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Sample records for high-performance phylogeny reconstruction

  1. Algorithms For Phylogeny Reconstruction In a New Mathematical Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenzini, Gabriele; Marianelli, Silvia

    1997-01-01

    The evolutionary history of a set of species is represented by a tree called phylogenetic tree or phylogeny. Its structure depends on precise biological assumptions about the evolution of species. Problems related to phylogeny reconstruction (i.e., finding a tree representation of information

  2. Distance-Based Phylogeny Reconstruction: Safety and Edge Radius

    OpenAIRE

    Gascuel, Olivier; Pardi, Fabio; Truszkowski, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    International audience; A phylogeny is an evolutionary tree tracing the shared history, including common ancestors, of a set of extant species or “taxa”. Phylogenies are increasingly reconstructed on the basis of molecular data (DNA and protein sequences) using statistical techniques such as likelihood and Bayesian methods. Algorithmically, these techniques suffer from the discrete nature of tree topology space. Since the number of tree topologies increases exponentially as a function of the ...

  3. High-performance computing and networking as tools for accurate emission computed tomography reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passeri, A. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Formiconi, A.R. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); De Cristofaro, M.T.E.R. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Pupi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Meldolesi, U. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy)

    1997-04-01

    It is well known that the quantitative potential of emission computed tomography (ECT) relies on the ability to compensate for resolution, attenuation and scatter effects. Reconstruction algorithms which are able to take these effects into account are highly demanding in terms of computing resources. The reported work aimed to investigate the use of a parallel high-performance computing platform for ECT reconstruction taking into account an accurate model of the acquisition of single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) data. An iterative algorithm with an accurate model of the variable system response was ported on the MIMD (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data) parallel architecture of a 64-node Cray T3D massively parallel computer. The system was organized to make it easily accessible even from low-cost PC-based workstations through standard TCP/IP networking. A complete brain study of 30 (64 x 64) slices could be reconstructed from a set of 90 (64 x 64) projections with ten iterations of the conjugate gradients algorithm in 9 s, corresponding to an actual speed-up factor of 135. This work demonstrated the possibility of exploiting remote high-performance computing and networking resources from hospital sites by means of low-cost workstations using standard communication protocols without particular problems for routine use. The achievable speed-up factors allow the assessment of the clinical benefit of advanced reconstruction techniques which require a heavy computational burden for the compensation effects such as variable spatial resolution, scatter and attenuation. The possibility of using the same software on the same hardware platform with data acquired in different laboratories with various kinds of SPET instrumentation is appealing for software quality control and for the evaluation of the clinical impact of the reconstruction methods. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. A stochastic local search algorithm for distance-based phylogeny reconstruction.

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    Tria, Francesca; Caglioti, Emanuele; Loreto, Vittorio; Pagnani, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    In many interesting cases, the reconstruction of a correct phylogeny is blurred by high mutation rates and/or horizontal transfer events. As a consequence, a divergence arises between the true evolutionary distances and the differences between pairs of taxa as inferred from available data, making the phylogenetic reconstruction a challenging problem. Mathematically, this divergence translates in a loss of additivity of the actual distances between taxa. In distance-based reconstruction methods, two properties of additive distances have been extensively exploited as antagonist criteria to drive phylogeny reconstruction: On the one hand, a local property of quartets, that is, sets of four taxa in a tree, the four-points condition; on the other hand, a recently proposed formula that allows to write the tree length as a function of the distances between taxa, Pauplin's formula. Here, we introduce a new reconstruction scheme that exploits in a unified framework both the four-points condition and the Pauplin's formula. We propose, in particular, a new general class of distance-based Stochastic Local Search algorithms, which reduces in a limit case to the minimization of Pauplin's length. When tested on artificially generated phylogenies, our Stochastic Big-Quartet Swapping algorithmic scheme significantly outperforms state-of-art distance-based algorithms in cases of deviation from additivity due to high rate of back mutations. A significant improvement is also observed with respect to the state-of-art algorithms in the case of high rate of horizontal transfer.

  5. OpenCL: a viable solution for high-performance medical image reconstruction?

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    Siegl, Christian; Hofmann, H. G.; Keck, B.; Prümmer, M.; Hornegger, J.

    2011-03-01

    Reconstruction of 3-D volumetric data from C-arm CT projections is a computationally demanding task. For interventional image reconstruction, hardware optimization is mandatory. Manufacturers of medical equipment use a variety of high-performance computing (HPC) platforms, like FPGAs, graphics cards, or multi-core CPUs. A problem of this diversity is that many different frameworks and (vendor-specific) programming languages are used. Furthermore, it is costly to switch the platform, since the code has to be re-written, verified, and optimized. OpenCL, a relatively new industry standard for HPC, promises to enable portable code. Its key idea is to abstract hardware in a way that allows an efficient mapping onto real CPUs, GPUs, and other hardware. The code is compiled for the actual target by the device driver. In this work we investigated the suitability of OpenCL as a tool to write portable code that runs efficiently across different hardware. The problems chosen are back- and forward-projection, the most time-consuming parts of (iterative) reconstruction. We present results on three platforms, a multi-core CPU system and two GPUs, and compare them against manually optimized native implementations. We found that OpenCL allows to share a common framework in one language across platforms. However, considering differences in the underlying architecture, a hardware-oblivious implementation cannot be expected to deliver maximal performance. By optimizing the OpenCL code for the specific hardware we reached over 90% of native performance for both problems, back- and forward-projection, on all platforms.

  6. Three-dimensional reconstruction and the phylogeny of extinct chelicerate orders

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    Russell J. Garwood

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Arachnids are an important group of arthropods. They are: diverse and abundant; a major constituent of many terrestrial ecosystems; and possess a deep and extensive fossil record. In recent years a number of exceptionally preserved arachnid fossils have been investigated using tomography and associated techniques, providing valuable insights into their morphology. Here we use X-ray microtomography to reconstruct members of two extinct arachnid orders. In the Haptopoda, we demonstrate the presence of ‘clasp-knife’ chelicerae, and our novel redescription of a member of the Phalangiotarbida highlights leg details, but fails to resolve chelicerae in the group due to their small size. As a result of these reconstructions, tomographic studies of three-dimensionally preserved fossils now exist for three of the four extinct orders, and for fossil representatives of several extant ones. Such studies constitute a valuable source of high fidelity data for constructing phylogenies. To illustrate this, here we present a cladistic analysis of the chelicerates to accompany these reconstructions. This is based on a previously published matrix, expanded to include fossil taxa and relevant characters, and allows us to: cladistically place the extinct arachnid orders; explicitly test some earlier hypotheses from the literature; and demonstrate that the addition of fossils to phylogenetic analyses can have broad implications. Phylogenies based on chelicerate morphology—in contrast to molecular studies—have achieved elements of consensus in recent years. Our work suggests that these results are not robust to the addition of novel characters or fossil taxa. Hypotheses surrounding chelicerate phylogeny remain in a state of flux.

  7. Three-dimensional reconstruction and the phylogeny of extinct chelicerate orders

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    Dunlop, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Arachnids are an important group of arthropods. They are: diverse and abundant; a major constituent of many terrestrial ecosystems; and possess a deep and extensive fossil record. In recent years a number of exceptionally preserved arachnid fossils have been investigated using tomography and associated techniques, providing valuable insights into their morphology. Here we use X-ray microtomography to reconstruct members of two extinct arachnid orders. In the Haptopoda, we demonstrate the presence of ‘clasp-knife’ chelicerae, and our novel redescription of a member of the Phalangiotarbida highlights leg details, but fails to resolve chelicerae in the group due to their small size. As a result of these reconstructions, tomographic studies of three-dimensionally preserved fossils now exist for three of the four extinct orders, and for fossil representatives of several extant ones. Such studies constitute a valuable source of high fidelity data for constructing phylogenies. To illustrate this, here we present a cladistic analysis of the chelicerates to accompany these reconstructions. This is based on a previously published matrix, expanded to include fossil taxa and relevant characters, and allows us to: cladistically place the extinct arachnid orders; explicitly test some earlier hypotheses from the literature; and demonstrate that the addition of fossils to phylogenetic analyses can have broad implications. Phylogenies based on chelicerate morphology—in contrast to molecular studies—have achieved elements of consensus in recent years. Our work suggests that these results are not robust to the addition of novel characters or fossil taxa. Hypotheses surrounding chelicerate phylogeny remain in a state of flux. PMID:25405073

  8. RASP (Reconstruct Ancestral State in Phylogenies): a tool for historical biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Harris, Alan J; Blair, Christopher; He, Xingjin

    2015-06-01

    We announce the release of Reconstruct Ancestral State in Phylogenies (RASP), a user-friendly software package for inferring historical biogeography through reconstructing ancestral geographic distributions on phylogenetic trees. RASP utilizes the widely used Statistical-Dispersal Vicariance Analysis (S-DIVA), the Dispersal-Extinction-Cladogenesis (DEC) model (Lagrange), a Statistical DEC model (S-DEC) and BayArea. It provides a graphical user interface (GUI) to specify a phylogenetic tree or set of trees and geographic distribution constraints, draws pie charts on the nodes of a phylogenetic tree to indicate levels of uncertainty, and generates high-quality exportable graphical results. RASP can run on both Windows and Mac OS X platforms. All documentation and source code for RASP is freely available at http://mnh.scu.edu.cn/soft/blog/RASP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. High Performance 3D PET Reconstruction Using Spherical Basis Functions on a Polar Grid

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    J. Cabello

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistical iterative methods are a widely used method of image reconstruction in emission tomography. Traditionally, the image space is modelled as a combination of cubic voxels as a matter of simplicity. After reconstruction, images are routinely filtered to reduce statistical noise at the cost of spatial resolution degradation. An alternative to produce lower noise during reconstruction is to model the image space with spherical basis functions. These basis functions overlap in space producing a significantly large number of non-zero elements in the system response matrix (SRM to store, which additionally leads to long reconstruction times. These two problems are partly overcome by exploiting spherical symmetries, although computation time is still slower compared to non-overlapping basis functions. In this work, we have implemented the reconstruction algorithm using Graphical Processing Unit (GPU technology for speed and a precomputed Monte-Carlo-calculated SRM for accuracy. The reconstruction time achieved using spherical basis functions on a GPU was 4.3 times faster than the Central Processing Unit (CPU and 2.5 times faster than a CPU-multi-core parallel implementation using eight cores. Overwriting hazards are minimized by combining a random line of response ordering and constrained atomic writing. Small differences in image quality were observed between implementations.

  10. On the Reconstruction of Text Phylogeny Trees: Evaluation and Analysis of Textual Relationships.

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    Marmerola, Guilherme D; Oikawa, Marina A; Dias, Zanoni; Goldenstein, Siome; Rocha, Anderson

    2016-01-01

    Over the history of mankind, textual records change. Sometimes due to mistakes during transcription, sometimes on purpose, as a way to rewrite facts and reinterpret history. There are several classical cases, such as the logarithmic tables, and the transmission of antique and medieval scholarship. Today, text documents are largely edited and redistributed on the Web. Articles on news portals and collaborative platforms (such as Wikipedia), source code, posts on social networks, and even scientific publications or literary works are some examples in which textual content can be subject to changes in an evolutionary process. In this scenario, given a set of near-duplicate documents, it is worthwhile to find which one is the original and the history of changes that created the whole set. Such functionality would have immediate applications on news tracking services, detection of plagiarism, textual criticism, and copyright enforcement, for instance. However, this is not an easy task, as textual features pointing to the documents' evolutionary direction may not be evident and are often dataset dependent. Moreover, side information, such as time stamps, are neither always available nor reliable. In this paper, we propose a framework for reliably reconstructing text phylogeny trees, and seamlessly exploring new approaches on a wide range of scenarios of text reusage. We employ and evaluate distinct combinations of dissimilarity measures and reconstruction strategies within the proposed framework, and evaluate each approach with extensive experiments, including a set of artificial near-duplicate documents with known phylogeny, and from documents collected from Wikipedia, whose modifications were made by Internet users. We also present results from qualitative experiments in two different applications: text plagiarism and reconstruction of evolutionary trees for manuscripts (stemmatology).

  11. High-performance image reconstruction in fluorescence tomography on desktop computers and graphics hardware.

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    Freiberger, Manuel; Egger, Herbert; Liebmann, Manfred; Scharfetter, Hermann

    2011-11-01

    Image reconstruction in fluorescence optical tomography is a three-dimensional nonlinear ill-posed problem governed by a system of partial differential equations. In this paper we demonstrate that a combination of state of the art numerical algorithms and a careful hardware optimized implementation allows to solve this large-scale inverse problem in a few seconds on standard desktop PCs with modern graphics hardware. In particular, we present methods to solve not only the forward but also the non-linear inverse problem by massively parallel programming on graphics processors. A comparison of optimized CPU and GPU implementations shows that the reconstruction can be accelerated by factors of about 15 through the use of the graphics hardware without compromising the accuracy in the reconstructed images.

  12. High-performance image reconstruction in fluorescence tomography on desktop computers and graphics hardware

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    Freiberger, Manuel; Egger, Herbert; Liebmann, Manfred; Scharfetter, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Image reconstruction in fluorescence optical tomography is a three-dimensional nonlinear ill-posed problem governed by a system of partial differential equations. In this paper we demonstrate that a combination of state of the art numerical algorithms and a careful hardware optimized implementation allows to solve this large-scale inverse problem in a few seconds on standard desktop PCs with modern graphics hardware. In particular, we present methods to solve not only the forward but also the non-linear inverse problem by massively parallel programming on graphics processors. A comparison of optimized CPU and GPU implementations shows that the reconstruction can be accelerated by factors of about 15 through the use of the graphics hardware without compromising the accuracy in the reconstructed images. PMID:22076279

  13. Reconstructing protein and gene phylogenies using reconciliation and soft-clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuitche, Esaie; Lafond, Manuel; Ouangraoua, Aïda

    2017-12-01

    The architecture of eukaryotic coding genes allows the production of several different protein isoforms by genes. Current gene phylogeny reconstruction methods make use of a single protein product per gene, ignoring information on alternative protein isoforms. These methods often lead to inaccurate gene tree reconstructions that require to be corrected before phylogenetic analyses. Here, we propose a new approach for the reconstruction of gene trees and protein trees accounting for alternative protein isoforms. We extend the concept of reconciliation to protein trees, and we define a new reconciliation problem called MinDRGT that consists in finding a gene tree that minimizes a double reconciliation cost with a given protein tree and a given species tree. We define a second problem called MinDRPGT that consists in finding a protein supertree and a gene tree minimizing a double reconciliation cost, given a species tree and a set of protein subtrees. We propose a shift from the traditional view of protein ortholog groups as hard-clusters to soft-clusters and we study the MinDRPGT problem under this assumption. We provide algorithmic exact and heuristic solutions for versions of the problems, and we present the results of applications on protein and gene trees from the Ensembl database. The implementations of the methods are available at https://github.com/UdeS-CoBIUS/Protein2GeneTree and https://github.com/UdeS-CoBIUS/SuperProteinTree .

  14. High performance graphics processor based computed tomography reconstruction algorithms for nuclear and other large scale applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Edward S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Orr, Laurel J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thompson, Kyle R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a fast computed tomography (CT) reconstruction algorithm based on graphics processing units (GPU) that achieves significant improvement over traditional central processing unit (CPU) based implementations. The main challenge in developing a CT algorithm that is capable of handling very large datasets is parallelizing the algorithm in such a way that data transfer does not hinder performance of the reconstruction algorithm. General Purpose Graphics Processing (GPGPU) is a new technology that the Science and Technology (S&T) community is starting to adopt in many fields where CPU-based computing is the norm. GPGPU programming requires a new approach to algorithm development that utilizes massively multi-threaded environments. Multi-threaded algorithms in general are difficult to optimize since performance bottlenecks occur that are non-existent in single-threaded algorithms such as memory latencies. If an efficient GPU-based CT reconstruction algorithm can be developed; computational times could be improved by a factor of 20. Additionally, cost benefits will be realized as commodity graphics hardware could potentially replace expensive supercomputers and high-end workstations. This project will take advantage of the CUDA programming environment and attempt to parallelize the task in such a way that multiple slices of the reconstruction volume are computed simultaneously. This work will also take advantage of the GPU memory by utilizing asynchronous memory transfers, GPU texture memory, and (when possible) pinned host memory so that the memory transfer bottleneck inherent to GPGPU is amortized. Additionally, this work will take advantage of GPU-specific hardware (i.e. fast texture memory, pixel-pipelines, hardware interpolators, and varying memory hierarchy) that will allow for additional performance improvements.

  15. Reconstructing recent human phylogenies with forensic STR loci: A statistical approach

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    Khan Faisal

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Forensic Short Tandem Repeat (STR loci are effective for the purpose of individual identification, and other forensic applications. Most of these markers have high allelic variability and mutation rate because of which they have limited use in the phylogenetic reconstruction. In the present study, we have carried out a meta-analysis to explore the possibility of using only five STR loci (TPOX, FES, vWA, F13A and Tho1 to carry out phylogenetic assessment based on the allele frequency profile of 20 world population and north Indian Hindus analyzed in the present study. Results Phylogenetic analysis based on two different approaches – genetic distance and maximum likelihood along with statistical bootstrapping procedure involving 1000 replicates was carried out. The ensuing tree topologies and PC plots were further compared with those obtained in earlier phylogenetic investigations. The compiled database of 21 populations got segregated and finely resolved into three basal clusters with very high bootstrap values corresponding to three geo-ethnic groups of African, Orientals, and Caucasians. Conclusion Based on this study we conclude that if appropriate and logistic statistical approaches are followed then even lesser number of forensic STR loci are powerful enough to reconstruct the recent human phylogenies despite of their relatively high mutation rates.

  16. Reconstructing the Backbone of the Saccharomycotina Yeast Phylogeny Using Genome-Scale Data

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    Xing-Xing Shen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the phylogenetic relationships among the yeasts of the subphylum Saccharomycotina is a prerequisite for understanding the evolution of their metabolisms and ecological lifestyles. In the last two decades, the use of rDNA and multilocus data sets has greatly advanced our understanding of the yeast phylogeny, but many deep relationships remain unsupported. In contrast, phylogenomic analyses have involved relatively few taxa and lineages that were often selected with limited considerations for covering the breadth of yeast biodiversity. Here we used genome sequence data from 86 publicly available yeast genomes representing nine of the 11 known major lineages and 10 nonyeast fungal outgroups to generate a 1233-gene, 96-taxon data matrix. Species phylogenies reconstructed using two different methods (concatenation and coalescence and two data matrices (amino acids or the first two codon positions yielded identical and highly supported relationships between the nine major lineages. Aside from the lineage comprised by the family Pichiaceae, all other lineages were monophyletic. Most interrelationships among yeast species were robust across the two methods and data matrices. However, eight of the 93 internodes conflicted between analyses or data sets, including the placements of: the clade defined by species that have reassigned the CUG codon to encode serine, instead of leucine; the clade defined by a whole genome duplication; and the species Ascoidea rubescens. These phylogenomic analyses provide a robust roadmap for future comparative work across the yeast subphylum in the disciplines of taxonomy, molecular genetics, evolutionary biology, ecology, and biotechnology. To further this end, we have also provided a BLAST server to query the 86 Saccharomycotina genomes, which can be found at http://y1000plus.org/blast.

  17. Reconstructing mammalian phylogenies: a detailed comparison of the cytochrome B and cytochrome oxidase subunit I mitochondrial genes.

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    Shanan S Tobe

    Full Text Available The phylogeny and taxonomy of mammalian species were originally based upon shared or derived morphological characteristics. However, genetic analyses have more recently played an increasingly important role in confirming existing or establishing often radically different mammalian groupings and phylogenies. The two most commonly used genetic loci in species identification are the cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI and the cytochrome b gene (cyt b. For the first time this study provides a detailed comparison of the effectiveness of these two loci in reconstructing the phylogeny of mammals at different levels of the taxonomic hierarchy in order to provide a basis for standardizing methodologies in the future. Interspecific and intraspecific variation is assessed and for the first time, to our knowledge, statistical confidence is applied to sequence comparisons. Comparison of the DNA sequences of 217 mammalian species reveals that cyt b more accurately reconstructs their phylogeny and known relationships between species based on other molecular and morphological analyses at Super Order, Order, Family and generic levels. Cyt b correctly assigned 95.85% of mammal species to Super Order, 94.31% to Order and 98.16% to Family compared to 78.34%, 93.36% and 96.93% respectively for COI. Cyt b also gives better resolution when separating species based on sequence data. Using a Kimura 2-parameter p-distance (x100 threshold of 1.5-2.5, cyt b gives a better resolution for separating species with a lower false positive rate and higher positive predictive value than those of COI.

  18. A novel phylogeny and morphological reconstruction of the PIN genes and first phylogeny of the ACC-oxidases (ACOs

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    Ronald Matthew Clouse

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The PIN and ACO gene families present interesting questions about the evolution of plant physiology, including testing hypotheses about the ecological drivers of their diversification and whether unrelated genes have been recruited for similar functions. The PIN-formed proteins contribute to the polar transport of auxin, a hormone which regulates plant growth and development. PIN loci are categorized into groups according to their protein length and structure, as well as subcellular localization. An interesting question with PIN genes is the nature of the ancestral form and location. ACOs are members of a superfamily of oxygenases and oxidases that catalyze the last step of ethylene synthesis, which regulates many aspects of the plant life cycle. We used publicly available PIN and ACO sequences to conduct phylogenetic analyses. Third codon positions of these genes in monocots have a high GC content, which could be historical but is more likely due to a mutational bias. Thus we developed methods to extract phylogenetic information from nucleotide sequences while avoiding this convergent feature. One method consisted in using only A-T transformations, and another used only the first and second codon positions for serine, which can only take A or T and G or C, respectively. We also conducted tree-searches for both gene families using unaligned amino acid sequences and dynamic homology. PIN genes appear to have diversified earlier than ACOs, with monocot and dicot copies more mixed in the phylogeny. However, gymnosperm PINs appear to be derived and not closely related to those from primitive plants. We find strong support for a long PIN gene ancestor with short forms subsequently evolving one or more times. ACO genes appear to have diversified mostly since the dicot-monocot split, as most genes cluster into a small number of monocot and dicot clades when the tree is rooted by genes from mosses. Gymnosperm ACOs were recovered as closely related and

  19. High-performance blob-based iterative three-dimensional reconstruction in electron tomography using multi-GPUs.

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    Wan, Xiaohua; Zhang, Fa; Chu, Qi; Liu, Zhiyong

    2012-06-25

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction in electron tomography (ET) has emerged as a leading technique to elucidate the molecular structures of complex biological specimens. Blob-based iterative methods are advantageous reconstruction methods for 3D reconstruction in ET, but demand huge computational costs. Multiple graphic processing units (multi-GPUs) offer an affordable platform to meet these demands. However, a synchronous communication scheme between multi-GPUs leads to idle GPU time, and a weighted matrix involved in iterative methods cannot be loaded into GPUs especially for large images due to the limited available memory of GPUs. In this paper we propose a multilevel parallel strategy combined with an asynchronous communication scheme and a blob-ELLR data structure to efficiently perform blob-based iterative reconstructions on multi-GPUs. The asynchronous communication scheme is used to minimize the idle GPU time so as to asynchronously overlap communications with computations. The blob-ELLR data structure only needs nearly 1/16 of the storage space in comparison with ELLPACK-R (ELLR) data structure and yields significant acceleration. Experimental results indicate that the multilevel parallel scheme combined with the asynchronous communication scheme and the blob-ELLR data structure allows efficient implementations of 3D reconstruction in ET on multi-GPUs.

  20. Reconstructing the phylogeny of Blattodea: robust support for interfamilial relationships and major clades.

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    Wang, Zongqing; Shi, Yan; Qiu, Zhiwei; Che, Yanli; Lo, Nathan

    2017-06-20

    Cockroaches are among the most recognizable of all insects. In addition to their role as pests, they play a key ecological role as decomposers. Despite numerous studies of cockroach phylogeny in recent decades, relationships among most major lineages are yet to be resolved. Here we examine phylogenetic relationships among cockroaches based on five genes (mitochondrial 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, COII; nuclear 28S rRNA and histone H3), and infer divergence times on the basis of 8 fossils. We included in our analyses sequences from 52 new species collected in China, representing 7 families. These were combined with data from a recent study that examined these same genes from 49 species, resulting in a significant increase in taxa analysed. Three major lineages, Corydioidea, Blaberoidea, and Blattoidea were recovered, the latter comprising Blattidae, Tryonicidae, Lamproblattidae, Anaplectidae, Cryptocercidae and Isoptera. The estimated age of the split between Mantodea and Blattodea ranged from 204.3 Ma to 289.1 Ma. Corydioidea was estimated to have diverged 209.7 Ma (180.5-244.3 Ma 95% confidence interval [CI]) from the remaining Blattodea. The clade Blattoidea diverged from their sister group, Blaberoidea, around 198.3 Ma (173.1-229.1 Ma). The addition of the extra taxa in this study has resulted in significantly higher levels of support for a number of previously recognized groupings.

  1. 150 years beyond Darwin's Origin of species: finding new approaches to reconstruct early animal phylogeny

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    Loesel, Rudi

    2009-01-01

    The conference ‘Celebrating Darwin: From the Origin of Species to Deep Metazoan Phylogeny’ was held at the Humboldt University in Berlin, from 3 to 6 March 2009. Specialists from the fields of bioinformatics, molecular biology, developmental biology, comparative morphology and paleontology joined forces to present and discuss novel approaches in reconstructing the still unresolved early branching patterns of the metazoan tree of life. PMID:19443502

  2. New avian paramyxoviruses type I strains identified in Africa provide new outcomes for phylogeny reconstruction and genotype classification.

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    Renata Servan de Almeida

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease (ND is one of the most lethal diseases of poultry worldwide. It is caused by an avian paramyxovirus 1 that has high genomic diversity. In the framework of an international surveillance program launched in 2007, several thousand samples from domestic and wild birds in Africa were collected and analyzed. ND viruses (NDV were detected and isolated in apparently healthy fowls and wild birds. However, two thirds of the isolates collected in this study were classified as virulent strains of NDV based on the molecular analysis of the fusion protein and experimental in vivo challenges with two representative isolates. Phylogenetic analysis based on the F and HN genes showed that isolates recovered from poultry in Mali and Ethiopia form new groups, herein proposed as genotypes XIV and sub-genotype VIf with reference to the new nomenclature described by Diel's group. In Madagascar, the circulation of NDV strains of genotype XI, originally reported elsewhere, is also confirmed. Full genome sequencing of five African isolates was generated and an extensive phylogeny reconstruction was carried out based on the nucleotide sequences. The evolutionary distances between groups and the specific amino acid signatures of each cluster allowed us to refine the genotype nomenclature.

  3. Molecular phylogeny of 21 tropical bamboo species reconstructed by integrating non-coding internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and 2) sequences and their consensus secondary structure.

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    Ghosh, Jayadri Sekhar; Bhattacharya, Samik; Pal, Amita

    2017-06-01

    The unavailability of the reproductive structure and unpredictability of vegetative characters for the identification and phylogenetic study of bamboo prompted the application of molecular techniques for greater resolution and consensus. We first employed internal transcribed spacer (ITS1, 5.8S rRNA and ITS2) sequences to construct the phylogenetic tree of 21 tropical bamboo species. While the sequence alone could grossly reconstruct the traditional phylogeny amongst the 21-tropical species studied, some anomalies were encountered that prompted a further refinement of the phylogenetic analyses. Therefore, we integrated the secondary structure of the ITS sequences to derive individual sequence-structure matrix to gain more resolution on the phylogenetic reconstruction. The results showed that ITS sequence-structure is the reliable alternative to the conventional phenotypic method for the identification of bamboo species. The best-fit topology obtained by the sequence-structure based phylogeny over the sole sequence based one underscores closer clustering of all the studied Bambusa species (Sub-tribe Bambusinae), while Melocanna baccifera, which belongs to Sub-Tribe Melocanneae, disjointedly clustered as an out-group within the consensus phylogenetic tree. In this study, we demonstrated the dependability of the combined (ITS sequence+structure-based) approach over the only sequence-based analysis for phylogenetic relationship assessment of bamboo.

  4. A mixed integer linear programming model to reconstruct phylogenies from single nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes under the maximum parsimony criterion

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    2013-01-01

    Background Phylogeny estimation from aligned haplotype sequences has attracted more and more attention in the recent years due to its importance in analysis of many fine-scale genetic data. Its application fields range from medical research, to drug discovery, to epidemiology, to population dynamics. The literature on molecular phylogenetics proposes a number of criteria for selecting a phylogeny from among plausible alternatives. Usually, such criteria can be expressed by means of objective functions, and the phylogenies that optimize them are referred to as optimal. One of the most important estimation criteria is the parsimony which states that the optimal phylogeny T∗for a set H of n haplotype sequences over a common set of variable loci is the one that satisfies the following requirements: (i) it has the shortest length and (ii) it is such that, for each pair of distinct haplotypes hi,hj∈H, the sum of the edge weights belonging to the path from hi to hj in T∗ is not smaller than the observed number of changes between hi and hj. Finding the most parsimonious phylogeny for H involves solving an optimization problem, called the Most Parsimonious Phylogeny Estimation Problem (MPPEP), which is NP-hard in many of its versions. Results In this article we investigate a recent version of the MPPEP that arises when input data consist of single nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes extracted from a population of individuals on a common genomic region. Specifically, we explore the prospects for improving on the implicit enumeration strategy of implicit enumeration strategy used in previous work using a novel problem formulation and a series of strengthening valid inequalities and preliminary symmetry breaking constraints to more precisely bound the solution space and accelerate implicit enumeration of possible optimal phylogenies. We present the basic formulation and then introduce a series of provable valid constraints to reduce the solution space. We then prove

  5. An evaluation of the suitability of COI and COII gene variation for reconstructing the phylogeny of, and identifying cryptic species in, anopheline mosquitoes (Diptera Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Li, Chunxiao; Zheng, Wei; Song, Fenglin; Guo, Xiaoxia; Wu, Zhonghua; Luo, Peng; Yang, Yongyao; He, Lei; Zhao, Tongyan

    2017-09-01

    We assessed the practicality and effectiveness of using variation in the mitochondrial COI and COII genes to discriminate species and reconstruct the phylogeny of anophelene mosquitoes. Phylogenetic relationships among the subfamily Anophelinae were inferred from portions of the mitochondrial COI (92 species) and COII genes (108 species). Phylogenetic trees were reconstructed on the basis of parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. The suitability of COI and COII gene variation for identifying cryptic species was compared by comparing the sequence divergence within species groups and complexes. The results show that the COI gene was more useful for identifying sibling and cryptic species, but that phylogenetic relationships reconstructed using the COII gene were more similar to those based on morphological data. We conclude that: (1) there is a significant molecular divergence among An. sinensis; (2) the COI and COII are valid genetic markers for resolving taxonomic relationships among anopheline mosquitoes and the resultant phylogeny raises some questions about the taxonomic status of anopheline species groups and complexes; (3) the genus Anopheles is not demonstrably monophyletic with regard to the genus Bironella; (4) the subgenera Kerteszia and Nyssorhynchus are monophyletic; (5) below the group-level, COI data support the existence of monophyletic taxa within the Anopheles funestus, Anopheles maculipennis and Anopheles strode and Anopheles barbirostris subgroups, and within the Anopheles nuneztovari complex, whereas COII data support the monophyletic taxa within the Anopheles minimus and Anopheles oswaldoi subgroups, and Anopheles hyrcanus group. The monophyletic taxa within the Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles albitarsis complexes are supported by both COI and COII data.

  6. Phylogeny reconstruction and hybrid analysis of populus (Salicaceae) based on nucleotide sequences of multiple single-copy nuclear genes and plastid fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoshan; Du, Shuhui; Dayanandan, Selvadurai; Wang, Dongsheng; Zeng, Yanfei; Zhang, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Populus (Salicaceae) is one of the most economically and ecologically important genera of forest trees. The complex reticulate evolution and lack of highly variable orthologous single-copy DNA markers have posed difficulties in resolving the phylogeny of this genus. Based on a large data set of nuclear and plastid DNA sequences, we reconstructed robust phylogeny of Populus using parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods. The resulting phylogenetic trees showed better resolution at both inter- and intra-sectional level than previous studies. The results revealed that (1) the plastid-based phylogenetic tree resulted in two main clades, suggesting an early divergence of the maternal progenitors of Populus; (2) three advanced sections (Populus, Aigeiros and Tacamahaca) are of hybrid origin; (3) species of the section Tacamahaca could be divided into two major groups based on plastid and nuclear DNA data, suggesting a polyphyletic nature of the section; and (4) many species proved to be of hybrid origin based on the incongruence between plastid and nuclear DNA trees. Reticulate evolution may have played a significant role in the evolution history of Populus by facilitating rapid adaptive radiations into different environments.

  7. Application of RNA-seq for mitogenome reconstruction, and reconsideration of long-branch artifacts in Hemiptera phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nan; An, Shiheng; Yin, Xinming; Cai, Wanzhi; Li, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Hemiptera make up the largest nonholometabolan insect assemblage. Despite previous efforts to elucidate phylogeny within this group, relationships among the major sub-lineages remain uncertain. In particular, mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) data are still sparse for many important hemipteran insect groups. Recent mitogenomic analyses of Hemiptera have usually included no more than 50 species, with conflicting hypotheses presented. Here, we determined the nearly complete nucleotide sequence of the mitogenome for the aphid species of Rhopalosiphum padi using RNA-seq plus gap filling. The 15,205 bp mitogenome included all mitochondrial genes except for trnF. The mitogenome organization and size for R. padi are similar to previously reported aphid species. In addition, the phylogenetic relationships for Hemiptera were examined using a mitogenomic dataset which included sequences from 103 ingroup species and 19 outgroup species. Our results showed that the seven species representing the Aleyrodidae exhibit extremely long branches, and always cluster with long-branched outgroups. This lead to the failure of recovering a monophyletic Hemiptera in most analyses. The data treatment of Degen-coding for protein-coding genes and the site-heterogeneous CAT model show improved suppression of the long-branch effect. Under these conditions, the Sternorrhyncha was often recovered as the most basal clade in Hemiptera. PMID:27633117

  8. The relative congruence of cranial and genetic estimates of hominoid taxon relationships: implications for the reconstruction of hominin phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Cramon-Taubadel, Noreen; Smith, Heather F

    2012-05-01

    Previous analyses of extant catarrhine craniodental morphology have often failed to recover their molecular relationships, casting doubt on the accuracy of hominin phylogenies based on anatomical data. However, on the basis of genetic, morphometric and environmental affinity patterns, a growing body of literature has demonstrated that particular aspects of cranial morphology are remarkably reliable proxies for neutral modern human population history. Hence, it is important to test whether these intra-specific patterns can be extrapolated to a broader primate taxon level such that inference rules for understanding the morphological evolution of the extinct hominins may be devised. Here, we use a matrix of molecular distances between 15 hominoid taxa to test the genetic congruence of 14 craniomandibular regions, defined and morphometrically delineated on the basis of previous modern human analyses. This methodology allowed us to test directly whether the cranial regions found to be reliable indicators of population history were also more reliable proxies for hominoid genetic relationships. Cranial regions were defined on the basis of three criteria: developmental-functional units, individual bones, and regions differentially affected by masticatory stress. The results found that all regions tested were significantly and strongly correlated with the molecular matrix. However, the modern human predictions regarding the relative congruence of particular regions did not hold true, as the face was statistically the most reliable indicator of hominoid genetic distances, as opposed to the vault or basicranium. Moreover, when modern humans were removed from the analysis, all cranial regions improved in their genetic congruence, suggesting that it is the inclusion of morphologically-derived humans that has the largest effect on incongruence between morphological and molecular estimates of hominoid relationships. Therefore, it may be necessary to focus on smaller intra

  9. High performance volume-of-intersection projectors for 3D-PET image reconstruction based on polar symmetries and SIMD vectorisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheins, J. J.; Vahedipour, K.; Pietrzyk, U.; Shah, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    For high-resolution, iterative 3D PET image reconstruction the efficient implementation of forward-backward projectors is essential to minimise the calculation time. Mathematically, the projectors are summarised as a system response matrix (SRM) whose elements define the contribution of image voxels to lines-of-response (LORs). In fact, the SRM easily comprises billions of non-zero matrix elements to evaluate the tremendous number of LORs as provided by state-of-the-art PET scanners. Hence, the performance of iterative algorithms, e.g. maximum-likelihood-expectation-maximisation (MLEM), suffers from severe computational problems due to the intensive memory access and huge number of floating point operations. Here, symmetries occupy a key role in terms of efficient implementation. They reduce the amount of independent SRM elements, thus allowing for a significant matrix compression according to the number of exploitable symmetries. With our previous work, the PET REconstruction Software TOolkit (PRESTO), very high compression factors (>300) are demonstrated by using specific non-Cartesian voxel patterns involving discrete polar symmetries. In this way, a pre-calculated memory-resident SRM using complex volume-of-intersection calculations can be achieved. However, our original ray-driven implementation suffers from addressing voxels, projection data and SRM elements in disfavoured memory access patterns. As a consequence, a rather limited numerical throughput is observed due to the massive waste of memory bandwidth and inefficient usage of cache respectively. In this work, an advantageous symmetry-driven evaluation of the forward-backward projectors is proposed to overcome these inefficiencies. The polar symmetries applied in PRESTO suggest a novel organisation of image data and LOR projection data in memory to enable an efficient single instruction multiple data vectorisation, i.e. simultaneous use of any SRM element for symmetric LORs. In addition, the calculation

  10. Constructing computer virus phylogenies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, L.A. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom) Dept. of Computer Science; Goldberg, P.W. [Aston Univ., Birmingham (United Kingdom) Dept. of Applied Mathematics; Phillips, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorkin, G.B. [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center

    1996-03-01

    There has been much recent algorithmic work on the problem of reconstructing the evolutionary history of biological species. Computer virus specialists are interested in finding the evolutionary history of computer viruses--a virus is often written using code fragments from one or more other viruses, which are its immediate ancestors. A phylogeny for a collection of computer viruses is a directed acyclic graph whose nodes are the viruses and whose edges map ancestors to descendants and satisfy the property that each code fragment is ``invented`` only once. To provide a simple explanation for the data, we consider the problem of constructing such a phylogeny with a minimal number of edges. In general, this optimization problem cannot be solved in quasi-polynomial time unless NQP=QP; we present positive and negative results for associated approximated problems. When tree solutions exist, they can be constructed and randomly sampled in polynomial time.

  11. Testing mitochondrial sequences and anonymous nuclear markers for phylogeny reconstruction in a rapidly radiating group: molecular systematics of the Delphininae (Cetacea: Odontoceti: Delphinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Sarah E; Adams, Lara D; Rosel, Patricia E

    2009-01-01

    Background Many molecular phylogenetic analyses rely on DNA sequence data obtained from single or multiple loci, particularly mitochondrial DNA loci. However, phylogenies for taxa that have undergone recent, rapid radiation events often remain unresolved. Alternative methodologies for discerning evolutionary relationships under these conditions are desirable. The dolphin subfamily Delphininae is a group that has likely resulted from a recent and rapid radiation. Despite several efforts, the evolutionary relationships among the species in the subfamily remain unclear. Results Here, we compare a phylogeny estimated using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences to a multi-locus phylogeny inferred from 418 polymorphic genomic markers obtained from amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. The two sets of phylogenies are largely incongruent, primarily because the mtDNA tree provides very poor resolving power; very few species' nodes in the tree are supported by bootstrap resampling. The AFLP phylogeny is considerably better resolved and more congruent with relationships inferred from morphological data. Both phylogenies support paraphyly for the genera Stenella and Tursiops. The AFLP data indicate a close relationship between the two spotted dolphin species and recent ancestry between Stenella clymene and S. longirostris. The placement of the Lagenodelphis hosei lineage is ambiguous: phenetic analysis of the AFLP data is consistent with morphological expectations but the phylogenetic analysis is not. Conclusion For closely related, recently diverged taxa, a multi-locus genome-wide survey is likely the most comprehensive approach currently available for phylogenetic inference. PMID:19811651

  12. Testing mitochondrial sequences and anonymous nuclear markers for phylogeny reconstruction in a rapidly radiating group: molecular systematics of the Delphininae (Cetacea: Odontoceti: Delphinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Sarah E; Adams, Lara D; Rosel, Patricia E

    2009-10-07

    Many molecular phylogenetic analyses rely on DNA sequence data obtained from single or multiple loci, particularly mitochondrial DNA loci. However, phylogenies for taxa that have undergone recent, rapid radiation events often remain unresolved. Alternative methodologies for discerning evolutionary relationships under these conditions are desirable. The dolphin subfamily Delphininae is a group that has likely resulted from a recent and rapid radiation. Despite several efforts, the evolutionary relationships among the species in the subfamily remain unclear. Here, we compare a phylogeny estimated using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences to a multi-locus phylogeny inferred from 418 polymorphic genomic markers obtained from amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. The two sets of phylogenies are largely incongruent, primarily because the mtDNA tree provides very poor resolving power; very few species' nodes in the tree are supported by bootstrap resampling. The AFLP phylogeny is considerably better resolved and more congruent with relationships inferred from morphological data. Both phylogenies support paraphyly for the genera Stenella and Tursiops. The AFLP data indicate a close relationship between the two spotted dolphin species and recent ancestry between Stenella clymene and S. longirostris. The placement of the Lagenodelphis hosei lineage is ambiguous: phenetic analysis of the AFLP data is consistent with morphological expectations but the phylogenetic analysis is not. For closely related, recently diverged taxa, a multi-locus genome-wide survey is likely the most comprehensive approach currently available for phylogenetic inference.

  13. Testing mitochondrial sequences and anonymous nuclear markers for phylogeny reconstruction in a rapidly radiating group: molecular systematics of the Delphininae (Cetacea: Odontoceti: Delphinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingston Sarah E

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many molecular phylogenetic analyses rely on DNA sequence data obtained from single or multiple loci, particularly mitochondrial DNA loci. However, phylogenies for taxa that have undergone recent, rapid radiation events often remain unresolved. Alternative methodologies for discerning evolutionary relationships under these conditions are desirable. The dolphin subfamily Delphininae is a group that has likely resulted from a recent and rapid radiation. Despite several efforts, the evolutionary relationships among the species in the subfamily remain unclear. Results Here, we compare a phylogeny estimated using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA control region sequences to a multi-locus phylogeny inferred from 418 polymorphic genomic markers obtained from amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP analysis. The two sets of phylogenies are largely incongruent, primarily because the mtDNA tree provides very poor resolving power; very few species' nodes in the tree are supported by bootstrap resampling. The AFLP phylogeny is considerably better resolved and more congruent with relationships inferred from morphological data. Both phylogenies support paraphyly for the genera Stenella and Tursiops. The AFLP data indicate a close relationship between the two spotted dolphin species and recent ancestry between Stenella clymene and S. longirostris. The placement of the Lagenodelphis hosei lineage is ambiguous: phenetic analysis of the AFLP data is consistent with morphological expectations but the phylogenetic analysis is not. Conclusion For closely related, recently diverged taxa, a multi-locus genome-wide survey is likely the most comprehensive approach currently available for phylogenetic inference.

  14. High Performance Marine Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Marine Vessels (HPMVs) range from the Fast Ferries to the latest high speed Navy Craft, including competition power boats and hydroplanes, hydrofoils, hovercraft, catamarans and other multi-hull craft. High Performance Marine Vessels covers the main concepts of HPMVs and discusses historical background, design features, services that have been successful and not so successful, and some sample data of the range of HPMVs to date. Included is a comparison of all HPMVs craft and the differences between them and descriptions of performance (hydrodynamics and aerodynamics). Readers will find a comprehensive overview of the design, development and building of HPMVs. In summary, this book: Focuses on technology at the aero-marine interface Covers the full range of high performance marine vessel concepts Explains the historical development of various HPMVs Discusses ferries, racing and pleasure craft, as well as utility and military missions High Performance Marine Vessels is an ideal book for student...

  15. Measuring Asymmetry in Time-Stamped Phylogenies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany L Dearlove

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that asymmetry in viral phylogenies may be indicative of heterogeneity in transmission, for example due to acute HIV infection or the presence of 'core groups' with higher contact rates. Hence, evidence of asymmetry may provide clues to underlying population structure, even when direct information on, for example, stage of infection or contact rates, are missing. However, current tests of phylogenetic asymmetry (a suffer from false positives when the tips of the phylogeny are sampled at different times and (b only test for global asymmetry, and hence suffer from false negatives when asymmetry is localised to part of a phylogeny. We present a simple permutation-based approach for testing for asymmetry in a phylogeny, where we compare the observed phylogeny with random phylogenies with the same sampling and coalescence times, to reduce the false positive rate. We also demonstrate how profiles of measures of asymmetry calculated over a range of evolutionary times in the phylogeny can be used to identify local asymmetry. In combination with different metrics of asymmetry, this combined approach offers detailed insights of how phylogenies reconstructed from real viral datasets may deviate from the simplistic assumptions of commonly used coalescent and birth-death process models.

  16. High performance homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne; Vibæk, Kasper Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    . Consideration of all these factors is a precondition for a truly integrated practice and as this chapter demonstrates, innovative project delivery methods founded on the manufacturing of prefabricated buildings contribute to the production of high performance homes that are cost effective to construct, energy......Can prefabrication contribute to the development of high performance homes? To answer this question, this chapter defines high performance in more broadly inclusive terms, acknowledging the technical, architectural, social and economic conditions under which energy consumption and production occur...... efficient to operate and valuable for building communities. Herein discussed are two successful examples of low energy prefabricated housing projects built in Copenhagen Denmark, which embraced both the constraints and possibilities offered by prefabrication....

  17. Danish High Performance Concretes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. P.; Christoffersen, J.; Frederiksen, J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the main results obtained in the research program High Performance Concretes in the 90's are presented. This program was financed by the Danish government and was carried out in cooperation between The Technical University of Denmark, several private companies, and Aalborg University...

  18. High performance systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, M.B. [comp.

    1995-03-01

    This document provides a written compilation of the presentations and viewgraphs from the 1994 Conference on High Speed Computing given at the High Speed Computing Conference, {open_quotes}High Performance Systems,{close_quotes} held at Gleneden Beach, Oregon, on April 18 through 21, 1994.

  19. High-Performance Networking

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    The series will start with an historical introduction about what people saw as high performance message communication in their time and how that developed to the now to day known "standard computer network communication". It will be followed by a far more technical part that uses the High Performance Computer Network standards of the 90's, with 1 Gbit/sec systems as introduction for an in depth explanation of the three new 10 Gbit/s network and interconnect technology standards that exist already or emerge. If necessary for a good understanding some sidesteps will be included to explain important protocols as well as some necessary details of concerned Wide Area Network (WAN) standards details including some basics of wavelength multiplexing (DWDM). Some remarks will be made concerning the rapid expanding applications of networked storage.

  20. High Performance Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traian Oneţ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the last studies and researches accomplished in Cluj-Napoca related to high performance concrete, high strength concrete and self compacting concrete. The purpose of this paper is to raid upon the advantages and inconveniences when a particular concrete type is used. Two concrete recipes are presented, namely for the concrete used in rigid pavement for roads and another one for self-compacting concrete.

  1. High performance AC drives

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Mukhtar

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive view of high performance ac drives. It may be considered as both a text book for graduate students and as an up-to-date monograph. It may also be used by R & D professionals involved in the improvement of performance of drives in the industries. The book will also be beneficial to the researchers pursuing work on multiphase drives as well as sensorless and direct torque control of electric drives since up-to date references in these topics are provided. It will also provide few examples of modeling, analysis and control of electric drives using MATLAB/SIMULIN

  2. High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talcott, Stephen

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has many applications in food chemistry. Food components that have been analyzed with HPLC include organic acids, vitamins, amino acids, sugars, nitrosamines, certain pesticides, metabolites, fatty acids, aflatoxins, pigments, and certain food additives. Unlike gas chromatography, it is not necessary for the compound being analyzed to be volatile. It is necessary, however, for the compounds to have some solubility in the mobile phase. It is important that the solubilized samples for injection be free from all particulate matter, so centrifugation and filtration are common procedures. Also, solid-phase extraction is used commonly in sample preparation to remove interfering compounds from the sample matrix prior to HPLC analysis.

  3. Clojure high performance programming

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Shantanu

    2013-01-01

    This is a short, practical guide that will teach you everything you need to know to start writing high performance Clojure code.This book is ideal for intermediate Clojure developers who are looking to get a good grip on how to achieve optimum performance. You should already have some experience with Clojure and it would help if you already know a little bit of Java. Knowledge of performance analysis and engineering is not required. For hands-on practice, you should have access to Clojure REPL with Leiningen.

  4. High performance data transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, R.; Fang, C.; Hanushevsky, A.; Kreuger, W.; Yang, W.

    2017-10-01

    The exponentially increasing need for high speed data transfer is driven by big data, and cloud computing together with the needs of data intensive science, High Performance Computing (HPC), defense, the oil and gas industry etc. We report on the Zettar ZX software. This has been developed since 2013 to meet these growing needs by providing high performance data transfer and encryption in a scalable, balanced, easy to deploy and use way while minimizing power and space utilization. In collaboration with several commercial vendors, Proofs of Concept (PoC) consisting of clusters have been put together using off-the- shelf components to test the ZX scalability and ability to balance services using multiple cores, and links. The PoCs are based on SSD flash storage that is managed by a parallel file system. Each cluster occupies 4 rack units. Using the PoCs, between clusters we have achieved almost 200Gbps memory to memory over two 100Gbps links, and 70Gbps parallel file to parallel file with encryption over a 5000 mile 100Gbps link.

  5. High Performance Network Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jesse E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-10

    Network Monitoring requires a substantial use of data and error analysis to overcome issues with clusters. Zenoss and Splunk help to monitor system log messages that are reporting issues about the clusters to monitoring services. Infiniband infrastructure on a number of clusters upgraded to ibmon2. ibmon2 requires different filters to report errors to system administrators. Focus for this summer is to: (1) Implement ibmon2 filters on monitoring boxes to report system errors to system administrators using Zenoss and Splunk; (2) Modify and improve scripts for monitoring and administrative usage; (3) Learn more about networks including services and maintenance for high performance computing systems; and (4) Gain a life experience working with professionals under real world situations. Filters were created to account for clusters running ibmon2 v1.0.0-1 10 Filters currently implemented for ibmon2 using Python. Filters look for threshold of port counters. Over certain counts, filters report errors to on-call system administrators and modifies grid to show local host with issue.

  6. Sequence characterization, molecular phylogeny reconstruction and recombination analysis of the large RNA of Tomato spotted wilt virus (Tospovirus: Bunyaviridae) from the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Shunmugiah V; Pappu, Hanu R

    2016-04-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV; Tospovirus: Bunyaviridae) has been an economically important virus in the USA for over 30 years. However the complete sequence of only one TSWV isolate PA01 characterized from pepper in Pennsylvania is available. The large (L) RNA of a TSWV WA-USA isolate was cloned and sequenced. It consisted of 8914 nucleotides (nt) encoding a single open reading frame of 8640 nts in the viral-complementary sense. The ORF potentially codes for RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of 330.9 kDa. Two untranslated regions of 241 and 33 nucleotides were present at the 5' and 3' termini, respectively that shared conserved tospoviral sequences. Phylogenetic analysis using nucleotide sequences of the complete L RNA showed that TSWV WA-USA isolate clustered with the American and Asian TSWV isolates which formed a distinct clade from Euro-Asiatic Tospoviruses. Phylogeny of the amino acid sequence of all tospoviral RdRps used in this study showed that all the known TSWV isolates including the USA isolate described in this study formed a distinct and a close cluster with that of Impateins necrotic spot virus. Multiple sequence alignment revealed conserved motifs in the RdRp of TSWV. Recombination analysis identified two recombinants including the TSWV WA-USA isolate. Among them, three recombination events were detected in the conserved motifs of the RdRp. Sequence analysis and phylogenetic analysis of the L RNA showed distinct clustering with selected TSWV isolates reported from elsewhere. Conserved motifs in the core polymerase region of the RdRp and recombination events were identified.

  7. Juvenile morphology in baleen whale phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R Ewan

    2014-09-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions are sensitive to the influence of ontogeny on morphology. Here, we use foetal/neonatal specimens of known species of living baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti) to show how juvenile morphology of extant species affects phylogenetic placement of the species. In one clade (sei whale, Balaenopteridae), the juvenile is distant from the usual phylogenetic position of adults, but in the other clade (pygmy right whale, Cetotheriidae), the juvenile is close to the adult. Different heterochronic processes at work in the studied species have different influences on juvenile morphology and on phylogenetic placement. This study helps to understand the relationship between evolutionary processes and phylogenetic patterns in baleen whale evolution and, more in general, between phylogeny and ontogeny; likewise, this study provides a proxy how to interpret the phylogeny when fossils that are immature individuals are included. Juvenile individuals in the peramorphic acceleration clades would produce misleading phylogenies, whereas juvenile individuals in the paedomorphic neoteny clades should still provide reliable phylogenetic signals.

  8. High-performance sports medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Speed, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    High performance sports medicine involves the medical care of athletes, who are extraordinary individuals and who are exposed to intensive physical and psychological stresses during training and competition...

  9. The roots of phylogeny: how did Haeckel build his trees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayrat, Benoît

    2003-08-01

    Haeckel created much of our current vocabulary in evolutionary biology, such as the term phylogeny, which is currently used to designate trees. Assuming that Haeckel gave the same meaning to this term, one often reproduces Haeckel's trees as the first illustrations of phylogenetic trees. A detailed analysis of Haeckel's own evolutionary vocabulary and theory revealed that Haeckel's trees were genealogical trees and that Haeckel's phylogeny was a morphological concept. However, phylogeny was actually the core of Haeckel's tree reconstruction, and understanding the exact meaning Haeckel gave to phylogeny is crucial to understanding the information Haeckel wanted to convey in his famous trees. Haeckel's phylogeny was a linear series of main morphological stages along the line of descent of a given species. The phylogeny of a single species would provide a trunk around which lateral branches were added as mere ornament; the phylogeny selected for drawing a tree of a given group was considered the most complete line of progress from lower to higher forms of this group, such as the phylogeny of Man for the genealogical tree of Vertebrates. Haeckel's phylogeny was mainly inspired by the idea of the scala naturae, or scale of being. Therefore, Haeckel's genealogical trees, which were only branched on the surface, mainly represented the old idea of scale of being. Even though Haeckel decided to draw genealogical trees after reading On the Origin of Species and was called the German Darwin, he did not draw Darwinian branching diagrams. Although Haeckel always saw Lamarck, Goethe, and Darwin as the three fathers of the theory of evolution, he was mainly influenced by Lamarck and Goethe in his approach to tree reconstruction.

  10. High Performance Space Pump Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — PDT is proposing a High Performance Space Pump based upon an innovative design using several technologies. The design will use a two-stage impeller, high temperature...

  11. RavenDB high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchie, Brian

    2013-01-01

    RavenDB High Performance is comprehensive yet concise tutorial that developers can use to.This book is for developers & software architects who are designing systems in order to achieve high performance right from the start. A basic understanding of RavenDB is recommended, but not required. While the book focuses on advanced topics, it does not assume that the reader has a great deal of prior knowledge of working with RavenDB.

  12. High Performance Computing at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, David H.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The speaker will give an overview of high performance computing in the U.S. in general and within NASA in particular, including a description of the recently signed NASA-IBM cooperative agreement. The latest performance figures of various parallel systems on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks will be presented. The speaker was one of the authors of the NAS (National Aerospace Standards) Parallel Benchmarks, which are now widely cited in the industry as a measure of sustained performance on realistic high-end scientific applications. It will be shown that significant progress has been made by the highly parallel supercomputer industry during the past year or so, with several new systems, based on high-performance RISC processors, that now deliver superior performance per dollar compared to conventional supercomputers. Various pitfalls in reporting performance will be discussed. The speaker will then conclude by assessing the general state of the high performance computing field.

  13. INL High Performance Building Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2010-02-01

    High performance buildings, also known as sustainable buildings and green buildings, are resource efficient structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reduce solid waste and pollutants, and limit the depletion of natural resources while also providing a thermally and visually comfortable working environment that increases productivity for building occupants. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish this mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate high performance sustainable design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. Additionally, INL is a large consumer of energy that contributes to both carbon emissions and resource inefficiency. In the current climate of rising energy prices and political pressure for carbon reduction, this guide will help new construction project teams to design facilities that are sustainable and reduce energy costs, thereby reducing carbon emissions. With these concerns in mind, the recommendations described in the INL High Performance Building Strategy (previously called the INL Green Building Strategy) are intended to form the INL foundation for high performance building standards. This revised strategy incorporates the latest federal and DOE orders (Executive Order [EO] 13514, “Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance” [2009], EO 13423, “Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management” [2007], and DOE Order 430.2B, “Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy, and Transportation Management” [2008]), the latest guidelines, trends, and observations in high performance building construction, and the latest changes to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

  14. High performance flexible heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaubach, R. M.; Gernert, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    A Phase I SBIR NASA program for developing and demonstrating high-performance flexible heat pipes for use in the thermal management of spacecraft is examined. The program combines several technologies such as flexible screen arteries and high-performance circumferential distribution wicks within an envelope which is flexible in the adiabatic heat transport zone. The first six months of work during which the Phase I contract goal were met, are described. Consideration is given to the heat-pipe performance requirements. A preliminary evaluation shows that the power requirement for Phase II of the program is 30.5 kilowatt meters at an operating temperature from 0 to 100 C.

  15. The High Performance Computing Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Lee B.; Smith, Paul H.; Macdonald, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses NASA High Performance Computing Initiative (HPCI), an essential component of the Federal High Performance Computing Program. The HPCI program is designed to provide a thousandfold increase in computing performance, and apply the technologies to NASA 'Grand Challenges'. The Grand Challenges chosen include integrated multidisciplinary simulations and design optimizations of aerospace vehicles throughout the mission profiles; the multidisciplinary modeling and data analysis of the earth and space science physical phenomena; and the spaceborne control of automated systems, handling, and analysis of sensor data and real-time response to sensor stimuli.

  16. High-Performance Operating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Robin

    1999-01-01

    Notes prepared for the DTU course 49421 "High Performance Operating Systems". The notes deal with quantitative and qualitative techniques for use in the design and evaluation of operating systems in computer systems for which performance is an important parameter, such as real-time applications......, communication systems and multimedia systems....

  17. High Performance Bulk Thermoelectric Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhifeng [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States)

    2013-03-31

    Over 13 plus years, we have carried out research on electron pairing symmetry of superconductors, growth and their field emission property studies on carbon nanotubes and semiconducting nanowires, high performance thermoelectric materials and other interesting materials. As a result of the research, we have published 104 papers, have educated six undergraduate students, twenty graduate students, nine postdocs, nine visitors, and one technician.

  18. A molecular phylogeny of living primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polina Perelman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Comparative genomic analyses of primates offer considerable potential to define and understand the processes that mold, shape, and transform the human genome. However, primate taxonomy is both complex and controversial, with marginal unifying consensus of the evolutionary hierarchy of extant primate species. Here we provide new genomic sequence (~8 Mb from 186 primates representing 61 (~90% of the described genera, and we include outgroup species from Dermoptera, Scandentia, and Lagomorpha. The resultant phylogeny is exceptionally robust and illuminates events in primate evolution from ancient to recent, clarifying numerous taxonomic controversies and providing new data on human evolution. Ongoing speciation, reticulate evolution, ancient relic lineages, unequal rates of evolution, and disparate distributions of insertions/deletions among the reconstructed primate lineages are uncovered. Our resolution of the primate phylogeny provides an essential evolutionary framework with far-reaching applications including: human selection and adaptation, global emergence of zoonotic diseases, mammalian comparative genomics, primate taxonomy, and conservation of endangered species.

  19. A Molecular Phylogeny of Living Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelman, Polina; Johnson, Warren E.; Roos, Christian; Seuánez, Hector N.; Horvath, Julie E.; Moreira, Miguel A. M.; Kessing, Bailey; Pontius, Joan; Roelke, Melody; Rumpler, Yves; Schneider, Maria Paula C.; Silva, Artur; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Pecon-Slattery, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses of primates offer considerable potential to define and understand the processes that mold, shape, and transform the human genome. However, primate taxonomy is both complex and controversial, with marginal unifying consensus of the evolutionary hierarchy of extant primate species. Here we provide new genomic sequence (∼8 Mb) from 186 primates representing 61 (∼90%) of the described genera, and we include outgroup species from Dermoptera, Scandentia, and Lagomorpha. The resultant phylogeny is exceptionally robust and illuminates events in primate evolution from ancient to recent, clarifying numerous taxonomic controversies and providing new data on human evolution. Ongoing speciation, reticulate evolution, ancient relic lineages, unequal rates of evolution, and disparate distributions of insertions/deletions among the reconstructed primate lineages are uncovered. Our resolution of the primate phylogeny provides an essential evolutionary framework with far-reaching applications including: human selection and adaptation, global emergence of zoonotic diseases, mammalian comparative genomics, primate taxonomy, and conservation of endangered species. PMID:21436896

  20. High performance in software development

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Haapio, Petri; Liukkonen, Juha-Matti

    2015-01-01

    What are the ingredients of high-performing software? Software development, especially for large high-performance systems, is one the most complex tasks mankind has ever tried. Technological change leads to huge opportunities but challenges our old ways of working. Processing large data sets, possibly in real time or with other tight computational constraints, requires an efficient solution architecture. Efficiency requirements span from the distributed storage and large-scale organization of computation and data onto the lowest level of processor and data bus behavior. Integrating performance behavior over these levels is especially important when the computation is resource-bounded, as it is in numerics: physical simulation, machine learning, estimation of statistical models, etc. For example, memory locality and utilization of vector processing are essential for harnessing the computing power of modern processor architectures due to the deep memory hierarchies of modern general-purpose computers. As a r...

  1. Neo4j high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Raj, Sonal

    2015-01-01

    If you are a professional or enthusiast who has a basic understanding of graphs or has basic knowledge of Neo4j operations, this is the book for you. Although it is targeted at an advanced user base, this book can be used by beginners as it touches upon the basics. So, if you are passionate about taming complex data with the help of graphs and building high performance applications, you will be able to get valuable insights from this book.

  2. High-performance sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Cathy

    2013-02-01

    High performance sports medicine involves the medical care of athletes, who are extraordinary individuals and who are exposed to intensive physical and psychological stresses during training and competition. The physician has a broad remit and acts as a 'medical guardian' to optimise health while minimising risks. This review describes this interesting field of medicine, its unique challenges and priorities for the physician in delivering best healthcare.

  3. Whole genome phylogenies for multiple Drosophila species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetharam Arun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstructing the evolutionary history of organisms using traditional phylogenetic methods may suffer from inaccurate sequence alignment. An alternative approach, particularly effective when whole genome sequences are available, is to employ methods that don’t use explicit sequence alignments. We extend a novel phylogenetic method based on Singular Value Decomposition (SVD to reconstruct the phylogeny of 12 sequenced Drosophila species. SVD analysis provides accurate comparisons for a high fraction of sequences within whole genomes without the prior identification of orthologs or homologous sites. With this method all protein sequences are converted to peptide frequency vectors within a matrix that is decomposed to provide simplified vector representations for each protein of the genome in a reduced dimensional space. These vectors are summed together to provide a vector representation for each species, and the angle between these vectors provides distance measures that are used to construct species trees. Results An unfiltered whole genome analysis (193,622 predicted proteins strongly supports the currently accepted phylogeny for 12 Drosophila species at higher dimensions except for the generally accepted but difficult to discern sister relationship between D. erecta and D. yakuba. Also, in accordance with previous studies, many sequences appear to support alternative phylogenies. In this case, we observed grouping of D. erecta with D. sechellia when approximately 55% to 95% of the proteins were removed using a filter based on projection values or by reducing resolution by using fewer dimensions. Similar results were obtained when just the melanogaster subgroup was analyzed. Conclusions These results indicate that using our novel phylogenetic method, it is possible to consult and interpret all predicted protein sequences within multiple whole genomes to produce accurate phylogenetic estimations of relatedness between

  4. High Performance Tools And Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collette, M R; Corey, I R; Johnson, J R

    2005-01-24

    This goal of this project was to evaluate the capability and limits of current scientific simulation development tools and technologies with specific focus on their suitability for use with the next generation of scientific parallel applications and High Performance Computing (HPC) platforms. The opinions expressed in this document are those of the authors, and reflect the authors' current understanding and functionality of the many tools investigated. As a deliverable for this effort, we are presenting this report describing our findings along with an associated spreadsheet outlining current capabilities and characteristics of leading and emerging tools in the high performance computing arena. This first chapter summarizes our findings (which are detailed in the other chapters) and presents our conclusions, remarks, and anticipations for the future. In the second chapter, we detail how various teams in our local high performance community utilize HPC tools and technologies, and mention some common concerns they have about them. In the third chapter, we review the platforms currently or potentially available to utilize these tools and technologies on to help in software development. Subsequent chapters attempt to provide an exhaustive overview of the available parallel software development tools and technologies, including their strong and weak points and future concerns. We categorize them as debuggers, memory checkers, performance analysis tools, communication libraries, data visualization programs, and other parallel development aides. The last chapter contains our closing information. Included with this paper at the end is a table of the discussed development tools and their operational environment.

  5. Multiple Nuclear Ortholog (COSII) Phylogeny of Wild Potatoes and Tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phylogenies reconstructed with only one or a few independently inherited loci may be unresolved or incongruent due to taxon and gene sampling, horizontal gene transfer, or differential selection and lineage sorting at individual loci. In an effort to remedy this situation, we examined more than 80 c...

  6. The phylogeny of Arthrotardigrada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Guldberg

    2011-01-01

    The order Arthrotardigrada, or water bears, constitutes a small group of 160 species of marine, microscopical invertebrates, within the phylum Tardigrada. Although the position of tardigrades in the Animal Kingdom has received much attention focusing on the metazoan phylogeny, the phylogenetic...

  7. Fossils and decapod phylogeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, Frederick R.; Dixon, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    An expanded series of morphological characters developed for a cladistic analysis of extant decapods has yielded a new hypothesis for the phylogeny of the group. Application of this database to selected fossil genera produces some interesting results and demonstrates the feasibility of treating

  8. High-performing physician executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M; Larson, S R; McCool, B P

    1988-01-01

    Physician leadership extends beyond traditional clinical disciplines to hospital administration, group practice management, health policy making, management of managed care programs, and many business positions. What kind of person makes a good physician executive? What stands out as the most important motivations, attributes, and interests of high-performing physician executives? How does this compare with non-physician health care executives? Such questions have long been high on the agenda of executives in other industries. This article builds on existing formal assessments of leadership attributes of high-performing business, government, and educational executives and on closer examination of health care executives. Previous studies looked at the need for innovative, entrepreneurial, energetic, community-oriented leaders for positions throughout health care. Traits that distinguish excellence and leadership were described by Brown and McCool.* That study characterized successful leaders in terms of physical strengths (high energy, good health, and propensity for hard work), mental strengths (creativity, intuition, and innovation), and organizational strengths (mission orientation, vision, and entrepreneurial spirit). In this investigation, a subset of health care executives, including physician executives, was examined more closely. It was initially assumed that successful physician executives exhibit many of the same positive traits as do nonphysician executives. This assumption was tested with physician leaders in a range of administrative and managerial positions. We also set out to identify key differences between physician and nonphysician executives. Even with our limited exploration, it seems to us that physician executives probably do differ from nonphysician executives.

  9. High Performance Flexible Thermal Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Arne; Preller, Fabian

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with the design and performance verification of a high performance and flexible carbon fibre thermal link.Project goal was to design a space qualified thermal link combining low mass, flexibility and high thermal conductivity with new approaches regarding selected materials and processes. The idea was to combine the advantages of existing metallic links regarding flexibility and the thermal performance of high conductive carbon pitch fibres. Special focus is laid on the thermal performance improvement of matrix systems by means of nano-scaled carbon materials in order to improve the thermal performance also perpendicular to the direction of the unidirectional fibres.One of the main challenges was to establish a manufacturing process which allows handling the stiff and brittle fibres, applying the matrix and performing the implementation into an interface component using unconventional process steps like thermal bonding of fibres after metallisation.This research was funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi).

  10. High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin; Lin, Feng; Wu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells fabricated from organometal halide light harvesters have captured significant attention due to their tremendously low device costs as well as unprecedented rapid progress on power conversion efficiency (PCE). A certified PCE of 20.1% was achieved in late 2014 following the first study of long‐term stable all‐solid‐state perovskite solar cell with a PCE of 9.7% in 2012, showing their promising potential towards future cost‐effective and high performance solar cells. Here, notable achievements of primary device configuration involving perovskite layer, hole‐transporting materials (HTMs) and electron‐transporting materials (ETMs) are reviewed. Numerous strategies for enhancing photovoltaic parameters of perovskite solar cells, including morphology and crystallization control of perovskite layer, HTMs design and ETMs modifications are discussed in detail. In addition, perovskite solar cells outside of HTMs and ETMs are mentioned as well, providing guidelines for further simplification of device processing and hence cost reduction. PMID:27774402

  11. High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin; Lin, Feng; Wu, Jiang; Wang, Zhiming M

    2016-05-01

    Perovskite solar cells fabricated from organometal halide light harvesters have captured significant attention due to their tremendously low device costs as well as unprecedented rapid progress on power conversion efficiency (PCE). A certified PCE of 20.1% was achieved in late 2014 following the first study of long-term stable all-solid-state perovskite solar cell with a PCE of 9.7% in 2012, showing their promising potential towards future cost-effective and high performance solar cells. Here, notable achievements of primary device configuration involving perovskite layer, hole-transporting materials (HTMs) and electron-transporting materials (ETMs) are reviewed. Numerous strategies for enhancing photovoltaic parameters of perovskite solar cells, including morphology and crystallization control of perovskite layer, HTMs design and ETMs modifications are discussed in detail. In addition, perovskite solar cells outside of HTMs and ETMs are mentioned as well, providing guidelines for further simplification of device processing and hence cost reduction.

  12. High Performance Proactive Digital Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Soltan; Moa, Belaid; Weber-Jahnke, Jens; Traore, Issa

    2012-10-01

    With the increase in the number of digital crimes and in their sophistication, High Performance Computing (HPC) is becoming a must in Digital Forensics (DF). According to the FBI annual report, the size of data processed during the 2010 fiscal year reached 3,086 TB (compared to 2,334 TB in 2009) and the number of agencies that requested Regional Computer Forensics Laboratory assistance increasing from 689 in 2009 to 722 in 2010. Since most investigation tools are both I/O and CPU bound, the next-generation DF tools are required to be distributed and offer HPC capabilities. The need for HPC is even more evident in investigating crimes on clouds or when proactive DF analysis and on-site investigation, requiring semi-real time processing, are performed. Although overcoming the performance challenge is a major goal in DF, as far as we know, there is almost no research on HPC-DF except for few papers. As such, in this work, we extend our work on the need of a proactive system and present a high performance automated proactive digital forensic system. The most expensive phase of the system, namely proactive analysis and detection, uses a parallel extension of the iterative z algorithm. It also implements new parallel information-based outlier detection algorithms to proactively and forensically handle suspicious activities. To analyse a large number of targets and events and continuously do so (to capture the dynamics of the system), we rely on a multi-resolution approach to explore the digital forensic space. Data set from the Honeynet Forensic Challenge in 2001 is used to evaluate the system from DF and HPC perspectives.

  13. Phylogeny and evolution of RNA structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Tanja; Schuster, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Darwin's conviction that all living beings on Earth are related and the graph of relatedness is tree-shaped has been essentially confirmed by phylogenetic reconstruction first from morphology and later from data obtained by molecular sequencing. Limitations of the phylogenetic tree concept were recognized as more and more sequence information became available. The other path-breaking idea of Darwin, natural selection of fitter variants in populations, is cast into simple mathematical form and extended to mutation-selection dynamics. In this form the theory is directly applicable to RNA evolution in vitro and to virus evolution. Phylogeny and population dynamics of RNA provide complementary insights into evolution and the interplay between the two concepts will be pursued throughout this chapter. The two strategies for understanding evolution are ultimately related through the central paradigm of structural biology: sequence ⇒ structure ⇒ function. We elaborate on the state of the art in modeling both phylogeny and evolution of RNA driven by reproduction and mutation. Thereby the focus will be laid on models for phylogenetic sequence evolution as well as evolution and design of RNA structures with selected examples and notes on simulation methods. In the perspectives an attempt is made to combine molecular structure, population dynamics, and phylogeny in modeling evolution.

  14. Inference of Large Phylogenies Using Neighbour-Joining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Martin; Mailund, Thomas; Pedersen, Christian Nørgaard Storm

    2011-01-01

    The neighbour-joining method is a widely used method for phylogenetic reconstruction which scales to thousands of taxa. However, advances in sequencing technology have made data sets with more than 10,000 related taxa widely available. Inference of such large phylogenies takes hours or days using...... the Neighbour-Joining method on a normal desktop computer because of the O(n^3) running time. RapidNJ is a search heuristic which reduce the running time of the Neighbour-Joining method significantly but at the cost of an increased memory consumption making inference of large phylogenies infeasible. We present...

  15. Meta-analysis of general bacterial subclades in whole-genome phylogenies using tree topology profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, Thomas; Krause, Antje

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, a large number of whole-genome phylogenies have been inferred to reconstruct the Tree of Life (ToL). Underlying data models range from gene or functionality content in species to phylogenetic gene family trees and multiple sequence alignments of concatenated protein sequences. Diversity in data models together with the use of different tree reconstruction techniques, disruptive biological effects and the steadily increasing number of genomes have led to a huge diversity in published phylogenies. Comparison of those and, moreover, identification of the impact of inference properties (underlying data model, inference technique) on particular reconstructions is almost impossible. In this work, we introduce tree topology profiling as a method to compare already published whole-genome phylogenies. This method requires visual determination of the particular topology in a drawn whole-genome phylogeny for a set of particular bacterial clans. For each clan, neighborhoods to other bacteria are collected into a catalogue of generalized alternative topologies. Particular topology alternatives found for an ordered list of bacterial clans reveal a topology profile that represents the analyzed phylogeny. To simulate the inhomogeneity of published gene content phylogenies we generate a set of seven phylogenies using different inference techniques and the SYSTERS-PhyloMatrix data model. After tree topology profiling on in total 54 selected published and newly inferred phylogenies, we separate artefactual from biologically meaningful phylogenies and associate particular inference results (phylogenies) with inference background (inference techniques as well as data models). Topological relationships of particular bacterial species groups are presented. With this work we introduce tree topology profiling into the scientific field of comparative phylogenomics.

  16. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  17. Molecular phylogeny and taxonomic review of Premnobiini Browne 1962 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony I Cognato

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomy of Premnobiini is reviewed in the context a molecular phylogeny including species of Ipini, Dryocoeotini, and Xyleborini. DNA data from COI, 16S, 28S, and CAD (~ 2640 characters were generated for 79 species and phylogenies were reconstructed using parsimony and Bayesian methods under different nucleotide sequence alignment parameters. The topologies of these phylogenies were in general agreement. Ipini was monophyletic along with all genera except Acathotomicus. Premnobiini was nested within Ipini and consisted of two clades, which associated with Premnobius and Premnophilus. These results justified taxonomic changes. Premnophilus was resurrected as a valid genus and Premnobiini was considered a sub-tribe of Ipini.

  18. Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    High performance schools are facilities that improve the learning environment while saving energy, resources, and money. The key is understanding the lifetime value of high performance schools and effectively managing priorities, time, and budget.

  19. Carpet Aids Learning in High Performance Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The Healthy and High Performance Schools Act of 2002 has set specific federal guidelines for school design, and developed a federal/state partnership program to assist local districts in their school planning. According to the Collaborative for High Performance Schools (CHPS), high-performance schools are, among other things, healthy, comfortable,…

  20. Inferring phylogenies from RAD sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin E R Rubin

    Full Text Available Reduced-representation genome sequencing represents a new source of data for systematics, and its potential utility in interspecific phylogeny reconstruction has not yet been explored. One approach that seems especially promising is the use of inexpensive short-read technologies (e.g., Illumina, SOLiD to sequence restriction-site associated DNA (RAD--the regions of the genome that flank the recognition sites of restriction enzymes. In this study, we simulated the collection of RAD sequences from sequenced genomes of different taxa (Drosophila, mammals, and yeasts and developed a proof-of-concept workflow to test whether informative data could be extracted and used to accurately reconstruct "known" phylogenies of species within each group. The workflow consists of three basic steps: first, sequences are clustered by similarity to estimate orthology; second, clusters are filtered by taxonomic coverage; and third, they are aligned and concatenated for "total evidence" phylogenetic analysis. We evaluated the performance of clustering and filtering parameters by comparing the resulting topologies with well-supported reference trees and we were able to identify conditions under which the reference tree was inferred with high support. For Drosophila, whole genome alignments allowed us to directly evaluate which parameters most consistently recovered orthologous sequences. For the parameter ranges explored, we recovered the best results at the low ends of sequence similarity and taxonomic representation of loci; these generated the largest supermatrices with the highest proportion of missing data. Applications of the method to mammals and yeasts were less successful, which we suggest may be due partly to their much deeper evolutionary divergence times compared to Drosophila (crown ages of approximately 100 and 300 versus 60 Mya, respectively. RAD sequences thus appear to hold promise for reconstructing phylogenetic relationships in younger clades in

  1. High performance computing and communications program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Lee

    1992-01-01

    A review of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) program is provided in vugraph format. The goals and objectives of this federal program are as follows: extend U.S. leadership in high performance computing and computer communications; disseminate the technologies to speed innovation and to serve national goals; and spur gains in industrial competitiveness by making high performance computing integral to design and production.

  2. High Performance Spaceflight Computing (HPSC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In 2012, the NASA Game Changing Development Program (GCDP), residing in the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD), commissioned a High Performance...

  3. High performance carbon nanocomposites for ultracapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to composite electrodes for electrochemical devices, particularly to carbon nanotube composite electrodes for high performance electrochemical devices, such as ultracapacitors.

  4. Using MOEA with Redistribution and Consensus Branches to Infer Phylogenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Xiaoping; Zhang, Mouzhao; Yuan, Sisi; Ge, Shengxiang; Liu, Xiangrong; Zeng, Xiangxiang; Xia, Ningshao

    2017-12-26

    In recent years, to infer phylogenies, which are NP-hard problems, more and more research has focused on using metaheuristics. Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood are two effective ways to conduct inference. Based on these methods, which can also be considered as the optimal criteria for phylogenies, various kinds of multi-objective metaheuristics have been used to reconstruct phylogenies. However, combining these two time-consuming methods results in those multi-objective metaheuristics being slower than a single objective. Therefore, we propose a novel, multi-objective optimization algorithm, MOEA-RC, to accelerate the processes of rebuilding phylogenies using structural information of elites in current populations. We compare MOEA-RC with two representative multi-objective algorithms, MOEA/D and NAGA-II, and a non-consensus version of MOEA-RC on three real-world datasets. The result is, within a given number of iterations, MOEA-RC achieves better solutions than the other algorithms.

  5. Using MOEA with Redistribution and Consensus Branches to Infer Phylogenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Min

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, to infer phylogenies, which are NP-hard problems, more and more research has focused on using metaheuristics. Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood are two effective ways to conduct inference. Based on these methods, which can also be considered as the optimal criteria for phylogenies, various kinds of multi-objective metaheuristics have been used to reconstruct phylogenies. However, combining these two time-consuming methods results in those multi-objective metaheuristics being slower than a single objective. Therefore, we propose a novel, multi-objective optimization algorithm, MOEA-RC, to accelerate the processes of rebuilding phylogenies using structural information of elites in current populations. We compare MOEA-RC with two representative multi-objective algorithms, MOEA/D and NAGA-II, and a non-consensus version of MOEA-RC on three real-world datasets. The result is, within a given number of iterations, MOEA-RC achieves better solutions than the other algorithms.

  6. An Associate Degree in High Performance Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Arnold

    In order for more individuals to enter higher paying jobs, employers must create a sufficient number of high-performance positions (the demand side), and workers must acquire the skills needed to perform in these restructured workplaces (the supply side). Creating an associate degree in High Performance Manufacturing (HPM) will help address four…

  7. Phylogeny of filamentous ascomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbsch, H. T.

    Phylogenetic studies of higher ascomycetes are enhanced by the introduction of molecular markers. Most studies employed sequences of the SSU rRNA gene, but recently data from additional genes (RPB2, LSU rRNA) have become available. Several groups defined by their ascoma-type, such as Pyrenomycetes, are supported while others, like the Discomycetes, appear to be paraphyletic. The Pezizales with operculate asci are basal to other eu-ascomycetes, while other Discomycetes appear to be derived eu-ascomycetes. The re-evaluation of classical characters using molecular data is discussed using three examples. Ascus types are often regarded as being of major importance in ascomycete systematics, but prototunicate asci were found to be of poor taxonomic value, since ascomycetes with prototunicate asci are polyphyletic. The independence of the Agyriales, assumed from their morphological characters, is supported by sequence data but the relationship to supposed sister groups remains dubious. The phylogeny of ascolocularous fungi and their circumscription requires further study. While a circumscription based on bitunicate asci can be rejected, it remains unclear whether fungi with ascolocularous ascoma development represent a monophyletic entity.

  8. Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holton, J.

    2012-02-01

    The Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting has been developed to provide a tool for the understanding and application of high performance lighting in the home. The high performance lighting strategies featured in this guide are drawn from recent advances in commercial lighting for application to typical spaces found in residential buildings. This guide offers strategies to greatly reduce lighting energy use through the application of high quality fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) technologies. It is important to note that these strategies not only save energy in the home but also serve to satisfy the homeowner's expectations for high quality lighting.

  9. High Performance Grinding and Advanced Cutting Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    High Performance Grinding and Advanced Cutting Tools discusses the fundamentals and advances in high performance grinding processes, and provides a complete overview of newly-developing areas in the field. Topics covered are grinding tool formulation and structure, grinding wheel design and conditioning and applications using high performance grinding wheels. Also included are heat treatment strategies for grinding tools, using grinding tools for high speed applications, laser-based and diamond dressing techniques, high-efficiency deep grinding, VIPER grinding, and new grinding wheels.

  10. Radiation Hard High Performance Optoelectronic Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High-performance, radiation-hard, widely-tunable integrated laser/modulator chip and large-area avalanche photodetectors (APDs) are key components of optical...

  11. High Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMTC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a High-Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMRE) to meet the demands of advanced chemical propulsion systems for deep-space mission...

  12. High-performance computing using FPGAs

    CERN Document Server

    Benkrid, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    This book is concerned with the emerging field of High Performance Reconfigurable Computing (HPRC), which aims to harness the high performance and relative low power of reconfigurable hardware–in the form Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs)–in High Performance Computing (HPC) applications. It presents the latest developments in this field from applications, architecture, and tools and methodologies points of view. We hope that this work will form a reference for existing researchers in the field, and entice new researchers and developers to join the HPRC community.  The book includes:  Thirteen application chapters which present the most important application areas tackled by high performance reconfigurable computers, namely: financial computing, bioinformatics and computational biology, data search and processing, stencil computation e.g. computational fluid dynamics and seismic modeling, cryptanalysis, astronomical N-body simulation, and circuit simulation.     Seven architecture chapters which...

  13. High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method for the Determination of Anethole in Rat Plasma. ... Journal Home > Vol 13, No 5 (2014) > ... Results: GC determination showed that anethole in the essential oil of star anise exhibited a ...

  14. Analog circuit design designing high performance amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Feucht, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The third volume Designing High Performance Amplifiers applies the concepts from the first two volumes. It is an advanced treatment of amplifier design/analysis emphasizing both wideband and precision amplification.

  15. High performance computing in Windows Azure cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Ambruš, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    High performance, security, availability, scalability, flexibility and lower costs of maintenance have essentially contributed to the growing popularity of cloud computing in all spheres of life, especially in business. In fact cloud computing offers even more than this. With usage of virtual computing clusters a runtime environment for high performance computing can be efficiently implemented also in a cloud. There are many advantages but also some disadvantages of cloud computing, some ...

  16. Obscured phylogeny and possible recombinational dormancy in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer Stanley A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli is one of the best studied organisms in all of biology, but its phylogenetic structure has been difficult to resolve with current data and analytical techniques. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms in chromosomes of representative strains to reconstruct the topology of its emergence. Results The phylogeny of E. coli varies according to the segment of chromosome analyzed. Recombination between extant E. coli groups is largely limited to only three intergroup pairings. Conclusions Segment-dependent phylogenies most likely are legacies of a complex recombination history. However, E. coli are now in an epoch in which they no longer broadly share DNA. Using the definition of species as organisms that freely exchange genetic material, this recombinational dormancy could reflect either the end of E. coli as a species, or herald the coalescence of E. coli groups into new species.

  17. High performance image processing of SPRINT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGroot, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    This talk will describe computed tomography (CT) reconstruction using filtered back-projection on SPRINT parallel computers. CT is a computationally intensive task, typically requiring several minutes to reconstruct a 512x512 image. SPRINT and other parallel computers can be applied to CT reconstruction to reduce computation time from minutes to seconds. SPRINT is a family of massively parallel computers developed at LLNL. SPRINT-2.5 is a 128-node multiprocessor whose performance can exceed twice that of a Cray-Y/MP. SPRINT-3 will be 10 times faster. Described will be the parallel algorithms for filtered back-projection and their execution on SPRINT parallel computers.

  18. Phylogeny and diversification patterns among vesicomyid bivalves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Decker

    Full Text Available Vesicomyid bivalves are among the most abundant and diverse symbiotic taxa in chemosynthetic-based ecosystems: more than 100 different vesicomyid species have been described so far. In the present study, we investigated the phylogenetic positioning of recently described vesicomyid species from the Gulf of Guinea and their western Atlantic and Pacific counterparts using mitochondrial DNA sequence data. The maximum-likelihood (ML tree provided limited support for the recent taxonomic revision of vesicomyids based on morphological criteria; nevertheless, most of the newly sequenced specimens did not cluster with their morphological conspecifics. Moreover, the observed lack of geographic clustering suggests the occurrence of independent radiations followed by worldwide dispersal. Ancestral character state reconstruction showed a significant correlation between the characters "depth" and "habitat" and the reconstructed ML phylogeny suggesting possible recurrent events of 'stepwise speciation' from shallow to deep waters in different ocean basins. This is consistent with genus or species bathymetric segregation observed from recent taxonomic studies. Altogether, our results highlight the need for ongoing re-evaluation of the morphological characters used to identify vesicomyid bivalves.

  19. A mitogenomic phylogeny of living primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finstermeier, Knut; Zinner, Dietmar; Brameier, Markus; Meyer, Matthias; Kreuz, Eva; Hofreiter, Michael; Roos, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Primates, the mammalian order including our own species, comprise 480 species in 78 genera. Thus, they represent the third largest of the 18 orders of eutherian mammals. Although recent phylogenetic studies on primates are increasingly built on molecular datasets, most of these studies have focused on taxonomic subgroups within the order. Complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes have proven to be extremely useful in deciphering within-order relationships even up to deep nodes. Using 454 sequencing, we sequenced 32 new complete mt genomes adding 20 previously not represented genera to the phylogenetic reconstruction of the primate tree. With 13 new sequences, the number of complete mt genomes within the parvorder Platyrrhini was widely extended, resulting in a largely resolved branching pattern among New World monkey families. We added 10 new Strepsirrhini mt genomes to the 15 previously available ones, thus almost doubling the number of mt genomes within this clade. Our data allow precise date estimates of all nodes and offer new insights into primate evolution. One major result is a relatively young date for the most recent common ancestor of all living primates which was estimated to 66-69 million years ago, suggesting that the divergence of extant primates started close to the K/T-boundary. Although some relationships remain unclear, the large number of mt genomes used allowed us to reconstruct a robust primate phylogeny which is largely in agreement with previous publications. Finally, we show that mt genomes are a useful tool for resolving primate phylogenetic relationships on various taxonomic levels.

  20. Phylogeny and Evolution of Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitter, Charles; Davis, Donald R; Cummings, Michael P

    2017-01-31

    Until recently, deep-level phylogeny in Lepidoptera, the largest single radiation of plant-feeding insects, was very poorly understood. Over the past two decades, building on a preceding era of morphological cladistic studies, molecular data have yielded robust initial estimates of relationships both within and among the ∼43 superfamilies, with unsolved problems now yielding to much larger data sets from high-throughput sequencing. Here we summarize progress on lepidopteran phylogeny since 1975, emphasizing the superfamily level, and discuss some resulting advances in our understanding of lepidopteran evolution.

  1. Strategy Guideline. Partnering for High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prahl, Duncan [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. This guide is intended for use by all parties associated in the design and construction of high performance homes. It serves as a starting point and features initial tools and resources for teams to collaborate to continually improve the energy efficiency and durability of new houses.

  2. The shape of mammalian phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purvis, Andy; Fritz, Susanne A; Rodríguez, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    an assemblage, ecoregion or larger area always tends to be more unbalanced than expected from the phylogeny of species at the next more inclusive spatial scale. We conclude with a verbal model of mammalian macroevolution, which emphasizes the importance to diversification of accessing new regions...

  3. Toward High Performance in Industrial Refrigeration Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, C.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Niemann, H.

    2002-01-01

    Achieving high performance in complex industrial systems requires information manipulation at different system levels. The paper shows how different models of same subsystems, but using different quality of information/data, are used for fault diagnosis as well as robust control design in industr......Achieving high performance in complex industrial systems requires information manipulation at different system levels. The paper shows how different models of same subsystems, but using different quality of information/data, are used for fault diagnosis as well as robust control design...... in industrial refrigeration systems....

  4. Towards High Performance in Industrial Refrigeration Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, C.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Niemann, H.

    2002-01-01

    Achieving high performance in complex industrial systems requires information manipulation at different system levels. The paper shows how different models of same subsystems, but using different quality of information/data, are used for fault diagnosis as well as robust control design in industr......Achieving high performance in complex industrial systems requires information manipulation at different system levels. The paper shows how different models of same subsystems, but using different quality of information/data, are used for fault diagnosis as well as robust control design...... in industrial refrigeration systems....

  5. High performance parallel I/O

    CERN Document Server

    Prabhat

    2014-01-01

    Gain Critical Insight into the Parallel I/O EcosystemParallel I/O is an integral component of modern high performance computing (HPC), especially in storing and processing very large datasets to facilitate scientific discovery. Revealing the state of the art in this field, High Performance Parallel I/O draws on insights from leading practitioners, researchers, software architects, developers, and scientists who shed light on the parallel I/O ecosystem.The first part of the book explains how large-scale HPC facilities scope, configure, and operate systems, with an emphasis on choices of I/O har

  6. High performance computing at Sandia National Labs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, R.M.; Noe, J.P.; Vandevender, W.H.

    1995-10-01

    Sandia`s High Performance Computing Environment requires a hierarchy of resources ranging from desktop, to department, to centralized, and finally to very high-end corporate resources capable of teraflop performance linked via high-capacity Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) networks. The mission of the Scientific Computing Systems Department is to provide the support infrastructure for an integrated corporate scientific computing environment that will meet Sandia`s needs in high-performance and midrange computing, network storage, operational support tools, and systems management. This paper describes current efforts at SNL/NM to expand and modernize centralized computing resources in support of this mission.

  7. High Performance Networks for High Impact Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Mary A.; Bair, Raymond A.

    2003-02-13

    This workshop was the first major activity in developing a strategic plan for high-performance networking in the Office of Science. Held August 13 through 15, 2002, it brought together a selection of end users, especially representing the emerging, high-visibility initiatives, and network visionaries to identify opportunities and begin defining the path forward.

  8. An Introduction to High Performance Fortran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Merlin

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available High Performance Fortran (HPF is an informal standard for extensions to Fortran 90 to assist its implementation on parallel architectures, particularly for data-parallel computation. Among other things, it includes directives for specifying data distribution across multiple memories, and concurrent execution features. This article provides a tutorial introduction to the main features of HPF.

  9. Debugging a high performance computing program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Thomas M.

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus, and computer program products are disclosed for debugging a high performance computing program by gathering lists of addresses of calling instructions for a plurality of threads of execution of the program, assigning the threads to groups in dependence upon the addresses, and displaying the groups to identify defective threads.

  10. High Performance Work Systems for Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contacos-Sawyer, Jonna; Revels, Mark; Ciampa, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the key elements of a High Performance Work System (HPWS) and explore the possibility of implementation in an online institution of higher learning. With the projected rapid growth of the demand for online education and its importance in post-secondary education, providing high quality curriculum, excellent…

  11. Optimization and validation of high performance liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimization and validation of high performance liquid chromatography-ultra violet method for quantitation of metoprolol in rabbit plasma: application to ... Methods: Mobile phase of methanol and 50 mM ammonium dihydrogen phosphate solution (50:50) at pH 3.05 was used for separation of metoprolol on BDS hypersil ...

  12. Project materials [Commercial High Performance Buildings Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-01-01

    The Consortium for High Performance Buildings (ChiPB) is an outgrowth of DOE'S Commercial Whole Buildings Roadmapping initiatives. It is a team-driven public/private partnership that seeks to enable and demonstrate the benefit of buildings that are designed, built and operated to be energy efficient, environmentally sustainable, superior quality, and cost effective.

  13. Comparing Dutch and British high performing managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, A.A. de; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Selvarajah, C.; Meyer, D.

    2016-01-01

    National cultures have a strong influence on the performance of organizations and should be taken into account when studying the traits of high performing managers. At the same time, many studies that focus upon the attributes of successful managers show that there are attributes that are similar

  14. High performance computing on vector systems

    CERN Document Server

    Roller, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Presents the developments in high-performance computing and simulation on modern supercomputer architectures. This book covers trends in hardware and software development in general and specifically the vector-based systems and heterogeneous architectures. It presents innovative fields like coupled multi-physics or multi-scale simulations.

  15. Performance, Performance System, and High Performance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hwan Young

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes needed transitions in the field of human performance technology. The following three transitions are discussed: transitioning from training to performance, transitioning from performance to performance system, and transitioning from learning organization to high performance system. A proposed framework that comprises…

  16. Gradient High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a gradient high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the simultaneous determination of phenylephrine (PHE) and ibuprofen (IBU) in solid dosage form. Methods: HPLC determination was carried out on an Agilent XDB C-18 column (4.6 x 150mm, 5 μ particle size) with a gradient ...

  17. Teacher Accountability at High Performing Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Moises G.

    2016-01-01

    This study will examine the teacher accountability and evaluation policies and practices at three high performing charter schools located in San Diego County, California. Charter schools are exempted from many laws, rules, and regulations that apply to traditional school systems. By examining the teacher accountability systems at high performing…

  18. Technology Leadership in Malaysia's High Performance School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yieng, Wong Ai; Daud, Khadijah Binti

    2017-01-01

    Headmaster as leader of the school also plays a role as a technology leader. This applies to the high performance schools (HPS) headmaster as well. The HPS excel in all aspects of education. In this study, researcher is interested in examining the role of the headmaster as a technology leader through interviews with three headmasters of high…

  19. High Performance Computing and Communications Panel Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, Washington, DC.

    This report offers advice on the strengths and weaknesses of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) initiative, one of five presidential initiatives launched in 1992 and coordinated by the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology. The HPCC program has the following objectives: (1) to extend U.S.…

  20. High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Determination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a simple, precise and rapid high-performance liquid chromatographic technique coupled with photodiode array detection (DAD) method for the simultaneous determination of rutin, quercetin, luteolin, genistein, galangin and curcumin in propolis. Methods: Ultrasound-assisted extraction was applied to ...

  1. Rapid high performance liquid chromatographic determination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid high performance liquid chromatographic determination of chlorpropamide in human plasma. MTB Odunola, IS Enemali, M Garba, OO Obodozie. Abstract. Samples were extracted with dichloromethane and the organic layer evaporated to dryness. The residue was dissolved in methanol, and 25 ìl aliquot injected ...

  2. High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chromatography (HPLC) technique with UV-VIS detection method was developed for the determination of the compound in rat ... Keywords: Anethole, High performance liguid chromatography, Star anise, Essential oil, Rat plasma,. Illicium verum Hook. .... solution of anethole. Plasma proteins were precipitated by adding 0.3.

  3. High-performance computing reveals missing genes

    OpenAIRE

    Whyte, Barry James

    2010-01-01

    Scientists at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute and the Department of Computer Science at Virginia Tech have used high-performance computing to locate small genes that have been missed by scientists in their quest to define the microbial DNA sequences of life.

  4. Lateral gene transfer in phylogeny of azoreductase enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafana, Amit; Chakrabarti, Tapan

    2008-06-01

    This paper attempts to reconstruct the phylogeny of azoreductase enzyme from different organisms and compare it with the small subunit rRNA-based phylogeny of the organisms. The two phylogenies were found to be incongruent, indicating several events of lateral transfer of azoreductase gene between phylogenetically diverse organisms. However, the phylogenetic analysis methods have several limitations and a single method may not give the true pattern. Hence, it is necessary to corroborate the results with other complementary analysis tools. We used several tools to test our hypothesis of lateral transfer and found that it was supported not only by the analysis of the whole sequences, but also by the conserved motifs detected in these sequences. There were ample evidences for lateral transfer of azoreductase gene among enteric bacteria. There were also indications that azoreductase probably evolved in prokaryotes and then it was laterally transferred to eukaryotes in multiple events, resulting in some sequence variation among eukaryotic azoreductases. Finally, profile HMMs and conserved motifs extracted from these azoreductase sequences were found to provide sensitive tools for identifying potential azoreductases from the database. The analysis techniques used in this study can be extended to other gene trees to verify their evolutionary histories.

  5. Phylogeny, systematics, and trait evolution of Carex section Glareosae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguilla, Enrique; Escudero, Marcial; Waterway, Marcia J; Hipp, Andrew L; Luceño, Modesto

    2015-07-01

    • The circumboreal Carex section Glareosae comprises 20-25 currently accepted species. High variability in geographic distribution, ecology, cytogenetics, and morphology has led to historical problems both in species delimitation and in circumscribing the limits of the section, which is one of the major tasks facing caricologists today.• We performed phylogenetic reconstructions based on ETS, ITS, G3PDH, and matK DNA sequences from 204 samples. Concatenation of gene regions in a supermatrix approach to phylogenetic reconstruction was compared to coalescent-based species-tree estimation. Ancestral state reconstructions were performed for eight morphological characters to evaluate correspondence between phylogeny and traits used in traditional classification within the section.• The results confirm the existence of a core Glareosae comprising 23-25 species. Most species constitute exclusive lineages, and relationships among species are highly resolved with both the supermatrix and coalescent-based species-tree approaches. We used ancestral state reconstruction to investigate sources of homoplasy underlying traditional taxonomy and species circumscription. We found that even species apparently not constituting exclusive lineages are morphologically homogeneous, raising the question of whether paraphyly of species is a phylogenetic artifact in our study or evidence of widespread homoplasy in characters used to define species.• This study demonstrates the monophyly of Carex section Glareosae and establishes a phylogenetic framework for the section. Homoplasy makes many of morphological characters difficult to apply for taxon delimitation. The strong concordance between supermatrix and species-tree approaches to phylogenetic reconstructions suggests that even in the face of incongruence among molecular markers, section-level or species-level phylogenies in Carex are tractable. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  6. Architecting Web Sites for High Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Iyengar

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Web site applications are some of the most challenging high-performance applications currently being developed and deployed. The challenges emerge from the specific combination of high variability in workload characteristics and of high performance demands regarding the service level, scalability, availability, and costs. In recent years, a large body of research has addressed the Web site application domain, and a host of innovative software and hardware solutions have been proposed and deployed. This paper is an overview of recent solutions concerning the architectures and the software infrastructures used in building Web site applications. The presentation emphasizes three of the main functions in a complex Web site: the processing of client requests, the control of service levels, and the interaction with remote network caches.

  7. High performance cloud auditing and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Baek-Young; Song, Sejun

    2014-01-01

    This book mainly focuses on cloud security and high performance computing for cloud auditing. The book discusses emerging challenges and techniques developed for high performance semantic cloud auditing, and presents the state of the art in cloud auditing, computing and security techniques with focus on technical aspects and feasibility of auditing issues in federated cloud computing environments.   In summer 2011, the United States Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) CyberBAT Cloud Security and Auditing Team initiated the exploration of the cloud security challenges and future cloud auditing research directions that are covered in this book. This work was supported by the United States government funds from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), the AFOSR Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP), the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Visiting Faculty Research Program (VFRP), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Health (NIH). All chapters were partially suppor...

  8. Failure analysis of high performance ballistic fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Spatola, Jennifer S

    2015-01-01

    High performance fibers have a high tensile strength and modulus, good wear resistance, and a low density, making them ideal for applications in ballistic impact resistance, such as body armor. However, the observed ballistic performance of these fibers is much lower than the predicted values. Since the predictions assume only tensile stress failure, it is safe to assume that the stress state is affecting fiber performance. The purpose of this research was to determine if there are failure mo...

  9. Performance tuning for high performance computing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Pahuja, Himanshu

    2017-01-01

    A Distributed System is composed by integration between loosely coupled software components and the underlying hardware resources that can be distributed over the standard internet framework. High Performance Computing used to involve utilization of supercomputers which could churn a lot of computing power to process massively complex computational tasks, but is now evolving across distributed systems, thereby having the ability to utilize geographically distributed computing resources. We...

  10. Nanoparticles for high performance concrete (HPC)

    OpenAIRE

    Torgal, Fernando Pacheco; Miraldo, Sérgio; Ding, Yining; J.A. Labrincha

    2013-01-01

    According to the 2011 ERMCO statistics, only 11% of the production of ready-mixed concrete relates to the high performance concrete (HPC) target. This percentage has remained unchanged since at least 2001 and appears a strange choice on the part of the construction industry, as HPC offers several advantages over normal-strength concrete, specifically those of high strength and durability. It allows for concrete structures requiring less steel reinforcement and offers a longer serviceable life...

  11. Robust High Performance Aquaporin based Biomimetic Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus; Zhao, Yichun; Qiu, C.

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins are water channel proteins with high water permeability and solute rejection, which makes them promising for preparing high-performance biomimetic membranes. Despite the growing interest in aquaporin-based biomimetic membranes (ABMs), it is challenging to produce robust and defect......% rejection for urea and a water permeability around 10 L/(m2h) with 2M NaCl as draw solution. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using aquaporin proteins in biomimetic membranes for technological applications....

  12. High Performance Computing Operations Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupps, Kimberly C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-12-19

    The High Performance Computing Operations Review (HPCOR) meeting—requested by the ASC and ASCR program headquarters at DOE—was held November 5 and 6, 2013, at the Marriott Hotel in San Francisco, CA. The purpose of the review was to discuss the processes and practices for HPC integration and its related software and facilities. Experiences and lessons learned from the most recent systems deployed were covered in order to benefit the deployment of new systems.

  13. High performance work practices, innovation and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Newton, Cameron; Johnston, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Research spanning nearly 20 years has provided considerable empirical evidence for relationships between High Performance Work Practices (HPWPs) and various measures of performance including increased productivity, improved customer service, and reduced turnover. What stands out from......, and Africa to examine these various questions relating to the HPWP-innovation-performance relationship. Each paper discusses a practice that has been identified in HPWP literature and potential variables that can facilitate or hinder the effects of these practices of innovation- and performance...

  14. vSphere high performance cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Prasenjit

    2013-01-01

    vSphere High Performance Cookbook is written in a practical, helpful style with numerous recipes focusing on answering and providing solutions to common, and not-so common, performance issues and problems.The book is primarily written for technical professionals with system administration skills and some VMware experience who wish to learn about advanced optimization and the configuration features and functions for vSphere 5.1.

  15. High Performance Electronics on Flexible Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2016-09-01

    Over the last few years, flexible electronic systems have gained increased attention from researchers around the world because of their potential to create new applications such as flexible displays, flexible energy harvesters, artificial skin, and health monitoring systems that cannot be integrated with conventional wafer based complementary metal oxide semiconductor processes. Most of the current efforts to create flexible high performance devices are based on the use of organic semiconductors. However, inherent material\\'s limitations make them unsuitable for big data processing and high speed communications. The objective of my doctoral dissertation is to develop integration processes that allow the transformation of rigid high performance electronics into flexible ones while maintaining their performance and cost. In this work, two different techniques to transform inorganic complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor electronics into flexible ones have been developed using industry compatible processes. Furthermore, these techniques were used to realize flexible discrete devices and circuits which include metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors, the first demonstration of flexible Fin-field-effect-transistors, and metal-oxide-semiconductors-based circuits. Finally, this thesis presents a new technique to package, integrate, and interconnect flexible high performance electronics using low cost additive manufacturing techniques such as 3D printing and inkjet printing. This thesis contains in depth studies on electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of the fabricated devices.

  16. Supervising the highly performing general practice registrar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Simon

    2014-02-01

    There is extensive literature on the poorly performing learner. In contrast, there is very little written on supervising the highly performing registrar. Outstanding trainees with high-level knowledge and skills can be a challenge for supervisors to supervise and teach. Narrative review and discussion. As with all learners, a learning-needs analysis is fundamental to successful supervision. The key to effective teaching of the highly performing registrar is to contextualise clinical knowledge and skills with the wisdom of accumulated experience. Moreover, supervisors must provide a stimulating learning environment, with regular opportunities for intellectual challenge. The provision of specific, constructive feedback is essential. There are potential opportunities to extend the highly performing registrar in all domains of general practice, namely communication skills and patient-centred care, applied knowledge and skills, population health, professionalism, and organisation and legal issues. Specific teaching strategies include role-play, video-consultation review, random case analysis, posing hypothetical clinical scenarios, role modelling and teaching other learners. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. High Performance with Prescriptive Optimization and Debugging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Nicklas Bo

    Parallel programming is the dominant approach to achieve high performance in computing today. Correctly writing efficient and fast parallel programs is a big challenge mostly carried out by experts. We investigate optimization and debugging of parallel programs. We argue that automatic paralleliz......Parallel programming is the dominant approach to achieve high performance in computing today. Correctly writing efficient and fast parallel programs is a big challenge mostly carried out by experts. We investigate optimization and debugging of parallel programs. We argue that automatic...... analysis and vectorizer in GCC. Automatic optimizations often fail for theoretical and practical reasons. When they fail we argue that a hybrid approach can be effective. Using compiler feedback, we propose to use the programmer’s intuition and insight to achieve high performance. Compiler feedback...... the prescriptive debugging model, which is a user-guided model that allows the programmer to use his intuition to diagnose bugs in parallel programs. The model is scalable, yet capable enough, to be general-purpose. In our evaluation we demonstrate low run time overhead and logarithmic scalability. This enable...

  18. Computational Biology and High Performance Computing 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Horst D.; Zorn, Manfred D.; Spengler, Sylvia J.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Stewart, Craig; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2000-10-19

    The pace of extraordinary advances in molecular biology has accelerated in the past decade due in large part to discoveries coming from genome projects on human and model organisms. The advances in the genome project so far, happening well ahead of schedule and under budget, have exceeded any dreams by its protagonists, let alone formal expectations. Biologists expect the next phase of the genome project to be even more startling in terms of dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of human biology, the biology of health and of disease. Only today can biologists begin to envision the necessary experimental, computational and theoretical steps necessary to exploit genome sequence information for its medical impact, its contribution to biotechnology and economic competitiveness, and its ultimate contribution to environmental quality. High performance computing has become one of the critical enabling technologies, which will help to translate this vision of future advances in biology into reality. Biologists are increasingly becoming aware of the potential of high performance computing. The goal of this tutorial is to introduce the exciting new developments in computational biology and genomics to the high performance computing community.

  19. Deep phylogeny and evolution of sponges (phylum Porifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörheide, G; Dohrmann, M; Erpenbeck, D; Larroux, C; Maldonado, M; Voigt, O; Borchiellini, C; Lavrov, D V

    2012-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are a diverse taxon of benthic aquatic animals of great ecological, commercial, and biopharmaceutical importance. They are arguably the earliest-branching metazoan taxon, and therefore, they have great significance in the reconstruction of early metazoan evolution. Yet, the phylogeny and systematics of sponges are to some extent still unresolved, and there is an on-going debate about the exact branching pattern of their main clades and their relationships to the other non-bilaterian animals. Here, we review the current state of the deep phylogeny of sponges. Several studies have suggested that sponges are paraphyletic. However, based on recent phylogenomic analyses, we suggest that the phylum Porifera could well be monophyletic, in accordance with cladistic analyses based on morphology. This finding has many implications for the evolutionary interpretation of early animal traits and sponge development. We further review the contribution that mitochondrial genes and genomes have made to sponge phylogenetics and explore the current state of the molecular phylogenies of the four main sponge lineages (Classes), that is, Demospongiae, Hexactinellida, Calcarea, and Homoscleromorpha, in detail. While classical systematic systems are largely congruent with molecular phylogenies in the class Hexactinellida and in certain parts of Demospongiae and Homoscleromorpha, the high degree of incongruence in the class Calcarea still represents a challenge. We highlight future areas of research to fill existing gaps in our knowledge. By reviewing sponge development in an evolutionary and phylogenetic context, we support previous suggestions that sponge larvae share traits and complexity with eumetazoans and that the simple sedentary adult lifestyle of sponges probably reflects some degree of secondary simplification. In summary, while deep sponge phylogenetics has made many advances in the past years, considerable efforts are still required to achieve a

  20. Molecular phylogeny of Arthrotardigrada (Tardigrada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Aslak; Faurby, Søren; Hansen, Jesper G; Møbjerg, Nadja; Kristensen, Reinhardt M

    2010-03-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic ecdysozoans with a worldwide distribution covering marine, limnic and terrestrial habitats. They are regarded as a neglected phylum with regard to studies of their phylogeny. During the last decade molecular data have been included in the investigation of tardigrades. However, the marine arthrotardigrades are still poorly sampled due to their relative rarity, difficult identification and minute size even for tardigrades. In the present study, we have sampled various arthrotardigrades and sequenced the 18S and partial 28S ribosomal subunits. The phylogenetic analyses based on Bayesian inference and maximum parsimony inferred Heterotardigrada (Arthrotardigrada+Echiniscoidea) and Eutardigrada to be monophyletic. Arthrotardigrada was inferred to be paraphyletic as the monophyletic Echiniscoidea is included within the arthrotardigrades. The phylogenetic positions of Stygarctidae and Batillipedidae are poorly resolved with low branch support. The Halechiniscidae is inferred to be polyphyletic as the currently recognized Styraconyxinae is not part of the family. Archechiniscus is the sister-group to the Halechiniscidae and Orzeliscus is placed as one of the basal halechiniscids. The phylogeny of the included eutardigrade taxa resembles the current molecular phylogenies. The genetic diversity within Arthrotardigrada is much larger (18S 15.1-26.5%, 28S 7.2-20.7%) than within Eutardigrada (18S 1.0-12.6%, 28S 1.3-8.2%). This can be explained by higher substitution rates in the arthrotardigrades or by a much younger evolutionary age of the sampled eutardigrades. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Phylogeny based discovery of regulatory elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Barak A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Algorithms that locate evolutionarily conserved sequences have become powerful tools for finding functional DNA elements, including transcription factor binding sites; however, most methods do not take advantage of an explicit model for the constrained evolution of functional DNA sequences. Results We developed a probabilistic framework that combines an HKY85 model, which assigns probabilities to different base substitutions between species, and weight matrix models of transcription factor binding sites, which describe the probabilities of observing particular nucleotides at specific positions in the binding site. The method incorporates the phylogenies of the species under consideration and takes into account the position specific variation of transcription factor binding sites. Using our framework we assessed the suitability of alignments of genomic sequences from commonly used species as substrates for comparative genomic approaches to regulatory motif finding. We then applied this technique to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related species by examining all possible six base pair DNA sequences (hexamers and identifying sequences that are conserved in a significant number of promoters. By combining similar conserved hexamers we reconstructed known cis-regulatory motifs and made predictions of previously unidentified motifs. We tested one prediction experimentally, finding it to be a regulatory element involved in the transcriptional response to glucose. Conclusion The experimental validation of a regulatory element prediction missed by other large-scale motif finding studies demonstrates that our approach is a useful addition to the current suite of tools for finding regulatory motifs.

  2. Nuclear ribosomal DNA phylogeny and its implications for evolutionary trends in Mexican Bursera (Burseraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, J X; Venable, D L

    1999-07-01

    The genus Bursera (Burseraceae) is one of the most diversified and abundant groups of plants of the tropical dry forests of Mexico. In order to provide a basis for better understanding of its evolutionary biology, we reconstructed a phylogeny of 57 species and varieties using the nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 and ITS2) of 18S-26S and the 5.8S coding region of nuclear ribosomal DNA. We used four species of the allied genera Commiphora and Boswellia and one species of Spondias (Anacardiaceae) as outgroups. Our results support the views that Bursera is monophyletic and more closely related to Commiphora than to Boswellia. The division of Bursera into sections Bullockia and Bursera is also strongly supported by our phylogeny. Several other subclades also had high bootstrap values, especially within section Bursera. We use the phylogeny as a basis for discussing evolutionary tendencies in bark, leaves, breeding systems, and fruits.

  3. Toward a theory of high performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Julia

    2005-01-01

    What does it mean to be a high-performance company? The process of measuring relative performance across industries and eras, declaring top performers, and finding the common drivers of their success is such a difficult one that it might seem a fool's errand to attempt. In fact, no one did for the first thousand or so years of business history. The question didn't even occur to many scholars until Tom Peters and Bob Waterman released In Search of Excellence in 1982. Twenty-three years later, we've witnessed several more attempts--and, just maybe, we're getting closer to answers. In this reported piece, HBR senior editor Julia Kirby explores why it's so difficult to study high performance and how various research efforts--including those from John Kotter and Jim Heskett; Jim Collins and Jerry Porras; Bill Joyce, Nitin Nohria, and Bruce Roberson; and several others outlined in a summary chart-have attacked the problem. The challenge starts with deciding which companies to study closely. Are the stars the ones with the highest market caps, the ones with the greatest sales growth, or simply the ones that remain standing at the end of the game? (And when's the end of the game?) Each major study differs in how it defines success, which companies it therefore declares to be worthy of emulation, and the patterns of activity and attitude it finds in common among them. Yet, Kirby concludes, as each study's method incrementally solves problems others have faced, we are progressing toward a consensus theory of high performance.

  4. High performance HRM: NHS employee perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Paula; Sparrow, Paul; Boaden, Ruth; Harris, Claire

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine National Health Service (NHS) employee perspectives of how high performance human resource (HR) practices contribute to their performance. The paper draws on an extensive qualitative study of the NHS. A novel two-part method was used; the first part used focus group data from managers to identify high-performance HR practices specific to the NHS. Employees then conducted a card-sort exercise where they were asked how or whether the practices related to each other and how each practice affected their work. In total, 11 high performance HR practices relevant to the NHS were identified. Also identified were four reactions to a range of HR practices, which the authors developed into a typology according to anticipated beneficiaries (personal gain, organisation gain, both gain and no-one gains). Employees were able to form their own patterns (mental models) of performance contribution for a range of HR practices (60 interviewees produced 91 groupings). These groupings indicated three bundles particular to the NHS (professional development, employee contribution and NHS deal). These mental models indicate employee perceptions about how health services are organised and delivered in the NHS and illustrate the extant mental models of health care workers. As health services are rearranged and financial pressures begin to bite, these mental models will affect employee reactions to changes both positively and negatively. The novel method allows for identification of mental models that explain how NHS workers understand service delivery. It also delineates the complex and varied relationships between HR practices and individual performance.

  5. Strategy Guideline. High Performance Residential Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holton, J. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    This report has been developed to provide a tool for the understanding and application of high performance lighting in the home. The strategies featured in this guide are drawn from recent advances in commercial lighting for application to typical spaces found in residential buildings. This guide offers strategies to greatly reduce lighting energy use through the application of high quality fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) technologies. It is important to note that these strategies not only save energy in the home but also serve to satisfy the homeowner’s expectations for high quality lighting.

  6. The monogroove high performance heat pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.; Kosson, R.

    1981-06-01

    The development of the monogroove heat pipe, a fundamentally new high-performance device suitable for multi-kilowatt space radiator heat-rejection systems, is reported. The design separates heat transport and transfer functions, so that each can be separately optimized to yield heat transport capacities on the order of 25 kW/m. Test versions of the device have proven the concept of heat transport capacity control by pore dimensions and the permeability of the circumferential wall wick structure, which together render it insensitive to tilt. All cases tested were for localized, top-side heat input and cooling and produced results close to theoretical predictions.

  7. Playa: High-Performance Programmable Linear Algebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria E. Howle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces Playa, a high-level user interface layer for composing algorithms for complex multiphysics problems out of objects from other Trilinos packages. Among other features, Playa provides very high-performance overloaded operators implemented through an expression template mechanism. In this paper, we give an overview of the central Playa objects from a user's perspective, show application to a sequence of increasingly complex solver algorithms, provide timing results for Playa's overloaded operators and other functions, and briefly survey some of the implementation issues involved.

  8. High performance channel injection sealant invention abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, R. W.; Basiulis, D. I.; Salisbury, D. P. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High performance channel sealant is based on NASA patented cyano and diamidoximine-terminated perfluoroalkylene ether prepolymers that are thermally condensed and cross linked. The sealant contains asbestos and, in its preferred embodiments, Lithofrax, to lower its thermal expansion coefficient and a phenolic metal deactivator. Extensive evaluation shows the sealant is extremely resistant to thermal degradation with an onset point of 280 C. The materials have a volatile content of 0.18%, excellent flexibility, and adherence properties, and fuel resistance. No corrosibility to aluminum or titanium was observed.

  9. Portability Support for High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Doreen Y.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    While a large number of tools have been developed to support application portability, high performance application developers often prefer to use vendor-provided, non-portable programming interfaces. This phenomena indicates the mismatch between user priorities and tool capabilities. This paper summarizes the results of a user survey and a developer survey. The user survey has revealed the user priorities and resulted in three criteria for evaluating tool support for portability. The developer survey has resulted in the evaluation of portability support and indicated the possibilities and difficulties of improvements.

  10. Strategy Guideline: Partnering for High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prahl, D.

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. In an environment where the builder is the only source of communication between trades and consultants and where relationships are, in general, adversarial as opposed to cooperative, the chances of any one building system to fail are greater. Furthermore, it is much harder for the builder to identify and capitalize on synergistic opportunities. Partnering can help bridge the cross-functional aspects of the systems approach and achieve performance-based criteria. Critical success factors for partnering include support from top management, mutual trust, effective and open communication, effective coordination around common goals, team building, appropriate use of an outside facilitator, a partnering charter progress toward common goals, an effective problem-solving process, long-term commitment, continuous improvement, and a positive experience for all involved.

  11. High-performance computing for airborne applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fairbanks, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dallmann, Nicholas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Desgeorges, Rose [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-06-28

    Recently, there has been attempts to move common satellite tasks to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAVs are significantly cheaper to buy than satellites and easier to deploy on an as-needed basis. The more benign radiation environment also allows for an aggressive adoption of state-of-the-art commercial computational devices, which increases the amount of data that can be collected. There are a number of commercial computing devices currently available that are well-suited to high-performance computing. These devices range from specialized computational devices, such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and digital signal processors (DSPs), to traditional computing platforms, such as microprocessors. Even though the radiation environment is relatively benign, these devices could be susceptible to single-event effects. In this paper, we will present radiation data for high-performance computing devices in a accelerated neutron environment. These devices include a multi-core digital signal processor, two field-programmable gate arrays, and a microprocessor. From these results, we found that all of these devices are suitable for many airplane environments without reliability problems.

  12. Building Trust in High-Performing Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Soudunsaari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Facilitation of growth is more about good, trustworthy contacts than capital. Trust is a driving force for business creation, and to create a global business you need to build a team that is capable of meeting the challenge. Trust is a key factor in team building and a needed enabler for cooperation. In general, trust building is a slow process, but it can be accelerated with open interaction and good communication skills. The fast-growing and ever-changing nature of global business sets demands for cooperation and team building, especially for startup companies. Trust building needs personal knowledge and regular face-to-face interaction, but it also requires empathy, respect, and genuine listening. Trust increases communication, and rich and open communication is essential for the building of high-performing teams. Other building materials are a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, willingness for cooperation, and supporting and encouraging leadership. This study focuses on trust in high-performing teams. It asks whether it is possible to manage trust and which tools and operation models should be used to speed up the building of trust. In this article, preliminary results from the authors’ research are presented to highlight the importance of sharing critical information and having a high level of communication through constant interaction.

  13. A Linux Workstation for High Performance Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Robert; Westall, James

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of this effort was to provide a low-cost method of obtaining high-performance 3-D graphics using an industry standard library (OpenGL) on PC class computers. Previously, users interested in doing substantial visualization or graphical manipulation were constrained to using specialized, custom hardware most often found in computers from Silicon Graphics (SGI). We provided an alternative to expensive SGI hardware by taking advantage of third-party, 3-D graphics accelerators that have now become available at very affordable prices. To make use of this hardware our goal was to provide a free, redistributable, and fully-compatible OpenGL work-alike library so that existing bodies of code could simply be recompiled. for PC class machines running a free version of Unix. This should allow substantial cost savings while greatly expanding the population of people with access to a serious graphics development and viewing environment. This should offer a means for NASA to provide a spectrum of graphics performance to its scientists, supplying high-end specialized SGI hardware for high-performance visualization while fulfilling the requirements of medium and lower performance applications with generic, off-the-shelf components and still maintaining compatibility between the two.

  14. Hybrid ventilation systems and high performance buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utzinger, D.M. [Wisconsin Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). School of Architecture and Urban Planning

    2009-07-01

    This paper described hybrid ventilation design strategies and their impact on 3 high performance buildings located in southern Wisconsin. The Hybrid ventilation systems combined occupant controlled natural ventilation with mechanical ventilation systems. Natural ventilation was shown to provide adequate ventilation when appropriately designed. Proper control integration of natural ventilation into hybrid systems was shown to reduce energy consumption in high performance buildings. This paper also described the lessons learned from the 3 buildings. The author served as energy consultant on all three projects and had the responsibility of designing and integrating the natural ventilation systems into the HVAC control strategy. A post occupancy evaluation of building energy performance has provided learning material for architecture students. The 3 buildings included the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center completed in 2003; the Urban Ecology Center completed in 2004; and the Aldo Leopold Legacy Center completed in 2007. This paper included the size, measured energy utilization intensity and percentage of energy supplied by renewable solar power and bio-fuels on site for each building. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  15. Management issues for high performance storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Burris, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Managing distributed high-performance storage systems is complex and, although sharing common ground with traditional network and systems management, presents unique storage-related issues. Integration technologies and frameworks exist to help manage distributed network and system environments. Industry-driven consortia provide open forums where vendors and users cooperate to leverage solutions. But these new approaches to open management fall short addressing the needs of scalable, distributed storage. We discuss the motivation and requirements for storage system management (SSM) capabilities and describe how SSM manages distributed servers and storage resource objects in the High Performance Storage System (HPSS), a new storage facility for data-intensive applications and large-scale computing. Modem storage systems, such as HPSS, require many SSM capabilities, including server and resource configuration control, performance monitoring, quality of service, flexible policies, file migration, file repacking, accounting, and quotas. We present results of initial HPSS SSM development including design decisions and implementation trade-offs. We conclude with plans for follow-on work and provide storage-related recommendations for vendors and standards groups seeking enterprise-wide management solutions.

  16. The path toward HEP High Performance Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Apostolakis, John; Carminati, Federico; Gheata, Andrei; Wenzel, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    High Energy Physics code has been known for making poor use of high performance computing architectures. Efforts in optimising HEP code on vector and RISC architectures have yield limited results and recent studies have shown that, on modern architectures, it achieves a performance between 10% and 50% of the peak one. Although several successful attempts have been made to port selected codes on GPUs, no major HEP code suite has a 'High Performance' implementation. With LHC undergoing a major upgrade and a number of challenging experiments on the drawing board, HEP cannot any longer neglect the less-than-optimal performance of its code and it has to try making the best usage of the hardware. This activity is one of the foci of the SFT group at CERN, which hosts, among others, the Root and Geant4 project. The activity of the experiments is shared and coordinated via a Concurrency Forum, where the experience in optimising HEP code is presented and discussed. Another activity is the Geant-V project, centred on th...

  17. Phylogeny and subgeneric taxonomy of Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, S.W.; Varga, Janos; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2008-01-01

    The phylogeny of the genus Aspergillus and its teleomorphs is discussed based on multilocus sequence data. DNA sequence analysis was used to formulate a nucleotide sequence framework of the genus and to analyze character changes in relationship to the phylogeny hypothesized from the DNA sequence ...

  18. How to create high-performing teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Samuel M

    2010-02-01

    This article is intended to discuss inspirational aspects on how to lead a high-performance team. Cogent topics discussed include how to hire staff through methods of "topgrading" with reference to Geoff Smart and "getting the right people on the bus" referencing Jim Collins' work. In addition, once the staff is hired, this article covers how to separate the "eagles from the ducks" and how to inspire one's staff by creating the right culture with suggestions for further reading by Don Miguel Ruiz (The four agreements) and John Maxwell (21 Irrefutable laws of leadership). In addition, Simon Sinek's concept of "Start with Why" is elaborated to help a leader know what the core element should be with any superior culture. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  19. Parallel Algebraic Multigrid Methods - High Performance Preconditioners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, U M

    2004-11-11

    The development of high performance, massively parallel computers and the increasing demands of computationally challenging applications have necessitated the development of scalable solvers and preconditioners. One of the most effective ways to achieve scalability is the use of multigrid or multilevel techniques. Algebraic multigrid (AMG) is a very efficient algorithm for solving large problems on unstructured grids. While much of it can be parallelized in a straightforward way, some components of the classical algorithm, particularly the coarsening process and some of the most efficient smoothers, are highly sequential, and require new parallel approaches. This chapter presents the basic principles of AMG and gives an overview of various parallel implementations of AMG, including descriptions of parallel coarsening schemes and smoothers, some numerical results as well as references to existing software packages.

  20. A high performance microfabricated surface ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobser, Daniel; Blain, Matthew; Haltli, Raymond; Hollowell, Andrew; Revelle, Melissa; Stick, Daniel; Yale, Christopher; Maunz, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Microfabricated surface ion traps present a natural solution to the problem of scalability in trapped ion quantum computing architectures. We address some of the chief concerns about surface ion traps by demonstrating low heating rates, long trapping times as well as other high-performance features of Sandia's high optical access (HOA-2) trap. For example, due to the HOA's specific electrode layout, we are able to rotate principal axes of the trapping potential from 0 to 2 π without any change in the secular trap frequencies. We have also achieved the first single-qubit gates with a diamond norm below a rigorous fault tolerance threshold, and a two-qubit Mølmer-Sørensen gate with a process fidelity of 99.58(6). Here we present specific details of trap capabilities, such as shuttling and ion reordering, as well as details of our high fidelity single- and two-qubit gates.

  1. High-Performance, Low Environmental Impact Refrigerants

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, E. T.; Dhooge, P. M.; Glass, S. M.; Nimitz, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    Refrigerants used in process and facilities systems in the US include R-12, R-22, R-123, R-134a, R-404A, R-410A, R-500, and R-502. All but R-134a, R-404A, and R-410A contain ozone-depleting substances that will be phased out under the Montreal Protocol. Some of the substitutes do not perform as well as the refrigerants they are replacing, require new equipment, and have relatively high global warming potentials (GWPs). New refrigerants are needed that addresses environmental, safety, and performance issues simultaneously. In efforts sponsored by Ikon Corporation, NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), ETEC has developed and tested a new class of refrigerants, the Ikon (registered) refrigerants, based on iodofluorocarbons (IFCs). These refrigerants are nonflammable, have essentially zero ozone-depletion potential (ODP), low GWP, high performance (energy efficiency and capacity), and can be dropped into much existing equipment.

  2. High performance nano-composite technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Whung Whoe; Rhee, C. K.; Kim, S. J.; Park, S. D. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, E. K.; Jung, S. Y.; Ryu, H. J. [KRICT, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, S. S.; Kim, J. K.; Hong, S. M. [KIST, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chea, Y. B. [KIGAM, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, C. H.; Kim, S. D. [ATS, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, B. G.; Lee, S. H. [HGREC, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-15

    The trend of new material development are being to carried out not only high performance but also environmental attraction. Especially nano composite material which enhances the functional properties of components, extending the component life resulting to reduced the wastes and environmental contamination, has a great effect on various industrial area. The application of nano composite, depends on the polymer matrix and filler materials, has various application from semiconductor to medical field. In spite of nano composite merits, nano composite study are confined to a few special materials as a lab, scale because a few technical difficulties are still on hold. Therefore, the purpose of this study establishes the systematical planning to carried out the next generation projects on order to compete with other countries and overcome the protective policy of advanced countries with grasping over sea's development trends and our present status. (author).

  3. High Performance Database Management for Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishe, Naphtali; Barton, David; Urban, Frank; Chekmasov, Maxim; Martinez, Maria; Alvarez, Elms; Gutierrez, Martha; Pardo, Philippe

    1998-01-01

    The High Performance Database Research Center at Florida International University is completing the development of a highly parallel database system based on the semantic/object-oriented approach. This system provides exceptional usability and flexibility. It allows shorter application design and programming cycles and gives the user control via an intuitive information structure. It empowers the end-user to pose complex ad hoc decision support queries. Superior efficiency is provided through a high level of optimization, which is transparent to the user. Manifold reduction in storage size is allowed for many applications. This system allows for operability via internet browsers. The system will be used for the NASA Applications Center program to store remote sensing data, as well as for Earth Science applications.

  4. High performance stepper motors for space mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sega, Patrick; Estevenon, Christine

    1995-01-01

    Hybrid stepper motors are very well adapted to high performance space mechanisms. They are very simple to operate and are often used for accurate positioning and for smooth rotations. In order to fulfill these requirements, the motor torque, its harmonic content, and the magnetic parasitic torque have to be properly designed. Only finite element computations can provide enough accuracy to determine the toothed structures' magnetic permeance, whose derivative function leads to the torque. It is then possible to design motors with a maximum torque capability or with the most reduced torque harmonic content (less than 3 percent of fundamental). These later motors are dedicated to applications where a microstep or a synchronous mode is selected for minimal dynamic disturbances. In every case, the capability to convert electrical power into torque is much higher than on DC brushless motors.

  5. High performance computing applications in neurobiological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Cheng, Rei; Doshay, David G.; Linton, Samuel W.; Montgomery, Kevin; Parnas, Bruce R.

    1994-01-01

    The human nervous system is a massively parallel processor of information. The vast numbers of neurons, synapses and circuits is daunting to those seeking to understand the neural basis of consciousness and intellect. Pervading obstacles are lack of knowledge of the detailed, three-dimensional (3-D) organization of even a simple neural system and the paucity of large scale, biologically relevant computer simulations. We use high performance graphics workstations and supercomputers to study the 3-D organization of gravity sensors as a prototype architecture foreshadowing more complex systems. Scaled-down simulations run on a Silicon Graphics workstation and scale-up, three-dimensional versions run on the Cray Y-MP and CM5 supercomputers.

  6. High Performance OLED Panel and Luminaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, Jeffrey [OLEDWorks LLC, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2017-02-20

    In this project, OLEDWorks developed and demonstrated the technology required to produce OLED lighting panels with high energy efficiency and excellent light quality. OLED panels developed in this program produce high quality warm white light with CRI greater than 85 and efficacy up to 80 lumens per watt (LPW). An OLED luminaire employing 24 of the high performance panels produces practical levels of illumination for general lighting, with a flux of over 2200 lumens at 60 LPW. This is a significant advance in the state of the art for OLED solid-state lighting (SSL), which is expected to be a complementary light source to the more advanced LED SSL technology that is rapidly replacing all other traditional forms of lighting.

  7. High performance anode for advanced Li batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, Carla [Applied Sciences, Inc., Cedarville, OH (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The overall objective of this Phase I SBIR effort was to advance the manufacturing technology for ASI’s Si-CNF high-performance anode by creating a framework for large volume production and utilization of low-cost Si-coated carbon nanofibers (Si-CNF) for the battery industry. This project explores the use of nano-structured silicon which is deposited on a nano-scale carbon filament to achieve the benefits of high cycle life and high charge capacity without the consequent fading of, or failure in the capacity resulting from stress-induced fracturing of the Si particles and de-coupling from the electrode. ASI’s patented coating process distinguishes itself from others, in that it is highly reproducible, readily scalable and results in a Si-CNF composite structure containing 25-30% silicon, with a compositionally graded interface at the Si-CNF interface that significantly improve cycling stability and enhances adhesion of silicon to the carbon fiber support. In Phase I, the team demonstrated the production of the Si-CNF anode material can successfully be transitioned from a static bench-scale reactor into a fluidized bed reactor. In addition, ASI made significant progress in the development of low cost, quick testing methods which can be performed on silicon coated CNFs as a means of quality control. To date, weight change, density, and cycling performance were the key metrics used to validate the high performance anode material. Under this effort, ASI made strides to establish a quality control protocol for the large volume production of Si-CNFs and has identified several key technical thrusts for future work. Using the results of this Phase I effort as a foundation, ASI has defined a path forward to commercialize and deliver high volume and low-cost production of SI-CNF material for anodes in Li-ion batteries.

  8. PREFACE: High Performance Computing Symposium 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talon, Suzanne; Mousseau, Normand; Peslherbe, Gilles; Bertrand, François; Gauthier, Pierre; Kadem, Lyes; Moitessier, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy; Wittig, Rod

    2012-02-01

    HPCS (High Performance Computing Symposium) is a multidisciplinary conference that focuses on research involving High Performance Computing and its application. Attended by Canadian and international experts and renowned researchers in the sciences, all areas of engineering, the applied sciences, medicine and life sciences, mathematics, the humanities and social sciences, it is Canada's pre-eminent forum for HPC. The 25th edition was held in Montréal, at the Université du Québec à Montréal, from 15-17 June and focused on HPC in Medical Science. The conference was preceded by tutorials held at Concordia University, where 56 participants learned about HPC best practices, GPU computing, parallel computing, debugging and a number of high-level languages. 274 participants from six countries attended the main conference, which involved 11 invited and 37 contributed oral presentations, 33 posters, and an exhibit hall with 16 booths from our sponsors. The work that follows is a collection of papers presented at the conference covering HPC topics ranging from computer science to bioinformatics. They are divided here into four sections: HPC in Engineering, Physics and Materials Science, HPC in Medical Science, HPC Enabling to Explore our World and New Algorithms for HPC. We would once more like to thank the participants and invited speakers, the members of the Scientific Committee, the referees who spent time reviewing the papers and our invaluable sponsors. To hear the invited talks and learn about 25 years of HPC development in Canada visit the Symposium website: http://2011.hpcs.ca/lang/en/conference/keynote-speakers/ Enjoy the excellent papers that follow, and we look forward to seeing you in Vancouver for HPCS 2012! Gilles Peslherbe Chair of the Scientific Committee Normand Mousseau Co-Chair of HPCS 2011 Suzanne Talon Chair of the Organizing Committee UQAM Sponsors The PDF also contains photographs from the conference banquet.

  9. Wearable Accelerometers in High Performance Jet Aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, G Merrill; VanBrunt, Thomas B; Snider, Dallas H; Hoyt, Robert E

    2016-02-01

    Wearable accelerometers have become ubiquitous in the fields of exercise physiology and ambulatory hospital settings. However, these devices have yet to be validated in extreme operational environments. The objective of this study was to correlate the gravitational forces (G forces) detected by wearable accelerometers with the G forces detected by high performance aircraft. We compared the in-flight G forces detected by the two commercially available portable accelerometers to the F/A-18 Carrier Aircraft Inertial Navigation System (CAINS-2) during 20 flights performed by the Navy's Flight Demonstration Squadron (Blue Angels). Postflight questionnaires were also used to assess the perception of distractibility during flight. Of the 20 flights analyzed, 10 complete in-flight comparisons were made, accounting for 25,700 s of correlation between the CAINS-2 and the two tested accelerometers. Both accelerometers had strong correlations with that of the F/A-18 Gz axis, averaging r = 0.92 and r = 0.93, respectively, over 10 flights. Comparison of both portable accelerometer's average vector magnitude to each other yielded an average correlation of r = 0.93. Both accelerometers were found to be minimally distracting. These results suggest the use of wearable accelerometers is a valid means of detecting G forces during high performance aircraft flight. Future studies using this surrogate method of detecting accelerative forces combined with physiological information may yield valuable in-flight normative data that heretofore has been technically difficult to obtain and hence holds the promise of opening the door for a new golden age of aeromedical research.

  10. SISYPHUS: A high performance seismic inversion factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhberg, Alexey; Simutė, Saulė; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In the recent years the massively parallel high performance computers became the standard instruments for solving the forward and inverse problems in seismology. The respective software packages dedicated to forward and inverse waveform modelling specially designed for such computers (SPECFEM3D, SES3D) became mature and widely available. These packages achieve significant computational performance and provide researchers with an opportunity to solve problems of bigger size at higher resolution within a shorter time. However, a typical seismic inversion process contains various activities that are beyond the common solver functionality. They include management of information on seismic events and stations, 3D models, observed and synthetic seismograms, pre-processing of the observed signals, computation of misfits and adjoint sources, minimization of misfits, and process workflow management. These activities are time consuming, seldom sufficiently automated, and therefore represent a bottleneck that can substantially offset performance benefits provided by even the most powerful modern supercomputers. Furthermore, a typical system architecture of modern supercomputing platforms is oriented towards the maximum computational performance and provides limited standard facilities for automation of the supporting activities. We present a prototype solution that automates all aspects of the seismic inversion process and is tuned for the modern massively parallel high performance computing systems. We address several major aspects of the solution architecture, which include (1) design of an inversion state database for tracing all relevant aspects of the entire solution process, (2) design of an extensible workflow management framework, (3) integration with wave propagation solvers, (4) integration with optimization packages, (5) computation of misfits and adjoint sources, and (6) process monitoring. The inversion state database represents a hierarchical structure with

  11. NCI's Transdisciplinary High Performance Scientific Data Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ben; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Car, Nicholas; Cox, Simon; Druken, Kelsey; Evans, Bradley; Fraser, Ryan; Ip, Alex; Kemp, Carina; King, Edward; Minchin, Stuart; Larraondo, Pablo; Pugh, Tim; Richards, Clare; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages Earth Systems data collections sourced from several domains and organisations onto a single High Performance Data (HPD) Node to further Australia's national priority research and innovation agenda. The NCI HPD Node has rapidly established its value, currently managing over 10 PBytes of datasets from collections that span a wide range of disciplines including climate, weather, environment, geoscience, geophysics, water resources and social sciences. Importantly, in order to facilitate broad user uptake, maximise reuse and enable transdisciplinary access through software and standardised interfaces, the datasets, associated information systems and processes have been incorporated into the design and operation of a unified platform that NCI has called, the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). The key goal of the NERDIP is to regularise data access so that it is easily discoverable, interoperable for different domains and enabled for high performance methods. It adopts and implements international standards and data conventions, and promotes scientific integrity within a high performance computing and data analysis environment. NCI has established a rich and flexible computing environment to access to this data, through the NCI supercomputer; a private cloud that supports both domain focused virtual laboratories and in-common interactive analysis interfaces; as well as remotely through scalable data services. Data collections of this importance must be managed with careful consideration of both their current use and the needs of the end-communities, as well as its future potential use, such as transitioning to more advanced software and improved methods. It is therefore critical that the data platform is both well-managed and trusted for stable production use (including transparency and reproducibility), agile enough to incorporate new technological advances and

  12. Genome-wide EST data mining approaches to resolving incongruence of molecular phylogenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Yunfeng; Gras, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-six single genes of 6 plants inferred 18 unique trees using maximum parsimony. Such incongruence is an important challenge. How to reconstruct the congruent tree is still one of the most challenges in molecular phylogenetics. For resolving this problem, a genome-wide EST data mining approach was systematically investigated by retrieving a large size of EST data of 144 shared genes of 6 green plants from GenBank. The results show that the concatenated alignments approach overcame incongruence among single-gene phylogenies and successfully reconstructed the congruent tree of 6 species with 100% jackknife support across each branch when 144 genes was used. Jackknife supports of correct branches increased with number of genes linearly, but the number of wrong branches also increased linearly. For inferring the congruent tree, a minimum of 30 genes were required. This approach may provide potential power in resolving conflictions of phylogenies.

  13. Materials for high performance light water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, K.; Konys, J.; Heikinheimo, L.

    2004-05-01

    A state-of-the-art study was performed to investigate the operational conditions for in-core and out-of-core materials in a high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) and to evaluate the potential of existing structural materials for application in fuel elements, core structures and out-of-core components. In the conventional parts of a HPLWR-plant the approved materials of supercritical fossil power plants (SCFPP) can be used for given temperatures (⩽600 °C) and pressures (≈250 bar). These are either commercial ferritic/martensitic or austenitic stainless steels. Taking the conditions of existing light water reactors (LWR) into account an assessment of potential cladding materials was made, based on existing creep-rupture data, an extensive analysis of the corrosion in conventional steam power plants and available information on material behaviour under irradiation. As a major result it is shown that for an assumed maximum temperature of 650 °C not only Ni-alloys, but also austenitic stainless steels can be used as cladding materials.

  14. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.M.

    1998-04-28

    The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a high performance hand-held, real time detection gas chromatograph (HHGC) by Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this hand-held gas chromatograph is about five lbs., with a physical size of 8{close_quotes} x 5{close_quotes} x 3{close_quotes} including carrier gas and battery. It consumes about 12 watts of electrical power with a response time on the order of one to two minutes. This HHGC has an average effective theoretical plate of about 40k. Presently, its sensitivity is limited by its thermal sensitive detector at PPM. Like a conventional G.C., this HHGC consists mainly of three major components: (1) the sample injector, (2) the column, and (3) the detector with related electronics. The present HHGC injector is a modified version of the conventional injector. Its separation column is fabricated completely on silicon wafers by means of MEMS technology. This separation column has a circular cross section with a diameter of 100 pm. The detector developed for this hand-held GC is a thermal conductivity detector fabricated on a silicon nitride window by MEMS technology. A normal Wheatstone bridge is used. The signal is fed into a PC and displayed through LabView software.

  15. Optimizing High Performance Self Compacting Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond A Yonathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper’s objectives are to learn the effect of glass powder, silica fume, Polycarboxylate Ether, and gravel to optimizing composition of each factor in making High Performance SCC. Taguchi method is proposed in this paper as best solution to minimize specimen variable which is more than 80 variations. Taguchi data analysis method is applied to provide composition, optimizing, and the effect of contributing materials for nine variable of specimens. Concrete’s workability was analyzed using Slump flow test, V-funnel test, and L-box test. Compressive and porosity test were performed for the hardened state. With a dimension of 100×200 mm the cylindrical specimens were cast for compressive test with the age of 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 days. Porosity test was conducted at 28 days. It is revealed that silica fume contributes greatly to slump flow and porosity. Coarse aggregate shows the greatest contributing factor to L-box and compressive test. However, all factors show unclear result to V-funnel test.

  16. Automatic Energy Schemes for High Performance Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundriyal, Vaibhav [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Although high-performance computing traditionally focuses on the efficient execution of large-scale applications, both energy and power have become critical concerns when approaching exascale. Drastic increases in the power consumption of supercomputers affect significantly their operating costs and failure rates. In modern microprocessor architectures, equipped with dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) and CPU clock modulation (throttling), the power consumption may be controlled in software. Additionally, network interconnect, such as Infiniband, may be exploited to maximize energy savings while the application performance loss and frequency switching overheads must be carefully balanced. This work first studies two important collective communication operations, all-to-all and allgather and proposes energy saving strategies on the per-call basis. Next, it targets point-to-point communications to group them into phases and apply frequency scaling to them to save energy by exploiting the architectural and communication stalls. Finally, it proposes an automatic runtime system which combines both collective and point-to-point communications into phases, and applies throttling to them apart from DVFS to maximize energy savings. The experimental results are presented for NAS parallel benchmark problems as well as for the realistic parallel electronic structure calculations performed by the widely used quantum chemistry package GAMESS. Close to the maximum energy savings were obtained with a substantially low performance loss on the given platform.

  17. Development of a High Performance Spacer Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kee Nam; Song, K. N.; Yoon, K. H. (and others)

    2007-03-15

    A spacer grid in a LWR fuel assembly is a key structural component to support fuel rods and to enhance the heat transfer from the fuel rod to the coolant. In this research, the main research items are the development of inherent and high performance spacer grid shapes, the establishment of mechanical/structural analysis and test technology, and the set-up of basic test facilities for the spacer grid. The main research areas and results are as follows. 1. 18 different spacer grid candidates have been invented and applied for domestic and US patents. Among the candidates 16 are chosen from the patent. 2. Two kinds of spacer grids are finally selected for the advanced LWR fuel after detailed performance tests on the candidates and commercial spacer grids from a mechanical/structural point of view. According to the test results the features of the selected spacer grids are better than those of the commercial spacer grids. 3. Four kinds of basic test facilities are set up and the relevant test technologies are established. 4. Mechanical/structural analysis models and technology for spacer grid performance are developed and the analysis results are compared with the test results to enhance the reliability of the models.

  18. Initial rheological description of high performance concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Lorenzetti de Castro

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is defined as a composite material and, in rheological terms, it can be understood as a concentrated suspension of solid particles (aggregates in a viscous liquid (cement paste. On a macroscopic scale, concrete flows as a liquid. It is known that the rheological behavior of the concrete is close to that of a Bingham fluid and two rheological parameters regarding its description are needed: yield stress and plastic viscosity. The aim of this paper is to present the initial rheological description of high performance concretes using the modified slump test. According to the results, an increase of yield stress was observed over time, while a slight variation in plastic viscosity was noticed. The incorporation of silica fume showed changes in the rheological properties of fresh concrete. The behavior of these materials also varied with the mixing procedure employed in their production. The addition of superplasticizer meant that there was a large reduction in the mixture's yield stress, while plastic viscosity remained practically constant.

  19. High Performance Graphene Oxide Based Rubber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yingyan; Wen, Shipeng; Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Fazhong; Panine, Pierre; Chan, Tung W.; Zhang, Liqun; Liang, Yongri; Liu, Li

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide/styrene-butadiene rubber (GO/SBR) composites with complete exfoliation of GO sheets were prepared by aqueous-phase mixing of GO colloid with SBR latex and a small loading of butadiene-styrene-vinyl-pyridine rubber (VPR) latex, followed by their co-coagulation. During co-coagulation, VPR not only plays a key role in the prevention of aggregation of GO sheets but also acts as an interface-bridge between GO and SBR. The results demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the GO/SBR composite with 2.0 vol.% GO is comparable with those of the SBR composite reinforced with 13.1 vol.% of carbon black (CB), with a low mass density and a good gas barrier ability to boot. The present work also showed that GO-silica/SBR composite exhibited outstanding wear resistance and low-rolling resistance which make GO-silica/SBR very competitive for the green tire application, opening up enormous opportunities to prepare high performance rubber composites for future engineering applications.

  20. High Performance Graphene Oxide Based Rubber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yingyan; Wen, Shipeng; Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Fazhong; Panine, Pierre; Chan, Tung W.; Zhang, Liqun; Liang, Yongri; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide/styrene-butadiene rubber (GO/SBR) composites with complete exfoliation of GO sheets were prepared by aqueous-phase mixing of GO colloid with SBR latex and a small loading of butadiene-styrene-vinyl-pyridine rubber (VPR) latex, followed by their co-coagulation. During co-coagulation, VPR not only plays a key role in the prevention of aggregation of GO sheets but also acts as an interface-bridge between GO and SBR. The results demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the GO/SBR composite with 2.0 vol.% GO is comparable with those of the SBR composite reinforced with 13.1 vol.% of carbon black (CB), with a low mass density and a good gas barrier ability to boot. The present work also showed that GO-silica/SBR composite exhibited outstanding wear resistance and low-rolling resistance which make GO-silica/SBR very competitive for the green tire application, opening up enormous opportunities to prepare high performance rubber composites for future engineering applications. PMID:23974435

  1. Design of high performance CMC brake discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krenkel, W.; Henke, T. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials based on 2D-carbon fibre preforms show high heat-absorption capacities and good tribological as well as thermomechanical properties. To take advantage of the full lightweight potential of these new materials in high performance automotive brake discs, the thermal conductivity transverse to the friction surface has to be high in order to reduce the surface temperature. Experimental tests showed, that lower surface temperatures prevent overheating of the brake`s periphery and stabilizes the friction behaviour. In this study different design approaches with improved transverse heat conductivity have been investigated by finite element analysis. C/C-SiC bolts as well as SiC coatings and combinations of them have been investigated and compared with an orthotropic brake disc, showing a reduction of temperature of up to 50%. Original sized brake discs with C/C-SiC have been manufactured and tested under real conditions which verified the calculations. Using only low-cost CMC materials and avoiding any additional processing steps, the potential of C/C-SiC brake discs are very attractive under tribological as well as under economical aspects. (orig.) 4 refs.

  2. 24 CFR 902.71 - Incentives for high performers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Incentives for high performers. 902... DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING ASSESSMENT SYSTEM PHAS Incentives and Remedies § 902.71 Incentives for high performers. (a) Incentives for high performer PHAs. A PHA that is designated a high performer will be...

  3. Heterochrony, generic distinction and phylogeny in the family Hydractiniidae (Hydrozoa: Cnidaria)

    OpenAIRE

    Boero, F.; Bouillon, J; Piraino, S.

    1998-01-01

    The taxonomy of Hydractinia, Stylactaria and Podocoryna is discussed and the three genera are merged into Hydractinia since their diagnostic characters are liable to lead to polyphyly and paraphyly, due to repeated episodes of medusa reduction via heterochrony (paedomorphosis). The phylogeny of the Hydractiniidae is reconstructed by using two outgroups, Clava and Cytaeis, both having some characters in common with the Hydractiniidae. The resulting phylogenetic trees agree in identifying affin...

  4. High-performance phase-field modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Vignal, Philippe

    2015-04-27

    Many processes in engineering and sciences involve the evolution of interfaces. Among the mathematical frameworks developed to model these types of problems, the phase-field method has emerged as a possible solution. Phase-fields nonetheless lead to complex nonlinear, high-order partial differential equations, whose solution poses mathematical and computational challenges. Guaranteeing some of the physical properties of the equations has lead to the development of efficient algorithms and discretizations capable of recovering said properties by construction [2, 5]. This work builds-up on these ideas, and proposes novel discretization strategies that guarantee numerical energy dissipation for both conserved and non-conserved phase-field models. The temporal discretization is based on a novel method which relies on Taylor series and ensures strong energy stability. It is second-order accurate, and can also be rendered linear to speed-up the solution process [4]. The spatial discretization relies on Isogeometric Analysis, a finite element method that possesses the k-refinement technology and enables the generation of high-order, high-continuity basis functions. These basis functions are well suited to handle the high-order operators present in phase-field models. Two-dimensional and three dimensional results of the Allen-Cahn, Cahn-Hilliard, Swift-Hohenberg and phase-field crystal equation will be presented, which corroborate the theoretical findings, and illustrate the robustness of the method. Results related to more challenging examples, namely the Navier-Stokes Cahn-Hilliard and a diusion-reaction Cahn-Hilliard system, will also be presented. The implementation was done in PetIGA and PetIGA-MF, high-performance Isogeometric Analysis frameworks [1, 3], designed to handle non-linear, time-dependent problems.

  5. Scalable resource management in high performance computers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frachtenberg, E. (Eitan); Petrini, F. (Fabrizio); Fernandez Peinador, J. (Juan); Coll, S. (Salvador)

    2002-01-01

    Clusters of workstations have emerged as an important platform for building cost-effective, scalable and highly-available computers. Although many hardware solutions are available today, the largest challenge in making large-scale clusters usable lies in the system software. In this paper we present STORM, a resource management tool designed to provide scalability, low overhead and the flexibility necessary to efficiently support and analyze a wide range of job scheduling algorithms. STORM achieves these feats by closely integrating the management daemons with the low-level features that are common in state-of-the-art high-performance system area networks. The architecture of STORM is based on three main technical innovations. First, a sizable part of the scheduler runs in the thread processor located on the network interface. Second, we use hardware collectives that are highly scalable both for implementing control heartbeats and to distribute the binary of a parallel job in near-constant time, irrespective of job and machine sizes. Third, we use an I/O bypass protocol that allows fast data movements from the file system to the communication buffers in the network interface and vice versa. The experimental results show that STORM can launch a job with a binary of 12MB on a 64 processor/32 node cluster in less than 0.25 sec on an empty network, in less than 0.45 sec when all the processors are busy computing other jobs, and in less than 0.65 sec when the network is flooded with a background traffic. This paper provides experimental and analytical evidence that these results scale to a much larger number of nodes. To the best of our knowledge, STORM is at least two orders of magnitude faster than existing production schedulers in launching jobs, performing resource management tasks and gang scheduling.

  6. High-performance laboratories and cleanrooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, William; Sartor, Dale; Mills, Evan; Xu, Tengfang

    2002-07-01

    The California Energy Commission sponsored this roadmap to guide energy efficiency research and deployment for high performance cleanrooms and laboratories. Industries and institutions utilizing these building types (termed high-tech buildings) have played an important part in the vitality of the California economy. This roadmap's key objective to present a multi-year agenda to prioritize and coordinate research efforts. It also addresses delivery mechanisms to get the research products into the market. Because of the importance to the California economy, it is appropriate and important for California to take the lead in assessing the energy efficiency research needs, opportunities, and priorities for this market. In addition to the importance to California's economy, energy demand for this market segment is large and growing (estimated at 9400 GWH for 1996, Mills et al. 1996). With their 24hr. continuous operation, high tech facilities are a major contributor to the peak electrical demand. Laboratories and cleanrooms constitute the high tech building market, and although each building type has its unique features, they are similar in that they are extremely energy intensive, involve special environmental considerations, have very high ventilation requirements, and are subject to regulations--primarily safety driven--that tend to have adverse energy implications. High-tech buildings have largely been overlooked in past energy efficiency research. Many industries and institutions utilize laboratories and cleanrooms. As illustrated, there are many industries operating cleanrooms in California. These include semiconductor manufacturing, semiconductor suppliers, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, disk drive manufacturing, flat panel displays, automotive, aerospace, food, hospitals, medical devices, universities, and federal research facilities.

  7. Flow simulation and high performance computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezduyar, T.; Aliabadi, S.; Behr, M.; Johnson, A.; Kalro, V.; Litke, M.

    1996-10-01

    Flow simulation is a computational tool for exploring science and technology involving flow applications. It can provide cost-effective alternatives or complements to laboratory experiments, field tests and prototyping. Flow simulation relies heavily on high performance computing (HPC). We view HPC as having two major components. One is advanced algorithms capable of accurately simulating complex, real-world problems. The other is advanced computer hardware and networking with sufficient power, memory and bandwidth to execute those simulations. While HPC enables flow simulation, flow simulation motivates development of novel HPC techniques. This paper focuses on demonstrating that flow simulation has come a long way and is being applied to many complex, real-world problems in different fields of engineering and applied sciences, particularly in aerospace engineering and applied fluid mechanics. Flow simulation has come a long way because HPC has come a long way. This paper also provides a brief review of some of the recently-developed HPC methods and tools that has played a major role in bringing flow simulation where it is today. A number of 3D flow simulations are presented in this paper as examples of the level of computational capability reached with recent HPC methods and hardware. These examples are, flow around a fighter aircraft, flow around two trains passing in a tunnel, large ram-air parachutes, flow over hydraulic structures, contaminant dispersion in a model subway station, airflow past an automobile, multiple spheres falling in a liquid-filled tube, and dynamics of a paratrooper jumping from a cargo aircraft.

  8. Phylogeny and evolution of glass sponges (porifera, hexactinellida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohrmann, Martin; Janussen, Dorte; Reitner, Joachim; Collins, Allen G; Worheide, Gert

    2008-06-01

    Reconstructing the phylogeny of sponges (Porifera) is one of the remaining challenges to resolve the metazoan Tree of Life and is a prerequisite for understanding early animal evolution. Molecular phylogenetic analyses for two of the three extant classes of the phylum, Demospongiae and Calcarea, are largely incongruent with traditional classifications, most likely because of a paucity of informative morphological characters and high levels of homoplasy. For the third class, Hexactinellida (glass sponges)--predominantly deep-sea inhabitants with unusual morphology and biology--we present the first molecular phylogeny, along with a cladistic analysis of morphological characters. We collected 18S, 28S, and mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences of 34 glass sponge species from 27 genera, 9 families, and 3 orders and conducted partitioned Bayesian analyses using RNA secondary structure-specific substitution models (paired-sites models) for stem regions. Bayes factor comparisons of different paired-sites models against each other and conventional (independent-sites) models revealed a significantly better fit of the former but, contrary to previous predictions, the least parameter-rich of the tested paired-sites models provided the best fit to our data. In contrast to Demospongiae and Calcarea, our rDNA phylogeny agrees well with the traditional classification and a previously proposed phylogenetic system, which we ascribe to a more informative morphology in Hexactinellida. We find high support for a close relationship of glass sponges and Demospongiae sensu stricto, though the latter may be paraphyletic with respect to Hexactinellida. Homoscleromorpha appears to be the sister group of Calcarea. Contrary to most previous findings from rDNA, we recover Porifera as monophyletic, although support for this clade is low under paired-sites models.

  9. Ontogeny and phylogeny of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Charles

    2013-04-16

    How did language evolve? A popular approach points to the similarities between the ontogeny and phylogeny of language. Young children's language and nonhuman primates' signing both appear formulaic with limited syntactic combinations, thereby suggesting a degree of continuity in their cognitive abilities. To evaluate the validity of this approach, as well as to develop a quantitative benchmark to assess children's language development, I propose a formal analysis that characterizes the statistical profile of grammatical rules. I show that very young children's language is consistent with a productive grammar rather than memorization of specific word combinations from caregivers' speech. Furthermore, I provide a statistically rigorous demonstration that the sign use of Nim Chimpsky, the chimpanzee who was taught American Sign Language, does not show the expected productivity of a rule-based grammar. Implications for theories of language acquisition and evolution are discussed.

  10. Integrating advanced facades into high performance buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    2001-05-01

    Glass is a remarkable material but its functionality is significantly enhanced when it is processed or altered to provide added intrinsic capabilities. The overall performance of glass elements in a building can be further enhanced when they are designed to be part of a complete facade system. Finally the facade system delivers the greatest performance to the building owner and occupants when it becomes an essential element of a fully integrated building design. This presentation examines the growing interest in incorporating advanced glazing elements into more comprehensive facade and building systems in a manner that increases comfort, productivity and amenity for occupants, reduces operating costs for building owners, and contributes to improving the health of the planet by reducing overall energy use and negative environmental impacts. We explore the role of glazing systems in dynamic and responsive facades that provide the following functionality: Enhanced sun protection and cooling load control while improving thermal comfort and providing most of the light needed with daylighting; Enhanced air quality and reduced cooling loads using natural ventilation schemes employing the facade as an active air control element; Reduced operating costs by minimizing lighting, cooling and heating energy use by optimizing the daylighting-thermal tradeoffs; Net positive contributions to the energy balance of the building using integrated photovoltaic systems; Improved indoor environments leading to enhanced occupant health, comfort and performance. In addressing these issues facade system solutions must, of course, respect the constraints of latitude, location, solar orientation, acoustics, earthquake and fire safety, etc. Since climate and occupant needs are dynamic variables, in a high performance building the facade solution have the capacity to respond and adapt to these variable exterior conditions and to changing occupant needs. This responsive performance capability

  11. Toward high performance in Powder Metallurgy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torralba, José M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Powder Metallurgy (PM is technology well known for mass production of parts at low cost but usually with worse mechanical properties than same parts obtained by alternative routes. But using this technology, high performance materials can be obtained, depending of the processing route and the type and amount of porosity. In this paper, a brief review of the capabilities of powder technology is made with the objective of attaining the highest level of mechanical and physical properties. For this purpose, different strategies over the processing can be chosen: to act over the density/porosity level and properties of the pores, to act over strengthening mechanisms apart from the density of the material (the alloying system, the microstructure, the grain size,.., to improve the sintering activity by different routes and to use techniques that avoid the grain growth during sintering.La Pulvimetalurgia es una tecnología bien conocida por su faceta de producir piezas de forma masiva a bajo coste, pero habitualmente con una pérdida de propiedades mecánicas si se la compara con tecnologías alternativas para obtener las mismas piezas. Sin embargo, mediante esta tecnología, también se pueden obtener piezas de altas prestaciones, dependiendo de la ruta de procesado y del nivel de porosidad. En este trabajo, se realiza una sucinta revisión de las posibilidades de la tecnología de polvos que permitirían obtener los mayores niveles de prestaciones en cuanto a propiedades mecánicas y físicas. Se pueden elegir distintas estrategias en el procesado: actuar sobre el nivel de densidad/porosidad y las propiedades de los poros, actuar sobre mecanismos de endurecimiento distintos a la densidad (el sistema de aleación, la microestructura, el tamaño de grano,…, mejorar la activación durante la sinterización y utilizar técnicas que inhiban el tamaño de grano durante la sinterización.

  12. High Performance Commercial Fenestration Framing Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike Manteghi; Sneh Kumar; Joshua Early; Bhaskar Adusumalli

    2010-01-31

    A major objective of the U.S. Department of Energy is to have a zero energy commercial building by the year 2025. Windows have a major influence on the energy performance of the building envelope as they control over 55% of building energy load, and represent one important area where technologies can be developed to save energy. Aluminum framing systems are used in over 80% of commercial fenestration products (i.e. windows, curtain walls, store fronts, etc.). Aluminum framing systems are often required in commercial buildings because of their inherent good structural properties and long service life, which is required from commercial and architectural frames. At the same time, they are lightweight and durable, requiring very little maintenance, and offer design flexibility. An additional benefit of aluminum framing systems is their relatively low cost and easy manufacturability. Aluminum, being an easily recyclable material, also offers sustainable features. However, from energy efficiency point of view, aluminum frames have lower thermal performance due to the very high thermal conductivity of aluminum. Fenestration systems constructed of aluminum alloys therefore have lower performance in terms of being effective barrier to energy transfer (heat loss or gain). Despite the lower energy performance, aluminum is the choice material for commercial framing systems and dominates the commercial/architectural fenestration market because of the reasons mentioned above. In addition, there is no other cost effective and energy efficient replacement material available to take place of aluminum in the commercial/architectural market. Hence it is imperative to improve the performance of aluminum framing system to improve the energy performance of commercial fenestration system and in turn reduce the energy consumption of commercial building and achieve zero energy building by 2025. The objective of this project was to develop high performance, energy efficient commercial

  13. Comparison of nuclear, plastid, and mitochondrial phylogenies and the origin of wild octoploid strawberry species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajulu, Rajanikanth; Parks, Matthew; Tennessen, Jacob A; Liston, Aaron; Ashman, Tia-Lynn

    2015-04-01

    Molecular phylogenies derived from all three plant genomes can provide insight into the evolutionary history of plant groups influenced by reticulation. We sought to reconstruct mitochondrial exome, chloroplast, and nuclear genome phylogenies for octoploid Fragaria and their diploid ancestors and to document patterns of incongruence between and within the cytoplasmic genomes and interpret these in the context of evolutionary origin of the octoploid strawberries. Using a genome-skimming approach, we assembled chloroplast genomes and mitochondrial exomes, and we used the POLiMAPS method to assemble nuclear sequence for octoploid species and constructed phylogenies from all three genomes. We assessed incongruence between and within cytoplasmic genomes using topology-based phylogenetic incongruence tests. The incongruent cytoplasmic genome phylogeny with respect to the placement of octoploids suggests potential breakage in linkage disequilibrium of cytoplasmic genomes during allopolyploid origin of the octoploids. Furthermore, a single mitochondrial chimeric gene with a putative role in cytoplasmic male sterility yields a phylogeny that is inconsistent with the rest of the mitochondrial genome but consistent with the chloroplast phylogeny, suggesting intracellular gene transfer between heteroplasmic mitochondria, possibly driven by selection to overcome the effects of mito-nuclear incompatibility in octoploid origins. This work expands on the current understanding of evolutionary history of the octoploid ancestors of cultivated strawberry. It demonstrates phylogenetic incongruence between cytoplasmic genomes in octoploids with respect to diploid ancestors, indicating breakage in linkage disequilibrium of cytoplasmic genomes. We discuss potential organism-level processes that may have contributed to the observed incongruence in Fragaria. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  14. Molecular Infectious Disease Epidemiology: Survival Analysis and Algorithms Linking Phylogenies to Transmission Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenah, Eben; Britton, Tom; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has attempted to use whole-genome sequence data from pathogens to reconstruct the transmission trees linking infectors and infectees in outbreaks. However, transmission trees from one outbreak do not generalize to future outbreaks. Reconstruction of transmission trees is most useful to public health if it leads to generalizable scientific insights about disease transmission. In a survival analysis framework, estimation of transmission parameters is based on sums or averages over the possible transmission trees. A phylogeny can increase the precision of these estimates by providing partial information about who infected whom. The leaves of the phylogeny represent sampled pathogens, which have known hosts. The interior nodes represent common ancestors of sampled pathogens, which have unknown hosts. Starting from assumptions about disease biology and epidemiologic study design, we prove that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the possible assignments of interior node hosts and the transmission trees simultaneously consistent with the phylogeny and the epidemiologic data on person, place, and time. We develop algorithms to enumerate these transmission trees and show these can be used to calculate likelihoods that incorporate both epidemiologic data and a phylogeny. A simulation study confirms that this leads to more efficient estimates of hazard ratios for infectiousness and baseline hazards of infectious contact, and we use these methods to analyze data from a foot-and-mouth disease virus outbreak in the United Kingdom in 2001. These results demonstrate the importance of data on individuals who escape infection, which is often overlooked. The combination of survival analysis and algorithms linking phylogenies to transmission trees is a rigorous but flexible statistical foundation for molecular infectious disease epidemiology.

  15. Molecular Infectious Disease Epidemiology: Survival Analysis and Algorithms Linking Phylogenies to Transmission Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenah, Eben; Britton, Tom; Halloran, M. Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has attempted to use whole-genome sequence data from pathogens to reconstruct the transmission trees linking infectors and infectees in outbreaks. However, transmission trees from one outbreak do not generalize to future outbreaks. Reconstruction of transmission trees is most useful to public health if it leads to generalizable scientific insights about disease transmission. In a survival analysis framework, estimation of transmission parameters is based on sums or averages over the possible transmission trees. A phylogeny can increase the precision of these estimates by providing partial information about who infected whom. The leaves of the phylogeny represent sampled pathogens, which have known hosts. The interior nodes represent common ancestors of sampled pathogens, which have unknown hosts. Starting from assumptions about disease biology and epidemiologic study design, we prove that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the possible assignments of interior node hosts and the transmission trees simultaneously consistent with the phylogeny and the epidemiologic data on person, place, and time. We develop algorithms to enumerate these transmission trees and show these can be used to calculate likelihoods that incorporate both epidemiologic data and a phylogeny. A simulation study confirms that this leads to more efficient estimates of hazard ratios for infectiousness and baseline hazards of infectious contact, and we use these methods to analyze data from a foot-and-mouth disease virus outbreak in the United Kingdom in 2001. These results demonstrate the importance of data on individuals who escape infection, which is often overlooked. The combination of survival analysis and algorithms linking phylogenies to transmission trees is a rigorous but flexible statistical foundation for molecular infectious disease epidemiology. PMID:27070316

  16. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '17 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center

    CERN Document Server

    Kröner, Dietmar; Resch, Michael; HLRS 2017

    2018-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in supercomputer simulation. It includes the latest findings from leading researchers using systems from the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) in 2017. The reports cover all fields of computational science and engineering ranging from CFD to computational physics and from chemistry to computer science with a special emphasis on industrially relevant applications. Presenting findings of one of Europe’s leading systems, this volume covers a wide variety of applications that deliver a high level of sustained performance.The book covers the main methods in high-performance computing. Its outstanding results in achieving the best performance for production codes are of particular interest for both scientists and engineers. The book comes with a wealth of color illustrations and tables of results.

  17. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '15 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center

    CERN Document Server

    Kröner, Dietmar; Resch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in supercomputer simulation. It includes the latest findings from leading researchers using systems from the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) in 2015. The reports cover all fields of computational science and engineering ranging from CFD to computational physics and from chemistry to computer science with a special emphasis on industrially relevant applications. Presenting findings of one of Europe’s leading systems, this volume covers a wide variety of applications that deliver a high level of sustained performance. The book covers the main methods in high-performance computing. Its outstanding results in achieving the best performance for production codes are of particular interest for both scientists and engineers. The book comes with a wealth of color illustrations and tables of results.

  18. Phylogeny of bovine species based on AFLP fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntjer, J B; Otsen, M; Nijman, I J; Kuiper, M T R; Lenstra, J A

    2002-01-01

    The Bovini species comprise both domestic and wild cattle species. Published phylogenies of this tribe based on mitochondrial DNA contain anomalies, while nuclear sequences show only low variation. We have used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting in order to detect variation in loci distributed over the nuclear genome. Computer-assisted scoring of electrophoretic fingerprinting patterns yielded 361 markers, which provided sufficient redundancy to suppress stochastic effects of intraspecies polymorphisms and length homoplasies (comigration of non-homologous fragments). Tree reconstructions reveal three clusters: African buffalo with water buffalo, ox with zebu, and bison with wisent. Similarity values suggest a clustering of gaur and banteng, but bifurcating clustering algorithms did not assign consistent positions to these species and yak. We propose that because of shared polymorphisms and reticulations, tree topologies are only partially adequate to represent the phylogeny of the Bovini. Principal-coordinate analysis positions zebu between a gaur/banteng cluster and taurine cattle. This correlates with the region of origin of these species and suggests that genomic distances between the cattle species have been influenced by genetic exchange between neighbouring ancestral populations.

  19. History, objectivity, and the construction of molecular phylogenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Díaz, Edna; Anaya-Muñoz, Victor H

    2008-12-01

    Despite the promises made by molecular evolutionists since the early 1960s that phylogenies would be readily reconstructed using molecular data, the construction of molecular phylogenies has both retained many methodological problems of the past and brought up new ones of considerable epistemic relevance. The field is driven not only by changes in knowledge about the processes of molecular evolution, but also by an ever-present methodological anxiety manifested in the constant search for an increased objectivity-or in its converse, the avoidance of subjectivity. This paper offers an exhaustive account of the methodological and conceptual difficulties embedded in each of the steps required to elaborate molecular phytogenies. The authors adopt a historical perspective on the field in order to follow the development of practices that seek to increase the objectivity of their methods and representations. These include the adoption and development of explicit criteria for evaluation of evidence, and of procedures associated with methods of statistical inference, quantification and automation. All these are linked to an increasing use of computers in research since the mid 1960s. We will show that the practices of objectivity described are highly dependent on the problems and tools of molecular phylogenetics.

  20. Molecular Phylogeny of the Bamboo Sharks (Chiloscyllium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Haslina Masstor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chiloscyllium, commonly called bamboo shark, can be found inhabiting the waters of the Indo-West Pacific around East Asian countries such as Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, Singapore, and Indonesia. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN Red List has categorized them as nearly threatened sharks out of their declining population status due to overexploitation. A molecular study was carried out to portray the systematic relationships within Chiloscyllium species using 12S rRNA and cytochrome b gene sequences. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian were used to reconstruct their phylogeny trees. A total of 381 bp sequences’ lengths were successfully aligned in the 12S rRNA region, with 41 bp sites being parsimony-informative. In the cytochrome b region, a total of 1120 bp sites were aligned, with 352 parsimony-informative characters. All analyses yield phylogeny trees on which C. indicum has close relationships with C. plagiosum. C. punctatum is sister taxon to both C. indicum and C. plagiosum while C. griseum and C. hasseltii formed their own clade as sister taxa. These Chiloscyllium classifications can be supported by some morphological characters (lateral dermal ridges on the body, coloring patterns, and appearance of hypobranchials and basibranchial plate that can clearly be used to differentiate each species.

  1. Phylogeny Inference Based on Spectral Graph Clustering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Shu-Bo; Zhou, Song-Yu; He, Jian-Guo; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2011-01-01

    ...; this may enlarge the error gradually, and lead to an inaccurate tree topology. In this study, a splitting algorithm is proposed for phylogeny inference by using the spectral graph clustering (SGC) technique...

  2. Intelligent Facades for High Performance Green Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyson, Anna [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Progress Towards Net-Zero and Net-Positive-Energy Commercial Buildings and Urban Districts Through Intelligent Building Envelope Strategies Previous research and development of intelligent facades systems has been limited in their contribution towards national goals for achieving on-site net zero buildings, because this R&D has failed to couple the many qualitative requirements of building envelopes such as the provision of daylighting, access to exterior views, satisfying aesthetic and cultural characteristics, with the quantitative metrics of energy harvesting, storage and redistribution. To achieve energy self-sufficiency from on-site solar resources, building envelopes can and must address this gamut of concerns simultaneously. With this project, we have undertaken a high-performance building integrated combined-heat and power concentrating photovoltaic system with high temperature thermal capture, storage and transport towards multiple applications (BICPV/T). The critical contribution we are offering with the Integrated Concentrating Solar Façade (ICSF) is conceived to improve daylighting quality for improved health of occupants and mitigate solar heat gain while maximally capturing and transferring onsite solar energy. The ICSF accomplishes this multi-functionality by intercepting only the direct-normal component of solar energy (which is responsible for elevated cooling loads) thereby transforming a previously problematic source of energy into a high quality resource that can be applied to building demands such as heating, cooling, dehumidification, domestic hot water, and possible further augmentation of electrical generation through organic Rankine cycles. With the ICSF technology, our team is addressing the global challenge in transitioning commercial and residential building stock towards on-site clean energy self-sufficiency, by fully integrating innovative environmental control systems strategies within an intelligent and responsively dynamic building

  3. Alternative High-Performance Ceramic Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, S. K. [Alfred Univ., NY (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This final report (M5NU-12-NY-AU # 0202-0410) summarizes the results of the project titled “Alternative High-Performance Ceramic Waste Forms,” funded in FY12 by the Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP Project # 12-3809) being led by Alfred University in collaboration with Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The overall focus of the project is to advance fundamental understanding of crystalline ceramic waste forms and to demonstrate their viability as alternative waste forms to borosilicate glasses. We processed single- and multiphase hollandite waste forms based on simulated waste streams compositions provided by SRNL based on the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI) aqueous separation process developed in the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D). For multiphase simulated waste forms, oxide and carbonate precursors were mixed together via ball milling with deionized water using zirconia media in a polyethylene jar for 2 h. The slurry was dried overnight and then separated from the media. The blended powders were then subjected to melting or spark plasma sintering (SPS) processes. Microstructural evolution and phase assemblages of these samples were studied using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersion analysis of x-rays (EDAX), wavelength dispersive spectrometry (WDS), transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM), selective area x-ray diffraction (SAXD), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). These results showed that the processing methods have significant effect on the microstructure and thus the performance of these waste forms. The Ce substitution into zirconolite and pyrochlore materials was investigated using a combination of experimental (in situ XRD and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES)) and modeling techniques to study these single phases independently. In zirconolite materials, a transition from the 2M to the 4M polymorph was observed with increasing Ce content. The resulting

  4. Phylogeny of nematodes from birds of prey

    OpenAIRE

    Honisch, Michaela

    2010-01-01

    Birds of prey host a wide variety of endoparasites. The majority of these endoparasites are nematodes. They can be found mainly in the digestive and respiratory system. The current accepted phylogeny of nematodes found in birds of prey is based on morphological traits. In this study molecular data were used to assess phylogenetic relationships in this group of parasitic nematodes. The aim of the study was to evaluate a method for rapid species identification, to construct a phylogeny of paras...

  5. Inference of Tumor Phylogenies with Improved Somatic Mutation Discovery

    KAUST Repository

    Salari, Raheleh

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies provide a powerful tool for studying genome evolution during progression of advanced diseases such as cancer. Although many recent studies have employed new sequencing technologies to detect mutations across multiple, genetically related tumors, current methods do not exploit available phylogenetic information to improve the accuracy of their variant calls. Here, we present a novel algorithm that uses somatic single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in multiple, related tissue samples as lineage markers for phylogenetic tree reconstruction. Our method then leverages the inferred phylogeny to improve the accuracy of SNV discovery. Experimental analyses demonstrate that our method achieves up to 32% improvement for somatic SNV calling of multiple related samples over the accuracy of GATK\\'s Unified Genotyper, the state of the art multisample SNV caller. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  6. A fungal phylogeny based on 42 complete genomes derived from supertree and combined gene analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stajich Jason E

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, most fungal phylogenies have been derived from single gene comparisons, or from concatenated alignments of a small number of genes. The increase in fungal genome sequencing presents an opportunity to reconstruct evolutionary events using entire genomes. As a tool for future comparative, phylogenomic and phylogenetic studies, we used both supertrees and concatenated alignments to infer relationships between 42 species of fungi for which complete genome sequences are available. Results A dataset of 345,829 genes was extracted from 42 publicly available fungal genomes. Supertree methods were employed to derive phylogenies from 4,805 single gene families. We found that the average consensus supertree method may suffer from long-branch attraction artifacts, while matrix representation with parsimony (MRP appears to be immune from these. A genome phylogeny was also reconstructed from a concatenated alignment of 153 universally distributed orthologs. Our MRP supertree and concatenated phylogeny are highly congruent. Within the Ascomycota, the sub-phyla Pezizomycotina and Saccharomycotina were resolved. Both phylogenies infer that the Leotiomycetes are the closest sister group to the Sordariomycetes. There is some ambiguity regarding the placement of Stagonospora nodurum, the sole member of the class Dothideomycetes present in the dataset. Within the Saccharomycotina, a monophyletic clade containing organisms that translate CTG as serine instead of leucine is evident. There is also strong support for two groups within the CTG clade, one containing the fully sexual species Candida lusitaniae, Candida guilliermondii and Debaryomyces hansenii, and the second group containing Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis and Lodderomyces elongisporus. The second major clade within the Saccharomycotina contains species whose genomes have undergone a whole genome duplication (WGD, and their close

  7. High-performance commercial building systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selkowitz, Stephen

    2003-10-01

    This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to

  8. High Performance Home Building Guide for Habitat for Humanity Affiliates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey Marburger

    2010-10-01

    This guide covers basic principles of high performance Habitat construction, steps to achieving high performance Habitat construction, resources to help improve building practices, materials, etc., and affiliate profiles and recommendations.

  9. Incongruence between nuclear and chloroplast DNA phylogenies in pedicularis section Cyathophora (Orobanchaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Bin Yu

    Full Text Available Pedicularis section Cyathophora is a monophyletic group characterized by perfoliate leaf and/or bract bases at each node. This section comprises four series, corresponding to four general corolla types of Pedicularis, i.e. toothless, toothed, beaked and long-tubed corollas. In this study, we aim to reconstruct a comprehensive phylogeny of section Cyathophora, and compare phylogenetic incongruence between nuclear and chloroplast datasets. Sixty-seven accessions belonging to section Cyathophora and 9 species for other Pedicularis were sampled, and one nuclear gene (nrITS and four chloroplast genes (matK, rbcL, trnH-psbA and trnL-F were sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses show that the topologies and networks inferred from nrITS and the concatenated chloroplast datasets were incongruent, and the nrITS phylogenies and network agreed with the morphology-based taxonomy to some degree. The chloroplast genome of two Sichuan samples of P. cyathophylloides (E4 and E5 may show introgression from an ancestor of P. cyathophylla. Neither the nrITS dataset nor the concatenated chloroplast dataset were able to adequately resolve relationships among species in the series Reges; this is most likely due to incomplete lineage sorting and/or introgression/hybridization. The nrITS phylogeny indicates the beakless (toothed and toothless and beaked galeas may have evolved independently within section Cyathophora, and the chloroplast phylogeny reveals that the long corolla tube with beaked galea is derived from the short one.

  10. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '99 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center

    CERN Document Server

    Jäger, Willi

    2000-01-01

    The book contains reports about the most significant projects from science and engineering of the Federal High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS). They were carefully selected in a peer-review process and are showcases of an innovative combination of state-of-the-art modeling, novel algorithms and the use of leading-edge parallel computer technology. The projects of HLRS are using supercomputer systems operated jointly by university and industry and therefore a special emphasis has been put on the industrial relevance of results and methods.

  11. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '98 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center

    CERN Document Server

    Jäger, Willi

    1999-01-01

    The book contains reports about the most significant projects from science and industry that are using the supercomputers of the Federal High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS). These projects are from different scientific disciplines, with a focus on engineering, physics and chemistry. They were carefully selected in a peer-review process and are showcases for an innovative combination of state-of-the-art physical modeling, novel algorithms and the use of leading-edge parallel computer technology. As HLRS is in close cooperation with industrial companies, special emphasis has been put on the industrial relevance of results and methods.

  12. High Performance Input/Output Systems for High Performance Computing and Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Geoffrey C.; Ou, Chao-Wei

    1997-01-01

    The approach of this task was to apply leading parallel computing research to a number of existing techniques for assimilation, and extract parameters indicating where and how input/output limits computational performance. The following was used for detailed knowledge of the application problems: 1. Developing a parallel input/output system specifically for this application 2. Extracting the important input/output characteristics of data assimilation problems; and 3. Building these characteristics s parameters into our runtime library (Fortran D/High Performance Fortran) for parallel input/output support.

  13. Molecular phylogeny of Duvenhage virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis H. Nel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Duvenhage virus (DUVV constitutes one of the 11 species in the Lyssavirus genus and causes fatal rabies encephalitis. The virus is associated with insectivorous bat species and three human cases have been reported, all of which were linked to contact with bats. Few of these isolates have been studied and thus little is known about the phylogeny and epidemiology of this lyssavirus. Until 2007, when an isolate was made from the East African country of Kenya, all isolations of this virus had been from southern Africa. This discovery led to many questions regarding the spread and diversity of this lyssavirus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the DUVV isolates constitute two different lineages, in which the southern African isolates group together to form one lineage and the more recent isolate from Kenya constitutes a new, second lineage. We found that the new isolate has a genetic variation that has not yet been seen for DUVV. Not only is our lack of knowledge regarding the geographical distribution of this uniquely African virus emphasised, but we have also demonstrated the potential diversity within this genotype.

  14. Taxonomy and phylogeny of chytrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, D J

    1978-04-01

    Thallus development, zoospore size, zoospore ultrastructural complexity and organization, and flagellum length are cited as important in phylogeny of the Chytridiales (chytrids) and should be the bases for this classification. Discharge of zoospores is also cited as important although emphasis is not placed on operculation. It is proposed that simple, eucarpic, monocentric chytrids which discharge zoospores following dissolution of the sporangium wall evolved into multipapilliate species of Rhizophydium and 2 lines of evolution from these species are documented with examples. In one line they evolved into single-pored species such as R. pollinis-pini, then to Chytridium and tendochytrium-like chytrids and to polycentric chytrids such as Nowakowskiella and Cladochytrium. The second line evolved from multipapilliate Rhizophydium species to Phlyctochytrium and Entophlyctis, and to the order Blastocladiales. Rhizophlyctis rosea and some olpidiaceous chytrids, because of a fibrillar rhizoplast in their zoospores do not appear close to Rhizophydium-related chytrids and may require separate subordinal rank in classification. It is proposed that zoospores of the advanced members of the class Chytridiomycetes have reached limits for further zoospore development because of size; however, the zoospore is no longer essential for them because they have developed a filamentous habit of growth.

  15. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '02 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center

    CERN Document Server

    Jäger, Willi

    2003-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in modeling and simulation on supercomputers. Leading German research groups present their results achieved on high-end systems of the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) for the year 2002. Reports cover all fields of supercomputing simulation ranging from computational fluid dynamics to computer science. Special emphasis is given to industrially relevant applications. Moreover, by presenting results for both vector sytems and micro-processor based systems the book allows to compare performance levels and usability of a variety of supercomputer architectures. It therefore becomes an indispensable guidebook to assess the impact of the Japanese Earth Simulator project on supercomputing in the years to come.

  16. Phylogeny inference based on spectral graph clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Bo; Zhou, Song-Yu; He, Jian-Guo; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2011-04-01

    Phylogeny inference is an importance issue in computational biology. Some early approaches based on characteristics such as the maximum parsimony algorithm and the maximum likelihood algorithm will become intractable when the number of taxonomic units is large. Recent algorithms based on distance data which adopt an agglomerative scheme are widely used for phylogeny inference. However, they have to recursively merge the nearest pair of taxa and estimate a distance matrix; this may enlarge the error gradually, and lead to an inaccurate tree topology. In this study, a splitting algorithm is proposed for phylogeny inference by using the spectral graph clustering (SGC) technique. The SGC algorithm splits graphs by using the maximum cut criterion and circumvents optimization problems through solving a generalized eigenvalue system. The promising features of the proposed algorithm are the following: (i) using a heuristic strategy for constructing phylogenies from certain distance functions, which are not even additive; (ii) distance matrices do not have to be estimated recursively; (iii) inferring a more accurate tree topology than that of the Neighbor-joining (NJ) algorithm on simulated datasets; and (iv) strongly supporting hypotheses induced by other methods for Baculovirus genomes. Our numerical experiments confirm that the SGC algorithm is efficient for phylogeny inference. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  17. Conodont affinity and chordate phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, P C; Forey, P L; Aldridge, R J

    2000-05-01

    Current information on the conodonts Clydagnathus windsorensis (Globensky) and Promissum pulchrum Kovács-Endrödy, together with the latest interpretations of conodont hard tissues, are reviewed and it is concluded that sufficient evidence exists to justify interpretation of the conodonts on a chordate model. A new phylogenetic analysis is undertaken, consisting of 17 chordate taxa and 103 morphological, physiological and biochemical characters; conodonts are included as a primary taxon. Various experiments with character coding, taxon deletion and the use of constraint trees are carried out. We conclude that conodonts are cladistically more derived than either hagfishes or lampreys because they possess a mineralised dermal skeleton and that they are the most plesiomorphic member of the total group Gnathostomata. We discuss the evolution of the nervous and sensory systems and the skeleton in the context of our optimal phylogenetic tree. There appears to be no simple evolution of free to canal-enclosed neuromasts; organised neuromasts within canals appear to have arisen at least three times from free neuromasts or neuromasts arranged within grooves. The mineralised vertebrate skeleton first appeared as odontodes of dentine or dentine plus enamel in the paraconodont/euconodont feeding apparatus. Bone appeared later, co-ordinate with the development of a dermal skeleton, and it appears to have been primitively acellular. Atubular dentine is more primitive than tubular dentine. However, the subsequent distribution of the different types of dentine (e.g. mesodentine, orthodentine), suggests that these tissue types are homoplastic. The topology of relationships and known stratigraphic ranges of taxa in our phylogeny predict the existence of myxinoids and petromyzontids in the Cambrian.

  18. Probabilistic modeling of the evolution of gene synteny within reconciled phylogenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeria, Magali; Tannier, Eric; Guéguen, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Most models of genome evolution concern either genetic sequences, gene content or gene order. They sometimes integrate two of the three levels, but rarely the three of them. Probabilistic models of gene order evolution usually have to assume constant gene content or adopt a presence/absence coding of gene neighborhoods which is blind to complex events modifying gene content. We propose a probabilistic evolutionary model for gene neighborhoods, allowing genes to be inserted, duplicated or lost. It uses reconciled phylogenies, which integrate sequence and gene content evolution. We are then able to optimize parameters such as phylogeny branch lengths, or probabilistic laws depicting the diversity of susceptibility of syntenic regions to rearrangements. We reconstruct a structure for ancestral genomes by optimizing a likelihood, keeping track of all evolutionary events at the level of gene content and gene synteny. Ancestral syntenies are associated with a probability of presence.

  19. DOE research in utilization of high-performance computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzbee, B.L.; Worlton, W.J.; Michael, G.; Rodrigue, G.

    1980-12-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) and other Government research laboratories depend on high-performance computer systems to accomplish their programatic goals. As the most powerful computer systems become available, they are acquired by these laboratories so that advances can be made in their disciplines. These advances are often the result of added sophistication to numerical models whose execution is made possible by high-performance computer systems. However, high-performance computer systems have become increasingly complex; consequently, it has become increasingly difficult to realize their potential performance. The result is a need for research on issues related to the utilization of these systems. This report gives a brief description of high-performance computers, and then addresses the use of and future needs for high-performance computers within DOE, the growing complexity of applications within DOE, and areas of high-performance computer systems warranting research. 1 figure.

  20. From gene trees to organismal phylogeny in prokaryotes: the case of the gamma-Proteobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Lerat

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in published genomic sequences for bacteria presents the first opportunity to reconstruct evolutionary events on the scale of entire genomes. However, extensive lateral gene transfer (LGT may thwart this goal by preventing the establishment of organismal relationships based on individual gene phylogenies. The group for which cases of LGT are most frequently documented and for which the greatest density of complete genome sequences is available is the gamma-Proteobacteria, an ecologically diverse and ancient group including free-living species as well as pathogens and intracellular symbionts of plants and animals. We propose an approach to multigene phylogeny using complete genomes and apply it to the case of the gamma-Proteobacteria. We first applied stringent criteria to identify a set of likely gene orthologs and then tested the compatibilities of the resulting protein alignments with several phylogenetic hypotheses. Our results demonstrate phylogenetic concordance among virtually all (203 of 205 of the selected gene families, with each of the exceptions consistent with a single LGT event. The concatenated sequences of the concordant families yield a fully resolved phylogeny. This topology also received strong support in analyses aimed at excluding effects of heterogeneity in nucleotide base composition across lineages. Our analysis indicates that single-copy orthologous genes are resistant to horizontal transfer, even in ancient bacterial groups subject to high rates of LGT. This gene set can be identified and used to yield robust hypotheses for organismal phylogenies, thus establishing a foundation for reconstructing the evolutionary transitions, such as gene transfer, that underlie diversity in genome content and organization.

  1. High Performance Work Practices In Indian Organizations- An Understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Awasthi, Shakti

    2013-01-01

    In todays global competitive era, every business aims to optimize their processes. High performance work practices are such a practice, which can lead to the optimal utilization of human resources. In the present article I have tried to bring into light different aspects related to the high performing work practices in the organizational setup and their implementation can make a difference in the organization. The high performance work practices not only can bring the change in human resource...

  2. Mitochondrial genome sequences effectively reveal the phylogeny of Hylobates gibbons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chiao Chan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uniquely among hominoids, gibbons exist as multiple geographically contiguous taxa exhibiting distinctive behavioral, morphological, and karyotypic characteristics. However, our understanding of the evolutionary relationships of the various gibbons, especially among Hylobates species, is still limited because previous studies used limited taxon sampling or short mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequences. Here we use mtDNA genome sequences to reconstruct gibbon phylogenetic relationships and reveal the pattern and timing of divergence events in gibbon evolutionary history. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of 51 individuals representing 11 species belonging to three genera (Hylobates, Nomascus and Symphalangus using the high-throughput 454 sequencing system with the parallel tagged sequencing approach. Three phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood, Bayesian analysis and neighbor-joining depicted the gibbon phylogenetic relationships congruently and with strong support values. Most notably, we recover a well-supported phylogeny of the Hylobates gibbons. The estimation of divergence times using Bayesian analysis with relaxed clock model suggests a much more rapid speciation process in Hylobates than in Nomascus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Use of more than 15 kb sequences of the mitochondrial genome provided more informative and robust data than previous studies of short mitochondrial segments (e.g., control region or cytochrome b as shown by the reliable reconstruction of divergence patterns among Hylobates gibbons. Moreover, molecular dating of the mitogenomic divergence times implied that biogeographic change during the last five million years may be a factor promoting the speciation of Sundaland animals, including Hylobates species.

  3. Phylogeny of ladybirds (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): are the subfamilies monophyletic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, A; Lecompte, E; Magné, F; Hemptinne, J-L; Crouau-Roy, B

    2010-03-01

    The Coccinellidae (ladybirds) is a highly speciose family of the Coleoptera. Ladybirds are well known because of their use as biocontrol agents, and are the subject of many ecological studies. However, little is known about phylogenetic relationships of the Coccinellidae, and a precise evolutionary framework is needed for the family. This paper provides the first phylogenetic reconstruction of the relationships within the Coccinellidae based on analysis of five genes: the 18S and 28S rRNA nuclear genes and the mitochondrial 12S, 16S rRNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) genes. The phylogenetic relationships of 67 terminal taxa, representative of all the subfamilies of the Coccinellidae (61 species, 37 genera), and relevant outgroups, were reconstructed using multiple approaches, including Bayesian inference with partitioning strategies. The recovered phylogenies are congruent and show that the Coccinellinae is monophyletic but the Coccidulinae, Epilachninae, Scymninae and Chilocorinae are paraphyletic. The tribe Chilocorini is identified as the sister-group of the Coccinellinae for the first time. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. High Performance Monopropellants for Future Planetary Ascent Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. proposes to design, develop, and demonstrate, a novel high performance monopropellant for application in future planetary ascent vehicles. Our...

  5. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '08 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center

    CERN Document Server

    Kröner, Dietmar; Resch, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The discussions and plans on all scienti?c, advisory, and political levels to realize an even larger “European Supercomputer” in Germany, where the hardware costs alone will be hundreds of millions Euro – much more than in the past – are getting closer to realization. As part of the strategy, the three national supercomputing centres HLRS (Stuttgart), NIC/JSC (Julic ¨ h) and LRZ (Munich) have formed the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) as a new virtual organization enabled by an agreement between the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the state ministries for research of Baden-Wurttem ¨ berg, Bayern, and Nordrhein-Westfalen. Already today, the GCS provides the most powerful high-performance computing - frastructure in Europe. Through GCS, HLRS participates in the European project PRACE (Partnership for Advances Computing in Europe) and - tends its reach to all European member countries. These activities aligns well with the activities of HLRS in the European HPC infrastructur...

  6. Molecular phylogeny of the burying beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae: Nicrophorinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, Derek S; Venables, Chandra

    2013-12-01

    Burying beetles (Silphidae: Nicrophorus) are well-known for their monopolization of small vertebrate carcasses in subterranean crypts and complex biparental care behaviors. They have been the focus of intense behavioral, ecological, and conservation research since the 1980s yet no thorough phylogenetic estimate for the group exists. Herein, we infer relationships, test past hypotheses of relationships, and test biogeographic scenarios among 55 of the subfamily Nicrophorinae's currently valid and extant 72 species. Two mitochondrial genes, COI and COII, and two nuclear genes, the D2 region of 28S, and the protein coding gene CAD, provided 3,971 nucleotides for 58 nicrophorine and 5 outgroup specimens. Ten partitions, with each modeled by GTR+I+G, were used for a 100 M generation MrBayes analysis and maximum likelihood bootstrapping with Garli. The inferred Bayesian phylogeny was mostly well-resolved with only three weak branches of biogeographic relevance. The common ancestor of the subfamily and of the genus Nicrophorus was reconstructed as Old World with four separate transitions to the New World and four reverse colonizations of the Old World from the New. Divergence dating from analysis with BEAST indicate the genus Nicrophorus originated in the Cretaceous, 127-99 Ma. Most prior, pre-cladistic hypotheses of relationships were strongly rejected while most modern hypotheses were largely congruent with monophyletic groups in our estimated phylogeny. Our results reject a recent hypothesis that Nicrophorus morio Gebler, 1817 (NEW STATUS as valid species) is a subspecies of N. germanicus (L., 1758). Two subgenera of Nicrophorus are recognized: NecroxenusSemenov-Tian-Shanskij, 1933, and NicrophorusFabricius, 1775. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Phylogeny of Gobioidei and the origin of European gobies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa Agorreta

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The percomorph order Gobioidei comprises over 2200 species worldwide distributed that occupy most freshwater, brackish and marine environments, and show a spectacular variety in morphology, ecology, and behaviour. However, phylogenetic relationships among many gobioid groups still remain poorly understood. Such is the case of Gobiidae, a rapidly radiating lineage that encompass an unusually high diversity of species (nearly 2000, including the largely endemic European species whose origin and ancestry remain uncertain. The resolution and accuracy of previous molecular phylogenetic studies has been limited due to the use of only a few (generally mitochondrial molecular markers and/or the absence of representatives of several key lineages. Our study (built on Agorreta et al. 2013 is the first to include multiple nuclear and mitochondrial genes for nearly 300 terminal taxa representing the vast diversity of gobioid lineages. We have used this information to reconstruct a robust phylogeny of Gobioidei, and we are now investigating the historical biogeography and diversification times of European gobies with a time-calibrated molecular phylogeny. Robustness of the inferred phylogenetic trees is significantly higher than that of previous studies, hence providing the most compelling molecular phylogenetic hypotheses for Gobioidei thus far. The family Eleotrididae branches off the gobioid tree after the Rhyacichthyidae + Odontobutidae clade followed by the Butidae as the sister-group of the Gobiidae. Several monophyletic groups are identified within the two major Gobiidae subclades, the gobionelline-like and the gobiine-like gobiids. The European gobies cluster in three distinct lineages (Pomatoschistus-, Aphia-, and Gobius-lineages, each with different affinities with gobiids from the Indo-Pacific and perhaps the New World. Our ongoing more-detailed study on European gobies will reveal whether their origin is related to vicariant events linked to the

  8. An alu-based phylogeny of lemurs (infraorder: Lemuriformes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T McLain

    Full Text Available LEMURS (INFRAORDER: Lemuriformes are a radiation of strepsirrhine primates endemic to the island of Madagascar. As of 2012, 101 lemur species, divided among five families, have been described. Genetic and morphological evidence indicates all species are descended from a common ancestor that arrived in Madagascar ∼55-60 million years ago (mya. Phylogenetic relationships in this species-rich infraorder have been the subject of debate. Here we use Alu elements, a family of primate-specific Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs, to construct a phylogeny of infraorder Lemuriformes. Alu elements are particularly useful SINEs for the purpose of phylogeny reconstruction because they are identical by descent and confounding events between loci are easily resolved by sequencing. The genome of the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus was computationally assayed for synapomorphic Alu elements. Those that were identified as Lemuriformes-specific were analyzed against other available primate genomes for orthologous sequence in which to design primers for PCR (polymerase chain reaction verification. A primate phylogenetic panel of 24 species, including 22 lemur species from all five families, was examined for the presence/absence of 138 Alu elements via PCR to establish relationships among species. Of these, 111 were phylogenetically informative. A phylogenetic tree was generated based on the results of this analysis. We demonstrate strong support for the monophyly of Lemuriformes to the exclusion of other primates, with Daubentoniidae, the aye-aye, as the basal lineage within the infraorder. Our results also suggest Lepilemuridae as a sister lineage to Cheirogaleidae, and Indriidae as sister to Lemuridae. Among the Cheirogaleidae, we show strong support for Microcebus and Mirza as sister genera, with Cheirogaleus the sister lineage to both. Our results also support the monophyly of the Lemuridae. Within Lemuridae we place Lemur and Hapalemur together to the

  9. Multigenic phylogeny and analysis of tree incongruences in Triticeae (Poaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilhaumon Claire

    2011-06-01

    decoupling gene trees from multigenic trees. Conclusions Our study is the first to propose a comprehensive, multigenic phylogeny of Triticeae. It clarifies several aspects of the relationships among genera and species of this tribe, and pinpoints biological groups with likely reticulate evolution. Importantly, this study extends previous results obtained in Drosophila by demonstrating that recombination can exacerbate gene-tree conflicts in phylogenetic reconstructions.

  10. Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of the fern genus Pteris (Pteridaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yi-Shan; Rouhan, Germinal; Amoroso, Victor B; Chiou, Wen-Liang

    2014-07-01

    Pteris (Pteridaceae), comprising over 250 species, had been thought to be a monophyletic genus until the three monotypic genera Neurocallis, Ochropteris and Platyzoma were included. However, the relationships between the type species of the genus Pteris, P. longifolia, and other species are still unknown. Furthermore, several infrageneric morphological classifications have been proposed, but are debated. To date, no worldwide phylogenetic hypothesis has been proposed for the genus, and no comprehensive biogeographical history of Pteris, crucial to understanding its cosmopolitan distribution, has been presented. A molecular phylogeny of Pteris is presented for 135 species, based on cpDNA rbcL and matK and using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference approaches. The inferred phylogeny was used to assess the biogeographical history of Pteris and to reconstruct the evolution of one ecological and four morphological characters commonly used for infrageneric classifications. The monophyly of Pteris remains uncertain, especially regarding the relationship of Pteris with Actiniopteris + Onychium and Platyzoma. Pteris comprises 11 clades supported by combinations of ecological and morphological character states, but none of the characters used in previous classifications were found to be exclusive synapomorphies. The results indicate that Pteris diversified around 47 million years ago, and when species colonized new geographical areas they generated new lineages, which are associated with morphological character transitions. This first phylogeny of Pteris on a global scale and including more than half of the diversity of the genus should contribute to a new, more reliable infrageneric classification of Pteris, based not only on a few morphological characters but also on ecological traits and geographical distribution. The inferred biogeographical history highlights long-distance dispersal as a major process shaping the worldwide distribution of the

  11. Mechanical Properties of High Performance Cementitious Grout Masterflow 9300

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report describes tests carried out on the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9300, developed by BASF Construction Chemicals A/S.......The present report describes tests carried out on the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9300, developed by BASF Construction Chemicals A/S....

  12. Myth Busting: Do High-Performance Students Prefer Working Alone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Cheryl L.; Shore, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a longstanding assumption that gifted, high-ability, or high-performing students prefer working alone; however, this may not be true in every case. The current study expanded on this assumption to reveal more nuanced learning preferences of these students. Sixty-nine high-performing and community-school students in Grades 5 and 6…

  13. 7 CFR 275.24 - High performance bonuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High performance bonuses. 275.24 Section 275.24... High performance bonuses. (a) General rule. (1) FNS will award bonuses totaling $48 million for each fiscal year to State agencies that show high or improved performance in accordance with the performance...

  14. New Entrepreneurs and High Performance Enterprises in the Middle ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    New Entrepreneurs and High Performance Enterprises in the Middle East and North Africa. Book cover New Entrepreneurs and High Performance Enterprises in the Middle East and North Africa. Auteur(s) : OECD, IDRC. Maison(s) d'édition : OECD, IDRC. 6 février 2013. ISBN : 9789264100251. 114 pages. e-ISBN :.

  15. Turning High-Poverty Schools into High-Performing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrett, William H.; Budge, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    If some schools can overcome the powerful and pervasive effects of poverty to become high performing, shouldn't any school be able to do the same? Shouldn't we be compelled to learn from those schools? Although schools alone will never systemically eliminate poverty, high-poverty, high-performing (HP/HP) schools take control of what they can to…

  16. Mechanical Properties of High Performance Cementitious Grout (II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report is an update of the report “Mechanical Properties of High Performance Cementitious Grout (I)” [1] and describes tests carried out on the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9500, marked “WMG 7145 FP”, developed by BASF Construction Chemicals A/S and designed for use in grouted co...... connections of offshore windmill foundations....

  17. From the Editor: The High Performance Computing Act of 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses issues related to the High Performance Computing and Communication program and National Research and Education Network (NREN) established by the High Performance Computing Act of 1991, including program management, specific program development, affecting policy decisions, access to the NREN, the Department of Education role, and…

  18. The phylogeny of Orussidae (Insecta: Hymenoptera) revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    The phylogeny of the parasitic wasp family Orussidae is analyzed with a slightly expanded version of a previously published data set. The basal splitting events in the family between two fossil taxa and the extant members are not unambiguously resolved. Intergeneric relationships in general are p...

  19. Book review: Insect morphology and phylogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Randolf

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Beutel RG, Friedrich F, Ge S-Q, Yang X-K (2014 Insect Morphology and Phylogeny: A textbook for students of entomology. De Gruyter, Berlin/Boston, 516 pp., softcover. ISBN 978-3-11-026263-6.

  20. Revision and phylogeny of the genus Balgus Fleutiaux, 1920 (Coleoptera, Elateridae, Thylacosterninae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Felipe Francisco

    2016-02-23

    The genus Balgus Fleutiaux 1920 was currently comprised of nine species and can be easily distinguished from other Thylacosterninae by the presence of tubercles on the pronotal disk. In this paper a taxonomic revision and a reconstruction of the phylogeny of the genus were performed. Morphological data were analyzed using maximum parsimony (MP) and by Bayesian inference (BI). For BI the Mkv model was used. The genus Balgus and eight of the nine species were redescribed. The subspecies B. schnusei cayennensis Chassain, 2003 was considered a synonym of B. schnusei (Heller, 1914), and the genus was considered monophyletic. An identification key to all species of the genus was generated.

  1. A molecular phylogeny of Dorylus army ants provides evidence for multiple evolutionary transitions in foraging niche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronauer, Daniel J C; Schöning, Caspar; Vilhelmsen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    in the leaf-litter and some as conspicuous swarm raiders on the forest floor and in the lower vegetation (the infamous driver ants). Here we use a combination of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences to reconstruct the phylogeny of the Dorylus s.l. army ants and to infer the evolutionary transitions...... in foraging niche and associated morphological adaptations. RESULTS: Underground foraging is basal and gave rise to leaf-litter foraging. Leaf-litter foraging in turn gave rise to two derived conditions: true surface foraging (the driver ants) and a reversal to subterranean foraging (a clade with most...

  2. Improving the Analysis of Dinoflagellate Phylogeny based on rDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Shauna; Jørgensen, Mårten Flø; Ho, Simon Y.W.

    2005-01-01

    Phylogenetic studies of dinoflagellates are often conducted using rDNA sequences. In analyses to date, the monophyly of some of the major lineages of dinoflagellates remain to be demonstrated. There are several reasons for this uncertainty, one of which may be the use of models of evolution...... that may not closely fit the data. We constructed and examined alignments of SSU and partial LSU rRNA along with a concatenated alignment of the two molecules. The alignments showed several characteristics that may confound phylogeny reconstruction: paired helix (stem) regions that contain non...

  3. A Versatile Glass Processor for High-Performance Photonic Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-08

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: With the DURIP fund, we acquire a glass processing station to enhance our capabilities to achieve ultra-high performance...funded by PECASE (supported by DoD-ARO under the contract/grant number W911NF-12-1-0026) on high performance optical sensors. The multipurpose glass ...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 08-12-2016 1-Aug-2014 31-Jul-2015 Final Report: A Versatile Glass Processor for High-Performance Photonic Platforms The views

  4. Experimental phylogeny of neutrally evolving DNA sequences generated by a bifurcate series of nested polymerase chain reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanson, Gerdine F O; Kawashita, Silvia Y; Brunstein, Adriana; Briones, Marcelo R S

    2002-02-01

    A known phylogeny was generated using a four-step serial bifurcate PCR method. The ancestor sequence (SSU rDNA) evolved in vitro for 280 nested PCR cycles, and the resulting 15 ancestor and 16 terminal sequences (2,238 bp each) were determined. Parsimony, distance, and maximum likelihood analysis of the terminal sequences reconstructed the topology of the real phylogeny and branch lengths accurately. Divergence dates and ancestor sequences were estimated with very small error, particularly at the base of the phylogeny, mostly due to insertion and deletion changes. The substitution patterns along the known phylogeny are not described by reversible models, and accordingly, the probability substitution matrix, based on the observed substitutions from ancestor to terminal nodes along the known phylogeny, was calculated. This approach is an extension of previous studies using bacteriophage serial propagation, because here mutations were allowed to occur neutrally rather than by addition of a mutagenic agent, which produced biased mutational changes. These results provide for the first time biochemical experimental support for phylogenies, divergence date estimates, and an irreversible substitution model based on neutrally evolving DNA sequences. The substitution preferences observed here (A to G and T to C) are consistent with the high G+C content of the Thermus aquaticus genome. This suggests, at least in part, that the method here described, which explores the high Taq DNA polymerase error rate, simulates the evolution of a DNA segment in a thermophilic organism. These organisms include the bacterial rod T. aquaticus and several Archaea, and thus, the method and data set described here may well contribute new insights about the genome evolution of these organisms.

  5. A modern approach to rotiferan phylogeny: combining morphological and molecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Martin V; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2006-08-01

    The phylogeny of selected members of the phylum Rotifera is examined based on analyses under parsimony direct optimization and Bayesian inference of phylogeny. Species of the higher metazoan lineages Acanthocephala, Micrognathozoa, Cycliophora, and potential outgroups are included to test rotiferan monophyly. The data include 74 morphological characters combined with DNA sequence data from four molecular loci, including the nuclear 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, histone H3, and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I. The combined molecular and total evidence analyses support the inclusion of Acanthocephala as a rotiferan ingroup, but do not support the inclusion of Micrognathozoa and Cycliophora. Within Rotifera, the monophyletic Monogononta is sister group to a clade consisting of Acanthocephala, Seisonidea, and Bdelloidea-for which we propose the name Hemirotifera. We also formally propose the inclusion of Acanthocephala within Rotifera, but maintaining the name Rotifera for the new expanded phylum. Within Monogononta, Gnesiotrocha and Ploima are also supported by the data. The relationships within Ploima remain unstable to parameter variation or to the method of phylogeny reconstruction and poorly supported, and the analyses showed that monophyly was questionable for the families Dicranophoridae, Notommatidae, and Brachionidae, and for the genus Proales. Otherwise, monophyly was generally supported for the represented ploimid families and genera.

  6. Generalized buneman pruning for inferring the most parsimonious multi-state phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Navodit; Blelloch, Guy; Ravi, R; Schwartz, Russell

    2011-03-01

    Accurate reconstruction of phylogenies remains a key challenge in evolutionary biology. Most biologically plausible formulations of the problem are formally NP-hard, with no known efficient solution. The standard in practice are fast heuristic methods that are empirically known to work very well in general, but can yield results arbitrarily far from optimal. Practical exact methods, which yield exponential worst-case running times but generally much better times in practice, provide an important alternative. We report progress in this direction by introducing a provably optimal method for the weighted multi-state maximum parsimony phylogeny problem. The method is based on generalizing the notion of the Buneman graph, a construction key to efficient exact methods for binary sequences, so as to apply to sequences with arbitrary finite numbers of states with arbitrary state transition weights. We implement an integer linear programming (ILP) method for the multi-state problem using this generalized Buneman graph and demonstrate that the resulting method is able to solve data sets that are intractable by prior exact methods in run times comparable with popular heuristics. We further show on a collection of less difficult problem instances that the ILP method leads to large reductions in average-case run times relative to leading heuristics on moderately hard problems. Our work provides the first method for provably optimal maximum parsimony phylogeny inference that is practical for multi-state data sets of more than a few characters.

  7. SPREAD: spatial phylogenetic reconstruction of evolutionary dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielejec, Filip; Rambaut, Andrew; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe

    2011-10-15

    SPREAD is a user-friendly, cross-platform application to analyze and visualize Bayesian phylogeographic reconstructions incorporating spatial-temporal diffusion. The software maps phylogenies annotated with both discrete and continuous spatial information and can export high-dimensional posterior summaries to keyhole markup language (KML) for animation of the spatial diffusion through time in virtual globe software. In addition, SPREAD implements Bayes factor calculation to evaluate the support for hypotheses of historical diffusion among pairs of discrete locations based on Bayesian stochastic search variable selection estimates. SPREAD takes advantage of multicore architectures to process large joint posterior distributions of phylogenies and their spatial diffusion and produces visualizations as compelling and interpretable statistical summaries for the different spatial projections. SPREAD is licensed under the GNU Lesser GPL and its source code is freely available as a GitHub repository: https://github.com/phylogeography/SPREAD CONTACT: filip.bielejec@rega.kuleuven.be.

  8. Inclusive vision for high performance computing at the CSIR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gazendam, A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available gaining popularity in South Africa. One reason for this relatively slow adoption is the lack of appropriate scientific computing infrastructure. Open and distributed high-performance computing (HPC) represents a radically new computing concept for data...

  9. Fracture in high performance fibre reinforced concrete pavement materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Denneman, E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available high performance fibre reinforced concrete pavement slab with a nominal thickness of approximately 50 mm. The material has a significant post crack stress capacity compared to plain concrete. Current design methods for UTCRCP are based on conventional...

  10. Application of ultra-high performance concrete to bridge girders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    "Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) is a new class of concrete that has superior performance characteristics : compared to conventional concrete. The enhanced strength and durability properties of UHPC are mainly due to optimized : particle grada...

  11. High Performance Concrete (HPC) bridge project for SR 43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this research was to develop and test high performance concrete mixtures, made of locally available materials, having : durability characteristics that far exceed those of conventional concrete mixtures. Based on the results from the...

  12. Internal curing of high-performance concrete for bridge decks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    High performance concrete (HPC) provides a long lasting, durable concrete that is typically used in bridge decks due to its low permeability, high abrasion resistance, freeze-thaw resistance and strength. However, this type of concrete is highly susc...

  13. Innovative Deep Throttling, High Performance Injector Concept Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Science and Technology Applications, LLC's (STA) vision for a versatile space propulsion system is a highly throttleable, high performance, and cost effective Liquid...

  14. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Tropical Island Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-11-01

    Design guidelines outline high performance principles for the new or retrofit design of K-12 schools in tropical island climates. By incorporating energy improvements into construction or renovation plans, schools can reduce energy consumption and costs.

  15. High-performance inhoudsstoffen vinden hun weg naar de markt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der I.M.; Vollebregt, M.

    2015-01-01

    High-performance inhoudsstoffen uit biomassa ontstijgen de onderzoekslaboratoria en duiken op in proefprojecten met bedrijven en concrete toepassingen in eindproducten. Het tempo waarmee dit gebeurt en de onderliggende markt drivers verschillen per productgebied, zo blijkt uit een rondje langs

  16. High Performance Low Mass Nanowire Enabled Heatpipe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Heat pipes are widely used for passive, two-phase electronics cooling. As advanced high power, high performance electronics in space based and terrestrial...

  17. Advanced Risk Analysis for High-Performing Organizations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alberts, Christopher; Dorofee, Audrey

    2006-01-01

    ...) are not readily identified using traditional risk analysis techniques. High-performing organizations have the basic skills needed to identify and manage these new types of risk, but lack sufficient techniques...

  18. Mastering the Challenge of High-Performance Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how, just as all of higher education got serious with wiring individual campuses for the Internet, the nation's leading research institutions have initiated "high-performance computing." Describes several such initiatives involving historically black colleges and universities. (EV)

  19. Analysis of Simvastatin using a Simple and Fast High Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) analytical method for the lipid lowering drug, simvastatin, and to apply the developed method to study the solubility of the drug in various oils and surfactants. Methods: Isocratic ...

  20. High Performance Low Mass Nanowire Enabled Heatpipe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Illuminex Corporation proposes a NASA Phase I SBIR project to develop high performance, lightweight, low-profile heat pipes with enhanced thermal transfer properties...

  1. Export Control of High Performance Computing: Analysis and Alternative Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holland, Charles

    2001-01-01

    High performance computing has historically played an important role in the ability of the United States to develop and deploy a wide range of national security capabilities, such as stealth aircraft...

  2. Architecture and Programming Models for High Performance Intensive Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-29

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0230 Architecture and Programming Models for High Performance Intensive Computation XiaoMing Li UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE Final...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Architecture and Programming Models for High Performance Intensive Computation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-13-1-0213...developing an efficient system architecture and software tools for building and running Dynamic Data Driven Application Systems (DDDAS). The foremost

  3. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Tropical Island Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-11-01

    The Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools--Tropical Island Climates provides school boards, administrators, and design staff with guidance to help them make informed decisions about energy and environmental issues important to school systems and communities. These design guidelines outline high performance principles for the new or retrofit design of your K-12 school in tropical island climates. By incorporating energy improvements into their construction or renovation plans, schools can significantly reduce energy consumption and costs.

  4. Highlighting High Performance: Whitman Hanson Regional High School; Whitman, Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-06-01

    This brochure describes the key high-performance building features of the Whitman-Hanson Regional High School. The brochure was paid for by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative as part of their Green Schools Initiative. High-performance features described are daylighting and energy-efficient lighting, indoor air quality, solar and wind energy, building envelope, heating and cooling systems, water conservation, and acoustics. Energy cost savings are also discussed.

  5. Mechanical Properties of High Performance Cementitious Grout Masterflow 9200

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report describes tests carried out on the high performance grout Masterflow 9200, developed by BASF Construction Chemicals A/S and designed for use in grouted connections of windmill foundations.......The present report describes tests carried out on the high performance grout Masterflow 9200, developed by BASF Construction Chemicals A/S and designed for use in grouted connections of windmill foundations....

  6. Defining a Comprehensive Threat Model for High Performance Computational Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Mogilevsky, Dmitry; Lee, Adam; Yurcik, William

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade, high performance computational (HPC) clusters have become mainstream in academic and industrial settings as accessible means of computation. Throughout their proliferation, HPC security has been a secondary concern to performance. It is evident, however, that ensuring HPC security presents different challenges than the ones faced when dealing with traditional networks. To design suitable security measures for high performance computing, it is necessary to first realize t...

  7. A phylogeny and revised classification of Squamata, including 4161 species of lizards and snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The extant squamates (>9400 known species of lizards and snakes) are one of the most diverse and conspicuous radiations of terrestrial vertebrates, but no studies have attempted to reconstruct a phylogeny for the group with large-scale taxon sampling. Such an estimate is invaluable for comparative evolutionary studies, and to address their classification. Here, we present the first large-scale phylogenetic estimate for Squamata. Results The estimated phylogeny contains 4161 species, representing all currently recognized families and subfamilies. The analysis is based on up to 12896 base pairs of sequence data per species (average = 2497 bp) from 12 genes, including seven nuclear loci (BDNF, c-mos, NT3, PDC, R35, RAG-1, and RAG-2), and five mitochondrial genes (12S, 16S, cytochrome b, ND2, and ND4). The tree provides important confirmation for recent estimates of higher-level squamate phylogeny based on molecular data (but with more limited taxon sampling), estimates that are very different from previous morphology-based hypotheses. The tree also includes many relationships that differ from previous molecular estimates and many that differ from traditional taxonomy. Conclusions We present a new large-scale phylogeny of squamate reptiles that should be a valuable resource for future comparative studies. We also present a revised classification of squamates at the family and subfamily level to bring the taxonomy more in line with the new phylogenetic hypothesis. This classification includes new, resurrected, and modified subfamilies within gymnophthalmid and scincid lizards, and boid, colubrid, and lamprophiid snakes. PMID:23627680

  8. Plastome phylogeny and early diversification of Brassicaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Xinyi; Liu, Jianquan; Hao, Guoqian; Zhang, Lei; Mao, Kangshan; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Dan; Ma, Tao; Hu, Quanjun; Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan A.; Koch, Marcus A.

    2017-01-01

    Background The family Brassicaceae encompasses diverse species, many of which have high scientific and economic importance. Early diversifications and phylogenetic relationships between major lineages or clades remain unclear. Here we re-investigate Brassicaceae phylogeny with complete plastomes from 51 species representing all four lineages or 5 of 6 major clades (A, B, C, E and F) as identified in earlier studies. Results Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses using a partiti...

  9. Towards a phylogeny of the Tenebrionoidea (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Nicole L; Levkaničová, Zuzana; Weir, Tom H; Ślipiński, Adam; Cameron, Stephen L; Bocak, Ladislav

    2014-10-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the beetle superfamily Tenebrionoidea are investigated using the most comprehensive genetic data set compiled to date. With ∼34,000 described species in approximately 1250 genera and 28 families, Tenebrionoidea represent one of the most diverse and species-rich superfamilies of beetles. The interfamilial relationships of the Tenebrionoidea are poorly known; previous morphological and molecular phylogenies recovered few well-supported and often conflicting relationships between families. Here we present a molecular phylogeny of Tenebrionoidea based on genes commonly used to resolve family and superfamily-level phylogenies of beetles (18S, 28S, 16S, 12S, tRNA Val and COI). The alignment spanned over 6.5KB of DNA sequence and over 300 tenebrionoid genera from 24 of the 28 families were sampled. Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian analysis could not resolve deeper level divergences within the superfamily and very few relationships between families were supported. Increasing gene coverage in the alignment by removing taxa with missing data did not improve clade support but when rogue taxa were removed increased resolution was recovered. Investigation of signal strength suggested conflicting phylogenetic signal was present in the standard genes used for beetle phylogenetics, even when rogue taxa were removed. Our study of Tenebrionoidea highlights that even with relatively comprehensive taxon sampling within a lineage, this standard set of genes is unable to resolve relationships within this superfamily. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Phylogeny and Biogeography of Cyanobacteria and Their Produced Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cristiana; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    Phylogeny is an evolutionary reconstruction of the past relationships of DNA or protein sequences and it can further be used as a tool to assess population structuring, genetic diversity and biogeographic patterns. In the microbial world, the concept that everything is everywhere is widely accepted. However, it is much debated whether microbes are easily dispersed globally or whether they, like many macro-organisms, have historical biogeographies. Biogeography can be defined as the science that documents the spatial and temporal distribution of a given taxa in the environment at local, regional and continental scales. Speciation, extinction and dispersal are proposed to explain the generation of biogeographic patterns. Cyanobacteria are a diverse group of microorganisms that inhabit a wide range of ecological niches and are well known for their toxic secondary metabolite production. Knowledge of the evolution and dispersal of these microorganisms is still limited, and further research to understand such topics is imperative. Here, we provide a compilation of the most relevant information regarding these issues to better understand the present state of the art as a platform for future studies, and we highlight examples of both phylogenetic and biogeographic studies in non-symbiotic cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins. PMID:24189276

  11. Genomes-based phylogeny of the genus Xanthomonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-R Luis M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Xanthomonas comprises several plant pathogenic bacteria affecting a wide range of hosts. Despite the economic, industrial and biological importance of Xanthomonas, the classification and phylogenetic relationships within the genus are still under active debate. Some of the relationships between pathovars and species have not been thoroughly clarified, with old pathovars becoming new species. A change in the genus name has been recently suggested for Xanthomonas albilineans, an early branching species currently located in this genus, but a thorough phylogenomic reconstruction would aid in solving these and other discrepancies in this genus. Results Here we report the results of the genome-wide analysis of DNA sequences from 989 orthologous groups from 17 Xanthomonas spp. genomes available to date, representing all major lineages within the genus. The phylogenetic and computational analyses used in this study have been automated in a Perl package designated Unus, which provides a framework for phylogenomic analyses which can be applied to other datasets at the genomic level. Unus can also be easily incorporated into other phylogenomic pipelines. Conclusions Our phylogeny agrees with previous phylogenetic topologies on the genus, but revealed that the genomes of Xanthomonas citri and Xanthomonas fuscans belong to the same species, and that of Xanthomonas albilineans is basal to the joint clade of Xanthomonas and Xylella fastidiosa. Genome reduction was identified in the species Xanthomonas vasicola in addition to the previously identified reduction in Xanthomonas albilineans. Lateral gene transfer was also observed in two gene clusters.

  12. Phylogeny and Biogeography of Cyanobacteria and Their Produced Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostinho Antunes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Phylogeny is an evolutionary reconstruction of the past relationships of DNA or protein sequences and it can further be used as a tool to assess population structuring, genetic diversity and biogeographic patterns. In the microbial world, the concept that everything is everywhere is widely accepted. However, it is much debated whether microbes are easily dispersed globally or whether they, like many macro-organisms, have historical biogeographies. Biogeography can be defined as the science that documents the spatial and temporal distribution of a given taxa in the environment at local, regional and continental scales. Speciation, extinction and dispersal are proposed to explain the generation of biogeographic patterns. Cyanobacteria are a diverse group of microorganisms that inhabit a wide range of ecological niches and are well known for their toxic secondary metabolite production. Knowledge of the evolution and dispersal of these microorganisms is still limited, and further research to understand such topics is imperative. Here, we provide a compilation of the most relevant information regarding these issues to better understand the present state of the art as a platform for future studies, and we highlight examples of both phylogenetic and biogeographic studies in non-symbiotic cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins.

  13. Molecular phylogeny of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, J P; O'Brien, S J

    1995-01-01

    The phylogenetic placement of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) has been an evolutionary enigma since their original descriptions in the nineteenth century. A series of recent molecular analyses led to a consensus that the giant panda's ancestors were derived from early bears (Ursidae), but left unsettled the phylogenetic relationship of the red panda. Previous molecular and morphological phylogenies were inconclusive and varied among placement of the red panda within the raccoon family (Procyonidae), within the bear family (Ursidae), or in a separate family of carnivores equidistant between the two. To examine a relatively ancient (circa 20-30 million years before the present, MYBP) phylogenetic divergence, we used two slowly evolving genetic markers: mitochondrial 12S rRNA sequence and 592 fibroblast proteins resolved by two dimensional gel electrophoresis. Four different carnivore outgroup species, including dog (Canidae: Canis familiaris), cat (Felidae: Felis catus), fanaloka (Viverridae: Fossa fossa), and mongoose (Herpestidae: Galidia elegans), were selected to identify the root of the phylogenetic topologies. Phylogenetic reconstruction by distance-based methods, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood clearly indicate a distinct bifurcation forming the Ursidae and the Procyonidae. Further, our data consistently place the red panda as an early divergence within the Procyonidae radiation and confirm the inclusion of giant panda in the Ursidae lineage.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeny of camel spiders (Arachnida: Solifugae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddahi, Hassan; Khazanehdari, Mahsa; Aliabadian, Mansour; Kami, Haji Gholi; Mirshamsi, Amin; Mirshamsi, Omid

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, the mitochondrial DNA phylogeny of five solifuge families of Iran is presented using phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, subunit 1 (COI) sequence data. Moreover, we included available representatives from seven families from GenBank to examine the genetic distance between Old and New World taxa and test the phylogenetic relationships among more solifuge families. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed based on the two most probabilistic methods, Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) approaches. Resulting topologies demonstrated the monophyly of the families Daesiidae, Eremobatidae, Galeodidae, Karschiidae and Rhagodidae, whereas the monophyly of the families Ammotrechidae and Gylippidae was not supported. Also, within the family Eremobatidae, the subfamilies Eremobatinae and Therobatinae and the genus Hemerotrecha were paraphyletic or polyphyletic. According to the resulted topologies, the taxonomic placements of Trichotoma michaelseni (Gylippidae) and Nothopuga sp. 1 (Ammotrechidae) are still remain under question and their revision might be appropriate. According to the results of this study, within the family Galeodidae, the validity of the genus Galeodopsis is supported, while the validity of the genus Paragaleodes still remains uncertain. Moreover, our results revealed that the species Galeodes bacillatus, and Rhagodes melanochaetus are junior synonyms of G. caspius, and R. eylandti, respectively.

  15. Phylogeny of the Botryosphaeriaceae reveals patterns of host association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wet, Juanita; Slippers, Bernard; Preisig, Oliver; Wingfield, Brenda D; Wingfield, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Three anamorph genera of the Botryosphaeriaceae namely Diplodia, Lasiodiplodia and Dothiorella have typically dark, ovoid conidia with thick walls, and are consequently difficult to distinguish from each other. These genera are well-known pathogens of especially pine species. We generated a multiple gene genealogy to resolve the phylogenetic relationships of Botryosphaeriaceae with dark conidial anamorphs, and mapped host associations based on this phylogeny. The multiple gene genealogy separated Diplodia, Lasiodiplodia and Dothiorella and it revealed trends in the patterns of host association. The data set was expanded to include more lineages of the Botryosphaeriaceae, and included all isolates from different host species for which ITS sequence data are available. Results indicate that Diplodia species occur mainly on gymnosperms, with a few species on both gymnosperms and angiosperms. Lasiodiplodia species occur equally on both gymnosperms and angiosperms, Dothiorella species are restricted to angiosperms and Neofusicoccum species occur mainly on angiosperms with rare reports on Southern Hemisphere gymnosperms. Botryosphaeria species with Fusicoccum anamorphs occur mostly on angiosperms with rare reports on gymnosperms. Ancestral state reconstruction suggests that a putative ancestor of the Botryosphaeriaceae most likely evolved on the angiosperms. Another interesting observation was that both host generalist and specialist species were observed in all the lineages of the Botryosphaeriaceae, with little evidence of host associated co-evolution.

  16. Genomes-based phylogeny of the genus Xanthomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Xanthomonas comprises several plant pathogenic bacteria affecting a wide range of hosts. Despite the economic, industrial and biological importance of Xanthomonas, the classification and phylogenetic relationships within the genus are still under active debate. Some of the relationships between pathovars and species have not been thoroughly clarified, with old pathovars becoming new species. A change in the genus name has been recently suggested for Xanthomonas albilineans, an early branching species currently located in this genus, but a thorough phylogenomic reconstruction would aid in solving these and other discrepancies in this genus. Results Here we report the results of the genome-wide analysis of DNA sequences from 989 orthologous groups from 17 Xanthomonas spp. genomes available to date, representing all major lineages within the genus. The phylogenetic and computational analyses used in this study have been automated in a Perl package designated Unus, which provides a framework for phylogenomic analyses which can be applied to other datasets at the genomic level. Unus can also be easily incorporated into other phylogenomic pipelines. Conclusions Our phylogeny agrees with previous phylogenetic topologies on the genus, but revealed that the genomes of Xanthomonas citri and Xanthomonas fuscans belong to the same species, and that of Xanthomonas albilineans is basal to the joint clade of Xanthomonas and Xylella fastidiosa. Genome reduction was identified in the species Xanthomonas vasicola in addition to the previously identified reduction in Xanthomonas albilineans. Lateral gene transfer was also observed in two gene clusters. PMID:22443110

  17. Resource estimation in high performance medical image computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banalagay, Rueben; Covington, Kelsie Jade; Wilkes, D M; Landman, Bennett A

    2014-10-01

    Medical imaging analysis processes often involve the concatenation of many steps (e.g., multi-stage scripts) to integrate and realize advancements from image acquisition, image processing, and computational analysis. With the dramatic increase in data size for medical imaging studies (e.g., improved resolution, higher throughput acquisition, shared databases), interesting study designs are becoming intractable or impractical on individual workstations and servers. Modern pipeline environments provide control structures to distribute computational load in high performance computing (HPC) environments. However, high performance computing environments are often shared resources, and scheduling computation across these resources necessitates higher level modeling of resource utilization. Submission of 'jobs' requires an estimate of the CPU runtime and memory usage. The resource requirements for medical image processing algorithms are difficult to predict since the requirements can vary greatly between different machines, different execution instances, and different data inputs. Poor resource estimates can lead to wasted resources in high performance environments due to incomplete executions and extended queue wait times. Hence, resource estimation is becoming a major hurdle for medical image processing algorithms to efficiently leverage high performance computing environments. Herein, we present our implementation of a resource estimation system to overcome these difficulties and ultimately provide users with the ability to more efficiently utilize high performance computing resources.

  18. Resource Estimation in High Performance Medical Image Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banalagay, Rueben; Covington, Kelsie Jade; Wilkes, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging analysis processes often involve the concatenation of many steps (e.g., multi-stage scripts) to integrate and realize advancements from image acquisition, image processing, and computational analysis. With the dramatic increase in data size for medical imaging studies (e.g., improved resolution, higher throughput acquisition, shared databases), interesting study designs are becoming intractable or impractical on individual workstations and servers. Modern pipeline environments provide control structures to distribute computational load in high performance computing (HPC) environments. However, high performance computing environments are often shared resources, and scheduling computation across these resources necessitates higher level modeling of resource utilization. Submission of ‘jobs’ requires an estimate of the CPU runtime and memory usage. The resource requirements for medical image processing algorithms are difficult to predict since the requirements can vary greatly between different machines, different execution instances, and different data inputs. Poor resource estimates can lead to wasted resources in high performance environments due to incomplete executions and extended queue wait times. Hence, resource estimation is becoming a major hurdle for medical image processing algorithms to efficiently leverage high performance computing environments. Herein, we present our implementation of a resource estimation system to overcome these difficulties and ultimately provide users with the ability to more efficiently utilize high performance computing resources. PMID:24906466

  19. Phylogeny of Opiliones (Arachnida): An Assessment of the "Cyphopalpatores" Concept

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeffrey W. Shultz

    1998-01-01

    .... Because most genitalic characters within Opiliones are unique to that order, genitalic characters cannot be polarized and opilion phylogeny cannot be rooted using objective outgroup comparison...

  20. Calculation of the non-inductive current profile in high-performance NSTX plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Fredrickson, E.; Gates, D.; Kaye, S.; Menard, J.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Le Blanc, B. P.; Kugel, H.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Yuh, H.

    2011-03-01

    The constituents of the current profile have been computed for a wide range of high-performance plasmas in NSTX (Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557); these include cases designed to maximize the non-inductive fraction, pulse length, toroidal-β or stored energy. In the absence of low-frequency MHD activity, good agreement is found between the reconstructed current profile and that predicted by summing the independently calculated inductive, pressure-driven and neutral beam currents, without the need to invoke any anomalous beam ion diffusion. Exceptions occur, for instance, when there are toroidal Alfvén eigenmode avalanches or coupled m/n = 1/1 + 2/1 kink-tearing modes. In these cases, the addition of a spatially and temporally dependent fast-ion diffusivity can reduce the core beam current drive, restoring agreement between the reconstructed profile and the summed constituents, as well as bringing better agreement between the simulated and measured neutron emission rate. An upper bound on the fast-ion diffusivity of ~0.5-1 m2 s-1 is found in 'MHD-free' discharges, based on the neutron emission, the time rate of change in the neutron signal when a neutral beam is stepped and reconstructed on-axis current density.

  1. Phylogeny, paleontology, and primates: do incomplete fossils bias the tree of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattinson, David J; Thompson, Richard S; Piotrowski, Aleks K; Asher, Robert J

    2015-03-01

    Paleontological systematics relies heavily on morphological data that have undergone decay and fossilization. Here, we apply a heuristic means to assess how a fossil's incompleteness detracts from inferring its phylogenetic relationships. We compiled a phylogenetic matrix for primates and simulated the extinction of living species by deleting an extant taxon's molecular data and keeping only those morphological characters present in actual fossils. The choice of characters present in a given living taxon (the subject) was defined by those present in a given fossil (the template). By measuring congruence between a well-corroborated phylogeny to those incorporating artificial fossils, and by comparing real vs. random character distributions and states, we tested the information content of paleontological datasets and determined if extinction of a living species leads to bias in phylogeny reconstruction. We found a positive correlation between fossil completeness and topological congruence. Real fossil templates sampled for 36 or more of the 360 available morphological characters (including dental) performed significantly better than similarly complete templates with random states. Templates dominated by only one partition performed worse than templates with randomly sampled characters across partitions. The template based on the Eocene primate Darwinius masillae performs better than most other templates with a similar number of sampled characters, likely due to preservation of data across multiple partitions. Our results support the interpretation that Darwinius is strepsirhine, not haplorhine, and suggest that paleontological datasets are reliable in primate phylogeny reconstruction. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. A multilocus molecular phylogeny of combtooth blennies (Percomorpha: Blennioidei: Blenniidae): Multiple invasions of intertidal habitats

    KAUST Repository

    Hundt, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The combtooth blennies (f. Blenniidae) is a diverse family of primarily marine fishes with approximately 387 species that inhabit subtidal, intertidal, supralittoral habitats in tropical and warm temperate regions throughout the world. The Blenniidae has typically been divided into six groups based on morphological characters: Blenniini, Nemophini, Omobranchini, Phenablenniini, Parablenniini, and Salariini. There is, however, considerable debate over the validity of these groups and their relationships. Since little is known about the relationships in this group, other aspects of their evolutionary history, such as habitat evolution and remain unexplored. Herein, we use Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses of four nuclear loci (ENC1, myh6, ptr, and tbr1) from 102 species, representing 41 genera, to resolve the phylogeny of the Blenniidae, determine the validity of the previously recognized groupings, and explore the evolution of habitat association using ancestral state reconstruction. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses of the resulting 3100. bp of DNA sequence produced nearly identical topologies, and identified many well-supported clades. Of these clades, Nemophini was the only traditionally recognized group strongly supported as monophyletic. This highly resolved and thoroughly sampled blenniid phylogeny provides strong evidence that the traditional rank-based classification does not adequately delimit monophyletic groups with the Blenniidae. This phylogeny redefines the taxonomy of the group and supports the use of 13 unranked clades for the classification of blenniids. Ancestral state reconstructions identified four independent invasions of intertidal habitats within the Blenniidae, and subsequent invasions into supralittoral and freshwater habitats from these groups. The independent invasions of intertidal habitats are likely to have played an important role in the evolutionary history of blennies. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  3. Molecular phylogeny of Anopheles hyrcanus group (Diptera: Culicidae) based on mtDNA COI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuan; Shi, Wen-Qi; Zhang, Yi

    2017-05-08

    The Anopheles hyrcanus group, which includes at least 25 species, is widely distributed in the Oriental and Palearctic regions. Some group members have been incriminated as vectors of malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases. It is difficult to identify Hyrcanus Group members by morphological features. Thus, molecular phylogeny has been proposed as an important complementary method to traditional morphological taxonomy. Based on the GenBank database and our original study data, we used 466 mitochondrial DNA COI sequences belonging to 18 species to reconstruct the molecular phylogeny of the Hyrcanus Group across its worldwide geographic range. The results are as follows. 1) The average conspecific K2P divergence was 0.008 (range 0.002-0.017), whereas sequence divergence between congroup species averaged 0.064 (range 0.026-0.108). 2) The topology of COI tree of the Hyrcanus Group was generally consistent with classical morphological taxonomy in terms of species classification, but disagreed in subgroup division. In the COI tree, the group was divided into at least three main clusters. The first cluster contained An. nimpe; the second was composed of the Nigerrimus Subgroup and An. argyropus; and the third cluster was comprised of the Lesteri Subgroup and other unassociated species. 3) Phylogenetic analysis of COI indicated that ancient hybridizations probably occurred among the three closely related species, An. sinensis, An. belenrae, and An. kleini. 4) The results supported An. paraliae as a probable synonym of An. lesteri, and it was possible that An. pseudopictus and An. hyrcanus were the same species, as evident from their extremely low interspecific genetic divergence (0.020 and 0.007, respectively) and their phylogenetic positions. In summary, we reconstructed the molecular phylogeny and analysed genetic divergence of the Hyrcanus Group using mitochondrial COI sequences. Our results suggest that in the future of malaria surveillance, we should not only pay

  4. Phylogeny and divergence times of gymnosperms inferred from single-copy nuclear genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Lu

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic reconstruction is fundamental to study evolutionary biology and historical biogeography. However, there was not a molecular phylogeny of gymnosperms represented by extensive sampling at the genus level, and most published phylogenies of this group were constructed based on cytoplasmic DNA markers and/or the multi-copy nuclear ribosomal DNA. In this study, we use LFY and NLY, two single-copy nuclear genes that originated from an ancient gene duplication in the ancestor of seed plants, to reconstruct the phylogeny and estimate divergence times of gymnosperms based on a complete sampling of extant genera. The results indicate that the combined LFY and NLY coding sequences can resolve interfamilial relationships of gymnosperms and intergeneric relationships of most families. Moreover, the addition of intron sequences can improve the resolution in Podocarpaceae but not in cycads, although divergence times of the cycad genera are similar to or longer than those of the Podocarpaceae genera. Our study strongly supports cycads as the basal-most lineage of gymnosperms rather than sister to Ginkgoaceae, and a sister relationship between Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae and between Cephalotaxaceae-Taxaceae and Cupressaceae. In addition, intergeneric relationships of some families that were controversial, and the relationships between Taxaceae and Cephalotaxaceae and between conifers and Gnetales are discussed based on the nuclear gene evidence. The molecular dating analysis suggests that drastic extinctions occurred in the early evolution of gymnosperms, and extant coniferous genera in the Northern Hemisphere are older than those in the Southern Hemisphere on average. This study provides an evolutionary framework for future studies on gymnosperms.

  5. Generic phylogeny, historical biogeography and character evolution of the cosmopolitan aquatic plant family Hydrocharitaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Yun; Chen, Jin-Ming; Gituru, Robert Wahiti; Wang, Qing-Feng

    2012-03-10

    Hydrocharitaceae is a fully aquatic monocot family, consists of 18 genera with approximately 120 species. The family includes both fresh and marine aquatics and exhibits great diversity in form and habit including annual and perennial life histories; submersed, partially submersed and floating leaf habits and linear to orbicular leaf shapes. The family has a cosmopolitan distribution and is well represented in the Tertiary fossil record in Europe. At present, the historical biogeography of the family is not well understood and the generic relationships remain controversial. In this study we investigated the phylogeny and biogeography of Hydrocharitaceae by integrating fossils and DNA sequences from eight genes. We also conducted ancestral state reconstruction for three morphological characters. Phylogenetic analyses produced a phylogeny with most branches strongly supported by bootstrap values greater than 95 and Bayesian posterior probability values of 1.0. Stratiotes is the first diverging lineage with the remaining genera in two clades, one clade consists of Lagarosiphon, Ottelia, Blyxa, Apalanthe, Elodea and Egeria; and the other consists of Hydrocharis-Limnobium, Thalassia, Enhalus, Halophila, Najas, Hydrilla, Vallisneria, Nechamandra and Maidenia. Biogeographic analyses (DIVA, Mesquite) and divergence time estimates (BEAST) resolved the most recent common ancestor of Hydrocharitaceae as being in Asia during the Late Cretaceous and Palaeocene (54.7-72.6 Ma). Dispersals (including long-distance dispersal and migrations through Tethys seaway and land bridges) probably played major roles in the intercontinental distribution of this family. Ancestral state reconstruction suggested that in Hydrocharitaceae evolution of dioecy is bidirectional, viz., from dioecy to hermaphroditism, and from hermaphroditism to dioecy, and that the aerial-submerged leaf habit and short-linear leaf shape are the ancestral states. Our study has shed light on the previously controversial

  6. Prey preference follows phylogeny: evolutionary dietary patterns within the marine gastropod group Cladobranchia (Gastropoda: Heterobranchia: Nudibranchia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodheart, Jessica A; Bazinet, Adam L; Valdés, Ángel; Collins, Allen G; Cummings, Michael P

    2017-10-26

    The impact of predator-prey interactions on the evolution of many marine invertebrates is poorly understood. Since barriers to genetic exchange are less obvious in the marine realm than in terrestrial or freshwater systems, non-allopatric divergence may play a fundamental role in the generation of biodiversity. In this context, shifts between major prey types could constitute important factors explaining the biodiversity of marine taxa, particularly in groups with highly specialized diets. However, the scarcity of marine specialized consumers for which reliable phylogenies exist hampers attempts to test the role of trophic specialization in evolution. In this study, RNA-Seq data is used to produce a phylogeny of Cladobranchia, a group of marine invertebrates that feed on a diverse array of prey taxa but mostly specialize on cnidarians. The broad range of prey type preferences allegedly present in two major groups within Cladobranchia suggest that prey type shifts are relatively common over evolutionary timescales. In the present study, we generated a well-supported phylogeny of the major lineages within Cladobranchia using RNA-Seq data, and used ancestral state reconstruction analyses to better understand the evolution of prey preference. These analyses answered several fundamental questions regarding the evolutionary relationships within Cladobranchia, including support for a clade of species from Arminidae as sister to Tritoniidae (which both preferentially prey on Octocorallia). Ancestral state reconstruction analyses supported a cladobranchian ancestor with a preference for Hydrozoa and show that the few transitions identified only occur from lineages that prey on Hydrozoa to those that feed on other types of prey. There is strong phylogenetic correlation with prey preference within Cladobranchia, suggesting that prey type specialization within this group has inertia. Shifts between different types of prey have occurred rarely throughout the evolution of

  7. Phylogeny and divergence times of gymnosperms inferred from single-copy nuclear genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; Ran, Jin-Hua; Guo, Dong-Mei; Yang, Zu-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction is fundamental to study evolutionary biology and historical biogeography. However, there was not a molecular phylogeny of gymnosperms represented by extensive sampling at the genus level, and most published phylogenies of this group were constructed based on cytoplasmic DNA markers and/or the multi-copy nuclear ribosomal DNA. In this study, we use LFY and NLY, two single-copy nuclear genes that originated from an ancient gene duplication in the ancestor of seed plants, to reconstruct the phylogeny and estimate divergence times of gymnosperms based on a complete sampling of extant genera. The results indicate that the combined LFY and NLY coding sequences can resolve interfamilial relationships of gymnosperms and intergeneric relationships of most families. Moreover, the addition of intron sequences can improve the resolution in Podocarpaceae but not in cycads, although divergence times of the cycad genera are similar to or longer than those of the Podocarpaceae genera. Our study strongly supports cycads as the basal-most lineage of gymnosperms rather than sister to Ginkgoaceae, and a sister relationship between Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae and between Cephalotaxaceae-Taxaceae and Cupressaceae. In addition, intergeneric relationships of some families that were controversial, and the relationships between Taxaceae and Cephalotaxaceae and between conifers and Gnetales are discussed based on the nuclear gene evidence. The molecular dating analysis suggests that drastic extinctions occurred in the early evolution of gymnosperms, and extant coniferous genera in the Northern Hemisphere are older than those in the Southern Hemisphere on average. This study provides an evolutionary framework for future studies on gymnosperms.

  8. On the inference of large phylogenies with long branches: how long is too long?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossel, Elchanan; Roch, Sébastien; Sly, Allan

    2011-07-01

    The accurate reconstruction of phylogenies from short molecular sequences is an important problem in computational biology. Recent work has highlighted deep connections between sequence-length requirements for high-probability phylogeny reconstruction and the related problem of the estimation of ancestral sequences. In Daskalakis et al. (in Probab. Theory Relat. Fields 2010), building on the work of Mossel (Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 356(6):2379-2404, 2004), a tight sequence-length requirement was obtained for the simple CFN model of substitution, that is, the case of a two-state symmetric rate matrix Q. In particular the required sequence length for high-probability reconstruction was shown to undergo a sharp transition (from O(log n) to poly(n), where n is the number of leaves) at the "critical" branch length g (ML)(Q) (if it exists) of the ancestral reconstruction problem defined roughly as follows: below g (ML)(Q) the sequence at the root can be accurately estimated from sequences at the leaves on deep trees, whereas above g (ML)(Q) information decays exponentially quickly down the tree.Here, we consider a more general evolutionary model, the GTR model, where the q×q rate matrix Q is reversible with q≥2. For this model, recent results of Roch (Preprint, 2009) show that the tree can be accurately reconstructed with sequences of length O(log (n)) when the branch lengths are below g (Lin)(Q), known as the Kesten-Stigum (KS) bound, up to which ancestral sequences can be accurately estimated using simple linear estimators. Although for the CFN model g (ML)(Q)=g (Lin)(Q) (in other words, linear ancestral estimators are in some sense best possible), it is known that for the more general GTR models one has g (ML)(Q)≥g (Lin)(Q) with a strict inequality in many cases. Here, we show that this phenomenon also holds for phylogenetic reconstruction by exhibiting a family of symmetric models Q and a phylogenetic reconstruction algorithm which recovers the tree from O

  9. High performance leadership in unusually challenging educational circumstances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Hargreaves

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on findings from the results of a study of leadership in high performing organizations in three sectors. Organizations were sampled and included on the basis of high performance in relation to no performance, past performance, performance among similar peers and performance in the face of limited resources or challenging circumstances. The paper concentrates on leadership in four schools that met the sample criteria.  It draws connections to explanations of the high performance ofEstoniaon the OECD PISA tests of educational achievement. The article argues that leadership in these four schools that performed above expectations comprised more than a set of competencies. Instead, leadership took the form of a narrative or quest that pursued an inspiring dream with relentless determination; took improvement pathways that were more innovative than comparable peers; built collaboration and community including with competing schools; and connected short-term success to long-term sustainability.

  10. A Component Architecture for High-Performance Scientific Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernholdt, David E; Allan, Benjamin A; Armstrong, Robert C; Bertrand, Felipe; Chiu, Kenneth; Dahlgren, Tamara L; Damevski, Kostadin; Elwasif, Wael R; Epperly, Thomas G; Govindaraju, Madhusudhan; Katz, Daniel S; Kohl, James A; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Kumfert, Gary K; Larson, J Walter; Lefantzi, Sophia; Lewis, Michael J; Malony, Allen D; McInnes, Lois C; Nieplocha, Jarek; Norris, Boyana; Parker, Steven G; Ray, Jaideep; Shende, Sameer; Windus, Theresa L; Zhou, Shujia

    2006-07-03

    The Common Component Architecture (CCA) provides a means for software developers to manage the complexity of large-scale scientific simulations and to move toward a plug-and-play environment for high-performance computing. In the scientific computing context, component models also promote collaboration using independently developed software, thereby allowing particular individuals or groups to focus on the aspects of greatest interest to them. The CCA supports parallel and distributed computing as well as local high-performance connections between components in a language-independent manner. The design places minimal requirements on components and thus facilitates the integration of existing code into the CCA environment. The CCA model imposes minimal overhead to minimize the impact on application performance. The focus on high performance distinguishes the CCA from most other component models. The CCA is being applied within an increasing range of disciplines, including combustion research, global climate simulation, and computational chemistry.

  11. A Component Architecture for High-Performance Scientific Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernholdt, D E; Allan, B A; Armstrong, R; Bertrand, F; Chiu, K; Dahlgren, T L; Damevski, K; Elwasif, W R; Epperly, T W; Govindaraju, M; Katz, D S; Kohl, J A; Krishnan, M; Kumfert, G; Larson, J W; Lefantzi, S; Lewis, M J; Malony, A D; McInnes, L C; Nieplocha, J; Norris, B; Parker, S G; Ray, J; Shende, S; Windus, T L; Zhou, S

    2004-12-14

    The Common Component Architecture (CCA) provides a means for software developers to manage the complexity of large-scale scientific simulations and to move toward a plug-and-play environment for high-performance computing. In the scientific computing context, component models also promote collaboration using independently developed software, thereby allowing particular individuals or groups to focus on the aspects of greatest interest to them. The CCA supports parallel and distributed computing as well as local high-performance connections between components in a language-independent manner. The design places minimal requirements on components and thus facilitates the integration of existing code into the CCA environment. The CCA model imposes minimal overhead to minimize the impact on application performance. The focus on high performance distinguishes the CCA from most other component models. The CCA is being applied within an increasing range of disciplines, including combustion research, global climate simulation, and computational chemistry.

  12. ANALYSIS OF AMINO ACIDS BY HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurat E Noor Baig

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and are considered as the key precursors for the formation of hormones and low molecular weight nitrogenous substances with biological importance. Since the analysis of amino acids has been carried out for both qualitative and quantitative purposes with an aim to study their levels in the plasma concentration, the quantitative determination, in particular, also helps in the diagnosis of different diseases associated with their deficiency. This review article deals with the determination of amino acids by chromatographic methods which include ion-exchange chromatography (IEC, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC and ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC. The review will also give an idea for the preparation of samples, derivatization methods for the analysis of amino acids (direct and indirect methods and separation of amino acids by high performance liquid chromatographic technique.

  13. High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites 6 HPFRCC 6

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhardt, Hans; Naaman, A

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites (HPFRCC) represent a class of cement composites whose stress-strain response in tension undergoes strain hardening behaviour accompanied by multiple cracking, leading to a high strain prior to failure. The primary objective of this International Workshop was to provide a compendium of up-to-date information on the most recent developments and research advances in the field of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites. Approximately 65 contributions from leading world experts are assembled in these proceedings and provide an authoritative perspective on the subject. Special topics include fresh and hardening state properties; self-compacting mixtures; mechanical behavior under compressive, tensile, and shear loading; structural applications; impact, earthquake and fire resistance; durability issues; ultra-high performance fiber reinforced concrete; and textile reinforced concrete. Target readers: graduate students, researchers, fiber producers, desi...

  14. Analyzing the impact of conflictive dental characters on the phylogeny of octodontoid rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M. Candela

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Systematics of fossil octodontoids (Rodentia, Caviomorpha is in great part based on insights into the knowledge of teeth, making the step of dental characterization certainly relevant for the evolutionary reconstruction of these rodents. Different homology hypotheses were proposed for the same tooth structures, a fact that indicates the importance of knowing on which criteria the dental characters supporting the classifications were based. In this line, I evaluate the step of characterization of certain conflictive molar characters previously used, and their impact on phylogeny of octodontoids. I explore which the criteria followed to propose the hypotheses of correspondences for these characters are in light of the anatomical evidence. Based on the outcome of phylogenetic trees obtained previously, I analyze if the evolutionary transformations are compatible with character states observed in the terminals. New cladistic analyses based on recoded molar characters indicate that, unlike results recently obtained, the unorthodox position of Sallamys, Protadelphomys, and Willidewu as basal ctenomyines is not recovered. The position of Caviocricetus, Acarechimys–Neophanomysas as Octodontinae is not maintained. These results indicate that reanalyses of conflictive dental characters, scrutinizing data matrices, are particularly necessary to evaluate the current controversy on the phylogeny of octodontoids. Lower molar character definition and character states delimitation in octodontoids, being relevant to phylogenetic reconstruction, should be founded on anatomical examination, following explicit criteria of homology. Alternative hypotheses of “primary homology” proposed for the same molar traits in octodontoids indicate that each main group of caviomorphs requires its own anatomical study.

  15. Bulk de novo mitogenome assembly from pooled total DNA elucidates the phylogeny of weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Conrad P D T; Crampton-Platt, Alex; Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Jordal, Bjarte H; Emerson, Brent C; Vogler, Alfried P

    2014-08-01

    Complete mitochondrial genomes have been shown to be reliable markers for phylogeny reconstruction among diverse animal groups. However, the relative difficulty and high cost associated with obtaining de novo full mitogenomes have frequently led to conspicuously low taxon sampling in ensuing studies. Here, we report the successful use of an economical and accessible method for assembling complete or near-complete mitogenomes through shot-gun next-generation sequencing of a single library made from pooled total DNA extracts of numerous target species. To avoid the use of separate indexed libraries for each specimen, and an associated increase in cost, we incorporate standard polymerase chain reaction-based "bait" sequences to identify the assembled mitogenomes. The method was applied to study the higher level phylogenetic relationships in the weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea), producing 92 newly assembled mitogenomes obtained in a single Illumina MiSeq run. The analysis supported a separate origin of wood-boring behavior by the subfamilies Scolytinae, Platypodinae, and Cossoninae. This finding contradicts morphological hypotheses proposing a close relationship between the first two of these but is congruent with previous molecular studies, reinforcing the utility of mitogenomes in phylogeny reconstruction. Our methodology provides a technically simple procedure for generating densely sampled trees from whole mitogenomes and is widely applicable to groups of animals for which bait sequences are the only required prior genome knowledge. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Designing high-Performance layered thermoelectric materials through orbital engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Lirong; Madsen, Georg K. H.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric technology, which possesses potential application in recycling industrial waste heat as energy, calls for novel high-performance materials. The systematic exploration of novel thermoelectric materials with excellent electronic transport properties is severely hindered by limited...... insight into the underlying bonding orbitals of atomic structures. Here we propose a simple yet successful strategy to discover and design high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through minimizing the crystal field splitting energy of orbitals to realize high orbital degeneracy. The approach......-abundant elements. Moreover, the approach can be extended to several other non-cubic materials, thereby substantially accelerating the screening and design of new thermoelectric materials....

  17. Contemporary high performance computing from petascale toward exascale

    CERN Document Server

    Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary High Performance Computing: From Petascale toward Exascale focuses on the ecosystems surrounding the world's leading centers for high performance computing (HPC). It covers many of the important factors involved in each ecosystem: computer architectures, software, applications, facilities, and sponsors. The first part of the book examines significant trends in HPC systems, including computer architectures, applications, performance, and software. It discusses the growth from terascale to petascale computing and the influence of the TOP500 and Green500 lists. The second part of the

  18. High-Performance Matrix-Vector Multiplication on the GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a high-performance GPU kernel for one of the most popular dense linear algebra operations, the matrix-vector multiplication. The target hardware is the most recent Nvidia Tesla 20-series (Fermi architecture), which is designed from the ground up for scientific computing....... We show that it is essentially a matter of fully utilizing the fine-grained parallelism of the many-core GPU in order to achieve high-performance for dense matrix-vector multiplication. We show that auto-tuning can be successfully employed to the GPU kernel so that it performs well for all matrix...

  19. High performance computing and communications: FY 1997 implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program was formally authorized by passage, with bipartisan support, of the High-Performance Computing Act of 1991, signed on December 9, 1991. The original Program, in which eight Federal agencies participated, has now grown to twelve agencies. This Plan provides a detailed description of the agencies` FY 1996 HPCC accomplishments and FY 1997 HPCC plans. Section 3 of this Plan provides an overview of the HPCC Program. Section 4 contains more detailed definitions of the Program Component Areas, with an emphasis on the overall directions and milestones planned for each PCA. Appendix A provides a detailed look at HPCC Program activities within each agency.

  20. Visualization and Data Analysis for High-Performance Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewell, Christopher Meyer [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-27

    This is a set of slides from a guest lecture for a class at the University of Texas, El Paso on visualization and data analysis for high-performance computing. The topics covered are the following: trends in high-performance computing; scientific visualization, such as OpenGL, ray tracing and volume rendering, VTK, and ParaView; data science at scale, such as in-situ visualization, image databases, distributed memory parallelism, shared memory parallelism, VTK-m, "big data", and then an analysis example.

  1. Phylogeny and systematics of the brake fern genus Pteris (Pteridaceae) based on molecular (plastid and nuclear) and morphological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Li-Bing

    2018-01-01

    The brake fern genus Pteris belongs to Pteridaceae subfamily Pteridoideae. It is one of the largest fern genera and has been estimated to contain 200-250 species distributed on all continents except Antarctica. Previous studies were either based on plastid data only or based on both plastid and nuclear data but the sampling was small. In addition, an infrageneric classification of Pteris based on morphological and molecular evidence has not been available yet. In the present study, based on molecular data of eight plastid markers and one nuclear marker (gapCp) of 256 accessions representing ca. 178 species of Pteris, we reconstruct a global phylogeny of Pteris. The 15 major clades identified earlier are recovered here and we further identified a new major clade. Our nuclear phylogeny recovered 11 of these 16 major clades, seven of which are strongly supported. The inclusion of Schizostege in Pteris is confirmed for the first time. Based on the newly reconstructed phylogeny and evidence from morphology, distribution and/or ecology, we classify Pteris into three subgenera: P. subg. Pteris, P. subg. Campteria, and P. subg. Platyzoma. The former two are further divided into three and 12 sections, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Climate Reconstructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Paleoclimatology Program archives reconstructions of past climatic conditions derived from paleoclimate proxies, in addition to the Program's large holdings...

  3. A Research and Development Strategy for High Performance Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Science and Technology Policy, Washington, DC.

    This report is the result of a systematic review of the status and directions of high performance computing and its relationship to federal research and development. Conducted by the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET), the review involved a series of workshops attended by numerous computer scientists and…

  4. Contemporary high performance computing from petascale toward exascale

    CERN Document Server

    Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    A continuation of Contemporary High Performance Computing: From Petascale toward Exascale, this second volume continues the discussion of HPC flagship systems, major application workloads, facilities, and sponsors. The book includes of figures and pictures that capture the state of existing systems: pictures of buildings, systems in production, floorplans, and many block diagrams and charts to illustrate system design and performance.

  5. Enabling High-Performance Computing as a Service

    KAUST Repository

    AbdelBaky, Moustafa

    2012-10-01

    With the right software infrastructure, clouds can provide scientists with as a service access to high-performance computing resources. An award-winning prototype framework transforms the Blue Gene/P system into an elastic cloud to run a representative HPC application. © 2012 IEEE.

  6. Effect of residual elements on high performance nickel base ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 28; Issue 4. Effect of residual elements on high performance nickel base superalloys for gas turbines and strategies for manufacture. O P Sinha M Chatterjee V V R S Sarma S N Jha. Volume 28 Issue 4 July 2005 pp 379-382 ...

  7. Dynamic Social Networks in High Performance Football Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhino, Joseph; Mallett, Cliff; Rynne, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sports coaching is largely a social activity where engagement with athletes and support staff can enhance the experiences for all involved. This paper examines how high performance football coaches develop knowledge through their interactions with others within a social learning theory framework. Purpose: The key purpose of this study…

  8. Two Profiles of the Dutch High Performing Employee

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, A. A.; Oudshoorn, Michella

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the profile of an ideal employee, to be more precise the behavioral characteristics of the Dutch high-performing employee (HPE). Organizational performance depends for a large part on the commitment of employees. Employees provide their knowledge, skills, experiences and creativity to the…

  9. Understanding the Work and Learning of High Performance Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynne, Steven B.; Mallett, Cliff J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The development of high performance sports coaches has been proposed as a major imperative in the professionalization of sports coaching. Accordingly, an increasing body of research is beginning to address the question of how coaches learn. While this is important work, an understanding of how coaches learn must be underpinned by an…

  10. The Case for High-Performance, Healthy Green Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Leesa

    2011-01-01

    When trying to reach their sustainability goals, schools and school districts often run into obstacles, including financing, training, and implementation tools. Last fall, the U.S. Green Building Council-Georgia (USGBC-Georgia) launched its High Performance, Healthy Schools (HPHS) Program to help Georgia schools overcome those obstacles. By…

  11. Sensitive high performance liquid chromatographic method for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new simple, sensitive, cost-effective and reproducible high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the determination of proguanil (PG) and its metabolites, cycloguanil (CG) and 4-chlorophenylbiguanide (4-CPB) in urine and plasma is described. The extraction procedure is a simple three-step process ...

  12. Neural Correlates of High Performance in Foreign Language Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedonia, Manuela; Muller, Karsten; Friederici, Angela D.

    2010-01-01

    Learning vocabulary in a foreign language is a laborious task which people perform with varying levels of success. Here, we investigated the neural underpinning of high performance on this task. In a within-subjects paradigm, participants learned 92 vocabulary items under two multimodal conditions: one condition paired novel words with iconic…

  13. Fatigue Behaviour of High Performance Cementitious Grout Masterflow 9500

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report describes the fatigue behaviour of the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9500 subjected to cyclic loading, in air as well as submerged in water, at various frequencies and levels of maximum stress. Part of the results were also reported in [1] together with other mechanical...

  14. Maintaining High-Performance Schools after Construction or Renovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luepke, Gary; Ronsivalli, Louis J., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    With taxpayers' considerable investment in schools, it is critical for school districts to preserve their community's assets with new construction or renovation and effective facility maintenance programs. "High-performance" school buildings are designed to link the physical environment to positive student achievement while providing such benefits…

  15. Computer science of the high performance; Informatica del alto rendimiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraleda, A.

    2008-07-01

    The high performance computing is taking shape as a powerful accelerator of the process of innovation, to drastically reduce the waiting times for access to the results and the findings in a growing number of processes and activities as complex and important as medicine, genetics, pharmacology, environment, natural resources management or the simulation of complex processes in a wide variety of industries. (Author)

  16. Development of High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and validation, a high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) system with WinCATS software was used. Freshly prepared ... recommended in routine analysis of pharmaceutical products containing lamivudine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. Introduction ... A strong system of quality control and quality assurance ...

  17. High Performance Skiing. How to Become a Better Alpine Skier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacenda, John

    This book is intended for people who desire to improve their skiing by exploring high performance techniques leading to: (1) more consistent performance; (2) less fatigue and more endurance; (3) greater strength and flexibility; (4) greater versatility; (5) greater confidence in all skiing conditions; and (6) the knowledge to participate in…

  18. Replica-Based High-Performance Tuple Space Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andric, Marina; De Nicola, Rocco; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We present the tuple-based coordination language RepliKlaim, which enriches Klaim with primitives for replica-aware coordination. Our overall goal is to offer suitable solutions to the challenging problems of data distribution and locality in large-scale high performance computing. In particular,...

  19. Algorithms and Methods for High-Performance Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frison, Gianluca

    The goal of this thesis is to investigate algorithms and methods to reduce the solution time of solvers for Model Predictive Control (MPC). The thesis is accompanied with an open-source toolbox for High-Performance implementation of solvers for MPC (HPMPC), that contains the source code of all...

  20. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of ultraviolet (UV) irradiated chlorophyll a and secondary plant compounds. ... in all the samples leaving a bleached extract suitable for biological assays. Key words: Chlorophyll a, UV radiation, activated charcoal, HPLC, secondary compounds in plant extracts.

  1. Comparative Studies of Some Polypores Using High Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolates of four polypores; Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma lucidum, Trametes cingulata and Daedalea quercina were compared using the High performance liquid chromatographic profiles of their triterpenoids. A higher abundance of colossolactone E was found in Ganoderma colossum isolate (FC 876) when compared ...

  2. Developments on HNF based high performance and green solid propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizers, H.L.J.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Vliet, L.D. van; Welland-Veltmans, W.H.M.; Ciucci, A.

    2001-01-01

    Worldwide developments are ongoing to develop new and more energetic composite solid propellant formulations for space transportation and military applications. Since the 90's, the use of HNF as a new high performance oxidiser is being reinvestigated. Within European development programmes,

  3. High performance sport and sustainability: a contradiction of terms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, D.; Barker-Ruchtia, N.; Wals, A.E.J.; Tinning, R.

    2014-01-01

    Success in high performance sport has always been highly valued. Today, lucrative contracts, sponsorship deals and opportunities for celebrity status are balanced against substantial time spent training and high chances of failure. With pressure mounting on athletes to make the most of their

  4. Development and validation of a reversed phase High Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple, rapid, accurate and economical isocratic Reversed Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RPHPLC) method was developed, validated and used for the evaluation of content of different brands of paracetamol tablets. The method was validated according to ICH guidelines and may be adopted for the ...

  5. Development and Validation of Reverse Phase High Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a sensitive and validated reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatographic. (RP-HPLC) method for quantification of olanzapine in micro-sample of rat plasma using UV detection. Methods: A single oral dose of olanzapine (7 mg/kg) was given to overnight fasted rats (n = 6). Rat plasma samples ...

  6. Quantification of Tea Flavonoids by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jessica D.; Niemeyer, Emily D.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory experiment that uses high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to quantify flavonoid levels in a variety of commercial teas. Specifically, this experiment analyzes a group of flavonoids known as catechins, plant-derived polyphenolic compounds commonly found in many foods and beverages, including green and black…

  7. An optimized gossypol high-performance liquid chromatography ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A comparative study on gossypol content of various genetic types of pigment glands of cotton varieties was conducted through an optimized high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on a C18 column (4.6 mm × 250 mm, 5 m particle) with methanol–0.5% acetic acid aqueous solution, 90 : 10 (v/v), as mobile phase, ...

  8. Achieving High Performance with FPGA-Based Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbordt, Martin C.; VanCourt, Tom; Gu, Yongfeng; Sukhwani, Bharat; Conti, Al; Model, Josh; DiSabello, Doug

    2011-01-01

    Numerous application areas, including bioinformatics and computational biology, demand increasing amounts of processing capability. In many cases, the computation cores and data types are suited to field-programmable gate arrays. The challenge is identifying the design techniques that can extract high performance potential from the FPGA fabric. PMID:21603088

  9. Control switching in high performance and fault tolerant control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2010-01-01

    The problem of reliability in high performance control and in fault tolerant control is considered in this paper. A feedback controller architecture for high performance and fault tolerance is considered. The architecture is based on the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization. By usi....... The architecture will also allow changing the applied sensors and/or actuators when switching between different controllers. This switchingget particular simple for open-loop stable systems.......The problem of reliability in high performance control and in fault tolerant control is considered in this paper. A feedback controller architecture for high performance and fault tolerance is considered. The architecture is based on the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization. By using...... the nominal controller in the architecture as a simple and robust controller, it is possible to use the YJBK transfer function for optimization of the closed-loop performance. This can be done both in connections with normal operation of the system as well as in connection with faults in the system...

  10. Design and Modeling of High Performance Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Geest, M.

    2015-01-01

    The electrification of transportation, and especially aerospace transportation, increases the demand for high performance electrical machines. Those machines often need to be fault-tolerant, cheap, highly efficient, light and small, and interface well with the inverter. In addition, the development

  11. A high-performance, low-cost, leading edge discriminator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A high-performance, low-cost, leading edge discriminator has been designed with a timing performance comparable to state-of-the-art, commercially available ... Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India; Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585, Japan ...

  12. Buffer-Free High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop and validate a simple, economical and reproducible high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the determination of theophylline in pharmaceutical dosage forms. Method: Caffeine was used as the internal standard and reversed phase C-18 column was used to elute the drug and ...

  13. High performance current controller for particle accelerator magnets supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ram Krishan; Bidoggia, Benoit; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2013-01-01

    The electromagnets in modern particle accelerators require high performance power supply whose output is required to track the current reference with a very high accuracy (down to 50 ppm). This demands very high bandwidth controller design. A converter based on buck converter topology is used...

  14. High Performance Computing and Networking for Science--Background Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    The Office of Technology Assessment is conducting an assessment of the effects of new information technologies--including high performance computing, data networking, and mass data archiving--on research and development. This paper offers a view of the issues and their implications for current discussions about Federal supercomputer initiatives…

  15. Promoting High-Performance Computing and Communications. A CBO Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webre, Philip

    In 1991 the Federal Government initiated the multiagency High Performance Computing and Communications program (HPCC) to further the development of U.S. supercomputer technology and high-speed computer network technology. This overview by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) concentrates on obstacles that might prevent the growth of the…

  16. Seeking Solution: High-Performance Computing for Science. Background Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This is the second publication from the Office of Technology Assessment's assessment on information technology and research, which was requested by the House Committee on Science and Technology and the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. The first background paper, "High Performance Computing & Networking for…

  17. Optical interconnection networks for high-performance computing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biberman, Aleksandr; Bergman, Keren

    2012-04-01

    Enabled by silicon photonic technology, optical interconnection networks have the potential to be a key disruptive technology in computing and communication industries. The enduring pursuit of performance gains in computing, combined with stringent power constraints, has fostered the ever-growing computational parallelism associated with chip multiprocessors, memory systems, high-performance computing systems and data centers. Sustaining these parallelism growths introduces unique challenges for on- and off-chip communications, shifting the focus toward novel and fundamentally different communication approaches. Chip-scale photonic interconnection networks, enabled by high-performance silicon photonic devices, offer unprecedented bandwidth scalability with reduced power consumption. We demonstrate that the silicon photonic platforms have already produced all the high-performance photonic devices required to realize these types of networks. Through extensive empirical characterization in much of our work, we demonstrate such feasibility of waveguides, modulators, switches and photodetectors. We also demonstrate systems that simultaneously combine many functionalities to achieve more complex building blocks. We propose novel silicon photonic devices, subsystems, network topologies and architectures to enable unprecedented performance of these photonic interconnection networks. Furthermore, the advantages of photonic interconnection networks extend far beyond the chip, offering advanced communication environments for memory systems, high-performance computing systems, and data centers.

  18. High Performance Computing and Communications: Toward a National Information Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology, Washington, DC.

    This report describes the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) initiative of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology. This program is supportive of and coordinated with the National Information Infrastructure Initiative. Now halfway through its 5-year effort, the HPCC program counts among its…

  19. Development and Validation of Reversed Phase High Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop and validate a new sensitive and low-cost method for the analysis of amlodipine in tablet dosage form using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection. Methods: Standards and samples were prepared by dissolving amlodipine besylate standard ...

  20. Profiling elite/high performance sport athletes with impairments at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Worldwide, universities have increasingly become hubs for high performance sports, as student-athletes enter the latter phase of the long-term athlete development process (LTAD). Within the South African context, several universities have and continue to play a significant role in the training and preparation of numerous ...

  1. Spectrum-effect relationships between high performance liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the spectrum-effect relationships between high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprints and duodenum contractility of charred areca nut (CAN) on rats. Methods: An HPLC method was used to establish the fingerprint of charred areca nut (CAN). The promoting effect on contractility of ...

  2. Manufacturing Advantage: Why High-Performance Work Systems Pay Off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Eileen; Bailey, Thomas; Berg, Peter; Kalleberg, Arne L.

    A study examined the relationship between high-performance workplace practices and the performance of plants in the following manufacturing industries: steel, apparel, and medical electronic instruments and imaging. The multilevel research methodology combined the following data collection activities: (1) site visits; (2) collection of plant…

  3. Development and Validation of Reverse Phase High Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a sensitive and validated reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) method for quantification of olanzapine in micro-sample of rat plasma using UV detection. Methods: A single oral dose of olanzapine (7 mg/kg) was given to overnight fasted rats (n = 6). Rat plasma samples ...

  4. Scientific and high-performance computing at FAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisel Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Future FAIR experiments have to deal with very high input rates, large track multiplicities, make full event reconstruction and selection on-line on a large dedicated computer farm equipped with heterogeneous many-core CPU/GPU compute nodes. To develop efficient and fast algorithms, which are optimized for parallel computations, is a challenge for the groups of experts dealing with the HPC computing. Here we present and discuss the status and perspectives of the data reconstruction and physics analysis software of one of the future FAIR experiments, namely, the CBM experiment.

  5. Construction of random perfect phylogeny matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Sadeghi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Mehdi Sadeghi1,2, Hamid Pezeshk4, Changiz Eslahchi3,5, Sara Ahmadian6, Sepideh Mah Abadi61National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran, Iran; 2School of Computer Science, 3School of Mathematics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM, Tehran, Iran; 4School of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Sciences, Center of Excellence in Biomathematics, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran; 5Department of Mathematics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran, Iran; 6Department of Computer Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, IranPurpose: Interest in developing methods appropriate for mapping increasing amounts of genome-wide molecular data are increasing rapidly. There is also an increasing need for methods that are able to efficiently simulate such data.Patients and methods: In this article, we provide a graph-theory approach to find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a phylogeny matrix with k nonidentical haplotypes, n single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and a population size of m for which the minimum allele frequency of each SNP is between two specific numbers a and b.Results: We introduce an O(max(n2, nm algorithm for the random construction of such a phylogeny matrix. The running time of any algorithm for solving this problem would be Ω (nm.Conclusion: We have developed software, RAPPER, based on this algorithm, which is available at http://bioinf.cs.ipm.ir/softwares/RAPPER.Keywords: perfect phylogeny, minimum allele frequency (MAF, tree, recursive algorithm 

  6. Phylogeny of Artemisia L. : Recent developments | Hayat | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genus is divided into five large groups Absinthium DC., Artemisia L., Dracunculus Besser, Seriphidium Besser and Tridantatae (Rydb.) McArthur. Its phylogeny was based on the two hypothesized evolutionary trends, loss of fertility in the disc florets and loss of ray florets. Recently its molecular phylogeny based on ...

  7. Phylogeny and biogeography of Maclura (Moraceae) and the origin of an anachronistic fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Elliot M; Sarraf, Paya; Williams, Evelyn W; Zerega, Nyree J C

    2017-12-01

    Maclura (ca. 12spp., Moraceae) is a widespread genus of trees and woody climbers found on five continents. Maclura pomifera, the Osage orange, is considered a classic example of an anachronistic fruit. Native to the central USA, the grapefruit-sized Osage oranges are unpalatable and have no known extant native dispersers, leading to speculation that the fruits were adapted to extinct megafauna. Our aim was to reconstruct the phylogeny, estimate divergence dates, and infer ancestral ranges of Maclura in order to test the monophyly of subgeneric classifications and to understand evolution and dispersal patterns in this globally distributed group. Employing Bayesian and maximum-likelihood methods, we reconstructed the Maclura phylogeny using two nuclear and five chloroplast loci from all Maclura species and outgroups representing all Moraceae tribes. We reconstructed ancestral ranges and syncarp sizes using a family level dated tree, and used Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models to test for significant changes in syncarp size in the Osage orange lineage. Our analyses support a monophyletic Maclura with a Paleocene crown. Subgeneric sections were monophyletic except for the geographically-disjunct Cardiogyne. There was strong support for current species delineations except in the widespread M. cochinchinensis. South America was reconstructed as the ancestral range for Maclura with subsequent colonization of Africa and the northern hemisphere. The clade containing M. pomifera likely diverged in the Oligocene, closely coinciding with crown divergence dates of the mammoth/mastodon and sloth clades that contain possible extinct dispersers. The best fitting model for syncarp size evolution indicated an increase in both syncarp size and the rate of syncarp size evolution in the Osage orange lineage. We conclude that our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that M. pomifera was adapted to dispersal by extinct megafauna. In addition, we consider dispersal rather than vicariance to

  8. Genome BLAST distance phylogenies inferred from whole plastid and whole mitochondrion genome sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holland Barbara R

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic methods which do not rely on multiple sequence alignments are important tools in inferring trees directly from completely sequenced genomes. Here, we extend the recently described Genome BLAST Distance Phylogeny (GBDP strategy to compute phylogenetic trees from all completely sequenced plastid genomes currently available and from a selection of mitochondrial genomes representing the major eukaryotic lineages. BLASTN, TBLASTX, or combinations of both are used to locate high-scoring segment pairs (HSPs between two sequences from which pairwise similarities and distances are computed in different ways resulting in a total of 96 GBDP variants. The suitability of these distance formulae for phylogeny reconstruction is directly estimated by computing a recently described measure of "treelikeness", the so-called δ value, from the respective distance matrices. Additionally, we compare the trees inferred from these matrices using UPGMA, NJ, BIONJ, FastME, or STC, respectively, with the NCBI taxonomy tree of the taxa under study. Results Our results indicate that, at this taxonomic level, plastid genomes are much more valuable for inferring phylogenies than are mitochondrial genomes, and that distances based on breakpoints are of little use. Distances based on the proportion of "matched" HSP length to average genome length were best for tree estimation. Additionally we found that using TBLASTX instead of BLASTN and, particularly, combining TBLASTX and BLASTN leads to a small but significant increase in accuracy. Other factors do not significantly affect the phylogenetic outcome. The BIONJ algorithm results in phylogenies most in accordance with the current NCBI taxonomy, with NJ and FastME performing insignificantly worse, and STC performing as well if applied to high quality distance matrices. δ values are found to be a reliable predictor of phylogenetic accuracy. Conclusion Using the most treelike distance matrices, as

  9. Reticulate phylogeny of gastropod-shell-breeding cichlids from Lake Tanganyika – the result of repeated introgressive hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanc Michel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tribe Lamprologini is the major substrate breeding lineage of Lake Tanganyika's cichlid species flock. Among several different life history strategies found in lamprologines, the adaptation to live and breed in empty gastropod shells is probably the most peculiar. Although shell-breeding arose several times in the evolutionary history of the lamprologines, all obligatory and most facultative shell-breeders belong to the so called "ossified group", a monophyletic lineage within the lamprologine cichlids. Since their distinctive life style enables these species to live and breed in closest vicinity, we hypothesized that these cichlids might be particularly prone to accidental hybridization, and that introgression might have affected the evolutionary history of this cichlid lineage. Results Our analyses revealed discrepancies between phylogenetic hypotheses based on mitochondrial and nuclear (AFLP data. While the nuclear phylogeny was congruent with morphological, behavioral and ecological characteristics, several species – usually highly specialized shell-breeders – were placed at contradicting positions in the mitochondrial phylogeny. The discordant phylogenies strongly suggest repeated incidents of introgressive hybridization between several distantly related shell-breeding species, which reticulated the phylogeny of this group of cichlids. Long interior branches and high bootstrap support for many interior nodes in the mitochondrial phylogeny argue against a major effect of ancient incomplete lineage sorting on the phylogenetic reconstruction. Moreover, we provide morphological and genetic (mtDNA and microsatellites evidence for ongoing hybridization among distantly related shell-breeders. In these cases, the territorial males of the inferred paternal species are too large to enter the shells of their mate, such that they have to release their sperm over the entrance of the shell to fertilize the eggs. With sperm

  10. Micro-crack detection in high-performance cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Guang, Ye; Tanaka, Kyoji

    2005-01-01

    Detection and quantification of microcracks due to autogenous shrinkage in high-performance concrete represents a problematic issue. Techniques based on crack impregnation typically require drying of the samples, which may introduce further cracks. Other non-destructive techniques, such as x......-ray tomography, do not allow sufficient resolution of microcracks. A new technique presented in this paper allows detection of microcracks in cement paste while avoiding artefacts induced by unwanted restraint, drying or temperature variations. The technique consists in casting small circular cylindrical samples...... of high-performance cement pastes in silicone moulds that exert minimal external restraint. Cast-in steel rods with varying diameter internally restrain the autogenous shrinkage and lead to crack formation. Dimensions of the steel rods are chosen so that the size of this restraining inclusion resembles...

  11. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '14

    CERN Document Server

    Kröner, Dietmar; Resch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in supercomputer simulation. It includes the latest findings from leading researchers using systems from the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS). The reports cover all fields of computational science and engineering ranging from CFD to computational physics and from chemistry to computer science with a special emphasis on industrially relevant applications. Presenting findings of one of Europe’s leading systems, this volume covers a wide variety of applications that deliver a high level of sustained performance. The book covers the main methods in high-performance computing. Its outstanding results in achieving the best performance for production codes are of particular interest for both scientists and   engineers. The book comes with a wealth of color illustrations and tables of results.  

  12. Progress on high-performance rapid prototype aluminum mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Kenneth S.; Myrick, Bruce H.

    2017-05-01

    Near net shape parts can be produced using some very old processes (investment casting) and the relatively new direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) process. These processes have significant advantages for complex blank lightweighting and costs but are not inherently suited for producing high performance mirrors. The DMLS process can provide extremely complex lightweight structures but the high residual stresses left in the material results in unstable mirror figure retention. Although not to the extreme intricacy of DMLS, investment casting can also provide complex lightweight structures at considerably lower costs than DMLS and even conventional wrought mirror blanks but the less than 100% density for casting (and also DMLS) limits finishing quality. This paper will cover the progress that has been made to make both the DMLS and investment casting processes into viable near net shape blank options for high performance aluminum mirrors. Finish and figure results will be presented to show performance commensurate with existing conventional processes.

  13. High-Performance Photovoltaic Project: Identifying Critical Pathways; Kickoff Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symko-Davis, M.

    2001-11-07

    The High Performance Photovoltaic Project held a Kickoff Meeting in October, 2001. This booklet contains the presentations given by subcontractors and in-house teams at that meeting. The areas of subcontracted research under the HiPer project include Polycrystalline Thin Films and Multijunction Concentrators. The in-house teams in this initiative will focus on three areas: (1) High-Performance Thin-Film Team-leads the investigation of tandem structures and low-flux concentrators, (2) High-Efficiency Concepts and Concentrators Team-an expansion of an existing team that leads the development of high-flux concentrators, and (3) Thin-Film Process Integration Team-will perform fundamental process and characterization research, to resolve the complex issues of making thin-film multijunction devices.

  14. Laser additive manufacturing of high-performance materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    This book entitled “Laser Additive Manufacturing of High-Performance Materials” covers the specific aspects of laser additive manufacturing of high-performance new materials components based on an unconventional materials incremental manufacturing philosophy, in terms of materials design and preparation, process control and optimization, and theories of physical and chemical metallurgy. This book describes the capabilities and characteristics of the development of new metallic materials components by laser additive manufacturing process, including nanostructured materials, in situ composite materials, particle reinforced metal matrix composites, etc. The topics presented in this book, similar as laser additive manufacturing technology itself, show a significant interdisciplinary feature, integrating laser technology, materials science, metallurgical engineering, and mechanical engineering. This is a book for researchers, students, practicing engineers, and manufacturing industry professionals interested i...

  15. Conference on High Performance Software for Nonlinear Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Murli, Almerico; Pardalos, Panos; Toraldo, Gerardo

    1998-01-01

    This book contains a selection of papers presented at the conference on High Performance Software for Nonlinear Optimization (HPSN097) which was held in Ischia, Italy, in June 1997. The rapid progress of computer technologies, including new parallel architec­ tures, has stimulated a large amount of research devoted to building software environments and defining algorithms able to fully exploit this new computa­ tional power. In some sense, numerical analysis has to conform itself to the new tools. The impact of parallel computing in nonlinear optimization, which had a slow start at the beginning, seems now to increase at a fast rate, and it is reasonable to expect an even greater acceleration in the future. As with the first HPSNO conference, the goal of the HPSN097 conference was to supply a broad overview of the more recent developments and trends in nonlinear optimization, emphasizing the algorithmic and high performance software aspects. Bringing together new computational methodologies with theoretical...

  16. High performance computing and communications: FY 1996 implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-16

    The High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program was formally authorized by passage of the High Performance Computing Act of 1991, signed on December 9, 1991. Twelve federal agencies, in collaboration with scientists and managers from US industry, universities, and research laboratories, have developed the Program to meet the challenges of advancing computing and associated communications technologies and practices. This plan provides a detailed description of the agencies` HPCC implementation plans for FY 1995 and FY 1996. This Implementation Plan contains three additional sections. Section 3 provides an overview of the HPCC Program definition and organization. Section 4 contains a breakdown of the five major components of the HPCC Program, with an emphasis on the overall directions and milestones planned for each one. Section 5 provides a detailed look at HPCC Program activities within each agency.

  17. A HIGH PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUE FOR POLE BALANCING PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadır KARASULU

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available High performance computing techniques can be used effectively for solution of the complex scientific problems. Pole balancing problem is a basic benchmark tool of robotic field, which is an important field of Artificial Intelligence research areas. In this study, a solution is developed for pole balancing problem using Artificial Neural Network (ANN and high performance computation technique. Algorithm, that basis of the Reinforcement Learning method which is used to find the force of pole's balance, is transfered to parallel environment. In Implementation, C is preferred as programming language and Message Passing Interface (MPI is used for parallel computation technique. Self–Organizing Map (SOM ANN model's neurons (artificial neural nodes and their weights are distributed to six processors of a server computer which equipped with each quad core processor (total 24 processors. In this way, performance values are obtained for different number of artificial neural nodes. Success of method based on results is discussed.

  18. Scientific data storage solutions: Meeting the high-performance challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, D.; Jones, L.; Kluegel, L.; Ramsey, C.; Collins, W.

    1994-04-01

    The Los Alamos High-Performance Data System (HPDS) has been developed to meet data storage and data access requirements of Grand Challenge and National Security problems running in a high-performance computing environment. HPDS is a fourth-generation data storage system in which storage devices are directly connected to a network, data is transferred directly between client machines and storage devices, and software distributed on workstations provides system management and control capabilities. Essential to the success of HPDS is the ability to effectively use HIPPI networks and HIPPI-attached storage devices for high-speed data transfer. This paper focuses on the performance of the HPDS storage systems in a Cray Supercomputer environment.

  19. WOMBAT: A Scalable and High-performance Astrophysical Magnetohydrodynamics Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendygral, P. J.; Radcliffe, N.; Kandalla, K. [Cray Inc., St. Paul, MN 55101 (United States); Porter, D. [Minnesota Supercomputing Institute for Advanced Computational Research, Minneapolis, MN USA (United States); O’Neill, B. J.; Nolting, C.; Donnert, J. M. F.; Jones, T. W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Edmon, P., E-mail: pjm@cray.com, E-mail: nradclif@cray.com, E-mail: kkandalla@cray.com, E-mail: oneill@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: nolt0040@umn.edu, E-mail: donnert@ira.inaf.it, E-mail: twj@umn.edu, E-mail: dhp@umn.edu, E-mail: pedmon@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Theory and Computation, Center for Astrophysics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We present a new code for astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics specifically designed and optimized for high performance and scaling on modern and future supercomputers. We describe a novel hybrid OpenMP/MPI programming model that emerged from a collaboration between Cray, Inc. and the University of Minnesota. This design utilizes MPI-RMA optimized for thread scaling, which allows the code to run extremely efficiently at very high thread counts ideal for the latest generation of multi-core and many-core architectures. Such performance characteristics are needed in the era of “exascale” computing. We describe and demonstrate our high-performance design in detail with the intent that it may be used as a model for other, future astrophysical codes intended for applications demanding exceptional performance.

  20. The challenge of innovation and the high-performance team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, David A; Chessum, Thomas; Leopold, Jay

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a high-performance team model in the leadership of a healthcare construction project with a vision of fostering innovation in the design and building process. This model facilitated the effective implementation of = Lean principles and a joint governance model combining stakeholders under a shared vision. The healthcare facility discussed is a California healthcare district in San Diego. Because of state seismic safety legislation, the district elected to build a replacement hospital for its tertiary care trauma facility. The organization's leadership decided to pursue a course that demanded innovation in both the design and construction process. The owner, architects, construction manager, and trade contractors adopted a high-performance team model to meet this challenge. The governance and leadership of a construction project should reflect the design and ultimate intent of the facility. The vision of building the most innovative hospital under constrained resources required the implementation of an innovative approach to leading the construction process.

  1. Micromachined high-performance RF passives in CMOS substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinxin; Ni, Zao; Gu, Lei; Wu, Zhengzheng; Yang, Chen

    2016-11-01

    This review systematically addresses the micromachining technologies used for the fabrication of high-performance radio-frequency (RF) passives that can be integrated into low-cost complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-grade (i.e. low-resistivity) silicon wafers. With the development of various kinds of post-CMOS-compatible microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) processes, 3D structural inductors/transformers, variable capacitors, tunable resonators and band-pass/low-pass filters can be compatibly integrated into active integrated circuits to form monolithic RF system-on-chips. By using MEMS processes, including substrate modifying/suspending and LIGA-like metal electroplating, both the highly lossy substrate effect and the resistive loss can be largely eliminated and depressed, thereby meeting the high-performance requirements of telecommunication applications.

  2. High Performance Descriptive Semantic Analysis of Semantic Graph Databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Adolf, Robert D.; al-Saffar, Sinan; Feo, John T.; Haglin, David J.; Mackey, Greg E.; Mizell, David W.

    2011-06-02

    As semantic graph database technology grows to address components ranging from extant large triple stores to SPARQL endpoints over SQL-structured relational databases, it will become increasingly important to be able to understand their inherent semantic structure, whether codified in explicit ontologies or not. Our group is researching novel methods for what we call descriptive semantic analysis of RDF triplestores, to serve purposes of analysis, interpretation, visualization, and optimization. But data size and computational complexity makes it increasingly necessary to bring high performance computational resources to bear on this task. Our research group built a novel high performance hybrid system comprising computational capability for semantic graph database processing utilizing the large multi-threaded architecture of the Cray XMT platform, conventional servers, and large data stores. In this paper we describe that architecture and our methods, and present the results of our analyses of basic properties, connected components, namespace interaction, and typed paths such for the Billion Triple Challenge 2010 dataset.

  3. Digital control of high performance aircraft using adaptive estimation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landingham, H. F.; Moose, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive signal processing algorithm is joined with gain-scheduling for controlling the dynamics of high performance aircraft. A technique is presented for a reduced-order model (the longitudinal dynamics) of a high performance STOL aircraft. The actual controller views the nonlinear behavior of the aircraft as equivalent to a randomly switching sequence of linear models taken from a preliminary piecewise-linear fit of the system nonlinearities. The adaptive nature of the estimator is necessary to select the proper sequence of linear models along the flight trajectory. Nonlinear behavior is approximated by effective switching of the linear models at random times, with durations reflecting aircraft motion in response to pilot commands.

  4. Building and measuring a high performance network architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, William T.C.; Toole, Timothy; Fisher, Chuck; Dugan, Jon; Wheeler, David; Wing, William R; Nickless, William; Goddard, Gregory; Corbato, Steven; Love, E. Paul; Daspit, Paul; Edwards, Hal; Mercer, Linden; Koester, David; Decina, Basil; Dart, Eli; Paul Reisinger, Paul; Kurihara, Riki; Zekauskas, Matthew J; Plesset, Eric; Wulf, Julie; Luce, Douglas; Rogers, James; Duncan, Rex; Mauth, Jeffery

    2001-04-20

    Once a year, the SC conferences present a unique opportunity to create and build one of the most complex and highest performance networks in the world. At SC2000, large-scale and complex local and wide area networking connections were demonstrated, including large-scale distributed applications running on different architectures. This project was designed to use the unique opportunity presented at SC2000 to create a testbed network environment and then use that network to demonstrate and evaluate high performance computational and communication applications. This testbed was designed to incorporate many interoperable systems and services and was designed for measurement from the very beginning. The end results were key insights into how to use novel, high performance networking technologies and to accumulate measurements that will give insights into the networks of the future.

  5. GPU-based high-performance computing for radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xun; Ziegenhein, Peter; Jiang, Steve B

    2014-02-21

    Recent developments in radiotherapy therapy demand high computation powers to solve challenging problems in a timely fashion in a clinical environment. The graphics processing unit (GPU), as an emerging high-performance computing platform, has been introduced to radiotherapy. It is particularly attractive due to its high computational power, small size, and low cost for facility deployment and maintenance. Over the past few years, GPU-based high-performance computing in radiotherapy has experienced rapid developments. A tremendous amount of study has been conducted, in which large acceleration factors compared with the conventional CPU platform have been observed. In this paper, we will first give a brief introduction to the GPU hardware structure and programming model. We will then review the current applications of GPU in major imaging-related and therapy-related problems encountered in radiotherapy. A comparison of GPU with other platforms will also be presented.

  6. Decal electronics for printed high performance cmos electronic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-11-23

    High performance complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics are critical for any full-fledged electronic system. However, state-of-the-art CMOS electronics are rigid and bulky making them unusable for flexible electronic applications. While there exist bulk material reduction methods to flex them, such thinned CMOS electronics are fragile and vulnerable to handling for high throughput manufacturing. Here, we show a fusion of a CMOS technology compatible fabrication process for flexible CMOS electronics, with inkjet and conductive cellulose based interconnects, followed by additive manufacturing (i.e. 3D printing based packaging) and finally roll-to-roll printing of packaged decal electronics (thin film transistors based circuit components and sensors) focusing on printed high performance flexible electronic systems. This work provides the most pragmatic route for packaged flexible electronic systems for wide ranging applications.

  7. Flexible nanoscale high-performance FinFETs

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2014-10-28

    With the emergence of the Internet of Things (IoT), flexible high-performance nanoscale electronics are more desired. At the moment, FinFET is the most advanced transistor architecture used in the state-of-the-art microprocessors. Therefore, we show a soft-etch based substrate thinning process to transform silicon-on-insulator (SOI) based nanoscale FinFET into flexible FinFET and then conduct comprehensive electrical characterization under various bending conditions to understand its electrical performance. Our study shows that back-etch based substrate thinning process is gentler than traditional abrasive back-grinding process; it can attain ultraflexibility and the electrical characteristics of the flexible nanoscale FinFET show no performance degradation compared to its rigid bulk counterpart indicating its readiness to be used for flexible high-performance electronics.

  8. Optical Thermal Characterization Enables High-Performance Electronics Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-02-01

    NREL developed a modeling and experimental strategy to characterize thermal performance of materials. The technique provides critical data on thermal properties with relevance for electronics packaging applications. Thermal contact resistance and bulk thermal conductivity were characterized for new high-performance materials such as thermoplastics, boron-nitride nanosheets, copper nanowires, and atomically bonded layers. The technique is an important tool for developing designs and materials that enable power electronics packaging with small footprint, high power density, and low cost for numerous applications.

  9. Low-Cost, High-Performance Hall Thruster Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesterman, Bryce

    2015-01-01

    Colorado Power Electronics (CPE) has built an innovative modular PPU for Hall thrusters, including discharge, magnet, heater and keeper supplies, and an interface module. This high-performance PPU offers resonant circuit topologies, magnetics design, modularity, and a stable and sustained operation during severe Hall effect thruster current oscillations. Laboratory testing has demonstrated discharge module efficiency of 96 percent, which is considerably higher than current state of the art.

  10. Wavy channel transistor for area efficient high performance operation

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2013-04-05

    We report a wavy channel FinFET like transistor where the channel is wavy to increase its width without any area penalty and thereby increasing its drive current. Through simulation and experiments, we show the effectiveness of such device architecture is capable of high performance operation compared to conventional FinFETs with comparatively higher area efficiency and lower chip latency as well as lower power consumption.

  11. Experimental analysis of properties of high performance recycled aggregate concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzàlez Corominas, Andreu; Etxeberria Larrañaga, Miren

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increase in the demolition of high strength concrete structures and the interest of precast concrete companies in being more competitive, it is necessary to analyse the use of recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) in high performance concrete (HPC). In this study, HPC were produced using 20%, 50% and 100% of RCA on substitution of natural coarse aggregates. Three types of RCA were used, they were produced crushing original concrete of 100, 60 and 40 MPa of compressive strength. The ph...

  12. Progress Toward Demonstrating a High Performance Optical Tape Recording Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, W. S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the technology developments achieved during the first year of a program to develop a high performance digital optical tape recording device using a solid state, diode pumped, frequency doubled green laser source. The goal is to demonstrate, within two years, useful read/write data transfer rates to at least 100 megabytes per second and a user capacity of up to one terabyte per cartridge implemented in a system using a '3480' style mono-reel tape cartridge.

  13. Piezoelectric Resonance Defined High Performance Sensors and Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-30

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Electromechanical resonance of piezoelectric crystals has been shown to have substantial influence on their electrooptic...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 30-05-2016 15-Feb-2012 14-Feb-2016 Final Report: Piezoelectric Resonance Defined High Performance Sensors and Modulators The...Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 piezoelectric resonators, electrooptics, microwave, sensors, modulators, PMN-PT, PZN

  14. High Performance Visualization using Query-Driven Visualizationand Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E. Wes; Campbell, Scott; Dart, Eli; Shalf, John; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu, Kesheng

    2006-06-15

    Query-driven visualization and analytics is a unique approach for high-performance visualization that offers new capabilities for knowledge discovery and hypothesis testing. The new capabilities akin to finding needles in haystacks are the result of combining technologies from the fields of scientific visualization and scientific data management. This approach is crucial for rapid data analysis and visualization in the petascale regime. This article describes how query-driven visualization is applied to a hero-sized network traffic analysis problem.

  15. Analysis of Tocopherols by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Edison

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available : Gas chromatography is the key technique for organic components and also for tocopherols analysis. High performance liquid chromatography has an important role to take part in applications such as the handling of less usual samples, prevention of degradation of heat sensitive functional groups and for micro preparative purposes. Many approaches for development of improved methods are suggested, especially for reversed phase applications.

  16. Accelerating R with high performance linear algebra libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Oancea

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Linear algebra routines are basic building blocks for the statistical software. In this paper we analyzed how can we improve R performance for matrix computations. We benchmarked few matrix operations using the standard linear algebra libraries included in the R distribution and high performance libraries like OpenBLAS, GotoBLAS and MKL. Our tests showed the best results are obtained with the MKL library, the other two libraries having similar performances, but lower than MKL.

  17. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeschele, Marc [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Springer, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dakin, Bill [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); German, Alea [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist, and reducing the amount of wood penetrating the wall cavity.

  18. High Performance Networks From Supercomputing to Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Abts, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Datacenter networks provide the communication substrate for large parallel computer systems that form the ecosystem for high performance computing (HPC) systems and modern Internet applications. The design of new datacenter networks is motivated by an array of applications ranging from communication intensive climatology, complex material simulations and molecular dynamics to such Internet applications as Web search, language translation, collaborative Internet applications, streaming video and voice-over-IP. For both Supercomputing and Cloud Computing the network enables distributed applicati

  19. Renewing functionalized graphene as electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yan [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Zhongguancun, Beiyitiao No.11, Beijing, 100190 (China); Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Luo, Bin; Jia, Yuying; Li, Xianglong; Wang, Bin; Song, Qi [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Zhongguancun, Beiyitiao No.11, Beijing, 100190 (China); Kang, Feiyu [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Zhi, Linjie [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Zhongguancun, Beiyitiao No.11, Beijing, 100190 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Jungong Road 516, 200093, Shanghai (China)

    2012-12-11

    An acid-assisted ultrarapid thermal strategy is developed for constructing specifically functionalized graphene. The electrochemical performance of functionalized graphene can be boosted via elaborate coupling between the pseudocapacitance and the electronic double layer capacitance through rationally tailoring the structure of graphene sheets. This presents an opportunity for developing further high-performance graphene-based electrodes to bridge the performance gap between traditional capacitors and batteries. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Nuclear Forces and High-Performance Computing: The Perfect Match

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luu, T; Walker-Loud, A

    2009-06-12

    High-performance computing is now enabling the calculation of certain nuclear interaction parameters directly from Quantum Chromodynamics, the quantum field theory that governs the behavior of quarks and gluons and is ultimately responsible for the nuclear strong force. We briefly describe the state of the field and describe how progress in this field will impact the greater nuclear physics community. We give estimates of computational requirements needed to obtain certain milestones and describe the scientific and computational challenges of this field.

  1. Noise of High-Performance Aircraft at Afterburner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-22

    flow inside a military styled nozzle Recently, Tam and Parrish (Noise of High-Performance Aircraft at Afterburner Journal of Sound and Vibration ...quantities as scales λ0 (the size of the dominant entropy blobs) as the length scale. (speed of sound ) as the velocity scale λ0 /a0 as the time...generate sound when passing through a shock wave. We expect the same is true when entropy blobs are convected through an oblique shock. This mechanism of

  2. Factoring symmetric indefinite matrices on high-performance architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mark T.; Patrick, Merrell L.

    1990-01-01

    The Bunch-Kaufman algorithm is the method of choice for factoring symmetric indefinite matrices in many applications. However, the Bunch-Kaufman algorithm does not take advantage of high-performance architectures such as the Cray Y-MP. Three new algorithms, based on Bunch-Kaufman factorization, that take advantage of such architectures are described. Results from an implementation of the third algorithm are presented.

  3. High Performance Pillared Vanadium Oxide Cathode for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-24

    Performance Pillared Vanadium Oxide Cathode for Lithium Ion Batteries Siu on Tung, Krista L. Hawthorne, Yi Ding, James Mainero, and Levi T. Thompson...Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center, Warren, MI 48387, USA Keywords: nanostructured materials, lithium ion batteries , cathode...2014 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High Performance Pillared Vanadium Oxide Cathode for Lithium Ion Batteries 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  4. High Performance Object-Oriented Scientific Programming in Fortran 90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Charles D.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Szymanski, Boleslaw K.

    1997-01-01

    We illustrate how Fortran 90 supports object-oriented concepts by example of plasma particle computations on the IBM SP. Our experience shows that Fortran 90 and object-oriented methodology give high performance while providing a bridge from Fortran 77 legacy codes to modern programming principles. All of our object-oriented Fortran 90 codes execute more quickly thatn the equeivalent C++ versions, yet the abstraction modelling capabilities used for scentific programming are comparably powereful.

  5. Quantum Accelerators for High-performance Computing Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humble, Travis S. [ORNL; Britt, Keith A. [ORNL; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A. [ORNL

    2017-11-01

    We define some of the programming and system-level challenges facing the application of quantum processing to high-performance computing. Alongside barriers to physical integration, prominent differences in the execution of quantum and conventional programs challenges the intersection of these computational models. Following a brief overview of the state of the art, we discuss recent advances in programming and execution models for hybrid quantum-classical computing. We discuss a novel quantum-accelerator framework that uses specialized kernels to offload select workloads while integrating with existing computing infrastructure. We elaborate on the role of the host operating system to manage these unique accelerator resources, the prospects for deploying quantum modules, and the requirements placed on the language hierarchy connecting these different system components. We draw on recent advances in the modeling and simulation of quantum computing systems with the development of architectures for hybrid high-performance computing systems and the realization of software stacks for controlling quantum devices. Finally, we present simulation results that describe the expected system-level behavior of high-performance computing systems composed from compute nodes with quantum processing units. We describe performance for these hybrid systems in terms of time-to-solution, accuracy, and energy consumption, and we use simple application examples to estimate the performance advantage of quantum acceleration.

  6. High-Performance Java Codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Christopher; Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational science community is reluctant to write large-scale computationally -intensive applications in Java due to concerns over Java's poor performance, despite the claimed software engineering advantages of its object-oriented features. Naive Java implementations of numerical algorithms can perform poorly compared to corresponding Fortran or C implementations. To achieve high performance, Java applications must be designed with good performance as a primary goal. This paper presents the object-oriented design and implementation of two real-world applications from the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): a finite-volume fluid flow solver (LAURA, from NASA Langley Research Center), and an unstructured mesh adaptation algorithm (2D_TAG, from NASA Ames Research Center). This work builds on our previous experience with the design of high-performance numerical libraries in Java. We examine the performance of the applications using the currently available Java infrastructure and show that the Java version of the flow solver LAURA performs almost within a factor of 2 of the original procedural version. Our Java version of the mesh adaptation algorithm 2D_TAG performs within a factor of 1.5 of its original procedural version on certain platforms. Our results demonstrate that object-oriented software design principles are not necessarily inimical to high performance.

  7. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeschele, Marc [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Springer, David [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Dakin, Bill [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); German, Alea [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist. To support this activity, in 2013 the Pacific Gas & Electric Company initiated a project with Davis Energy Group (lead for the Building America team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation) to solicit builder involvement in California to participate in field demonstrations of high performance wall systems. Builders were given incentives and design support in exchange for providing site access for construction observation, cost information, and builder survey feedback. Information from the project was designed to feed into the 2016 Title 24 process, but also to serve as an initial mechanism to engage builders in more high performance construction strategies. This Building America project utilized information collected in the California project.

  8. Two Failures to Replicate High-Performance-Goal Priming Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christine R.; Coburn, Noriko; Rohrer, Doug; Pashler, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Bargh et al. (2001) reported two experiments in which people were exposed to words related to achievement (e.g., strive, attain) or to neutral words, and then performed a demanding cognitive task. Performance on the task was enhanced after exposure to the achievement related words. Bargh and colleagues concluded that better performance was due to the achievement words having activated a "high-performance goal". Because the paper has been cited well over 1100 times, an attempt to replicate its findings would seem warranted. Two direct replication attempts were performed. Results from the first experiment (n = 98) found no effect of priming, and the means were in the opposite direction from those reported by Bargh and colleagues. The second experiment followed up on the observation by Bargh et al. (2001) that high-performance-goal priming was enhanced by a 5-minute delay between priming and test. Adding such a delay, we still found no evidence for high-performance-goal priming (n = 66). These failures to replicate, along with other recent results, suggest that the literature on goal priming requires some skeptical scrutiny. PMID:23977304

  9. Two failures to replicate high-performance-goal priming effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine R Harris

    Full Text Available Bargh et al. (2001 reported two experiments in which people were exposed to words related to achievement (e.g., strive, attain or to neutral words, and then performed a demanding cognitive task. Performance on the task was enhanced after exposure to the achievement related words. Bargh and colleagues concluded that better performance was due to the achievement words having activated a "high-performance goal". Because the paper has been cited well over 1100 times, an attempt to replicate its findings would seem warranted. Two direct replication attempts were performed. Results from the first experiment (n = 98 found no effect of priming, and the means were in the opposite direction from those reported by Bargh and colleagues. The second experiment followed up on the observation by Bargh et al. (2001 that high-performance-goal priming was enhanced by a 5-minute delay between priming and test. Adding such a delay, we still found no evidence for high-performance-goal priming (n = 66. These failures to replicate, along with other recent results, suggest that the literature on goal priming requires some skeptical scrutiny.

  10. Design of High Performance Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Wind Generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yu Hsiao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the analysis and design of high performance permanent-magnet synchronous wind generators (PSWGs. A systematic and sequential methodology for the design of PMSGs is proposed with a high performance wind generator as a design model. Aiming at high induced voltage, low harmonic distortion as well as high generator efficiency, optimal generator parameters such as pole-arc to pole-pitch ratio and stator-slot-shoes dimension, etc. are determined with the proposed technique using Maxwell 2-D, Matlab software and the Taguchi method. The proposed double three-phase and six-phase winding configurations, which consist of six windings in the stator, can provide evenly distributed current for versatile applications regarding the voltage and current demands for practical consideration. Specifically, windings are connected in series to increase the output voltage at low wind speed, and in parallel during high wind speed to generate electricity even when either one winding fails, thereby enhancing the reliability as well. A PMSG is designed and implemented based on the proposed method. When the simulation is performed with a 6 Ω load, the output power for the double three-phase winding and six-phase winding are correspondingly 10.64 and 11.13 kW. In addition, 24 Ω load experiments show that the efficiencies of double three-phase winding and six-phase winding are 96.56% and 98.54%, respectively, verifying the proposed high performance operation.

  11. Evaluation of nutritional intake in Canadian high-performance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Victor; Erdman, Kelly Anne; Reimer, Raylene A

    2009-09-01

    To determine the nutritional intake of Canadian high-performance athletes. Prospective survey study. Canadian sport center athletes. Three hundred twenty-four high-performance athletes (114 males and 201 females; mean age 21.3 +/- 13 years) from 8 Canadian sport centers participated in the study. Subjects prospectively completed 3-day dietary records, reporting all food, fluid, and supplement consumption. Dietary records were analyzed for total calories, macronutrients, and micronutrients for food alone and food plus supplements for all subjects collectively and according to gender and competitive event. Average daily energy intake was 2533 +/- 843 Kcal/day with males consuming more calories than females (2918 +/- 927 and 2304 +/- 713 Kcal/day, respectively; P Supplementation significantly increased athletes' energy, total carbohydrate, protein, and fat intake. Of 17 micronutrients assessed, intake ranged between 120% and 366% of recommended daily intake with food alone and between 134% to 680% of recommended daily intake with supplements. Canadian high-performance athletes do not consume adequate energy or carbohydrates. However, their intake of micronutrients exceed current recommended daily intakes, even when supplements are not considered, indicating that athletes make high-quality food choices. Supplementation significantly increased energy, macronutrient, and micronutrient intake.

  12. Integrating reconfigurable hardware-based grid for high performance computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondo Gazzano, Julio; Sanchez Molina, Francisco; Rincon, Fernando; López, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    FPGAs have shown several characteristics that make them very attractive for high performance computing (HPC). The impressive speed-up factors that they are able to achieve, the reduced power consumption, and the easiness and flexibility of the design process with fast iterations between consecutive versions are examples of benefits obtained with their use. However, there are still some difficulties when using reconfigurable platforms as accelerator that need to be addressed: the need of an in-depth application study to identify potential acceleration, the lack of tools for the deployment of computational problems in distributed hardware platforms, and the low portability of components, among others. This work proposes a complete grid infrastructure for distributed high performance computing based on dynamically reconfigurable FPGAs. Besides, a set of services designed to facilitate the application deployment is described. An example application and a comparison with other hardware and software implementations are shown. Experimental results show that the proposed architecture offers encouraging advantages for deployment of high performance distributed applications simplifying development process.

  13. Integrating Reconfigurable Hardware-Based Grid for High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondo Gazzano, Julio; Sanchez Molina, Francisco; Rincon, Fernando; López, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    FPGAs have shown several characteristics that make them very attractive for high performance computing (HPC). The impressive speed-up factors that they are able to achieve, the reduced power consumption, and the easiness and flexibility of the design process with fast iterations between consecutive versions are examples of benefits obtained with their use. However, there are still some difficulties when using reconfigurable platforms as accelerator that need to be addressed: the need of an in-depth application study to identify potential acceleration, the lack of tools for the deployment of computational problems in distributed hardware platforms, and the low portability of components, among others. This work proposes a complete grid infrastructure for distributed high performance computing based on dynamically reconfigurable FPGAs. Besides, a set of services designed to facilitate the application deployment is described. An example application and a comparison with other hardware and software implementations are shown. Experimental results show that the proposed architecture offers encouraging advantages for deployment of high performance distributed applications simplifying development process. PMID:25874241

  14. High performance flexible CMOS SOI FinFETs

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate the first ever CMOS compatible soft etch back based high performance flexible CMOS SOI FinFETs. The move from planar to non-planar FinFETs has enabled continued scaling down to the 14 nm technology node. This has been possible due to the reduction in off-state leakage and reduced short channel effects on account of the superior electrostatic charge control of multiple gates. At the same time, flexible electronics is an exciting expansion opportunity for next generation electronics. However, a fully integrated low-cost system will need to maintain ultra-large-scale-integration density, high performance and reliability - same as today\\'s traditional electronics. Up until recently, this field has been mainly dominated by very weak performance organic electronics enabled by low temperature processes, conducive to low melting point plastics. Now however, we show the world\\'s highest performing flexible version of 3D FinFET CMOS using a state-of-the-art CMOS compatible fabrication technique for high performance ultra-mobile consumer applications with stylish design. © 2014 IEEE.

  15. [Eyebrow reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraër, F; Darsonval, V; Lejeune, F; Bochot-Hermouet, B; Rousseau, P

    2013-10-01

    The eyebrow is an essential anatomical area, from a social point of view, so its reconstruction, in case of skin defect, must be as meticulous as possible, with the less residual sequela. Capillary density extremely varies from one person to another and the different methods of restoration of this area should absolutely take this into consideration. We are going to review the various techniques of reconstruction, according to the sex and the surface to cover. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Angiosperm phylogeny: 17 genes, 640 taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltis, Douglas E; Smith, Stephen A; Cellinese, Nico; Wurdack, Kenneth J; Tank, David C; Brockington, Samuel F; Refulio-Rodriguez, Nancy F; Walker, Jay B; Moore, Michael J; Carlsward, Barbara S; Bell, Charles D; Latvis, Maribeth; Crawley, Sunny; Black, Chelsea; Diouf, Diaga; Xi, Zhenxiang; Rushworth, Catherine A; Gitzendanner, Matthew A; Sytsma, Kenneth J; Qiu, Yin-Long; Hilu, Khidir W; Davis, Charles C; Sanderson, Michael J; Beaman, Reed S; Olmstead, Richard G; Judd, Walter S; Donoghue, Michael J; Soltis, Pamela S

    2011-04-01

    Recent analyses employing up to five genes have provided numerous insights into angiosperm phylogeny, but many relationships have remained unresolved or poorly supported. In the hope of improving our understanding of angiosperm phylogeny, we expanded sampling of taxa and genes beyond previous analyses. We conducted two primary analyses based on 640 species representing 330 families. The first included 25260 aligned base pairs (bp) from 17 genes (representing all three plant genomes, i.e., nucleus, plastid, and mitochondrion). The second included 19846 aligned bp from 13 genes (representing only the nucleus and plastid). Many important questions of deep-level relationships in the nonmonocot angiosperms have now been resolved with strong support. Amborellaceae, Nymphaeales, and Austrobaileyales are successive sisters to the remaining angiosperms (Mesangiospermae), which are resolved into Chloranthales + Magnoliidae as sister to Monocotyledoneae + [Ceratophyllaceae + Eudicotyledoneae]. Eudicotyledoneae contains a basal grade subtending Gunneridae. Within Gunneridae, Gunnerales are sister to the remainder (Pentapetalae), which comprises (1) Superrosidae, consisting of Rosidae (including Vitaceae) and Saxifragales; and (2) Superasteridae, comprising Berberidopsidales, Santalales, Caryophyllales, Asteridae, and, based on this study, Dilleniaceae (although other recent analyses disagree with this placement). Within the major subclades of Pentapetalae, most deep-level relationships are resolved with strong support. Our analyses confirm that with large amounts of sequence data, most deep-level relationships within the angiosperms can be resolved. We anticipate that this well-resolved angiosperm tree will be of broad utility for many areas of biology, including physiology, ecology, paleobiology, and genomics.

  17. A supertree approach to shorebird phylogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gavin H

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Order Charadriiformes (shorebirds is an ideal model group in which to study a wide range of behavioural, ecological and macroevolutionary processes across species. However, comparative studies depend on phylogeny to control for the effects of shared evolutionary history. Although numerous hypotheses have been presented for subsets of the Charadriiformes none to date include all recognised species. Here we use the matrix representation with parsimony method to produce the first fully inclusive supertree of Charadriiformes. We also provide preliminary estimates of ages for all nodes in the tree. Results Three main lineages are revealed: i the plovers and allies; ii the gulls and allies; and iii the sandpipers and allies. The relative position of these clades is unresolved in the strict consensus tree but a 50% majority-rule consensus tree indicates that the sandpiper clade is sister group to the gulls and allies whilst the plover group is placed at the base of the tree. The overall topology is highly consistent with recent molecular hypotheses of shorebird phylogeny. Conclusion The supertree hypothesis presented herein is (to our knowledge the only complete phylogenetic hypothesis of all extant shorebirds. Despite concerns over the robustness of supertrees (see Discussion, we believe that it provides a valuable framework for testing numerous evolutionary hypotheses relating to the diversity of behaviour, ecology and life-history of the Charadriiformes.

  18. Molecular phylogeny of the Siphonocladales (Chlorophyta: Cladophorophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leliaert, Frederik; De Clerck, Olivier; Verbruggen, Heroen; Boedeker, Christian; Coppejans, Eric

    2007-09-01

    The Siphonocladales are tropical to warm-temperate, marine green macro-algae characterized by a wide variety of thallus morphologies, ranging from branched filaments to pseudo-parenchymatous plants. Phylogenetic analyses of partial large subunit (LSU) rDNA sequences sampled from 166 isolates revealed nine well-supported siphonocladalean clades. Analyses of a concatenated dataset of small subunit (SSU) and partial LSU rDNA sequences greatly clarified the phylogeny of the Siphonocladales. However, the position of the root of the Siphonocladales could not be determined unambiguously, as outgroup rooting and molecular clock rooting resulted in a different root placement. Different phylogenetic methods (likelihood, parsimony and distance) yielded similar tree topologies with comparable internal node resolution. Likewise, analyses under more realistic models of sequence evolution, taking into account differences in evolution between stem and loop regions of rRNA, did not differ markedly from analyses using standard four-state models. The molecular phylogeny revealed that all siphonocladalean architectures may be derived from a single Cladophora-like ancestor. Parallel and convergent evolution of various morphological characters (including those traditionally employed to circumscribe the families and genera) have occurred in the Siphonocladales. Consequently, incongruence with traditional classifications, including non-monophyly in all families and most genera, was shown.

  19. Dated Plant Phylogenies Resolve Neogene Climate and Landscape Evolution in the Cape Floristic Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Hoffmann

    Full Text Available In the context of molecularly-dated phylogenies, inferences informed by ancestral habitat reconstruction can yield valuable insights into the origins of biomes, palaeoenvironments and landforms. In this paper, we use dated phylogenies of 12 plant clades from the Cape Floristic Region (CFR in southern Africa to test hypotheses of Neogene climatic and geomorphic evolution. Our combined dataset for the CFR strengthens and refines previous palaeoenvironmental reconstructions based on a sparse, mostly offshore fossil record. Our reconstructions show remarkable consistency across all 12 clades with regard to both the types of environments identified as ancestral, and the timing of shifts to alternative conditions. They reveal that Early Miocene land surfaces of the CFR were wetter than at present and were dominated by quartzitic substrata. These conditions continue to characterize the higher-elevation settings of the Cape Fold Belt, where they have fostered the persistence of ancient fynbos lineages. The Middle Miocene (13-17 Ma saw the development of perennial to weakly-seasonal arid conditions, with the strongly seasonal rainfall regime of the west coast arising ~6.5-8 Ma. Although the Late Miocene may have seen some exposure of the underlying shale substrata, the present-day substrate diversity of the CFR lowlands was shaped by Pliocene-Pleistocene events. Particularly important was renewed erosion, following the post-African II uplift episode, and the reworking of sediments on the coastal platform as a consequence of marine transgressions and tectonic uplift. These changes facilitated adaptive radiations in some, but not all, lineages studied.

  20. High-performance mass storage system for workstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, T.; Tang, Y.; Gupta, L.; Cooperman, S.

    1993-01-01

    Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) workstations and Personnel Computers (PC) are very popular tools for office automation, command and control, scientific analysis, database management, and many other applications. However, when using Input/Output (I/O) intensive applications, the RISC workstations and PC's are often overburdened with the tasks of collecting, staging, storing, and distributing data. Also, by using standard high-performance peripherals and storage devices, the I/O function can still be a common bottleneck process. Therefore, the high-performance mass storage system, developed by Loral AeroSys' Independent Research and Development (IR&D) engineers, can offload a RISC workstation of I/O related functions and provide high-performance I/O functions and external interfaces. The high-performance mass storage system has the capabilities to ingest high-speed real-time data, perform signal or image processing, and stage, archive, and distribute the data. This mass storage system uses a hierarchical storage structure, thus reducing the total data storage cost, while maintaining high-I/O performance. The high-performance mass storage system is a network of low-cost parallel processors and storage devices. The nodes in the network have special I/O functions such as: SCSI controller, Ethernet controller, gateway controller, RS232 controller, IEEE488 controller, and digital/analog converter. The nodes are interconnected through high-speed direct memory access links to form a network. The topology of the network is easily reconfigurable to maximize system throughput for various applications. This high-performance mass storage system takes advantage of a 'busless' architecture for maximum expandability. The mass storage system consists of magnetic disks, a WORM optical disk jukebox, and an 8mm helical scan tape to form a hierarchical storage structure. Commonly used files are kept in the magnetic disk for fast retrieval. The optical disks are used as archive

  1. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '16 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center, Stuttgart (HLRS) 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Kröner, Dietmar; Resch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in supercomputer simulation. It includes the latest findings from leading researchers using systems from the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) in 2016. The reports cover all fields of computational science and engineering ranging from CFD to computational physics and from chemistry to computer science with a special emphasis on industrially relevant applications. Presenting findings of one of Europe’s leading systems, this volume covers a wide variety of applications that deliver a high level of sustained performance. The book covers the main methods in high-performance computing. Its outstanding results in achieving the best performance for production codes are of particular interest for both scientists and engineers. The book comes with a wealth of color illustrations and tables of results.

  2. Vaginal reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients.

  3. High performance computing in science and engineering '09: transactions of the High Performance Computing Center, Stuttgart (HLRS) 2009

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nagel, Wolfgang E; Kröner, Dietmar; Resch, Michael

    2010-01-01

    ...), NIC/JSC (J¨ u lich), and LRZ (Munich). As part of that strategic initiative, in May 2009 already NIC/JSC has installed the first phase of the GCS HPC Tier-0 resources, an IBM Blue Gene/P with roughly 300.000 Cores, this time in J¨ u lich, With that, the GCS provides the most powerful high-performance computing infrastructure in Europe alread...

  4. Mitogenomic phylogeny of cone snails endemic to Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abalde, Samuel; Tenorio, Manuel J; Afonso, Carlos M L; Zardoya, Rafael

    2017-07-01

    Cone snails attain in Senegal one of their highest peaks of species diversity throughout the continental coast of Western Africa. A total of 15 endemic species have been described, all placed in the genus Lautoconus. While there is ample data regarding the morphology of the shell and the radular tooth of these species, virtually nothing is known regarding the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of one of the most endangered groups of cones. In this work, we determined the complete or near-complete (only lacking the control region) mitochondrial (mt) genomes of 17 specimens representing 11 endemic species (Lautoconus belairensis, Lautoconus bruguieresi, Lautoconus cacao, Lautoconus cloveri, Lautoconus cf. echinophilus, Lautoconus guinaicus, Lautoconus hybridus, Lautoconus senegalensis, Lautoconus mercator, Lautoconus taslei, and Lautoconus unifasciatus). We also sequenced the complete mt genome of Lautoconus guanche from the Canary Islands, which has been related to the cones endemic to Senegal. All mt genomes share the same gene arrangement, which conforms to the consensus reported for Conidae, Neogastropoda and Caenogastropoda. Phylogenetic analyses using probabilistic methods recovered three major lineages, whose divergence coincided in time with sea level and ocean current changes as well as temperature fluctuations during the Messinian salinity crisis and the Plio-Pleistocene transition. Furthermore, the three lineages corresponded to distinct types of radular tooth (robust, small, and elongated), suggesting that dietary specialization could be an additional evolutionary driver in the diversification of the cones endemic to Senegal. The reconstructed phylogeny showed several cases of phenotypic convergence (cryptic species) and questions the validity of some species (ecotypes or phenotypic plasticity), both results having important taxonomic and conservation consequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Highlighting High Performance: Clearview Elementary School, Hanover, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-08-01

    Case study on high performance building features of Clearview Elementary School in Hanover, Pennsylvania. Clearview Elementary School in Hanover, Pennsylvania, is filled with natural light, not only in classrooms but also in unexpected, and traditionally dark, places like stairwells and hallways. The result is enhanced learning. Recent scientific studies conducted by the California Board for Energy Efficiency, involving 21,000 students, show test scores were 15% to 26% higher in classrooms with daylighting. Clearview's ventilation system also helps students and teachers stay healthy, alert, and focused on learning. The school's superior learning environment comes with annual average energy savings of about 40% over a conventional school. For example, with so much daylight, the school requires about a third less energy for electric lighting than a typical school. The school's innovative geothermal heating and cooling system uses the constant temperature of the Earth to cool and heat the building. The building and landscape designs work together to enhance solar heating in the winter, summer cooling, and daylighting all year long. Students and teachers have the opportunity to learn about high-performance design by studying their own school. At Clearview, the Hanover Public School District has shown that designing a school to save energy is affordable. Even with its many innovative features, the school's $6.35 million price tag is just $150,000 higher than average for elementary schools in Pennsylvania. Projected annual energy cost savings of approximately $18,000 mean a payback in 9 years. Reasonable construction costs demonstrate that other school districts can build schools that conserve energy, protect natural resources, and provide the educational and health benefits that come with high-performance buildings.

  6. Understanding and Improving High-Performance I/O Subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghazawi, Tarek A.; Frieder, Gideon; Clark, A. James

    1996-01-01

    This research program has been conducted in the framework of the NASA Earth and Space Science (ESS) evaluations led by Dr. Thomas Sterling. In addition to the many important research findings for NASA and the prestigious publications, the program has helped orienting the doctoral research program of two students towards parallel input/output in high-performance computing. Further, the experimental results in the case of the MasPar were very useful and helpful to MasPar with which the P.I. has had many interactions with the technical management. The contributions of this program are drawn from three experimental studies conducted on different high-performance computing testbeds/platforms, and therefore presented in 3 different segments as follows: 1. Evaluating the parallel input/output subsystem of a NASA high-performance computing testbeds, namely the MasPar MP- 1 and MP-2; 2. Characterizing the physical input/output request patterns for NASA ESS applications, which used the Beowulf platform; and 3. Dynamic scheduling techniques for hiding I/O latency in parallel applications such as sparse matrix computations. This study also has been conducted on the Intel Paragon and has also provided an experimental evaluation for the Parallel File System (PFS) and parallel input/output on the Paragon. This report is organized as follows. The summary of findings discusses the results of each of the aforementioned 3 studies. Three appendices, each containing a key scholarly research paper that details the work in one of the studies are included.

  7. High performance APCS conceptual design and evaluation scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, N.; Liekhus, K.; Chambers, A.; Anderson, G.

    1998-02-01

    This Air Pollution Control System (APCS) Conceptual Design and Evaluation study was conducted to evaluate a high-performance (APC) system for minimizing air emissions from mixed waste thermal treatment systems. Seven variations of high-performance APCS designs were conceptualized using several design objectives. One of the system designs was selected for detailed process simulation using ASPEN PLUS to determine material and energy balances and evaluate performance. Installed system capital costs were also estimated. Sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate the incremental cost and benefit of added carbon adsorber beds for mercury control, specific catalytic reduction for NO{sub x} control, and offgas retention tanks for holding the offgas until sample analysis is conducted to verify that the offgas meets emission limits. Results show that the high-performance dry-wet APCS can easily meet all expected emission limits except for possibly mercury. The capability to achieve high levels of mercury control (potentially necessary for thermally treating some DOE mixed streams) could not be validated using current performance data for mercury control technologies. The engineering approach and ASPEN PLUS modeling tool developed and used in this study identified APC equipment and system performance, size, cost, and other issues that are not yet resolved. These issues need to be addressed in feasibility studies and conceptual designs for new facilities or for determining how to modify existing facilities to meet expected emission limits. The ASPEN PLUS process simulation with current and refined input assumptions and calculations can be used to provide system performance information for decision-making, identifying best options, estimating costs, reducing the potential for emission violations, providing information needed for waste flow analysis, incorporating new APCS technologies in existing designs, or performing facility design and permitting activities.

  8. Inferring the shallow phylogeny of true salamanders (Salamandra) by multiple phylogenomic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ariel; Burgon, James D; Lyra, Mariana; Irisarri, Iker; Baurain, Denis; Blaustein, Leon; Göçmen, Bayram; Künzel, Sven; Mable, Barbara K; Nolte, Arne W; Veith, Michael; Steinfartz, Sebastian; Elmer, Kathryn R; Philippe, Hervé; Vences, Miguel

    2017-10-01

    The rise of high-throughput sequencing techniques provides the unprecedented opportunity to analyse controversial phylogenetic relationships in great depth, but also introduces a risk of being misinterpreted by high node support values influenced by unevenly distributed missing data or unrealistic model assumptions. Here, we use three largely independent phylogenomic data sets to reconstruct the controversial phylogeny of true salamanders of the genus Salamandra, a group of amphibians providing an intriguing model to study the evolution of aposematism and viviparity. For all six species of the genus Salamandra, and two outgroup species from its sister genus Lyciasalamandra, we used RNA sequencing (RNAseq) and restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) to obtain data for: (1) 3070 nuclear protein-coding genes from RNAseq; (2) 7440 loci obtained by RADseq; and (3) full mitochondrial genomes. The RNAseq and RADseq data sets retrieved fully congruent topologies when each of them was analyzed in a concatenation approach, with high support for: (1) S. infraimmaculata being sister group to all other Salamandra species; (2) S. algira being sister to S. salamandra; (3) these two species being the sister group to a clade containing S. atra, S. corsica and S. lanzai; and (4) the alpine species S. atra and S. lanzai being sister taxa. The phylogeny inferred from the mitochondrial genome sequences differed from these results, most notably by strongly supporting a clade containing S. atra and S. corsica as sister taxa. A different placement of S. corsica was also retrieved when analysing the RNAseq and RADseq data under species tree approaches. Closer examination of gene trees derived from RNAseq revealed that only a low number of them supported each of the alternative placements of S. atra. Furthermore, gene jackknife support for the S. atra - S. lanzai node stabilized only with very large concatenated data sets. The phylogeny of true salamanders thus provides a

  9. Advanced Modified High Performance Synthetic Jet Actuator with Curved Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The advanced modified high performance synthetic jet actuator with optimized curvature shape chamber (ASJA-M) is a synthetic jet actuator (SJA) with a lower volume reservoir or chamber. A curved chamber is used, instead of the conventional cylinder chamber, to reduce the dead volume of the jet chamber and increase the efficiency of the synthetic jet actuator. The shape of the curvature corresponds to the maximum displacement (deformation) profile of the electroactive diaphragm. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the ASJA-M will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric actuators.

  10. IBM SP high-performance networking with a GRF.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, J.P.

    1999-05-27

    Increasing use of highly distributed applications, demand for faster data exchange, and highly parallel applications can push the limits of conventional external networking for IBM SP sites. In technical computing applications we have observed a growing use of a pipeline of hosts and networks collaborating to collect, process, and visualize large amounts of realtime data. The GRF, a high-performance IP switch from Ascend and IBM, is the first backbone network switch to offer a media card that can directly connect to an SP Switch. This enables switch attached hosts in an SP complex to communicate at near SP Switch speeds with other GRF attached hosts and networks.

  11. Strategy Guideline: Advanced Construction Documentation Recommendations for High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukachko, A.; Gates, C.; Straube, J.

    2011-12-01

    As whole house energy efficiency increases, new houses become less like conventional houses that were built in the past. New materials and new systems require greater coordination and communication between industry stakeholders. The Guideline for Construction Documents for High Performance Housing provides advice to address this need. The reader will be presented with four changes that are recommended to achieve improvements in energy efficiency, durability and health in Building America houses: create coordination drawings, improve specifications, improve detail drawings, and review drawings and prepare a Quality Control Plan.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Boron Trifluoride Doped High Performance Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Basavaiah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report simple synthesis of boron trifluoride (BF3 doped defect free high performance polyaniline (HPPANI in two step method. Firstly, HPPANI was prepared via self-stabilization dispersion polymerization method in a heterogeneous reaction medium. Second step involves doping of emeraldine base form of HPPANI with boron trifluoride under reduced vacuum. The resultants BF3 doped HPPANI have been well characterized by using UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and thermogravimetry. The spectroscopic data indicated that the interaction between HPPANI and BF3.Thermogravimetry studies revealed that the BF3 doping improved the thermal stability of defects free PANI.

  13. High performance, durable polymers including poly(phenylene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Cy; Pratt, Harry; Anderson, Travis Mark

    2017-02-28

    The present invention relates to functionalized polymers including a poly(phenylene) structure. In some embodiments, the polymers and copolymers of the invention include a highly localized concentration of acidic moieties, which facilitate proton transport and conduction through networks formed from these polymers. In addition, the polymers can include functional moieties, such as electron-withdrawing moieties, to protect the polymeric backbone, thereby extending its durability. Such enhanced proton transport and durability can be beneficial for any high performance platform that employs proton exchange polymeric membranes, such as in fuel cells or flow batteries.

  14. Alternative High Performance Polymers for Ablative Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghozian, Tane; Stackpoole, Mairead; Gonzales, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Ablative thermal protection systems are commonly used as protection from the intense heat during re-entry of a space vehicle and have been used successfully on many missions including Stardust and Mars Science Laboratory both of which used PICA - a phenolic based ablator. Historically, phenolic resin has served as the ablative polymer for many TPS systems. However, it has limitations in both processing and properties such as char yield, glass transition temperature and char stability. Therefore alternative high performance polymers are being considered including cyanate ester resin, polyimide, and polybenzoxazine. Thermal and mechanical properties of these resin systems were characterized and compared with phenolic resin.

  15. High-Performance Management Practices and Employee Outcomes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristini, Annalisa; Eriksson, Tor; Pozzoli, Dario

    High-performance work practices are frequently considered to have positive effects on corporate performance, but what do they do for employees? After showing that organizational innovation is indeed positively associated with firm performance, we investigate whether high-involvement work practices...... are associ- ated with higher wages, changes in wage inequality and workforce composition, using data from a survey directed at Danish private sector firms matched with linked employer-employee data. We also examine whether the relationship be- tween high-involvement work practices and employee outcomes...

  16. High-Performance Management Practices and Employee Outcomes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristini, Annalisa; Eriksson, Tor; Pozzoli, Dario

    2013-01-01

    High-performance work practices are frequently considered to have positive effects on corporate performance, but what do they do for employees? After assessing the correlation between organizational innovation and firm performance, this article investigates whether high-involvement work practices...... affect workers in terms of wages, wage inequality and workforce composition. The analysis is based on a survey directed at Danish firms matched with linked employer–employee data and also examines whether the relationship between high-involvement work practices and employee outcomes is affected...

  17. High performance protection circuit for power electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudoran, Cristian D.; Dǎdârlat, Dorin N.; Toşa, Nicoleta; Mişan, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present a high performance protection circuit designed for the power electronics applications where the load currents can increase rapidly and exceed the maximum allowed values, like in the case of high frequency induction heating inverters or high frequency plasma generators. The protection circuit is based on a microcontroller and can be adapted for use on single-phase or three-phase power systems. Its versatility comes from the fact that the circuit can communicate with the protected system, having the role of a "sensor" or it can interrupt the power supply for protection, in this case functioning as an external, independent protection circuit.

  18. High performance hybrid magnetic structure for biotechnology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, David E [El Cerrito, CA; Pollard, Martin J [El Cerrito, CA; Elkin, Christopher J [San Ramon, CA

    2009-02-03

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetic or magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are further improvements to aspects of the hybrid magnetic structure, including additional elements and for adapting the use of the hybrid magnetic structure for use in biotechnology and high throughput processes.

  19. High performance deformable image registration algorithms for manycore processors

    CERN Document Server

    Shackleford, James; Sharp, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    High Performance Deformable Image Registration Algorithms for Manycore Processors develops highly data-parallel image registration algorithms suitable for use on modern multi-core architectures, including graphics processing units (GPUs). Focusing on deformable registration, we show how to develop data-parallel versions of the registration algorithm suitable for execution on the GPU. Image registration is the process of aligning two or more images into a common coordinate frame and is a fundamental step to be able to compare or fuse data obtained from different sensor measurements. E

  20. High-Performance Tiled WMS and KML Web Server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2007-01-01

    This software is an Apache 2.0 module implementing a high-performance map server to support interactive map viewers and virtual planet client software. It can be used in applications that require access to very-high-resolution geolocated images, such as GIS, virtual planet applications, and flight simulators. It serves Web Map Service (WMS) requests that comply with a given request grid from an existing tile dataset. It also generates the KML super-overlay configuration files required to access the WMS image tiles.

  1. Cogset : A High-Performance MapReduce Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Viken Valvåg, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    The papers of this thesis are not available in Munin: 1. Steffen Viken Valvåg and Dag Johansen: 'Oivos : simple and efficient distributed data processing' (2008). In Proceedings of the 2008 Tenth IEEE International Conference on High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC 2008), pages 113– 122. IEEE Computer Society. Available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/HPCC.2008.105 2. Steffen Viken Valvåg and Dag Johansen: 'Update Maps : a new abstraction for High-Throughput Batch processing' (200...

  2. Fundamentals of Modeling, Data Assimilation, and High-performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    This lecture will introduce the concepts of modeling, data assimilation and high- performance computing as it relates to the study of atmospheric composition. The lecture will work from basic definitions and will strive to provide a framework for thinking about development and application of models and data assimilation systems. It will not provide technical or algorithmic information, leaving that to textbooks, technical reports, and ultimately scientific journals. References to a number of textbooks and papers will be provided as a gateway to the literature.

  3. High-performance silicon photonics technology for telecommunications applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Koji; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Nishi, Hidetaka; Kou, Rai; Hiraki, Tatsurou; Takeda, Kotaro; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko; Wada, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2014-04-01

    By way of a brief review of Si photonics technology, we show that significant improvements in device performance are necessary for practical telecommunications applications. In order to improve device performance in Si photonics, we have developed a Si-Ge-silica monolithic integration platform, on which compact Si-Ge-based modulators/detectors and silica-based high-performance wavelength filters are monolithically integrated. The platform features low-temperature silica film deposition, which cannot damage Si-Ge-based active devices. Using this platform, we have developed various integrated photonic devices for broadband telecommunications applications.

  4. High performance protection circuit for power electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tudoran, Cristian D., E-mail: cristian.tudoran@itim-cj.ro; Dădârlat, Dorin N.; Toşa, Nicoleta; Mişan, Ioan [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat, PO 5 Box 700, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    In this paper we present a high performance protection circuit designed for the power electronics applications where the load currents can increase rapidly and exceed the maximum allowed values, like in the case of high frequency induction heating inverters or high frequency plasma generators. The protection circuit is based on a microcontroller and can be adapted for use on single-phase or three-phase power systems. Its versatility comes from the fact that the circuit can communicate with the protected system, having the role of a “sensor” or it can interrupt the power supply for protection, in this case functioning as an external, independent protection circuit.

  5. Toward High Performance Photovoltaic Cells based on Conjugated Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0103 Toward High Performance Photovoltaic Cells based on Conjugated Polymers Kung-Hwa Wei National Chiao Tung University Final...Conjugated Polymers 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-15-1-4113 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Kung-Hwa Wei 5d.  PROJECT...gap polymer with good packing order as the active layer for a single-junction photovoltaic device. The light absorptions for the small molecule and the

  6. Phylogeny mandalas for illustrating the Tree of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masami

    2017-12-01

    A circular phylogeny with photos or drawings of species is named a phylogeny mandala. This is one of the ways for illustrating the Tree of Life, and is suitable to show visually how the biodiversity has developed in the course of evolution as clarified by the molecular phylogenetics. To demonstrate the recent progress of molecular phylogenetics, six phylogeny mandalas for various taxonomic groups of life were presented; i.e., (1) Eukaryota, (2) Metazoa, (3) Hexapoda, (4) Tetrapoda, (5) Eutheria, and (6) Primates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Coloration mechanisms and phylogeny of Morpho butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, M A; Yoshioka, S; Liu, C; Stavenga, D G

    2016-12-15

    Morpho butterflies are universally admired for their iridescent blue coloration, which is due to nanostructured wing scales. We performed a comparative study on the coloration of 16 Morpho species, investigating the morphological, spectral and spatial scattering properties of the differently organized wing scales. In numerous previous studies, the bright blue Morpho coloration has been fully attributed to the multi-layered ridges of the cover scales' upper laminae, but we found that the lower laminae of the cover and ground scales play an important additional role, by acting as optical thin film reflectors. We conclude that Morpho coloration is a subtle combination of overlapping pigmented and/or unpigmented scales, multilayer systems, optical thin films and sometimes undulated scale surfaces. Based on the scales' architecture and their organization, five main groups can be distinguished within the genus Morpho, largely agreeing with the accepted phylogeny. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Future of phylogeny in HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Bluma G; Wainberg, Mark A

    2013-07-01

    The success of the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial has led to revisions in HIV-1 treatment guidelines. Antiretroviral therapy may reduce the risk of HIV-1 transmissions at the population level. The design of successful treatment as prevention interventions will be predicated on a comprehensive understanding of the spatial, temporal, and biological dynamics of heterosexual men who have sex with men and intravenous drug user epidemics. Viral phylogenetics can capture the underlying structure of transmission networks based on the genetic interrelatedness of viral sequences and cluster networks that could not be otherwise identified. This article describes the phylogenetic expansion of the Montreal men who have sex with men epidemic over the last decade. High rates of coclustering of primary infections are associated with 1 infection leading to 13 onward transmissions. Phylogeny substantiates the role of primary and recent stage infection in transmission dynamics, underlying the importance of timely diagnosis and immediate antiretroviral therapy initiation to avert transmission cascades.

  9. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy On This Page What is breast reconstruction? How ... are some new developments in breast reconstruction after mastectomy? What is breast reconstruction? Many women who have ...

  10. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... to make reconstruction easier. If you will have breast reconstruction later, your surgeon will remove enough skin ...

  11. Molecular phylogeny of the neritidae (gastropoda: neritimorpha) based on the mitochondrial genes cytochrome oxidase i (coi) and 16s rrna

    OpenAIRE

    Quintero Galvis, Julián Fernando; Castro, Lyda Raquel

    2013-01-01

    The family Neritidae has representatives in tropical and subtropical regions that occur in a variety of environments, and its known fossil record dates back to the late Cretaceous. However there have been few studies of molecular phylogeny in this family. We performed a phylogenetic reconstruction of the family Neritidae using the COI (722 bp) and the 16S rRNA (559 bp) regions of the mitochondrial genome. Neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference were performed.The best phylo...

  12. High-Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeschele, Marc [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chitwood, Rick [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); German, Alea [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Weitzel, Elizabeth [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-30

    Duct thermal losses and air leakage have long been recognized as prime culprits in the degradation of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system efficiency. Both the U.S. Department of Energy’s Zero Energy Ready Home program and California’s proposed 2016 Title 24 Residential Energy Efficiency Standards require that ducts be installed within conditioned space or that other measures be taken to provide similar improvements in delivery effectiveness (DE). Pacific Gas & Electric Company commissioned a study to evaluate ducts in conditioned space and high-performance attics (HPAs) in support of the proposed codes and standards enhancements included in California’s 2016 Title 24 Residential Energy Efficiency Standards. The goal was to work with a select group of builders to design and install high-performance duct (HPD) systems, such as ducts in conditioned space (DCS), in one or more of their homes and to obtain test data to verify the improvement in DE compared to standard practice. Davis Energy Group (DEG) helped select the builders and led a team that provided information about HPD strategies to them. DEG also observed the construction process, completed testing, and collected cost data.

  13. High performance platinum single atom electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Jiao, Menggai; Lu, Lanlu; Barkholtz, Heather M.; Li, Yuping; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Luhua; Wu, Zhijian; Liu, Di-Jia; Zhuang, Lin; Ma, Chao; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dangsheng; Song, Ping; Xing, Wei; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Zheng; Sun, Gongquan

    2017-07-01

    For the large-scale sustainable implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells in vehicles, high-performance electrocatalysts with low platinum consumption are desirable for use as cathode material during the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Here we report a carbon black-supported cost-effective, efficient and durable platinum single-atom electrocatalyst with carbon monoxide/methanol tolerance for the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. The acidic single-cell with such a catalyst as cathode delivers high performance, with power density up to 680 mW cm-2 at 80 °C with a low platinum loading of 0.09 mgPt cm-2, corresponding to a platinum utilization of 0.13 gPt kW-1 in the fuel cell. Good fuel cell durability is also observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that the main effective sites on such platinum single-atom electrocatalysts are single-pyridinic-nitrogen-atom-anchored single-platinum-atom centres, which are tolerant to carbon monoxide/methanol, but highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  14. High-performance analysis of filtered semantic graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buluc, Aydin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fox, Armando [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gilbert, John R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Kamil, Shoaib A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lugowski, Adam [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Oliker, Leonid [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Samuel W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    High performance is a crucial consideration when executing a complex analytic query on a massive semantic graph. In a semantic graph, vertices and edges carry "attributes" of various types. Analytic queries on semantic graphs typically depend on the values of these attributes; thus, the computation must either view the graph through a filter that passes only those individual vertices and edges of interest, or else must first materialize a subgraph or subgraphs consisting of only the vertices and edges of interest. The filtered approach is superior due to its generality, ease of use, and memory efficiency, but may carry a performance cost. In the Knowledge Discovery Toolbox (KDT), a Python library for parallel graph computations, the user writes filters in a high-level language, but those filters result in relatively low performance due to the bottleneck of having to call into the Python interpreter for each edge. In this work, we use the Selective Embedded JIT Specialization (SEJITS) approach to automatically translate filters defined by programmers into a lower-level efficiency language, bypassing the upcall into Python. We evaluate our approach by comparing it with the high-performance C++ /MPI Combinatorial BLAS engine, and show that the productivity gained by using a high-level filtering language comes without sacrificing performance.

  15. High performance computing and communications: FY 1995 implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-04-01

    The High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program was formally established following passage of the High Performance Computing Act of 1991 signed on December 9, 1991. Ten federal agencies in collaboration with scientists and managers from US industry, universities, and laboratories have developed the HPCC Program to meet the challenges of advancing computing and associated communications technologies and practices. This plan provides a detailed description of the agencies` HPCC implementation plans for FY 1994 and FY 1995. This Implementation Plan contains three additional sections. Section 3 provides an overview of the HPCC Program definition and organization. Section 4 contains a breakdown of the five major components of the HPCC Program, with an emphasis on the overall directions and milestones planned for each one. Section 5 provides a detailed look at HPCC Program activities within each agency. Although the Department of Education is an official HPCC agency, its current funding and reporting of crosscut activities goes through the Committee on Education and Health Resources, not the HPCC Program. For this reason the Implementation Plan covers nine HPCC agencies.

  16. High Performance Activity Practices in Small Firms in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela ŢUŢUEANU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High Performance Activity Practices in Small Firms in Romania Abstract: High performance activity practices (HPAPs are human resource management activities aimed at stimulating employee and organisational performance. The application of HPAPs is not widespread in small organisations. We examine whether the implementation of coherent bundles of HPAPs (aimed at employee ability, employee motivation or at the opportunity to perform depends on the scarcity of resources, as reflected in the size of the company, and on strategic decision-making in small firms related to the owner’s expertise and attitudes. In our research, a total of 224 employees from 50 small organisations were asked to rate the presence of HPAPs in their organisation. These averaged perceptions were linked to information provided by the owner–managers on the size of their firm and their own expertise and attitudes. The findings support that smaller but coherent bundles of HPAPs can be found in small organisations and that the implementation of these bundles depends on available resources, strategic decision-making and the combination of the two. These findings highlight the need to integrate the notions of resource poverty and strategic decision-making to understand the uptake of bundles of HPAPs within small firms.

  17. High-performance teams and the physician leader: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majmudar, Aalap; Jain, Anshu K; Chaudry, Joseph; Schwartz, Richard W

    2010-01-01

    The complexity of health care delivery within the United States continues to escalate in an exponential fashion driven by an explosion of medical technology, an ever-expanding research enterprise, and a growing emphasis on evidence-based practices. The delivery of care occurs on a continuum that spans across multiple disciplines, now requiring complex coordination of care through the use of novel clinical teams. The use of teams permeates the health care industry and has done so for many years, but confusion about the structure and role of teams in many organizations contributes to limited effectiveness and suboptimal outcomes. Teams are an essential component of graduate medical education training programs. The health care industry's relative lack of focus regarding the fundamentals of teamwork theory has contributed to ineffective team leadership at the physician level. As a follow-up to our earlier manuscripts on teamwork, this article clarifies a model of teamwork and discusses its application to high-performance teams in health care organizations. Emphasized in this discussion is the role played by the physician leader in ensuring team effectiveness. By educating health care professionals on the fundamentals of high-performance teamwork, we hope to stimulate the development of future physician leaders who use proven teamwork principles to achieve the goals of trainee education and excellent patient care. Copyright 2010 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stretchable and High-Performance Supercapacitors with Crumpled Graphene Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Jianfeng; Cao, Changyong; Feng, Yaying; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2014-10-01

    Fabrication of unconventional energy storage devices with high stretchability and performance is challenging, but critical to practical operations of fully power-independent stretchable electronics. While supercapacitors represent a promising candidate for unconventional energy-storage devices, existing stretchable supercapacitors are limited by their low stretchability, complicated fabrication process, and high cost. Here, we report a simple and low-cost method to fabricate extremely stretchable and high-performance electrodes for supercapacitors based on new crumpled-graphene papers. Electrolyte-mediated-graphene paper bonded on a compliant substrate can be crumpled into self-organized patterns by harnessing mechanical instabilities in the graphene paper. As the substrate is stretched, the crumpled patterns unfold, maintaining high reliability of the graphene paper under multiple cycles of large deformation. Supercapacitor electrodes based on the crumpled graphene papers exhibit a unique combination of high stretchability (e.g., linear strain ~300%, areal strain ~800%), high electrochemical performance (e.g., specific capacitance ~196 F g-1), and high reliability (e.g., over 1000 stretch/relax cycles). An all-solid-state supercapacitor capable of large deformation is further fabricated to demonstrate practical applications of the crumpled-graphene-paper electrodes. Our method and design open a wide range of opportunities for manufacturing future energy-storage devices with desired deformability together with high performance.

  19. Mediaprocessors in medical imaging for high performance and flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managuli, Ravi; Kim, Yongmin

    2002-05-01

    New high performance programmable processors, called mediaprocessors, have been emerging since the early 1990s for various digital media applications, such as digital TV, set-top boxes, desktop video conferencing, and digital camcorders. Modern mediaprocessors, e.g., TI's TMS320C64x and Hitachi/Equator Technologies MAP-CA, can offer high performance utilizing both instruction-level and data-level parallelism. During this decade, with continued performance improvement and cost reduction, we believe that the mediaprocessors will become a preferred choice in designing imaging and video systems due to their flexibility in incorporating new algorithms and applications via programming and faster-time-to-market. In this paper, we will evaluate the suitability of these mediaprocessors in medical imaging. We will review the core routines of several medical imaging modalities, such as ultrasound and DR, and present how these routines can be mapped to mediaprocessors and their resultant performance. We will analyze the architecture of several leading mediaprocessors. By carefully mapping key imaging routines, such as 2D convolution, unsharp masking, and 2D FFT, to the mediaprocessor, we have been able to achieve comparable (if not better) performance to that of traditional hardwired approaches. Thus, we believe that future medical imaging systems will benefit greatly from these advanced mediaprocessors, offering significantly increased flexibility and adaptability, reducing the time-to-market, and improving the cost/performance ratio compared to the existing systems while meeting the high computing requirements.

  20. Stretchable and High-Performance Supercapacitors with Crumpled Graphene Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Jianfeng; Cao, Changyong; Feng, Yaying; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2014-01-01

    Fabrication of unconventional energy storage devices with high stretchability and performance is challenging, but critical to practical operations of fully power-independent stretchable electronics. While supercapacitors represent a promising candidate for unconventional energy-storage devices, existing stretchable supercapacitors are limited by their low stretchability, complicated fabrication process, and high cost. Here, we report a simple and low-cost method to fabricate extremely stretchable and high-performance electrodes for supercapacitors based on new crumpled-graphene papers. Electrolyte-mediated-graphene paper bonded on a compliant substrate can be crumpled into self-organized patterns by harnessing mechanical instabilities in the graphene paper. As the substrate is stretched, the crumpled patterns unfold, maintaining high reliability of the graphene paper under multiple cycles of large deformation. Supercapacitor electrodes based on the crumpled graphene papers exhibit a unique combination of high stretchability (e.g., linear strain ~300%, areal strain ~800%), high electrochemical performance (e.g., specific capacitance ~196 F g−1), and high reliability (e.g., over 1000 stretch/relax cycles). An all-solid-state supercapacitor capable of large deformation is further fabricated to demonstrate practical applications of the crumpled-graphene-paper electrodes. Our method and design open a wide range of opportunities for manufacturing future energy-storage devices with desired deformability together with high performance. PMID:25270673

  1. A high performance SAR ADC for WLAN analog front end

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Pengfei; Yi, Bo; Wu, Bin; Wang, Han; Pu, Yilin

    2017-08-01

    A 10 bit 100 MS/s successive approximation register (SAR) analog to digital converter (ADC) for WLAN analog front end is presented. To ensure high performance and low power, we presented a method that is based on figure of merit (FOM) to obtain the optimal unit capacitance of the digital-to-analog converter (DAC) capacitor network. With this method, we obtain the minimum FOM 17.92 fJ/Conv.-step as well as the optimal unit capacitance of the DAC capacitor network 1.59 fF. What is more, to ensure high performance of the dynamic comparator, a comparator clock logic is presented. Post-simulation results in 55 nm CMOS technology show that, this 10-bit 100-MS/s ADC achieves the signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratio (SNDR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) of 61.7 dB, 63.7 dB and 72.5 dB with 1.3V supply. The ADC consumes 1.67 mW, and the active area is only 0.0162 mm2.

  2. High performance platinum single atom electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Jiao, Menggai; Lu, Lanlu; Barkholtz, Heather M.; Li, Yuping; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Luhua; Wu, Zhijian; Liu, Di-jia; Zhuang, Lin; Ma, Chao; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dangsheng; Song, Ping; Xing, Wei; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Zheng; Sun, Gongquan

    2017-01-01

    For the large-scale sustainable implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells in vehicles, high-performance electrocatalysts with low platinum consumption are desirable for use as cathode material during the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Here we report a carbon black-supported cost-effective, efficient and durable platinum single-atom electrocatalyst with carbon monoxide/methanol tolerance for the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. The acidic single-cell with such a catalyst as cathode delivers high performance, with power density up to 680 mW cm−2 at 80 °C with a low platinum loading of 0.09 mgPt cm−2, corresponding to a platinum utilization of 0.13 gPt kW−1 in the fuel cell. Good fuel cell durability is also observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that the main effective sites on such platinum single-atom electrocatalysts are single-pyridinic-nitrogen-atom-anchored single-platinum-atom centres, which are tolerant to carbon monoxide/methanol, but highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction. PMID:28737170

  3. Characterization of the behavior of ultra-high performance concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybeal, Benjamin A.

    In the past decade significant advances have been made in the field of high performance concretes. The next generation of concrete, Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC), exhibits exceptional strength and durability characteristics that make it well suited for use in highway bridge structures. This material can exhibit compressive strength of 28 ksi, tensile strength of 1.3 ksi, significant tensile toughness, elastic modulus of 7600 ksi, and minimal long-term creep or shrinkage. It can also resist freeze-thaw and scaling conditions with virtually no damage and is nearly impermeable to chloride ions. Prestressed highway bridge girders were cast from this material and tested under flexure and shear loadings. The testing of these AASHTO Type II girders containing no mild steel reinforcement indicated that UHPC, with its internal passive fiber reinforcement, could effectively be used in highway bridge girders. A large suite of material characterization tests was also completed. Based on this research, a basic structural design philosophy for bridge girder design is proposed.

  4. Mass storage: The key to success in high performance computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard R.

    1993-01-01

    There are numerous High Performance Computing & Communications Initiatives in the world today. All are determined to help solve some 'Grand Challenges' type of problem, but each appears to be dominated by the pursuit of higher and higher levels of CPU performance and interconnection bandwidth as the approach to success, without any regard to the impact of Mass Storage. My colleagues and I at Data Storage Technologies believe that all will have their performance against their goals ultimately measured by their ability to efficiently store and retrieve the 'deluge of data' created by end-users who will be using these systems to solve Scientific Grand Challenges problems, and that the issue of Mass Storage will become then the determinant of success or failure in achieving each projects goals. In today's world of High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC), the critical path to success in solving problems can only be traveled by designing and implementing Mass Storage Systems capable of storing and manipulating the truly 'massive' amounts of data associated with solving these challenges. Within my presentation I will explore this critical issue and hypothesize solutions to this problem.

  5. Nonlinear reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Yu, Yu; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Yu, Hao-Ran

    2017-12-01

    We present a direct approach to nonparametrically reconstruct the linear density field from an observed nonlinear map. We solve for the unique displacement potential consistent with the nonlinear density and positive definite coordinate transformation using a multigrid algorithm. We show that we recover the linear initial conditions up to the nonlinear scale (rδrδL>0.5 for k ≲1 h /Mpc ) with minimal computational cost. This reconstruction approach generalizes the linear displacement theory to fully nonlinear fields, potentially substantially expanding the baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift space distortions information content of dense large scale structure surveys, including for example SDSS main sample and 21 cm intensity mapping initiatives.

  6. Causal Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    suitable source of core events supporting causal reconstruction in a range of domains might be a combination of bodily - kinesthetic and simple...suggested in the previ- ous section, a good place to start might be with causal situations involving bodily - kinesthetic events or simple mechanical events...ANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(LS) tý PJIfORMIN’, CRGANIZATION !.LPDRT NUMBEK Artificial Intelligence Laboratory 545 Technology Square AIM 1403 Cambridge

  7. Phylogeny and systematics of deep-sea precious corals (Anthozoa: Octocorallia: Coralliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Tzu-Hsuan; Dai, Chang-Feng; Jeng, Ming-Shiou

    2015-03-01

    The phylogeny of Coralliidae is being increasingly studied to elucidate their evolutionary history and species delimitation due to global concerns about their conservation. Previous studies on phylogenetic relationships within Coralliidae have pointed out that the two currently recognized genera are not monophyletic and the Coralliidae should be divided into three genera. In order to provide a comprehensive revision of the taxonomy of Coralliidae, we documented 110 specimens using eight mitochondrial and one nuclear loci to reconstruct their phylogeny. The morphological features of 27 type specimens were also examined. Phylogenetic relationships based on both mitochondrial and nuclear markers revealed two reciprocally monophyletic clades of Coralliidae. One of the clades was further split into two subclades with respect to sequence variation and observable morphological features. Based on the results of genealogical analyses and distinctive morphological features, the three genera classification of Coralliidae proposed by Gray (1867) was redefined. In this revised taxonomic system, Corallium, Hemicorallium, and Pleurocorallium consist of 7, 16 and 14 species, respectively. Our results also showed that the cosmopolitan Hemicorallium laauense is a species complex containing a cryptic species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Phylogeny of Elatinaceae and the Tropical Gondwanan Origin of the Centroplacaceae(Malpighiaceae, Elatinaceae Clade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Cai

    Full Text Available The flowering plant family Elatinaceae is a widespread aquatic lineage inhabiting temperate and tropical latitudes, including ∼35(-50 species. Its phylogeny remains largely unknown, compromising our understanding of its systematics. Moreover, this group is particularly in need of attention because the biogeography of most aquatic plant clades has yet to be investigated, resulting in uncertainty about whether aquatic plants show histories that deviate from terrestrial plants. We inferred the phylogeny of Elatinaceae from four DNA regions spanning 59 accessions across the family. An expanded sampling was used for molecular divergence time estimation and ancestral area reconstruction to infer the biogeography of Elatinaceae and their closest terrestrial relatives, Malpighiaceae and Centroplacaceae. The two genera of Elatinaceae, Bergia and Elatine, are monophyletic, but several traditionally recognized groups within the family are non-monophyletic. Our results suggest two ancient biogeographic events in the Centroplacaceae(Malpighiaceae, Elatinaceae clade involving western Gondwana, while Elatinaceae shows a more complicated biogeographic history with a high degree of continental endemicity. Our results indicate the need for further taxonomic investigation of Elatinaceae. Further, our study is one of few to implicate ancient Gondwanan biogeography in extant angiosperms, especially significant given the Centroplacaceae(Malpighiaceae, Elatinaceae clade's largely tropical distribution. Finally, Elatinaceae demonstrates long-term continental in situ diversification, which argues against recent dispersal as a universal explanation commonly invoked for aquatic plant distributions.

  9. Total evidence phylogeny and the evolution of adult bioluminescence in fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gavin J; Branham, Marc A; Whiting, Michael F; Bybee, Seth M

    2017-02-01

    Fireflies are some of the most captivating organisms on the planet. They have a rich history as subjects of scientific study, especially in relation to their bioluminescent behavior. Yet, the phylogenetic relationships of fireflies are still poorly understood. Here, we present the first total evidence approach to reconstruct lampyrid phylogeny using both a molecular matrix from six loci and an extensive morphological matrix. Using this phylogeny we test the hypothesis that adult bioluminescence evolved after the origin of the firefly clade. The ancestral state of adult bioluminescence is recovered as non-bioluminescent with one to six gains and five to ten subsequent losses. The monophyly of the family, as well as the subfamilies is also tested. Ototretinae, Cyphonocerinae, Luciolinae (incl. Pristolycus), Amydetinae, "cheguevarinae" sensu Jeng 2008, and Photurinae are highly supported as monophyletic. With the exception of four taxa, Lampyrinae is also recovered as monophyletic with high support. Based on phylogenetic and morphological data Lamprohiza, Phausis, and Lamprigera are transferred to Lampyridae incertae sedis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A comprehensive phylogeny of birds (Aves) using targeted next-generation DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prum, Richard O; Berv, Jacob S; Dornburg, Alex; Field, Daniel J; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty; Lemmon, Alan R

    2015-10-22

    Although reconstruction of the phylogeny of living birds has progressed tremendously in the last decade, the evolutionary history of Neoaves--a clade that encompasses nearly all living bird species--remains the greatest unresolved challenge in dinosaur systematics. Here we investigate avian phylogeny with an unprecedented scale of data: >390,000 bases of genomic sequence data from each of 198 species of living birds, representing all major avian lineages, and two crocodilian outgroups. Sequence data were collected using anchored hybrid enrichment, yielding 259 nuclear loci with an average length of 1,523 bases for a total data set of over 7.8 × 10(7) bases. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses yielded highly supported and nearly identical phylogenetic trees for all major avian lineages. Five major clades form successive sister groups to the rest of Neoaves: (1) a clade including nightjars, other caprimulgiforms, swifts, and hummingbirds; (2) a clade uniting cuckoos, bustards, and turacos with pigeons, mesites, and sandgrouse; (3) cranes and their relatives; (4) a comprehensive waterbird clade, including all diving, wading, and shorebirds; and (5) a comprehensive landbird clade with the enigmatic hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin) as the sister group to the rest. Neither of the two main, recently proposed Neoavian clades--Columbea and Passerea--were supported as monophyletic. The results of our divergence time analyses are congruent with the palaeontological record, supporting a major radiation of crown birds in the wake of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction.

  11. Three-Dimensional Phylogeny Explorer: Distinguishing paralogs, lateral transfer, and violation of "molecular clock" assumption with 3D visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Christopher

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Construction and interpretation of phylogenetic trees has been a major research topic for understanding the evolution of genes. Increases in sequence data and complexity are creating a need for more powerful and insightful tree visualization tools. Results We have developed 3D Phylogeny Explorer (3DPE, a novel phylogeny tree viewer that maps trees onto three spatial axes (species on the X-axis; paralogs on Z; evolutionary distance on Y, enabling one to distinguish at a glance evolutionary features such as speciation; gene duplication and paralog evolution; lateral gene transfer; and violation of the "molecular clock" assumption. Users can input any tree on the online 3DPE, then rotate, scroll, rescale, and explore it interactively as "live" 3D views. All objects in 3DPE are clickable to display subtrees, connectivity path highlighting, sequence alignments, and gene summary views, and etc. To illustrate the value of this visualization approach for microbial genomes, we also generated 3D phylogeny analyses for all clusters from the public COG database. We constructed tree views using well-established methods and graph algorithms. We used Scientific Python to generate VRML2 3D views viewable in any web browser. Conclusion 3DPE provides a novel phylogenetic tree projection method into 3D space and its web-based implementation with live 3D features for reconstruction of phylogenetic trees of COG database.

  12. Morphological characters are compatible with mitogenomic data in resolving the phylogeny of nymphalid butterflies (lepidoptera: papilionoidea: nymphalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qing-Hui; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yun-Liang; Hao, Jia-Sheng; Yang, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Nymphalidae is the largest family of butterflies with their phylogenetic relationships not adequately approached to date. The mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of 11 new nymphalid species were reported and a comparative mitogenomic analysis was conducted together with other 22 available nymphalid mitogenomes. A phylogenetic analysis of the 33 species from all 13 currently recognized nymphalid subfamilies was done based on the mitogenomic data set with three Lycaenidae species as the outgroups. The mitogenome comparison showed that the eleven new mitogenomes were similar with those of other butterflies in gene content and order. The reconstructed phylogenetic trees reveal that the nymphalids are made up of five major clades (the nymphaline, heliconiine, satyrine, danaine and libytheine clades), with sister relationship between subfamilies Cyrestinae and Biblidinae, and most likely between subfamilies Morphinae and Satyrinae. This whole mitogenome-based phylogeny is generally congruent with those of former studies based on nuclear-gene and mitogenomic analyses, but differs considerably from the result of morphological cladistic analysis, such as the basal position of Libytheinae in morpho-phylogeny is not confirmed in molecular studies. However, we found that the mitogenomic phylogeny established herein is compatible with selected morphological characters (including developmental and adult morpho-characters).

  13. Evidence for a Higher Number of Species of Odontotermes (Isoptera) than Currently Known from Peninsular Malaysia from Mitochondrial DNA Phylogenies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shawn; Kirton, Laurence G.; Panandam, Jothi M.; Siraj, Siti S.; Ng, Kevin Kit-Siong; Tan, Soon-Guan

    2011-01-01

    Termites of the genus Odontotermes are important decomposers in the Old World tropics and are sometimes important pests of crops, timber and trees. The species within the genus often have overlapping size ranges and are difficult to differentiate based on morphology. As a result, the taxonomy of Odontotermes in Peninsular Malaysia has not been adequately worked out. In this study, we examined the phylogeny of 40 samples of Odontotermes from Peninsular Malaysia using two mitochondrial DNA regions, that is, the 16S ribosomal RNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit I genes, to aid in elucidating the number of species in the peninsula. Phylogenies were reconstructed from the individual gene and combined gene data sets using parsimony and likelihood criteria. The phylogenies supported the presence of up to eleven species in Peninsular Malaysia, which were identified as O. escherichi, O. hainanensis, O. javanicus, O. longignathus, O. malaccensis, O. oblongatus, O. paraoblongatus, O. sarawakensis, and three possibly new species. Additionally, some of our taxa are thought to comprise a complex of two or more species. The number of species found in this study using DNA methods was more than the initial nine species thought to occur in Peninsular Malaysia. The support values for the clades and morphology of the soldiers provided further evidence for the existence of eleven or more species. Higher resolution genetic markers such as microsatellites would be required to confirm the presence of cryptic species in some taxa. PMID:21687629

  14. A non-coding plastid DNA phylogeny of Asian Begonia (Begoniaceae): evidence for morphological homoplasy and sectional polyphyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D C; Hughes, M; Phutthai, T; Rajbhandary, S; Rubite, R; Ardi, W H; Richardson, J E

    2011-09-01

    Maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of non-coding plastid DNA sequence data based on a broad sampling of all major Asian Begonia sections (ndhA intron, ndhF-rpl32 spacer, rpl32-trnL spacer, 3977 aligned characters, 84 species) were used to reconstruct the phylogeny of Asian Begonia and to test the monophyly of major Asian Begonia sections. Ovary and fruit characters which are crucial in current sectional circumscriptions were mapped on the phylogeny to assess their utility in infrageneric classifications. The results indicate that the strong systematic emphasis placed on single, homoplasious characters such as undivided placenta lamellae (section Reichenheimia) and fleshy pericarps (section Sphenanthera), and the recognition of sections primarily based on a suite of plesiomorphic characters including three-locular ovaries with axillary, bilamellate placentae and dry, dehiscent pericarps (section Diploclinium), has resulted in the circumscription of several polyphyletic sections. Moreover, sections Platycentrum and Petermannia were recovered as paraphyletic. Because of the homoplasy of systematically important characters, current classifications have a certain diagnostic, but only poor predictive value. The presented phylogeny provides for the first time a reasonably resolved and supported phylogenetic framework for Asian Begonia which has the power to inform future taxonomic, biogeographic and evolutionary studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Timepix Telescope for High Performance Particle Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Akiba, Kazuyoshi; van Beuzekom, Martin; van Beveren, Vincent; Borghi, Silvia; Boterenbrood, Henk; Buytaert, Jan; Collins, Paula; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dumps, Raphael; Eklund, Lars; Esperante, Daniel; Gallas, Abraham; Gordon, Hamish; van der Heijden, Bas; Hombach, Christoph; Hynds, Daniel; John, Malcolm; Leflat, Alexander; Li, Yi Ming; Longstaff, Ian; Morton, Alexander; Nakatsuka, Noritsugu; Nomerotski, Andre; Parkes, Chris; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Plackett, Richard; Reid, Matthew M; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Schindler, Heinrich; Szumlak, Tomasz; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Velthuis, Jaap; Wysokinski, Michal

    2013-01-01

    The Timepix particle tracking telescope has been developed as part of the LHCb VELO Upgrade project, supported by the Medipix Collaboration and the AIDA framework. It is a primary piece of infrastructure for the VELO Upgrade project and is being used for the development of new sensors and front end technologies for several upcoming LHC trackers and vertexing systems. The telescope is designed around the dual capability of the Timepix ASICs to provide information about either the deposited charge or the timing information from tracks traversing the 14 x 14mm matrix of 55 x 55 um pixels. The rate of reconstructed tracks available is optimised by taking advantage of the shutter driven readout architecture of the Timepix chip, operated with existing readout systems. Results of tests conducted in the SPS North Area beam facility at CERN show that the telescope typically provides reconstructed track rates during the beam spills of between 3.5 and 7.5 kHz, depending on beam conditions. The tracks are time stamped wi...

  16. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING FOR THE STUDY OF EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FENG,H.; JONES,K.W.; MCGUIGAN,M.; SMITH,G.J.; SPILETIC,J.

    2001-10-12

    Synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) is a non-destructive method for examination of rock, soil, and other types of samples studied in the earth and environmental sciences. The high x-ray intensities of the synchrotron source make possible the acquisition of tomographic volumes at a high rate that requires the application of high-performance computing techniques for data reconstruction to produce the three-dimensional volumes, for their visualization, and for data analysis. These problems are exacerbated by the need to share information between collaborators at widely separated locations over both local and tide-area networks. A summary of the CMT technique and examples of applications are given here together with a discussion of the applications of high-performance computing methods to improve the experimental techniques and analysis of the data.

  17. A Preliminary Molecular Investigation of Aleocharine Phylogeny (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J. C. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    .... As a preliminary step toward building a tribal-level phylogeny for this lineage of beetles, a molecular investigation of partial sequences of 12s and 16s mitochondrial genes was undertaken for 21...

  18. Phylogeny and Species Diversity of Gulf of California Oysters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset of DNA sequence data from two mitochondrial loci (COI and 16S) used to infer the phylogeny of oysters in the genus Ostrea along the Pacific coast of North...

  19. Developing Flexible, High Performance Polymers with Self-Healing Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Scott T.; Williams, Martha K.; Gibson, Tracy L.; Caraccio, Anne J.

    2011-01-01

    Flexible, high performance polymers such as polyimides are often employed in aerospace applications. They typically find uses in areas where improved physical characteristics such as fire resistance, long term thermal stability, and solvent resistance are required. It is anticipated that such polymers could find uses in future long duration exploration missions as well. Their use would be even more advantageous if self-healing capability or mechanisms could be incorporated into these polymers. Such innovative approaches are currently being studied at the NASA Kennedy Space Center for use in high performance wiring systems or inflatable and habitation structures. Self-healing or self-sealing capability would significantly reduce maintenance requirements, and increase the safety and reliability performance of the systems into which these polymers would be incorporated. Many unique challenges need to be overcome in order to incorporate a self-healing mechanism into flexible, high performance polymers. Significant research into the incorporation of a self-healing mechanism into structural composites has been carried out over the past decade by a number of groups, notable among them being the University of I1linois [I]. Various mechanisms for the introduction of self-healing have been investigated. Examples of these are: 1) Microcapsule-based healant delivery. 2) Vascular network delivery. 3) Damage induced triggering of latent substrate properties. Successful self-healing has been demonstrated in structural epoxy systems with almost complete reestablishment of composite strength being achieved through the use of microcapsulation technology. However, the incorporation of a self-healing mechanism into a system in which the material is flexible, or a thin film, is much more challenging. In the case of using microencapsulation, healant core content must be small enough to reside in films less than 0.1 millimeters thick, and must overcome significant capillary and surface

  20. Trends in High Performance Liquid Chromatography for Cultural Heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degano, Ilaria; La Nasa, Jacopo

    2016-04-01

    The separation, detection and quantitation of specific species contained in a sample in the field of Cultural Heritage requires selective, sensitive and reliable methods. Procedures based on liquid chromatography fulfil these requirements and offer a wide range of applicability in terms of analyte types and concentration range. The main applications of High Performance Liquid Chromatography in this field are related to the separation and detection of dyestuffs in archaeological materials and paint samples by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with suitable detectors. The relevant literature will be revised, with particular attention to sample treatment strategies and future developments. Reversed phase chromatography has also recently gained increasing importance in the analysis of lipid binders and lipid materials in archaeological residues: the main advantages and disadvantages of the new approaches will be discussed. Finally, the main applications of ion chromatography and size exclusion chromatography in the field of Cultural Heritage will be revised in this chapter.

  1. Designing High Performance Factory Automation Applications on Top of DDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Calvo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available DDS is a recent specification aimed at providing high-performance publisher/subscriber middleware solutions. Despite being a very powerful flexible technology, it may prove complex to use, especially for the inexperienced. This work provides some guidelines for connecting software components that represent a new generation of automation devices (such as PLCs, IPCs and robots using Data Distribution Service (DDS as a virtual software bus. More specifically, it presents the design of a DDS-based component, the so-called Automation Component, and discusses how to map different traffic patterns using DDS entities exploiting the wealth of QoS management mechanisms provided by the DDS specification. A case study demonstrates the creation of factory automation applications out of software components that encapsulate independent stations.

  2. High Performance Computing - Power Application Programming Interface Specification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laros, James H.,; Kelly, Suzanne M.; Pedretti, Kevin; Grant, Ryan; Olivier, Stephen Lecler; Levenhagen, Michael J.; DeBonis, David

    2014-08-01

    Measuring and controlling the power and energy consumption of high performance computing systems by various components in the software stack is an active research area [13, 3, 5, 10, 4, 21, 19, 16, 7, 17, 20, 18, 11, 1, 6, 14, 12]. Implementations in lower level software layers are beginning to emerge in some production systems, which is very welcome. To be most effective, a portable interface to measurement and control features would significantly facilitate participation by all levels of the software stack. We present a proposal for a standard power Application Programming Interface (API) that endeavors to cover the entire software space, from generic hardware interfaces to the input from the computer facility manager.

  3. High Performance Embedded System for Real-Time Pattern Matching

    CERN Document Server

    Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; The ATLAS collaboration; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Citraro, Saverio; Giannetti, Paola; Dell'Orso, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    We present an innovative and high performance embedded system for real-time pattern matching. This system is based on the evolution of hardware and algorithms developed for the field of High Energy Physics (HEP) and more specifically for the execution of extremely fast pattern matching for tracking of particles produced by proton-proton collisions in hadron collider experiments. A miniaturized version of this complex system is being developed for pattern matching in generic image processing applications. The design uses the flexibility of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and the powerful Associative Memory Chip (ASIC) to achieve real-time performance. The system works as a contour identifier able to extract the salient features of an image. It is based on the principles of cognitive image processing, which means that it executes fast pattern matching and data reduction mimicking the operation of the human brain.

  4. High performance multicrystalline silicon: Grain structure and iron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autruffe, Antoine; M'hamdi, Mohammed; Schindler, Florian; Heinz, Friedemann D.; Ekstrøm, Kai Erik; Schubert, Martin C.; Di Sabatino, Marisa; Stokkan, Gaute

    2017-10-01

    A study of the spatial occurrence of iron precipitation in a high performance multicrystalline silicon (HPMC-Si) sample is presented. The separated effects of grain-boundaries, sparse intra-granular dislocations, and dislocation clusters are investigated by combining the Fei imaging method with glow discharge mass spectroscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and two iron precipitation models. While the area-averaged precipitation at grain boundaries is relatively minor, almost the whole iron precipitation occurs within the grains, despite the very low intra-granular dislocation density. The fraction of non-precipitated iron in the studied HPMC-Si material was found to be one to two orders of magnitude higher than that reported previously for standard materials.

  5. High performance thermal insulation systems - HLWD; Hochleistungs-Waermedaemmung HLWD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eicher, H.; Erb, M. [Eicher und Pauli AG, Liestal (Switzerland); Binz, A.; Moosmann, A. [Fachhochschule beider Basel, Institut fuer Energie, Muttenz (Switzerland)

    2000-12-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) by the research program concerning the efficient use of energy in buildings takes a look at high-performance thermal insulation systems (HLWD). Work done on three applications - internal insulation used in the refurbishment of buildings, insulation of hot-water storage tanks and outside doors - is reported on. Economic feasibility is discussed and a number of demonstration projects are reported on. Apart from the above mentioned, the insulation of a terrace, the insulation of a roller-blind housing and the insulation of a deep-freeze cubicle are reviewed. The construction of vacuum insulation panels (VIP) and their manufacture are looked at. Economic aspects are looked at and the use of VIP in practice is discussed.

  6. 3rd International Conference on High Performance Scientific Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Kostina, Ekaterina; Phu, Hoang; Rannacher, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    This proceedings volume contains a selection of papers presented at the Third International Conference on High Performance Scientific Computing held at the Hanoi Institute of Mathematics, Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), March 6-10, 2006. The conference has been organized by the Hanoi Institute of Mathematics, Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR), Heidelberg, and its International PhD Program ``Complex Processes: Modeling, Simulation and Optimization'', and Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology. The contributions cover the broad interdisciplinary spectrum of scientific computing and present recent advances in theory, development of methods, and applications in practice. Subjects covered are mathematical modelling, numerical simulation, methods for optimization and control, parallel computing, software development, applications of scientific computing in physics, chemistry, biology and mechanics, environmental and hydrology problems, transport, logistics and site loca...

  7. 6th International Conference on High Performance Scientific Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Phu, Hoang; Rannacher, Rolf; Schlöder, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    This proceedings volume highlights a selection of papers presented at the Sixth International Conference on High Performance Scientific Computing, which took place in Hanoi, Vietnam on March 16-20, 2015. The conference was jointly organized by the Heidelberg Institute of Theoretical Studies (HITS), the Institute of Mathematics of the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), the Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR) at Heidelberg University, and the Vietnam Institute for Advanced Study in Mathematics, Ministry of Education The contributions cover a broad, interdisciplinary spectrum of scientific computing and showcase recent advances in theory, methods, and practical applications. Subjects covered numerical simulation, methods for optimization and control, parallel computing, and software development, as well as the applications of scientific computing in physics, mechanics, biomechanics and robotics, material science, hydrology, biotechnology, medicine, transport, scheduling, and in...

  8. High-Performance Beam Simulator for the LANSCE Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Xiaoying [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baily, Scott A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-14

    A high performance multiparticle tracking simulator is currently under development at Los Alamos. The heart of the simulator is based upon the beam dynamics simulation algorithms of the PARMILA code, but implemented in C++ on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) hardware using NVIDIA's CUDA platform. Linac operating set points are provided to the simulator via the EPICS control system so that changes of the real time linac parameters are tracked and the simulation results updated automatically. This simulator will provide valuable insight into the beam dynamics along a linac in pseudo real-time, especially where direct measurements of the beam properties do not exist. Details regarding the approach, benefits and performance are presented.

  9. Development of sustainable ultra-high performance concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jisong; Zhao, Yinghua

    2017-04-01

    To design Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) in a sustainable way, this paper investigates the properties of UHPC containing supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), such as fly ash (FA) and silica fume (SF). The flexural strength, compressive strength, and microstructure of the UHPC are examined. Results indicate that it is possible to design UHPC with very low cement amount. On the basis of 30% FA replacement, the incorporation of 10% and 20% SF shows equivalent or higher mechanical properties compared to the reference samples. The microstructure and pore volume of developed UHPC indicated a high correlation with its compressive strength. Efficiency factor (k-value) is calculated as an indicator to predict the flexural and compressive strength of UHPC with SCMs in terms of their synergistic effects.

  10. Advanced high performance horizontal piezoelectric hybrid synthetic jet actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high performance, horizontal, zero-net mass-flux, synthetic jet actuator for active control of viscous, separated flow on subsonic and supersonic vehicles. The present invention is a horizontal piezoelectric hybrid zero-net mass-flux actuator, in which all the walls of the chamber are electrically controlled synergistically to reduce or enlarge the volume of the synthetic jet actuator chamber in three dimensions simultaneously and to reduce or enlarge the diameter of orifice of the synthetic jet actuator simultaneously with the reduction or enlargement of the volume of the chamber. The present invention is capable of installation in the wing surface as well as embedding in the wetted surfaces of a supersonic inlet. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the SJA-H will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric actuators.

  11. Advanced high performance vertical hybrid synthetic jet actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high performance, vertical, zero-net mass-flux, synthetic jet actuator for active control of viscous, separated flow on subsonic and supersonic vehicles. The present invention is a vertical piezoelectric hybrid zero-net mass-flux actuator, in which all the walls of the chamber are electrically controlled synergistically to reduce or enlarge the volume of the synthetic jet actuator chamber in three dimensions simultaneously and to reduce or enlarge the diameter of orifice of the synthetic jet actuator simultaneously with the reduction or enlargement of the volume of the chamber. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the present invention will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric synthetic jet actuators.

  12. High Performance Fe-Co Based SOFC Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer Hansen, Kent; Hansen, Karin Vels; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2010-01-01

    With the aim of reducing the temperature of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), a new high-performance perovskite cathode has been developed. An area-specific resistance (ASR) as low as 0.12 Ωcm2 at 600 °C was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) on symmetrical cells. The cathode...... is a composite between (Gd0.6Sr0.4)0.99Fe0.8Co0.2O3-δ (GSFC) and Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO10). Examination of the microstructure of the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a possibility of further optimisation of the microstructure in order to increase the performance of the cathodes. It also...

  13. High Performance Nano-Ceria Electrodes for Solid Oxide Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Christopher R.; Martinez Aguilera, Lev; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy

    2016-01-01

    In solid oxide electrochemical cells, the conventional Ni-based fuel-electrodes provide high electrocatalytic activity but they are often a major source of long-term performance degradation due to carbon deposition, poisoning of reaction sites, Ni mobility, etc. Doped-ceria is a promising mixed...... ionic-electronic conducting oxide that could solve these issues if it can be integrated into an appropriate electrode structure. Two new approaches to obtain high-performance nanostructured doped-ceria electrodes are highlighted. The first is an infiltration-based architecture with Ce0.8Pr0.2O2-δ...... forming the active surfaces on a porous backbone with embedded electronic current collector material, yielding one of the highest performances reported for an electrode that operates either on fuel or oxidant. The second is a nano-Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ thin film prepared by spin-coating, which provides...

  14. Overview of Parallel Platforms for Common High Performance Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fryza

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with various parallel platforms used for high performance computing in the signal processing domain. More precisely, the methods exploiting the multicores central processing units such as message passing interface and OpenMP are taken into account. The properties of the programming methods are experimentally proved in the application of a fast Fourier transform and a discrete cosine transform and they are compared with the possibilities of MATLAB's built-in functions and Texas Instruments digital signal processors with very long instruction word architectures. New FFT and DCT implementations were proposed and tested. The implementation phase was compared with CPU based computing methods and with possibilities of the Texas Instruments digital signal processing library on C6747 floating-point DSPs. The optimal combination of computing methods in the signal processing domain and new, fast routines' implementation is proposed as well.

  15. Assessment of the high performance light water reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starflinger, J. [Univ. of Stuttgart, IKE, (Germany); Schulenberg, T. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Tech., Karlsruhe (Germany); Bittermann, D. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Andreani, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Maraczy, C. [AEKI-KFKI, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-07-01

    From 2006-2010, the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) was investigated within a European Funded project called HPLWR Phase 2. Operated at 25MPa with a heat-up rate in the core from 280{sup o}C to 500{sup o}C, this reactor concept provides a technological challenge in the fields of design, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and heat transfer, materials, and safety. The assessment of the concept with respect to the goals of the technology roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Reactors of the Generation IV International Forum shows that the HPLWR has a potential to fulfil the goals of economics, safety and proliferation resistance and physical protection. In terms of sustainability, the HPLWR with a thermal neutron spectrum investigated within this project, does not differ from existing Light Water Reactors in terms of usage of fuel and waste production. (author)

  16. High performance direct methanol fuel cell with thin electrolyte membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Nianfang

    2017-06-01

    A high performance direct methanol fuel cell is achieved with thin electrolyte membrane. 320 mW cm-2 of peak power density and over 260 mW cm-2 at 0.4 V are obtained when working at 90 °C with normal pressure air supply. It is revealed that the increased anode half-cell performance with temperature contributes primarily to the enhanced performance at elevated temperature. From the comparison of iR-compensated cathode potential of methanol/air with that of H2/air fuel cell, the impact of methanol crossover on cathode performance decreases with current density and becomes negligible at high current density. Current density is found to influence fuel efficiency and methanol crossover significantly from the measurement of fuel efficiency at different current density. At high current density, high fuel efficiency can be achieved even at high temperature, indicating decreased methanol crossover.

  17. High performance computing in structural determination by electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J J

    2008-10-01

    Computational advances have significantly contributed to the current role of electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) in structural biology. The needs for computational power are constantly growing with the increasing complexity of algorithms and the amount of data needed to push the resolution limits. High performance computing (HPC) is becoming paramount in cryoEM to cope with those computational needs. Since the nineties, different HPC strategies have been proposed for some specific problems in cryoEM and, in fact, some of them are already available in common software packages. Nevertheless, the literature is scattered in the areas of computer science and structural biology. In this communication, the HPC approaches devised for the computation-intensive tasks in cryoEM (single particles and tomography) are retrospectively reviewed and the future trends are discussed. Moreover, the HPC capabilities available in the most common cryoEM packages are surveyed, as an evidence of the importance of HPC in addressing the future challenges.

  18. High Performance Embedded System for Real-Time Pattern Matching

    CERN Document Server

    Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; The ATLAS collaboration; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Citraro, Saverio; Giannetti, Paola; Dell'Orso, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present an innovative and high performance embedded system for real-time pattern matching. This system is based on the evolution of hardware and algorithms developed for the field of High Energy Physics (HEP) and more specifically for the execution of extremely fast pattern matching for tracking of particles produced by proton-proton collisions in hadron collider experiments. A miniaturised version of this complex system is being developed for pattern matching in generic image processing applications. The system works as a contour identifier able to extract the salient features of an image. It is based on the principles of cognitive image processing, which means that it executes fast pattern matching and data reduction mimicking the operation of the human brain. The pattern matching can be executed by a custom designed Associative Memory (AM) chip. The reference patterns are chosen by a complex training algorithm implemented on an FPGA device. Post processing algorithms (e.g. pixel clustering...

  19. Benchmarking high performance computing architectures with CMS’ skeleton framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Gartung, P.; Jones, C. D.

    2017-10-01

    In 2012 CMS evaluated which underlying concurrency technology would be the best to use for its multi-threaded framework. The available technologies were evaluated on the high throughput computing systems dominating the resources in use at that time. A skeleton framework benchmarking suite that emulates the tasks performed within a CMSSW application was used to select Intel’s Thread Building Block library, based on the measured overheads in both memory and CPU on the different technologies benchmarked. In 2016 CMS will get access to high performance computing resources that use new many core architectures; machines such as Cori Phase 1&2, Theta, Mira. Because of this we have revived the 2012 benchmark to test it’s performance and conclusions on these new architectures. This talk will discuss the results of this exercise.

  20. Power/energy use cases for high performance computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laros, James H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kelly, Suzanne M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Steven [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Elmore, Ryan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Munch, Kristin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Power and Energy have been identified as a first order challenge for future extreme scale high performance computing (HPC) systems. In practice the breakthroughs will need to be provided by the hardware vendors. But to make the best use of the solutions in an HPC environment, it will likely require periodic tuning by facility operators and software components. This document describes the actions and interactions needed to maximize power resources. It strives to cover the entire operational space in which an HPC system occupies. The descriptions are presented as formal use cases, as documented in the Unified Modeling Language Specification [1]. The document is intended to provide a common understanding to the HPC community of the necessary management and control capabilities. Assuming a common understanding can be achieved, the next step will be to develop a set of Application Programing Interfaces (APIs) to which hardware vendors and software developers could utilize to steer power consumption.

  1. Frequency selective surfaces based high performance microstrip antenna

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, Shiv; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on performance enhancement of printed antennas using frequency selective surfaces (FSS) technology. The growing demand of stealth technology in strategic areas requires high-performance low-RCS (radar cross section) antennas. Such requirements may be accomplished by incorporating FSS into the antenna structure either in its ground plane or as the superstrate, due to the filter characteristics of FSS structure. In view of this, a novel approach based on FSS technology is presented in this book to enhance the performance of printed antennas including out-of-band structural RCS reduction. In this endeavor, the EM design of microstrip patch antennas (MPA) loaded with FSS-based (i) high impedance surface (HIS) ground plane, and (ii) the superstrates are discussed in detail. The EM analysis of proposed FSS-based antenna structures have been carried out using transmission line analogy, in combination with the reciprocity theorem. Further, various types of novel FSS structures are considered in desi...

  2. 5th International Conference on High Performance Scientific Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Xuan; Rannacher, Rolf; Schlöder, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    This proceedings volume gathers a selection of papers presented at the Fifth International Conference on High Performance Scientific Computing, which took place in Hanoi on March 5-9, 2012. The conference was organized by the Institute of Mathematics of the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), the Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR) of Heidelberg University, Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology, and the Vietnam Institute for Advanced Study in Mathematics. The contributions cover the broad interdisciplinary spectrum of scientific computing and present recent advances in theory, development of methods, and practical applications. Subjects covered include mathematical modeling; numerical simulation; methods for optimization and control; parallel computing; software development; and applications of scientific computing in physics, mechanics and biomechanics, material science, hydrology, chemistry, biology, biotechnology, medicine, sports, psychology, transport, logistics, com...

  3. [Determination of amygdalin in hawthorn by high performance liquid chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Weifeng; Ding, Mingyu

    2005-09-01

    A suitable method for extraction of amygdalin from hawthorn has been established. At first, the lipophilic components were removed with petroleum ether by ultrasonic extraction. The amygdalin was then extracted by methanol in a Soxhlet's apparatus. For quantitation, a high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed by using a reversed-phase C18 column, mobile phase of methanol-water (15:85, v/v) and a detection wavelengh of 215 nm. It can be concluded that the content of amygdalin is higher in the seeds than that in the hawthorn powder without the seeds and the yield of amygdalin is higher in the hawthorn pieces than that in the hawthorn powder.

  4. New High Performance Deterministic Interleavers for Turbo Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TRIFINA, L.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Turbo codes offer extraordinary performance, especially at low signal to noise ratios, due to a low multiplicity of low weight code words. The interleaver design is critical in order to realize an apparent randomness of the code, thus further enhancing its performance, especially for short block frames. This paper presents four new deterministic interleaver design methods, that lead to highly performing turbo coding systems, namely the block-spread, the block-backtracking and their variations the linearly-spread and linearly-backtracking interleavers. The design methods are explained in depth and the results are compared against some of the most wide-spread turbo code interleavers. Furthermore, the selection method of the generator polynomials used in the simulations is explained.

  5. High performance coronagraphy for direct imaging of exoplanets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyon O.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronagraphy has recently been an extremely active field of research, with several high performance concepts proposed, and several new coronagraphs tested in laboratories and telescopes. Coronagraph concepts can be grouped in a few broad categories: Lyot-type coronagraphs, pupil apodization and nulling interferometers. Among existing coronagraph concepts, several approach the fundamental performance limit imposed by the physical nature of light. To achieve their full potential, coronagraphs require exquisite wavefront control and calibration. This has been, and still is, the main bottleneck for the scientifically productive use of coronagraphs on ground-based telescopes. New and promising wavefront sensing techniques suitable for high contrast imaging have however been developed in the last few years and are started to be realized in laboratories. I will review some of these enabling technologies, and show that coronagraphs are now ready for “prime time” on existing and future telescopes.

  6. Operating System Support for High-Performance Solid State Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørling, Matias

    a form of application-SSD co-design? What are the impacts on operating system design? (v) What would it take to provide quality of service for applications requiring millions of I/O per second? The dissertation consists of six publications covering these issues. Two of the main contributions...... of the operating system in reducing the gap, and enabling new forms of communication and even co-design between applications and high-performance SSDs. More specifically, we studied the storage layers within the Linux kernel. We explore the following issues: (i) what are the limitations of the legacy block......The performance of Solid State Drives (SSD) has evolved from hundreds to millions of I/Os per second in the past three years. Such a radical evolution is transforming both the storage and the software industries. Indeed, software designed based on the assumption of slow IOs has become...

  7. Alcoholic fermentation process control by high-performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morawski, J.; Dincer, A.K.; Ivie, K.

    1983-02-01

    In large-scale fermentation for energy production high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) provides an accurate method of monitoring the original oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, as well as their hydrolysis to fermentable monosaccharides. Also measuring the saccharide and alcohol content of the fermentation vat allows overseeing of the process, providing the capability of allowing the fermentation to proceed to the most economical level prior to distillation. Another application for HPLC in a large-scale fermentation for energy is to analyze the stillage for its ethanol content during distillation, in order to observe the efficiency of the still. HPLC can separate and detect very low levels, (i.e., 100 parts per million), of ethanol to yield information concerning the distillation process. These capabilities indicate that HPLC is an extremely useful efficient instrument to the fermentation industries. (Refs. 2).

  8. High-performance Computing Applied to Semantic Databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Eric L.; Jimenez, Edward; Mizell, David W.; al-Saffar, Sinan; Adolf, Robert D.; Haglin, David J.

    2011-06-02

    To-date, the application of high-performance computing resources to Semantic Web data has largely focused on commodity hardware and distributed memory platforms. In this paper we make the case that more specialized hardware can offer superior scaling and close to an order of magnitude improvement in performance. In particular we examine the Cray XMT. Its key characteristics, a large, global shared-memory, and processors with a memory-latency tolerant design, offer an environment conducive to programming for the Semantic Web and have engendered results that far surpass current state of the art. We examine three fundamental pieces requisite for a fully functioning semantic database: dictionary encoding, RDFS inference, and query processing. We show scaling up to 512 processors (the largest configuration we had available), and the ability to process 20 billion triples completely in-memory.

  9. Status of High Performance PV: Polycrystalline Thin-Film Tandems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symko-Davies, M.

    2005-02-01

    The High-Performance Photovoltaic (HiPerf PV) Project was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy to substantially increase the viability of photovoltaics (PV) for cost-competitive applications so that PV can contribute significantly to our energy supply and our environment. The HiPerf PV Project aims at exploring the ultimate performance limits of existing PV technologies, approximately doubling their sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiencies during its course. This work includes bringing thin-film cells and modules toward 25% and 20% efficiencies, respectively, and developing multijunction concentrator cells and modules able to convert more than one-third of the sun's energy to electricity (i.e., 33% efficiency). This paper will address recent accomplishments of the NREL in-house research effort involving polycrystalline thin-film tandems, as well as the research efforts under way in the subcontracted area.

  10. CHAPTER 3. High-performance Organic Photovoltaic Donor Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Wadsworth, Andrew

    2017-11-08

    The field of organic photovoltaics has advanced a great deal over the last decade, with device efficiencies now exceeding 11%. A large part of this success can be attributed to the development of donor polymer materials, from their humble beginnings as homopolymers to the highly tuned push-pull copolymer and terpolymer materials that are now being reported on a regular basis. Through the careful use of chemical modification, it has been possible to design and synthesize a wide variety of donor polymers, allowing optimization of both the optoelectronic and structural properties of the materials. In doing so, more favourable active layer blends have been achieved and therefore significant improvements in device performance have been observed. Herein we discuss how the chemical design of donor polymers for organic photovoltaics has led to the emergence of high-performance materials.

  11. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Johnson, Gary W.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1995-01-01

    A high performance capacitor fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a "notepad" configuration composed of 200-300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The "notepad" capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density.

  12. High-performance rotation invariant multiview face detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chang; Ai, Haizhou; Li, Yuan; Lao, Shihong

    2007-04-01

    Rotation invariant multiview face detection (MVFD) aims to detect faces with arbitrary rotation-in-plane (RIP) and rotation-off-plane (ROP) angles in still images or video sequences. MVFD is crucial as the first step in automatic face processing for general applications since face images are seldom upright and frontal unless they are taken cooperatively. In this paper, we propose a series of innovative methods to construct a high-performance rotation invariant multiview face detector, including the Width-First-Search (WFS) tree detector structure, the Vector Boosting algorithm for learning vector-output strong classifiers, the domain-partition-based weak learning method, the sparse feature in granular space, and the heuristic search for sparse feature selection. As a result of that, our multiview face detector achieves low computational complexity, broad detection scope, and high detection accuracy on both standard testing sets and real-life images.

  13. Towards high-performance materials for road construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladkikh, V.; Korolev, E.; Smirnov, V.

    2017-10-01

    Due to constant increase of traffic, modern road construction is in need of high-performance pavement materials. The operational performance of such materials can be characterized by many properties. Nevertheless, the most important ones are resistance to rutting and resistance to dynamical loads. It was proposed earlier to use sulfur extended asphalt concrete in road construction practice. To reduce the emission of sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide during the concrete mix preparation and pavement production stages, it is beneficial to make such a concrete on the base of complex sulfur modifier. In the present work the influence of the complex modifier to mechanical properties of sulfur extended asphalt concrete was examined. It was shown that sulfur extended asphalt concrete is of high mechanical properties. It was also revealed that there as an anomalous negative correlations between strain capacity, fatigue life and fracture toughness.

  14. Achieving Mixtures of Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea POPA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC is a relatively new concrete. According to [11] UHPC is that concrete which features compressive strength over C100/115 class. Up to this point standards for this type of concrete were not adopted, although its characteristic strength exceeds those specified in [33]. Its main property is high compressive strength. This provides the possibility of reducing the section of elements (beams or columns made of this type of concrete, while the load capacity remains high. The study consists in blending mixtures of UHPC made of varying proportions of materials. The authors have obtained strengths of up to 160 MPa. The materials used are: Portland cement, silica fume, quartz powder, steel fibers, superplasticiser, sand and crushed aggregate for concrete - andesite.

  15. Trends in high-performance computing for engineering calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, M B; Reguly, I

    2014-08-13

    High-performance computing has evolved remarkably over the past 20 years, and that progress is likely to continue. However, in recent years, this progress has been achieved through greatly increased hardware complexity with the rise of multicore and manycore processors, and this is affecting the ability of application developers to achieve the full potential of these systems. This article outlines the key developments on the hardware side, both in the recent past and in the near future, with a focus on two key issues: energy efficiency and the cost of moving data. It then discusses the much slower evolution of system software, and the implications of all of this for application developers. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Next-generation sequencing: big data meets high performance computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Bertil; Hildebrandt, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The progress of next-generation sequencing has a major impact on medical and genomic research. This high-throughput technology can now produce billions of short DNA or RNA fragments in excess of a few terabytes of data in a single run. This leads to massive datasets used by a wide range of applications including personalized cancer treatment and precision medicine. In addition to the hugely increased throughput, the cost of using high-throughput technologies has been dramatically decreasing. A low sequencing cost of around US$1000 per genome has now rendered large population-scale projects feasible. However, to make effective use of the produced data, the design of big data algorithms and their efficient implementation on modern high performance computing systems is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The architecture of the High Performance Storage System (HPSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teaff, D.; Coyne, B. [IBM Federal, Houston, TX (United States); Watson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The rapid growth in the size of datasets has caused a serious imbalance in I/O and storage system performance and functionality relative to application requirements and the capabilities of other system components. The High Performance Storage System (HPSS) is a scalable, next-generation storage system that will meet the functionality and performance requirements of large-scale scientific and commercial computing environments. Our goal is to improve the performance and capacity of storage systems by two orders of magnitude or more over what is available in the general or mass marketplace today. We are also providing corresponding improvements in architecture and functionality. This paper describes the architecture and functionality of HPSS.

  18. Do Danes enjoy a high performing chronic care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Annegrete; Olejaz, Maria; Rudkjøbing, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The trends in population health in Denmark are similar to those in most Western European countries. Major health issues include, among others, the high prevalence of chronic illnesses and lifestyle related risk factors such as obesity, tobacco, physical inactivity and alcohol. This has pressed...... the health system towards a model of provision of care based on the management of chronic care conditions. While the Chronic Care Model was introduced in 2005, the Danish health system does not fulfil the ten key preconditions that would characterise a high-performing chronic care system. As revealed...... in a recent report, the fragmented structure of the Danish health system poses challenges in providing effectively coordinated care to patients with chronic diseases....

  19. Separation of human tear proteins by high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, A; Kijlstra, A

    1984-12-01

    The optimal conditions for separating human tear proteins by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using a Waters I-125 gel filtration column were investigated. Several elution buffers were tested including phosphate buffer alone and phosphate buffer to which varying amounts of NaCl or 0.1% Tween was added. The combination of phosphate buffer (pH 5.28), 0.5 M NaCl and 0.1% Tween gave the best resolution and a recovery of 90% of the proteins applied. Tear lactoferrin was shown to adhere to the column packing when the molarity of the elution buffer was not high enough. Using optimal conditions, the tear proteins IgA, lactoferrin and lysozyme were identified in distinct peaks after a preparative HPLC run. When used in combination with Schirmer strips as a tear sampling method, HPLC was shown to be a rapid, simple and reproducible way of investigating the composition of tear proteins.

  20. High Performance Data mining by Genetic Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadmehr Rahbari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Data mining in computer science is the process of discovering interesting and useful patterns and relationships in large volumes of data. Most methods for mining problems is based on artificial intelligence algorithms. Neural network optimization based on three basic parameters topology, weights and the learning rate is a powerful method. We introduce optimal method for solving this problem. In this paper genetic algorithm with mutation and crossover operators change the network structure and optimized that. Dataset used for our work is stroke disease with twenty features that optimized number of that achieved by new hybrid algorithm. Result of this work is very well incomparison with other similar method. Low present of error show that our method is our new approach to efficient, high-performance data mining problems is introduced.