in a pre-chirp managed amplifier. The experimental strategy offers a potential towards high-power ultrashort laser pulses at high repetition rates. By investigating the laser pulse evolution in the amplification processes, we show that self-similar evolution, finite gain bandwidth and mode instabilities determine pulse characteristics in different regimes. Further average power scaling is limited by the mode instabilities. Nevertheless, this laser system enables us to achieve sub-50 fs pulses with an average power of 93 W. (letter)

  6. Design and RF test result of High Power Hybrid Combiner for Helicon Wave Current Drive in KSTAR Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Wi, H. H.; Wang, S. J.; Kwak, J. G. [NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    200 kW RF power will be injected to plasmas through the traveling wave antenna after combining four klystrons output powers using three hybrid combiners. Each klystron produces 60 kW output at the frequency of 500 MHz. RF power combiners commonly used to divide or combine output powers for various rf and microwave applications. It is divided into several types according to the design type such as Wilkinson combiner, radial and quadrature hybrid combiner. We designed high power hybrid combiners using 6-1/8 inch coaxial line. The power combiner has many advantages such as high isolation, low insertion loss and high power handling capability. In this paper design and rf test results of high power combiners will be described. High power combiners using three coaxial hybrid couplers will be utilized for effectively combining of 500 MHz, 200 kW output powers generated by four klystrons. We have designed, fabricated, and tested a 6-1/8 inch coaxial hybrid combiners at 500 MHz for efficiently off-axis Helicon wave current drive in KSTAR. Simulation and test results of high power coaxial hybrid combiners are good agreement.

  7. Short Pulse Switches for Airborne High Power Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-10-01

    4120 4130 4140 4150 4160 417 0 4180 4190 4195 «00 4ßl0 4620 «25 «30 «35 «38 «40 «50 «60 4480 4500C 4510C 5000 5010 45...IF(NTIM.GE.31)GO TO 66 GO TO 7 132 ***** i»a *i innithriinii ■F»’,»«"»W"II’III1|^-P ■’■I1 "’ "»UIP«». .- 4130 6R KCYC-KCYC*! 4140 IF...flow lato acci»ulator lB3/a«o U3/ sae 1 q1 • Inlet flow to actuator ln J/aac 221 . ri ■rf-iiTiii^aWilifrÜttli Aifctrfi i I w WM

  8. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  9. Characterization of a high-power/current pulsed magnetized arc discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, J. J.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Morgan, T. W.; D.C. Schram,; De Temmerman, G.

    2012-01-01

    A high-power pulsed magnetized arc discharge has been developed to allow the superimposition of a dc plasma and a high-power plasma impulse with a single plasma source. A capacitor bank (8400 mu F) is parallel-coupled to the current regulated power supply. The current is transiently increased from

  10. Characterization of a high-power/current pulsed magnetized arc discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, J.J.; Meiden, van der H.J.; Morgan, T.W.; Schram, D.C.; De Temmerman, G.C.

    2012-01-01

    A high-power pulsed magnetized arc discharge has been developed to allow the superimposition of a dc plasma and a high-power plasma impulse with a single plasma source. A capacitor bank (8400 µF) is parallel-coupled to the current regulated power supply. The current is transiently increased from its

  11. Short-pulse optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification for the generation of high-power few-cycle pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, Zs.; Osterhoff, J.; Hoerlein, R.; Karsch, S.; Fuoloep, J.A.; Krausz, F.; Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet, Muenchen

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. In the quest for a way to generate ultrashort, high-power, few-cycle laser pulses the discovery of optical parametric amplification (OPA) has opened up to the path towards a completely new regime, well beyond that of conventional laser amplification technology. The main advantage of this parametric amplification process is that it allows for an extremely broad amplification bandwidth compared to any known laser amplifier medium. When combined with the chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) principle (i.e. OPCPA), on one hand pulses of just 10 fs duration and 8 mJ pulse energy have been demonstrated. On the other hand, pulse energies of up to 30 J were also achieved on a different OPCPA system; the pulse duration in this case, however, was 100 fs. In order to combine ultrashort pulse durations (i.e. pulses in the few-cycle regime) with high pulse energies (i.e. in the Joule range) we propose tu pump on OPCPA chain with TW-scale short pulses (100 fs - 1 ps instead of > 100 ps of previous OPCPA systems) delivered by a conventional CPA system. This approach inherently improves the conditions for generating high-power ultrashort pulses using OPCPA in the following ways. Firstly, the short pump pulse duration reduces the necessary stretching factor for the seed pulse, thereby increasing stretching and compression fidelity. Secondly, also due to the shortened pump pulse duration, a much higher contrast is achieved. Finally, the significantly increased pump power makes the use of thinner OPCPA crystals possible, which implies an even broader amplification bandwidth, thereby allowing for even shorter pulses. We carried out theoretical investigations to show the feasibility of such a set-up. Alongside these studies we will also present preliminary experimental results of an OPCPA system pumped by the output of our Ti:Sapphire ATLAS laser, currently delivering 350 mJ in 43 fs. An insight into the planned scaling of this technique to petawatt

  12. High-power Yb-doped continuous-wave and pulsed fibre lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-05

    Jan 5, 2014 ... In this article, a review of Yb-doped CW and pulsed fibre lasers along with our study on self-pulsing dynamics in CW fibre lasers to find its role in high-power fibre laser development and the physical ... Solid State Laser Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, India ...

  13. New fat suppression RF pulse with shorter duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Kojiro; Ukai, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    The fat suppression radio frequency pulse currently employed for MRI, which selectively saturates the frequency of the fat, has the narrow-band frequency characteristics. Therefore, the application duration for the pulse employed tends to be prolonged. In the present study, we designed a new fat suppression radiofrequency (RF) pulse using the Laguerre function in order to shorten the duration for fat suppression RF pulse and conducted an evaluation with the clinical equipment. The length of the RF pulse that we created allowed to reduce the duration by 47.3% compared with that employed for the clinical equipment. In addition, in the MR imaging evaluation, the new pulse was confirmed to have the fat suppression effect equivalent to that employed for the clinical equipment. (author)

  14. Design of an RF Antenna for a Large-Bore, High Power, Steady State Plasma Processing Chamber for Material Separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Freeman, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure

  15. Development of an S-band high-power pillbox-type RF window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, A.; Matsumoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    We report on the development of RF windows used to handle a high transmission power up to 110 MW for the Japan Linear Collider. A detailed simulation on multipactoring has been carried out. The results were compared with cathode-luminescence on the surface of alumina RF windows experimentally observed with power transmission up to 200 MW. (Author) 10 refs., 9 figs

  16. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data of the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  17. Development of multi-channel high power rectangular RF window for LHCD system employing high temperature vacuum brazing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P K; Ambulkar, K K; Parmar, P R; Virani, C G; Thakur, A L; Joshi, L M; Nangru, S C

    2010-01-01

    A 3.7 GHz., 120 kW (pulsed), lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system is employed to drive non-inductive plasma current in ADITYA tokamak. The rf power is coupled to the plasma through grill antenna and is placed in vacuum environment. A vacuum break between the pressurized transmission line and the grill antenna is achieved with the help of a multi (eight) channel rectangular RF vacuum window. The phasing between adjacent channels of 8-channel window (arranged in two rows) is important for launching lower hybrid waves and each channel should have independent vacuum window so that phase information is retained. The geometrical parameter of the grill antenna, like periodicity (9mm), channel dimensions (cross sectional dimension of 76mm x 7mm), etc. is to be maintained. These design constraint demanded a development of a multi channel rectangular RF vacuum window. To handle rf losses and thermal effects, high temperature vacuum brazing techniques is desired. Based on the above requirements we have successfully developed a multi channel rectangular rf vacuum window employing high temperature vacuum brazing technique. During the development process we could optimize the chemical processing parameters, brazing process parameters, jigs and fixtures for high temperature brazing and leak testing, etc. Finally the window is tested for low power rf performance using VNA. In this paper we would present the development of the said window in detail along with its mechanical, vacuum and rf performances.

  18. Development of multi-channel high power rectangular RF window for LHCD system employing high temperature vacuum brazing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, P K; Ambulkar, K K; Parmar, P R; Virani, C G; Thakur, A L [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Joshi, L M; Nangru, S C, E-mail: pramod@ipr.res.i [Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute, Pilani, Rajasthan 333 031 (India)

    2010-02-01

    A 3.7 GHz., 120 kW (pulsed), lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system is employed to drive non-inductive plasma current in ADITYA tokamak. The rf power is coupled to the plasma through grill antenna and is placed in vacuum environment. A vacuum break between the pressurized transmission line and the grill antenna is achieved with the help of a multi (eight) channel rectangular RF vacuum window. The phasing between adjacent channels of 8-channel window (arranged in two rows) is important for launching lower hybrid waves and each channel should have independent vacuum window so that phase information is retained. The geometrical parameter of the grill antenna, like periodicity (9mm), channel dimensions (cross sectional dimension of 76mm x 7mm), etc. is to be maintained. These design constraint demanded a development of a multi channel rectangular RF vacuum window. To handle rf losses and thermal effects, high temperature vacuum brazing techniques is desired. Based on the above requirements we have successfully developed a multi channel rectangular rf vacuum window employing high temperature vacuum brazing technique. During the development process we could optimize the chemical processing parameters, brazing process parameters, jigs and fixtures for high temperature brazing and leak testing, etc. Finally the window is tested for low power rf performance using VNA. In this paper we would present the development of the said window in detail along with its mechanical, vacuum and rf performances.

  19. An ultra short pulse reconstruction software applied to the GEMINI high power laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galletti, Mario, E-mail: mario.gall22@gmail.com [INFN – LNF, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Galimberti, Marco [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Hooker, Chris [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Chekhlov, Oleg; Tang, Yunxin [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Bisesto, Fabrizio Giuseppe [INFN – LNF, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Curcio, Alessandro [INFN – LNF, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Sapienza – University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Rome (Italy); Anania, Maria Pia [INFN – LNF, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Giulietti, Danilo [Physics Department of the University and INFN, Pisa (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    The GRENOUILLE traces of Gemini pulses (15 J, 30 fs, PW, shot per 20 s) were acquired in the Gemini Target Area PetaWatt at the Central Laser Facility (CLF), Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). A comparison between the characterizations of the laser pulse parameters made using two different types of algorithms: Video Frog and GRenouille/FrOG (GROG), was made. The temporal and spectral parameters came out to be in great agreement for the two kinds of algorithms. In this experimental campaign it has been showed how GROG, the developed algorithm, works as well as VideoFrog algorithm with the PetaWatt pulse class. - Highlights: • Integration of the diagnostic tool on high power laser. • Validation of the GROG algorithm in comparison to a well-known commercial available software. • Complete characterization of the GEMINI ultra-short high power laser pulse.

  20. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry using Pulsed, High Power LED Volume Illumination

    OpenAIRE

    Buchmann, N. A.; Willert, C.; Soria, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of high-power light emitting diode (LED) illumination in Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) as an alternative to traditional laser-based illumination. The solid-state LED devices can provide averaged radiant power in excess of 10W and by operating the LEDs with short current pulses, considerably higher than in continuous operation, light pulses of sufficient energy suitable for imaging micron-sized particles can be generated. The feasibility of this LED-based ill...

  1. Monitoring of energetic characteristics of electron beams during formation of high-power pulsed bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivaschenko, D.M.; Mordasov, N.G.; Chlenov, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    A method and a device for monitoring the dynamic and integrated characteristics of high-power electron and bremsstrahlung beams of the pulse accelerators are proposed. The transfer functions for various types of a target in operating conditions of the pulse accelerator UIN-10 are presented. Possibilities if the integrated diagnostics of acceleration rate of the electron beams with simultaneous testing of the bremsstrahlung parameters as a local field point beyond the converting target are shown [ru

  2. Look at energy compression as an assist for high power rf production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birx, D.L.; Farkas, Z.D.; Wilson, P.B.

    1984-01-01

    The desire to construct electron linacs of higher and higher energies, coupled with the realities of available funding and real estate, has forced machine designers to reassess the limitations in both accelerator gradient (MeV/m) and energy. The gradients achieved in current radio-frequency (RF) linacs are sometimes set by electrical breakdown in the accelerating structure, but are in most cases determined by the RF power level available to drive the linac. In this paper we will not discuss RF power sources in general, but rather take a brief look at several energy compression schemes which might be of service in helping to make better use of the sources we employ. We will, however, diverge for a bit and discuss what the RF power requirements are. 12 references, 21 figures, 3 tables

  3. Design of high-power, broadband 180o pulses and mixing sequences for fast MAS solid state chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, Christian; Herbst, Jirada; Kirschstein, Anika; Leppert, Joerg; Ohlenschlaeger, Oliver; Goerlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2009-01-01

    An approach for the design of high-power, broadband 180 o pulses and mixing sequences for generating dipolar and scalar coupling mediated 13 C- 13 C chemical shift correlation spectra of isotopically labelled biological systems at fast magic-angle spinning frequencies without 1 H decoupling during mixing is presented. Considering RF field strengths in the range of 100-120 kHz, as typically available in MAS probes employed at high spinning speeds, and limited B 1 field inhomogeneities, the Fourier coefficients defining the phase modulation profile of the RF pulses were optimised numerically to obtain broadband inversion and refocussing pulses and mixing sequences. Experimental measurements were carried out to assess the performance characteristics of the mixing sequences reported here

  4. Lasertron, a pulsed RF-source using laser triggered photocathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Masakazu.

    1988-12-01

    A new pulsed RF-source, 'Lasertron', are being developed as a possible RF-power source for future electron-positron linear colliders. In a series of systematic study, a prototype lasertron has been fabricated and tested. A peak power of 80 kW is attained at 2.856 GHz RF-frequency in 1-μs time duration. This paper describes the experimental results of the lasertron including the developments of the photocathode and the laser system. Test results are compared with the analysis of beam dynamics in the lasertron. (author)

  5. Development and simulation of RF components for high power millimeter wave gyrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyaslavets, M.; Sato, M.; Shimozuma, T.; Takita, Y.; Idei, H.; Kubo, S.; Ohkubo, K.; Hayashi, K.

    1996-11-01

    To test gyrotron RF components, efficient low-power generators for rotating high-order modes of high purity are necessary. Designs of generators for the TE{sub 15,3} mode at 84 GHz and for the TE{sub 31,8} mode at 168 GHz are presented and some preliminary test results are discussed. In addition, Toshiba gyrotron cavities at 168 GHz were analyzed for leakage of RF power in the beam tunnel. To decrease RF power leakage, the declination angle of the cut-off cavity cross section has to be decreased. A TE{sub 15,3} waveguide nonlinear uptaper is analyzed at 84 GHz as well as 168 GHz uptapers. Since the calculated conversion losses are slightly higher than designed value, an optimization of those uptapers may be required. (author)

  6. High-power RF window design for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, M.; Hodgson, J.; Ng, C.; Schwarz, H.; Skarpaas, K.; Kroll, N.; Rimmer, R.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the design of RF windows to transmit up to 500 kW CW to the PEP-II 476 MHz cavities. RF analysis of the windows using high-frequency simulation codes are described. These provide information about the power loss distribution in the ceramic and tim matching properties of the structure. Finite-element analyses of the resulting temperature distribution and thermal stresses are presented. Fabrication methods including a proposed scheme to compensate for thermal expansion s are discussed and hardware tests to validate this approach are described. The effects of surface coatings (intentional and otherwise) and the application of air cooling are considered

  7. Design of a high-power test model of the PEP-II rf cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.D.; Bell, R.A.; Hodgson, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    The design of a normal-conducting high-power test cavity (HPTC) for PEP-II is described. The cavity includes HOM loading waveguides and provisions for testing two alternate input coupling schemes. 3-D electromagnetic field simulations provided input information for the surface power deposition. Finite element codes were utilized for thermal and stress analyses of the cavity to arrive at a suitable mechanical design capable of handling the high power dissipation. The mechanical design approach with emphasis on the cooling channel layout and mechanical stress reduction is described

  8. Influence of a falling edge on high power microwave pulse combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiawei; Huang, Wenhua; Zhu, Qi; Xiao, Renzhen; Shao, Hao

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an explanation of the influence of a microwave falling edge on high-power microwave pulse combination. Through particle-in-cell simulations, we discover that the falling edge is the driving factor that limits the output power of the combined pulses. We demonstrate that the space charge field, which accumulates to become comparable to the E-field at the falling edge of the former pulse, will trap the electrons in the gas layer and decrease its energy to attain a high ionization rate. Hence, avalanche discharge, caused by trapped electrons, makes the plasma density to approach the critical density and cuts off the latter microwave pulse. An X-band combination experiment is conducted with different pulse intervals. This experiment confirms that the high density plasma induced by the falling edge can cut off the latter pulse, and that the time required for plasma recombination in the transmission channel is several microseconds. To ensure a high output power for combined pulses, the latter pulse should be moved ahead of the falling edge of the former one, and consequently, a beat wave with high peak power becomes the output by adding two pulses with normal amplitudes.

  9. Electron pulse shaping in the FELIX RF accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weits, H. H.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Oepts, D.; van der Meer, A. F. G.

    1999-01-01

    The FELIX free-electron laser uses short pulses of relativistic electrons produced by an RF accelerator. The design target for the duration of these electron bunches was around 3 ps. In experiments we observed that the bunches emit coherently enhanced spontaneous emission (CSE) when they travel

  10. Suppression of multipacting in high power RF couplers operating with superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostroumov, P.N., E-mail: ostroumov@frib.msu.edu [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Kazakov, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Morris, D.; Larter, T.; Plastun, A.S.; Popielarski, J.; Wei, J.; Xu, T. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Capacitive input couplers based on a 50 Ω coaxial transmission line are frequently used to transmit RF power to superconducting (SC) resonators operating in CW mode. It is well known that coaxial transmission lines are prone to multipacting phenomenon in a wide range of RF power level and operating frequency. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being constructed at Michigan State University includes two types of quarter wave SC resonators (QWR) operating at 80.5 MHz and two types of half wave SC resonators (HWR) operating at 322 MHz. As was reported in ref. [1] a capacitive input coupler used with HWRs was experiencing strong multipacting that resulted in a long conditioning time prior the cavity testing at design levels of accelerating fields. We have developed an insert into 50 Ω coaxial transmission line that provides opportunity to bias the RF coupler antenna and protect the amplifier from the bias potential in the case of breakdown in DC isolation. Two of such devices have been built and are currently used for the off-line testing of 8 HWRs installed in the cryomodule.

  11. Performance of the Crowbar of the LHC High Power RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Ravidà, G; Valuch, D

    2012-01-01

    The counter-rotating proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are captured and accelerated to their final energies by two identical 400 MHz Radio Frequency (RF) systems. The RF power source required for each beam comprises eight 300 kW klystrons. The output power of each klystron is fed via a circulator and a waveguide line to the input coupler of a single-cell superconducting (SC) cavity. Each unit of four klystrons is powered by a -100kV/40A AC/DC power converter. A fast protection system (crowbar) protects the four klystrons in each of these units. Although the LHC RF system has shown has very good performance, operational experience has shown that the five-gap double-ended thyratrons used in the crowbar system suffer, from time to time, from auto-firing, which result in beam dumps. This paper presents the recent results obtained with an alternative solution based on solid state thyristors. Comparative measurements with the thyratron are shown.

  12. Self-channeling of high-power laser pulses through strong atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñano, J.; Palastro, J. P.; Hafizi, B.; Helle, M. H.; DiComo, G. P.

    2017-07-01

    We present an unusual example of truly long-range propagation of high-power laser pulses through strong atmospheric turbulence. A form of nonlinear self-channeling is achieved when the laser power is close to the self-focusing power of air and the transverse dimensions of the pulse are smaller than the coherence diameter of turbulence. In this mode, nonlinear self-focusing counteracts diffraction, and turbulence-induced spreading is greatly reduced. Furthermore, the laser intensity is below the ionization threshold so that multiphoton absorption and plasma defocusing are avoided. Simulations show that the pulse can propagate many Rayleigh lengths (several kilometers) while maintaining a high intensity. In the presence of aerosols, or other extinction mechanisms that deplete laser energy, the pulse can be chirped to maintain the channeling.

  13. Emission properties of diode laser bars during pulsed high-power operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempel, Martin; Tomm, Jens W; Elsaesser, Thomas; Hennig, Petra

    2011-01-01

    High-power diode laser bars (cm-bars) are subjected to single pulse step tests carried out up to and beyond their ultimate limits of operation. Laser nearfields and thermal behaviour are monitored for pulse widths in the 10–100 µs range with streak- and thermo-cameras, respectively. Thresholds of catastrophic optical damage are determined, and their dependence on the length of the injected current pulses is explained qualitatively. This approach permits testing the hardness of facet coatings of cm-bars with or without consideration of accidental single pre-damaged emitter failure effects and thermal crosstalk between the emitters. This allows for the optimization of pulsed operation parameters, helps limiting sudden degradation and provides insight into the mechanisms governing the device emission behaviour at ultimate output powers. (fast track communication)

  14. Performance and reliability of TPE-2 device with pulsed high power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.; Takeda, S.; Kiyama, S.

    1987-01-01

    The performance and the reliability of TPE-2 device with pulsed high power sources are described. To obtain the stable high beta plasma, the reproducibility and the reliability of the pulsed power sources must be maintained. A new power crowbar system with high efficiency and the switches with low jitter time are adopted to the bank system. A monitor system which always watches the operational states of the switches is developed too, and applied for the fast rising capacitor banks of TPE-2 device. The reliable operation for the bank has been realized, based on the data of switch monitor system

  15. ASL: Comparison of presaturation and RF pulse optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David; Sidaros, Karam

    2005-01-01

    In arterial spin labelling, the difference between the tag and control image is on the order of 1% of the equilibrium magnetization. A small offset between the images not related to perfusion, can therefore lead to large errors in the measured perfusion. One source of error is non-ideal RF pulses...... resulting in the inversion pulse affecting the acquired signal from the imaging area. This systematic error can be reduced by increasing the gap between the inversion and imaging regions, by using optimized inversion pulses e.g. FOCI1 or by saturating the signal from static tissue in the imaging area prior...

  16. A new RF tagging pulse based on the Frank poly-phase perfect sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer; Greferath, Marcus; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) spectrally selective multiband pulses or tagging pulses, are applicable in a broad range of magnetic resonance methods. We demonstrate through simulations and experiments a new phase-modulation-only RF pulse for RF tagging based on the Frank poly-phase perfect sequence...

  17. Numerical study of the propagation of high power microwave pulses in air breakdown environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Kuo, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical model based on a set of two modal equations has been developed to describe self-consistently the propagation of an intense microwave pulse in an air breakdown environment. It includes Poynting's equation for the continuity of the power flux of the pulse and the rate equation of the electron density. A forward wave approximation is used to simplify Poynting's equation and a semi-empirical formula for the ionization frequency as a function of the wave field amplitude is adopted for this model. In order to improve the numerical efficiency of the model in terms of the required computation time and available subroutines for numerical analysis of pulse propagation over a long distance, a transformation to the frame of local time of the pulse is introduced. The effect of space-time dependence of the group velocity of the pulse is included in this properly designed transformation. The inhomogeneous feature of the background pressure is also preserved in the model. The resultant equations are reduced to the forms which can be solved directly by the available subroutine of ODE solver. In this work, a comprehensive numerical analysis of the propagation of high power microwave pulse through the atmosphere is performed. It is shown that the pulse energy can severely be attenuated by the self-generated plasma. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to identify the optimum parameters of the pulse so that the energy loss of the pulse before reaching the destination can be minimized. These parameters include the power, frequency, shape and length of the pulse. The conditions for maximizing the ionization at a destinated region in the upper atmosphere will also be determined

  18. Transmission line pulse system for avalanche characterization of high power semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Michele; Ascione, Giovanni; De Falco, Giuseppe; Maresca, Luca; De Laurentis, Martina; Irace, Andrea; Breglio, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Because of the increasing in power density of electronic devices for medium and high power application, reliabilty of these devices is of great interest. Understanding the avalanche behaviour of a power device has become very important in these last years because it gives an indication of the maximum energy ratings which can be seen as an index of the device ruggedness. A good description of this behaviour is given by the static IV blocking characteristc. In order to avoid self heating, very relevant in high power devices, very short pulses of current have to be used, whose value can change from few milliamps up to tens of amps. The most used method to generate short pulses is the TLP (Transmission Line Pulse) test, which is based on charging the equivalent capacitance of a transmission line to high value of voltage and subsequently discharging it onto a load. This circuit let to obtain very short square pulses but it is mostly used for evaluate the ESD capability of semiconductor and, in this environment, it generates pulses of low amplitude which are not high enough to characterize the avalanche behaviour of high power devices . Advanced TLP circuit able to generate high current are usually very expensive and often suffer of distorption of the output pulse. In this article is proposed a simple, low cost circuit, based on a boosted-TLP configuration, which is capable to produce very square pulses of about one hundreds of nanosecond with amplitude up to some tens of amps. A prototype is implemented which can produce pulses up to 20A of amplitude with 200 ns of duration which can characterize power devices up to 1600V of breakdown voltage. Usage of microcontroller based logic make the circuit very flexible. Results of SPICE simulation are provided, together with experimental results. To prove the effectiveness of the circuit, the I-V blocking characteristics of two commercial devices, namely a 600V PowerMOS and a 1200V Trench-IGBT, are measured at different

  19. Towards shorter wavelength x-ray lasers using a high power, short pulse pump laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tighe, W.; Krushelnick, K.; Valeo, E.; Suckewer, S.

    1991-05-01

    A near-terawatt, KrF* laser system, focussable to power densities >10 18 W/cm 2 has been constructed for use as a pump laser in various schemes aimed at the development of x-ray lasing below 5nm. The laser system along with output characteristics such as the pulse duration, the focal spot size, and the percentage of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) emitted along with the laser pulse will be presented. Schemes intended to lead to shorter wavelength x-ray emission will be described. The resultant requirements on the pump laser characteristics and the target design will be outlined. Results from recent solid target experiments and two-laser experiments, showing the interaction of a high-power, short pulse laser with a preformed plasma, will be presented. 13 refs., 5 figs

  20. Pulse forming networks for fast pumping of high power electron-beam-controlled CO2 lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riepe, K.B.

    1975-01-01

    The transverse electric discharge is a widely used technique for pumping CO 2 lasers at high pressures for the generation, simply and efficiently, of very high power laser pulses. The development of the electron-beam-controlled discharge has allowed the application of the transverse discharge to large aperture, very high energy systems. LASL is now in the process of assembly and checkout of a CO 2 laser which is designed to generate a one nanosecond pulse containing 10 kilojoules, for use in laser fusion experiments. The front end of this laser consists of a set of preamplifiers and a mode locked oscillator with electro-optic single pulse switchout. The final amplifier stage consists of four parallel modules, each one consisting of a two-sided electron gun, and two 35 x 35 x 200 cm gas pumping regions operating at a pressure of 1800 torr with a 3/ 1 / 4 /1 (He/N 2 /CO 2 ) laser mix. (auth)

  1. Transient magnetized plasma as an optical element for high power laser pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiko Nakanii

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Underdense plasma produced in gas jets by low intensity laser prepulses in the presence of a static magnetic field, B∼0.3  T, is shown experimentally to become an optical element allowing steering of tightly focused high power femtosecond laser pulses within several degrees along with essential enhancement of pulse’s focusability. Strong laser prepulses form a density ramp perpendicularly to magnetic field direction and, owing to the light refraction, main laser pulses propagate along the magnetic field even if it is tilted from the laser axis. Electrons generated in the laser pulse wake are well collimated and follow in the direction of the magnetic field; their characteristics are measured to be not sensitive to the tilt of magnetic field up to angles ±5°.

  2. Characteristics of a high-power RF source of negative hydrogen ions for neutral beam injection into controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdrashitov, G. F.; Belchenko, Yu. I.; Gusev, I. A.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kondakov, A. A.; Sanin, A. L.; Sotnikov, O. Z., E-mail: O.Z.Sotnikov@inp.nsk.su; Shikhovtsev, I. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    An injector of hydrogen atoms with an energy of 0.5–1 MeV and equivalent current of up to 1.5 A for purposes of controlled fusion research is currently under design at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. Within this project, a multiple-aperture RF surface-plasma source of negative hydrogen ions is designed. The source design and results of experiments on the generation of a negative ion beam with a current of >1 A in the long-pulse mode are presented.

  3. Study of novel plasma devices generated by high power lasers coupled with a micro-pulse power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, A; Chen, Z L; Jin, Z; Kondo, K; Nakagawa, M; Kodama, R; Arima, H; Yoneda, H

    2008-01-01

    The authors have proposed introducing a micro pulse power technology in high power laser plasma experiments to boost up the return current, resulting in efficiently guiding of energetic electrons. High current pulse power generators with a pulse laser trigger system generate high-density plasma that is well conductor. To efficiently guiding by using a micro pulse power, we estimated parameter of a micro pulse power system that is voltage of rise time, current, charging voltage and capacitance

  4. Radar Waveform Pulse Analysis Measurement System for High-Power GaN Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrivikraman, Tushar; Perkovic-Martin, Dragana; Jenabi, Masud; Hoffman, James

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a measurement system to characterize the pulsed response of high-power GaN amplifiers for use in space-based SAR platforms that require very strict amplitude and phase stability. The measurement system is able to record and analyze data on three different time scales: fast, slow, and long, which allows for greater detail of the mechanisms that impact amplitude and phase stability. The system is fully automated through MATLAB, which offers both instrument control capability and in-situ data processing. To validate this system, a high-power GaN HEMT amplifier operated in saturation was characterized. The fast time results show that variations to the amplitude and phase are correlated to DC supply transients, while long time characteristics are correlated to temperature changes.

  5. High power, high brightness electron beam generation in a pulse-line driven pseudospark discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destler, W.W.; Segalov, Z.; Rodgers, J.; Ramaswamy, K.; Reiser, M.

    1993-01-01

    High brightness (∼10 10 A/m 2 rad 2 ), high power density (∼10 10 W/cm 2 ) electron beams have been generated by the mating of a hollow-cathode discharge device operating in the pseudospark regime to the output of a high power pulse line accelerator. Very small diameter (∼1 mm) electron beams with currents in the range 500--1000 A and energies in the range 150--300 keV have been generated with effective emittances estimated to be at or below 170 mm mrad. Such emittances are comparable to those achieved in conventional electron beam sources at current densities several orders of magnitude lower than those observed in these experiments

  6. Design and development of embedded control system for high power RF test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nageswara Rao, J.; Badapanda, M.K.; Upadhyay, Rinki; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Design and development of an embedded control system for the control, interlock and operation of 1MW, 352.2 MHz TH2089 klystron based RF test facility. The key components of the control system are NI compact Re configurable Input Output (cRIO) system and Windows based PC. The cRIO system's rugged hardware architecture includes a 1.06 GHz Dual-Core embedded controller with Real Time (RT) Operating System, a reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chassis for custom I/O timing, control and processing; and I/O modules. Windows based Graphical User Interface (GUI) has been developed to guide the user through start-up procedure, to set the operating parameters and also to display the status information of all the signals. The application software for data logging and publishing of the acquired data namely set, read back and status signals of auxiliary power supplies and machine safety interlocks has been developed in LabVIEW RT module and is running on embedded controller. Machine safety interlock logic has been implemented in FPGA to meet the time criticality. (author)

  7. Fiber Optic Cables for Transmission of High-Power Laser Pulses in Spaceflight Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomes, W. J., Jr.; Ott, M. N.; Chuska, R. F.; Switzer, R. C.; Blair, D. E.

    2010-01-01

    Lasers with high peak power pulses are commonly used in spaceflight missions for a wide range of applications, from LIDAR systems to optical communications. Due to the high optical power needed, the laser has to be located on the exterior of the satellite or coupled through a series of free space optics. This presents challenges for thermal management, radiation resistance, and mechanical design. Future applications will require multiple lasers located close together, which further complicates the design. Coupling the laser energy into a fiber optic cable allows the laser to be relocated to a more favorable position on the spacecraft. Typical fiber optic termination procedures are not sufficient for injection of these high-power laser pulses without catastrophic damage to the fiber endface. In the current study, we will review the causes of fiber damage during high-power injection and discuss our new manufacturing procedures that overcome these issues to permit fiber use with high reliability in these applications. We will also discuss the proper methods for launching the laser pulses into the fiber to avoid damage and how this is being implemented for current spaceflight missions.

  8. Fiber optic cables for transmission of high-power laser pulses in spaceflight applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomes, W. J.; Ott, M. N.; Chuska, R. F.; Switzer, R. C.; Blair, D. E.

    2017-11-01

    Lasers with high peak power pulses are commonly used in spaceflight missions for a wide range of applications, from LIDAR systems to optical communications. Due to the high optical power needed, the laser has to be located on the exterior of the satellite or coupled through a series of free space optics. This presents challenges for thermal management, radiation resistance, and mechanical design. Future applications will require multiple lasers located close together, which further complicates the design. Coupling the laser energy into a fiber optic cable allows the laser to be relocated to a more favorable position on the spacecraft. Typical fiber optic termination procedures are not sufficient for injection of these high-power laser pulses without catastrophic damage to the fiber endface. In the current study, we will review the causes of fiber damage during high-power injection and discuss our new manufacturing procedures that overcome these issues to permit fiber use with high reliability in these applications. We will also discuss the proper methods for launching the laser pulses into the fiber to avoid damage and how this is being implemented for current spaceflight missions.

  9. Simple Theory of Thermal Fatigue Caused by RF Pulse Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzikov, S

    2004-01-01

    The projects of electron-positron linear colliders imply that accelerating structures and other RF components will undergo action of extremely high RF fields. Except for breakdown threat there is an effect of the damage due to multi-pulse mechanical stress caused by Ohmic heating of the skin layer. A new theory of the thermal fatigue is considered. The theory is based on consideration of the quasi-elastic interaction between neighbor grains of metal due to the expansion of the thermal skin-layer. The developed theory predicts a total number of the RF pulses needed for surface degradation in dependence on temperature rise, pulse duration, and average temperature. The unknown coefficients in the final formula were found, using experimental data obtained at 11.4 GHz for the copper. In order to study the thermal fatigue at higher frequencies and to compare experimental and theoretical results, the experimental investigation of degradation of the copper cavity exposed to 30 GHz radiation is carried out now, basing...

  10. Fragments and debris generation using a high power pulsed electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassany, Bruno; Courchinoux, Roger; Bertron, Isabelle; Malaise, Frederic; Hebert, David

    2002-01-01

    The high power Laser Megajoule (LMJ) will be constructed at CEA/DAM/CESTA near Bordeaux, in the south west part of France. Among the problems encountered in the LMJ experimental chamber, there is the impact of the debris produced after a laser shot on the silica optical windows. The production of debris as well as the behavior of optical materials under their influence can be simulated and studied with a pulsed electron beam. We present in this paper the first experimental results obtained by this original technique

  11. The formation of ozone and UV radiation from high-power pulsed electric discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskarev, I. M.; Ushkanov, V. A.; Selemir, V. D.; Spirov, G. M.; Malevannaya Pikar', I. A.; Zuimach, E. A.

    2008-09-01

    High-power electric discharges with pulse energies of from 0.15 J to 4 kJ were studied. The yields of UV photons and ozone were found to be approximately equal, which led us to conclude that discharge conditions under which UV radiation and ozone fully destroyed each other were possible. If ozone formation was suppressed, as when a negative volume charge was created in the spark gap region, the flux of UV photons reached 3 × 1023 photons/(cm2 s).

  12. RF system developments for CW and/or long pulse linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.

    1998-01-01

    High Power Proton Linacs are under development or proposed for development at Los Alamos and elsewhere. By current standards these linacs all require very large amounts of RF power. The Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) is a CW accelerator with an output current and energy of 100 mA and 1,700 MeV, respectively. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), in its ultimate configuration, is a pulsed accelerator with an average output power of 4 MW of beam. Other accelerators such as those that address transmutation and upgrades to LANSCE have similar requirements. For these high average power applications, the RF systems represent approximately half of the total cost of the linac and are thus key elements in the design and configuration of the accelerator. Los Alamos is fortunate to be actively working on both APT and SNS. For these programs the author is pursuing a number of component developments which are aimed at one or more of the key issues for large RF systems: technical performance, capital cost, reliability, and operating efficiency. This paper briefly describes some of the linac applications and then provides updates on the key RF developments being pursued

  13. RF windows used at s-band pulsed klystrons in KEK linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michizono, S.; Saito, Y. [KEK, National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-04-01

    The breakdown of the alumina RF-windows used in high-power klystrons is one of the most serious problems in the development of klystrons. This breakdown results from excess heating of alumina due to multipactor bombardments and/or localized RF dissipations. A statistical research of window materials was carried out, and high-power tests were performed in order to develop RF windows having high durability for the KEKB klystrons. The breakdown mechanism of RF windows is being considered. An improved RF window installed in a KEKB klystron is also being tested. (J.P.N)

  14. High powered pulsed plasma enhanced deposition of thin film semiconductor and optical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llewellyn, I.P.; Sheach, K.J.A.; Heinecke, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    A glow discharge deposition technique is described which allows the deposition of a large range of high quality materials without the requirement for substrate heating. The method is differentiated from conventional plasma deposition techniques in that a much higher degree of dissociation is achieved in the gases prior to deposition, such that thermally activated surface reactions are no longer required in order to produce a dense film. The necessary discharge intensity (>300Wcm -3 ) is achieved using a high power radio frequency generator which is pulsed at a low duty cycle (1%) to keep the average energy of the discharge low (100W), in order to avoid the discharge heating the substrate. In addition, by varying the gas composition between discharge pulses, layered structures of materials can be produced, with a disordered interface about 8 A thick. Various uses of the technique in semiconductor and optical filter production are described, and the properties of films deposited using these technique are presented. (orig.)

  15. Fault analysis and strategy of high pulsed power supply for high power laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kefu; Qin Shihong; Li Jin; Pan Yuan; Yao Zonggan; Zheng Wanguo; Guo Liangfu; Zhou Peizhang; Li Yizheng; Chen Dehuai

    2001-01-01

    according to the requirements of driving flash-lamp, a high pulsed power supply (PPS) based on capacitors as energy storage elements is designed. The author analyzes in detail the faults of high pulsed power supply for high power laser. Such as capacitor internal short-circuit, main bus breakdown to ground, flashlamp sudden short or break. The fault current and voltage waveforms were given by circuit simulations. Based on the analysis and computation, the protection strategy with the fast fuse and ZnO was put forward, which can reduce the damage of PPS to the lower extent and provide the personnel safe and collateral property from the all threats. The preliminary experiments demonstrated that the design of the PPS can satisfy the project requirements

  16. High power, short pulses ultraviolet laser for the development of a new x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meixler, L.; Nam, C.H.; Robinson, J.; Tighe, W.; Krushelnick, K.; Suckewer, S.; Goldhar, J.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    1989-04-01

    A high power, short pulse ultraviolet laser system (Powerful Picosecond-Laser) has been developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) as part of experiments designed to generate shorter wavelength x-ray lasers. With the addition of pulse compression and a final KrF amplifier the laser output is expected to have reached 1/3-1/2 TW (10 12 watts) levels. The laser system, particularly the final amplifier, is described along with some initial soft x-ray spectra from laser-target experiments. The front end of the PP-Laser provides an output of 20--30 GW (10 9 watts) and can be focussed to intensities of /approximately/10 16 W/cm 2 . Experiments using this output to examine the effects of a prepulse on laser-target interaction are described. 19 refs., 14 figs

  17. Pulsed operation of high-power light emitting diodes for imaging flow velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willert, C; Klinner, J; Moessner, S; Stasicki, B

    2010-01-01

    High-powered light emitting diodes (LED) are investigated for possible uses as light sources in flow diagnostics, in particular, as an alternative to laser-based illumination in particle imaging flow velocimetry in side-scatter imaging arrangements. Recent developments in solid state illumination resulted in mass-produced LEDs that provide average radiant power in excess of 10 W. By operating these LEDs with short duration, pulsed currents that are considerably beyond their continuous current damage threshold, light pulses can be generated that are sufficient to illuminate and image micron-sized particles in flow velocimetry. Time-resolved PIV measurements in water at a framing rate of 2kHz are presented. The feasibility of LED-based PIV measurements in air is also demonstrated

  18. A Langmuir probe system for high power RF-driven negative ion sources on high potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeely, P; Christ-Koch, S; Fantz, U; Dudin, S V

    2009-01-01

    A fully automated Langmuir probe system capable of operating simultaneously with beam extraction has been developed and commissioned for the negative hydrogen ion source testbeds at IPP Garching. It allows the measurement of temporal and spatial distributions of the plasma parameters within a single plasma pulse ( 10 18 m -3 ) and hot (T e > 10 eV) plasma with bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution at low pressures. The plasma found near the plasma grid is very different being of low density (≤10 17 m -3 ) and very cold (T e < 2 eV). This plasma is also strongly influenced by the presence of caesium, the potential of the plasma grid, and if an ion beam is extracted from the source. Caesium strongly reduces the plasma potential of the source and enhances the negative ion density near the plasma grid. Extracting an ion beam is observed to reduce the electron density and increase the potential near the plasma grid. Applying a potential greater than the plasma potential to the plasma grid is found to significantly decrease the electron density near the plasma grid.

  19. Towards high-power long-pulse operation on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Tore Supra tokamak was given the main mission to investigate the route towards long pulse plasma discharges. This includes the problem of heat exhaust and particle control (via the development of high-performance plasma facing components), and in parallel the physics of fully non inductive discharges and its optimization with respect to the confinement. Tore Supra is thus equipped with a superconducting toroidal magnet (maximum magnetic field on axis 4.5T), a full set of actively cooled plasma facing components (PFC), and a heating and current drive capability based on high power RIF systems connected to actively cooled antennas. The encouraging results already obtained, as well as recent progress in PFC, allowed us to envisage a significant improvement in the heat exhaust capability of Tore Supra. The so-called CIEL-project consists in a complete upgrade of the inner chamber of Tore Supra, planned to be installed during the year 2000. The present paper deals with the experimental and modeling activity linked to the preparation of the long-pulse high-power discharges using the present Tore Supra equipment: heating and current drive scenarios, power coupling, confinement and transport studies, discharge control... An overview of the results obtained in that field is presented, as well as the progress required in the coming years, and the expected performance, for the CIEL phase, in terms of current drive and confinement. (author)

  20. Physics of laser fusion. Volume III. High-power pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Eimerl, D.; George, E.V.; Trenholme, J.B.; Simmons, W.W.; Hunt, J.T.

    1982-09-01

    High-power pulsed lasers can deliver sufficient energy on inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) time scales (0.1 to 10 ns) to heat and compress deuterium-tritium fuel to fusion-reaction conditions. Several laser systems have been examined, including Nd:glass, CO 2 , KrF, and I 2 , for their ICF applicability. A great deal of developmental effort has been applied to the Nd:glass laser and the CO 2 gas laser systems; these systems now deliver > 10 4 J and 20 x 10 12 W to ICF targets. We are constructing the Nova Nd:glass laser at LLNL to provide > 100 kJ and > 100 x 10 12 W of 1-μm radiation for fusion experimentation in the mid-1980s. For ICF target gain > 100 times the laser input, we expect that the laser driver must deliver approx. 3 to 5 MJ of energy on a time scale of 10 to 20 ns. In this paper we review the technological status of fusion-laser systems and outline approaches to constructing high-power pulsed laser drivers

  1. Active RF Pulse Compression Using An Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    First we review the theory of active pulse compression systems using resonant delay lines. Then we describe the design of an electrically controlled semiconductor active switch. The switch comprises an active window and an overmoded waveguide three-port network. The active window is based on a four-inch silicon wafer which has 960 PIN diodes. These are spatially combined in an overmoded waveguide. We describe the philosophy and design methodology for the three-port network and the active window. We then present the results of using this device to compress 11.4 GHz RF signals with high compression ratios. We show how the system can be used with amplifier like sources, in which one can change the phase of the source by manipulating the input to the source. We also show how the active switch can be used to compress a pulse from an oscillator like sources, which is not possible with passive pulse compression systems.

  2. Surface modification of ceramic materials induced by irradiation of high power pulsed ICP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigaki, Takamasa; Okada, Nobuhiro; Ohashi, Naoki; Haneda, Hajime

    2003-01-01

    Newly developed pulse-modulated high-power inductively coupled plasma [ICP] is expected to offer the unique physico-chemical condition, such as the increased concentration of chemically reactive species, as well as the appropriate heat flux for materials processing. Two kinds of oxide materials, titanium and zinc oxide, were placed at the downstream of Ar-H 2 ICP and irradiated in the plasma of continuous [CN] and pulse-modulated [PM] modes. The CN-ICP irradiation at the position close to the plasma tail gave rise to the thermal reduction of oxides. In the PM-ICP irradiation, the degree of thermal reduction depended on the lower power level during pulse-off time, as well as the total electric power. Irradiation in PM-ICP led to the increased formation of oxygen vacancies in titanium dioxide. In the case of zinc oxide, the UV emission efficiency was improved by PM-ICP irradiation, while the green emission became predominant by CN-ICP irradiation at the appropriate position. Induced effects in the two oxides by PM-ICP would be related to the high concentration of hydrogen radicals in the plasma. (author)

  3. Downstream plasma transport and metal ionization in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Liang; Szott, Matthew M.; McLain, Jake T.; Ruzic, David N.; Yu, He

    2014-01-01

    Downstream plasma transport and ionization processes in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron were studied. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of electron density (n e ) and temperature (T e ) were characterized with a 3D scanning triple Langmuir probe. Plasma expanded from the racetrack region into the downstream region, where a high n e peak was formed some time into the pulse-off period. The expansion speed and directionality towards the substrate increased with a stronger magnetic field (B), largely as a consequence of a larger potential drop in the bulk plasma region during a relatively slower sheath formation. The fraction of Cu ions in the deposition flux was measured on the substrate using a gridded energy analyzer. It increased with higher pulse voltage. With increased B field from 200 to 800 Gauss above racetrack, n e increased but the Cu ion fraction decreased from 42% to 16%. A comprehensive model was built, including the diffusion of as-sputtered Cu flux, the Cu ionization in the entire plasma region using the mapped n e and T e data, and ion extraction efficiency based on the measured plasma potential (V p ) distribution. The calculations matched the measurements and indicated the main causes of lower Cu ion fractions in stronger B fields to be the lower T e and inefficient ion extraction in a larger pre-sheath potential.

  4. Remote detection of radioactive material using high-power pulsed electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongsung; Yu, Dongho; Sawant, Ashwini; Choe, Mun Seok; Lee, Ingeun; Kim, Sung Gug; Choi, EunMi

    2017-05-09

    Remote detection of radioactive materials is impossible when the measurement location is far from the radioactive source such that the leakage of high-energy photons or electrons from the source cannot be measured. Current technologies are less effective in this respect because they only allow the detection at distances to which the high-energy photons or electrons can reach the detector. Here we demonstrate an experimental method for remote detection of radioactive materials by inducing plasma breakdown with the high-power pulsed electromagnetic waves. Measurements of the plasma formation time and its dispersion lead to enhanced detection sensitivity compared to the theoretically predicted one based only on the plasma on and off phenomena. We show that lower power of the incident electromagnetic wave is sufficient for plasma breakdown in atmospheric-pressure air and the elimination of the statistical distribution is possible in the presence of radioactive material.

  5. Heat treatable indium tin oxide films deposited with high power pulse magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstmann, F.; Sittinger, V.; Szyszka, B.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, indium tin oxide (ITO) films were prepared by high power pulse magnetron sputtering [D. J. Christie, F. Tomasel, W. D. Sproul, D. C. Carter, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A, 22 (2004) 1415. ] without substrate heating. The ITO films were deposited from a ceramic target at a deposition rate of approx. 5.5 nm*m/min kW. Afterwards, the ITO films were covered with a siliconoxynitride film sputtered from a silicon alloy target in order to prevent oxidation of the ITO film during annealing at 650 deg. C for 10 min in air. The optical and electrical properties as well as the texture and morphology of these films were investigated before and after annealing. Mechanical durability of the annealed films was evaluated at different test conditions. The results were compared with state-of-the art ITO films which were obtained at optimized direct current magnetron sputtering conditions

  6. Experimental characterization of plasma formation and shockwave propagation induced by high power pulsed underwater electrical discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claverie, A; Deroy, J; Boustie, M; Avrillaud, G; Chuvatin, A; Mazanchenko, E; Demol, G; Dramane, B

    2014-06-01

    High power pulsed electrical discharges into liquids are investigated for new industrial applications based on the efficiency of controlled shock waves. We present here new experimental data obtained by combination of detailed high speed imaging equipments. It allows the visualization of the very first instants of plasma discharge formation, and then the pulsations of the gaseous bubble with an accurate timing of events. The time history of the expansion/compression of this bubble leads to an estimation of the energy effectively transferred to water during the discharge. Finally, the consecutive shock generation driven by this pulsating bubble is optically monitored by shadowgraphs and schlieren setup. These data provide essential information about the geometrical pattern and chronometry associated with the shock wave generation and propagation.

  7. High power pulsed magnetron sputtering: A method to increase deposition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, Priya; McLain, Jake; Ruzic, David N; Shchelkanov, Ivan A.

    2015-01-01

    High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) is a state-of-the-art physical vapor deposition technique with several industrial applications. One of the main disadvantages of this process is its low deposition rate. In this work, the authors report a new magnetic field configuration, which produces deposition rates twice that of conventional magnetron's dipole magnetic field configuration. Three different magnet pack configurations are discussed in this paper, and an optimized magnet pack configuration for HPPMS that leads to a higher deposition rate and nearly full-face target erosion is presented. The discussed magnetic field produced by a specially designed magnet assembly is of the same size as the conventional magnet assembly and requires no external fields. Comparison of deposition rates with different power supplies and the electron trapping efficiency in complex magnetic field arrangements are discussed

  8. Development of modular scalable pulsed power systems for high power magnetized plasma experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, I. A.; Weber, T. E.; Adams, C. S.; Henderson, B. R.; Klim, A. J.

    2017-10-01

    New pulsed power switches and trigger drivers are being developed in order to explore higher energy regimes in the Magnetic Shock Experiment (MSX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. To achieve the required plasma velocities, high-power (approx. 100 kV, 100s of kA), high charge transfer (approx. 1 C), low-jitter (few ns) gas switches are needed. A study has been conducted on the effects of various electrode geometries and materials, dielectric media, and triggering strategies; resulting in the design of a low-inductance annular field-distortion switch, optimized for use with dry air at 90 psig, and triggered by a low-jitter, rapid rise-time solid-state Linear Transformer Driver. The switch geometry and electrical characteristics are designed to be compatible with Syllac style capacitors, and are intended to be deployed in modular configurations. The scalable nature of this approach will enable the rapid design and implementation of a wide variety of high-power magnetized plasma experiments. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration. Approved for unlimited release, LA-UR-17-2578.

  9. High-power TM01 millimeter wave pulse sensor in circular waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guang-Qiang; Zhu Xiang-Qin; Chen Zai-Gao; Wang Xue-Feng; Zhang Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    By investigating the interaction of an n-type silicon sample with the TM 01 mode millimeter wave in a circular waveguide, a viable high-power TM 01 millimeter wave sensor is proposed. Based on the hot electron effect, the silicon sample serving as a sensing element (SE) and appropriately mounted on the inner wall of the circular waveguide is devoted to the on-line measurement of a high-power millimeter wave pulse. A three-dimensional parallel finite-difference time-domain method is applied to simulate the wave propagation within the measuring structure. The transverse electric field distribution, the dependences of the frequency response of the voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR) in the circular waveguide, and the average electric field amplitude within the SE on the electrophysical parameters of the SE are calculated and analyzed in the frequency range of 300–400 GHz. As a result, the optimal dimensions and specific resistance of the SE are obtained, which provide a VSWR of no more than 2.0, a relative sensitivity around 0.0046 kW −1 fluctuating within ± 17.3%, and a maximum enduring power of about 4.3 MW. (paper)

  10. Electron pulse shaping in the FELIX RF accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weits, H.H.; Geer, C.A.J. van der; Oepts, D.; Meer, A.F.G. van der

    1999-01-01

    The FELIX free-electron laser uses short pulses of relativistic electrons produced by an RF accelerator. The design target for the duration of these electron bunches was around 3 ps. In experiments we observed that the bunches emit coherently enhanced spontaneous emission (CSE) when they travel through an undulator. It was demonstrated that the power level of the CSE critically depends on the settings of the accelerator. In this article we seek to explain these observations by studying the length and shape of the electron bunches as a function of the settings of the accelerator. A particle-tracking model was used to simulate the acceleration and transport processes. These include bunch compression in a 14-cell travelling wave buncher cavity, acceleration in a travelling wave linear accelerator, and passage through a (dispersive) chicane structure. The effect of the phase setting of the RF accelerating field with respect to the arrival time of the electron bunch in each accelerator structure was studied. The parameter range of the simulations is related to that of an actual free-electron laser experiment using these bunches. We find that, for specific settings of the accelerating system, electron pulses with a length of 350 μm FWHM (1 ps) are produced. The charge in the bunch rises steeply within a distance of 25 μm. This bunch shape explains the high level of coherently enhanced spontaneous emission observed in the FELIX laser. (author)

  11. Cold cathode electron guns in the LASL high power short-pulse CO2 laser program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, S.; Ladish, J.S.; Nutter, M.J.

    1975-01-01

    The Electron Beam Controlled Discharge CO 2 Laser is now firmly established as the only high power short pulse laser amplifier that has been demonstrated to have scaling capabilities to large apertures and energies much greater than 100 J. These devices require a beam of energetic electrons to control the gas discharge that produces the required population inversion. Until recently, the electron source was usually a thermionic emitter, even for rather large lasers, whose heater requirements dwarfed the pulsed energies associated with the transient operation of the laser. With the advent of reliable cold-cathode electron guns, the operation of these lasers has been greatly simplified. At LASL, there are four electron beam controlled laser systems which are in operation, under construction, or in design: the 1 kJ system, now operational; the 2.5 kJ system; the 10 kJ system; and the 100 kJ system. Only the first uses thermionic-emitter electron guns; the remainder use or will use cold cathode sources. The operation of the 200 x 35 cm 2 two sided cold cathode electron gun used in the 2.5 kJ laser system and to be used in the 10 kJ laser is described

  12. Advances in High Power Calorimetric Matched Loads for Short Pulses and CW Gyrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bin, W.M.; Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Gandini, F.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Muzzini, V.; Nardone, A.; Sozzi, C.; Spinicchia, N.

    2006-01-01

    The development of high power gyrotrons for plasma physics research needs proper matched and calorimetric loads able to absorb and measure the power, which nowadays is foreseen to be as high as 2 MW during CW operations. To this end IFP/CNR has developed a family of matched loads useful in the mm-wave frequency band for applications ranging from a few ms to CW in pulse length. The different loads in the family, made of an integrating sphere with a partially reflecting coating on the inner wall, are characterized by having the same absorbing geometry for the incoming beam and a different heat removal system for the specific application. Some important advances have been recently achieved from the point of view of the uniformity of power distribution on the absorbing wall and of the load construction. With high precision achieved in the coating thickness a better control of the heating power distribution is possible by proper shaping of the local reflectivity, in addition to the shaping of the mirror dispersing the input beam. A more sophisticated model describing the power distribution has been developed, taking into account a variable thickness of the absorbing coating, the proper shape of the spreading mirror, the frequency of the incoming radiation and the shape of the input beam. Lower coating thickness is shown to be preferable, at equal local reflectivity, from the point of view of a lower peak temperature and thermal stress. The paper describes a load with variable coating thickness along the meridian of the sphere, showing a uniform power deposition on the inner walls. The cooling pipe is completely electroformed on the spherical copper shell, ensuring the maintenance of the correct curvature of the inner surface and a fast heat conduction from the absorbing coating to the water through the thin copper body. For CW use all heated parts of the load must be cooled and this is achieved by 16 electroformed spiral channels. Both short pulse loads (0.1-1 s) and

  13. Relativistic acceleration and retardation effects on photoemission of intense electron short pulses, in RF-FEL photoinjectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolique, J.M.; Coacolo, M.

    1991-01-01

    In high-power free electron lasers, self-field effects in the electron beam are often the most important phenomenon on which the beam quality depends. These effects are generally conceived as space-charge effects, and described by a Poisson equation in a beam frame. In RF-FEL photoinjectors, the electrons of the intense short pulse produced by laser irradiation are submitted, just after their photoemission, to such a strong acceleration that relativistic acceleration and retardation effects are discussed, from the rigorous calculation of the Lienard-Wiechert velocity- and acceleration electric and magnetic fields, as a function of RF-electric field and beam parameters. The beam pulse is assumed to be axisymmetric, with a constant photoemitted current density. Consequences for the maximum current density that can be extracted are considered (the 'self-field limit,' a name more appropriate than 'space-charge limit' for the present conditions where electro-dynamic phenomena play an important role)

  14. CrN/AlN nanolaminate coatings deposited via high power pulsed and middle frequency pulsed magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagcivan, N.; Bobzin, K.; Ludwig, A.; Grochla, D.; Brugnara, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    Nanolaminate coatings based on transition metal nitrides such as CrN, AlN and TiN deposited via physical vapor deposition (PVD) have shown great advantage as protective coatings on tools and components subject to high loads in tribological applications. By varying the individual layer materials and their thicknesses it is possible to optimize the coating properties, e.g. hardness, Young's modulus and thermal stability. One way for further improvement of coating properties is the use of advanced PVD technologies. High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) is an advancement of pulsed magnetron sputtering (MS). The use of HPPMS allows a better control of the energetic bombardment of the substrate due to the higher ionization degree of metallic species. It provides an opportunity to influence chemical and mechanical properties by varying the process parameters. The present work deals with the development of CrN/AlN nanolaminate coatings in an industrial scale unit by using two different PVD technologies. Therefore, HPPMS and mfMS (middle frequency magnetron sputtering) technologies were used. The bilayer period Λ, i.e. the thickness of a CrN/AlN double layer, was varied between 6.2 nm and 47.8 nm by varying the rotational speed of the substrate holders. In a second step the highest rotational speed was chosen and further HPPMS CrN/AlN coatings were deposited applying different HPPMS pulse lengths (40, 80, 200 μs) at the same mean cathode power and frequency. Thickness, morphology, roughness and phase composition of the coatings were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser microscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The chemical composition was determined using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). Detailed characterization of the nanolaminate was conducted by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hardness and the Young's modulus were analyzed by nanoindentation measurements. The residual

  15. Measurement of electromagnetic pulses generated during interactions of high power lasers with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marco, M.; Krása, J.; Margarone, D.; Giuffrida, L.; Vrana, R.; Velyhan, A.; Korn, G.; Weber, S.; Cikhardt, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Krouský, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Ahmed, H.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.; Limpouch, J.; Velardi, L.; Side, D. Delle; Nassisi, V.

    2016-01-01

    A target irradiated with a high power laser pulse, blows off a large amount of charge and as a consequence the target itself becomes a generator of electromagnetic pulses (EMP) owing to high return current flowing to the ground through the target holder. The first measurement of the magnetic field induced by the neutralizing current reaching a value of a few kA was performed with the use of an inductive target probe at the PALS Laser Facility (Cikhardt et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85 (2014) 103507). A full description of EMP generation should contain information on the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the electromagnetic field inside and outside of the interaction chamber. For this reason, we consider the interaction chamber as a resonant cavity in which different modes of EMP oscillate for hundreds of nanoseconds, until the EMP is transmitted outside through the glass windows and EM waves are attenuated. Since the experimental determination of the electromagnetic field distribution is limited by the number of employed antennas, a mapping of the electromagnetic field has to be integrated with numerical simulations. Thus, this work reports on a detailed numerical mapping of the electromagnetic field inside the interaction chamber at the PALS Laser Facility (covering a frequency spectrum from 100 MHz to 3 GHz) using the commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics 5.2. Moreover we carried out a comparison of the EMP generated in the parallelepiped-like interaction chamber used in the Vulcan Petawatt Laser Facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, against that produced in the spherical interaction chamber of PALS.

  16. High-power, photofission-inducing bremsstrahlung source for intense pulsed active detection of fissile material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Zier

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Intense pulsed active detection (IPAD is a promising technique for detecting fissile material to prevent the proliferation of special nuclear materials. With IPAD, fissions are induced in a brief, intense radiation burst and the resulting gamma ray or neutron signals are acquired during a short period of elevated signal-to-noise ratio. The 8 MV, 200 kA Mercury pulsed-power generator at the Naval Research Laboratory coupled to a high-power vacuum diode produces an intense 30 ns bremsstrahlung beam to study this approach. The work presented here reports on Mercury experiments designed to maximize the photofission yield in a depleted-uranium (DU object in the bremsstrahlung far field by varying the anode-cathode (AK diode gap spacing and by adding an inner-diameter-reducing insert in the outer conductor wall. An extensive suite of diagnostics was fielded to measure the bremsstrahlung beam and DU fission yield as functions of diode geometry. Delayed fission neutrons from the DU proved to be a valuable diagnostic for measuring bremsstrahlung photons above 5 MeV. The measurements are in broad agreement with particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics and radiation transport. These show that with increasing AK gap, electron losses to the insert and outer conductor wall increase and that the electron angles impacting the bremsstrahlung converter approach normal incidence. The diode conditions for maximum fission yield occur when the gap is large enough to produce electron angles close to normal, yet small enough to limit electron losses.

  17. High-power, photofission-inducing bremsstrahlung source for intense pulsed active detection of fissile material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zier, J. C.; Mosher, D.; Allen, R. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Jackson, S. L.; Murphy, D. P.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.

    2014-06-01

    Intense pulsed active detection (IPAD) is a promising technique for detecting fissile material to prevent the proliferation of special nuclear materials. With IPAD, fissions are induced in a brief, intense radiation burst and the resulting gamma ray or neutron signals are acquired during a short period of elevated signal-to-noise ratio. The 8 MV, 200 kA Mercury pulsed-power generator at the Naval Research Laboratory coupled to a high-power vacuum diode produces an intense 30 ns bremsstrahlung beam to study this approach. The work presented here reports on Mercury experiments designed to maximize the photofission yield in a depleted-uranium (DU) object in the bremsstrahlung far field by varying the anode-cathode (AK) diode gap spacing and by adding an inner-diameter-reducing insert in the outer conductor wall. An extensive suite of diagnostics was fielded to measure the bremsstrahlung beam and DU fission yield as functions of diode geometry. Delayed fission neutrons from the DU proved to be a valuable diagnostic for measuring bremsstrahlung photons above 5 MeV. The measurements are in broad agreement with particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics and radiation transport. These show that with increasing AK gap, electron losses to the insert and outer conductor wall increase and that the electron angles impacting the bremsstrahlung converter approach normal incidence. The diode conditions for maximum fission yield occur when the gap is large enough to produce electron angles close to normal, yet small enough to limit electron losses.

  18. Interaction of a high-power laser pulse with supercritical-density porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gus'kov, Sergei Yu; Rozanov, Vladislav B; Caruso, A; Strangio, C

    2000-01-01

    The properties of a nonequilibrium plasma produced by high-power laser pulses with intensities I L ∼ 10 14 -10 15 W cm -2 irradiating plane targets made of a porous material are investigated. The mean density of matter in targets was substantially higher than the critical plasma density corresponding to a plasma resonance. The density of porous material was ρ a ∼ 1 - 20 mg cm -3 , whereas the critical density at the wavelength of incident radiation was ρ cr ∼ 3 mg cm -3 . An anomalously high absorption (no less than 80%) of laser radiation inside a target was observed. Within the first 3 - 4 ns of interaction, the plasma flow through the irradiated target surface in the direction opposite of the direction of the laser beam was noticeably suppressed. Only about 5% of absorbed laser energy was transformed into the energy of particles in this flow during the laser pulse. Absorbed energy was stored as the internal plasma energy at this stage (the greenhouse effect). Then, this energy was transformed, similar to a strong explosion, into the energy of a powerful hydrodynamic flow of matter surrounding the absorption region. The specific features of the formation and evolution of a nonequilibrium laser-produced plasma in porous media are theoretically analysed. This study allows the results of experiments to be explained. In particular, we investigated absorption of laser radiation in the bulk of a target, volume evaporation of porous material, the expansion of a laser-produced plasma inside the pores, stochastic collisions of plasma flows, and hydrothermal energy dissipation. These processes give rise to long-lived oscillations of plasma density and lead to the formation of an internal region where laser radiation is absorbed. (invited paper)

  19. Type-I cascaded quadratic soliton compression in lithium niobate: Compressing femtosecond pulses from high-power fiber lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Wise, Frank W.

    2010-01-01

    The output pulses of a commercial high-power femtosecond fiber laser or amplifier are typically around 300–500 fs with wavelengths of approximately 1030 nm and tens of microjoules of pulse energy. Here, we present a numerical study of cascaded quadratic soliton compression of such pulses in LiNbO3....... However, the strong group-velocity dispersion implies that the pulses can achieve moderate compression to durations of less than 130 fs in available crystal lengths. Most of the pulse energy is conserved because the compression is moderate. The effects of diffraction and spatial walk-off are addressed......, and in particular the latter could become an issue when compressing such long crystals (around 10 cm long). We finally show that the second harmonic contains a short pulse locked to the pump and a long multi-picosecond red-shifted detrimental component. The latter is caused by the nonlocal effects...

  20. Developing a Methodology for Elaborating a Pulsed Optical Safety Area for High Power Laser Diodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yankov, Plamen

    2006-01-01

    The laser diodes are efficient sources of optical radiation. The maximum optical peak power depends on the pulse duration of the driving current pulse - reducing the pulse duration the safety peak power is increased...

  1. Frequency up-conversion and spectral breaking of a high power microwave pulse propagation in a self-generated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, S.P.; Ren, A.

    1993-01-01

    The main concern of the propagation of high power microwave pulse is the energy loss of the pulse before reaching the destination. The loss is caused by self-generated plasma. There are two processes which are responsible for the energy loss (so called tail erosion). They are collisional damping and cutoff reflection. In very high power region, the cutoff reflection is much more severe than the collisional damping. A frequency up-conversion process may help to avoid the cutoff reflection of powerful electromagnetic pulse propagating in a self-generated plasma. Both chamber experiments and numerical simulation are performed. When the field amplitude only slightly exceeds the breakdown threshold field of the background gas, the result shows that the carrier frequency ω of the pulse shifts upward during the growth of local plasma frequency ωpe 2 . Thus, the self-generated plasma remains underdense to the pulse. However, the spectrum of the pulse starts to break up into two major peaks when the amplitude of the pulse is further increased. The frequency of one of the peaks is lower than the original carrier frequency and that of the other peak is higher than the original carrier frequency. These phenomena are observed both experimentally and numerically. The frequency down shift result is believed to be caused by damping mechanisms. Good agreement between the experimental results and the numerical simulation is obtained

  2. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette Marie; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kinds of hollow core band gap fibers. The light source for this experiment consists of ytterbium-doped double clad fiber aeroGAIN-ROD-PM85 in a high power amplifier...

  3. Formation of nanosecond SBS-compressed pulses for pumping an ultra-high power parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuz’min, A. A.; Kulagin, O. V.; Rodchenkov, V. I.

    2018-04-01

    Compression of pulsed Nd : glass laser radiation under stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in perfluorooctane is investigated. Compression of 16-ns pulses at a beam diameter of 30 mm is implemented. The maximum compression coefficient is 28 in the optimal range of laser pulse energies from 2 to 4 J. The Stokes pulse power exceeds that of the initial laser pulse by a factor of about 11.5. The Stokes pulse jitter (fluctuations of the Stokes pulse exit time from the compressor) is studied. The rms spread of these fluctuations is found to be 0.85 ns.

  4. Development of high power X-band semiconductor microwave switch for pulse compression systems of future linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiko Tamura

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe concepts for high power semiconductor rf switches, designed to handle signals at X-band with power level near 100 MW. We describe an abstract design methodology and derive a general scaling law for these switches. We also present a design and experimental work of a switch operating at the TE_{01} mode in overmoded circular waveguides. The switch is composed of an array of tee junction elements that have a p-i-n diode array window in the third arm.

  5. High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) and High Power Microwave (HPM) Devices: Threat Assessments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Clay

    2006-01-01

    .... This method is called High Power Microwave (HPM). Several nations, including sponsors of terrorism, may currently have a capability to use EMP as a weapon for cyberterrorism to disrupt communications and other parts of the U.S...

  6. High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) and High Power Microwave (HPM) Devices: Threat Assessments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Clay

    2005-01-01

    .... This method is called High Power Microwave (HPM). Several nations, including reported sponsors of terrorism, may currently have a capability to use EMP as a weapon to disrupt communications and other parts of the U.S...

  7. High-power terahertz optical pulse generation with a dual-wavelength harmonically mode-locked Yb:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, W Z; Chang, M T; Su, K W; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2013-01-01

    We report on high-power terahertz optical pulse generation with a dual-wavelength harmonically mode-locked Yb:YAG laser. A semiconductor saturable absorber mirror is developed to achieve synchronously mode-locked operation at two spectral bands centered at 1031.67 and 1049.42 nm with a pulse duration of 1.54 ps and a pulse repetition rate of 80.3 GHz. With a diamond heat spreader to improve the heat removal efficiency, the average output power can be up to 1.1 W at an absorbed pump power of 5.18 W. The autocorrelation traces reveal that the mode-locked pulse is modulated with a beat frequency of 4.92 THz and displays a modulation depth to be greater than 80%. (paper)

  8. Pressure and stress waves in a spallation neutron source mercury target generated by high-power proton pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Futakawa, M; Conrad, H; Stechemesser, H

    2000-01-01

    The international ASTE collaboration has performed a first series of measurements on a spallation neutron source target at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) in Brookhaven. The dynamic response of a liquid mercury target hit by high-power proton pulses of about 40 ns duration has been measured by a laser Doppler technique and compared with finite elements calculations using the ABAQUS code. It is shown that the calculation can describe the experimental results for at least the time interval up to 100 mu s after the pulse injection. Furthermore, it has been observed that piezoelectric pressure transducers cannot be applied in the high gamma-radiation field of a spallation target.

  9. Design and development of a high-power, 500 kV pulsed line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, A.

    A study was made of very high voltage (500 kV) pulse production for 50 ns at half height. A coaxial line was coupled to a Marx generator for obtaining the pulses on an impedance-adapted electron diode. The maximum power obtained was 6.4 x 10 10 W with a current front in the diode of about 30 ns (80 ns pulse length at half height)

  10. Application of plasma erosion opening switches to high power accelerators for pulse compression and power multiplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.; Boller, J.R.; Commisso, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A new vacuum opening switch called a plasma erosion opening switch is described. A model of its operation is presented and the energy efficiency of such a switch is discussed. Recent high power experiments on the Gamble II accelerator are described and compared to previous experiments

  11. Computer-aided design of the RF-cavity for a high-power S-band klystron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, D.; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.; Pal, D.; Meena, R.; Nangru, S. C.; Joshi, L. M.

    2012-08-01

    This article describes the computer-aided design of the RF-cavity for a S-band klystron operating at 2856 MHz. State-of-the-art electromagnetic simulation tools SUPERFISH, CST Microwave studio, HFSS and MAGIC have been used for cavity design. After finalising the geometrical details of the cavity through simulation, it has been fabricated and characterised through cold testing. Detailed results of the computer-aided simulation and cold measurements are presented in this article.

  12. High-power pulsed and CW diode-pumped mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Larry R.; Hays, A. D.; Kaz, Alex; Kasinski, Jeff; Burnham, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The operation of both pulsed and CW diode-pumped mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers are presented. The pulsed laser produced 1.0 mJ with pulsewidths of 90 psec at 20 Hz. The CW pumped laser produced 6 W output at 1.064 microns and 3 W output at 532 nm.

  13. Polymerization of polyethers initiated by irradiation with high power pulsed electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, V.D.; Tolkachev, V.S.; Chmukh, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    Air oxygen effect on thin-layer polymerization of polyethers, initiated by irradiation with powerful pulse electron beams is studied using the method of IR-spectrophotometry. The analysis of experimental data has shown that in polyether surface layer polymerization is suppressed by oxygen, concentration of which in the layer remains stable at the expense of diffusion from air during two consequent irradiation pulses

  14. High-power pulsed light ion beams for applications in fusion- and matter research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluhm, H.; Karow, H.U.; Rusch, D.; Zieher, K.W.

    1982-01-01

    The foundations of ultrahigh-power pulse techniques are described together with the two pulse generators KALIF (Karlsruhe Light lion Facility) and Pollux of the INR. The physical principles and diagnostics of ion beam production are discussed as well as possible applications in the field of fusion research. (orig./HT) [de

  15. Forward voltage short-pulse technique for measuring high power laser array junction temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Byron L. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Frazin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Baker, Nathaniel R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of measuring the temperature of the P-N junction within the light-emitting region of a quasi-continuous-wave or pulsed semiconductor laser diode device. A series of relatively short and low current monitor pulses are applied to the laser diode in the period between the main drive current pulses necessary to cause the semiconductor to lase. At the sufficiently low current level of the monitor pulses, the laser diode device does not lase and behaves similar to an electronic diode. The voltage across the laser diode resulting from each of these low current monitor pulses is measured with a high degree of precision. The junction temperature is then determined from the measured junction voltage using their known linear relationship.

  16. Medium Power 352 MHZ solid state pulsed RF amplifiers for the CERN LINAC4 Project

    CERN Document Server

    Broere, J; Gómez Martínez, Y; Rossi, M

    2011-01-01

    Economic, modular and highly linear pulsed RF amplifiers have recently been developed to be used for the three buncher cavities in the CERN Linac4. The amplifiers are water-cooled and can provide up to 33 kW pulsed RF Power, 1.5 ms pulse length and 50 Hz repetition rate. Furthermore a 60 kW unit is under construction to provide the required RF Power for the debuncher cavity. The concept is based on 1.2 kW RF power modules using the latest 6th generation LDMOS technology. For integration into the CERN control environment the amplifiers have an internal industrial controller, which will provide easy control and extended diagnostic functions. This paper describes the construction, performance, including linearity, phase stability and EMC compliance tests

  17. High-power noise-like pulse generation using a 1.56-µm all-fiber laser system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Shian; Hwang, Sheng-Kwang; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrated an all-fiber, high-power noise-like pulse laser system at the 1.56-µm wavelength. A low-power noise-like pulse train generated by a ring oscillator was amplified using a two-stage amplifier, where the performance of the second-stage amplifier determined the final output power level. The optical intensity in the second-stage amplifier was managed well to avoid not only the excessive spectral broadening induced by nonlinearities but also any damage to the device. On the other hand, the power conversion efficiency of the amplifier was optimized through proper control of its pump wavelength. The pump wavelength determines the pump absorption and therefore the power conversion efficiency of the gain fiber. Through this approach, the average power of the noise-like pulse train was amplified considerably to an output of 13.1 W, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 36.1% and a pulse energy of 0.85 µJ. To the best of our knowledge, these amplified pulses have the highest average power and pulse energy for noise-like pulses in the 1.56-µm wavelength region. As a result, the net gain in the cascaded amplifier reached 30 dB. With peak and pedestal widths of 168 fs and 61.3 ps, respectively, for the amplified pulses, the pedestal-to-peak intensity ratio of the autocorrelation trace remains at the value of 0.5 required for truly noise-like pulses.

  18. A broadly tunable autocorrelator for ultra-short, ultra-high power infrared optical pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szarmes, E.B.; Madey, J.M.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We describe the design of a crossed-beam, optical autocorrelator that uses an uncoated, birefringent beamsplitter to split a linearly polarized incident pulse into two orthogonally polarized pulses, and a Type II, SHG crystal to generate the intensity autocorrelation function. The uncoated beamsplitter accommodates extremely broad tunability while precluding any temporal distortion of ultrashort optical pulses at the dielectric interface, and the specific design provides efficient operation between 1 {mu}m and 4 {mu}m. Furthermore, the use of Type II SHG completely eliminates any single-beam doubling, so the autocorrelator can be operated at very shallow crossed-beam angles without generating a background pedestal. The autocorrelator has been constructed and installed in the Mark III laboratory at Duke University as a broadband diagnostic for ongoing compression experiments on the chirped-pulse FEL.

  19. High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) and High Power Microwave (HPM) Devices: Threat Assessments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Clay

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is an instantaneous, intense energy field that can disrupt at a distance numerous electrical systems and high technology microcircuits that are especially sensitive to power surges...

  20. High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) and High Power Microwave (HPM) Devices: Threat Assessments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Clay

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is an instantaneous, intense energy field that can overload or disrupt at a distance numerous electrical systems and high technology microcircuits, which are especially sensitive to power surges...

  1. S-band 300 W pulsed solid state microwave amplifier development for driving high power klystrons for electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohania, Praveen; Shrivastava, Purushottam; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2005-01-01

    S-Band Microwave electron accelerators like microtrons and linear accelerators need pulsed microwaves from few megawatts to tens of megawatts to accelerator the electrons to desired energy and intensity. Klystron tube based driver amplifiers were used to drive the high power klystrons, which need microwave power from few tens of watts to 1 kW depending on tube output power and gain. A endeavour was initiated at Centre for Advanced Technology to develop state of art solid state S-band microwave amplifiers indigenously to drive the klystron tubes. A modular design approach was used and individual modules up to 160 W power levels were developed and tested. Finally combining 160 W modules will give up to 300 W output power. Several more modules can be combined to achieve even high power levels. Present paper describes the developmental efforts of 300 W S-band solid-state amplifiers and related microwave technologies. (author)

  2. Electron Beam Energy Compensation by Controlling RF Pulse Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Kii, T; Kusukame, K; Masuda, K; Nakai, Y; Ohgaki, H; Yamazaki, T; Yoshikawa, K; Zen, H

    2005-01-01

    We have studied on improvement of electron beam macropulse properties from a thermionic RF gun. Though a thermionic RF gun has many salient features, there is a serious problem that back-bombardment effect worsens quality of the beam. To reduce beam energy degradation by this effect, we tried to feed non-flat RF power into the gun. As a result, we successfully obtained about 1.5 times longer macropulse and two times larger total charge per macropulse. On the other hand, we calculated transient evolution of RF power considering non-constant beam loading. The beam loading is evaluated from time evolution of cathode temperature, by use of one dimensional heat conduction model and electron trajectories' calculations by a particle simulation code. Then we found good agreement between the experimental and calculation results. Furthermore, with the same way, we studied the electron beam output dependence on the cathode radius.

  3. Breakdown in ZnO Varistors by High Power Electrical Pulses; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PIKE, GORDON E.

    2001-01-01

    This report documents an investigation of irreversible electrical breakdown in ZnO varistors due to short pulses of high electric field and current density. For those varistors that suffer breakdown, there is a monotonic, pulse-by-pulse degradation in the switching electric field. The electrical and structural characteristics of varistors during and after breakdown are described qualitatively and quantitatively. Once breakdown is nucleated, the degradation typically follows a well-defined relationship between the number of post-initiation pulses and the degraded switching voltage. In some cases the degraded varistor has a remnant 20(micro)m diameter hollow track showing strong evidence of once-molten ZnO. A model is developed for both electrical and thermal effects during high energy pulsing. The breakdown is assumed to start at one electrode and advance towards the other electrode as a thin filament of conductive material that grows incrementally with each successive pulse. The model is partially validated by experiments in which the varistor rod is cut at several different lengths from the electrode. Invariably one section of the cut varistor has a switching field that is not degraded while the other section(s) are heavily degraded. Based on the experiments and models of behavior during breakdown, some speculations about the nature of the nucleating mechanism are offered in the last section

  4. RF pulse methods for use with surface coils: Frequency-modulated pulses and parallel transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Michael; Uğurbil, Kamil

    2018-06-01

    The first use of a surface coil to obtain a 31P NMR spectrum from an intact rat by Ackerman and colleagues initiated a revolution in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS). Today, we take it for granted that one can detect signals in regions external to an RF coil; at the time, however, this concept was most unusual. In the approximately four decade long period since its introduction, this simple idea gave birth to an increasing number of innovations that has led to transformative changes in the way we collect data in an in vivo magnetic resonance experiment, particularly with MRI of humans. These innovations include spatial localization and/or encoding based on the non-uniform B1 field generated by the surface coil, leading to new spectroscopic localization methods, image acceleration, and unique RF pulses that deal with B1 inhomogeneities and even reduce power deposition. Without the surface coil, many of the major technological advances that define the extraordinary success of MRI in clinical diagnosis and in biomedical research, as exemplified by projects like the Human Connectome Project, would not have been possible.

  5. Construction of a dog training device with high frequency and high power pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viaud Trejos, Rafael Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    An electronic device is built to produce high frequency and high power sound. The device is used in training and control of dogs. Commercial ultrasonic devices used for dog training are analyzed. The best strategies and components of the design are determined from an electronic device to produce sounds in frequency from 15kHz to 50Khz. Effectiveness tests are performed to establish the adequate design of the ultrasonic electronic device. The test results are analyzed to find opportunities of improvement in the design or construction of the device [es

  6. Outlook for the use of microsecond plasma opening switches to generate high-power nanosecond current pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgachev, G.I.; Maslennikov, D.D.; Ushakov, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Paper deals with a phenomenon of current breaking in a conducting plasma volume of plasma opening switchers with a nanosecond time of energy initiation and their application in high-power generators. One determined the conditions to ensure megavolt voltages under the erosion mode making use of external applied magnetic field to ensure magnetic insulation of gap of plasma opening switchers. One studied the peculiar features of application of plasma opening switchers under 5-6 MV voltages to ensure X-ray and gamma-radiation pulses [ru

  7. A vacuum-sealed, gigawatt-class, repetitively pulsed high-power microwave source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Tao; Fan, Yu-wei; Yang, Han-wu; Zhang, Zi-cheng; Chen, Dong-qun; Zhang, Jian-de

    2017-06-01

    A compact L-band sealed-tube magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) has been developed that does not require bulky external vacuum pump for repetitive operations. This device with a ceramic insulated vacuum interface, a carbon fiber array cathode, and non-evaporable getters has a base vacuum pressure in the low 10-6 Pa range. A dynamic 3-D Monte-Carlo model for the molecular flow movement and collision was setup for the MILO chamber. The pulse desorption, gas evolution, and pressure distribution were exactly simulated. In the 5 Hz repetition rate experiments, using a 600 kV diode voltage and 48 kA beam current, the average radiated microwave power for 25 shots is about 3.4 GW in 45 ns pulse duration. The maximum equilibrium pressure is below 4.0 × 10-2 Pa, and no pulse shortening limitations are observed during the repetitive test in the sealed-tube condition.

  8. A Pulse Power Modulator System for Commercial High Power Ion Beam Surface Treatment Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, D.M.; Cockreham, B.D.; Dragt, A.J.; Ives, H.C.; Neau, E.L.; Reed, K.W.; White, F.E.

    1999-01-01

    The Ion Beam Surface Treatment (lBESTrM) process utilizes high energy pulsed ion beams to deposit energy onto the surface of a material allowing near instantaneous melting of the surface layer. The melted layer typically re-solidifies at a very rapid rate which forms a homogeneous, fine- grained structure on the surface of the material resulting in significantly improved surface characteristics. In order to commercialize the IBESTTM process, a reliable and easy-to-operate modulator system has been developed. The QM-I modulator is a thyratron-switched five-stage magnetic pulse compression network which drives a two-stage linear induction adder. The adder provides 400 kV, 150 ns FWHM pulses at a maximum repetition rate of 10 pps for the acceleration of the ion beam. Special emphasis has been placed upon developing the modulator system to be consistent with long-life commercial service

  9. 1-MHz high power femtosecond Yb-doped fiber chirped-pulse amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhong-Qi; Yang, Pei-Long; Teng, Hao; Zhu, Jiang-Feng; Wei, Zhi-Yi

    2018-01-01

    A practical femtosecond polarization-maintaining Yb-doped fiber amplifier enabling 153 fs transform-limited pulse duration with 32 μJ pulse energy at 1 MHz repetition rate corresponding to a peak power of 0.21 GW is demonstrated. The laser system based on chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) technique is seeded by a dispersion managed, nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE) mode-locked oscillator with spectrum bandwidth of 31 nm at 1040 nm and amplified by three fiber pre-amplifying stages and a rod type fiber main amplifying stage. The laser works with beam quality of M2 of 1.3 and power stability of 0.63% (root mean square, RMS) over 24 hours will be stable sources for industrial micromachining, medical therapy and scientific research.

  10. High-power high-voltage pulse generator for supplying electrostatic precipitators of dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, A.; Martin, D.

    1992-01-01

    The study and development of an experimental high voltage generator specialized in the supply of electrostatic precipitators are presented. The main parameters of the pulse generator are: U = -30 kV, I = 8.8 A, τ = 120μs, f r = 150 Hz. The pulse generator was tested on a laboratory electrostatic precipitator with nominal capacitance C = 25 nF, biased at -40 kV by means of a separate high voltage rectifier. The experimental results will be used for the creation of a more powerful pulse generator, a prototype for the supply of a real industrial electrostatic precipitator: U = -50 kV, I = 313 A, τ = 100μs, f r = 300 Hz, C = 100 nF. (Author)

  11. Parametric performance predictions for high-power pulsed electric CO lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Center, R.E.; Caledonia, G.E.

    1975-01-01

    A kinetic model of the pulsed electrical CO laser is used to survey the time-dependent laser performance on parameters such as gas mixture, initial translational temperature, and discharge pulse length for both multiline and selected-line operation. Predictions are presented for the total output efficiency, spectral distributions of the stimulated transitions, energy partitioning in the vibrational and translational modes, and the translational temperature history in CO-N 2 mixtures. A brief description of the kinetic model is included. Simple scaling relationships are presented which can be used to scale the results to other densities in the pressure-broadened regime

  12. Liquid metal targets for high-power applications : pulsed heating and shock hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    2000-01-01

    Significant interest has recently focused on the use of liquid-metal targets flowing with high velocities for various high-power nuclear and high-energy physics applications such as fusion reactor first-walls, the Spallation Neutron Source, Isotope Separation On Line, and Muon Collider projects. This is because the heat generated in solid targets due to beam or plasma bombardment cannot be removed easily and the resulting thermal shock damage could be a serious lifetime problem for long-term operation. More recently, the use of free or open flying-liquid jets has been proposed for higher-power-density applications. The behavior of a free-moving liquid mercury or gallium jet subjected to proton beam deposition in a strong magnetic field has been modeled and analyzed for the Muon Collider project. Free-liquid-metal jets can offer significant advantages over conventional solid targets, particularly for the more demanding and challenging high-power applications. However, the use of free-moving liquid-metal targets raises a number of new and challenging problems such as instabilities of the jet in a strong magnetic field, induced eddy-current effects on jet shape, thermal-shock formation, and possible jet fragmentation. Problems associated with shock heating of liquid jets in a strong magnetic field are analyzed in this study

  13. The three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation analysis of cavity of high power subterahertz pulsed gyrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Koyu; Jiang, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    High power sub-terahertz pulsed gyrotrons for Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) diagnostics of fusion plasmas are being developed. The typical target parameters are: output power of 100-200 kW, operation frequency of 300 GHz, and pulsed length > 10 us. In order to support experimental development, numerical simulations were carried out by using Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code MAGIC. The oscillation mode of the electromagnetic radiation was selected as TE_1_5_,_2, for which the beam parameters and cavity dimensions were determined accordingly. The simulation results have showed maximum power of 144 kW at oscillation frequency of 292.80 GHz, with oscillation efficiency of 22.15%. (author)

  14. Very long pulse high-RF power test of a lower hybrid frequency antenna module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goniche, M; Brossaud, J; Barral, C; Berger-By, G; Bibet, Ph; Poli, S; Rey, G; Tonon, G [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d` Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Seki, M; Obara, K [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; and others

    1994-03-01

    Outgassing, induced by very long RF waves injection at high power density was studied in a module, able to be used for a lower hybrid frequency antenna. Good RF properties of the module are reported, however, resonance phenomena with strong absorption of RF power (15%) was observed at high temperature (T>400 deg C). A large outgassing data base is provided by the 75 shots cumulating 27 hours of RF injection. The comparison with previous experiments (Tore Supra and TdV prototype modules) confirm the effect of baking and results are consistent. Outgassing increases exponentially with -1/T, and a desorption model with an activation energy Ed {approx} 0.35 eV fits the data up to 400 deg C. In order to design vacuum pumping system for large lower hybrid frequency antenna, outgassing rates are given for different working temperatures. (author). 11 refs., 55 figs.

  15. Very long pulse high-RF power test of a lower hybrid frequency antenna module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goniche, M.; Brossaud, J.; Barral, C.; Berger-By, G.; Bibet, Ph.; Poli, S.; Rey, G.; Tonon, G.; Seki, M.; Obara, K.

    1994-03-01

    Outgassing, induced by very long RF waves injection at high power density was studied in a module, able to be used for a lower hybrid frequency antenna. Good RF properties of the module are reported, however, resonance phenomena with strong absorption of RF power (15%) was observed at high temperature (T>400 deg C). A large outgassing data base is provided by the 75 shots cumulating 27 hours of RF injection. The comparison with previous experiments (Tore Supra and TdV prototype modules) confirm the effect of baking and results are consistent. Outgassing increases exponentially with -1/T, and a desorption model with an activation energy Ed ∼ 0.35 eV fits the data up to 400 deg C. In order to design vacuum pumping system for large lower hybrid frequency antenna, outgassing rates are given for different working temperatures. (author). 11 refs., 55 figs

  16. Generating high-power short terahertz electromagnetic pulses with a multifoil radiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokurov, Nikolay A; Jeong, Young Uk

    2013-02-08

    We describe a multifoil cone radiator capable of generating high-field short terahertz pulses using short electron bunches. Round flat conducting foil plates with successively decreasing radii are stacked, forming a truncated cone with the z axis. The gaps between the foil plates are equal and filled with some dielectric (or vacuum). A short relativistic electron bunch propagates along the z axis. At sufficiently high particle energy, the energy losses and multiple scattering do not change the bunch shape significantly. When passing by each gap between the foil plates, the electron bunch emits some energy into the gap. Then, the radiation pulses propagate radially outward. For transverse electromagnetic waves with a longitudinal (along the z axis) electric field and an azimuthal magnetic field, there is no dispersion in these radial lines; therefore, the radiation pulses conserve their shapes (time dependence). At the outer surface of the cone, we have synchronous circular radiators. Their radiation field forms a conical wave. Ultrashort terahertz pulses with gigawatt-level peak power can be generated with this device.

  17. High-power LED light sources for optical measurement systems operated in continuous and overdriven pulsed modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasicki, Bolesław; Schröder, Andreas; Boden, Fritz; Ludwikowski, Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    The rapid progress of light emitting diode (LED) technology has recently resulted in the availability of high power devices with unprecedented light emission intensities comparable to those of visible laser light sources. On this basis two versatile devices have been developed, constructed and tested. The first one is a high-power, single-LED illuminator equipped with exchangeable projection lenses providing a homogenous light spot of defined diameter. The second device is a multi-LED illuminator array consisting of a number of high-power LEDs, each integrated with a separate collimating lens. These devices can emit R, G, CG, B, UV or white light and can be operated in pulsed or continuous wave (CW) mode. Using an external trigger signal they can be easily synchronized with cameras or other devices. The mode of operation and all parameters can be controlled by software. Various experiments have shown that these devices have become a versatile and competitive alternative to laser and xenon lamp based light sources. The principle, design, achieved performances and application examples are given in this paper.

  18. Advances in High-Power, Ultrashort Pulse DPSSL Technologies at HiLASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Smrž

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of kW-class diode-pumped picosecond laser sources emitting at various wavelengths started at the HiLASE Center four years ago. A 500-W Perla C thin-disk laser with a diffraction limited beam and repetition rate of 50–100 kHz, a frequency conversion to mid-infrared (mid-IR, and second to fifth harmonic frequencies was demonstrated. We present an updated review on the progress in the development of compact picosecond and femtosecond high average power radiation sources covering the ultraviolet (UV to mid-IR spectral range at the HiLASE Center. We also report on thin-disk manufacturing by atomic diffusion bonding, which is a crucial technology for future high-power laser development.

  19. Slice-selective RF pulses for in vivo B1+ inhomogeneity mitigation at 7 tesla using parallel RF excitation with a 16-element coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setsompop, Kawin; Alagappan, Vijayanand; Gagoski, Borjan; Witzel, Thomas; Polimeni, Jonathan; Potthast, Andreas; Hebrank, Franz; Fontius, Ulrich; Schmitt, Franz; Wald, Lawrence L; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2008-12-01

    Slice-selective RF waveforms that mitigate severe B1+ inhomogeneity at 7 Tesla using parallel excitation were designed and validated in a water phantom and human studies on six subjects using a 16-element degenerate stripline array coil driven with a butler matrix to utilize the eight most favorable birdcage modes. The parallel RF waveform design applied magnitude least-squares (MLS) criteria with an optimized k-space excitation trajectory to significantly improve profile uniformity compared to conventional least-squares (LS) designs. Parallel excitation RF pulses designed to excite a uniform in-plane flip angle (FA) with slice selection in the z-direction were demonstrated and compared with conventional sinc-pulse excitation and RF shimming. In all cases, the parallel RF excitation significantly mitigated the effects of inhomogeneous B1+ on the excitation FA. The optimized parallel RF pulses for human B1+ mitigation were only 67% longer than a conventional sinc-based excitation, but significantly outperformed RF shimming. For example the standard deviations (SDs) of the in-plane FA (averaged over six human studies) were 16.7% for conventional sinc excitation, 13.3% for RF shimming, and 7.6% for parallel excitation. This work demonstrates that excitations with parallel RF systems can provide slice selection with spatially uniform FAs at high field strengths with only a small pulse-duration penalty. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Schemes of high-power pulsed generators with inductive storages on stepped lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, V.S.; Bossamykin, V.S.

    1996-01-01

    Some multistage pulse generator designs based on homogeneous transmission lines of equal electrical length T 0 with stepwise impedance changes are described. The energy is initially stored as magnetic field by all the generator stages, while it is also stored by some of them as electrical energy. Upon triggering the switch connecting the high-voltage electrode of charged lines to the grounded generator frame, both the magnetic and electrical energies would concentrate completely at the generator output due to wave effects. Ideally, for any number of stages, the resistive load connected in parallel to the current opening switch is where a square-shaped voltage pulse of 2T 0 width would be generated, whose peak value can be considerably higher than the generator charging voltage. (author). 1 fig., 5 refs

  1. Schemes of high-power pulsed generators with inductive storages on stepped lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordeev, V S; Bossamykin, V S [All-Russian Scientific Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Some multistage pulse generator designs based on homogeneous transmission lines of equal electrical length T{sub 0} with stepwise impedance changes are described. The energy is initially stored as magnetic field by all the generator stages, while it is also stored by some of them as electrical energy. Upon triggering the switch connecting the high-voltage electrode of charged lines to the grounded generator frame, both the magnetic and electrical energies would concentrate completely at the generator output due to wave effects. Ideally, for any number of stages, the resistive load connected in parallel to the current opening switch is where a square-shaped voltage pulse of 2T{sub 0} width would be generated, whose peak value can be considerably higher than the generator charging voltage. (author). 1 fig., 5 refs.

  2. Plasma-pulse formation and acceleration for fast high-power technology and switching applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet, H.J.; Jones, W.D.; Moustaizis, S.; Lamain, H.; Rouille, C.

    1985-01-01

    A carbon plasma gun powered by a low-inductance capacitor bank and transmission line is used to produce μsec-length pulses of protons having densities of 10/sup 12/-10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ at distances of 0.3-1.5 m from the gun and velocities of 10-20 cm/μs. Essential features are a low-inductance surface switch and a nonlinear transmission grid

  3. [Apoptosis of human lung carcinoma cell line GLC-82 induced by high power electromagnetic pulse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiao-zhe; Zhao, Mei-lan; Wang, De-wen; Dong, Bo

    2002-09-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) could be used for sterilization of food and the efficiency is higher than 2450 MHz continuous microwave done. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on apoptosis of human lung carcinoma cell line GLC-82, so that to explore and develop therapeutic means for cancer. The injury changes in GLC-82 cells after irradiated with EMP (electric field intensity was 60 kV/m, 5 pulses/2 min) were analyzed by cytometry, MTT chronometry, and flow cytometry. The immunohistochemical SP staining was used to determine the expressions of bcl-2 protein and p53 protein. The stained positive cells were analyzed by CMIAS-II image analysis system at a magnification 400. All data were analyzed by SPSS8.0 software. EMP could obviously inhibited proliferation and activity of lung carcinoma cell line GLC-82. The absorbance value (A570) of MTT decreased immediately, at 0 h, 1 h, and 6 h after the GLC-82 cells irradiated by EMP as compared with control group. The highest apoptosis rate was found to reach 13.38% by flow cytometry at 6 h after EMP irradiation. Down-regulation of bcl-2 expression and up-regulation of p53 expression were induced by EMP. EMP promotes apoptosis of GLC-82 cells. At same time, EMP can down-regulate bcl-2 expression and up-regulate p53 expression in GLC-82 cells. The bcl-2 and the p53 protein may involve the apoptotic process.

  4. Multiphoton photoemission from a copper cathode illuminated by ultrashort laser pulses in an RF photoinjector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Cultrera, L; Ferrario, M; Filippetto, D; Gatti, G; Gutierrez, M S; Moody, J T; Moore, N; Rosenzweig, J B; Scoby, C M; Travish, G; Vicario, C

    2010-02-26

    In this Letter we report on the use of ultrashort infrared laser pulses to generate a copious amount of electrons by a copper cathode in an rf photoinjector. The charge yield verifies the generalized Fowler-Dubridge theory for multiphoton photoemission. The emission is verified to be prompt using a two pulse autocorrelation technique. The thermal emittance associated with the excess kinetic energy from the emission process is comparable with the one measured using frequency tripled uv laser pulses. In the high field of the rf gun, up to 50 pC of charge can be extracted from the cathode using a 80 fs long, 2 microJ, 800 nm pulse focused to a 140 mum rms spot size. Taking into account the efficiency of harmonic conversion, illuminating a cathode directly with ir laser pulses can be the most efficient way to employ the available laser power.

  5. Multiphoton Photoemission from a Copper Cathode Illuminated by Ultrashort Laser Pulses in an rf Photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musumeci, P.; Gutierrez, M. S.; Moody, J. T.; Moore, N.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Scoby, C. M.; Travish, G.; Cultrera, L.; Ferrario, M.; Filippetto, D.; Gatti, G.; Vicario, C.

    2010-01-01

    In this Letter we report on the use of ultrashort infrared laser pulses to generate a copious amount of electrons by a copper cathode in an rf photoinjector. The charge yield verifies the generalized Fowler-Dubridge theory for multiphoton photoemission. The emission is verified to be prompt using a two pulse autocorrelation technique. The thermal emittance associated with the excess kinetic energy from the emission process is comparable with the one measured using frequency tripled uv laser pulses. In the high field of the rf gun, up to 50 pC of charge can be extracted from the cathode using a 80 fs long, 2 μJ, 800 nm pulse focused to a 140 μm rms spot size. Taking into account the efficiency of harmonic conversion, illuminating a cathode directly with ir laser pulses can be the most efficient way to employ the available laser power.

  6. 30 nm T-gate enhancement-mode InAlN/AlN/GaN HEMT on SiC substrates for future high power RF applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugapandiyan, P.; Ravimaran, S.; William, J.

    2017-08-01

    The DC and RF performance of 30 nm gate length enhancement mode (E-mode) InAlN/AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) on SiC substrate with heavily doped source and drain region have been investigated using the Synopsys TCAD tool. The proposed device has the features of a recessed T-gate structure, InGaN back barrier and Al2O3 passivated device surface. The proposed HEMT exhibits a maximum drain current density of 2.1 A/mm, transconductance {g}{{m}} of 1050 mS/mm, current gain cut-off frequency {f}{{t}} of 350 GHz and power gain cut-off frequency {f}\\max of 340 GHz. At room temperature the measured carrier mobility (μ), sheet charge carrier density ({n}{{s}}) and breakdown voltage are 1580 cm2/(V \\cdot s), 1.9× {10}13 {{cm}}-2, and 10.7 V respectively. The superlatives of the proposed HEMTs are bewitching competitor or future sub-millimeter wave high power RF VLSI circuit applications.

  7. The disintegration and vaporization of plastic targets irradiated by high-power laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greig, J.R.; Pechacek, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    We have studied the disintegration of polyethylene and polystyrene targets irradiated by 100-J 40-nsec Nd/glass laser pulses. At power densities of approximately-less-than10 12 W/cm 2 relatively massive targets (6 x 10 -5 to 5 x 10 -4 cm 3 ) are totally disintegrated to produce finely divided target material and un-ionized vapor. Both the size of the target and the presence or absence of a laser prepulse strongly influence the proportions of finely divided target material and un-ionized vapor, especially within the first few microseconds after peak laser power. This disintegration is always preceded by the emission of a hot fully ionized plasma, but only 1% of the target material is contained in the hot plasma. Typically, (1--3) x 10 19 atoms of un-ionized vapor are released as a slowly expanding (vapprox.10 5 cm/sec) cold dense gas cloud (n/sub o/>10 19 cm -3 ) surrounding the initial target position. This cloud of target material has subsequently been heated by absorption of a 300-J 100-nsec CO 2 laser pulse to produce an approximately fully ionized plasma

  8. RF-sheath assessment of ICRF antenna geometry for long pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, L.; Bremond, S.

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring powered ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) antennas in magnetic fusion devices has revealed localized modifications of the plasma edge in the antenna shadow, most of them probably related to an enhanced polarization of the scrape-off layer (SOL) through radio-frequency (RF) sheath rectification. Although tolerable on present short RF pulses, sheaths should be minimized, as they may hinder proper operation of steady-state antennas and other subsystems connected magnetically to them, such as lower hybrid grills. As a first step towards mitigating RF sheaths in the design of future antennas, the present paper analyses the spatial structure of sheath potential maps in their vicinity, in relation with the 3D topology of RF near fields and the geometry of antenna front faces. Various combinations of poloidal radiating straps are first considered, and results are confronted to those inferred from transmission line theory. The dependence of sheath potentials on RF voltages or RF currents is studied. The role of RF near-field symmetries along tilted field lines is stressed to interpret such effects as that of strap phasing. A generalization of the 'dipole effect' is proposed. With similar arguments, the behavior of Faraday screen corners, where hot spots concentrate on Tore-Supra (TS), is then studied. The merits of aligning the antenna structure with the tilted magnetic field are thus discussed. The effect of switching from TS (high RF voltage near corners) to ITER-like electrical configurations of the straps (high voltage near equatorial plane) is also analyzed. (authors)

  9. Advances in high-power, Ultrashort pulse DPSSL technologies at HiLASE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smrž, Martin; Novák, Ondřej; Mužík, Jiří; Turčičová, Hana; Chyla, Michal; Nagisetty, Siva S.; Vyvlečka, Michal; Roškot, Lukáš; Miura, Taisuke; Černohorská, Jitka; Sikocinski, Pawel; Chen, Liyuan; Huynh, Jaroslav; Severová, Patricie; Pranovich, Alina; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 10 (2017), s. 1-12, č. článku 1016. ISSN 2076-3417 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1602; GA ČR GA16-12960S; GA MŠk LM2015086; GA TA ČR(CZ) TG02010056 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 739573 Grant - others:OP VVV - HiLASE-CoE(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_006/0000674 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diode-pumped solid- state lasers (DPSSL) * high average power lasers * higher harmonic generation * Yb:YAG * mid-infrared radiation * thin-disk laser * picosecond pulses Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.679, year: 2016

  10. Measurement of electromagnetic pulses generated during interactions of high power lasers with solid targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Marco, Massimo; Krása, Josef; Cikhardt, Jakub; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Krouský, Eduard; Margarone, Daniele; Ahmed, H.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.; Giuffrida, Lorenzo; Vrána, Roman; Velyhan, Andriy; Limpouch, J.; Korn, Georg; Weber, Stefan A.; Velardi, L.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V.; Ullschmied, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, Jun (2016), 1-8, č. článku C06004. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LQ1606; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02964S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089; GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162; ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : lasers * pulsed power Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  11. Thermal properties of borate crystals for high power optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, R; Rothhardt, J; Beil, K; Gronloh, B; Klenke, A; Höppner, H; Schulz, M; Teubner, U; Kränkel, C; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A; Prandolini, M J; Tavella, F

    2014-07-28

    The potential of borate crystals, BBO, LBO and BiBO, for high average power scaling of optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifiers is investigated. Up-to-date measurements of the absorption coefficients at 515 nm and the thermal conductivities are presented. The measured absorption coefficients are a factor of 10-100 lower than reported by the literature for BBO and LBO. For BBO, a large variation of the absorption coefficients was found between crystals from different manufacturers. The linear and nonlinear absorption coefficients at 515 nm as well as thermal conductivities were determined for the first time for BiBO. Further, different crystal cooling methods are presented. In addition, the limits to power scaling of OPCPAs are discussed.

  12. Continuous and pulsed laser high power beam combiner for additive manufacturing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassignana, Marta; Califano, Alessio; Pescarmona, Francesco; Braglia, Andrea; Perrone, Guido

    2018-02-01

    Laser-based additive manufacturing (AM) from metal powders is emerging as the new industrial revolution, although current fabrication approaches still require long mechanical post-processing to improve the final surface quality and meet the design tolerances. To overcome this limitation, the next generation machines are expected to complement laser AM with laser ablation (LA) to implement surface finishing and micro texturing already during the device growth process. With this aim, a new beam combiner to allow the real-time interchange of additive and subtractive processes using the same scanner head has been designed. Extensive tests have been carried out using a 6 kW continuous-wave laser similar to that used for the metal powder fusion and a nanosecond 100W pulsed source similar to that used for laser ablation.

  13. Progress of high power and long pulse ECRH system in EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Fukun; Shan, Jiafang; Xu, Handong; DajunWu; Li, Bo; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Yiyun; Tang, Yunying; Xu, Weiye; Hu, Huaichuan; Wang, Jian; Xu, Li; Zhang, Liyuan; Feng, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The design and the status of the 140 GHz/4 MW/1000 s ECRH system on EAST tokamak is described in detail. • Two of the four gyrotrons are tested in factory. • The transmission line and the equatorial launcher for the first 2 MW system are ready for installation. • Series tests have been carried out for the most critical elements for the real-time launcher. • The auxiliary system includes the water cooling system, the HVPS system, the vacuum system have been installed and tested. - Abstract: In accordance with the long pulse objectives of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), an electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system with the feature of 4 MW power for a pulse length up to 1000 s at 140 GHz, using second harmonic of the extraordinary mode (X2) is presently under construction at the institute of plasma physics, Chinese academy of sciences (ASIPP). The missions of the system are to provide central heating, current drive, plasma profile tailoring and control of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. The continuous wave (CW) power is transmitted from the gyrotrons to EAST via low-loss evacuated waveguide transmission lines. Considering the diverse applications of the EC system, the front steering launcher is designed to inject four individually steered beams across nearly the entire plasma cross section. The beam's launch angles can be continuously varied with the optimized scanning range of over 30° in poloidal direction and ±25° in toroidal, as well as the polarization will be adjusted during the discharge by the orientations of a pair of polarizers in the transmission line to maintain the highest absorption for different operational scenarios. The commissioning of the first 2 MW system will be commenced in the end of 2014.

  14. High-power and long-pulse operation of TE{sub 31,11} mode gyrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Ryosuke, E-mail: ikeda.ryosuke@jaea.go.jp; Kajiwara, Ken; Oda, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Koji; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We are under development of TE{sub 31,11} mode gyrotron to aim ITER specification. • HE{sub 11} mode purity reached 96% of ITER specification. • Mode competition was suppressed in initial phase of oscillation by anode voltage control. • Maximum output power of 1.2 MW was achieved. • Steady state operation of 500 MJ was achieved. - Abstract: The ITER electron cyclotron system is designed to inject a 20 MW RF beam by using twenty-four 170 GHz/1 MW gyrotrons. JAEA is currently developing a gyrotron having a high-order mode (TE{sub 31,11}) to reduce the heat load in the cavity resonator and achieve an output power greater than 1 MW. The measured radiation profile at the front of the diamond window agreed with the results of the calculation. In order to suppress RF loss in the equatorial and upper port launchers, a high-quality HE{sub 11} mode is required at the exit of the matching optics unit (MOU). An HE{sub 11} mode purity of 96% was achieved by finely adjusting the two mirrors in the MOU. During the oscillation start-up phase, mode competition with counter-rotating TE{sub 29,12} mode was observed on the higher magnetic field side which caused arcing and pressure increase in the gyrotron. To avoid the counter-rotating TE{sub 29,12} mode from being excited, a start-up scenario that controls the voltage between the anode and cathode electrodes at the initial phase of operation was introduced, which was able to achieve a stable start-up of TE{sub 31,11} mode. A 1.2 MW output power having a total electric efficiency of 43% was obtained in high-power experiments. In steady-state operation, a 1000 s oscillation length and output power of 0.51 MW was achieved.

  15. Energy of a shock wave generated in different metals under irradiation by a high-power laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Borodziuk, S.; Ullschmied, J.; Krousky, E.; Masek, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2007-01-01

    The energies of a shock wave generated in different metals under irradiation by a high-power laser beam were determined experimentally. The experiments were performed with the use of targets prepared from a number of metals, such as aluminum, copper, silver and lead (which belong to different periods of the periodic table) under irradiation by pulses of the first and third harmonics of the PALS iodine laser at a radiation intensity of approximately 10 14 W/cm 2 . It was found that, for heavy metals, like for light solid materials, the fraction of laser radiation energy converted into the energy of a shock wave under irradiation by a laser pulse of the third harmonic considerably (by a factor of 2-3) exceeds the fraction of laser radiation energy converted under irradiation by a laser pulse of the first harmonic. The influence of radiation processes on the efficiency of conversion of the laser energy into the energy of the shock wave was analyzed

  16. Surface treatment of dental implants with high- power pulsed ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulov, V.A.; Nochovnaya, N.A.; Remnev, G.E.; Ivanov, S.Y.; Lomakin, M.V.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present research is development of HPPIB technology for surface processing of compact components with a complex shape. The surface state of the dental implants from titanium alloys before and after irradiation and long time operation was investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray structural analysis, optical metallography methods. It is shown that the homogeneous state in the surface layer of titanium alloys is formed due to the irradiation (carbon ions and protons, energy of ions is equal to 300 keV, density of ion energy in a pulse achieves 1-5 J/cm 2 ). This state is characterized by a low amount of the impurities and a fine dispersion structure formed as a result of high speed crystallization. Thus, HPPIB irradiation of the dental implants leads to formation of developed micro relief and the decrease of impurities content on the surface. As a result, this treatment allows one to achieve a good cohesion between the implants and a body tissue. The latter allows the conclusion that biocompatibility of the dental titanium implants produced by can be improved using HPPIB treatment

  17. Simulation and initial experiments of a high power pulsed TEA CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, R.; Saghafifar, H.; Koushki, A. M.; Ganjovi, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the output characteristics of a UV pin array pre-ionized TEA CO2 laser have been simulated and compared with the associated experimental data. In our simulation, a new theoretical model has been improved for transient behavior analysis of the discharge current pulse. The laser discharge tube was modeled by a nonlinear RLC electric circuit as a real model for electron density calculation. This model was coupled with a six-temperature model (6TM) in order to simulation dynamic emission processes of the TEA CO2 laser. The equations were solved numerically by the fourth order Runge-Kutta numerical method and some important variables such as current and voltage of the main discharge, resistance of the plasma column and electron density in the main discharge region, were calculated as functions of time. The effects of non-dissociation factor, rotational quantum number and output coupler reflectivity were also studied theoretically. The experimental and simulation results are in good agreement.

  18. 1 MW, 352.2 MHz, CW and Pulsed RF test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badapanda, M.K.; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Upadhyay, Rinki; Tyagi, Rajiv; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    A 1 MW, 352.2 MHz, RF test stand based on Thales make TH 2089 klystron amplifier is being developed at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore for characterization and qualification of RF components, cavities and related subsystems. Provision to vary RF power from 50 kW to 1 MW with adequate flexibility for testing wide range of HV components, RF components and cavities is incorporated in this test stand. The paper presents a brief detail of various power supplies like high voltage cathode bias power supply, modulating anode power supply, filament power supply, electromagnet power supplies and ion pump power supplies along with their interconnections for biasing TH 2089 klystron amplifier. A digital control and interlock system is being developed to realize proper sequence of operation of various power supplies and to monitor the status of crucial parameters in this test set up. This RF test stand will be a unique national facility, capable of providing both CW and pulse RF power for realizing reliable RF power sources for various projects including the development of high energy proton linac under ADSS program of the Department of Atomic Energy. (author)

  19. The characterization of secondary lithium-ion battery degradation when operating complex, ultra-high power pulsed loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Derek N.

    The US Navy is actively developing all electric fleets, raising serious questions about what is required of onboard power supplies in order to properly power the ship's electrical systems. This is especially relevant when choosing a viable power source to drive high power propulsion and electric weapon systems in addition to the conventional loads deployed aboard these types of vessels. Especially when high pulsed power loads are supplied, the issue of maintaining power quality becomes important and increasingly complex. Conventionally, a vessel's electrical power is generated using gas turbine or diesel driven motor-generator sets that are very inefficient when they are used outside of their most efficient load condition. What this means is that if the generator is not being utilized continuously at its most efficient load capacity, the quality of the output power may also be effected and fall outside of the acceptable power quality limits imposed through military standards. As a solution to this potential problem, the Navy has proposed using electrochemical storage devices since they are able to buffer conventional generators when the load is operating below the generator's most efficient power level or able to efficiently augment a generator when the load is operating in excess of the generator's most efficient power rating. Specifically, the US Navy is interested in using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) lithium-ion batteries within an intelligently controlled energy storage module that could act as either a prime power supply for on-board pulsed power systems or as a backup generator to other shipboard power systems. Due to the unique load profile of high-rate pulsed power systems, the implementation of lithium-ion batteries within these complex systems requires them to be operated at very high rates and the effects these things have on cell degradation has been an area of focus. There is very little published research into the effects that high power transient

  20. Impact of High-Power Pulsed Light on Microbial Contamination, Health Promoting Components and Shelf Life of Strawberries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Buchovec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to evaluate the impact of high-power pulsed light (HPPL on the microbial control and nutritional properties of strawberries. Berries were treated with HPPL and afterwards analyzed in terms of microbial contamination, shelf life extension, antioxidant capacity, firmness, total phenolic, total anthocyanin and ascorbic acid content, and colour. Results indicate that the decontamination of strawberries by HPPL was significant compared to control. Naturally distributed mesophilic bacteria on the surface of strawberries were inactivated by 2.2 log, and inoculated Bacillus cereus and Listeria monocytogenes were inactivated by 1.5 and 1.1 log, respectively. Yeasts/microfungi distributed on the surface of strawberries were inactivated by 1 log. The shelf life of treated strawberries was extended by 2 days. The increase of temperature on the surface of fruit never exceeded 42 °C. No significantly important differences were observed in total phenolic, total anthocyanin and ascorbic acid content, and antioxidant capacity of strawberry fruits before and after pulsed light treatment. Moreover, no impact on the strawberry colour or firmness was found after HPPL treatment. In conclusion, HPPL is fast, effective, non-thermal and environmentally friendly technique which can be applied for microbial control of strawberries.

  1. RF-superimposed DC and pulsed DC sputtering for deposition of transparent conductive oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stowell, Michael; Mueller, Joachim; Ruske, Manfred; Lutz, Mark; Linz, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Transparent conductive oxide films are widely used materials for electronic applications such as flat panel displays and solar cells. The superposition of DC and pulsed DC power by a certain fraction of RF power was applied to deposit indium tin oxide films. This technique allows an additional tuning of different parameters relevant to film growth, and yields high quality films even under kinetically limited conditions. A long-term stable RF/DC process could be realized by using different combinations of standard power supply components, which includes a fully reliable arc handling system for both the RF and DC generators. The effectiveness of the arc handling system is illustrated by the current and voltage behavior recorded for actual arcing events. The resistivity of indium tin oxide films is strongly influenced by the respective sputtering mode. The best resistivity values of 145-148 μΩ cm were obtained by RF-superimposed pulsed DC sputtering at a pulse frequency between 100 and 200 kHz and a substrate temperature as low as 140 deg. C. In addition, the films were extremely smooth with a surface roughness of 1-2.5 nm

  2. Measurements of the temporal and spatial phase variations of a 33 GHz pulsed free electron laser amplifier and application to high gradient RF acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volfbeyn, P.; Bekefi, G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We report the results of temporal and spatial measurements of phase of a pulsed free electron laser amplifier (FEL) operating in combined wiggler and axial guide magnetic fields. The 33 GHz FEL is driven by a mildly relativistic electron beam (750 kV, 90-300 A, 30 ns) and generates 61 MW of radiation with a high power magnetron as the input source. The phase is measured by an interferometric technique from which frequency shifting is determined. The results are simulated with a computer code. Experimental studies on a CERN-CLIC 32.98 GHz 26-cell high gradient accelerating section (HGA) were carried out for input powers from 0.1 MW to 35 MW. The FEL served as the r.f. power source for the HGA. The maximum power in the transmitted pulse was measured to be 15 MW for an input pulse of 35 MW. The theoretically calculated shunt impedance of 116 M{Omega}/m predicts a field gradient of 65 MeV/m inside the HGA. For power levels >3MW the pulse transmitted through the HGA was observed to be shorter than the input pulse and pulse shortening became more serious with increasing power input. At the highest power levels the output pulse length (about 5 nsec) was about one quarter of the input pulse length. Various tests suggest that these undesirable effects occur in the input coupler to the HGA. Light and X-ray production inside the HGA have been observed.

  3. Science opportunities at high power accelerators like APT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browne, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents applications of high power RF proton linear accelerators to several fields. Radioisotope production is an area in which linacs have already provided new isotopes for use in medical and industrial applications. A new type of spallation neutron source, called a long-pulse spallation source (LPSS), is discussed for application to neutron scattering and to the production and use of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN). The concept of an accelerator-driven, transmutation of nuclear waste system, based on high power RF linac technology, is presented along with its impact on spent nuclear fuels

  4. Efficient method to design RF pulses for parallel excitation MRI using gridding and conjugate gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuo; Ji, Jim

    2014-04-01

    Parallel excitation (pTx) techniques with multiple transmit channels have been widely used in high field MRI imaging to shorten the RF pulse duration and/or reduce the specific absorption rate (SAR). However, the efficiency of pulse design still needs substantial improvement for practical real-time applications. In this paper, we present a detailed description of a fast pulse design method with Fourier domain gridding and a conjugate gradient method. Simulation results of the proposed method show that the proposed method can design pTx pulses at an efficiency 10 times higher than that of the conventional conjugate-gradient based method, without reducing the accuracy of the desirable excitation patterns.

  5. Development of L-band pillbox RF window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Y.; Fukuda, S.; Hisamatsu, H.; Saito, Y.; Takahashi, A.

    1994-01-01

    A pillbox RF output window was developed for the L-band pulsed klystron for the Japanese Hadron Project (JHP) 1-GeV proton linac. The window was designed to withstand a peak RF power of 6 MW, where the pulse width is 600 μsec and the repetition rate is 50 Hz. A high power model was fabricated using an alumina ceramic which has a low loss tangent of 2.5x10 -5 . A high power test was successfully performed up to a 113 kW RF average power with a 4 MW peak power, a 565 μsec pulse width and a 50 Hz repetition rate. By extrapolating the data of this high power test, the temperature rise of the ceramic is estimated low enough at the full RF power of 6 MW. Thus this RF window is expected to satisfy the specifications of the L-band Klystron. (author)

  6. Experimental Study of RF Pulsed Heating on Oxygen Free Electronic Copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2003-02-10

    When the thermal stresses induced by RF pulsed heating are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Therefore, pulsed heating limits the maximum surface magnetic field and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz was designed to study pulsed heating on Oxygen Free Electronic (OFE) copper. An X-band klystron delivered up to 10 MW to the cavities in 1.5 {micro}s pulses at 60 Hz repetition rate. One run was executed at a temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Cracks at grain boundaries, slip bands and cracks associated with these slip bands were observed. The second run consisted of 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses with a temperature rise of 82 K, and cracks at grain boundaries and slip bands were seen. Additional information can be derived from the power-coupling iris, and we conclude that a pulsed temperature rise of 250 K for several million pulses leads to destruction of copper. These results can be applied to any mode of any OFE copper cavity.

  7. High-power, high-brightness pseudospark-produced electron beam driven by improved pulse line accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junbino Zhu; Mingchang Wang; Zhijiang Wang

    1995-01-01

    A high power (200KV), intense current density, low emittance (71mmmrad), high brightness (8x10 10 A/m rad) electron beam was generated in the 10cm long, high-voltage-resistive multi-gap hollow cathode pseudospark chamber filled with 15pa nitrogen and driven by an improved pulse line accelerator. The beam was ejected with the 1mm diameter, the 2.2KA beam current, and the 400ns pulse length, and could propagated 20cm in the drift tube. At a distance of 5cm from the anode it penetrated consecutively an acid-sensitive discoloring film and a 0.05mm-thick copper foil both stuck closely, left 0.6mm and 0.3mm holes on them, respectively. That 10 shots on an acid-sensitive film produced a hole of 1.6mm at 7cm downstream of anode showed its good repeatability. After 60 shots the pseudospark discharge chamber was disassembled and observed that almost no destructive damage traces left on the surfaces of its various electrodes and insulators. But on almost all the surfaces of changeable central hole parts installed on intermediate electrodes there are traces of electron emission from the sides facing the anode and of bombardment on the sides facing the cathode, in contrast with which on the front- and back-surfaces of hollow cathode no visible traces of electron emission from then was observed. In addition, there were different tints, strip-like regions on the side of anode facing the cathode. Another interesting phenomenon was that there were a set of concentric circular or elliptical ring pattern on the acid-sensitive discoloring film got at 5cm from the anode and observed tinder a metallograph. It seems that the pseudospark electron beam is Laminar beam i.e, being possessed of a multi-layer structure, at least in the case of multi-gap pseudospark discharge chamber. It was found experimentally that the quality of pseudospark electron beam is much better than that of the cold-cathode electron beam

  8. High-power CW and long-pulse lasers in the green wavelength regime for copper welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricking, Sebastian; Huber, Rudolf; Klausmann, Konrad; Kaiser, Elke; Stolzenburg, Christian; Killi, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    We report on industrial high-power lasers in the green wavelength regime. By means of a thin disk oscillator and a resonator-internal nonlinear crystal for second harmonic generation we are able to extract up to 8 kW pulse power in the few-millisecond range at a wavelength of 515 nm with a duty cycle of 10%. Careful shaping and stabilization of the polarization and spectral properties leads to a high optical-to-optical efficiency larger than 55%. The beam parameter product is designed and measured to be below 5 mm·mrad which allows the transport by a fiber with a 100 μm core diameter. The fiber and beam guidance optics are adapted to the green wavelength, enabling low transmission losses and stable operation. Application tests show that this laser is perfectly suited for copper welding due to the superior absorption of the green wavelength compared to IR, which allows us to produce weld spots with an unprecedented reproducibility in diameter and welding depth. With an optimized set of parameters we could achieve a splatter-free welding process of copper, which is crucial for welding electronic components. Furthermore, the surface condition does not influence the welding process when the green wavelength is used, which allows to skip any expensive preprocessing steps like tin-coating. With minor changes we could operate the laser in cw mode and achieved up to 1.7 kW of cw power at 515 nm with a beam parameter product of 2.5 mm·mrad. These parameters make the laser perfectly suitable for additional applications such as selective laser melting of copper.

  9. A z-gradient array for simultaneous multi-slice excitation with a single-band RF pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertan, Koray; Taraghinia, Soheil; Sadeghi, Alireza; Atalar, Ergin

    2018-07-01

    Multi-slice radiofrequency (RF) pulses have higher specific absorption rates, more peak RF power, and longer pulse durations than single-slice RF pulses. Gradient field design techniques using a z-gradient array are investigated for exciting multiple slices with a single-band RF pulse. Two different field design methods are formulated to solve for the required current values of the gradient array elements for the given slice locations. The method requirements are specified, optimization problems are formulated for the minimum current norm and an analytical solution is provided. A 9-channel z-gradient coil array driven by independent, custom-designed gradient amplifiers is used to validate the theory. Performance measures such as normalized slice thickness error, gradient strength per unit norm current, power dissipation, and maximum amplitude of the magnetic field are provided for various slice locations and numbers of slices. Two and 3 slices are excited by a single-band RF pulse in simulations and phantom experiments. The possibility of multi-slice excitation with a single-band RF pulse using a z-gradient array is validated in simulations and phantom experiments. Magn Reson Med 80:400-412, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Study of Pulsed vs. RF Plasma Properties for Surface Processing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ricky; Hopkins, Matthew; Barnat, Edward; Miller, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The ability to manipulate the plasma parameters (density, E/N) was previously demonstrated using a double-pulsed column discharge. Experiments extending this to large-surface plasmas of interest to the plasma processing community were conducted. Differences between an audio-frequency pulsed plasma and a radio-frequency (rf) discharge, both prevalent in plasma processing applications, were studied. Optical emission spectroscopy shows higher-intensity emission in the UV/visible range for the pulsed plasma comparing to the rf plasma at comparable powers. Data suggest that the electron energy is higher for the pulsed plasma leading to higher ionization, resulting in increased ion density and ion flux. Diode laser absorption measurements of the concentration of the 1S5 metastable and 1S4 resonance states of argon (correlated with the plasma E/N) provide comparisons between the excitation/ionization states of the two plasmas. Preliminary modeling efforts suggest that the low-frequency polarity switch causes a much more abrupt potential variation to support interesting transport phenomena, generating a ``wave'' of higher temperature electrons leading to more ionization, as well as ``sheath capture'' of a higher density bolus of ions that are then accelerated during polarity switch.

  11. High-power parametric amplification of 11.8-fs laser pulses with carrier-envelope phase control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinkstok, R.T.; Witte, S.; Hogervorst, W.; Eikema, K.S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Phase-stable parametric chirped-pulse amplification of ultrashort pulses from a carrier-envelope phase-stabilized mode-locked Ti:sapphire oscillator (11.0 fs) to 0.25 mJ/pulse at 1 kHz is demonstrated. Compression with a grating compressor and a LCD shaper yields near-Fourier-limited 11.8-fs pulses

  12. High-quality electron pulse generation from a laser photocathode RF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jinfeng; Sakai, Fumio; Aoki, Yasushi

    1999-01-01

    A laser photocathode RF gun system was developed for ultra short X-ray pulse generation via the inverse Compton scattering. The gun is a BNL-type S-band RF gun and the performance test of the gun was performed at the Linear Accelerator Facility in the Institute of Scientific and Industries Research, Osaka University. The gun system produced 115 pC electron bunches with the energy of 1.6 MeV under the condition of RF peak power of 1.5 MW and laser pulse energy of 65 μJ. The quantum efficiency and dark current were obtained to be 10 -5 and 0.6 nA at the repetition rate of 10 Hz, respectively. The energy and charge of the electron bunch were measured as a function of laser injection phase. Furthermore, the electron bunches were accelerated up to 117 MeV by three s-band TW linacs and the energy monochromaticity (ΔE/E) of the beam was 1.2%. The transverse emittance was also experimentally investigated at the end of the linacs. (author)

  13. Acoustic pressure waves induced in human heads by RF pulses from high-field MRI scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, James C; Wang, Zhangwei

    2010-04-01

    The current evolution toward greater image resolution from magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanners has prompted the exploration of higher strength magnetic fields and use of higher levels of radio frequencies (RFs). Auditory perception of RF pulses by humans has been reported during MRI with head coils. It has shown that the mechanism of interaction for the auditory effect is caused by an RF pulse-induced thermoelastic pressure wave inside the head. We report a computational study of the intensity and frequency of thermoelastic pressure waves generated by RF pulses in the human head inside high-field MRI and clinical scanners. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA) guides limit the local specific absorption rate (SAR) in the body-including the head-to 8 W kg(-1). We present results as functions of SAR and show that for a given SAR the peak acoustic pressures generated in the anatomic head model were essentially the same at 64, 300, and 400 MHz (1.5, 7.0, and 9.4 T). Pressures generated in the anatomic head are comparable to the threshold pressure of 20 mPa for sound perception by humans at the cochlea for 4 W kg(-1). Moreover, results indicate that the peak acoustic pressure in the brain is only 2 to 3 times the auditory threshold at the U.S. FDA guideline of 8 W kg(-1). Even at a high SAR of 20 W kg(-1), where the acoustic pressure in the brain could be more than 7 times the auditory threshold, the sound pressure levels would not be more than 17 db above threshold of perception at the cochlea.

  14. Compression and radiation of high-power short rf pulses. I. Energy accumulation in direct-flow waveguide compressors

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn; Pazynin, Vadim L.; Sirenko, Yu K.; Bagci, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Proper design of efficient requires precise understanding of the physics pertinent to energy accumulation and exhaust processes in resonant waveguide cavities. In this paper, practically for the first time these highly non-monotonic transient processes are studied in detail using a rigorous time-domain approach. Additionally, influence of the geometrical design and excitation parameters on the compressor's performance is quantified in detail.

  15. Compression and radiation of high-power short rf pulses. I. Energy accumulation in direct-flow waveguide compressors

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    Proper design of efficient requires precise understanding of the physics pertinent to energy accumulation and exhaust processes in resonant waveguide cavities. In this paper, practically for the first time these highly non-monotonic transient processes are studied in detail using a rigorous time-domain approach. Additionally, influence of the geometrical design and excitation parameters on the compressor\\'s performance is quantified in detail.

  16. A UV pre-ionized dual-wavelength short-pulse high-power CO{sub 2} laser facility for laser particle acceleration research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahim, N A; Mouris, J F; Davis, R W

    1994-12-01

    In this report we describe the Chalk River dual-wavelength, short-pulse, single-mode, high-power CO{sub 2} laser facility for research in laser particle acceleration and CANDU materials modifications. The facility is designed and built around UV-preionized transversely-excited atmospheric-pressure (TEA) Lumonics CO{sub 2} laser discharge modules. Peak focussed power densities of up to 2 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} in 500 ps pulses have been obtained. (author). 10 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Calculation of mass transfer in the remote cutting of metals by radiation of a high-power repetitively pulsed CO2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladush, G G; Rodionov, N B

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of remote cutting of steel plates by radiation of a high-power repetitively pulsed CO 2 laser is theoretically studied. The models of melt removal by the gravity force and the recoil pressure of material vapour are proposed and the sufficient conditions for the initiation of cutting are determined. A numerical model of a thermally thin plate was employed to describe the cutting for large focal spots. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  18. Modelling of pulsed RF corona discharges in high-pressure air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auzas, F; Makarov, M; Naidis, G V

    2012-01-01

    An approach to description of pulsed RF corona discharges in high-pressure air is developed, based on the model of a filamentary discharge sustained by an electromagnetic wave guided along the plasma filament. Results of numerical simulation of spatial-temporal discharge dynamics at the quasi-stationary stage are obtained for various values of gas pressure and wave frequency. Experimental data on the discharge length versus the power absorbed by the discharge are presented. Their comparison with simulation results is given. (paper)

  19. Third-harmonic generation and self-channeling in air using high-power femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akoezbek, N.; Iwasaki, A.; Chin, S.L.; Becker, A.; Scalora, M.; Bowden, C.M.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that during laser pulse filamentation in air an intense ultrashort third-harmonic pulse is generated forming a two-colored filament. The third-harmonic pulse maintains both its peak intensity and energy over distances much longer than the characteristic coherence length. We argue that this is due to a nonlinear phase-locking mechanism between the two pulses in the filament and is independent of the initial material wave-vector mismatch. A rich spatiotemporal propagation dynamics of the third-harmonic pulse is predicted. Potential applications of this phenomenon to other parametric processes are discussed

  20. EXCESS RF POWER REQUIRED FOR RF CONTROL OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) LINAC, A PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY SUPERCONDUCTING PROTON ACCELERATOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.; Kwon, S.

    2001-01-01

    A high-intensity proton linac, such as that being planned for the SNS, requires accurate RF control of cavity fields for the entire pulse in order to avoid beam spill. The current design requirement for the SNS is RF field stability within ±0.5% and ±0.5 o [1]. This RF control capability is achieved by the control electronics using the excess RF power to correct disturbances. To minimize the initial capital costs, the RF system is designed with 'just enough' RF power. All the usual disturbances exist, such as beam noise, klystron/HVPS noise, coupler imperfections, transport losses, turn-on and turn-off transients, etc. As a superconducting linac, there are added disturbances of large magnitude, including Lorentz detuning and microphonics. The effects of these disturbances and the power required to correct them are estimated, and the result shows that the highest power systems in the SNS have just enough margin, with little or no excess margin

  1. Preliminary tests of a second harmonic rf system for the intense pulsed neutron source synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Brandeberry, F.

    1983-01-01

    The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) operating at Argonne National Laboratory is presently producing intensities of 2 to 2.5 x 10 12 protons per pulse (ppp) with the addition of a new ion source. This intensity is close to the space charge limit of the machine, estimated at approx. 3 x 10 12 ppp, depending somewhat on the available aperture. Accelerator improvements are being directed at (1) increasing beam intensities for neutron science, (2) lowering acceleration losses to minimize activation, and (3) gaining better control of the beam so that losses can be made to occur when and where they can be most easily controlled. We are now proposing a third cavity for the RF system which would provide control of the longitudinal bunch shape during the cycle which would permit raising the effective space charge limit of the accelerator and reducing losses by providing more RF voltage at maximum acceleration. This paper presents an outline of the expected benefits together with recent results obtained during low energy operation with one of the two existing cavities operating at the second harmonic

  2. Generation of femtosecond electron single pulse using laser photocathode RF gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesaka, M.; Kinoshita, K.; Watanabe, T. [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, Tokai, Ibaraki (JP)] [and others

    1998-11-01

    A new laser photocathode RF electron gun was installed in the second linac of the S-band twin linac system of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory(NERL) of University of Tokyo in August in 1997. Since then, the behavior of the new gun has been tested and the characteristic parameters have been evaluated. At the exit of the gun, the energy is 4.7 MeV, the charge per bunch 1 nC, the pulse width is 10 ps(FWHM), respectively, for 6 MW RF power supply from a klystron. The electron bunch is accelerated up to 17 MeV. The horizontal normalized emittance is 1 {pi} mm.mrad. Then, the bunch is compressed to be 440 fs(FWHM) with 0.35 nC by the chicane-type magnetic pulse compressor. The gun is planned to be used for femtosecond X-ray generation via the head-on Thomson scattering and laser wakefield acceleration in 1998. (author)

  3. High power pulsed/microwave technologies for electron accelerators vis a vis 10MeV, 10kW electron LINAC for food irradiation at CAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Purushottam; Mulchandani, J.; Mohania, P.; Baxy, D.; Wanmode, Y.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2005-01-01

    Use of electron accelerators for irradiation of food items is gathering momentum in India. The various technologies for powering the electron LINAC were needed to be developed in the country due to embargo situations as well as reservations of the developers worldwide to share the information related to this development. Centre for Advanced Technology, CAT, Indore, is engaged in the development of particle accelerators for medical industrial and scientific applications. Amongst other electron accelerators developed in CAT, a 10MeV, 10kW LINAC for irradiation of food items has been commissioned and tested for full rated 10kW beam power. The high power pulsed microwave driver for the LINAC was designed, developed and commissioned with full indigenous efforts, and is right now operational at CAT. It consists of a 6MW, 25kW S-band pulsed klystron, 15MW peak power pulse modulator system for the klystron, microwave driver amplifier chain, stabilized generator, protection and control electronics, waveguide system to handle the high peak and average power, gun modulator electronics, grid electronics etc. The present paper highlights various technologies like the pulsed power systems and components, microwave circuits and systems etc. Also the performance results of the high power microwave driver for the 10MeV LINAC at CAT are discussed. Future strategies for developing the state of art technologies are highlighted. (author)

  4. Hybrid Simulation of Duty Cycle Influences on Pulse Modulated RF SiH4/Ar Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xifeng; Song, Yuanhong; Zhao, Shuxia; Dai, Zhongling; Wang, Younian

    2016-04-01

    A one-dimensional fluid/Monte-Carlo (MC) hybrid model is developed to describe capacitively coupled SiH4/Ar discharge, in which the lower electrode is applied by a RF source and pulse modulated by a square-wave, to investigate the modulation effects of the pulse duty cycle on the discharge mechanism. An electron Monte Carlo simulation is used to calculate the electron energy distribution as a function of position and time phase. Rate coefficients in chemical reactions can then be obtained and transferred to the fluid model for the calculation of electron temperature and densities of different species, such as electrons, ions, and radicals. The simulation results show that, the electron energy distribution f(ɛ) is modulated evidently within a pulse cycle, with its tail extending to higher energies during the power-on period, while shrinking back promptly in the afterglow period. Thus, the rate coefficients could be controlled during the discharge, resulting in modulation of the species composition on the substrate compared with continuous excitation. Meanwhile, more negative ions, like SiH-3 and SiH-2, may escape to the electrodes owing to the collapse of ambipolar electric fields, which is beneficial to films deposition. Pulse modulation is thus expected to provide additional methods to customize the plasma densities and components. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11275038)

  5. Time-dependent two-temperature chemically non-equilibrium modelling of high-power Ar-N2 pulse-modulated inductively coupled plasmas at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yasunori

    2006-01-01

    A time-dependent, two-dimensional, two-temperature and chemical non-equilibrium model was developed for high-power Ar-N 2 pulse-modulated inductively coupled plasmas (PMICPs) at atmospheric pressure. The high-power PMICP is a new technique for sustaining high-power induction plasmas. It can control the plasma temperature and radical densities in the time domain. The PMICP promotes non-equilibrium effects by a sudden application of electric field, even in the high-power density plasmas. The developed model accounts separately for the time-dependent energy conservation equations of electrons and heavy particles. This model also considers reaction heat effects and energy transfer between electrons and heavy particles as well as enthalpy flow resulting from diffusion caused by the particle density gradient. Chemical non-equilibrium effects are also taken into account by solving time-dependent mass conservation equations for each particle, considering diffusion, convection and net production terms resulting from 30 chemical reactions. Transport and thermodynamic properties of Ar-N 2 plasmas are calculated self-consistently using the first order approximation of the Chapman-Enskog method at each position and iteration using the local particle composition, heavy particle temperature and electron temperature. This model is useful to discuss time evolution in temperature, gas flow fields and distribution of chemical species

  6. Temporal laser pulse shaping for RF photocathode guns: the cheap and easy way using UV birefringent crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, J.G.; Jing, C.

    2009-01-01

    We report experimental investigations into a new technique for achieving temporal laser pulse shaping for RF photocathode gun applications using inexpensive UV birefringent crystals. Exploiting the group velocity mismatch between the two different polarizations of a birefringent crystal, a stack of UV pulses can be assembled into the desired temporal pulse shape. The scheme is capable of generating a variety of temporal pulse shapes including: (i) flat-top pulses with fast rise-time and variable pulse duration. (ii) microbunch trains, and (iii) ramped pulse generation. We will consider two applications for beam generation at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) including a flat-top laser pulse for low emittance production and matched bunch length for enhanced transformer ratio production. Streak camera measurements of the temporal profiles generated with a 2-crystal set and a 4-crystal set are presented.

  7. High power beam test and measurement of emittance evolution of a 1.6-cell photocathode RF gun at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jang-Ho; Park, Sung-Ju; Kim, Changbum; Huang, Jung-Yun; Ko, In Soo; Parc, Yong-Woon; Hong, Ju-Ho; Xiang Dao; Wang, Xijie

    2007-01-01

    A Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) GUN-IV type photocathode rf gun has been fabricated to use in femtosecond electron diffraction (FED), femtosecond far infrared radiation (fs-FIR) facility, and X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). The gun consists of a 1.6-cell cavity with a copper cathode, a solenoid magnet, beam diagnostic components and auxiliary systems. We report here the measurement of the basic beam parameters which confirm a successful fabrication of the photocathode RF gun system. The emittance evolution is measured by an emittance meter and compared with the PARMELA simulation, which shows a good agreement. (author)

  8. Development of a movable plunger tuner for the high-power RF cavity for the PEP-II B-factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.D.; Fant, K.; Judkins, J.G.

    1997-05-01

    A 10 cm diameter by 5 cm travel plunger tuner was developed for the PEP-II RF copper cavity system. The single cell cavity including the tuner is designed to operate up to 150 kW of dissipated RF power are specially placed 8.5 cm away from the inside wall of the cavity to avoid fundamental and higher order mode resonances. The spring fingers are made of dispersion-strengthened copper to accommodate relatively high heating. The design, alignment, testing and performance of the tuner is described

  9. Characteristics of a long-pulse (30-s), high-power (4-MW) ion source for neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.; Barber, G.C.; Combs, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    A quasi-steady-state ion source has been developed for neutral beam injection applications. It is of the duoPIGatron type designed for delivering 50 A of hydrogen ions at 80 keV for 30-s-long pulses. Ion beams of 40 A at 75 keV were extracted for pulse lengths up to 30 s, maintaining excellent optical quality in the beam for the entire pulse duration. The design features and operational characteristics of the ion source are elaborated

  10. Performance review of an indigenously developed high power test stand built for the Indian S-band 5 MW pulsed klystron development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Purushottam; Baxy, D.; Mulchandani, J.; Hannurkar, P.R.; Joshi, L.M.

    2003-01-01

    CAT took up development of 5 MW S-Band klystrons indigenously in collaboration with CEERI Pilani. The development of klystron prototype is completed. These klystrons are very crucial devices, for energizing the 10-20 MeV electron accelerators, which are developed in the country for various industrial, medical and scientific applications. A test station has been developed indigenously at CAT for these klystrons. It consists of a 12 MW peak power 130 kV klystron pulse modulator, a 1 : 10 pulse transformer, 130 kV high voltage deck having high voltage pulse divider, pulse current transformer as well indigenously built klystron socket, filament supplies, klystron support structure and pulse transformer oil tank. After development/rigorous testing the test stand was shifted to CEERI and was installed and commissioned there by CAT. Gun collector test module and prototypes of the 5 MW klystron were tested, aged and conditioned at high power using this test stand. The details of the system / test results are discussed

  11. Comparison of selective arterial spin labeling using 1D and 2D tagging RF pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstandin, Simon; Heiler, Patrick M.; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Scharf, Johann [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2011-07-01

    Generic arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques label all brain feeding arteries. In this work, we used two different selective ASL (SASL) methods to show the perfusion of one single artery. A slice selective inversion of an area including the desired vessel was compared to a multidimensional RF pulse with Gaussian profile to label only the artery of interest. Perfusion images with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 mm{sup 3} are shown that were acquired after tagging only the internal carotid artery of healthy volunteers. In addition, both techniques were applied to a patient with an extra-intracranial bypass to illustrate its perfusion territory. These perfusion images are consistent with a standard angiography. SASL imaging with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 mm{sup 3} is possible in a total scan time of 5 min. The presented MR techniques may in part replace the assessment of revascularization success by conventional angiography. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of selective arterial spin labeling using 1D and 2D tagging RF pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstandin, Simon; Heiler, Patrick M.; Schad, Lothar R.; Scharf, Johann

    2011-01-01

    Generic arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques label all brain feeding arteries. In this work, we used two different selective ASL (SASL) methods to show the perfusion of one single artery. A slice selective inversion of an area including the desired vessel was compared to a multidimensional RF pulse with Gaussian profile to label only the artery of interest. Perfusion images with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 mm 3 are shown that were acquired after tagging only the internal carotid artery of healthy volunteers. In addition, both techniques were applied to a patient with an extra-intracranial bypass to illustrate its perfusion territory. These perfusion images are consistent with a standard angiography. SASL imaging with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 mm 3 is possible in a total scan time of 5 min. The presented MR techniques may in part replace the assessment of revascularization success by conventional angiography. (orig.)

  13. High-power femtosecond pulse generation in a passively mode-locked Nd:SrLaAlO4 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan-De; Dong, Lu-Lu; Zheng, Li-He; Berkowski, Marek; Su, Liang-Bi; Ren, Ting-Qi; Peng, Yan-Dong; Hou, Jia; Zhang, Bai-Tao; He, Jing-Liang

    2016-07-01

    A high optical quality Nd:SrLaAlO4 (Nd:SLA) crystal was grown using the Czochralski method and showed broad fluorescence spectrum with a full width at half maximum value of 34 nm, which is beneficial for generating femtosecond laser pulses. A stable diode-pumped passively mode-locked femtosecond Nd:SLA laser with 458 fs pulse duration was achieved for the first time at a central wavelength of 1077.9 nm. The average output power of the continuous-wave mode-locked laser was 520 mW and the repetition rate was 78.5 MHz.

  14. A phase stabilized and pulse shaped Ti:Sapphire oscillator-amplifier laser system for the LCLS rf photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotseroglou, T.; Alley, R.; Clendenin, J.; Fisher, A.; Frisch, J.

    1998-04-01

    The authors have designed a laser system for the Linac Coherent Light Source rf photoinjector consisting of a Ti:Sapphire oscillator and 2 amplifiers using Chirped Pulse Amplification. The output after tripling will be 0.5 mJ tunable UV pulses at 120 Hz, with wavelength around 260 nm, pulsewidth of 10 ps FWHM and 200 fs rise and fall times. Amplitude stability is expected to be 1% rms in the UV and timing jitter better than 500 fs rms

  15. RF sources for recent linear accelerator projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrien, J.C.; Faillon, G.; Guidee, P.

    1992-01-01

    We present the state of the art of high power klystrons at Thomson Tubes Electroniques, along with the main technological limitations for peak power and pulse width. Then we describe the work that is under way to upgrade performance and some of the alternative RF sources that have been developed. (Author) 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  16. RF transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choroba, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the techniques of transport of high-power radiofrequency (RF) power from a RF power source to the cavities of an accelerator. Since the theory of electromagnetic waves in waveguides and of waveguide components is very well explained in a number of excellent text books it will limit itself on special waveguide distributions and on a number of, although not complete list of, special problems which sometimes occur in RF power transportation systems. (author)

  17. Non-Fourier conduction model with thermal source term of ultra short high power pulsed laser ablation and temperature evolvement before melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Duanming; Li, Li; Li Zhihua; Guan Li; Tan Xinyu

    2005-01-01

    A non-Fourier conduction model with heat source term is presented to study the target temperature evolvement when the target is radiated by high power (the laser intensity is above 10 9 w/cm 2 ) and ultra short (the pulse width is less than 150 ps) pulsed laser. By Laplace transform, the analytical expression of the space- and time-dependence of temperature is derived. Then as an example of aluminum target, the target temperature evolvement is simulated. Compared with the results of Fourier conduction model and non-Fourier model without heat source term, it is found that the effect of non-Fourier conduction is notable and the heat source plays an important role during non-Fourier conduction which makes surface temperature ascending quickly with time. Meanwhile, the corresponding physical mechanism is analyzed theoretically

  18. Computational and experimental progress on laser-activated gas avalanche switches for broadband, high-power electromagnetic pulse generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayhall, D.J.; Yee, J.H.; Villa, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the gas avalanche switch, a high-voltage, picosecond-speed switch, which has been proposed. The basic switch consists of pulse-charged electrodes, immersed in a high-pressure gas. An avalanche discharge is induced in the gas between the electrodes by ionization from a picosecond-scale laser pulse. The avalanching electrons move toward the anode, causing the applied voltage to collapse in picoseconds. This voltage collapse, if rapid enough, generates electromagnetic waves. A two-dimensional (2D), finite difference computer code solves Maxwell's equations for transverse magnetic modes for rectilinear electrodes between parallel plate conductors, along with electron conservation equations for continuity, momentum, and energy. Collision frequencies for ionization and momentum and energy transfer to neutral molecules are assumed to scale linearly with neutral pressure. Electrode charging and laser-driven electron deposition are assumed to be instantaneous. Code calculations are done for a pulse generator geometry, consisting of an 0.7 mm wide by 0.8 mm high, beveled, rectangular center electrode between grounded parallel plates at 2 mm spacing in air

  19. RF design and tests on a broadband, high-power coaxial quadrature hybrid applicable to ITER ICRF transmission line system for load-resilient operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hae Jin; Wang, Son Jong; Park, Byoung Ho; Kwak, Jong-Gu; Hillairet, Julien; Choi, Jin Joo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Amplitude balanced 3 dB coaxial hybrid splitter has been designed and rf tested. • The proposed hybrid is applicable to ITER ICRF transmission line for load resilience. • Two-section, broadband coaxial hybrid can be tunable by changing dielectric insulator. - Abstract: RF design and network analyzer tests of broadband, amplitude-balanced coaxial hybrid junctions are presented. We have designed two 3 dB hybrid splitters with 9 and 12 in. coaxial transmission lines applicable to ITER ICRF for load-resilient operations using ANSYS HFSS. Amplitude-balanced broadband responses were obtained with the combination of impedance reductions of longitudinal and transverse branches in unequal proportion, length change of 50 Ω lines and diameter change of high impedance lines connected transversely to the T-section of the hybrid splitter, respectively. We have fabricated and RF tested the 9 in. coaxial hybrid coupler. We obtained an excellent coupling flatness of −3.2 ± 0.2 dB, phase difference of 4 degrees and return loss of 16 dB in 40–55 MHz. The measured data of 9 in. hybrid splitter is highly consistent with HFSS simulations. We found that the proposed 3 dB hybrid splitter can be tunable with amplitude-balanced, broadband response by changing dielectric insulators to keep the inner and outer conductors of coaxial line apart. The proposed 3 dB hybrid splitter can be utilized for load-resilient operations in a wide range of antenna load variations due to mode transitions or edge localized modes (ELMs) in fusion plasmas.

  20. RF design and tests on a broadband, high-power coaxial quadrature hybrid applicable to ITER ICRF transmission line system for load-resilient operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hae Jin, E-mail: haejin@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Son Jong; Park, Byoung Ho; Kwak, Jong-Gu [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hillairet, Julien [CEA/IRFM, Saint-lez-Durance (France); Choi, Jin Joo [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Amplitude balanced 3 dB coaxial hybrid splitter has been designed and rf tested. • The proposed hybrid is applicable to ITER ICRF transmission line for load resilience. • Two-section, broadband coaxial hybrid can be tunable by changing dielectric insulator. - Abstract: RF design and network analyzer tests of broadband, amplitude-balanced coaxial hybrid junctions are presented. We have designed two 3 dB hybrid splitters with 9 and 12 in. coaxial transmission lines applicable to ITER ICRF for load-resilient operations using ANSYS HFSS. Amplitude-balanced broadband responses were obtained with the combination of impedance reductions of longitudinal and transverse branches in unequal proportion, length change of 50 Ω lines and diameter change of high impedance lines connected transversely to the T-section of the hybrid splitter, respectively. We have fabricated and RF tested the 9 in. coaxial hybrid coupler. We obtained an excellent coupling flatness of −3.2 ± 0.2 dB, phase difference of 4 degrees and return loss of 16 dB in 40–55 MHz. The measured data of 9 in. hybrid splitter is highly consistent with HFSS simulations. We found that the proposed 3 dB hybrid splitter can be tunable with amplitude-balanced, broadband response by changing dielectric insulators to keep the inner and outer conductors of coaxial line apart. The proposed 3 dB hybrid splitter can be utilized for load-resilient operations in a wide range of antenna load variations due to mode transitions or edge localized modes (ELMs) in fusion plasmas.

  1. Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Brian -Tinh Van [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (104-106K) and high density plasmas (1022-1024cm-3) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (1013 - 1015W/cm2) and subpicosecond (10-12-10-13s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature (~40eV) super-critical density (~1023/cm3) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical (~1018/cm3) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films.

  2. Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, B.T.V.

    1994-02-01

    This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (10 4 -10 6 K) and high density plasmas (10 22 -10 24 cm -3 ) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (10 13 - 10 15 W/cm 2 ) and subpicosecond (10 -12 -10 -13 s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature (∼40eV) super-critical density (∼10 23 /cm 3 ) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical (∼10 18 /cm 3 ) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films

  3. Concerning the generation of very high pressures for EOS studies with ultra-high power laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, L.L.; Keeler, R.N.; Nuckolls, J.H.

    1977-07-01

    The use of basic physical and geometric principles, coupled with current laser technology, seems likely to extend experimental hyperbaric physics investigations from the megabar region into the portions of parameter space in which the ideal (degenerate) Fermi gas approximation is valid for even the highest Z materials. Implosions and speed-multiplying rectilinear stacks of flat plates seem particularly apt techniques for the near-term, transient attainment of pressure of 10 9 atmospheres in the laboratory, and laser-energized pulsed x-ray ''cameras'' appear suitable for analyzing the basic properties of matter under such conditions

  4. Multiscale analysis: a way to investigate laser damage precursors in materials for high power applications at nanosecond pulse duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, J. Y.; Wagner, F.; Ciapponi, A.; Capoulade, J.; Gallais, L.; Commandré, M.

    2010-11-01

    The mechanism of laser induced damage in optical materials under high power nanosecond laser irradiation is commonly attributed to the presence of precursor centers. Depending on material and laser source, the precursors could have different origins. Some of them are clearly extrinsic, such as impurities or structural defects linked to the fabrication conditions. In most cases the center size ranging from sub-micrometer to nanometer scale does not permit an easy detection by optical techniques before irradiation. Most often, only a post mortem observation of optics permits to proof the local origin of breakdown. Multi-scale analyzes by changing irradiation beam size have been performed to investigate the density, size and nature of laser damage precursors. Destructive methods such as raster scan, laser damage probability plot and morphology studies permit to deduce the precursor densities. Another experimental way to get information on nature of precursors is to use non destructive methods such as photoluminescence and absorption measurements. The destructive and non destructive multiscale studies are also motivated for practical reasons. Indeed LIDT studies of large optics as those used in LMJ or NIF projects are commonly performed on small samples and with table top lasers whose characteristics change from one to another. In these conditions, it is necessary to know exactly the influence of the different experimental parameters and overall the spot size effect on the final data. In this paper, we present recent developments in multiscale characterization and results obtained on optical coatings (surface case) and KDP crystal (bulk case).

  5. High-Power Short Pulsed Corona: Investigation of Electrical Parameters, Abatement of SO2 and Ozone Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokryvailo, A.; Yankelevich, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Electrical performance and chemical activity of a 50 MW, 100 kV, 22ns pulsed corona was studied in simulated air-SO 2 gas mixture in a coaxial reactor. Infrared and mass spectrometers and electrochemical sensors were used for gas diagnostics; solid byproducts were identified using X-ray fluorescent spectrometry. Electrochemical methods of gas diagnostics were not sufficiently reliable in view of the cross-influence of different gases, especially in ozone presence. The removal efficiency of SO 2 decreased at lower pollutant concentration and higher frequency, while the pulse energy was kept invariant. Removal efficiency in dry mixture was 25 g/kWh; in humid air, it was several times greater, which is attributed to the influence of OH radicals. In dry SO 2 -air mixture, the removal efficiency was much higher at positive polarity. Traces of many compounds were found and identified in treated gas. The precipitation of a yellowish powder identified as sulfur was observed. This effect was not previously noted in literature. It is ascribed to direct breaking of atomic bonds of the SO 2 molecule by energetic species. PSpice-based engineering model of corona-generator system is proposed. It was found that preliminary simulation results are in fair agreement with experimental data. The simulation revealed that surprisingly small part of the energy is coupled to plasma

  6. Tilt optimized flip uniformity (TOFU) RF pulse for uniform image contrast at low specific absorption rate levels in combination with a surface breast coil at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kalleveen, Irene M L; Boer, Vincent O; Luijten, Peter R; Klomp, Dennis W J

    2015-08-01

    Going to ultrahigh field MRI (e.g., 7 Tesla [T]), the nonuniformity of the B1+ field and the increased radiofrequency (RF) power deposition become challenging. While surface coils improve the power efficiency in B1+, its field remains nonuniform. In this work, an RF pulse was designed that uses the slab selection to compensate the inhomogeneous B1+ field of a surface coil without a substantial increase in specific absorption rate (SAR). A breast surface coil was used with a decaying B1+ field in the anterior-posterior direction of the human breast. Slab selective RF pulses were designed and compared with adiabatic and spokes RF pulses. Proof of principle was demonstrated with FFE and B1+ maps of the human breast. In vivo measurements obtained with the breast surface coil show that the tilt optimized flip uniformity (TOFU) RF pulses can improve the flip angle homogeneity by 31%, while the SAR will be lower compared with BIR-4 and spokes RF pulses. By applying TOFU RF pulses to the breast surface coil, we are able to compensate the inhomogeneous B1+ field, while keeping the SAR low. Therefore stronger T1 -weighting in FFE sequences can be obtained, while pulse durations can remain short, as shown in the human breast at 7T. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. High power all-solid-state fourth harmonic generation of 266 nm at the pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Q; Yan, X P; Fu, X; Gong, M; Wang, D S

    2009-01-01

    14.8 W UV laser at 266 nm was reported with the extra cavity frequency quartered configuration. The fundamental frequency IR source is a high-power high-beam-quality acoustic-optic Q-switched Nd:YVO 4 master-oscillator-power-amplifier laser. The type-I phase-matched LBO and type-I phase-matched BBO crystals were used as the extra-cavity frequency doubled and quartered crystal respectively. 14.8 W UV laser of 266 nm was obtained at the pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz with the conversion efficiency of 18.3% from green to UV, and the pulse duration of the UV laser was 10 ns corresponding to the pulse peak power of 14.8 kW. At 150 kHz, 11.5 W power output was obtained. The highest peak power of 21 kW was also achieved at 80 kHz with the average output power of 14.5 W

  8. High-power klystrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siambis, John G.; True, Richard B.; Symons, R. S.

    1994-05-01

    Novel emerging applications in advanced linear collider accelerators, ionospheric and atmospheric sensing and modification and a wide spectrum of industrial processing applications, have resulted in microwave tube requirements that call for further development of high power klystrons in the range from S-band to X-band. In the present paper we review recent progress in high power klystron development and discuss some of the issues and scaling laws for successful design. We also discuss recent progress in electron guns with potential grading electrodes for high voltage with short and long pulse operation via computer simulations obtained from the code DEMEOS, as well as preliminary experimental results. We present designs for high power beam collectors.

  9. Thermo-structural analysis of the rf-induced pulsed surface heating of the CLIC accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, Jouni Juhani

    2006-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is being studied at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e- collider. The acceleration of the particles is done by RF (Radio Frequency). The surfaces of the RF (radio frequency) accelerating cavities are exposed to high pulsed RF currents which induce cyclic thermal stresses. These cyclic stresses are crucial for the fatigue lifetime of the cavities. To study the fatigue phenomenon properly the induced stresses must be well known. ANSYS FEM simulations were made to study the thermo-structural behaviour of the CLIC accelerating structure in copper zirconium, bimetallic and diamond coated constructions. The simulations showed the existence of high thermal stresses and low stress level shockwaves. It was also shown that the bimetallic structure increases stress values due to the differences in material properties. Diamond coating was found to reduce the thermal stresses.

  10. Tilt optimized flip uniformity (TOFU) RF pulse for uniform image contrast at low specific absorption rate levels in combination with a surface breast coil at 7 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kalleveen, Irene M. L.; Boer, VO; Luijten, Peter R.; Klomp, DWJ

    Purpose: Going to ultrahigh field MRI (e. g., 7 Tesla [ T]), the nonuniformity of the B_1 field and the increased radiofrequency (RF) power deposition become challenging. While surface coils improve the power efficiency in B_1, its field remains nonuniform. In this work, an RF pulse was designed

  11. Development and contribution of rf heating and current drive systems to long pulse, high performance experiments in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Shinichi; Seki, Masami; Terakado, Masayuki; Shimono, Mitsugu; Ide, Shunsuke; Isayama, Akihiko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Fujii, Tsuneyuki

    2005-01-01

    To contribute to high performance long pulse (∼65 s) experiments in JT-60U, the target of the electron cyclotron (EC) operation in long pulse is 0.6 MW for 30 s with four gyrotrons, though 10 MJ (2.8 MW and 3.6 s) was achieved in high power operation before 2003. One of the critical issues for the long pulse operation is detuning due to decay in beam current of the gyrotron. This decay comes from the cathode cooling by continuous electron emission. As a countermeasure for this issue, active adjustments for the heater current and anode voltage during the pulse have successfully extended the duration of a good oscillation condition for the gyrotron. As a result, 0.4 MW for 16 s with one gyrotron to the dummy load and for 8.7 s to the plasma have been achieved up to now

  12. Impact of pulse duration in high power impulse magnetron sputtering on the low-temperature growth of wurtzite phase (Ti,Al)N films with high hardness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Tetsuhide, E-mail: simizu-tetuhide@tmu.ac.jp [Division of Human Mechatronics Systems, Graduate School of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6, Asahigaoka, Hino-shi, 191-0065 Tokyo (Japan); Teranishi, Yoshikazu; Morikawa, Kazuo; Komiya, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Tomotaro; Nagasaka, Hiroshi [Surface Finishing Technology Group, Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, 2-4-10, Aomi, Kohtoh-ku, 135-0064 Tokyo (Japan); Yang, Ming [Division of Human Mechatronics Systems, Graduate School of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6, Asahigaoka, Hino-shi, 191-0065 Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-04-30

    (Ti,Al)N films were deposited from a Ti{sub 0.33}Al{sub 0.67} alloy target with a high Al content at a substrate temperature of less than 150 °C using high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) plasma. The pulse duration was varied from 60 to 300 μs with a low frequency of 333 Hz to investigate the effects on the dynamic variation of the substrate temperature, microstructural grain growth and the resulting mechanical properties. The chemical composition, surface morphology and phase composition of the films were analyzed by energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Mechanical properties were additionally measured by using a nanoindentation tester. A shorter pulse duration resulted in a lower rate of increase in the substrate temperature with an exponentially higher peak target current. The obtained films had a high Al content of 70–73 at.% with a mixed highly (0002) textured wurtzite phase and a secondary phase of cubic (220) grains. Even with the wurtzite phase and the relatively high Al contents of more than 70 at.%, the films exhibited a high hardness of more than 30 GPa with a relatively smooth surface of less than 2 nm root-mean-square roughness. The hardest and smoothest surfaces were obtained for pulses with an intermediate duration of 150 μs. The differences between the obtained film properties under different pulse durations are discussed on the basis of the grain growth process observed by transmission electron microscopy. The feasibility of the low-temperature synthesis of AlN rich wurtzite phase (Ti,Al)N films with superior hardness by HIPIMS plasma duration was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Low temperature synthesis of AlN rich wurtzite phase (Ti,Al)N film was demonstrated. • 1 μm-thick TiAlN film was deposited under the temperature less than 150 °C by HIPIMS. • High Al content with highly (0002) textured wurtzite phase structure was obtained. • High hardness of 35 GPa were

  13. L-band pulsed klystron for the JHP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, S.; Takeuchi, Y.; Hisamatsu, H.; Anami, S.; Kihara, M.; Takahashi, A.

    1994-01-01

    An L-band high-power klystron for the JHP (6 MW output power and 600 μsec pulse width) was designed at KEK. High-power tests of the test diodes were performed up to a beam voltage of 140 kV, a pulse width of 600 μsec and a repetition rate of 50 pps. The capability to meet the specifications of the gun and the collector was confirmed. High-power tests of the rf window were also performed up to rf powers of 4 MW (600 μsec pulse width) and 5 MW (375 μsec pulse width). We obtained good results for an rf window using high-purity alumina (99.7%). The design considerations and manufacturing process are also described. Manufacturing a prototype tube has been completed and the tube is undergoing the high-power tests. (author)

  14. Synchronization of femtosecond laser pulses and RF signal by using a Sagnac loop Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Hui; Hajima, Ryoichi

    2008-11-01

    For future advanced energy recovery linac to generate femtosecond X-ray pulses, precise synchronization between sub-systems is highly desired. Typical synchronization methods based on direct photo detection are limited by detector nonlinearities, which lead to amplitude-to-phase conversion and introduce excess timing jitter. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate an optical-electronic mixed phase lock loop to synchronize the RF signal and laser pulses. In this synchronism setup, a Sagnac-loop Mach-Zehnder interferometer has been used to suppress the excess noise of direct photo detection. This scheme transfers the timing information into a intensity imbalance between the two output beams of the interferometer. As experimental demonstration, the single side-band phase noise of RF signal from the VCO is locked to the mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser in the spectrum covering the range of 10 kHz to 1 MHz. This synchronization scheme greatly reduces the phase noise and timing jitter of the RF signal. (author)

  15. An innovative high-power constant-current pulsed-arc power-supply for a high-density pulsed-arc-plasma ion-source using a LaB6-filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, A; Oguri, H; Ikegami, K; Namekawa, Y; Ohkoshi, K; Tokuchi, A

    2010-02-01

    An innovative high-power constant-current (CC) pulsed-arc (PA) power-supply (PS) indispensable for a high-density PA plasma ion-source using a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB(6)) filament was devised by combining a constant-voltage (CV) PA-PS, which is composed of an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) switch, a CV direct-current (dc) PS and a 270 mF capacitor with a CC-PA-PS, which is composed of an IGBT-switch, a CC-dc-PS and a 400 microH inductor, through the inductor. The hybrid-CC-PA-PS succeeded in producing a flat arc-pulse with a peak power of 56 kW (400 A x 140 V) and a duty factor of more than 1.5% (600 micros x 25 Hz) for Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) H(-) ion-source stably. It also succeeded in shortening the 99% rising-time of the arc-pulse-current to about 20 micros and tilting up or down the arc-pulse-current arbitrarily and almost linearly by changing the setting voltage of its CV-dc-PS.

  16. An innovative high-power constant-current pulsed-arc power-supply for a high-density pulsed-arc-plasma ion-source using a LaB6-filament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, A.; Oguri, H.; Ikegami, K.; Namekawa, Y.; Ohkoshi, K.; Tokuchi, A.

    2010-01-01

    An innovative high-power constant-current (CC) pulsed-arc (PA) power-supply (PS) indispensable for a high-density PA plasma ion-source using a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB 6 ) filament was devised by combining a constant-voltage (CV) PA-PS, which is composed of an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) switch, a CV direct-current (dc) PS and a 270 mF capacitor with a CC-PA-PS, which is composed of an IGBT-switch, a CC-dc-PS and a 400 μH inductor, through the inductor. The hybrid-CC-PA-PS succeeded in producing a flat arc-pulse with a peak power of 56 kW (400 Ax140 V) and a duty factor of more than 1.5%(600 μsx25 Hz) for Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) H - ion-source stably. It also succeeded in shortening the 99% rising-time of the arc-pulse-current to about 20 μs and tilting up or down the arc-pulse-current arbitrarily and almost linearly by changing the setting voltage of its CV-dc-PS.

  17. Energy spectrum measurement of high power and high energy(6 and 9 MeV) pulsed x-ray source for industrial use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Hiroyuki [Hitachi, Ltd. Power Systems Company, Ibaraki (Japan); Murata, Isao [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Industrial X-ray CT system is normally applied to non-destructive testing (NDT) for industrial product made from metal. Furthermore there are some special CT systems, which have an ability to inspect nuclear fuel assemblies or rocket motors, using high power and high energy (more than 6 MeV) pulsed X-ray source. In these case, pulsed X-ray are produced by the electron linear accelerator, and a huge number of photons with a wide energy spectrum are produced within a very short period. Consequently, it is difficult to measure the X-ray energy spectrum for such accelerator-based X-ray sources using simple spectrometry. Due to this difficulty, unexpected images and artifacts which lead to incorrect density information and dimensions of specimens cannot be avoided in CT images. For getting highly precise CT images, it is important to know the precise energy spectrum of emitted X-rays. In order to realize it we investigated a new approach utilizing the Bayesian estimation method combined with an attenuation curve measurement using step shaped attenuation material. This method was validated by precise measurement of energy spectrum from a 1 MeV electron accelerator. In this study, to extend the applicable X-ray energy range we tried to measure energy spectra of X-ray sources from 6 and 9 MeV linear accelerators by using the recently developed method. In this study, an attenuation curves are measured by using a step-shaped attenuation materials of aluminum and steel individually, and the each X-ray spectrum is reconstructed from the measured attenuation curve by the spectrum type Bayesian estimation method. The obtained result shows good agreement with simulated spectra, and the presently developed technique is adaptable for high energy X-ray source more than 6 MeV.

  18. Surface treatment of diamond-like carbon films by reactive Ar/CF{sub 4} high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Takashi, E-mail: t-kimura@nitech.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nishimura, Ryotaro [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Azuma, Kingo [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Nakao, Setsuo; Sonoda, Tsutomu; Kusumori, Takeshi; Ozaki, Kimihiro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) - Chubu, 2266-98 Anagahora, Moriyama, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Surface modification of diamond-like carbon films deposited by a high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) of Ar was carried out by a HPPMS of Ar/CF{sub 4} mixture, changing a CF{sub 4} fraction from 2.5% to 20%. The hardness of the modified films markedly decreased from about 13 to about 3.5 GPa with increasing CF{sub 4} fraction, whereas the water contact angle of the modified films increased from 68° to 109° owing to the increase in the CF{sub x} content on the film surface. C 1s spectra in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that a graphitic structure of modified films was formed at CF{sub 4} fractions less than 5%, above which the modified films possessed a polymer-like structure. Influence of treatment time on the properties of the modified films was also investigated in the range of treatment time from 5 to 30 min. The properties of the modified films did not depend on the treatment time in the range of treatment time longer than 10 min, whereas the water contact angle was not sensitive to the treatment time at any treatment time.

  19. Effect of oxygen incorporation on the structure and elasticity of Ti-Al-O-N coatings synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans, M., E-mail: hans@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Baben, M. to; Music, D.; Ebenhöch, J.; Schneider, J. M. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 10, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Primetzhofer, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, S-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Kurapov, D.; Arndt, M.; Rudigier, H. [Oerlikon Balzers Coating AG, Iramali 18, LI-9496 Balzers, Principality of Liechtenstein (Liechtenstein)

    2014-09-07

    Ti-Al-O-N coatings were synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The chemical composition of the coatings was determined by means of elastic recoil detection analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of oxygen incorporation on the stress-free lattice parameters and Young's moduli of Ti-Al-O-N coatings was investigated by X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation, respectively. As nitrogen is substituted by oxygen, implications for the charge balance may be expected. A reduction in equilibrium volume with increasing O concentration is identified by X-ray diffraction and density functional theory calculations of Ti-Al-O-N supercells reveal the concomitant formation of metal vacancies. Hence, the oxygen incorporation-induced formation of metal vacancies enables charge balancing. Furthermore, nanoindentation experiments reveal a decrease in elastic modulus with increasing O concentration. Based on ab initio data, two causes can be identified for this: First, the metal vacancy-induced reduction in elasticity; and second, the formation of, compared to the corresponding metal nitride bonds, relatively weak Ti-O and Al-O bonds.

  20. Nanomesh of Cu fabricated by combining nanosphere lithography and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering and a preliminary study about its function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wanchuan; Chen, Jiang; Jiang, Lang; Yang, Ping, E-mail: yangping8@263.net; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2013-10-15

    The Cu nanomesh was obtained by a combination of nanosphere lithography (NSL) and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPPMS). A deposition mask was formed on TiO{sub 2} substrates by the self-assembly of polystyrene latex spheres with a diameter of 1 μm, then Cu nanomesh structure was produced on the substrate using sputtering. The structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show the increase of temperature of the polystyrene mask caused by the thermal radiation from the target and the bombardment of sputtering particles would affect the quality of the final nanopattern. The tests of photocatalytic degradation, platelet adhesion and human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) culture show Cu deposition could promote the photocatalytic efficiency of TiO{sub 2}, affect platelet adhesion and inhibit smooth muscle cell adhesion and proliferation. It is highlighted that these findings may serve as a guide for the research of multifunctional surface structure.

  1. Effect of oxygen incorporation on the structure and elasticity of Ti-Al-O-N coatings synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hans, M.; Baben, M. to; Music, D.; Ebenhöch, J.; Schneider, J. M.; Primetzhofer, D.; Kurapov, D.; Arndt, M.; Rudigier, H.

    2014-01-01

    Ti-Al-O-N coatings were synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The chemical composition of the coatings was determined by means of elastic recoil detection analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of oxygen incorporation on the stress-free lattice parameters and Young's moduli of Ti-Al-O-N coatings was investigated by X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation, respectively. As nitrogen is substituted by oxygen, implications for the charge balance may be expected. A reduction in equilibrium volume with increasing O concentration is identified by X-ray diffraction and density functional theory calculations of Ti-Al-O-N supercells reveal the concomitant formation of metal vacancies. Hence, the oxygen incorporation-induced formation of metal vacancies enables charge balancing. Furthermore, nanoindentation experiments reveal a decrease in elastic modulus with increasing O concentration. Based on ab initio data, two causes can be identified for this: First, the metal vacancy-induced reduction in elasticity; and second, the formation of, compared to the corresponding metal nitride bonds, relatively weak Ti-O and Al-O bonds

  2. Control Instabilities in a Pulsed Multi-Cavity RF System with Vector Sum Feedback (A Mathematical Analysis)

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Upcoming projects relying on pulsed linear accelerators intend to use superconducting RF systems. Cost reasons suggest driving several cavities by a common transmitter, controlled over a vector sum feedback system, possibly supported by a feed forward system. Numerical simulations hint that such a system may become uncontrollable under certain conditions. In the present paper, for a model very close to reality, we will present a mathematical proof that in fact spontaneous symmetry braking is possible for these configurations, defining also the precise conditions under which it will take place. These can be used as an estimate for the real RF system stability limits. The listing of a small program demonstrating the mechanism numerically for two cavities is attached.

  3. Control Instabilities in a Pulsed Multi-Cavity RF System with Vector Sum Feedback (A Mathematical Analysis) 052

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Upcoming projects relying on pulsed linear accelerators intend to use superconducting RF systems. Cost reasons suggest driving several cavities by a common transmitter, controlled over a vector sum feedback system, possibly supported by a feed forward system. Numerical simulations hint that such a system may become uncontrollable under certain conditions. In the present paper, for a model very close to reality, we will present a mathematical proof that in fact spontaneous symmetry braking is possible for these configurations, defining also the precise conditions under which it will take place. These can be used as an estimate for the real RF system stability limits. The listing of a small program demonstrating the mechanism numerically for two cavities is attached.

  4. Generation of high-energy sub-20 fs pulses tunable in the 250-310 nm region by frequency doubling of a high-power noncollinear optical parametric amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutler, Marcus; Ghotbi, Masood; Noack, Frank; Brida, Daniele; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio

    2009-03-15

    We report on the generation of powerful sub-20 fs deep UV pulses with 10 microJ level energy and broadly tunable in the 250-310 nm range. These pulses are produced by frequency doubling a high-power noncollinear optical parametric amplifier and compressed by a pair of MgF2 prisms to an almost transform-limited duration. Our results provide a power scaling by an order of magnitude with respect to previous works.

  5. High power coaxial ubitron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkcum, Adam J.

    In the ubitron, also known as the free electron laser, high power coherent radiation is generated from the interaction of an undulating electron beam with an electromagnetic signal and a static periodic magnetic wiggler field. These devices have experimentally produced high power spanning the microwave to x-ray regimes. Potential applications range from microwave radar to the study of solid state material properties. In this dissertation, the efficient production of high power microwaves (HPM) is investigated for a ubitron employing a coaxial circuit and wiggler. Designs for the particular applications of an advanced high gradient linear accelerator driver and a directed energy source are presented. The coaxial ubitron is inherently suited for the production of HPM. It utilizes an annular electron beam to drive the low loss, RF breakdown resistant TE01 mode of a large coaxial circuit. The device's large cross-sectional area greatly reduces RF wall heat loading and the current density loading at the cathode required to produce the moderate energy (500 keV) but high current (1-10 kA) annular electron beam. Focusing and wiggling of the beam is achieved using coaxial annular periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stacks without a solenoidal guide magnetic field. This wiggler configuration is compact, efficient and can propagate the multi-kiloampere electron beams required for many HPM applications. The coaxial PPM ubitron in a traveling wave amplifier, cavity oscillator and klystron configuration is investigated using linear theory and simulation codes. A condition for the dc electron beam stability in the coaxial wiggler is derived and verified using the 2-1/2 dimensional particle-in-cell code, MAGIC. New linear theories for the cavity start-oscillation current and gain in a klystron are derived. A self-consistent nonlinear theory for the ubitron-TWT and a new nonlinear theory for the ubitron oscillator are presented. These form the basis for simulation codes which, along

  6. RF extraction issues in the relativistic klystron amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serlin, Victor; Friedman, Moshe; Lampe, Martin; Hubbard, Richard F.

    1994-05-01

    Relativistic klystron amplifiers (RKAs) were successfully operated at NRL in several frequency regimes and power levels. In particular, an L-band RKA was optimized for high- power rf extraction into the atmosphere and an S-band RKA was operated, both in a two-beam and a single-beam configuration. At L-band the rf extraction at maximum power levels (>= 15 GW) was hindered by pulse shortening and poor repeatability. Preliminary investigation showed electron emission in the radiating horn, due to very high voltages associated with the multi-gigawatt rf power levels. This electron current constituted an electric load in parallel with the radiating antenna, and precipitated the rf pulse collapse. At S-band the peak extracted power reached 1.7 GW with power efficiency approximately 50%. However, pulse shortening limited the duration to approximately 50 nanoseconds. The new triaxial RKA promises to solve many of the existing problems.

  7. Recoupling and decoupling of nuclear spin interactions at high MAS frequencies: numerical design of CNnν symmetry-based RF pulse schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, Christian; Herbst, Jirada; Kirschstein, Anika; Leppert, Joerg; Ohlenschlaeger, Oliver; Goerlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2009-01-01

    The CN n ν class of RF pulse schemes, commonly employed for recoupling and decoupling of nuclear spin interactions in magic angle spinning solid state NMR studies of biological systems, involves the application of a basic 'C' element corresponding to an RF cycle with unity propagator. In this study, the design of CN n ν symmetry-based RF pulse sequences for achieving 13 C- 13 C double-quantum dipolar recoupling and through bond scalar coupling mediated 13 C- 13 C chemical shift correlation has been examined at high MAS frequencies employing broadband, constant-amplitude, phase-modulated basic 'C' elements. The basic elements were implemented as a sandwich of a small number of short pulses of equal duration with each pulse characterised by an RF phase value. The phase-modulation profile of the 'C' element was optimised numerically so as to generate efficient RF pulse sequences. The performances of the sequences were evaluated via numerical simulations and experimental measurements and are presented here

  8. Phase and amplitude stability of a pulsed RF system on the example of the CLIC drive beam LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2132320; Prof. BANTEL, Michael

    The CLIC drive beam accelerator consists of the Drive Beam Injector (DBI) and two Drive Beam Linacs (DBLs). The drive beam injector is composed of a thermionic electron source, 3 Sub Harmonic Bunchers (SHBs), a pre-buncher, and several acceleration structures. In the electron source the DC electron beam is produced from a thermionic cathode. The following buncher cavities group ("bunch") the electrons to be accelerated by RF later on. Each electron bunch has an energy of 140 keV, a length of 3 mm, and a charge qb = 8.4 nC. Afterwards the electrons are accelerated in the 1 GHz accelerating structures up to 50MeV. The pulsed Radio Frequency (RF) power for this acceleration is provided by 1 GHz, 20MW modulator-klystron units, one per acceleration structure. A klystron is an RF amplifier based on a linear-beam vacuum tube. The high voltage modulator supplies the acceleration voltage to this tube. A DC electron beam gets modulated with an input signal, the modulation enhances in a drift space, and finally the powe...

  9. Effects of RF pulse profile and intra-voxel phase dispersion on MR fingerprinting with balanced SSFP readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Su-Chin; Lin, Te-Ming; Lin, Jyh-Miin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Ko, Cheng-Wen; Büchert, Martin; Bock, Michael

    2017-09-01

    To investigate possible errors in T1 and T2 quantification via MR fingerprinting with balanced steady-state free precession readout in the presence of intra-voxel phase dispersion and RF pulse profile imperfections, using computer simulations based on Bloch equations. A pulse sequence with TR changing in a Perlin noise pattern and a nearly sinusoidal pattern of flip angle following an initial 180-degree inversion pulse was employed. Gaussian distributions of off-resonance frequency were assumed for intra-voxel phase dispersion effects. Slice profiles of sinc-shaped RF pulses were computed to investigate flip angle profile influences. Following identification of the best fit between the acquisition signals and those established in the dictionary based on known parameters, estimation errors were reported. In vivo experiments were performed at 3T to examine the results. Slight intra-voxel phase dispersion with standard deviations from 1 to 3Hz resulted in prominent T2 under-estimations, particularly at large T2 values. T1 and off-resonance frequencies were relatively unaffected. Slice profile imperfections led to under-estimations of T1, which became greater as regional off-resonance frequencies increased, but could be corrected by including slice profile effects in the dictionary. Results from brain imaging experiments in vivo agreed with the simulation results qualitatively. MR fingerprinting using balanced SSFP readout in the presence of intra-voxel phase dispersion and imperfect slice profile leads to inaccuracies in quantitative estimations of the relaxation times. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. High-efficiency resonant rf spin rotator with broad phase space acceptance for pulsed polarized cold neutron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-N. Seo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available High precision fundamental neutron physics experiments have been proposed for the intense pulsed spallation neutron beams at JSNS, LANSCE, and SNS to test the standard model and search for new physics. Certain systematic effects in some of these experiments have to be controlled at the few ppb level. The NPDGamma experiment, a search for the small parity-violating γ-ray asymmetry A_{γ} in polarized cold neutron capture on parahydrogen, is one example. For the NPDGamma experiment we developed a radio-frequency resonant spin rotator to reverse the neutron polarization in a 9.5  cm×9.5  cm pulsed cold neutron beam with high efficiency over a broad cold neutron energy range. The effect of the spin reversal by the rotator on the neutron beam phase space is compared qualitatively to rf neutron spin flippers based on adiabatic fast passage. We discuss the design of the spin rotator and describe two types of transmission-based neutron spin-flip efficiency measurements where the neutron beam was both polarized and analyzed by optically polarized ^{3}He neutron spin filters. The efficiency of the spin rotator was measured at LANSCE to be 98.8±0.5% for neutron energies from 3 to 20 meV over the full phase space of the beam. Systematic effects that the rf spin rotator introduces to the NPDGamma experiment are considered.

  11. High power gyrotrons: a close perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartikeyan, M.V.

    2012-01-01

    Gyrotrons and their variants, popularly known as gyrodevices are millimetric wave sources provide very high powers ranging from long pulse to continuous wave (CW) for various technological, scientific and industrial applications. From their conception (monotron-version) in the late fifties until their successful development for various applications, these devices have come a long way technologically and made an irreversible impact on both users and developers. The possible applications of high power millimeter and sub-millimeter waves from gyrotrons and their variants (gyro-devices) span a wide range of technologies. The plasma physics community has already taken advantage of the recent advances of gyrotrons in the areas of RF plasma production, heating, non-inductive current drive, plasma stabilization and active plasma diagnostics for magnetic confinement thermonuclear fusion research, such as lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) (8 GHz), electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) (28-170-220 GHz), electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), collective Thomson scattering (CTS), heat-wave propagation experiments, and space-power grid (SPG) applications. Other important applications of gyrotrons are electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharges for the generation of multi- charged ions and soft X-rays, as well as industrial materials processing and plasma chemistry. Submillimeter wave gyrotrons are employed in high frequency, broadband electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Additional future applications await the development of novel high power gyro-amplifiers and devices for high resolution radar ranging and imaging in atmospheric and planetary science as well as deep space and specialized satellite communications, RF drivers for next generation high gradient linear accelerators (supercolliders), high resolution Doppler radar, radar ranging and imaging in atmospheric and planetary science, drivers for next-generation high-gradient linear accelerators

  12. High power CW linac in PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, S.; Wang, Y.L.; Emoto, T.

    1994-01-01

    Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) is developing a high power electron linac for various applications. The electron beam is accelerated in CW operation to get maximum beam current of 100 mA and energy of 10 MeV. Crucial components such as a high power L-band klystron and a high power traveling wave resonant ring (TWRR) accelerator guides were designed and manufactured and their performance were examined. These design and results from the recent high power RF tests were described in this paper. (author)

  13. Numerical design of RNnν symmetry-based RF pulse schemes for recoupling and decoupling of nuclear spin interactions at high MAS frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, Christian; Herbst, Jirada; Leppert, Joerg; Ohlenschlaeger, Oliver; Goerlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2009-01-01

    An approach for the efficient implementation of RN n ν symmetry-based pulse schemes that are often employed for recoupling and decoupling of nuclear spin interactions in biological solid state NMR investigations is demonstrated at high magic-angle spinning frequencies. RF pulse sequences belonging to the RN n ν symmetry involve the repeated application of the pulse sandwich {R φ R -φ }, corresponding to a propagator U RF = exp(-i4φI z ), where φ = πν/N and R is typically a pulse that rotates the nuclear spins through 180 o about the x-axis. In this study, broadband, phase-modulated 180 o pulses of constant amplitude were employed as the initial 'R' element and the phase-modulation profile of this 'R' element was numerically optimised for generating RN n ν symmetry-based pulse schemes with satisfactory magnetisation transfer characteristics. At representative MAS frequencies, RF pulse sequences were implemented for achieving 13 C- 13 C double-quantum dipolar recoupling and through bond scalar coupling mediated chemical shift correlation and evaluated via numerical simulations and experimental measurements. The results from these investigations are presented here

  14. Generation of high intensity rf pulses in the ionosphere by means of in situ compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, S.C.; Perkins, F.W.; Valeo, E.J.

    1993-04-01

    We demonstrate, using a simple model, that high intensity pulses can be generated from a frequency-chirped modifier of much lower intensity by making use of the dispersive properties of the ionosphere. We show that a frequency-chirped pulse can be constructed so that its various components overtake each other at a prescribed height, resulting in large (up to one hundred times) transient intensity enhancements as compared to those achievable from a steady modifier operating at the same power. We examine briefly one possible application: the enhancement of plasma wave amplitudes which occurs as a result of the interaction of such a compressed pulse with pre-generated turbulence

  15. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Calculation of mass transfer in the remote cutting of metals by radiation of a high-power repetitively pulsed CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladush, G. G.; Rodionov, N. B.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of remote cutting of steel plates by radiation of a high-power repetitively pulsed CO2 laser is theoretically studied. The models of melt removal by the gravity force and the recoil pressure of material vapour are proposed and the sufficient conditions for the initiation of cutting are determined. A numerical model of a thermally thin plate was employed to describe the cutting for large focal spots.

  16. Single-pass, efficient type-I phase-matched frequency doubling of high-power ultrashort-pulse Yb-fiber laser using LiB_3O_5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Mukesh Kumar; Kumar, Samir; Das, Ritwick

    2016-05-01

    We report 48 % efficient single-pass second harmonic generation of high-power ultrashort-pulse ({≈ }250 fs) Yb-fiber laser by utilizing type-I phase matching in LiB_3O_5 (LBO) crystal. The choice of LBO among other borate crystals for high-power frequency doubling is essentially motivated by large thermal conductivity, low birefringence and weak group velocity dispersion. By optimally focussing the beam in a 4-mm-long LBO crystal, we have generated about 2.3 W of average power at 532 nm using 4.8 W of available pump power at 1064 nm. The ultrashort green pulses were found out to be near-transform limited sech^2 pulses with a pulse width of Δ τ ≈ 150 fs and being delivered at 78 MHz repetition rate. Due to appreciably low spatial walk-off angle for LBO ({≈ }0.4°), we obtain M^2beam which signifies marginal distortion in comparison with the pump beam (M^2<1.15). We also discuss the impact of third-order optical nonlinearity of the LBO crystal on the generated ultrashort SH pulses.

  17. Laser plasma generation of hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon thin films on Zr-2.5Nb CANDU pressure tube materials and silicon wafers with a pulsed high-power CO2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahim, N.A.; Mouris, J.F.; Hoffmann, C.R.J.; Davis, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    We report the first experiments on the laser plasma deposition of hydrogen-free, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on Zr-2.5Nb CANDU pressure-tube materials and silicon substrates, using the short-pulse, high-power, CO 2 laser in the High-Power Laser Laboratory at Chalk River Laboratories. The films were (AFM). The thin films show the characteristic signature of DLC films in the Raman spectra obtained using a krypton-ion (Kr + ) laser. The Vickers ultra-low-load microhardness tests show hardness of the coated surface of approximately 7000 Kg force mm -2 , which is consistent with the hardness associated with DLC films. AFM examination of the film morphology shows diamond-like crystals distributed throughout the film, with film thicknesses of up to 0.5 μm generated with 50 laser pulses. With significantly more laser pulses, it is expected that very uniform diamond-like films would be produced. These experiments suggest that it should be possible to deposit hydrogen-free, diamond-like films of relevance to nuclear reactor components with a high-power and high-repetition-rate laser facility. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 15 figs

  18. A NEW THERMIONIC RF ELECTRON GUN FOR SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsaev, Sergey; Agustsson, R.; Hartzell, J; Murokh, A.; Nassiri, A.; Savin, E.; Smirnov, A.V.; Smirnov, A. Yu; Sun, Y.; Verma, A; Waldschmidt, Geoff; Zholents, A.

    2017-06-02

    A thermionic RF gun is a compact and efficient source of electrons used in many practical applications. RadiaBeam Systems and the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory collaborate in developing of a reliable and robust thermionic RF gun for synchrotron light sources which would offer substantial improvements over existing thermionic RF guns and allow stable operation with up to 1A of beam peak current at a 100 Hz pulse repetition rate and a 1.5 μs RF pulse length. In this paper, we discuss the electromagnetic and engineering design of the cavity and report the progress towards high power tests of the cathode assembly of the new gun.

  19. The drive beam pulse compression system for the CLIC RF power source

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, R

    1999-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) is a high energy (0.5 to 5 TeV) e ± linear collider that uses a high- current electron beam (the drive beam) for 30 GHz RF power production by the Two-Beam Acceleration (TBA) method. Recently, a new cost­effective and efficient generation scheme for the drive beam has been developed. A fully­loaded normal­conducting linac operating at lower frequency (937 MHz) generates and accelerates the drive beam bunches, and a compression system composed of a delay­line and two combiner rings produces the proper drive beam time structure for RF power generation in the drive beam decelerator. In this paper, a preliminary design of the whole compression system is presented. In particular, the fundamental issue of preserving the bunch quality along the complex is studied and its impact on the beam parameters and on the various system components is assessed. A first design of the rings and delay­line lattice, including path length tuning chicanes, injection and extraction regions is a...

  20. RF power source for the compact linear collider test facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, G; Brown, Peter; Carron, G; Hanni, R; Mourier, J; Rossat, G; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L; Thorndahl, L

    2004-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility will test and demonstrate many vital components of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider). This paper describes the pulsed RF power source at 2998.55 MHz for the drive-beam accelerator (DBA), which produces a beam with an energy of 150 MeV and a current of 3.5 Amps. Where possible, existing equipment from the LEP preinjector, especially the modulators and klystrons, is being used and upgraded to achieve this goal. A high power RF pulse compression system is used at the output of each klystron, which requires sophisticated RF phase programming on the low level side to achieve the required RF pulse. In addition to the 3 GHz system two pulsed RF sources operating at 1.5 GHz are being built. The first is a wide-band, low power, travelling wave tube (TWT) for the subharmonic buncher (SHB) system that produces a train of "phase coded" subpulses as part of the injector scheme. The second is a high power narrow band system to produce 20 MW RF power to the 1.5 GHz RF deflectors in the delay loop situate...

  1. Applications of high power microwaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benford, J.; Swegle, J.

    1993-01-01

    The authors address a number of applications for HPM technology. There is a strong symbiotic relationship between a developing technology and its emerging applications. New technologies can generate new applications. Conversely, applications can demand development of new technological capability. High-power microwave generating systems come with size and weight penalties and problems associated with the x-radiation and collection of the electron beam. Acceptance of these difficulties requires the identification of a set of applications for which high-power operation is either demanded or results in significant improvements in peRFormance. The authors identify the following applications, and discuss their requirements and operational issues: (1) High-energy RF acceleration; (2) Atmospheric modification (both to produce artificial ionospheric mirrors for radio waves and to save the ozone layer); (3) Radar; (4) Electronic warfare; and (5) Laser pumping. In addition, they discuss several applications requiring high average power than border on HPM, power beaming and plasma heating

  2. A high frequency, high power CARM proposal for the DEMO ECRH system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirizzi, Francesco; Spassovsky, Ivan; Ceccuzzi, Silvio; Dattoli, Giuseppe; Di Palma, Emanuele; Doria, Andrea; Gallerano, Gianpiero; Lampasi, Alessandro; Maffia, Giuseppe; Ravera, GianLuca; Sabia, Elio; Tuccillo, Angelo Antonio; Zito, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ECRH system for DEMO. • Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM) devices. • Relativistic electron beams. • Bragg reflectors. • High voltage pulse modulators. - Abstract: ECRH&CD systems are extensively used on tokamak plasmas due to their capability of highly tailored power deposition, allowing very localised heating and non-inductive current drive, useful for MHD and profiles control. The high electron temperatures expected in DEMO will require ECRH systems with operating frequency in the 200–300 GHz range, equipped with a reasonable number of high power (P ≥ 1 MW) CW RF sources, for allowing central RF power deposition. In this frame the ENEA Fusion Department (Frascati) is coordinating a task force aimed at the study and realisation of a suitable high power, high frequency reliable source.

  3. A high frequency, high power CARM proposal for the DEMO ECRH system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirizzi, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mirizzi@enea.it [Consorzio CREATE, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Spassovsky, Ivan [Unità Tecnica Applicazioni delle Radiazioni – ENEA, C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Ceccuzzi, Silvio [Unità Tecnica Fusione – ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Dattoli, Giuseppe; Di Palma, Emanuele; Doria, Andrea; Gallerano, Gianpiero [Unità Tecnica Applicazioni delle Radiazioni – ENEA, C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Lampasi, Alessandro; Maffia, Giuseppe; Ravera, GianLuca [Unità Tecnica Fusione – ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Sabia, Elio [Unità Tecnica Applicazioni delle Radiazioni – ENEA, C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Tuccillo, Angelo Antonio; Zito, Pietro [Unità Tecnica Fusione – ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ECRH system for DEMO. • Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM) devices. • Relativistic electron beams. • Bragg reflectors. • High voltage pulse modulators. - Abstract: ECRH&CD systems are extensively used on tokamak plasmas due to their capability of highly tailored power deposition, allowing very localised heating and non-inductive current drive, useful for MHD and profiles control. The high electron temperatures expected in DEMO will require ECRH systems with operating frequency in the 200–300 GHz range, equipped with a reasonable number of high power (P ≥ 1 MW) CW RF sources, for allowing central RF power deposition. In this frame the ENEA Fusion Department (Frascati) is coordinating a task force aimed at the study and realisation of a suitable high power, high frequency reliable source.

  4. The impact of hybrid energy storage on power quality, when high power pulsed DC loads are operated on a microgrid testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Jay Paul

    As the Navy's demands for high power transient loads evolves, so too does the need for alternative energy sources to back-up the more traditional power generation. Such applications in need of support include electrical grid backup and directed energy weapon systems such as electromagnetic launchers, laser systems, and high power microwave generators, among others. Among the alternative generation sources receiving considerable attention are energy storage devices such as rechargeable electrochemical batteries and capacitors. In such applications as those mentioned above, these energy storage devices offer the ability to serve a dual role as both a power source to the various loads as well high power loads themselves to the continual generation when the high power transient loads are in periods of downtime. With the recent developments in electrochemical energy storage, lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) seem like the obvious choice, but previous research has shown that the elevated rates of charging can be detrimental to both the cycle life and the operational life span of the device. In order to preserve the batteries, their charge rate must be limited. One proposed method to accomplish the dual role task mentioned above, while preserving the life of the batteries, is by combining high energy density LIBs with high power density electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) or lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) using controllable power electronics to adjust the flow of power to and from each device. Such a configuration is typically referred to as hybrid energy storage module (HESM). While shipboard generators start up, the combined high energy density and high power density of the HESM provides the capability to source critical loads for an extended period of time at the high rates they demand. Once the generator is operationally efficient, the HESM can act as a high energy reservoir to harvest the energy from the generator while the loads are in short periods of inactivity

  5. On the application of a new principle and new class of materials for protection of the IC systems against high power electromagnetic pulses (HPEMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuchkov, L.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to make a survey of a new principle and the possibilities for scientific investigations, testing and industrial incorporation of a new shielding material and technology for protection of the IC systems against high energy electromagnetic pulses and ion irradiation. The main result of the implementation of the new- principle, material and technology is to increase the safety of the critical military and civilian infrastructures, land-based and space techniques, apparatuses, devices and their components against high energy electromagnetic pulses and ion irradiation, including electromagnetic weapon arsenal of the international terrorist groups. Key words: electromagnetic pulses, ion irradiation, IC electronic equipment degradation, shielding protection

  6. On the application of a new principle and new class of materials for protection of the IC systems against high power electromagnetic pulses (HPEMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuchkov, L. [Institute of Electrochemistry and Energy Systems, Bulgarian Academy of Scinces, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the present work is to make a survey of a new principle and the possibilities for scientific investigations, testing and industrial incorporation of a new shielding material and technology for protection of the IC systems against high energy electromagnetic pulses and ion irradiation. The main result of the implementation of the new- principle, material and technology is to increase the safety of the critical military and civilian infrastructures, land-based and space techniques, apparatuses, devices and their components against high energy electromagnetic pulses and ion irradiation, including electromagnetic weapon arsenal of the international terrorist groups. Key words: electromagnetic pulses, ion irradiation, IC electronic equipment degradation, shielding protection.

  7. Towards realistic laboratory simulation of high-energy-density events in planetary atmospheres: Using large laser sparks created by a single pulse of high-power lasers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Juha, Libor; Jehlička, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2007), s. 503-503 ISSN 1531-1074. [Bioastronomy 2007. 16.07.2007-20.07.2007, San Juach] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1278; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : planetary atmospheres * high-power lasers Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  8. Moderate high power 1 to 20μs and kHz Ho:YAG thin disk laser pulses for laser lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renz, Günther

    2015-02-01

    An acousto-optically or self-oscillation pulsed thin disk Ho:YAG laser system at 2.1 μm with an average power in the 10 W range will be presented for laser lithotripsy. In the case of cw operation the thin disk Ho:YAG is either pumped with InP diode stacks or with a thulium fiber laser which leads to a laser output power of 20 W at an optical-to-optical efficiency of 30%. For the gain switched mode of operation a modulated Tm-fiber laser is used to produce self-oscillation pulses. A favored pulse lengths for uric acid stone ablation is known to be at a few μs pulse duration which can be delivered by the thin disk laser technology. In the state of the art laser lithotripter, stone material is typically ablated with 250 to 750 μs pulses at 5 to 10 Hz and with pulse energies up to a few Joule. The ablation mechanism is performed in this case by vaporization into stone dust and fragmentation. With the thin disk laser technology, 1 to 20 μs-laser pulses with a repetition rate of a few kHz and with pulse energies in the mJ-range are available. The ablation mechanism is in this case due to a local heating of the stone material with a decomposition of the crystalline structure into calcium carbonate powder which can be handled by the human body. As a joint process to this thermal effect, imploding water vapor bubbles between the fiber end and the stone material produce sporadic shock waves which help clear out the stone dust and biological material.

  9. Solid state high power amplifier for driving the SLC injector klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judkins, J.G.; Clendenin, J.E.; Schwarz, H.D.

    1985-03-01

    The SLC injector klystron rf drive is now provided by a recently developed solid-state amplifier. The high gain of the amplifier permits the use of a fast low-power electronic phase shifter. Thus the SLC computer control system can be used to shift the phase of the high-power rf rapidly during the fill time of the injector accelerator section. These rapid phase shifts are used to introduce a phase-energy relationship in the accelerated electron pulse in conjunction with the operation of the injector bunch compressor. The amplifier, the method of controlling the rf phase, and the operational characteristics of the system are described. 5 refs., 4 figs

  10. Strong doping of the n-optical confinement layer for increasing output power of high- power pulsed laser diodes in the eye safe wavelength range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryvkin, Boris S.; Avrutin, Eugene A.; Kostamovaara, Juha T.

    2017-12-01

    An analytical model for internal optical losses at high power in a 1.5 μm laser diode with strong n-doping in the n-side of the optical confinement layer is created. The model includes intervalence band absorption by holes supplied by both current flow and two-photon absorption (TPA), as well as the direct TPA effect. The resulting losses are compared with those in an identical structure with a weakly doped waveguide, and shown to be substantially lower, resulting in a significant improvement in the output power and efficiency in the structure with a strongly doped waveguide.

  11. Material studies for CLIC RF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Taborelli, M

    2004-01-01

    Following the EST/SM suggestion of replacing copper by molybdenum or tungsten for the construction of the RF cavity irises, different CLIC main beam accelerating structures were produced, extensively operated and disassembled for iris surface inspection. The observed surface modifications were found to be very similar to those obtained by sparking in a dedicated laboratory set-up, showing the superior behaviour of both Mo and W with respect to Cu, in terms of surface erosion and conditioning. The iris thermomechanical fatigue due to RF heating was simulated by high power pulsed laser irradiation. A CuZr alloy was found to be much more resistant than pure Cu. Measurements at higher pulse number will be performed on CuZr in order to extrapolate its fatigue behaviour up to the nominal CLIC duration. Finally a possible future development of a hybrid probe beam acceleration structure will be presented.

  12. High power semiconductor switches in the 12 kV, 50 kA pulse generator of the SPS beam dump kicker system

    CERN Document Server

    Bonthond, J; Faure, P; Vossenberg, Eugène B

    2001-01-01

    Horizontal deflection of the beam in the dump kicker system of the CERN SPS accelerator is obtained with a series of fast pulsed magnets. The high current pulses of 50 kA per magnet are generated with capacitor discharge type generators which, combined with a resistive free-wheel diode circuit, deliver a critically damped half-sine current with a rise-time of 25 ms. Each generator consists of two 25 kA units, connected in parallel to a magnet via a low inductance transmission line.

  13. Free-electron masers vs. gyrotrons prospects for high-power sources at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Thumm, M K

    2002-01-01

    The possible applications of high-power millimeter (mm) and sub-mm waves from free-electron masers (FEMs) and gyro-devices span a wide range of technologies. The plasma physics community has already taken advantage of recent advances in applying high-power mm waves generated by long pulse or continuous wave (CW) gyrotron oscillators and short pulse very high-power FEMs in the areas of RF-plasma production, heating, non-inductive current drive, plasma stabilization and active plasma diagnostics for magnetic confinement thermonuclear fusion research, such as electron cyclotron resonance heating (28-170 GHz), electron cyclotron current drive , collective Thomson scattering , microwave transmission and heat-wave propagation experiments. Continuously frequency tunable FEMs could widen these fields of applications. Another important application of CW gyrotrons is industrial materials processing, e.g. sintering of high-performance functional and structural nanostructured ceramics. Sub-mm wave sources are employed in...

  14. High power pulse electron beam modification and ion implantation of Hg{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}Te crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojtsekhovskij, A V; Remnev, G E [Tomsk Polytechnic Univ. (Russian Federation). Nuclear Physics Inst.; Opekunov, M S; Kokhanenko, A P; Korotaev, A G; Denisov, Yu A; Oucherenko, D A [Tomsk State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Radiophysics

    1997-12-31

    Hg{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}Te (MCT) samples (x = 0.21 - 0.22) were irradiated by pulse electron beams at doses of 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. The electron beams possessed the following parameters: 500 keV electron energy (30-40 A/cm{sup 2} electron current density, 60-80 ns current pulse); 200 keV electron energy (8- 10 A/cm{sup 2} electron current density, 100-200 ns current pulse). The electric conductivity and recombination of modified samples were investigated by the Hall effect and photoconductivity methods. For the 200 keV electron energy beam irradiation, the n-type surface regions were obtained under threshold mechanisms of donor defect generation. For the 500 keV electron energy beam irradiation, the maximum value of charge carrier lifetimes occur in the p- to n-type conductivity conversion range for the initial p-type crystals due to the conductivity compensation. MCT samples (x = 0.21 - 0.22) were implanted with Al ions at doses of 10{sup 12}-10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The ion beams possessed the following parameters: (1-10) A/cm{sup 2} ion current density, (100-200) ns current pulse; (150-450) keV Al ion (Al{sup +},Al{sup ++}, Al{sup +++}). The ion distribution and doping profiles were investigated by PIGE and Hall effect methods. Comparison between MCT samples after power pulse ion implantation and after standard ion implantation demonstrates differences in ion distribution, doping profiles and defect formation radiation mechanisms. (author). 3 figs., 8 refs.

  15. Deposition of PZT thin film onto copper-coated polymer films by mean of pulsed-DC and RF-reactive sputtering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchaneck, G.; Labitzke, R.; Adolphi, B.; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Adámek, Petr; Drahokoupil, Jan; Hubička, Zdeněk; Kiselev, D.A.; Kholkin, A. L.; Gerlach, G.; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 205, č. 2 (2011), S241-S244 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC202/09/J017; GA AV ČR KAN301370701; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : pulsed DC reactive sputtering * RF reactive sputtering * complex oxide film deposition * polymer substrate Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.867, year: 2011

  16. Optimization of an RF driven H- ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.N.; DiVergilio, W.F.; Hauck, C.A.; Kunkel, W.B.; McDonald, D.S.

    1991-04-01

    A radio-frequency driven multicusp source has recently been developed to generate volume-produced H - ion beams with extracted current density higher than 200 mA/cm 2 . We have improved the output power of the rf generator and the insulation coating of the antenna coil. We have also optimized the antenna positions and geometry and the filter magnetic field for high power pulsed operation. A total H - current of 30 mA can be obtained with a 5.4-mm-diam extraction aperture and with an rf input power of 50 kW. 4 refs., 5 figs

  17. High-powered microwave ablation with a small-gauge, gas-cooled antenna: initial ex vivo and in vivo results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubner, Meghan G; Hinshaw, J Louis; Andreano, Anita; Sampson, Lisa; Lee, Fred T; Brace, Christopher L

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the performance of a gas-cooled, high-powered microwave system. Investigators performed 54 ablations in ex vivo bovine livers using three devices-a single 17-gauge cooled radiofrequency(RF) electrode; a cluster RF electrode; and a single 17-gauge, gas-cooled microwave (MW) antenna-at three time points (n = 6 at 4 minutes, 12 minutes, and 16 minutes). RF power was applied using impedance-based pulsing with maximum 200 W generator output. MW power of 135 W at 2.45 GHz was delivered continuously. An approved in vivo study was performed using 13 domestic pigs. Hepatic ablations were performed using single applicators and the above-mentioned MW and RF generator systems at treatment times of 2 minutes (n = 7 MW, n = 6 RF), 5 minutes (n = 23 MW, n = 8 RF), 7 minutes (n = 11 MW, n = 6 RF), and 10 minutes (n = 7 MW, n = 9 RF). Mean transverse diameter and length of the ablation zones were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post-hoc t tests and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Single ex vivo MW ablations were larger than single RF ablations at all time points (MW mean diameter range 3.5-4.8 cm 4-16 minutes; RF mean diameter range 2.6-3.1 cm 4-16 minutes) (P generation of large ablation zones in short times. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of nitrogen doping on TiO.sub.x./sub.N.sub.y./sub. thin film formation at reactive high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Straňák, Vítězslav; Quaas, M.; Bogdanowicz, R.; Steffen, H.; Wulff, H.; Hubička, Zdeněk; Tichý, M.; Hippler, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 28 (2010), s. 1-7 ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN301370701; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100915 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : magnetron sputtering * TiO 2 * pulse discharge * XRD * band gap Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.105, year: 2010 http://iopscience.iop.org/0022-3727/43/28/285203/

  19. High-power repetitively pulsed CO{sub 2} laser with mechanical Q-switching and its application to studies in aerodynamic installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malov, Aleksei N; Orishich, Anatolii M; Shulyat' ev, Viktor B [S.A. Khristianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-30

    A new method for organising the repetitively pulsed regime of CO{sub 2} laser oscillation at the expense of a self-filtering resonator and two concave cylindrical mirrors with equal curvature in the intracavity modulator is considered. The studies of the energy and temporal characteristics of the laser radiation show that the constructed laser has high efficiency close to that of a cw laser. The mean and pulse power of 4.5 and 200 kW, respectively, are obtained. For a wide range of gas-dynamic characteristics the possibility of the optical breakdown in the supersonic wide-aperture air flow is demonstrated. The coefficient of absorption of laser radiation in optical breakdown plasma in a supersonic air flow is investigated and its value amounting to 60% is obtained. For the first time it is found that the threshold density of air, corresponding to the efficiency jump, is equal to 1.8 - 2 kg m{sup -3} and independent of the Mach number M = 1.7 - 3.7. (lasers)

  20. Design and preliminary characterization of a miniature pulsed RF APGD torch with downstream injection of the source of reactive species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveille, V; Coulombe, S

    2005-01-01

    The design of a miniature low-power atmospheric pressure glow discharge torch (APGD-t) and the results of its preliminary electrical and spectroscopic characterization are presented. A capacitively-coupled pulsed RF (13.56 MHz) helium plasma jet is formed in a converging confinement tube and O 2 is injected downstream in the plasma afterglow region through a capillary electrode. With 1 SLM He, the APGD-t produced a non-thermal plasma jet of 500 μm-diameter and ∼2.5 mm-long at power levels ranging from 1 to 5 W. At ∼1 W, the gas temperature and He excitation temperature near the nozzle exit were ∼50 0 C and slightly below 2000 K, respectively. The breakdown voltage in 1 SLM He is approximately 220 V pk-to-0 . Careful electric probe measurements and circuit analysis revealed the strong effect of the voltage probe on the total load impedance. The injection of 10 SCCM O 2 through the capillary electrode led to the transport of atomic O further downstream in the plasma jet and to a slight increase of the He excitation temperature without significant effects on the electrical properties and jet length. Alternatively, the addition of an equivalent amount of O 2 (1 v/v%) to the plasma-forming gas affected the electrical properties slightly, but led to a drastic contraction of the plasma jet. The atomic oxygen production and transport conditions provided by the APGD-t are promising for precise bio-applications such as the treatment of skin tissues and cells

  1. Arcing and rf signal generation during target irradiation by a high-energy, pulsed neutral particle beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robiscoe, R.T.

    1988-02-01

    We present a theory describing the dynamics of arc discharges in bulk dielectric materials on board space-based vehicles. Such ''punch-through'' arcs can occur in target satellites irradiated by high-energy (250 MeV), pulsed (100 mA x 10 ms) neutral particle beams. We treat the arc as a capacitively limited avalanche current in the target dielectric material, and we find expressions for the arc duration, charge transport, currents, and discharge energy. These quantities are adjusted to be consistent with known scaling laws for the area of charge depleted by the arc. After a brief account of the statistical distribution of voltages at which the arc starts and stops, we calculate the signal strength and frequency spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation broadcast by the arc. We find that arcs from thick (/similar to/1 cm) targets can generate rf signals detectable up to 1000 km from the target, bu a radio receiver operating at frequency 80 MHz, bandwidth 100 kHz, and detection threshold -105 dBm. These thick-target arc signals are 10 to 20 dB above ambient noise at the receiver, and they provide target hit assessment if the signal spectrum can be sampled at several frequencies in the nominal range 30-200 MHz. Thin-target (/similar to/1 mm) arc signals are much weaker, but when they are detecable in conjunction with thick-target signals, target discrimination is possible by comparing the signal frequency spectra. 24 refs., 12 figs

  2. Modelling aluminium wire bond reliability in high power OMP devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kregting, R.; Yuan, C.A.; Xiao, A.; Bruijn, F. de

    2011-01-01

    In a RF power application such as the OMP, the wires are subjected to high current (because of the high power) and high temperature (because of the heat from IC and joule-heating from the wire itself). Moreover, the wire shape is essential to the RF performance. Hence, the aluminium wire is

  3. A 12 kV, 1 kHz, Pulse Generator for Breakdown Studies of Samples for CLIC RF Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Soares, R H; Kovermann, J; Calatroni, S; Wuensch, W

    2012-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) RF structures must be capable of sustaining high surface electric fields, in excess of 200 MV/m, with a breakdown (BD) rate below 3×10-7 breakdowns/pulse/m. Achieving such a low rate requires a detailed understanding of all the steps involved in the mechanism of breakdown. One of the fundamental studies is to investigate the statistical characteristics of the BD rate phenomenon at very low values to understand the origin of an observed dependency of the surface electric field raised to the power of 30. To acquire sufficient BD data, in a reasonable period of time, a high repetition rate pulse generator is required for an existing d.c. spark system at CERN. Following BD of the material sample the pulse generator must deliver a current pulse of several 10’s of Amperes for ~2 μs. A high repetition rate pulse generator has been designed, built and tested; this utilizes pulse forming line technology and employs MOSFET switches. This paper describes the design of the pulse generat...

  4. Investigation of optical and hydrodynamic processes initiated in biological tissues and liquids under the action of high-power pulses of 1.54 μm laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Fomicheva, Yana Yu.; Gagarskiy, Sergey V.; Sergeev, Andrey N.; Smirnov, Sergey N.; Zagorulko, Alexey M.

    2018-04-01

    The results of strobe-photographic study of steam-gas cavities formation in a bulk of saline as a result of high-power Yb,Er:Glass laser pulses impact are presented. The data on dynamics of laser pulse transmission through the laserproduced steam-gas cavity for different values of the distance h between the fiber end and the cuvette bottom (quartz plate) are presented. It was observed that the steam-gas cavity might be used for effective non-contact delivery of laser radiation to the submerged target: transmission value at maximum steam-gas cavity size reached 0.87 for h = 0.5 mm. The influence of steam-gas cavities parameters on ablation efficiency of eye lens destruction in vitro is also discussed. The ablation of cataract eye lens in liquid environment is more effective than in air. The efficiency of eye lens ablation decreases with the increase of h . The maximal values of ablation efficiency (2.14·10-3 mm3/pulse) were obtained in the case of underwater ablation at h = 0 mm.

  5. Effect of RF Parameters on Breakdown Limits in High-Vacuum X-Band Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2003-01-01

    RF breakdown is one of the major factors determining performance of high power rf components and rf sources. RF breakdown limits working power and produces irreversible surface damage. The breakdown limit depends on the rf circuit, structure geometry, and rf frequency. It is also a function of the input power, pulse width, and surface electric and magnetic fields. In this paper we discuss multi-megawatt operation of X-band rf structures at pulse width on the order of one microsecond. These structures are used in rf systems of high gradient accelerators. Recent experiments at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) have explored the functional dependence of breakdown limit on input power and pulse width. The experimental data covered accelerating structures and waveguides. Another breakdown limit of accelerating structures was associated with high magnetic fields found in waveguide-to-structure couplers. To understand and quantify these limits we simulated 3D structures with the electrodynamics code Ansoft HFSS and the Particle-In-Cell code MAGIC3D. Results of these simulations together with experimental data will be discussed in this paper

  6. Switching power converters medium and high power

    CERN Document Server

    Neacsu, Dorin O

    2013-01-01

    An examination of all of the multidisciplinary aspects of medium- and high-power converter systems, including basic power electronics, digital control and hardware, sensors, analog preprocessing of signals, protection devices and fault management, and pulse-width-modulation (PWM) algorithms, Switching Power Converters: Medium and High Power, Second Edition discusses the actual use of industrial technology and its related subassemblies and components, covering facets of implementation otherwise overlooked by theoretical textbooks. The updated Second Edition contains many new figures, as well as

  7. Role of the carbonate impurities on the surface state of pyrite and arsenopyrite under treatment by high power electromagnetic pulses (HPEMP): oxidation of 50-100 μm size particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippova, I; Filippov, L; Ryazantseva, M; Chanturiya, V; Bunin, I

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) have shown the variation of surface phase compositions of carbonate bearing pyrite and arsenopyrite as a result of the combined action of chemical oxidation and thermal processes after the treatment by high power electromagnetic pulses (HPEMP). The monitoring of the surface phase composition allowed to determine the correlation between the treatment conditions, the surface phase composition, and the flotation yield. Thus, HPEMP treatment may be regarded as a tool controlling the surface composition and the sorption ability of flotation collector onto minerals surface, and therefore, allowing to control the hydrophobic-hydrophilic surface balance. It was confirmed in this study that the flotation of pyrite with xanthate as a result of the influence HPEMP may vary depending on the presence of impurities such as calcite.

  8. Time-dependent spectrum analysis of high power gyrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaich, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an investigation of vacuum electronic oscillators capable of generating multi-megawatt continuous wave output power in the millimeter-wave range (so-called gyrotrons) through spectral measurements is presented. The centerpiece is the development of a measurement system with a high dynamic range (50-60 dB) for time-dependent spectrum analysis, covering the frequency range 100-170 GHz with instantaneous bandwidths of 6-12 GHz. Despite relying on heterodyne reception through harmonic mixers, the Pulse Spectrum Analysis (PSA) system maintains RF unambiguity in the spectrogram output through the application of a novel RF reconstruction technique. Using the new possibilities, a wide range of spectral phenomena in gyrotrons has been investigated, such as cavity mode jumps, lowfrequency modulation, frequency tuning in long pulses and the spectral behavior during the presence of an RF window arc. A dedicated investigation on parasitic RF oscillations in W7-X gyrotrons combining several analysis techniques led to the conclusion that after-cavity oscillations can be physical reality in high power gyrotrons, and are the probable cause for the undesired signals observed. Apart from systematic parameter sweeps using the PSA system, an analytical dispersion analysis in the Brillouin diagram was applied, and numerical gyrotron interaction simulations of unprecedented extent were conducted. Furthermore, the improved frequency measurement capabilities were employed to analyze the frequency tuning through thermal expansion and electrostatic neutralization caused by ionization inside the tube in long-pulse operation. By macroscopically modeling the gas dynamics and ionization processes in combination with a fitting process, the time dependences of the two processes could be investigated. In doing so, indication was found that the neutralization in W7-X gyrotrons amounts to only 60% of the electrostatic depression voltage, instead of 100% as widely believed for

  9. Time-dependent spectrum analysis of high power gyrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaich, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    In this work, an investigation of vacuum electronic oscillators capable of generating multi-megawatt continuous wave output power in the millimeter-wave range (so-called gyrotrons) through spectral measurements is presented. The centerpiece is the development of a measurement system with a high dynamic range (50-60 dB) for time-dependent spectrum analysis, covering the frequency range 100-170 GHz with instantaneous bandwidths of 6-12 GHz. Despite relying on heterodyne reception through harmonic mixers, the Pulse Spectrum Analysis (PSA) system maintains RF unambiguity in the spectrogram output through the application of a novel RF reconstruction technique. Using the new possibilities, a wide range of spectral phenomena in gyrotrons has been investigated, such as cavity mode jumps, lowfrequency modulation, frequency tuning in long pulses and the spectral behavior during the presence of an RF window arc. A dedicated investigation on parasitic RF oscillations in W7-X gyrotrons combining several analysis techniques led to the conclusion that after-cavity oscillations can be physical reality in high power gyrotrons, and are the probable cause for the undesired signals observed. Apart from systematic parameter sweeps using the PSA system, an analytical dispersion analysis in the Brillouin diagram was applied, and numerical gyrotron interaction simulations of unprecedented extent were conducted. Furthermore, the improved frequency measurement capabilities were employed to analyze the frequency tuning through thermal expansion and electrostatic neutralization caused by ionization inside the tube in long-pulse operation. By macroscopically modeling the gas dynamics and ionization processes in combination with a fitting process, the time dependences of the two processes could be investigated. In doing so, indication was found that the neutralization in W7-X gyrotrons amounts to only 60% of the electrostatic depression voltage, instead of 100% as widely believed for

  10. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  11. High-power stirling-type pulse tube cooler for power engineering applications of high temperature superconductivity; Hochleistungspulsrohrkuehler vom Stirling-Typ fuer energietechnische Anwendungen der Hochtemperatursupraleitung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Marc

    2015-12-15

    For the cooling of high temperature superconducting 4 MVA machines (motors or generators), a single-stage Stirling-type pulse-tube cryocooler was built. The cooling power, which the cryocooler was aimed for, is 80 - 100 W at 30 K with an electrical input power of 10 kW (8 kW pV-power). The advantages of this cooler type compared to traditional cooling concepts are an increased reliability and long maintenance intervals. While single-stage Stirling-type pulse-tube cryocoolers for the temperature range of liquid nitrogen (77 K) are already commercially available, there exist currently no commercial systems for the temperature range near 30 K, which is the important range for applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The experimental setup consisted of a 10 kW linear compressor, type 2S297W, from CFIC Inc. which was used as the pressure wave generator. The compressor was operated by a Micromaster 440 frequency inverter from Siemens, which was controlled by a custom-made computer program. The cold head was made in inline configuration, in order to avoid deflection losses. During the first cool-downs tests a temperature inhomogeneity occurred in the regenerator at low temperature and high pV-power, which was attributed to a constant mass flow (circular dc-flow) within the regenerator. This firstly observed dc-flow, generates a net energy flow from the hot end to the cold end of the regenerator, which reduces the cooling capacity considerably and hence the minimum attainable temperature is severely increased. For the design and optimization of the cold-head, a cryocooler model was initially created using the commercial simulation software Sage, which did not include the regenerator inhomogeneity seen in the experiment. For the modeling of the observed streaming inhomogeneity caused by the dc-flow, the regenerator was replaced by two identical parallel regenerators with variable transverse thermal coupling. In the inhomogeneous case (without dc-flow) the

  12. RF Energy Compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1980-02-01

    The RF Energy Compressor, REC described here, transforms cw rf into periodic pulses using an energy storage cavity, ESC, whose charging is controlled by 180 0 bi-phase modulation, PSK, and external Q switching, βs. Compression efficiency, C/sub e/, of 100% can be approached at any compression factor C/sub f/

  13. Advanced Output Coupling for High Power Gyrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, Michael [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Ives, Robert Lawrence [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Marsden, David [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Collins, George [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Temkin, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Guss, William [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lohr, John [General Atomics, La Jolla, CA (United States); Neilson, Jeffrey [Lexam Research, Redwood City, CA (United States); Bui, Thuc [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States)

    2016-11-28

    The Phase II program developed an internal RF coupler that transforms the whispering gallery RF mode produced in gyrotron cavities to an HE11 waveguide mode propagating in corrugated waveguide. This power is extracted from the vacuum using a broadband, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, Brewster angle window capable of transmitting more than 1.5 MW CW of RF power over a broad range of frequencies. This coupling system eliminates the Mirror Optical Units now required to externally couple Gaussian output power into corrugated waveguide, significantly reducing system cost and increasing efficiency. The program simulated the performance using a broad range of advanced computer codes to optimize the design. Both a direct coupler and Brewster angle window were built and tested at low and high power. Test results confirmed the performance of both devices and demonstrated they are capable of achieving the required performance for scientific, defense, industrial, and medical applications.

  14. High-power, high-frequency, annular-beam free-electron maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.; Carlsten, B.E.; Earley, L.M.; Fortgang, C.M.; Haynes, W.B.; Haddock, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have developed a 15--17 GHz free electron maser (FEM) capable of producing high power pulses with a phase stability appropriate for linear collider applications. The electron beam source is a 1 micros, 800 kV, 5 kA, 6-cm-dia annular electron beam machine called BANSHEE. The beam interacts with the TM 02 mode Raman FEM amplifier in a corrugated cylindrical waveguide where the beam runs close to the interaction device walls to reduce the power density in the fields. They studied the phase stability by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field was transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories were purely longitudinal. Detailed particle-in-cell simulations demonstrated the transverse wiggling of the rf mode and the axial FEL interaction and explicit calculations of the growing root of the dispersion relation are included to verify the phase stability

  15. High power microwaves

    CERN Document Server

    Benford, James; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2016-01-01

    Following in the footsteps of its popular predecessors, High Power Microwaves, Third Edition continues to provide a wide-angle, integrated view of the field of high power microwaves (HPMs). This third edition includes significant updates in every chapter as well as a new chapter on beamless systems that covers nonlinear transmission lines. Written by an experimentalist, a theorist, and an applied theorist, respectively, the book offers complementary perspectives on different source types. The authors address: * How HPM relates historically and technically to the conventional microwave field * The possible applications for HPM and the key criteria that HPM devices have to meet in order to be applied * How high power sources work, including their performance capabilities and limitations * The broad fundamental issues to be addressed in the future for a wide variety of source types The book is accessible to several audiences. Researchers currently in the field can widen their understanding of HPM. Present or pot...

  16. Hybrid simulation of electron energy distributions and plasma characteristics in pulsed RF CCP sustained in Ar and SiH4/Ar discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi-Feng; Jia, Wen-Zhu; Song, Yuan-Hong; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Dai, Zhong-Ling; Wang, You-Nian

    2017-11-01

    Pulsed-discharge plasmas offer great advantages in deposition of silicon-based films due to the fact that they can suppress cluster agglomeration, moderate the energy of bombarding ions, and prolong the species' diffusion time on the substrate. In this work, a one-dimensional fluid/Monte-Carlo hybrid model is applied to study pulse modulated radio-frequency (RF) plasmas sustained in capacitively coupled Ar and SiH4/Ar discharges. First, the electron energy distributions in pulsed Ar and SiH4/Ar plasmas have been investigated and compared under identical discharge-circuit conditions. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in Ar discharge exhibits a familiar bi-Maxwellian shape during the power-on phase of the pulse, while a more complex (resembling a multi-Maxwellian) distribution with extra inflection points at lower energies is observed in the case of the SiH4/Ar mixture. These features become more prominent with the increasing fraction of SiH4 in the gas mixture. The difference in the shape of the EEDF (which is pronounced inside the plasma but not in the RF sheath where electron heating occurs) is mainly attributed to the electron-impact excitations of SiH4. During the power-off phase of the pulse, the EEDFs in both Ar and SiH4/Ar discharges evolve into bi-Maxwellian shapes, with shrinking high energy tails. Furthermore, the parameter of ion species in the case of SiH4/Ar discharge is strongly modulated by pulsing. For positive ions, such as SiH3+ and Si2H4+ , the particle fluxes overshoot at the beginning of the power-on interval. Meanwhile, for negative ions such as SiH2- and SiH3- , density profiles observed between the electrodes are saddle-shaped due to the repulsion by the self-bias electric field as it builds up. During the power-off phase, the wall fluxes of SiH2- and SiH3- gradually increase, leading to a significant decrease in the net surface charge density on the driven electrode. Compared with ions, the density of SiH3 is poorly modulated

  17. RF Processing Experience with the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmerge, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. A total of five different metal cathodes (4 Cu and 1 Mg) have been installed on the GTF gun. The rf processing history with the different cathodes will be presented including peak field achieved at the cathode. The LCLS gun is intended to operate at 120 MV/m and fields up to 140 MV/m have been achieved in the GTF gun. After installing a new cathode the number of rf pulses required to reach 120 MV/m is approximately 5-10 million. Total emitted dark current and Fowler Nordheim plots are also shown over the life of the cathode. The GTF photo-injector gun is an S-band standing-wave structure, with two resonant cavities and an intervening thick washer (Figure 1). The flat, back wall of the first cavity is a copper plate that serves as photocathode when illuminated with ultraviolet light from a pulsed, high-power laser. RF power enters the gun through an iris on the outer wall of the second cavity, and is coupled to the first through the axial opening of the washer. The first cavity is often referred to as a half cell, because its full-cell length has been truncated by the cathode plate and the second cavity is called the full cell. The gun is designed to operate in a π mode, with the peak field on axis in each cell approximately equal. The maximum in the half cell occurs at the cathode, and in the full cell near the center of the cavity. The field profile and tuning procedures are discussed in a separate tech note (1).

  18. Design of a high charge (10 - 100 nC) and short pulse (2 - 5 ps) rf photocathode gun for wakefield acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, W.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we present a design report on a 1-1/2 cell, L Band RF photocathode gun that is capable of generating and accelerating electron beams with peak currents >10 kA. We have performed simulation for bunch intensities in the range of 10-100 nC with peak axial electrical field at the photocathode of 30-100 MV/m. Unlike conventional short electron pulse generation, this design does not require magnetic pulse compression. Based on numerical simulations using SUPERFISH and PARMELA, this design will produce 20-100 nC beam at 18 MeV with rms bunch length 0.6-1.25 mm and normalized transverse emittance 30-108 mm mrad. Applications of this beam for wakefield acceleration is also discussed

  19. High power all solid state VUV lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shen-jin; Cui, Da-fu; Zhang, Feng-feng; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Zhi-min; Yang, Feng; Zong, Nan; Tu, Wei; Chen, Ying; Xu, Hong-yan; Xu, Feng-liang; Peng, Qin-jun; Wang, Xiao-yang; Chen, Chuang-tian; Xu, Zu-yan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Polarization and pulse repetition rate adjustable ps 177.3 nm laser was developed. • Wavelength tunable ns, ps and fs VUV lasers were developed. • High power ns 177.3 nm laser with narrow linewidth was investigated. - Abstract: We report the investigation on the high power all solid state vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) lasers by means of nonlinear frequency conversion with KBe 2 BO 3 F 2 (KBBF) nonlinear crystal. Several all solid state VUV lasers have developed in our group, including polarization and pulse repetition rate adjustable picosecond 177.3 nm VUV laser, wavelength tunable nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond VUV lasers, high power ns 177.3 nm laser with narrow linewidth. The VUV lasers have impact, accurate and precise advantage

  20. Optical engineering for high power laser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaro, M.

    1993-01-01

    Laser facilities for Inertial Confinement Fusion (I.C.F.) experiments require laser and X ray optics able to withstand short pulse conditions. After a brief recall of high power laser system arrangements and of the characteristics of their optics, the authors will present some X ray optical developments

  1. Driver Circuit For High-Power MOSFET's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letzer, Kevin A.

    1991-01-01

    Driver circuit generates rapid-voltage-transition pulses needed to switch high-power metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) modules rapidly between full "on" and full "off". Rapid switching reduces time of overlap between appreciable current through and appreciable voltage across such modules, thereby increasing power efficiency.

  2. Targets for high power neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs

  3. Application of high power microwave vacuum electron devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yaogen; Liu Pukun; Zhang Zhaochuan; Wang Yong; Shen Bin

    2011-01-01

    High power microwave vacuum electron devices can work at high frequency, high peak and average power. They have been widely used in military and civil microwave electron systems, such as radar, communication,countermeasure, TV broadcast, particle accelerators, plasma heating devices of fusion, microwave sensing and microwave heating. In scientific research, high power microwave vacuum electron devices are used mainly on high energy particle accelerator and fusion research. The devices include high peak power klystron, CW and long pulse high power klystron, multi-beam klystron,and high power gyrotron. In national economy, high power microwave vacuum electron devices are used mainly on weather and navigation radar, medical and radiation accelerator, TV broadcast and communication system. The devices include high power pulse and CW klystron, extended interaction klystron, traveling wave tube (TWT), magnetron and induced output tube (IOT). The state of art, common technology problems and trends of high power microwave vacuum electron devices are introduced in this paper. (authors)

  4. Experimental set-up for high-power pulsed X-rays on the basis of a high-current electron accelerator diode with a pointed brass cathode and an aluminum anode target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, V.K.; Krekoten', O.V.; Makarov, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to assess experimentally the possibility for the development and manufacturing of a high-power pulse X-ray source on the basis of a high-current electron accelerator of the diode type. This task was realized using a vacuum diode with the explosive plasma cathode from brass and an anode of aluminum foil 850 microns thick. As a result of the experiments performed, it is shown that, for this metal of the anode, the component of X-rays, propagating along electron beam motion, has bigger energy weight than the reflected one. The photographic paper placed in a black dense paper holder was used as a sensor. It is necessary to mark that at present the current investigations have a purely qualitative character. At the same time, the authors have succeeded to define an angle of divergence (~90°) of the generated radiation after an aluminum target. The possibility of generating bremsstrahlung and also the energy estimates indicate applicability of this installation in pure research, and application-oriented purposes, for example, for monitoring of the radiation stability of different electronic products. (authors)

  5. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  6. Experimental progress on virtual-cathode very high power microwave source development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.; Hoeberling, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of rf accelerator technology toward high-power, high-current, low-emittance beams produces an ever-increasing demand for efficient, very high power microwave sources. The present klystron technology has performed very well but is not expected to produce reliable gigawatt peak-power units in the 1- to 10-GHz regime. Further major advancements must involve other types of sources. The reflexing electron sources can produce microwave powers at the gigawatt level and have demonstrated operation from 800 MHz to 40 GHz. Pulse length appears to be limited by electron-beam diode closure, and reflexing electron devices have been operated in a repetitively pulsed mode. An experiment is under way to investigate concepts to stabilize the frequency of the virtual cathode source. If one can successfully frequency and phase lock this source to an external signal, then this source can operate as a very high power microwave amplifier making it practical for accelerator applications. The progress on an experiment to test these concepts will be discussed

  7. High-power electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Kapitsa, Petr Leonidovich

    1966-01-01

    High-Power Electronics, Volume 2 presents the electronic processes in devices of the magnetron type and electromagnetic oscillations in different systems. This book explores the problems of electronic energetics.Organized into 11 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the motion of electrons in a flat model of the magnetron, taking into account the in-phase wave and the reverse wave. This text then examines the processes of transmission of electromagnetic waves of various polarization and the wave reflection from grids made of periodically distributed infinite metal conductors. Other

  8. High Power Vanadate lasers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Strauss

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Strauss1_2006.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3151 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Strauss1_2006.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Laser Research Institute... University of Stellenbosch www.laser-research.co.za High Power Vanadate lasers H.J.Strauss, Dr. C. Bollig, R.C. Botha, Prof. H.M. von Bergmann, Dr. J.P. Burger Aims 1) To develop new techniques to mount laser crystals, 2) compare the lasing properties...

  9. High gradient RF breakdown study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, L.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Scheitrum, G.; Hanna, S.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.

    1998-01-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and UC Davis have been investigating high gradient RF breakdown and its effects on pulse shortening in high energy microwave devices. RF breakdown is a critical issue in the development of high power microwave sources and next generation linear accelerators since it limits the output power of microwave sources and the accelerating gradient of linacs. The motivation of this research is to find methods to increase the breakdown threshold level in X-band structures by reducing dark current. Emphasis is focused on improved materials, surface finish, and cleanliness. The test platform for this research is a traveling wave resonant ring. A 30 MW klystron is employed to provide up to 300 MW of traveling wave power in the ring to trigger breakdown in the cavity. Five TM 01 cavities have previously been tested, each with a different combination of surface polish and/or coating. The onset of breakdown was extended up to 250 MV/m with a TiN surface finish, as compared to 210 MV/m for uncoated OFE copper. Although the TiN coating was helpful in depressing the field emission, the lowest dark current was obtained with a 1 microinch surface finish, single-point diamond-turned cavity

  10. Growth of Sr1-xNdxCuOy thin films by rf-magnetron sputtering and pulsed-laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugii, N.; Ichikawa, M.; Kuba, K.; Sakurai, T.; Iamamoto, K.; Yamauchi, H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on Sr 1- x Nd x CuO y thin films grown on SrTiO 3 substrates by rf-magnetron sputtering and pulsed-laser deposition. The sputter-deposited film with x=0 has an infinite-layer structure whose lattice constants are: a=0.390 nm and c=0.347 nm. When x is larger than 0.1, the films contain a phase of the Sr 14 Cu 24 O 41 structure. The laser-deposited films of Sr 1- x Nd x CuO y with x ≥ 0.075 were single phase of the infinite-layer structure. The lattice parameter c decreased and the lattice parameter a increased, as the Nd content, x, increased. The films with x=0.10 and 0.125 exhibited superconducting onset temperatures around 26 K. Weak Meissner signals were observed for these films at temperatures below 30 K

  11. RF power sources for 5--15 TeV linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1996-09-01

    After outlining the design of the NLC rf system at 1 TeV, the possibility of a leap in linear collider energy into the 5--15 TeV energy range is considered. To keep the active accelerator length and ac wall-plug power within reasonable bounds, higher accelerating gradients at higher rf frequencies will be necessary. Scaling relations are developed for basic rf system parameters as a function of frequency, and some specific parameter examples are given for colliders at 34 Ghz and 91 Ghz. Concepts for rf pulse compression system design and for high power microwave sources at 34 Ghz (for example sheet-beam and multiple-beam klystrons) are briefly discussed

  12. Operational Performance and Improvements to the RF Power Sources for the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility is being used to test and demonstrate key technical issues for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study. Pulsed RF power sources are essential elements in this test facility. Klystrons at S-band (29998.55 GHz), in conjunction with pulse compression systems, are used to power the Drive Beam Accelerator (DBA) to achieve an electron beam energy of 150 MeV. The L-Band RF system, includes broadband Travelling Wave Tubes (TWTs) for beam bunching with 'phase coded' sub pulses in the injector and a narrow band high power L-Band klystron powering the transverse 1.5GHz RF deflector in the Delay Loop immediately after the DBA. This paper describes these different systems and discusses their operational performance.

  13. Operational performance and improvements to the rf power sources for the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility is being used to test and demonstrate key technical issues for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study. Pulsed RF power sources are essential elements in this test facility. Klystrons at S-band (29998.55 GHz), in conjunction with pulse compression systems, are used to power the Drive Beam Accelerator (DBA) to achieve an electron beam energy of 150 MeV. The L-Band RF system, includes broadband Travelling Wave Tubes (TWTs) for beam bunching with 'phase coded' sub pulses in the injector and a narrow band high power L-Band klystron powering the transverse 1.5 GHz RF deflector in the Delay Loop immediately after the DBA. This paper describes these different systems and discusses their operational performance.

  14. Adaptive feedforward in the LANL rf control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziomek, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive feedforward system that corrects repetitive errors in the amplitude and phase of the RF field of a pulsed accelerator. High-frequency disturbances that are beyond the effective bandwidth of the RF field feedback control system can be eliminated with a feedforward system. Many RF field disturbances for a pulsed accelerator are repetitive, occurring at the same relative time in every pulse. This design employs digital signal processing hardware to adaptively determine and track the control signals required to eliminate the repetitive errors in the feedback control system. In order to provide the necessary high-frequency response, the adaptive feedforward hardware provides the calculated control signal prior to the repetitive disturbance that it corrects. This system has been demonstrated to reduce the transient disturbances caused by beam pulses. Furthermore, it has been shown to negate high-frequency phase and amplitude oscillations in a high-power klystron amplifier caused by PFN ripple on the high-voltage. The design and results of the adaptive feedforward system are presented

  15. Adaptive feed forward in the LANL RF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziomek, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive feed forward system that corrects repetitive errors in the amplitude and phase of the RF field of a pulsed accelerator. High-frequency disturbances that are beyond the effective bandwidth of the RF-field feedback control system can be eliminated with a feed forward system. Many RF-field disturbances for a pulsed accelerator are repetitive, occurring at the same relative time in every pulse. This design employs digital signal processing hardware to adaptively determine and track the control signals required to eliminate the repetitive errors in the feedback control system. In order to provide the necessary high-frequency response, the adaptive feed forward hardware provides the calculated control signal prior to the repetitive disturbance that it corrects. This system has been demonstrated to reduce the transient disturbances caused by beam pulses. Furthermore, it has been shown to negate high-frequency phase and amplitude oscillations in a high-power klystron amplifier caused by PFN ripple on the high-voltage. The design and results of the adaptive feed forward system are presented. (Author) 3 figs., 2 refs

  16. Resonant High Power Combiners

    CERN Document Server

    Langlois, Michel; Peillex-Delphe, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Particle accelerators need radio frequency sources. Above 300 MHz, the amplifiers mostly used high power klystrons developed for this sole purpose. As for military equipment, users are drawn to buy "off the shelf" components rather than dedicated devices. IOTs have replaced most klystrons in TV transmitters and find their way in particle accelerators. They are less bulky, easier to replace, more efficient at reduced power. They are also far less powerful. What is the benefit of very compact sources if huge 3 dB couplers are needed to combine the power? To alleviate this drawback, we investigated a resonant combiner, operating in TM010 mode, able to combine 3 to 5 IOTs. Our IOTs being able to deliver 80 kW C.W. apiece, combined power would reach 400 kW minus the minor insertion loss. Values for matching and insertion loss are given. The behavior of the system in case of IOT failure is analyzed.

  17. SU-F-J-112: Clinical Feasibility Test of An RF Pulse-Based MRI Method for the Quantitative Fat-Water Segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, S; Wloch, J; Pirkola, M [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative fat-water segmentation is important not only because of the clinical utility of fat-suppressed MRI images in better detecting lesions of clinical significance (in the midst of bright fat signal) but also because of the possible physical need, in which CT-like images based on the materials’ photon attenuation properties may have to be generated from MR images; particularly, as in the case of MR-only radiation oncology environment to obtain radiation dose calculation or as in the case of hybrid PET/MR modality to obtain attenuation correction map for the quantitative PET reconstruction. The majority of such fat-water quantitative segmentations have been performed by utilizing the Dixon’s method and its variations, which have to enforce the proper settings (often predefined) of echo time (TE) in the pulse sequences. Therefore, such methods have been unable to be directly combined with those ultrashort TE (UTE) sequences that, taking the advantage of very low TE values (∼ 10’s microsecond), might be beneficial to directly detect bones. Recently, an RF pulse-based method (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mri.2015.11.006), termed as PROD pulse method, was introduced as a method of quantitative fat-water segmentation that does not have to depend on predefined TE settings. Here, the clinical feasibility of this method is verified in brain tumor patients by combining the PROD pulse with several sequences. Methods: In a clinical 3T MRI, the PROD pulse was combined with turbo spin echo (e.g. TR=1500, TE=16 or 60, ETL=15) or turbo field echo (e.g. TR=5.6, TE=2.8, ETL=12) sequences without specifying TE values. Results: The fat-water segmentation was possible without having to set specific TE values. Conclusion: The PROD pulse method is clinically feasible. Although not yet combined with UTE sequences in our laboratory, the method is potentially compatible with UTE sequences, and thus, might be useful to directly segment fat, water, bone and air.

  18. High-power VCSELs for smart munitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geske, Jon; MacDougal, Michael; Cole, Garrett; Snyder, Donald

    2006-08-01

    The next generation of low-cost smart munitions will be capable of autonomously detecting and identifying targets aided partly by the ability to image targets with compact and robust scanning rangefinder and LADAR capabilities. These imaging systems will utilize arrays of high performance, low-cost semiconductor diode lasers capable of achieving high peak powers in pulses ranging from 5 to 25 nanoseconds in duration. Aerius Photonics is developing high-power Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) to meet the needs of these smart munitions applications. The authors will report the results of Aerius' development program in which peak pulsed powers exceeding 60 Watts were demonstrated from single VCSEL emitters. These compact packaged emitters achieved pulse energies in excess of 1.5 micro-joules with multi kilo-hertz pulse repetition frequencies. The progress of the ongoing effort toward extending this performance to arrays of VCSEL emitters and toward further improving laser slope efficiency will be reported.

  19. Possible effects of RF field near ICRF antenna on density control during long pulse discharge in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Seki, T.; Watari, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Noda, N.; Watanabe, T.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Torii, Y.; Takeuchi, N.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Yokota, M.; Kato, A.; Zhao, Y.

    2005-01-01

    In the large helical device (LHD), the plasma duration time was extended up to 150 s by ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating. Time-integrated total input power reached 71 MJ. However, this discharge terminated due to radiation collapse accompanied by an increase of electron density. The temperature of the divertor plates and the intensity of H α were locally increased in the same toroidal section, near the ICRF antenna. One of the possible causes of the increase of radiation power is an outgassing from the divertor plates that were heated by particles accelerated in the cyclotron resonance layer near the antenna. Another possible cause is the outgassing from the ICRF antenna itself due to a temperature increase of the ICRF antenna owing to high-energy particles, or the formation of an RF (radio frequency) sheath

  20. High power microwave source development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, James N.; Miller, Gabriel; Potter, Seth; Ashby, Steve; Smith, Richard R.

    1995-05-01

    The requirements of this project have been to: (1) improve and expand the sources available in the facility for testing purposes and (2) perform specific tasks under direction of the Defense Nuclear Agency about the applications of high power microwaves (HPM). In this project the HPM application was power beaming. The requirements of this program were met in the following way: (1) We demonstrated that a compact linear induction accelerator can drive HPM sources at repetition rates in excess of 100 HZ at peak microwave powers of a GW. This was done for the relativistic magnetron. Since the conclusion of this contract such specifications have also been demonstrated for the relativistic klystron under Ballistic Missile Defense Organization funding. (2) We demonstrated an L band relativistic magnetron. This device has been used both on our single pulse machines, CAMEL and CAMEL X, and the repetitive system CLIA. (3) We demonstrated that phase locking of sources together in large numbers is a feasible technology and showed the generation of multigigawatt S-band radiation in an array of relativistic magnetrons.

  1. High power RF heating and nonthermal distributions in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeters, A.G.

    1994-12-13

    This thesis discusses the nonthermal effects in the electron population of a tokamak, that are generated by the inductive electric field and electron cyclotron resonant heating. The kinetic description of the plasma is given by a Boltzmann equation for the electron velocity distribution, in which the many small angle scattering Coulomb collisions that occur in the plasma are modelled by a Fokker-Planck collision term. These collisions drive the distribution towards the Maxwellian distribution of thermodynamic equilibrium. The energy absorption from the electron cyclotron waves and the acceleration by the toroidal electric field lead to deviations from the Maxwellian destribution. The interaction of the electron cyclotron waves with the plasma is treated within quasilinear theory. Resonant interaction occurs when the wave frequency matches one of the harmonics of the gyration frequency of the electrons in the static magnetic field. The waves generate a diffusion of resonant electrons in velocity space. The inductive electric field accelerates the electrons in the direction prallel to the magnetic field and leads to a convection in velocity space. The equilibrium that is reached between the driving forces of the electric field and the electron cyclotron waves and the restoring force of the collisions is studied in this thesis. The specific geometry of the tokamak is incorporated in the model through an average of the kinetic equation over the electron orbits. (orig./WL).

  2. High power RF heating and nonthermal distributions in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, A.G.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis discusses the nonthermal effects in the electron population of a tokamak, that are generated by the inductive electric field and electron cyclotron resonant heating. The kinetic description of the plasma is given by a Boltzmann equation for the electron velocity distribution, in which the many small angle scattering Coulomb collisions that occur in the plasma are modelled by a Fokker-Planck collision term. These collisions drive the distribution towards the Maxwellian distribution of thermodynamic equilibrium. The energy absorption from the electron cyclotron waves and the acceleration by the toroidal electric field lead to deviations from the Maxwellian destribution. The interaction of the electron cyclotron waves with the plasma is treated within quasilinear theory. Resonant interaction occurs when the wave frequency matches one of the harmonics of the gyration frequency of the electrons in the static magnetic field. The waves generate a diffusion of resonant electrons in velocity space. The inductive electric field accelerates the electrons in the direction prallel to the magnetic field and leads to a convection in velocity space. The equilibrium that is reached between the driving forces of the electric field and the electron cyclotron waves and the restoring force of the collisions is studied in this thesis. The specific geometry of the tokamak is incorporated in the model through an average of the kinetic equation over the electron orbits. (orig./WL)

  3. Linear and nonlinear analysis of high-power rf amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, M.

    1983-01-01

    After a survey of the state variable analysis method the final amplifier for the CBA is analyzed taking into account the real beam waveshape. An empirical method for checking the stability of a non-linear system is also considered

  4. Stretchers and compressors for ultra-high power laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakovlev, I V [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-30

    This review is concerned with pulse stretchers and compressors as key components of ultra-high power laser facilities that take advantage of chirped-pulse amplification. The potentialities, characteristics, configurations and methods for the matching and alignment of these devices are examined, with particular attention to the history of the optics of ultra-short, ultra-intense pulses before and after 1985, when the chirped-pulse amplification method was proposed, which drastically changed the view of the feasibility of creating ultra-high power laser sources. The review is intended primarily for young scientists and experts who begin to address the amplification and compression of chirped pulses, experts in laser optics and all who are interested in scientific achievements in the field of ultra-high power laser systems. (review)

  5. High-Power Electron Accelerators for Space (and other) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewellen, John W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-23

    This is a presentation on high-power electron accelerators for space and other applications. The main points covered are: electron beams for space applications, new designs of RF accelerators, high-power high-electron mobility transistors (HEMT) testing, and Li-ion battery design. In summary, the authors have considered a concept of 1-MeV electron accelerator that can operate up to several seconds. This concept can be extended to higher energy to produce higher beam power. Going to higher beam energy requires adding more cavities and solid-state HEMT RF power devices. The commercial HEMT have been tested for frequency response and RF output power (up to 420 W). Finally, the authors are testing these HEMT into a resonant load and planning for an electron beam test in FY17.

  6. Rf system specifications for a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.; Eaton, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    A linear accelerator contains many systems; however, the most complex and costly is the RF system. The goal of an RF system is usually simply stated as maintaining the phase and amplitude of the RF signal within a given tolerance to accelerate the charged particle beam. An RF system that drives a linear accelerator needs a complete system specification, which should contain specifications for all the subsystems (i.e., high-power RF, low-level RF, RF generation/distribution, and automation control). This paper defines a format for the specifications of these subsystems and discusses each RF subsystem independently to provide a comprehensive understanding of the function of each subsystem. This paper concludes with an example of a specification spreadsheet allowing one to input the specifications of a subsystem. Thus, some fundamental parameters (i.e., the cost and size) of the RF system can be determined

  7. SiOx Ink-Repellent Layer Deposited by Radio Frequency (RF) Plasmas in Continuous Wave and Pulse Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Qiang; Fu Yabo; Pang Hua; Zhang Yuefei; Zhang Guangqiu

    2007-01-01

    Low surface energy layers, proposed application for non-water printing in computer to plate (CTP) technology, are deposited in both continuous wave and pulse radio frequency (13.56 MHz) plasma with hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) as precursor. It is found that the plasma mode dominates the polymer growth rate and the surface composition. Derived from the spectra of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and combined with printable test it is concluded that concentration of Si in coatings plays an important role for the ink printability and the ink does not adhere on the surface with high silicon concentration

  8. Improvement of the long pulse operation of the s-band klystron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, T. [Graduate School of Sceince and Technology, Nihon Univ., Funabashi, Chiba (Japan); Sato, I.; Hayakawa, K. [Nihon Univ., Funabashi, Chiba (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst

    2000-07-01

    The long pulse operation of the PV3030 klystron for FEL linac at LEBRA in Nihon University has been improved considerably by the additional vacuum system placed immediately downstream the klystron output rf window. With the new vacuum system, the large conductance has enabled a high vacuum in normal operation and a quick recovery when the dielectric breakdown occurred. A high vacuum near the rf window may be essentially important for a stable operation of the high power klystron with long pulse duration. Now the PV3030 klystron can be operated at the condition of 20 MW x 20 {mu}s x 12.5 Hz. (author)

  9. Characteristics of a four element gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission line array high power microwave source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J. M., E-mail: jared.johnson@ttu.edu; Reale, D. V.; Garcia, R. S.; Cravey, W. H.; Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.; Mankowski, J. J. [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Krile, J. T. [Department of Electromagnetics and Sensor Systems, Naval Surface Warfare Center - Dahlgren Division, Dahlgren, Virginia 22448 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, a solid-state four element array gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission line high power microwave system is presented as well as a detailed description of its subsystems and general output capabilities. This frequency agile S-band source is easily adjusted from 2-4 GHz by way of a DC driven biasing magnetic field and is capable of generating electric fields of 7.8 kV/m at 10 m correlating to 4.2 MW of RF power with pulse repetition frequencies up to 1 kHz. Beam steering of the array at angles of ±16.7° is also demonstrated, and the associated general radiation pattern is detailed.

  10. Pulsed beam tests at the SANAEM RFQ beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turemen, G.; Akgun, Y.; Alacakir, A.; Kilic, I.; Yasatekin, B.; Ergenlik, E.; Ogur, S.; Sunar, E.; Yildiz, V.; Ahiska, F.; Cicek, E.; Unel, G.

    2017-07-01

    A proton beamline consisting of an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source, two solenoid magnets, two steerer magnets and a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is developed at the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority’s (TAEA) Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SNRTC-SANAEM) in Ankara. In Q4 of 2016, the RFQ was installed in the beamline. The high power tests of the RF power supply and the RF transmission line were done successfully. The high power RF conditioning of the RFQ was performed recently. The 13.56 MHz ICP source was tested in two different conditions, CW and pulsed. The characterization of the proton beam was done with ACCTs, Faraday cups and a pepper-pot emittance meter. Beam transverse emittance was measured in between the two solenoids of the LEBT. The measured beam is then reconstructed at the entrance of the RFQ by using computer simulations to determine the optimum solenoid currents for acceptance matching of the beam. This paper will introduce the pulsed beam test results at the SANAEM RFQ beamline. In addition, the high power RF conditioning of the RFQ will be discussed.

  11. Depth-profile analysis of thermoelectric layers on Si wafers by pulsed r.f. glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinsberg, K.-G.; Schumacher, C.; Tempez, A.; Nielsch, K.; Broekaert, J.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    In this work the depth-profile analysis of thermoelectric layers deposited on Au and Cr covered Si wafers with the aid of pulsed radiofrequency glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry (pulsed RF-GD-TOFMS also called plasma profiling TOFMS (PP-TOFMS™)) is described. For thermoelectric materials the depth resolutions obtained with both PP-TOFMS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are shown to be well comparable and in the order of the roughness of the corresponding layers (between 20 and 3700 nm). With both methods a direct solid analysis without any preparation steps is possible. In addition, the analysis of the samples with PP-TOFMS proved to be faster by a factor of 26 compared to SIMS, as sputtering rates were found to be 80 nm s −1 and 3 nm s −1 , respectively. For the analyzed samples the results of PP-TOFMS and SIMS show that a homogeneous deposition was obtained. Quantitative results for all samples could also be obtained directly by PP-TOFMS when the stoichiometry of one sample was determined beforehand for instance by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SEM-EDX). For Bi 2 Te 3 the standard deviation for the main component concentrations within one sample then is found to be between 1.1% and 1.9% and it is 3.6% from sample to sample. For Sb 2 Te 3 the values within one sample are from 1.7% to 4.2% and from sample to sample 5.3%, respectively. - Highlights: ► Depth resolution in sub micrometer size by glow discharge mass spectrometry. ► Bi and Sb telluride layers composition with GD-TOF-MS, ICP-OES and SEM-EDX agree. ► Homogeneities of layers measured with GD-TOF-MS and SIMS agree.

  12. Research results for the applications of high power ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hailiang; Qiu Aici; Sun Jianfeng; He Xiaoping; Tang Junping; Wang Haiyang; Zhang Jiasheng; Xu Ri; Peng Jianchang; Ren Shuqing; Li Peng; Yang Li; Huang Jianjun; Zhang Guoguang; Ouyang Xiaoping; Li Hongyu

    2003-01-01

    The results obtained in the theoretical and experimental studies for the application of high power ion beams in certain areas of nuclear physics and material science are reported. The preliminary experimental results of generating 6-7 MeV quasi-monoenergetic pulsed γ-rays with high power pulsed proton beams striking 19 F target on the Flash II accelerator are presented. By placing the target far enough downstream, the quasi-monoenergetic pulsed γ-rays can be discriminated experimentally from the diode Bremsstrahlung. This article also describes the other applications of high power ion beams and the preliminary experimental and theoretical results in simulation of soft X-ray thermal-mechanical effects, generation of high intense pulsed neutrons, equation of state and shock-wave physics experiments, surface modification and so on

  13. The high-power iodine laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brederlow, G.; Fill, E.; Witte, K. J.

    The book provides a description of the present state of the art concerning the iodine laser, giving particular attention to the design and operation of pulsed high-power iodine lasers. The basic features of the laser are examined, taking into account aspects of spontaneous emission lifetime, hyperfine structure, line broadening and line shifts, stimulated emission cross sections, the influence of magnetic fields, sublevel relaxation, the photodissociation of alkyl iodides, flashlamp technology, excitation in a direct discharge, chemical excitation, and questions regarding the chemical kinetics of the photodissociation iodine laser. The principles of high-power operation are considered along with aspects of beam quality and losses, the design and layout of an iodine laser system, the scalability and prospects of the iodine laser, and the design of the single-beam Asterix III laser.

  14. Pulsed energy storage antennas for ionospheric modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Wuerker

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interesting, "new", very high peak-power pulsed radio frequency (RF antennas have been assembled at the HIPAS Observatory (Alaska, USA and also at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA, USA; namely, a pair of quarter wavelength (λ/4 long cylindrical conductors separated by a high voltage spark gap. Such a combination can radiate multi-megawatt RF pulses whenever the spark gap fires. The antenna at HIPAS is 53m long (λ/2 with a central pressurized SF6 spark gap. It is mounted 5 meters (λ/21 above a ground plane. It radiates at 2.85MHz. The two antenna halves are charged to ± high voltages by a Tesla coil. Spark gap voltages of 0.4 MV (at the instant of spark gap closure give peak RF currents of ~1200A which correspond to ~14 MW peak total radiated power, or ~56 MW of Effective Radiated Power (ERP. The RF pulse train is initially square, decaying exponentially in time with Qs of ~50. Two similar but smaller 80-MHz antennas were assembled at UCLA to demonstrate their synchronization with a pulsed laser which fired the spark gaps in the two antennas simultanoeously. These experiments show that one can anticipate a pulsed array of laser synchronized antennas having a coherent Effective Radiated Power (ERP>10GW. One can even reconsider a pulse array radiating at 1.43MHz which corresponds to the electron gyrofrequency in the Earth's magnetic field at ~200km altitude. These "new" pulsed high power antennas are hauntingly similar to the ones used originally by Hertz (1857-1894 during his (1886-1889 seminal verifications of Maxwell's (1864 theory of electrodynamics.

  15. Pulsed energy storage antennas for ionospheric modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Wuerker

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interesting, "new", very high peak-power pulsed radio frequency (RF antennas have been assembled at the HIPAS Observatory (Alaska, USA and also at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA, USA; namely, a pair of quarter wavelength (λ/4 long cylindrical conductors separated by a high voltage spark gap. Such a combination can radiate multi-megawatt RF pulses whenever the spark gap fires. The antenna at HIPAS is 53m long (λ/2 with a central pressurized SF6 spark gap. It is mounted 5 meters (λ/21 above a ground plane. It radiates at 2.85MHz. The two antenna halves are charged to ± high voltages by a Tesla coil. Spark gap voltages of 0.4 MV (at the instant of spark gap closure give peak RF currents of ~1200A which correspond to ~14 MW peak total radiated power, or ~56 MW of Effective Radiated Power (ERP. The RF pulse train is initially square, decaying exponentially in time with Qs of ~50. Two similar but smaller 80-MHz antennas were assembled at UCLA to demonstrate their synchronization with a pulsed laser which fired the spark gaps in the two antennas simultanoeously. These experiments show that one can anticipate a pulsed array of laser synchronized antennas having a coherent Effective Radiated Power (ERP>10GW. One can even reconsider a pulse array radiating at 1.43MHz which corresponds to the electron gyrofrequency in the Earth's magnetic field at ~200km altitude. These "new" pulsed high power antennas are hauntingly similar to the ones used originally by Hertz (1857-1894 during his (1886-1889 seminal verifications of Maxwell's (1864 theory of electrodynamics.

  16. RF gun using laser-triggered photocathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, H.; Otake, Y.; Naito, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yoshioka, M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF gun using laser-triggered photocathode has many advantages as an injector of the linear colliders since it can generate a low emittance and high current pulsed beam. The experimental facility for the RF gun, such as an RF system, a laser system and a photocathode have been fabricated to study the fundamental characteristics. The dynamics of the RF gun has also studied by the 1D sheet beam model. (author)

  17. Investigation of the delay time distribution of high power microwave surface flashover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J.; Krompholz, H.; Neuber, A.

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing and modeling the statistics associated with the initiation of gas breakdown has proven to be difficult due to a variety of rather unexplored phenomena involved. Experimental conditions for high power microwave window breakdown for pressures on the order of 100 to several 100 torr are complex: there are little to no naturally occurring free electrons in the breakdown region. The initial electron generation rate, from an external source, for example, is time dependent and so is the charge carrier amplification in the increasing radio frequency (RF) field amplitude with a rise time of 50 ns, which can be on the same order as the breakdown delay time. The probability of reaching a critical electron density within a given time period is composed of the statistical waiting time for the appearance of initiating electrons in the high-field region and the build-up of an avalanche with an inherent statistical distribution of the electron number. High power microwave breakdown and its delay time is of critical importance, since it limits the transmission through necessary windows, especially for high power, high altitude, low pressure applications. The delay time distribution of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover has been examined for nitrogen and argon as test gases for pressures ranging from 60 to 400 torr, with and without external UV illumination. A model has been developed for predicting the discharge delay time for these conditions. The results provide indications that field induced electron generation, other than standard field emission, plays a dominant role, which might be valid for other gas discharge types as well.

  18. One nanosecond pulsed electron gun systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.

    1979-02-01

    At SLAC there has been a continuous need for the injection of very short bunches of electrons into the accelerator. Several time-of-flight experiments have used bursts of short pulses during a normal 1.6 micro-second rf acceleration period. Single bunch beam loading experiments made use of a short pulse injection system which included high power transverse beam chopping equipment. Until the equipment described in this paper came on line, the basic grid-controlled gun pulse was limited to a rise time of 7 nanoseconds and a pulse width of 10 nanoseconds. The system described here has a grid-controlled rise time of less than 500 pico-seconds, and a minimum pulse width of less than 1 nanosecond. Pulse burst repetition rate has been demonstrated above 20 MHz during a 1.6 microsecond rf accelerating period. The order-of-magnitude increase in gun grid switching speed comes from a new gun design which minimizes lead inductance and stray capacitance, and also increases gun grid transconductance. These gun improvements coupled with a newly designed fast pulser mounted directly within the gun envelope make possible subnanosecond pulsing of the gun

  19. High Power Orbit Transfer Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gulczinski, Frank

    2003-01-01

    ... from Virginia Tech University and Aerophysics, Inc. to examine propulsion requirements for a high-power orbit transfer vehicle using thin-film voltaic solar array technologies under development by the Space Vehicles Directorate (dubbed PowerSail...

  20. High power switches for ion induction linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S.; Savage, M.; Saylor, W.B.

    1985-01-01

    The success of linear induction ion accelerators for accelerator inertial fusion (AIF) applications depends largely on innovations in pulsed power technology. There are tight constraints on the accuracy of accelerating voltage waveforms to maintain a low momentum spread. Furthermore, the non-relativistic ion beams may be subject to a klystronlike interaction with the accelerating cavities, leading to enhanced momentum spread. In this paper, we describe a novel high power switch with a demonstrated ability to interrupt 300 A at 20 kV in less than 60 ns. The switch may allow the replacement of pulse modulators in linear induction accelerators with hard tube pulsers. A power system based on a hard tube pulser could solve the longitudinal instability problem while maintaining high energy transfer efficiency. The problem of longitudinal beam control in ion induction linacs is reviewed in Section 2. Section 3 describes the principles of the plasma flow switch. Experimental results are summarized in Section 4

  1. High power switches for ion induction linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Savage, M.; Saylor, W.B.

    1985-01-01

    The success of linear induction ion accelerators for accelerator inertial fusion (AIF) applications depends largely on innovations in pulsed power technology. There are tight constraints on the accuracy of accelerating voltage waveforms to maintain a low momentum spread. Furthermore, the non-relativistic ion beams may be subject to a klystron-like interaction with the accelerating cavities leading to enhanced momentum spread. In this paper, the author describe a novel high power switch with a demonstrated ability to interrupt 300 A at 20 kV in less than 60 ns. The switch may allow the replacement of pulse modulators in linear induction accelerators with hard tube pulsers. A power system based on a hard tube pulser could solve the longitudinal instability problem while maintaining high energy transfer efficiency. The problem of longitudinal beam control in ion induction linacs is reviewed in Section 2. Section 3 describes the principles of the plasma flow switch. Experimental results are summarized in Section 4

  2. Depth-profile analysis of thermoelectric layers on Si wafers by pulsed r.f. glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinsberg, K.-G. [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Schumacher, C. [Institute for Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Tempez, A. [HORIBA Jobin Yvon, 16-18 rue du Canal, F-91160 Longjumeau (France); Nielsch, K. [Institute for Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Broekaert, J.A.C., E-mail: jose.broekaert@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    In this work the depth-profile analysis of thermoelectric layers deposited on Au and Cr covered Si wafers with the aid of pulsed radiofrequency glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry (pulsed RF-GD-TOFMS also called plasma profiling TOFMS (PP-TOFMS Trade-Mark-Sign )) is described. For thermoelectric materials the depth resolutions obtained with both PP-TOFMS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are shown to be well comparable and in the order of the roughness of the corresponding layers (between 20 and 3700 nm). With both methods a direct solid analysis without any preparation steps is possible. In addition, the analysis of the samples with PP-TOFMS proved to be faster by a factor of 26 compared to SIMS, as sputtering rates were found to be 80 nm s{sup -1} and 3 nm s{sup -1}, respectively. For the analyzed samples the results of PP-TOFMS and SIMS show that a homogeneous deposition was obtained. Quantitative results for all samples could also be obtained directly by PP-TOFMS when the stoichiometry of one sample was determined beforehand for instance by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SEM-EDX). For Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} the standard deviation for the main component concentrations within one sample then is found to be between 1.1% and 1.9% and it is 3.6% from sample to sample. For Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} the values within one sample are from 1.7% to 4.2% and from sample to sample 5.3%, respectively. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depth resolution in sub micrometer size by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi and Sb telluride layers composition with GD-TOF-MS, ICP-OES and SEM-EDX agree. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homogeneities of layers measured with GD-TOF-MS and SIMS agree.

  3. High-Power Ka-Band Window and Resonant Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2006-01-01

    A stand-alone 200 MW rf test station is needed for carrying out development of accelerator structures and components for a future high-gradient multi-TeV collider, such as CLIC. A high-power rf window is needed to isolate the test station from a structure element under test. This project aimed to develop such a window for use at a frequency in the range 30-35 GHz, and to also develop a high-power resonant ring for testing the window. During Phase I, successful conceptual designs were completed for the window and the resonant ring, and cold tests of each were carried out that confirmed the designs

  4. Results of tests of the X2274 high power tetrode in a JT-60 110 to 130 MHz ICRH amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remsen, D.B.; Loring, C.M.; McNees, S.G.; Moriyama, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Anno, K.; Fujii, T.; Terakado, M.; Kogure, S.; Nagashima, T.; Ohta, M.

    1990-09-01

    This paper reports the results of tests of the newly developed Varian EIMAC X2274 in the JAERI JT-60 ICRH system at pulse lengths up to 6 seconds at 131 MHz. It is our belief that these tests achieved the highest long pulse, or CW, power that has ever been delivered by a single power grid tube at frequencies above 100 MHz. Varian's EIMAC X2274, developed in conjunction with General Atomics and the US Department of Energy, uses an improved pyrolytic graphite grid configuration which provides significantly better vhf performance than the grids of the X2242 tetrode which was tested in this system in 1989. The EIMAC X2274 combines the improved grids with a new anode design which reduces the required water flow approximately 50% and increases the maximum anode dissipation 80%. All tests were performed at 131 MHz, the system's highest operating frequency. Tests of both prototype EIMAC X2274s produced essentially identical results. The basic objectives of these tests were: to demonstrate that the system with the EIMAC X2274 can reliably produce 1.5 MW at 130 MHz at 5 second pulse lengths for the JT-60U tokamak and to collect data for use in the design of future high power ICRH systems. In these tests the tube and system produced up to 1.7 MW at pulse lengths up to 5.4 seconds: i.e, the EIMAC X2274 in this system can easily meet Objective 1. The remainder of this paper shows that Objective 2 has been fulfilled. In addition to the high power tests, operational range tests were performed under variable VSWR conditions. Unlike the EIMAC X2242 tests were rf current heating of the screen grid limited output power, system parameters, rather than tube parameters, limited the output power in the high power tests. Operational range tests were conducted at output power levels chosen to be well within the system's anode cooling capability

  5. High SBS-Threshold Er/Yb Co-Doped Phosphate Glass Fiber Amplifiers for High Power, Sub-us Pulsed, Narrow Linewidth, All Fiber-Based Laser Transmitter, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase I, NP Photonics has achieved 1.2 kW peak power for 105 ns fiber laser pulses, and successfully demonstrated the feasibility to produce monolithic high SBS...

  6. A reflexing electron microwave amplifier for rf particle accelerator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.; Hoeberling, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    The evolution of rf-accelerator technology toward high-power, high-current, low-emittance beams produces an ever-increasing demand for efficient, very high power microwave power sources. The present klystron technology has performed very well but is not expected to produce reliable gigawatt peak-power units in the 1- to 10-GHz regime. Further major advancements must involve other types of sources. The reflexing-electron class of sources can produce microwave powers at the gigawatt level and has demonstrated operation from 800-MHz to 40-GHz. The pulse length appears to be limited by diode closure, and reflexing-electron devices have been operated in a repetitively pulsed mode. A design is presented for a reflexing electron microwave amplifier that is frequency and phase locked. In this design, the generated microwave power can be efficiently coupled to one or several accelerator loads. Frequency and phase-locking capability may permit parallel-source operation for higher power. The low-frequency (500-MHz to 10-GHz) operation at very high power required by present and proposed microwave particle accelerators makes an amplifier, based on reflexing electron phenomena, a candidate for the development of new accelerator power sources. (author)

  7. A high-power compact regenerative amplifier FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.C.; Sheffield, R.L.; Fortgang, C.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Ebrahim, N.A.; Goldstein, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Regenerative Amplifier FEL (RAFEL) is a new FEL approach aimed at achieving the highest optical power from a compact rf-linac FEL. The key idea is to feed back a small fraction ( 5 in single pass) wiggler to enable the FEL to reach saturation in a few passes. This paper summarizes the design of a high-power compact regenerative amplifier FEL and describes the first experimental demonstration of the RAFEL concept

  8. The FELIX RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manintveld, P.; Delmee, P.F.M.; Geer, C.A.J. van der; Meddens, B.J.H.; Meer, A.F.G. van der; Amersfoort, P.W. van

    1992-01-01

    The performance of the RF system for the Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX) is discussed. The RF system provides the input power for a triode gun (1 GHz, 100 W), a prebuncher (1 GHz, 10 kW), a buncher (3 GHz, 20 MW), and two linacs (3 GHz, 8 MW each). The pulse length in the system is 20 μs. The required electron beam stability imposes the following demands on the RF system: a phase stability better than 0.3 deg for the 1 GHz signals and better than 1 deg for the 3 GHz signals; the amplitude stability has to be better than 1% for the 1 GHz and better than 0.2% for the 3 GHz signals. (author) 3 refs.; 6 figs

  9. RF MEMS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At the bare die level the insertion loss, return loss and the isolation ... ing and packaging of a silicon on glass based RF MEMS switch fabricated using DRIE. ..... follows the power law based on the asperity deformation model given by Pattona & ... Surface mount style RF packages (SMX series 580465) from Startedge Corp.

  10. A high power cross-field amplifier at X-Band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppley, K.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N.; Lee, T.; Nelson, E.

    1991-05-01

    A high power cross-field amplifier is under development at SLAC with the objective of providing sufficient peak power to feed a section of an X-Band (11.424 GHz) accelerator without the need for pulse compression. The CFA being designed employs a conventional distributed secondary emission cathode but a novel anode structure which consists of an array of vane resonators alternatively coupled to a rectangular waveguide. The waveguide impedance (width) is tapered linearly from input to output so as to provide a constant RF voltage at the vane tips, leading to uniform power generation along the structure. Nominal design for this tube calls for 300 MW output power, 20 dB gain, DC voltage 142 KV, magnetic field 5 KG, anode-cathode gap 3.6 mm and total interaction length of about 60 cm. These specifications have been supported by computer simulations of both the RF slow wave structure as well as the electron space charge wave interaction. We have used ARGUS to model the cold circuit properties and CONDOR to model the electronic power conversion. An efficiency of 60 percent can be expected. We will discuss the details of the design effort. 5 refs., 6 figs

  11. The TESLA RF System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choroba, S.

    2003-01-01

    The TESLA project proposed by the TESLA collaboration in 2001 is a 500 to 800GeV e+/e- linear collider with integrated free electron laser facility. The accelerator is based on superconducting cavity technology. Approximately 20000 superconducting cavities operated at 1.3GHz with a gradient of 23.4MV/m or 35MV/m will be required to achieve the energy of 500GeV or 800GeV respectively. For 500GeV ∼600 RF stations each generating 10MW of RF power at 1.3GHz at a pulse duration of 1.37ms and a repetition rate of 5 or 10Hz are required. The original TESLA design was modified in 2002 and now includes a dedicated 20GeV electron accelerator in a separate tunnel for free electron laser application. The TESLA XFEL will provide XFEL radiation of unprecedented peak brilliance and full transverse coherence in the wavelength range of 0.1 to 6.4nm at a pulse duration of 100fs. The technology of both accelerators, the TESLA linear collider and the XFEL, will be identical, however the number of superconducting cavities and RF stations for the XFEL will be reduced to 936 and 26 respectively. This paper describes the layout of the entire RF system of the TESLA linear collider and the TESLA XFEL and gives an overview of its various subsystems and components

  12. RF linacs for FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwettman, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    There are twenty rf linac-driven Free Electron Lasers (FELs) existing or under construction throughout the world and proposals for several more. A number of these FELs have recently been established as facilities to produce coherent optical beams for materials and biomedical research. Both short pulse low duty factor and long pulse high duty factor linac-driven FELs will be discussed. Accelerator issues that influence the performance of an FEL as a scientific instrument will be indicated. (Author) 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  13. A plasma microlens for ultrashort high power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzir, Yiftach; Eisenmann, Shmuel; Ferber, Yair; Zigler, Arie; Hubbard, Richard F.

    2009-07-01

    We present a technique for generation of miniature plasma lens system that can be used for focusing and collimating a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. The plasma lens was created by a nanosecond laser, which ablated a capillary entrance. The spatial configuration of the ablated plasma focused a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. This configuration offers versatility in the plasma lens small f-number for extremely tight focusing of high power lasers with no damage threshold restrictions of regular optical components.

  14. A plasma microlens for ultrashort high power lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzir, Yiftach; Eisenmann, Shmuel; Ferber, Yair; Zigler, Arie; Hubbard, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a technique for generation of miniature plasma lens system that can be used for focusing and collimating a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. The plasma lens was created by a nanosecond laser, which ablated a capillary entrance. The spatial configuration of the ablated plasma focused a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. This configuration offers versatility in the plasma lens small f-number for extremely tight focusing of high power lasers with no damage threshold restrictions of regular optical components.

  15. 34 GHz, 45 MW pulsed magnicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nezhevenko, Oleg A.; LaPointe, Michael A.; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.; Hirshfield, Jay L.; Serdobintsev, Gennady V.; Kuznetsov, Gennady I.; Persov, Boris Z.; Fix, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    A high efficiency, high power magnicon at 34.272 GHz has been designed and built as a microwave source to develop RF technology for a future multi-TeV electron-positron linear collider. The tube is designed to provide a peak output power of ∼45 MW in a 1 microsecond pulse, with a gain of 55 dB, using a 500 kV, 220 A, 1 mm-diameter electron beam. The status of the tube itself as well as the near-term experimental program is presented

  16. High power klystrons for efficient reliable high power amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, M.

    1980-11-01

    This report covers the design of reliable high efficiency, high power klystrons which may be used in both existing and proposed troposcatter radio systems. High Power (10 kW) klystron designs were generated in C-band (4.4 GHz to 5.0 GHz), S-band (2.5 GHz to 2.7 GHz), and L-band or UHF frequencies (755 MHz to 985 MHz). The tubes were designed for power supply compatibility and use with a vapor/liquid phase heat exchanger. Four (4) S-band tubes were developed in the course of this program along with two (2) matching focusing solenoids and two (2) heat exchangers. These tubes use five (5) tuners with counters which are attached to the focusing solenoids. A reliability mathematical model of the tube and heat exchanger system was also generated.

  17. Development of high power klystron. 3. Development of klystron No.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, K.; Wang, Y.L.; Sato, I.

    2000-08-01

    A high power klystron has been developed as the RF source of the high power CW electron linac (10 MeV, 100 mA, 1.249135 GHz). CW power of 1.2 MW and efficiencies over 65% at a beam voltage 85 kV were the design goal. We developed a long pill-box type beryllia window (long pill-box window) withstood the RF power of 1.7 MW (CW) and replaced the standard pill-box window of the prototype klystron with long pill-box window. The high power RF test was carried out with the converted klystron. This klystron has achieved CW RF power of 885 kW and efficiency of 47% at beam voltage of 85 kV. This paper describes key points of the designs to achieve the RF power over 1.2 MW and results of the high power RF test of the second klystron, which has been optimized by simulation codes to improve better efficiency. The second klystron has achieved the maximum efficiency of 56.5% with CW output power of 782 kW at a beam voltage of 80 kV and a cathode current of 20.4 A in present. The third klystron will be manufactured to reflect results of this test. (author)

  18. RF Loads for Energy Recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Federmann, S; Caspers, F

    2012-01-01

    Different conceptional designs for RF high power loads are presented. One concept implies the use of solid state rectifier modules for direct RF to DC conversion with efficiencies beyond 80%. In addition, robust metallic low-Q resonant structures, capable of operating at high temperatures (>150 ◦C) are discussed. Another design deals with a very high temperature (up to 800 ◦C) air cooled load using a ceramic foam block inside a metal enclosure. This porous ceramic block is the microwave absorber and is not brazed to the metallic enclosure.

  19. Active Snubber Circuit for High Power Inverter Leg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tonny Wederberg; Johansen, Morten Holst

    2009-01-01

    Abstract— High power converters in the conventional 6 pulse configuration with 6 switching elements IGBTs (Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor) are pushed to the limit of power. Especially the switching loss is high. This reduces the switching frequency due to cooling problems. Passive snubber circ...

  20. Overview on the high power excimer laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingru

    2013-05-01

    High power excimer laser has essential applications in the fields of high energy density physics, inertial fusion energy and industry owing to its advantages such as short wavelength, high gain, wide bandwidth, energy scalable and repetition operating ability. This overview is aimed at an introduction and evaluation of enormous endeavor of the international high power excimer laser community in the last 30 years. The main technologies of high power excimer laser are reviewed, which include the pumping source technology, angular multiplexing and pulse compressing, beam-smoothing and homogenous irradiation, high efficiency and repetitive operation et al. A high power XeCl laser system developed in NINT of China is described in detail.

  1. Microscopic investigation of RF surfaces of 3 GHz niobium accelerator cavities following RF processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, J.; Barnes, P.; Flynn, T.; Kirchgessner, J.; Knobloch, J.; Moffat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Sears, J.

    1993-01-01

    RF processing of Superconducting accelerating cavities is achieved through a change in the electron field emission (FE) characteristics of the RF surface. The authors have examined the RF surfaces of several single-cell 3 GHz cavities, following RF processing, in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The RF processing sessions included both High Peak Power (P ≤ 50 kW) pulsed processing, and low power (≤ 20 W) continuous wave processing. The experimental apparatus also included a thermometer array on the cavity outer wall, allowing temperature maps to characterize the emission before and after RF processing gains. Multiple sites have been located in cavities which showed improvements in cavity behavior due to RF processing. Several SEM-located sites can be correlated with changes in thermometer signals, indicating a direct relationship between the surface site and emission reduction due to RF processing. Information gained from the SEM investigations and thermometry are used to enhance the theoretical model of RF processing

  2. Autonomously managed high power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, D.J.; Bechtel, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The need for autonomous power management capabilities will increase as the power levels of spacecraft increase into the multi-100 kW range. The quantity of labor intensive ground and crew support consumed by the 9 kW Skylab cannot be afforded in support of a 75-300 kW Space Station or high power earth orbital and interplanetary spacecraft. Marshall Space Flight Center is managing a program to develop necessary technologies for high power system autonomous management. To date a reference electrical power system and automation approaches have been defined. A test facility for evaluation and verification of management algorithms and hardware has been designed with the first of the three power channel capability nearing completion

  3. The JLab high power ERL light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neil, G.R.; Behre, C.; Benson, S.V.

    2006-01-01

    discuss some of the discoveries we have made concerning the physics performance, design optimization, and operational limitations of such a first generation high power ERL light source

  4. The JLab high power ERL light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.R. Neil; C. Behre; S.V. Benson; M. Bevins; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; J. Coleman; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H.F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M.J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; W. Moore; N. Nishimori; E. Pozdeyev; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G.P. Williams and S. Zhang

    2005-03-19

    concerning the physics performance, design optimization, and operational limitations of such a first generation high power ERL light source.

  5. 8. High power laser and ignition facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramian, A.J.; Beach, R.J.; Bibeau, C.

    2002-01-01

    This document gives a review of the various high power laser projects and ignition facilities in the world: the Mercury laser system and Electra (Usa), the krypton fluoride (KrF) laser and the HALNA (high average power laser for nuclear-fusion application) project (Japan), the Shenguang series, the Xingguang facility and the TIL (technical integration line) facility (China), the Vulcan peta-watt interaction facility (UK), the Megajoule project and its feasibility phase: the LIL (laser integration line) facility (France), the Asterix IV/PALS high power laser facility (Czech Republic), and the Phelix project (Germany). In Japan the 100 TW Petawatt Module Laser, constructed in 1997, is being upgraded to the world biggest peta-watt laser. Experiments have been performed with single-pulse large aperture e-beam-pumped Garpun (Russia) and with high-current-density El-1 KrF laser installation (Russia) to investigate Al-Be foil transmittance and stability to multiple e-beam irradiations. An article is dedicated to a comparison of debris shield impacts for 2 experiments at NIF (national ignition facility). (A.C.)

  6. RF and microwave microelectronics packaging II

    CERN Document Server

    Sturdivant, Rick

    2017-01-01

    Reviews RF, microwave, and microelectronics assembly process, quality control, and failure analysis Bridges the gap between low cost commercial and hi-res RF/Microwave packaging technologies Engages in an in-depth discussion of challenges in packaging and assembly of advanced high-power amplifiers This book presents the latest developments in packaging for high-frequency electronics. It is a companion volume to “RF and Microwave Microelectronics Packaging” (2010) and covers the latest developments in thermal management, electrical/RF/thermal-mechanical designs and simulations, packaging and processing methods, and other RF and microwave packaging topics. Chapters provide detailed coverage of phased arrays, T/R modules, 3D transitions, high thermal conductivity materials, carbon nanotubes and graphene advanced materials, and chip size packaging for RF MEMS. It appeals to practicing engineers in the electronic packaging and high-frequency electronics domain, and to academic researchers interested in underst...

  7. RF-source development for ITER: Large area H- beam extraction, modifications for long pulse operation and design of a half size ITER source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.; Heinemann, B.; Falter, H.D.; Franzen, P.; Speth, E.; Entscheva, A.; Fantz, U.; Franke, T.; Holtum, D.; Martens, Ch.; McNeely, P.; Riedl, R.; Wilhelm, R.

    2005-01-01

    With an extraction area of 152 cm 2 a calorimetrically measured H - current density of 19.3 mA/cm 2 has been achieved at 0.45 Pa with 90 kW RF power. With 306 cm 2 the electrically measured H - current has reached up to 9.7 A corresponding to 32 mA/cm 2 at 100 kW. The current on the calorimeter is limited by the extraction system. Down to 0.2 Pa only a weak dependence on the source pressure has been observed. The test bed will be upgraded to demonstrate cw operation with deuterium. Based on the tested prototype a half size ITER RF-source of 80 cm x 90 cm with 360 kW RF power has been designed

  8. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, G; Spatschek, K H

    2016-06-03

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible.

  9. Experimental approach to high power long duration neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiike, Hiroshi

    1981-12-01

    Experimental studies of ion sources and beam dumps for the development of a high power long duration neutral beam injector for JT-60 are presented. Long pulse operation of high power beams requires a high degree of reliability. To develop a reliable ion source with large extraction area, a new duoPIGatron ion source with a coaxially shaped intermediate electrode is proposed and tested. Magnetic configuration is examined numerically to obtain high current arc discharge and source plasma with small density variation. Experimental results show that primary electrons were fed widely from the cathode plasma region to the source plasma region and that dense uniform source plasma could be obtained easily. Source plasma characteristics are studied and comparison of these with other sources are also described. To develop extraction electrode of high power ion source, experimental studies were made on the cooling of the electrode. Long Pulse beams were extracted safely under the condition of high heat loading on the electrode. Finally, burnout study for the development of high power beam dumps is presented. Burnout data were obtained from subcooled forced-convective boiling of water in a copper finned tube irradiated by high power ion beams. The results yield simple burnout correlations which can be used for the prediction of burnout heat flux of the beam dump. (author)

  10. High power ubitron-klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balkcum, A.J.; McDermott, D.B.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    A coaxial ubitron is being considered as the rf driver for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Prior simulation of a traveling-wave ubitron using a self-consistent code found that 200 MW of power and 53 dB of gain could be achieved with 37% efficiency. In a ubiron-klystron, a series of cavities are used to obtain an even tighter electron bunch for higher efficiency. A small-signal theory of the ubitron-klystron shows that gain scales with the square of the cavity separation distance. A linear stability theory has also been developed. Verification of the stability theory has been achieved using the 2-12-D PIC code, MAGIC, and the particle-tracing code. Saturation characteristics of the amplifier will be presented using both MAGIC and a simpler self-consistent slow-timescale code currently under development. The ubitron can also operate as a compact, highly efficient oscillator. Cavities only two wiggler periods in length have yielded up to 40% rf conversion efficiency in simulation. An initial oscillator design for directed energy applications will also be presented

  11. A no-load RF calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    The described device can be used to measure the output of any dc powered RF source. No dummy load is required for the measurements. The device is, therefore, called the 'no-load calorimeter' (NLC). The NLC measures the power actually fed to the antenna or another useful load. It is believed that the NLC can compete successfully with directional coupler type systems in measuring the output of high-power RF sources.

  12. High-power comparison among brazed, clamped and electroformed X-band cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spataro, B., E-mail: bruno.spataro@lnf.infn.it [INFN-LNF, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Alesini, D.; Chimenti, V. [INFN-LNF, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Dolgashev, V. [SLAC, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Higashi, Y. [KEK 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan); Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A. [University of Rome Sapienza, Department of Fundamental and Applied Science for Engineering, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00185 Rome (Italy); Parodi, R. [INFN-Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Tantawi, S.G.; Yeremian, A.D. [SLAC, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2011-11-21

    We report the building procedure of X-band copper structures using the electroforming and electroplating techniques. These techniques allow the deposition of copper layers on a suitable die and they can be used to build RF structures avoiding the high temperature brazing step in the standard technique. We show the constructed prototypes and low power RF measurements and discuss the results of the high power tests at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

  13. High-power semiconductor RSD-based switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezuglov, V G; Galakhov, I V; Grusin, I A [All-Russian Scientific Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation); and others

    1997-12-31

    The operating principle and test results of a high-power semiconductor RSD-based switch with the following operating parameters is described: operating voltage 25 kV, peak operating current 200 kA, maximum transferred charge 70 C. The switch is intended for use by high-power capacitor banks of state-of-the-art research facilities. The switch was evaluated for applicability in commercial pulsed systems. The possibility of increasing the peak operating current to 500 kA is demonstrated. (author). 4 figs., 2 refs.

  14. SNS Low-Level RF Control System Design and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hengjie; Crofford, Mark; Doolittle, Lawrence; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; Piller, Maurice; Ratti, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    A full digital Low-Level RF controller has been developed for SNS LINAC. Its design is a good example of a modern digital implementation of the classic control theory. The digital hardware for all the control and DSP functionalities, including the final vector modulation, is implemented on a single high-density FPGA. Two models for the digital hardware have been written in VHDL and Verilog respectively, based on a very low latency control algorithm, and both have been being used for supporting the testing and commissioning the LINAC to the date. During the commissioning, the flexibility and ability for precise controls that only digital design on a larger FPGA can offer has proved to be a necessity for meeting the great challenge of a high-power pulsed SCL.

  15. Material Selection and Characterization for High Gradient RF Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Arnau-Izquierdo, G; Heikkinen, S; Ramsvik, T; Sgobba, Stefano; Taborelli, M; Wuensch, W

    2007-01-01

    The selection of candidate materials for the accelerating cavities of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is carried out in parallel with high power RF testing. The maximum DC breakdown field of copper, copper alloys, refractory metals, aluminium and titanium have been measured with a dedicated setup. Higher maximum fields are obtained for refractory metals and for titanium, which exhibits, however, important damages after conditioning. Fatigue behaviour of copper alloys has been studied for surface and bulk by pulsed laser irradiation and ultrasonic excitation, respectively. The selected copper alloys show consistently higher fatigue resistance than copper in both experiments. In order to obtain the best local properties in the device a possible solution is a bi-metallic assembly. Junctions of molybdenum and copper-zirconium UNS C15000 alloy, achieved by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) diffusion bonding or explosion bonding were evaluated for their mechanical strength. The reliability of the results obtained wit...

  16. Design of an L-band normally conducting RF gun cavity for high peak and average RF power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramonov, V., E-mail: paramono@inr.ru [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, 60-th October Anniversary prospect 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Philipp, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Rybakov, I.; Skassyrskaya, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, 60-th October Anniversary prospect 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Stephan, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2017-05-11

    To provide high quality electron bunches for linear accelerators used in free electron lasers and particle colliders, RF gun cavities operate with extreme electric fields, resulting in a high pulsed RF power. The main L-band superconducting linacs of such facilities also require a long RF pulse length, resulting in a high average dissipated RF power in the gun cavity. The newly developed cavity based on the proven advantages of the existing DESY RF gun cavities, underwent significant changes. The shape of the cells is optimized to reduce the maximal surface electric field and RF loss power. Furthermore, the cavity is equipped with an RF probe to measure the field amplitude and phase. The elaborated cooling circuit design results in a lower temperature rise on the cavity RF surface and permits higher dissipated RF power. The paper presents the main solutions and results of the cavity design.

  17. High power, 140 GHz gyrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreischer, K.E.; Temkin, R.J.; Mulligan, W.J.; MacCabe, S.; Chaplya, R.

    1982-01-01

    The design and construction of a pulsed 100 kW, 140 GHz gyrotron is described. Initial gyrotron operation is expected in early 1982. Advances in gyrotron theory have also been carried out in support of this experimental research. The application of gyrotrons to plasma diagnostics is also under investigation. (author)

  18. CAS Accelerator Physics (High-Power Hadron Machines) in Spain

    CERN Multimedia

    CAS

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and ESS-Bilbao jointly organised a specialised course on High-Power Hadron Machines, held at the Hotel Barceló Nervión in Bilbao, Spain, from 24 May to 2 June, 2011.   CERN Accelerator School students. After recapitulation lectures on the essentials of accelerator physics and review lectures on the different types of accelerators, the programme focussed on the challenges of designing and operating high-power facilities. The particular problems for RF systems, beam instrumentation, vacuum, cryogenics, collimators and beam dumps were examined. Activation of equipment, radioprotection and remote handling issues were also addressed. The school was very successful, with 69 participants of 22 nationalities. Feedback from the participants was extremely positive, praising the expertise and enthusiasm of the lecturers, as well as the high standard and excellent quality of their lectures. In addition to the academic programme, the participants w...

  19. The Linac4 DTL Prototype: Low and High Power Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    De Michele, G; Marques-Balula, J; Ramberger, S

    2012-01-01

    The prototype of the Linac4 Drift Tube Linac (DTL) has undergone low power measurements in order to verify the RF coupling and to adjust the post-coupler lengths based on bead-pull and spectrum measurements. Following the installation at the test stand, the cavity has been subjected to high power operation at Linac4 and SPL duty cycles. Saturation effects and multipacting have been observed and linked to X-ray emission. Voltage holding is reported in the presence of magnetic fields from permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQ) installed in the first drift tubes.

  20. Ka-Band Rf Transmission Line Components for a High-Gradient Linear Accelerator. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2005-01-01

    High-power, high-vacuum prototypes of a variety of components for use at 34 GHz were developed. These include waveguide tapers, right-angle miter bends, windows, mode converters, power combiners, mode launchers, phase shifters, dual directional couplers, and loads. High-power, high-vacuum prototypes of all the components were built and tested up to 45 MW, using the Omega-P 34-GHz magnicon. Peak power limits for the components were determined using a quasi-optical rf pulse compressor, developed under a companion project. The components and the magnicon were configured into a user's facility for research and development by others on high-gradient accelerator structures for a future high-energy electron-positron collider.

  1. High speed micromachining with high power UV laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajesh S.; Bovatsek, James M.

    2013-03-01

    Increasing demand for creating fine features with high accuracy in manufacturing of electronic mobile devices has fueled growth for lasers in manufacturing. High power, high repetition rate ultraviolet (UV) lasers provide an opportunity to implement a cost effective high quality, high throughput micromachining process in a 24/7 manufacturing environment. The energy available per pulse and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of diode pumped solid state (DPSS) nanosecond UV lasers have increased steadily over the years. Efficient use of the available energy from a laser is important to generate accurate fine features at a high speed with high quality. To achieve maximum material removal and minimal thermal damage for any laser micromachining application, use of the optimal process parameters including energy density or fluence (J/cm2), pulse width, and repetition rate is important. In this study we present a new high power, high PRF QuasarR 355-40 laser from Spectra-Physics with TimeShiftTM technology for unique software adjustable pulse width, pulse splitting, and pulse shaping capabilities. The benefits of these features for micromachining include improved throughput and quality. Specific example and results of silicon scribing are described to demonstrate the processing benefits of the Quasar's available power, PRF, and TimeShift technology.

  2. High RF power test of a lower hybrid module mock-up in carbon fiber composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goniche, M.; Bibet, P.; Brossaud, J.; Cano, V.; Froissard, P.; Kazarian, F.; Rey, G.; Maebara, S.; Kiyono, K.; Seki, M.; Suganuma, K.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, T.

    1999-02-01

    A mock-up module of a Lower Hybrid Current Drive antenna module of a Carbon Fiber Composite (CFC) was fabricated for the development of heat resistive front facing the plasma. This module is made from CFC plates and rods which are copper coated to reduce the RF losses. The withstand-voltage, the RF properties and outgassing rates for long pulses and high RF power were tested at the Lower Hybrid test bed facility of Cadarache. After the short pulse conditioning, long pulses with a power density ranging between 50 and 150 MW/m 2 were performed with no breakdowns. During these tests, the module temperature was increasing from 100-200 deg. C to 400-500 deg. C. It was also checked that high power density, up to 150 MW/m 2 , could be transmitted when the waveguides are filled with H 2 at a pressure of 5 x 10 -2 Pa. No significant change in the reflection coefficient is measured after the long pulse operation. During a long pulse, the power reflection increases during the pulse typically from 0.8% to 1.3%. It is concluded that the outgassing rate of Cu-plated CFC is about 6 times larger than of Dispersion Strengthened Copper (DSC) module at the module temperature of 300 deg. C. No significant increase of the global outgassing of the CFC module was measured after hydrogen pre-filling. After the test, visual inspection revealed that peeling of the copper coating occurred at one end of the module only on a very small area (0.2 cm 2 ). It is assessed that a CFC module is an attractive candidate for the hardening of the tip of the LHCD antenna. (authors)

  3. High RF power test of a lower hybrid module mock-up in Carbon Fiber Composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maebara, Sunao; Kiyono, Kimihiro; Seki, Masami

    1997-11-01

    A mock-up module of a Lower Hybrid Current Drive antenna module of a Carbon Fiber Composite (CFC) was fabricated for the development of heat resistive front facing the plasma. This module is made from CFC plates and rods which are copper coated to reduce the RF losses. The withstand-voltage, the RF properties and outgassing rates for long pulses and high RF power were tested at the Lower Hybrid test bed facility of Cadarache. After the short pulse conditioning, long pulses with a power density ranging between 50 and 150 MW/m 2 were performed with no breakdowns. During these tests, the module temperature was increasing from 100-200degC to 400-500degC. It was also checked that high power density, up to 150 MW/m 2 , could be transmitted when the waveguides are filled with H 2 at a pressure of 5 x 10 -2 Pa. No significant change in the reflection coefficient is measured after the long pulse operation. During a long pulse, the power reflection increases during the pulse typically from 0.8 % to 1.3 %. It is concluded that the outgassing rate of Cu-plated CFC is about 6-7 times larger than of Dispersion Strengthened Copper (DSC) module at the module temperature of 300degC. No significant increase of the global outgassing of the CFC module was measured after hydrogen prefilling. After the test, visual inspection revealed that peeling of the copper coating occurred at one end of the module only on a very small area (0.2 cm 2 ). It is assessed that a CFC module is an attractive candidate for the hardening of the tip of the LHCD antenna. (author)

  4. High power laser exciter accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.

    1975-01-01

    Recent developments in untriggered oil and water switching now permit the construction of compact, high energy density pulsed power sources for laser excitation. These accelerators, developed principally for electron beam fusion studies, appear adaptable to laser excitation and will provide electron beams of 10 13 to 10 14 W in the next several years. The accelerators proposed for e-beam fusion essentially concentrate the available power from the outside edge of a disk into the central region where the electron beam is formed. One of the main problem areas, that of power flow at the vacuum diode insulator, is greatly alleviated by the multiplicity of electron beams that are allowable for laser excitation. A proposal is made whereby the disk-shaped pulsed power sections are stacked vertically to form a series of radially flowing electron beams to excite the laser gas volume. (auth)

  5. RF transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  6. High-power circulator test results at 350 and 700 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roybal, W.; Bradley, J.T.; Rees, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    The high-power RF systems for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program require high-power circulators at 350 MHz and 700 MHz to protect 1 MW Continuous Wave (CW) klystrons from reflected power. The 350 MHz circulator is based on the CERN, EXF, and APS designs and has performed very well. The 700 MHz circulator is a new design. Prototype 700 MHz circulators have been high-power tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The first of these circulators has satisfied performance requirements. The circulator requirements, results from the testing, and lessons learned from this development are presented and discussed

  7. Optics assembly for high power laser tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraze, Jason D.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-06-07

    There is provided a high power laser rotational optical assembly for use with, or in high power laser tools for performing high power laser operations. In particular, the optical assembly finds applications in performing high power laser operations on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations. The optical assembly has rotational seals and bearing configurations to avoid contamination of the laser beam path and optics.

  8. Electron-beam direct drive for rf accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahemow, M.D.; Humphries, S. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a Program to Demonstrate Electron-Beam Direct Drive for Radio Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerators at the Westinghouse R and D Center. The experimental program was undertaken using an existing electron beam facility at the Westinghouse R and C Center to demonstrate the potential of the Direct Drive RF Cavities for High Power Beams concept discussed as part of a program to develop a viable alternate concept for driving RF linear accelerators

  9. Very low pressure high power impulse triggered magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Andre; Andersson, Joakim

    2013-10-29

    A method and apparatus are described for very low pressure high powered magnetron sputtering of a coating onto a substrate. By the method of this invention, both substrate and coating target material are placed into an evacuable chamber, and the chamber pumped to vacuum. Thereafter a series of high impulse voltage pulses are applied to the target. Nearly simultaneously with each pulse, in one embodiment, a small cathodic arc source of the same material as the target is pulsed, triggering a plasma plume proximate to the surface of the target to thereby initiate the magnetron sputtering process. In another embodiment the plasma plume is generated using a pulsed laser aimed to strike an ablation target material positioned near the magnetron target surface.

  10. High-power ultrashort fiber laser for solar cells micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecourt, J.-B.; Duterte, C.; Liegeois, F.; Lekime, D.; Hernandez, Y.; Giannone, D.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a high-power ultra-short fiber laser for thin film solar cells micromachining. The laser is based on Chirped Pulse Amplification (CPA) scheme. The pulses are stretched to hundreds of picoseconds prior to amplification and can be compressed down to picosecond at high energy. The repetition rate is adjustable from 100 kHz to 1 MHz and the optical average output power is close to 13 W (before compression). The whole setup is fully fibred, except the compressor achieved with bulk gratings, resulting on a compact and reliable solution for cold ablation.

  11. Technology development of solid state rf systems at 350 MHz and 325 MHz for RF accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rama Rao, B.V.; Mishra, J.K.; Pande, Manjiri; Gupta, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    For decades vacuum tubes and klystrons have been used in high power application such as RF accelerators and broadcast transmitters. However, now, the solid-state technology can give power output in kilowatt regime. Higher RF power output can be achieved by combining several solid-state power amplifier modules using power combiners. This technology presents several advantages over traditional RF amplifiers, such as simpler start-up procedure, high modularity, high redundancy and flexibility, elimination of high voltage supplies and high power circulators, low operational cost, online maintenance without shut down of RF power station and no warm up time. In BARC, solid state amplifier technology development is being done both at 350 MHz and 325 MHz using RF transistors such as 1 kW LDMOS and 350 Watt VDMOS. Topology of input and output matching network in RF modules developed, consist of two L type matching sections with each section having a combination of series micro-strip line and parallel capacitor. The design is of equal Q for both the sections and of 25 ohm characteristics impedance of micro strip lines. Based on this, lengths of micro strips lines and values of shunt capacitors have been calculated. The calculated and simulated values of network elements have been compared. Similarly power combiners have been designed and developed based on Wilkinson techniques without internal resistors and using coaxial technology. This paper presents design and development of RF power amplifier modules, associated power combiner technologies and then integrated RF power amplifier. (author)

  12. The design of a linear L-band high power amplifier for mobile communication satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, N.; Brassard, G.; Li, E.; Goux, P.

    1990-01-01

    A linear L-band solid state high power amplifier designed for the space segment of the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) mobile communication system is described. The amplifier is capable of producing 35 watts of RF power with multitone signal at an efficiency of 25 percent and with intermodulation products better than 16 dB below carrier.

  13. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao

    2017-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser–rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser–rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam–rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  14. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao, E-mail: dxiang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2017-03-21

    We report on the measurement of the laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser–rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser–rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam–rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  15. Design and Calibration of an RF Actuator for Low-Level RF Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zheqiao; Hong, Bo

    2016-02-01

    X-ray free electron laser (FEL) machines like the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC require high-quality electron beams to generate X-ray lasers for various experiments. Digital low-level RF (LLRF) systems are widely used to control the high-power RF klystrons to provide a highly stable RF field in accelerator structures for beam acceleration. Feedback and feedforward controllers are implemented in LLRF systems to stabilize or adjust the phase and amplitude of the RF field. To achieve the RF stability and the accuracy of the phase and amplitude adjustment, low-noise and highly linear RF actuators are required. Aiming for the upgrade of the S-band Linac at SLAC, an RF actuator is designed with an I/Qmodulator driven by two digital-to-analog converters (DAC) for the digital LLRF systems. A direct upconversion scheme is selected for RF actuation, and an on-line calibration algorithm is developed to compensate the RF reference leakage and the imbalance errors in the I/Q modulator, which may cause significant phase and amplitude actuation errors. This paper presents the requirements on the RF actuator, the design of the hardware, the calibration algorithm, and the implementation in firmware and software and the test results at LCLS.

  16. Design, development and operational experience of radio frequency (RF) power systems/technologies for LEHIPA and 400 keV RFQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Patel, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    The important technology development for ion accelerators of 'accelerator driven sub critical reactor system (ADS) is being done under the program of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). In BARC (BARC) of DAE, technology development of 400 keV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator is done and a 20 MeV - low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA) is under development. A 400 KeV deuteron RFQ accelerator is already developed at BARC and its 60 kW radio frequency (RF) power system required for beam acceleration has been designed, developed and tested both in CW mode and in pulse mode for full power of 60 leW. It has been successfully integrated with RFQ via 6-1/8'', 50 ohm RF transmission line, to accelerate proton beam up to 200 KeV energy and deuteron beam to 400 KeV energy. LEHIPA requires about 3 MW of RF power for its operation. So, three 1 MW, 352 MHz RF systems based on klystron will be developed for RFQ and two DTLs. The klystron based RF system for 3 MeV RFQ is under commissioning. Its various subsystems like energy less and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) based high voltage and low voltage bias supplies, a critical and fast protection and control system - handling various types of field signals, fast acting hard wired instrumentation circuits for critical signals, 100 kV crowbar with its circuits, pulsing circuits and RF circuits have been successfully designed, developed and integrated with klystron. Latest technology development of solid state RF amplifiers at 325 MHz and 350 MHz for normal and super conducting accelerators has attained a certain power level. This paper will discuss all these high power RF systems in detail. (author)

  17. Short range RF communication for jet engine control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Daniel White (Inventor); Hershey, John Erik (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method transmitting a message over at least one of a plurality of radio frequency (RF) channels of an RF communications network is provided. The method comprises the steps of detecting a presence of jamming pulses in the at least one of the plurality of RF channels. The characteristics of the jamming pulses in the at least one of the plurality of RF channels is determined wherein the determined characteristics define at least interstices between the jamming pulses. The message is transmitted over the at least one of the plurality of RF channels wherein the message is transmitted within the interstices of the jamming pulse determined from the step of determining characteristics of the jamming pulses.

  18. RF-Trapped Chip Scale Helium Ion Pump (RFT-CHIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-06

    utilizes two operation states: an ion extraction state and an RF electron trapping state. A high power RF switch S1 (RF- LAMBDA RFSP2TRDC06G, DC-6 GHz...integrated in time. The electric potential is obtained by solution of Poisson’s equation using an incomplete LU BiConjugate Gradient sparse matrix

  19. The JAERI superconducting RF linac-based FELS and THEIR cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke J.

    2003-01-01

    In the 21st century, we need a powerful and efficient free-electron laser (FEL) for academic and industrial uses in almost all fields. In order to realize such a tunable, highly-efficient, high average power, high peak power and ultra-short pulse FEL, the JAERI FEL group and I have developed an industrial FEL driven by a compact, stand-alone and zero-boil off super-conducting rf linac with an energy-recovery geometry. Our discussions on the JAERI FEL and cryogenics will cover market-requirements for the industrial FELs, some answers from the JAERI compact, stand-alone and zero-boil off cryostat concept and operational experiences over these 9 years, our discovery of the new, highly-efficient, high-power, and ultra-short pulse lasing mode, and the energy-recovery geometry. (author)

  20. Reducing Energy Degradation Due to Back-bombardment Effect with Modulated RF Input in S-band Thermionic RF Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kii, Toshiteru; Nakai, Yoko; Fukui, Toshio; Zen, Heishun; Kusukame, Kohichi; Okawachi, Norihito; Nakano, Masatsugu; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Yamazaki, Tetsuo

    2007-01-01

    Energy degradation due to back-bombardment effect is quite serious to produce high-brightness electron beam with long macro-pulse with thermionic rf gun. To avoid the back-bombardment problem, a laser photo cathode is used at many FEL facilities, but usually it costs high and not easy to operate. Thus we have studied long pulse operation of the rf gun with thermionic cathode, which is inexpensive and easy to operate compared to the photocathode rf gun. In this work, to reduce the energy degradation, we controlled input rf power amplitude by controlling pulse forming network of the power modulator for klystron. We have successfully increased the pulse duration up to 4 μs by increasing the rf power from 7.8 MW to 8.5 MW during the macro pulse.

  1. LEDA RF distribution system design and component test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roybal, W.T.; Rees, D.E.; Borchert, H.L.; McCarthy, M.; Toole, L.

    1998-01-01

    The 350 MHz and 700 MHz RF distribution systems for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) have been designed and are currently being installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Since 350 MHz is a familiar frequency used at other accelerator facilities, most of the major high-power components were available. The 700 MHz, 1.0 MW, CW RF delivery system designed for LEDA is a new development. Therefore, high-power circulators, waterloads, phase shifters, switches, and harmonic filters had to be designed and built for this applications. The final Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) RF distribution systems design will be based on much of the same technology as the LEDA systems and will have many of the RF components tested for LEDA incorporated into the design. Low power and high-power tests performed on various components of these LEDA systems and their results are presented here

  2. High-quality laser-produced proton beam realized by the application of a synchronous RF electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Shu; Ikegami, Masahiro; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Tongu, Hiromu; Souda, Hikaru; Noda, Akira; Daido, Hiroyuki; Mori, Michiaki; Kado, Masataka; Sagisaka, Akito; Ogura, Koichi; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Orimo, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yukio; Yogo, Akifumi; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur; Nagashima, Akira; Kimura, Toyoaki; Tajima, Toshiki; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Fukumi, Atsushi; Li, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    A short-pulse (∼210fs) high-power (∼1 TW) laser was focused on a tape target 3 and 5 μm in thickness to a size of 11 x 15 μm 2 with an intensity of 3 x 10 17 W/cm 2 . Protons produced by this laser with an energy spread of 100% were found to be improved to create peaks in the energy distribution with a spread of ∼7% by the application of the RF electric field with an amplitude of ±40kV synchronous to the pulsed laser. This scheme combines the conventional RF acceleration technique with laser-produced protons for the first time. It is possible to be operated up to 10 Hz, and is found to have good reproducibility for every laser shot with the capability of adjusting the peak positions by control of the relative phase between the pulsed laser and the RF electric field. (author)

  3. Review of Literature on High Power Microwave Pulse Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    circulating fluid (Pedersen et al., 2004a,b). Earlier, in ultrasound hyperthermia, bone pain perceived by patients resulted in treatment termination in...15, 220-229. Ørstavik, K., Norheim, I., & Jørum, E. (2006). Pain and small-fiber neuropathy in patients with hypothyroidism . Neurology, 67, 786-791

  4. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  5. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized

  6. Evaluation of a high power submillimeter pulsed laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vander Sluis, K.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Staats, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes the selection, development, and testing of the system components and presents the power and frequency profiles achieved in tests made on the assembled system. These results, and knowledge gained through design and development work, have suggested improvements in design characteristics to be applied to future research on this diagnostic method

  7. High Power Electron Accelerator Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Tkachenko, Vadim; Cheskidov, Vladimir; Korobeynikov, G I; Kuznetsov, Gennady I; Lukin, A N; Makarov, Ivan; Ostreiko, Gennady; Panfilov, Alexander; Sidorov, Alexey; Tarnetsky, Vladimir V; Tiunov, Michael A

    2005-01-01

    In recent time the new powerful industrial electron accelerators appear on market. It caused the increased interest to radiation technologies using high energy X-rays due to their high penetration ability. However, because of low efficiency of X-ray conversion for electrons with energy below 5 MeV, the intensity of X-rays required for some industrial applications can be achieved only when the beam power exceeds 300 kW. The report describes a project of industrial electron accelerator ILU-12 for electron energy up to 5 MeV and beam power up to 300 kW specially designed for use in industrial applications. On the first stage of work we plan to use the existing generator designed for ILU-8 accelerator. It is realized on the GI-50A triode and provides the pulse power up to 1.5-2 MW and up to 20-30 kW of average power. In the report the basic concepts and a condition of the project for today are reflected.

  8. High power microwave emission and diagnostics of microsecond electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilgenbach, R; Hochman, J M; Jayness, R; Rintamaki, J I; Lau, Y Y; Luginsland, J; Lash, J S [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Intense Electron Beam Interaction Lab.; Spencer, T A [Air Force Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Experiments were performed to generate high power, long-pulse microwaves by the gyrotron mechanism in rectangular cross-section interaction cavities. Long-pulse electron beams are generated by MELBA (Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator), which operates with parameters: -0.8 MV, 1-10 kA, and 0.5-1 microsecond pulse length. Microwave power levels are in the megawatt range. Polarization control is being studied by adjustment of the solenoidal magnetic field. Initial results show polarization power ratios up to a factor of 15. Electron beam dynamics (V{sub perp}/V{sub par}) are being measured by radiation darkening on glass plates. Computer modeling utilizes the MAGIC Code for electromagnetic waves and a single electron orbit code that includes a distribution of angles. (author). 4 figs., 4 refs.

  9. Experimental investigations on the influence of the photocathode laser pulse parameters on the electron bunch quality in an RF-photoelectron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenel, Marc

    2010-06-01

    Free Electron Lasers based on the SASE principle like the European XFEL require electron bunches having peak currents of several kiloamperes as well as very low transverse emittance. While high peak currents can be generated using longitudinal bunch compression techniques, the transverse emittance must have values as low as 1mmmrad already at the source. The development of electron sources fulfilling these demanding specifications is the goal of the Photo Injector Test Facility (PITZ) in DESY, Zeuthen site. The key component of a photoinjector is the electron gun cavity where the electrons bunches are generated and immediately accelerated. The extraction of the electrons is based on the photoelectric effect of the cathode which requires a laser system having special capabilities. In the first part of the thesis, measurements are presented which were performed to investigate whether the laser and the laser transport system fulfill these requirements. The second part of the thesis is dedicated to simulations as well as experimental studies on the impact of the temporal and spatial parameters of the laser pulses on the electron bunch quality. This influence is possible because the response time of the Cs 2 Te photocathode is short compared to the laser pulse duration. Based on these investigations, suggestions for improvements are given and tolerances for the laser pulse properties are defined. (orig.)

  10. Experimental investigations on the influence of the photocathode laser pulse parameters on the electron bunch quality in an RF-photoelectron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenel, Marc

    2010-07-15

    Free Electron Lasers based on the SASE principle like the European XFEL require electron bunches having peak currents of several kiloamperes as well as very low transverse emittance. While high peak currents can be generated using longitudinal bunch compression techniques, the transverse emittance must have values as low as 1mmmrad already at the source. The development of electron sources fulfilling these demanding specifications is the goal of the Photo Injector Test Facility (PITZ) in DESY, Zeuthen site. The key component of a photoinjector is the electron gun cavity where the electrons bunches are generated and immediately accelerated. The extraction of the electrons is based on the photoelectric effect of the cathode which requires a laser system having special capabilities. In the first part of the thesis, measurements are presented which were performed to investigate whether the laser and the laser transport system fulfill these requirements. The second part of the thesis is dedicated to simulations as well as experimental studies on the impact of the temporal and spatial parameters of the laser pulses on the electron bunch quality. This influence is possible because the response time of the Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode is short compared to the laser pulse duration. Based on these investigations, suggestions for improvements are given and tolerances for the laser pulse properties are defined. (orig.)

  11. Parametric study of emerging high power accelerator applications using Accelerator Systems Model (ASM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berwald, D.H.; Mendelsohn, S.S.; Myers, T.J.; Paulson, C.C.; Peacock, M.A.; Piaszczyk, CM.; Rathke, J.W.; Piechowiak, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Emerging applications for high power rf linacs include fusion materials testing, generation of intense spallation neutrons for neutron physics and materials studies, production of nuclear materials and destruction of nuclear waste. Each requires the selection of an optimal configuration and operating parameters for its accelerator, rf power system and other supporting subsystems. Because of the high cost associated with these facilities, economic considerations become paramount, dictating a full evaluation of the electrical and rf performance, system reliability/availability, and capital, operating, and life cycle costs. The Accelerator Systems Model (ASM), expanded and modified by Northrop Grumman during 1993-96, provides a unique capability for detailed layout and evaluation of a wide variety of normal and superconducting accelerator and rf power configurations. This paper will discuss the current capabilities of ASM, including the available models and data base, and types of trade studies that can be performed for the above applications. (author)

  12. Online tuning of impedance matching circuit for long pulse inductively coupled plasma source operation—An alternate approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.; Kraus, W.; Gahlaut, A.; Bansal, G.

    2014-01-01

    Impedance matching circuit between radio frequency (RF) generator and the plasma load, placed between them, determines the RF power transfer from RF generator to the plasma load. The impedance of plasma load depends on the plasma parameters through skin depth and plasma conductivity or resistivity. Therefore, for long pulse operation of inductively coupled plasmas, particularly for high power (∼100 kW or more) where plasma load condition may vary due to different reasons (e.g., pressure, power, and thermal), online tuning of impedance matching circuit is necessary through feedback. In fusion grade ion source operation, such online methodology through feedback is not present but offline remote tuning by adjusting the matching circuit capacitors and tuning the driving frequency of the RF generator between the ion source operation pulses is envisaged. The present model is an approach for remote impedance tuning methodology for long pulse operation and corresponding online impedance matching algorithm based on RF coil antenna current measurement or coil antenna calorimetric measurement may be useful in this regard

  13. Electronic DC transformer with high power density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlovský, M.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the possibilities of increasing the power density of high-power dc-dc converters with galvanic isolation. Three cornerstones for reaching high power densities are identified as: size reduction of passive components, reduction of losses particularly in active components

  14. RF power generation for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowkes, W.R.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Miller, R.H.; Pearson, C.; Spalek, G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    The next linear collider will require 200 MW of rf power per meter of linac structure at relatively high frequency to produce an accelerating gradient of about 100 MV/m. The higher frequencies result in a higher breakdown threshold in the accelerating structure hence permit higher accelerating gradients per meter of linac. The lower frequencies have the advantage that high peak power rf sources can be realized. 11.42 GHz appears to be a good compromise and the effort at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is being concentrated on rf sources operating at this frequency. The filling time of the accelerating structure for each rf feed is expected to be about 80 ns. Under serious consideration at SLAC is a conventional klystron followed by a multistage rf pulse compression system, and the Crossed-Field Amplifier. These are discussed in this paper

  15. RF heating systems evolution for the WEST project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magne, R.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Argouarch, A.; Berger-By, G.; Bernard, J. M.; Bouquey, F.; Charabot, N.; Colas, L.; Corbel, E.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Guilhem, D.; Hillairet, J.; Jacquot, J.; Joffrin, E.; Litaudon, X.; Lombard, G.; Mollard, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

    2014-02-12

    Tore Supra is dedicated to long pulse operation at high power, with a record in injected energy of 1 GJ (2.8 MW × 380 s) and an achieved capability of 12 MW injected power delivered by 3 RF systems: Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD), Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH). The new WEST project (W [tungsten] Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) aims at fitting Tore Supra with an actively cooled tungsten coated wall and a bulk tungsten divertor. This new device will offer to ITER a test bed for validating the relevant technologies for actively cooled metallic components, with D-shaped H-mode plasmas. For WEST operation, different scenarii able to reproduce ITER relevant conditions in terms of steady state heat loads have been identified, ranging from a high RF power scenario (15 MW, 30 s) to a high fluence scenario (10 MW, 1000 s). This paper will focus on the evolution of the RF systems required for WEST. For the ICRH system, the main issues are its ELM resilience and its CW compatibility, three new actively cooled antennas are being designed, with the aim of reducing their sensitivity to the load variations induced by ELMs. The LH system has been recently upgraded with new klystrons and the PAM antenna, the possible reshaping of the antenna mouths is presently studied for matching with the magnetic field line in the WEST configuration. For the ECRH system, the device for the poloidal movement of the mirrors of the antenna is being changed for higher accuracy and speed.

  16. High power industrial picosecond laser from IR to UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saby, Julien; Sangla, Damien; Pierrot, Simonette; Deslandes, Pierre; Salin, François

    2013-02-01

    Many industrial applications such as glass cutting, ceramic micro-machining or photovoltaic processes require high average and high peak power Picosecond pulses. The main limitation for the expansion of the picosecond market is the cost of high power picosecond laser sources, which is due to the complexity of the architecture used for picosecond pulse amplification, and the difficulty to keep an excellent beam quality at high average power. Amplification with fibers is a good technology to achieve high power in picosecond regime but, because of its tight confinement over long distances, light undergoes dramatic non linearities while propagating in fibers. One way to avoid strong non linearities is to increase fiber's mode area. Nineteen missing holes fibers offering core diameter larger than 80μm have been used over the past few years [1-3] but it has been shown that mode instabilities occur at approximately 100W average output power in these fibers [4]. Recently a new fiber design has been introduced, in which HOMs are delocalized from the core to the clad, preventing from HOMs amplification [5]. In these so-called Large Pitch Fibers, threshold for mode instabilities is increased to 294W offering robust single-mode operation below this power level [6]. We have demonstrated a high power-high efficiency industrial picosecond source using single-mode Large Pitch rod-type fibers doped with Ytterbium. Large Pitch Rod type fibers can offer a unique combination of single-mode output with a very large mode area from 40 μm up to 100μm and very high gain. This enables to directly amplify a low power-low energy Mode Locked Fiber laser with a simple amplification architecture, achieving very high power together with singlemode output independent of power level or repetition rate.

  17. Klystron High Power Operation for KOMAC 100-MeV Proton Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Seong-Gu; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Kim, Han-Sung; Cho, Yong-Sub [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The Korea multi-purpose accelerator complex (KOMAC) accelerator facility has a 100-MeV proton linac, five beam lines for 20-MeV beam utilization, and another five beam lines for 100-MeV beam utilization. The 100-MeV linac consists of a 50-keV proton injector based on a microwave ion source, a 3-MeV RFQ with a four-vane structure, and a 100-MeV DTL. Nine sets of 1MW klystrons have been operated for the 100-MeV proton linac. The klystron filament heating time was approximately 5700 hours in 2014, and RF operation time was 2863.4 hours. During the high power operation of the klystron, unstable RF waveforms appeared at the klystron output, and we have checked and performed cavity frequency adjustments, magnet and heater current, reflection from a circulator, klystron test without a circulator, and the frequency spectrum measurement. Nine sets of the klystrons have been operated for the KOMAC 100-MeV proton linac. The klystron filament heating time was 5700 hours and RF operation time was 2863.4 hours during the operation in 2014. Some klystrons have unstable RF waveforms at specific power level. We have checked and tested the cavity frequency adjustment, reflection from a circulator, high power test without a circulator, and frequency spectrum at the unstable RF.

  18. Pulse to pulse klystron diagnosis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, J.; Davidson, V.; Genova, L.; Johnson, R.; Reagan, D.

    1981-03-01

    This report describes a system used to study the behavior of SLAC high powered klystrons operating with a twice normal pulse width of 5 μs. At present, up to eight of the klystrons installed along the accelerator can be operated with long pulses and monitored by this system. The report will also discuss some of the recent findings and investigations

  19. RF control system of the HIMAC synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, M.; Sato, K.; Itano, A.

    1992-01-01

    An RF control system of the HIMAC synchrotron has been constructed. In this control system we have adopted a digital feed back system with a digital synthesizer (DS). Combining a high power system, performance of the control system have been tested in a factory (Toshiba) with a simulator circuit of the synchrotron oscillation. Following this test, We had beam acceleration test with this control system at TARN-II in INS (Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo). This paper describes the RF control system and its tested results. (author)

  20. Fundamentals of RF and microwave transistor amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Bahl, Inder J

    2009-01-01

    A Comprehensive and Up-to-Date Treatment of RF and Microwave Transistor Amplifiers This book provides state-of-the-art coverage of RF and microwave transistor amplifiers, including low-noise, narrowband, broadband, linear, high-power, high-efficiency, and high-voltage. Topics covered include modeling, analysis, design, packaging, and thermal and fabrication considerations. Through a unique integration of theory and practice, readers will learn to solve amplifier-related design problems ranging from matching networks to biasing and stability. More than 240 problems are included to help read

  1. Emittance investigation of RF photo-injector

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Mao Rong; Li Zheng; Li Ming; Xu Zhou

    2002-01-01

    A high-power laser beam illuminates a photocathode surface placed on an end wall of an RF cavity. The emitted electrons are accelerated immediately to a relativistic energy by the strong RF find in the cavity. But space charge effect induces beam emittance growth especially near the cathode where the electrons are still nonrelativistic. The author analyzes the factors which lead the transverse emittance growth and method how to resolve this problem. After introducing solenoidal focusing near the photocathode, the beam emittance growth is suppressed dramatically. The beam emittance is given also after compensation and simulation results. The measurements show these results are coincident

  2. Design and High Power Measurements of a 3 GHz Rotary Joint for Medical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Degiovanni, Alberto; Garlasche, Marco; Giner-Navarro, Jorge; Magagnin, Paolo; Mcmonagle, Gerard; Syratchev, Igor; Wuensch, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The TUrning LInac for Protontherapy (TULIP) project requires the transport of RF power from modulator/klystron systems at rest on the floor to the linac structures mounted on a rotating gantry, via a waveguide system that can operate over a range of angles of rotation. A waveguide rotary joint capable of transporting RF power at 3 GHz and up to 20 MW has been designed and built in collaboration between TERA Foundation, CERN Beams and CERN Engineering Departments. A high-power test of the prototype has been performed at the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3), at CERN. The design and the results of the tests are reported in this article.

  3. Major projects for the use of high power linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prome, M.

    1996-01-01

    A review of the major projects for high power linacs is given. The field covers the projects aiming at the transmutation of nuclear waste or the production of tritium, as well as the production of neutrons for hybrid reactors or basic research with neutron sources. The technologies which arc common to all the projects are discussed. Comments are made on the technical difficulties encountered by all the projects, and the special problems of the pulsed linacs are mentioned. Elements for a comparison of normal conducting linacs versus superconducting ones are given. Finally the technical developments being made in various laboratories are reviewed. (author)

  4. ELBE Center for High-Power Radiation Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Dr. Michel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ELBE Center for High-Power Radiation Sources, the superconducting linear electron accelerator ELBE, serving  two free electron lasers, sources for intense coherent THz radiation, mono-energetic positrons, electrons, γ-rays, a neutron time-of-flight system as well as two synchronized ultra-short pulsed Petawatt laser systems are collocated. The characteristics of these beams make the ELBE center a unique research instrument for a variety of external users in fields ranging from material science over nuclear physics to cancer research, as well as scientists of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR.

  5. Very high power THz radiation at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, G.L.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Jordan, K.; Neil, George R.; Williams, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    We report the production of high power (20 watts average, ∼;1 Megawatt peak) broadband THz light based on coherent emission from relativistic electrons. We describe the source, presenting theoretical calculations and their experimental verification. For clarity we compare this source with one based on ultrafast laser techniques, and in fact the radiation has qualities closely analogous to that produced by such sources, namely that it is spatially coherent, and comprises short duration pulses with transform-limited spectral content. In contrast to conventional THz radiation, however, the intensity is many orders of magnitude greater due to the relativistic enhancement

  6. Low frequency RF heating of plasmas in a toroidal stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovato, S.N.

    1977-01-01

    Studies of transit-time magnetic pumping and Alfven wave heating have been done in the Proto-Cleo stellarator. Both plasma heating and plasma confinement have been investigated. A traveling wave was launched around the Proto-Cleo l = 2, 6 field period stellarator to attempt transit-time magnetic pumping of a pulsed electron beam moving along the magnetic field lines. An apparent loss of the beam was seen when the transit-time magnetic pumping was applied. A random walk diffusion of the beam electrons with a step size determined by the radial EXB drift due to the poloidal electric field agrees well with the experimental results. Alfven wave heating was applied to plasmas in the Proto-Cleo l = 3, 7 field period stellarator. Global excitation of Alfven waves was accomplished by exciting an electrostatically shielded helical winding corresponding to a q = 3 rational field line with a pulsed, high-power RF source. Theoretical analysis of this helical wave launcher predicted effective energy absorption in the Proto-Cleo gun-produced plasma

  7. Design and construction of tetrode tube modulator for high power electron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Poursaleh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high power tetrode tube (TH781-200kW, cw modulator is designed and implemented. This modulator is used for a part of RF system of the first Iranian high power electron accelerator project with similar structure to Rhodotron accelerator. Regarding to the level of sensitive and importance of TH781 tube the modulator system designed with high accuracy. So beside of power supplies design the control circuits for protection of the tube have been considered. The results of test and operation of this system that have been constructed in Iran for fist time is very satisfactory

  8. High power infrared QCLs: advances and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2012-01-01

    QCLs are becoming the most important sources of laser radiation in the midwave infrared (MWIR) and longwave infrared (LWIR) regions because of their size, weight, power and reliability advantages over other laser sources in the same spectral regions. The availability of multiwatt RT operation QCLs from 3.5 μm to >16 μm with wall plug efficiency of 10% or higher is hastening the replacement of traditional sources such as OPOs and OPSELs in many applications. QCLs can replace CO2 lasers in many low power applications. Of the two leading groups in improvements in QCL performance, Pranalytica is the commercial organization that has been supplying the highest performance QCLs to various customers for over four year. Using a new QCL design concept, the non-resonant extraction [1], we have achieved CW/RT power of >4.7 W and WPE of >17% in the 4.4 μm - 5.0 μm region. In the LWIR region, we have recently demonstrated QCLs with CW/RT power exceeding 1 W with WPE of nearly 10 % in the 7.0 μm-10.0 μm region. In general, the high power CW/RT operation requires use of TECs to maintain QCLs at appropriate operating temperatures. However, TECs consume additional electrical power, which is not desirable for handheld, battery-operated applications, where system power conversion efficiency is more important than just the QCL chip level power conversion efficiency. In high duty cycle pulsed (quasi-CW) mode, the QCLs can be operated without TECs and have produced nearly the same average power as that available in CW mode with TECs. Multiwatt average powers are obtained even in ambient T>70°C, with true efficiency of electrical power-to-optical power conversion being above 10%. Because of the availability of QCLs with multiwatt power outputs and wavelength range covering a spectral region from ~3.5 μm to >16 μm, the QCLs have found instantaneous acceptance for insertion into multitude of defense and homeland security applications, including laser sources for infrared

  9. The RF system of FELI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morii, Y.; Miyauchi, Y.; Koga, A.; Abe, H.; Keishi, T.; Bessho, I.; Tomimasu, T.

    1994-01-01

    FELI (Free Electron Laser Research Institute, Inc.) is constructing a Free Electron Laser facility covering from 20 μm (infra red region) to 0.35 μm (ultra violet region), using an S-band linac. The building will be completed in November 1993 and installation of the linac will start in December 1993. The linac consists of a thermoionic 0.5ns-pulse triggered gun, a 714 MHz SHB (subharmonic buncher), a 2856 MHz standing wave type buncher, and 7 ETL (Electrotechnical Laboratory) type accelerating sections. An RF system of the linac for FELs is required of long pulse duration and high stability. S-band klystrons (TOSHIBA E3729) are operated in three pulse operation modes (pulse width and peak RF power); 24 μs - 24 MW, 12.5 μs - 34 MW, 0.5 μs - 70 MW. Each klystron modulator has the PFN consisting of 4 parallel networks of 24 capacitors and 24 inductors, and it has a line switch of an optical thyristor stack. These equipments are manufactured now, and an S-band klystron and modulator will be combined to test their performance at the works of NISSIN ELECTRIC Co. in October 1993. (author)

  10. Epitaxial growth of InN on c-plane sapphire by pulsed laser deposition with r.f. nitrogen radical source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, J.; Fujioka, H.; Honke, T.; Oshima, M.

    2004-01-01

    We have grown InN films on c-plane sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with a radio frequency nitrogen radical source for the first time and investigated the effect of the substrate surface nitridation on the structural and electrical properties of InN films with reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), atomic force microscope, the Hall effect measurements and high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). RHEED and HRXRD characterizations revealed that high-quality InN grows epitaxially on sapphire by PLD and its epitaxial relationship is InN (0 0 0 1) parallel sapphire (0 0 0 1) and InN [2 -1 -1 0] parallel sapphire [1 0 -1 0]. The InN crystalline quality and the electron mobility are improved by the substrate nitridation process. The area of the pits at the InN surface is reduced by the substrate nitridation process probably due to the reduction in the interface energy between InN and the substrate. The full width at half maximum of the -1 -1 2 4 X-ray rocking curve for InN grown by the present technique without using any buffer layers was as small as 34.8 arcmin. These results indicate that the present technique is promising for the growth of the high-quality InN films

  11. High Power Fiber Laser Test Bed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility, unique within DoD, power-combines numerous cutting-edge fiber-coupled laser diode modules (FCLDM) to integrate pumping of high power rare earth-doped...

  12. Electric Fields near RF Heating and Current Drive Antennas in Tore Supra Measured with Dynamic Stark Effect Spectroscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, C. C.; Martin, E. H.; Isler, R. C.; Colas, L.; Hillairet, J.; Marandet, Y.; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Martin, V.; Hillis, D. L.; Harris, J. H.; Saoutic, B.

    2011-10-01

    Computational models of the interaction between RF waves and the scrape-off layer plasma near ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) and lower hybrid current drive launch antennas are continuously improving. These models mainly predict the RF electric fields produced in the SOL and, therefore, the best measurement for verification of these models would be a direct measurement of these electric fields. Both types of launch antennas are used on Tore Supra and are designed for high power (up to 4MW/antenna) and long pulse (> > 25s) operation. Direct, non-intrusive measurement of the RF electric fields in the vicinity of these structures is achieved by fitting spectral profiles of deuterium Balmer-alpha and Balmer-beta to a model that includes the dynamic, external-field Stark effect, as well as Zeeman splitting and Doppler broadening mechanisms. The measurements are compared to the mentioned, near-field region, RF antenna models. *Work supported in part by the US DOE under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC.

  13. High power electron beam accelerators for gas laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.G.; Martin, T.H.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1976-06-01

    A preliminary parameter investigation has been used to determine a possible design of a high-power, relativistic electron beam, transversely excited laser. Based on considerations of present and developing pulsed power technology, broad area diode physics and projected laser requirements, an exciter is proposed consisting of a Marx generator, pulse shaping transmission lines, radially converging ring diodes and a laser chamber. The accelerator should be able to deliver approximately 20 kJ of electron energy at 1 MeV to the 10 4 cm 2 cylindrical surface of a laser chamber 1 m long and 0.3 m in diameter in 24 ns with very small azimuthal asymmetry and uniform radial deposition

  14. Oak Ridge rf Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; McCurdy, H.C.; McManamy, T.J.; Moeller, J.A.; Ryan, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The rf Test Facility (RFTF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a national facility for the testing and evaluation of steady-state, high-power (approx.1.0-MW) ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems and components. The facility consists of a vacuum vessel and two fully tested superconducting development magnets from the ELMO Bumpy Torus Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) program. These are arranged as a simple mirror with a mirror ratio of 4.8. The axial centerline distance between magnet throat centers is 112 cm. The vacuum vessel cavity has a large port (74 by 163 cm) and a test volume adequate for testing prototypic launchers for Doublet III-D (DIII-D), Tore Supra, and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Attached to the internal vessel walls are water-cooled panels for removing the injected rf power. The magnets are capable of generating a steady-state field of approx.3 T on axis in the magnet throats. Steady-state plasmas are generated in the facility by cyclotron resonance breakdown using a dedicated 200-kW, 28-GHz gyrotron. Available rf sources cover a frequency range of 2 to 200 MHz at 1.5 kW and 3 to 18 MHz at 200 kW, with several sources at intermediate parameters. Available in July 1986 will be a >1.0-MW, cw source spanning 40 to 80 MHz. 5 figs

  15. Characteristics of high gradient insulators for accelerator and high power flow applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizondo, J.M.; Krogh, M.L.; Smith, D.

    1997-07-01

    The high gradient insulator has been demonstrated to operate at levels comparable or better than special geometry or coated insulators. Some patented insulator configurations allow for sophisticated accelerator structures, high power flow interfaces, and microwave applications not previously possible. Sophisticated manufacturing techniques available at AlliedSignal FM and T made this development possible. Bipolar and high power flow applications are specially suited for present insulator designs. The insulator shows a beneficial effect when used under RF fields or RF structures. These insulators can be designed, to a first approximation, from simple electron flight path equations. With a recently developed model of surface flashover physics the authors completed a set of design calculations that include effects such as layer density and dielectric/metal thickness. Experimental data, obtained in the last few years of development, is presented and reviewed. Several insulator fabrication characteristics, indicating critical design parameters, are also presented

  16. ENERGY CORRECTION FOR HIGH POWER PROTON/H MINUS LINAC INJECTORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAPARIA, D.; LEE, Y.Y.; WEI, J.

    2005-05-16

    High-energy proton/H minus energy (> GeV) linac injector suffer from energy jitter due to RF amplitude and phase stability. Especially in high power injectors this energy jitter result beam losses more than 1 W/m that require for hand on maintenance. Depending upon the requirements for next accelerator in the chain, this energy jitter may or may not require to be corrected. This paper will discuss the sources of this energy jitter, correction schemes with specific examples.

  17. Multimoded rf delay line distribution system for the Next Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Tantawi

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The delay line distribution system is an alternative to conventional pulse compression, which enhances the peak power of rf sources while matching the long pulse of those sources to the shorter filling time of accelerator structures. We present an implementation of this scheme that combines pairs of parallel delay lines of the system into single lines. The power of several sources is combined into a single waveguide delay line using a multimode launcher. The output mode of the launcher is determined by the phase coding of the input signals. The combined power is extracted from the delay line using mode-selective extractors, each of which extracts a single mode. Hence, the phase coding of the sources controls the output port of the combined power. The power is then fed to the local accelerator structures. We present a detailed design of such a system, including several implementation methods for the launchers, extractors, and ancillary high power rf components. The system is designed so that it can handle the 600 MW peak power required by the Next Linear Collider design while maintaining high efficiency.

  18. Cascaded quadratic soliton compression of high-power femtosecond fiber lasers in Lithium Niobate crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Moses, Jeffrey; Wise, Frank W.

    2008-01-01

    The output of a high-power femtosecond fiber laser is typically 300 fs with a wavelength around $\\lambda=1030-1060$ nm. Our numerical simulations show that cascaded quadratic soliton compression in bulk LiNbO$_3$ can compress such pulses to below 100 fs.......The output of a high-power femtosecond fiber laser is typically 300 fs with a wavelength around $\\lambda=1030-1060$ nm. Our numerical simulations show that cascaded quadratic soliton compression in bulk LiNbO$_3$ can compress such pulses to below 100 fs....

  19. Adaptive compensation of Lorentz force detuning in superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pischalnikov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Schappert, Warren [Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities and considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate. Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  20. ICAN: High power neutral beam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustaizis, S.D.; Lalousis, P.; Perrakis, K.; Auvray, P.; Larour, J.; Ducret, J.E.; Balcou, P.

    2015-01-01

    During the last few years there is an increasing interest on the development of alternative high power new negative ion source for Tokamak applications. The proposed new neutral beam device presents a number of advantages with respect to: the density current, the acceleration voltage, the relative compact dimension of the negative ion source, and the coupling of a high power laser beam for photo-neutralization of the negative ion beam. Here we numerically investigate, using a multi- fluid 1-D code, the acceleration and the extraction of high power ion beam from a Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID). The diode configuration will be coupled to a high power device capable of extracting a current up to a few kA with an accelerating voltage up to MeV. An efficiency of up to 92% of the coupling of the laser beam, is required in order to obtain a high power, up to GW, neutral beam. The new high energy, high average power, high efficiency (up to 30%) ICAN fiber laser is proposed for both the plasma generation and the photo-neutralizer configuration. (authors)