WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-neutron scattering cross

  1. Cross plane scattering correction

    Shao, L.; Karp, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Most previous scattering correction techniques for PET are based on assumptions made for a single transaxial plane and are independent of axial variations. These techniques will incorrectly estimate the scattering fraction for volumetric PET imaging systems since they do not take the cross-plane scattering into account. In this paper, the authors propose a new point source scattering deconvolution method (2-D). The cross-plane scattering is incorporated into the algorithm by modeling a scattering point source function. In the model, the scattering dependence both on axial and transaxial directions is reflected in the exponential fitting parameters and these parameters are directly estimated from a limited number of measured point response functions. The authors' results comparing the standard in-plane point source deconvolution to the authors' cross-plane source deconvolution show that for a small source, the former technique overestimates the scatter fraction in the plane of the source and underestimate the scatter fraction in adjacent planes. In addition, the authors also propose a simple approximation technique for deconvolution

  2. Scattering cross section for various potential systems

    Myagmarjav Odsuren

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the problems of scattering in this framework, and show that the applied method is very useful in the investigation of the effect of the resonance in the observed scattering cross sections. In this study, not only the scattering cross sections but also the decomposition of the scattering cross sections was computed for the α–α system. To obtain the decomposition of scattering cross sections into resonance and residual continuum terms, the complex scaled orthogonality condition model and the extended completeness relation are used. Applying the present method to the α–α and α–n systems, we obtained good reproduction of the observed phase shifts and cross sections. The decomposition into resonance and continuum terms makes clear that resonance contributions are dominant but continuum terms and their interference are not negligible. To understand the behavior of observed phase shifts and the shape of the cross sections, both resonance and continuum terms are calculated.

  3. Scattering cross section for various potential systems

    Odsuren, Myagmarjav; Khuukhenkhuu, Gonchigdorj; Davaa, Suren [Nuclear Research Center, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Kato, Kiyoshi [Nuclear Reaction Data Centre, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2017-08-15

    We discuss the problems of scattering in this framework, and show that the applied method is very useful in the investigation of the effect of the resonance in the observed scattering cross sections. In this study, not only the scattering cross sections but also the decomposition of the scattering cross sections was computed for the α–α system. To obtain the decomposition of scattering cross sections into resonance and residual continuum terms, the complex scaled orthogonality condition model and the extended completeness relation are used. Applying the present method to the α–α and α–n systems, we obtained good reproduction of the observed phase shifts and cross sections. The decomposition into resonance and continuum terms makes clear that resonance contributions are dominant but continuum terms and their interference are not negligible. To understand the behavior of observed phase shifts and the shape of the cross sections, both resonance and continuum terms are calculated.

  4. Precise relative cross sections for np scattering

    Goetz, J.; Brogli-Gysin, C.; Hammans, M.; Haffter, P.; Henneck, R.; Jourdan, J.; Masson, G.; Qin, L.M.; Robinson, S.; Sick, I.; Tuccillo, M.

    1994-01-01

    We present data on the differential cross section for neutron-proton scattering for an incident neutron energy of 67 MeV. These data allow a precise determination of the 1 P 1 phase which, in phase-shift analyses, is strongly correlated with the S-D amplitude which we are measuring via different observables. ((orig.))

  5. Ideal gas scattering kernel for energy dependent cross-sections

    Rothenstein, W.; Dagan, R.

    1998-01-01

    A third, and final, paper on the calculation of the joint kernel for neutron scattering by an ideal gas in thermal agitation is presented, when the scattering cross-section is energy dependent. The kernel is a function of the neutron energy after scattering, and of the cosine of the scattering angle, as in the case of the ideal gas kernel for a constant bound atom scattering cross-section. The final expression is suitable for numerical calculations

  6. Neutron scattering cross sections of uranium-238

    Beghian, L.E.; Kegel, G.H.R.; Marcella, T.V.; Barnes, B.K.; Couchell, G.P.; Egan, J.J.; Mittler, A.; Pullen, D.J.; Schier, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    The University of Lowell high-resolution time-of-flight spectrometer was used to measure angular distributions and 90-deg excitation functions for neutrons scattered from 238 U in the energy range from 0.9 to 3.1 MeV. This study was limited to the elastic and the first two inelastic groups, corresponding to states of 238 U at 45 keV (2 + ) and 148 keV (4 + ). Angular distributions were measured at primary neutron energies of 1.1, 1.9, 2.5, and 3.1 MeV for the same three neutron groups. Whereas the elastic data are in fair agreement with the evaluation in the ENDF/B-IV file, there is substantial disagreement between the inelastic measurements and the evaluated cross sections. 12 figures

  7. Scattering cross-section of an inhomogeneous plasma cylinder

    Jiaming Shi; Lijian Qiu; Ling, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Scattering of em waves by the plasma cylinder is of significance in radar target detection, plasma diagnosis, etc. This paper discusses the general method to calculate the scattering cross-section of em waves from a plasma cylinder which is radially inhomogeneous and infinitely long. Numerical results are also provided for several plasma density profiles. The effect of the electron density distribution on the scattering cross-section is investigated

  8. Total cross sections for electron scattering by He

    De Heer, F.J.; Jansen, R.H.J.

    1977-01-01

    A set of total cross sections for scattering of electrons by He has been evaluated over the energy range of zero to 3000 eV by means of the analysis of experiments and theories on total cross sections for elastic scattering, ionisation and excitation, and on differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering. Between 0 and 19.8 eV, where no inelastic processes occur, the total cross sections for scattering are equal to those for elastic scattering. Above 19.8 eV total cross sections for scattering of electrons have been evaluated by adding those for ionisation, excitation and elastic scattering. The total cross sections thus obtained are probably accurate to about 5% over a large part of the energy range. They appear to be in very good agreement with the recent experimental results of Blaauw et al. (J. Phys. B.; 10:L299 (1977)). The present results have already proved useful for application in the dispersion relation for forward scattering in electron-helium collisions. (author)

  9. Scattering kernels and cross sections working group

    Russell, G.; MacFarlane, B.; Brun, T.

    1998-01-01

    Topics addressed by this working group are: (1) immediate needs of the cold-moderator community and how to fill them; (2) synthetic scattering kernels; (3) very simple synthetic scattering functions; (4) measurements of interest; and (5) general issues. Brief summaries are given for each of these topics

  10. Neutron total scattering cross sections of elemental antimony

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron total cross sections are measured from 0.8 to 4.5 MeV with broad resolutions. Differential-neutron-elastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of 50 to 200 keV and at scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 degrees. Lumped-level neutron-inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured over the same angular and energy range. The exPerimental results are discussed in terms of an optical-statistical model and are compared with respective values given in ENDF/B-V.

  11. Neutron total scattering cross sections of elemental antimony

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron total cross sections are measured from 0.8 to 4.5 MeV with broad resolutions. Differential-neutron-elastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of 50 to 200 keV and at scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 degrees. Lumped-level neutron-inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured over the same angular and energy range. The exPerimental results are discussed in terms of an optical-statistical model and are compared with respective values given in ENDF/B-V

  12. Scattering and absorption differential cross sections for double ...

    The scattering and absorption differential cross sections for nonlinear QED process such as double photon Compton scattering have been measured as a function of independent final photon energy. The incident gamma photons are of 0.662 MeV in energy as produced by an 8 Ci137Cs radioactive source and thin ...

  13. Differential cross sections for neutrino scattering on 12C

    Kolbe, E.

    1996-01-01

    Differential cross sections for neutrino scattering on 12 C are calculated within the (continuum) random phase approximation model. The charged current (ν e ,e - ) and (ν μ ,μ - ) capture reactions on 12 C are measured by the LSND Collaboration at LAMPF. We investigate and discuss the merits of such studies, especially the information that can be extracted from data for differential neutrino scattering cross sections. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  14. Positive Scattering Cross Sections using Constrained Least Squares

    Dahl, J.A.; Ganapol, B.D.; Morel, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    A method which creates a positive Legendre expansion from truncated Legendre cross section libraries is presented. The cross section moments of order two and greater are modified by a constrained least squares algorithm, subject to the constraints that the zeroth and first moments remain constant, and that the standard discrete ordinate scattering matrix is positive. A method using the maximum entropy representation of the cross section which reduces the error of these modified moments is also presented. These methods are implemented in PARTISN, and numerical results from a transport calculation using highly anisotropic scattering cross sections with the exponential discontinuous spatial scheme is presented

  15. Spin wave scattering and interference in ferromagnetic cross

    Nanayakkara, Kasuni; Kozhanov, Alexander [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States); Center for Nano Optics, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States); Jacob, Ajey P. [Exploratory Research Device and Integration, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Magnetostatic spin wave scattering and interference across a CoTaZr ferromagnetic spin wave waveguide cross junction were investigated experimentally and by micromagnetic simulations. It is observed that the phase of the scattered waves is dependent on the wavelength, geometry of the junction, and scattering direction. It is found that destructive and constructive interference of the spin waves generates switching characteristics modulated by the input phase of the spin waves. Micromagnetic simulations are used to analyze experimental data and simulate the spin wave scattering and interference.

  16. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of niobium

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-07-01

    Neutron total cross sections of niobium were measured from approx. = 0.7 to 4.5 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 50 keV with broad resolution. Differential-elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from approx. = 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of 0.1 to 0.2 MeV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between approx. = 20 and 160 degrees. Inelastically-scattered neutrons, corresponding to the excitation of levels at: 788 +- 23, 982 +- 17, 1088 +- 27, 1335 +- 35, 1504 +- 30, 1697 +- 19, 1971 +- 22, 2176 +- 28, 2456 +- (.), and 2581 +- (.) keV, were observed. An optical-statistical model, giving a good description of the observables, was deduced from the measured differential-elastic-scattering cross sections. The experimental-results were compared with the respective evaluated quantities given in ENDF/B-V.

  17. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of niobium

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-07-01

    Neutron total cross sections of niobium were measured from approx. = 0.7 to 4.5 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 50 keV with broad resolution. Differential-elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from approx. = 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of 0.1 to 0.2 MeV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between approx. = 20 and 160 degrees. Inelastically-scattered neutrons, corresponding to the excitation of levels at: 788 +- 23, 982 +- 17, 1088 +- 27, 1335 +- 35, 1504 +- 30, 1697 +- 19, 1971 +- 22, 2176 +- 28, 2456 +- (.), and 2581 +- (.) keV, were observed. An optical-statistical model, giving a good description of the observables, was deduced from the measured differential-elastic-scattering cross sections. The experimental-results were compared with the respective evaluated quantities given in ENDF/B-V

  18. Neutron Scattering Differential Cross Sections for 12C

    Byrd, Stephen T.; Hicks, S. F.; Nickel, M. T.; Block, S. G.; Peters, E. E.; Ramirez, A. P. D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    Because of the prevalence of its use in the nuclear energy industry and for our overall understanding of the interactions of neutrons with matter, accurately determining the effects of fast neutrons scattering from 12C is important. Previously measured 12C inelastic neutron scattering differential cross sections found in the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) show significant discrepancies (>30%). Seeking to resolve these discrepancies, neutron inelastic and elastic scattering differential cross sections for 12C were measured at the University of Kentucky Acceleratory Laboratory for incident neutron energies of 5.58, 5.83, and 6.04 MeV. Quasi mono-energetic neutrons were scattered off an enriched 12C target (>99.99%) and detected by a C6D6 liquid scintillation detector. Time-of-flight (TOF) techniques were used to determine scattered neutron energies and allowed for elastic/inelastic scattering distinction. Relative detector efficiencies were determined through direct measurements of neutrons produced by the 2H(d,n) and 3H(p,n) source reactions, and absolute normalization factors were found by comparing 1H scattering measurements to accepted NNDC values. This experimental procedure has been successfully used for prior neutron scattering measurements and seems well-suited to our current objective. Significant challenges were encountered, however, with measuring the neutron detector efficiency over the broad incident neutron energy range required for these measurements. Funding for this research was provided by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  19. Transport cross section for small-angle scattering

    D'yakonov, M.I.; Khaetskii, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    Classical mechanics is valid for describing potential scattering under the conditions (1) λ much-lt α and (2) U much-gt ℎυ/α, where λ is the de Broglie wavelength, α is the characteristic size of the scatterer, U is the characteristic value of the potential energy, and υ is the velocity of the scattered particle. The second of these conditions means that the typical value of the classical scattering angle is far larger than the diffraction angle λ/α. In this paper the authors show that this second condition need not hold in a derivation of the transport cross section. In other words, provided that the condition λ much-lt α holds, it is always possible to calculate the transport cross section from the expressions of classical mechanics, even in the region U approx-lt ℎυ/α, where the scattering is diffractive,and the differential cross section is greatly different from the classical cross section. The transport cross section is found from the classical expression even in the anticlassical case U much-lt ℎυ/α, where the Born approximation can be used

  20. Scattering cross section of unequal length dipole arrays

    Singh, Hema; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a detailed and systematic analytical treatment of scattering by an arbitrary dipole array configuration with unequal-length dipoles, different inter-element spacing and load impedance. It provides a physical interpretation of the scattering phenomena within the phased array system. The antenna radar cross section (RCS) depends on the field scattered by the antenna towards the receiver. It has two components, viz. structural RCS and antenna mode RCS. The latter component dominates the former, especially if the antenna is mounted on a low observable platform. The reduction in the scattering due to the presence of antennas on the surface is one of the concerns towards stealth technology. In order to achieve this objective, a detailed and accurate analysis of antenna mode scattering is required. In practical phased array, one cannot ignore the finite dimensions of antenna elements, coupling effect and the role of feed network while estimating the antenna RCS. This book presents the RCS estimati...

  1. Classical scattering cross section in sputtering transport theory

    Zhang Zhulin

    2002-01-01

    For Lindhard scaling interaction potential scattering commonly used in sputtering theory, the authors analyzed the great difference between Sigmund's single power and the double power cross sections calculated. The double power cross sections can give a much better approximation to the Born-Mayer scattering in the low energy region (m∼0.1). In particular, to solve the transport equations by K r -C potential interaction given by Urbassek few years ago, only the double power cross sections (m∼0.1) can yield better approximate results for the number of recoils. Therefore, the Sigmund's single power cross section might be replaced by the double power cross sections in low energy collision cascade theory

  2. Fast-neutron scattering cross sections of elemental zirconium

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1982-12-01

    Differential neturon-elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental zirconium are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 200 keV. Inelastic-neutron-scattering cross sections corresponding to the excitation of levels at observed energies of: 914 +- 25, 1476 +- 37, 1787 +- 23, 2101 +- 26, 2221 +- 17, 2363 +- 14, 2791 +- 15 and 3101 +- 25 keV are determined. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of the optical-statistical model and are compared with corresponding quantities given in ENDF/B-V

  3. Thermal neutron scattering cross sections of beryllium and magnesium oxides

    Al-Qasir, Iyad; Jisrawi, Najeh; Gillette, Victor; Qteish, Abdallah

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutron thermalization in BeO and MgO was studied using Ab initio lattice dynamics. • The BeO phonon density of states used to generate the current ENDF library has issues. • The BeO cross sections can provide a more accurate ENDF library than the current one. • For MgO an ENDF library is lacking: a new accurate one can be built from our results. • BeO is a better filter than MgO, especially when cooled down to 77 K. - Abstract: Alkaline-earth beryllium and magnesium oxides are fundamental materials in nuclear industry and thermal neutron scattering applications. The calculation of the thermal neutron scattering cross sections requires a detailed knowledge of the lattice dynamics of the scattering medium. The vibrational properties of BeO and MgO are studied using first-principles calculations within the frame work of the density functional perturbation theory. Excellent agreement between the calculated phonon dispersion relations and the experimental data have been obtained. The phonon densities of states are utilized to calculate the scattering laws using the incoherent approximation. For BeO, there are concerns about the accuracy of the phonon density of states used to generate the current ENDF/B-VII.1 libraries. These concerns are identified, and their influences on the scattering law and inelastic scattering cross section are analyzed. For MgO, no up to date thermal neutron scattering cross section ENDF library is available, and our results represent a potential one for use in different applications. Moreover, the BeO and MgO efficiencies as neutron filters at different temperatures are investigated. BeO is found to be a better filter than MgO, especially when cooled down, and cooling MgO below 77 K does not significantly improve the filter’s efficiency.

  4. Total cross sections for positron and electron scattering from pyrimidine

    Zecca, A; Chiari, L; Trainotti, E; GarcIa, G; Blanco, F; Brunger, M J

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report original measurements of total cross sections for positron scattering from the important biomolecule pyrimidine. The energy range of these measurements was 0.3-45 eV, while the energy resolution was ∼260 meV. In addition, we report theoretical results, calculated within the independent atom-screened additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) formalism, for the corresponding electron impact total cross sections. In that case the energy range is 1-10 000 eV. Total cross sections are very important input data for codes that seek to simulate charged-particle tracks in matter, as they define the mean-free path between collisions. As the present data and computations are to the best of our knowledge the first total cross sections to be reported for either positron or electron scattering from pyrimidine, they fill an important void in our available knowledge in the literature.

  5. Nonelastic-scattering cross sections of elemental nickel

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1980-06-01

    Neutron total cross sections of elemental nickel were measured from 1.3 to 4.5 MeV, at intervals of approx. 50 keV, with resolutions of 30 to 50 keV and to accuracies of 1 to 2.5%. Neutron differential-elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from 1.45 to 3.8 MeV, at intervals and with resolutions comparable to those of the total cross sections, and to accuracies of 3 to 5%. The nonelastic-scattering cross section is derived from the measured values to accuracies of greater than or equal to 6%. The experimental results are compared with previously reported values as represented by ENDF/B-V, and areas of consistency and discrepancy, noted. The measured results are shown to be in good agreement with the predictions of a model previously reported by the authors. 4 figures, 1 table

  6. Absolute elastic cross sections for electron scattering from SF6

    Gulley, R.J.; Uhlmann, L.J.; Dedman, C.J.; Buckman, S.J.; Cho, H.; Trantham, K.W.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Absolute differential cross sections for vibrationally elastic scattering of electrons from sulphur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) have been measured at fixed angles of 60 deg, 90 deg and 120 deg over the energy range of 5 to 15 eV, and also at 11 fixed energies between 2.7 and 75 eV for scattering angles between 10 deg and 180 deg. These measurements employ the magnetic angle-changing technique of Read and Channing in combination with the relative flow technique to obtain absolute elastic scattering cross sections at backward angles (135 deg to 180 deg) for incident energies below 15 eV. The results reveal some substantial differences with several previous determinations and a reasonably good level of agreement with a recent close coupling calculation

  7. Fast-neutron scattering cross sections of elemental silver

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1982-05-01

    Differential neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections of elemental silver are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 200 keV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 0 . Inelastically-scattered neutron groups are observed corresponding to the excitation of levels at; 328 +- 13, 419 +- 50, 748 +- 25, 908 +- 26, 1150 +- 38, 1286 +- 25, 1507 +- 20, 1623 +- 30, 1835 +- 20 and 1944 +- 26 keV. The experimental results are used to derive an optical-statistical model that provides a good description of the observed cross sections. The measured values are compared with corresponding quantities given in ENDF/B-V

  8. Measurement of proton inelastic scattering cross sections on fluorine

    Chiari, M., E-mail: chiari@fi.infn.it [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence and INFN Florence, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Caciolli, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padua and INFN Padua, Padova (Italy); Calzolai, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence and INFN Florence, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Climent-Font, A. [CMAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence and INFN Florence, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2016-10-01

    Differential cross-sections for proton inelastic scattering on fluorine, {sup 19}F(p,p’){sup 19}F, from the first five excited levels of {sup 19}F at 110, 197, 1346, 1459 and 1554 keV were measured for beam energies from 3 to 7 MeV at a scattering angle of 150° using a LiF thin target (50 μg/cm{sup 2}) evaporated on a self-supporting C thin film (30 μg/cm{sup 2}). Absolute differential cross-sections were calculated with a method not dependent on the absolute values of collected beam charge and detector solid angle. The validity of the measured inelastic scattering cross sections was then tested by successfully reproducing EBS spectra collected from a thick Teflon (CF{sub 2}) target. As a practical application of these measured inelastic scattering cross sections in elastic backscattering spectroscopy (EBS), the feasibility of quantitative light element (C, N and O) analysis in aerosol particulate matter samples collected on Teflon by EBS measurements and spectra simulation is demonstrated.

  9. TOTEM Results on Elastic Scattering and Total Cross-Section

    Kašpar, Jan

    2015-01-01

    TOTEM is an LHC experiment dedicated to forward hadronic physics. In this contribution, two main parts of its physics programme - proton-proton elastic scattering and total cross-section - are discussed. The analysis procedures are outlined and their status is reviewed.

  10. Electron scattering cross sections pertinent to electron microscopy

    Inokuti, M.

    1978-01-01

    Some elements of the physics that determine cross sections are discussed, and various sources of data are indicated that should be useful for analytical microscopy. Atoms, molecules, and to some extent, solids are considered. Inelastic and elastic scattering of electrons and some solid-state effects are treated. 30 references

  11. Generation of neutron scattering cross sections for silicon dioxide

    Ramos, R; Marquez Damian, J.I; Granada, J.R.; Cantargi, F

    2009-01-01

    A set of neutron scattering cross sections for silicon and oxygen bound in silicon dioxide were generated and validated. The cross sections were generated in the ACE format for MCNP using the nuclear data processing system NJOY, and the validation was done with published experimental data. This cross section library was applied to the calculation of five critical configurations published in the benchmark Critical Experiments with Heterogeneous Compositions of Highly Enriched Uranium, Silicon Dioxide and Polyethylene. The original calculations did not use the thermal scattering libraries generated in this work and presented significant differences with the experimental results. For this reason, the newly generated library was added to the input and the multiplication factor for each configuration was recomputed. The utilization of the thermal scattering libraries did not result in an improvement of the computational results. Based on this we conclude that integral experiments to validate this type of thermal cross sections need to be designed with a higher influence of thermal scattering in the measured result, and the experiments have to be performed under more controlled conditions. [es

  12. Elastic scattering and total cross section at very high energies

    Castaldi, R.; Sanguinetti, G.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the recent progress in the field of elastic scattering and total cross section in this new energy domain. In Section 2 a survey of the experimental situation is outlined. The most significant data are presented, with emphasis on the interpretation, not the specific details or technicalities. This section is therefore intended to give a self-contained look at the field, especially for the nonspecialist. In Section 3, hadron scattering at high energy is described in an impact parameter picture, which provides a model-independent intuitive geometrical representation. The diffractive character of elastic scattering, seen as the shadow of inelastic absorption, is presented as a consequence of unitarity in the s-channel. Spins are neglected throughout this review, inasmuch as the asymptotic behavior in the very high-energy limit is the main concern here. In Section 4 some relevant theorems are recalled on the limiting behavior of hadron-scattering amplitudes at infinite energy. There is also a brief discussion on how asymptotically rising total cross sections imply scaling properties in the elastic differential cross sections. A quick survey of eikonal models is presented and their predictions are compared with ISR and SPS Collider data

  13. Internal magnetic turbulence measurement in plasma by cross polarization scattering

    Zou, X L; Colas, L; Paume, M; Chareau, J M; Laurent, L; Devynck, P; Gresillon, D

    1994-09-01

    For the first time, the internal magnetic turbulence is measured by a new cross polarization scattering diagnostic in Tore Supra tokamak. The principle of this experiment is presented. It is based on the polarization change or mode conversion of the e.m. wave scattering by magnetic fluctuations. The role of different physical processes on the signal formation are investigated. From the Observation, a rough estimate for the relative magnetic fluctuations of about 10{sup -4} is obtained. A strong correlation of the measured signal with additional heating is observed. (author). 14 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Collision, scattering and absorption differential cross-sections in double-photon Compton scattering

    Dewan, R.; Saddi, M.B.; Sandhu, B.S.; Singh, B.; Ghumman, B.S.

    2005-01-01

    The collision, scattering and absorption differential cross-sections of double-photon Compton scattering are measured experimentally for 0.662 MeV incident gamma photons. Two simultaneously emitted gamma quanta are investigated using a slow-fast coincidence technique having 25 ns resolving time. The coincidence spectra for different energy windows of one of the two final photons are recorded using HPGe detector. The experimental data do not suffer from inherent energy resolution of gamma detector and provide more faithful reproduction of the distribution under the full energy peak of recorded coincidence spectra. The present results are in agreement with the currently acceptable theory of this higher order process

  15. Differential cross sections for e-bar CO elastic scattering

    Raj, Deo; Meetu

    2005-01-01

    In a recent investigation, Raj and Kumar modified the absorption potential of Staszewska el at al in such a way that it yielded the best agreement between theory and experiment for elastic cross sections when applied to e-bar - O 2 scattering over a wide incident energy range. In the present investigation, the same modified absorption potential of Raj and Kumar has been employed to obtain the elastic differential cross sections (EDCS) for electron scattering by CO molecules at intermediate energies (100-800 eV). The independent atom model alongwith partial waves has been used for these calculations.The present results of EDCS are in fairly good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  16. SCATTER

    Broome, J.

    1965-11-01

    The programme SCATTER is a KDF9 programme in the Egtran dialect of Fortran to generate normalized angular distributions for elastically scattered neutrons from data input as the coefficients of a Legendre polynomial series, or from differential cross-section data. Also, differential cross-section data may be analysed to produce Legendre polynomial coefficients. Output on cards punched in the format of the U.K. A. E. A. Nuclear Data Library is optional. (author)

  17. Effective temperatures and scattering cross sections in water mixtures determined by Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    Dawidowski, J.; Rodríguez Palomino, L.A.; Márquez Damián, J.I.; Blostein, J.J.; Cuello, G.J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effective temperatures of atoms can be determined by the DINS technique. • This is the first time that such application of this experimental technique is made. • This technique is able to measure the known cross sections of the atoms. • No anomalous cross section was found, at variance with Dreissmann’s et al. claims. - Abstract: The present work shows a series of results of Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) experiments on light and heavy water mixtures performed at the spectrometer VESUVIO (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK) employing an analysis method based on the information provided by individual detectors in forward and backward scattering positions. We investigated the effective temperatures of the different atoms composing the samples, a magnitude of considerable interest for Nuclear Engineering. The peak intensities and their relation with the bound-atom cross sections is analyzed, showing a good agreement with tabulated values which supports the use of this technique as non-destructive mass spectrometry. Previous results in the determination of scattering cross sections by this technique (known in the literature) that were at variance with the present findings are commented.

  18. Total cross sections and elastic scattering at the SSC

    Foley, K.J.

    1985-12-05

    The need is discussed of a special purpose detector for the measurement of elastic scattering at the SSC. The detector would cover as small a solid angle as is practical. Two techniques are described briefly to measure total cross sections at hadron storage rings. The direct method is to measure the interaction rate in an IR of known luminosity - a method that gets more difficult increasing energy. A second method is to use the optical theorem. 6 refs., 1 fig. (LEW)

  19. Crossing statistics of laser light scattered through a nanofluid.

    Arshadi Pirlar, M; Movahed, S M S; Razzaghi, D; Karimzadeh, R

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the crossing statistics of speckle patterns formed in the Fresnel diffraction region by a laser beam scattering through a nanofluid. We extend zero-crossing statistics to assess the dynamical properties of the nanofluid. According to the joint probability density function of laser beam fluctuation and its time derivative, the theoretical frameworks for Gaussian and non-Gaussian regimes are revisited. We count the number of crossings not only at zero level but also for all available thresholds to determine the average speed of moving particles. Using a probabilistic framework in determining crossing statistics, a priori Gaussianity is not essentially considered; therefore, even in the presence of deviation from Gaussian fluctuation, this modified approach is capable of computing relevant quantities, such as mean value of speed, more precisely. Generalized total crossing, which represents the weighted summation of crossings for all thresholds to quantify small deviation from Gaussian statistics, is introduced. This criterion can also manipulate the contribution of noises and trends to infer reliable physical quantities. The characteristic time scale for having successive crossings at a given threshold is defined. In our experimental setup, we find that increasing sample temperature leads to more consistency between Gaussian and perturbative non-Gaussian predictions. The maximum number of crossings does not necessarily occur at mean level, indicating that we should take into account other levels in addition to zero level to achieve more accurate assessments.

  20. Total cross sections for electron scattering with halocarbon molecules

    Naghma, Rahla; Gupta, Dhanoj; Antony, Bobby, E-mail: bka.ism@gmail.com

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • A quantum mechanical model to find elastic, inelastic and total CS by e{sup −} impact. • Spherical complex optical potential formalism is used to find total CS. • Result shows consistency and good agreement with previous data wherever available. • Maiden attempt to find CS for CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}, CHBr{sub 3}, CBr{sub 4} and C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}Cl (n = 2–4) molecules. • Interesting correlation observed between total CS and polarizability of the molecule. - Abstract: A theoretical study on electron collision with chlorinated methanes: CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CHCl{sub 3}, brominated methanes: CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}, CHBr{sub 3} and CBr{sub 4} and some mono chloroalkanes: C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}Cl (n = 2–4) molecules in gaseous ground state is undertaken to report elastic, inelastic and total cross sections in the 20–5000 eV energy range. The target molecule is represented as a sum of various scattering centres, which are assumed to scatter electrons independently. The spherical complex optical potential (SCOP) is formulated to represent the interaction dynamics between the electron and the constituent scattering centres. Using SCOP, the quantum mechanical scattering problem is solved through partial wave analysis. The results obtained for CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CHCl{sub 3} are compared with the available experimental and theoretical values. The elastic cross section for CBr{sub 4} shows satisfactory agreement with the previous available data. The cross sections for CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2}, CHBr{sub 3}, and C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}Cl (n = 2–4) molecules presented in this work are reported for the first time.

  1. Positron induced scattering cross sections for hydrocarbons relevant to plasma

    Singh, Suvam; Antony, Bobby

    2018-05-01

    This article explores positron scattering cross sections by simple hydrocarbons such as ethane, ethene, ethyne, propane, and propyne. Chemical erosion processes occurring on the surface due to plasma-wall interactions are an abundant source of hydrocarbon molecules which contaminate the hydrogenic plasma. These hydrocarbons play an important role in the edge plasma region of Tokamak and ITER. In addition to this, they are also one of the major components in the planetary atmospheres and astrophysical mediums. The present work focuses on calculation of different positron impact interactions with simple hydrocarbons in terms of the total cross section (Qtot), elastic cross section (Qel), direct ionization cross section (Qion), positronium formation cross section (Qps), and total ionization cross section (Qtion). Knowing that the positron-plasma study is one of the trending fields, the calculated data have diverse plasma and astrophysical modeling applications. A comprehensive study of Qtot has been provided where the inelastic cross sections have been reported for the first time. Comparisons are made with those available from the literature, and a good agreement is obtained with the measurements.

  2. Optical model calculation of neutron-nucleus scattering cross sections

    Smith, M.E.; Camarda, H.S.

    1980-01-01

    A program to calculate the total, elastic, reaction, and differential cross section of a neutron interacting with a nucleus is described. The interaction between the neutron and the nucleus is represented by a spherically symmetric complex potential that includes spin-orbit coupling. This optical model problem is solved numerically, and is treated with the partial-wave formalism of scattering theory. The necessary scattering theory required to solve this problem is briefly stated. Then, the numerical methods used to integrate the Schroedinger equation, calculate derivatives, etc., are described, and the results of various programming tests performed are presented. Finally, the program is discussed from a user's point of view, and it is pointed out how and where the program (OPTICAL) can be changed to satisfy particular needs

  3. Database for 238U inelastic scattering cross section evaluation

    Kanda, Yukinori; Fujikawa, Noboru; Kawano, Toshihiko

    1993-10-01

    There are discrepancies among evaluated neutron inelastic scattering cross sections for 238 U in the evaluated nuclear data files, JENDL-3, ENDF/B-VI, JEF-2, BROND-2 and CENDL-2. Re-evaluating them is internationally being discussed to obtain the best outcome which can be accepted in common at the present by experts in the world. This report has been compiled to review the discrepancies among the evaluations in the present data files and to provide a common database for the re-evaluation work (author)

  4. Ions cross-B collisional diffusion and electromagnetic wave scattering

    Tomchuk, B.P.; Gresillon, D.

    2000-01-01

    The calculation is presented of the averaged quadratic displacement of a collisional charged particle in a magnetic field. This calculation is used to obtain the statistical presentation of the electromagnetic field scattered by these particles. These results extend the previous calculations that were restricted to non-magnetized particles (Ornstein equation, Einstein diffusion, etc.). In addition this calculation foresees effects that are absent of the Ornstein equation: a modulation of the averaged quadratic displacement function at the cyclotron frequency and a maximum of the Cross-B diffusion coefficient when the cyclotron frequency is equal to the collision frequency (Bohm diffusion)

  5. Atomic form factors, incoherent scattering functions, and photon scattering cross sections

    Hubbell, J.H.; Veigele, W.J.; Briggs, E.A.; Brown, R.T.; Cromer, D.T.; Howerton, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    Tabulations are presented of the atomic form factor, F (α,Z), and the incoherent scattering function, S (x,Z), for values of x (=sin theta/2)/lambda) from 0.005 A -1 to 10 9 A -1 , for all elements A=1 to 100. These tables are constructed from available state-of-the-art theoretical data, including the Pirenne formulas for Z=1, configuration-into action results by Brown using Brown-Fontana and Weiss correlated wavefunctions for Z=2 to 6 non-relativistic Hartree-Fock results by Cromer for Z=7 to 100 and a relativistic K-shell analytic expression for F (x,Z) by Bethe Levinger for x>10 A -1 for all elements Z=2 to 100. These tabulated values are graphically compared with available photon scattering angular distribution measurements. Tables of coherent (Rayleigh) and incoherent (Compton) total scattering cross sections obtained by nummerical integration over combinations of F 2 (x,Z) with the Thomson formula and S (x,Z) with the Klum-Nishina Formual, respectively, are presented for all elements Z=1 to 100, for photon energies 100 eV (lambda=124 A) to 100 MeV (0.000124 A). The incoherent scattering cross sections also include the radiative and double-Compton corrections as given by Mork. Similar tables are presented for the special cases of terminally-bonded hydrogen and for the H 2 molecule, interpolated and extrapolated from values calculated by Stewart et al., and by Bentley and Stewart using Kolos-Roothaan wavefunctions

  6. Cross-channel coupling in positron-atom scattering

    McAlinden, M.T.; Kernoghan, A.A.; Walters, H.R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Coupled-state calculations including positronium channels are reported for positron scattering by atomic hydrogen, lithium and sodium. Integrated cross sections and total cross sections are presented for all three atoms. For lithium differential cross sections are also given. Throughout, comparison is made between results calculated with and without inclusion of the positronium channels. S-wave cross sections for positron scattering by atomic hydrogen in the Ps(1s, 2s, 2p) + H(1s, 2s, 2p) approximation show the high energy resonance first observed by Higgins and Burke in the coupled-static approximation. This resonance has now moved up to 51.05 eV and narrowed in width to 2.92 eV. Other pronounced structure is seen in the S-wave cross sections between 10 and 20 eV; it is tentatively suggested that this structure may be due to the formation of a temporary pseudo-molecular collision complex. Results calculated in the Ps(1s, 2s, anti 3 anti s, anti 4 anti s, 2p, anti 3 anti p, anti 4 anti p, anti 3 anti d, anti 4 anti d) + H(1s, 2s, anti 3 anti s, anti 4 anti s, 2p, anti 3 anti p, anti 4 anti p, anti 3 anti d, anti 4 anti d) approximation show convergence towards accurate values in the energy region below and in the Ore gap. Contrary to previous work on lithium using only an atomic basis, it is found that coupling to the 3d state of lithium is not so important when positronium channels are included; this is because a mixed basis of atom and positronium states gives a more rapidly convergent approximation than an expansion based on atom states alone. The threshold behaviour of the elastic cross section and the Ps(1s) formation cross section for lithium is investigated. Results in the Ps(1s, 2s, 2p) + Na(3s, 3p) approximation for sodium show good agreement with the total cross section measurements of Kwan et al. (orig.)

  7. Electron and positron atomic elastic scattering cross sections

    Stepanek, Jiri

    2003-01-01

    A method was developed to calculate the total and differential elastic-scattering cross sections for incident electrons and positrons in the energy range from 0.01 eV to 1 MeV for atoms of Z=1-100. For electrons, hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, krypton, and xenon, and for positrons, helium, neon, and argon atoms were considered for comparison with experimental data. First, the variationally optimized atomic static potentials were calculated for each atom by solving the Dirac equations for bound electron states. Second, the Dirac equations for a free electron or positron are solved for an atom using the previously calculated static potential accomplished (in the case of electrons) by 'adjusted' Hara's exchange potential for a free-state particle. Additional to the exchange effects, the charge cloud polarization effects are considered applying the correlation-polarization potential of O'Connell and Lane (with correction of Padial and Norcross) for incident electrons, and of Jain for incident positrons. The total, cutoff and differential elastic-scattering cross sections are calculated for incident electrons and positrons with the help of the relativistic partial wave analysis. The solid state effects for scattering in solids are described by means of a muffin-tin model, i.e. the potentials of neighboring atoms are superpositioned in such a way that the resulting potential and its derivative are zero in the middle distance between the atoms. The potential of isolated atom is calculated up to the radius at which the long-range polarization potential becomes a value of -10 -8

  8. Positron total scattering cross-sections for alkali atoms

    Sinha, Nidhi; Singh, Suvam; Antony, Bobby

    2018-01-01

    Positron-impact total scattering cross-sections for Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs and Fr atoms are calculated in the energy range from 5-5000 eV employing modified spherical complex optical potential formalism. The main aim of this work is to apply this formalism to the less studied positron-target collision systems. The results are compared with previous theoretical and experimental data, wherever available. In general, the present data show overall agreement and consistency with other results. Furthermore, we have done a comparative study of the results to investigate the effect of atomic size on the cross-sections as we descend through the group in the periodic table. We have also plotted a correlation graph of the present total cross-sections with polarizability and number of target electrons. The two correlation plots confirm the credibility and consistency of the present results. Besides, this is the first theoretical attempt to report positron-impact total cross-sections of alkali atoms over such a wide energy range.

  9. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    Baseman, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    The reactions of O( 3 P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O( 1 D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O( 3 P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively

  10. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    Baseman, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    The reactions of O(/sup 3/P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O(/sup 1/D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O(/sup 3/P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively.

  11. Scattering cross-sections of common calibration gases measured by IBBCEAS technique

    S.I. Issac

    Full Text Available In this study, incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS was used to measure scattering cross-sections of a few common gases in the 650–670 nm spectral range relative to that of dry air. Precise measurements of scattering cross-sections of these calibration gases in the visible spectral range are important. The IBBCEAS system developed in the laboratory was calibrated with a low-loss optical window. The measurements made at 660 nm were compared with previously measured cross-section values and found to be in good agreement with the existing measurements. Keywords: IBBCEAS, Rayleigh scattering, Scattering cross section

  12. Measurement of the diffractive cross section in deep inelastic scattering

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1996-02-01

    Diffractive scattering of γ*p→X+N, where N is either a proton or a nucleonic system with M N X of the system X up to 15 GeV at average Q 2 values of 14 and 31 GeV 2 . The diffractive cross section dσ diff /dM X is, within errors, found to rise linearly with W. Parameterizing the W dependence by the form dσ diff /dM X ∝(W 2 )sup((2 anti α IP -2)) the DIS data yield for the pomeron trajectory anti α IP =1.23±0.02(stat)±0.04(syst) averaged over t in the measured kinematic range assuming the longitudinal photon contribution to be zero. This value for the pomeron trajectory is substantially larger than anti α IP extracted from soft interactions. The value of anti α IP measured in this analysis suggests that a substantial part of the diffractive DIS cross section originates form processes which can be described by perturbative QCD. From the measured diffractive cross sections the diffractive structure function of the proton F 2 D(3) (β, Q 2 , x IP ) has been determined, where β is the momentum fraction of the struck quark in the pomeron. The form F 2 D(3) =constant. (1/x IP ) a gives a good fit to the data in all β and Q 2 intervals with a=1.46±0.04(stat)±0.08(syst). (orig.)

  13. Ab initio calculation of scattering length and cross sections at very low energies for electron-helium scattering

    Saha, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    The multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method for continuum wave functions has been used to calculate the scattering length and phase shifts over extremely low energies ranging from 0 to 1 eV very accurately for electron-helium scattering. The scattering length is calculated very accurately with wave functions computed exactly at zero energy, resulting in an upper bound of 1.1784. The electron correlation and polarization of the target by the scattering electron, which are very important in these calculations, have been taken into account in an accurate ab initio manner through the configuration-interaction procedure by optimizing both bound and continuum orbitals simultaneously at each kinetic energy of the scattered electron. Detailed results for scattering length, differential, total, and momentum-transfer cross sections obtained from the phase shifts are presented. The present scattering length is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental result of Andrick and Bitsch [J. Phys. B 8, 402 (1975)] and the theoretical result of O'Malley, Burke, and Berrington [J. Phys. B 12, 953 (1979)]. There is excellent agreement between the present total cross sections and the corresponding experimental measurements of Buckman and Lohmann [J. Phys. B 19, 2547 (1986)]. The present momentum-transfer cross sections also show remarkable agreement with the experimental results of Crompton, Elford, and Robertson [Aust. J. Phys. 23, 667 (1970)

  14. Double Bounce Component in Cross-Polarimetric SAR from a New Scattering Target Decomposition

    Hong, Sang-Hoon; Wdowinski, Shimon

    2013-08-01

    Common vegetation scattering theories assume that the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) cross-polarization (cross-pol) signal represents solely volume scattering. We found this assumption incorrect based on SAR phase measurements acquired over the south Florida Everglades wetlands indicating that the cross-pol radar signal often samples the water surface beneath the vegetation. Based on these new observations, we propose that the cross-pol measurement consists of both volume scattering and double bounce components. The simplest multi-bounce scattering mechanism that generates cross-pol signal occurs by rotated dihedrals. Thus, we use the rotated dihedral mechanism with probability density function to revise some of the vegetation scattering theories and develop a three- component decomposition algorithm with single bounce, double bounce from both co-pol and cross-pol, and volume scattering components. We applied the new decomposition analysis to both urban and rural environments using Radarsat-2 quad-pol datasets. The decomposition of the San Francisco's urban area shows higher double bounce scattering and reduced volume scattering compared to other common three-component decomposition. The decomposition of the rural Everglades area shows that the relations between volume and cross-pol double bounce depend on the vegetation density. The new decomposition can be useful to better understand vegetation scattering behavior over the various surfaces and the estimation of above ground biomass using SAR observations.

  15. Bound coherent and incoherent thermal neutron scattering cross sections of the elements

    Sears, V.F.

    1982-12-01

    An up-to-date table of bound coherent and incoherent thermal neutron scattering cross sections of the elements is presented. Values from two different data sources are calculated and compared. These sources are: (1) the free-atom cross sections listed in the Σbarn bookΣ and (2) the Julich scattering length tables. We also call attention to, and clarify, the confusion that exists in the literature concerning the sign of the imaginary part of the complex scattering length

  16. Low energy positron interactions with uracil—Total scattering, positronium formation, and differential elastic scattering cross sections

    Anderson, E. K.; Boadle, R. A.; Machacek, J. R.; Makochekanwa, C.; Sullivan, J. P. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Chiari, L. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, 5001 SA (Australia); Buckman, S. J., E-mail: Stephen.buckman@anu.edu.au [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Brunger, M. J. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, 5001 SA (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fısica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigationes Cientıficas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fısica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ingolfsson, O. [Department of Chemistry, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavík 107 (Iceland)

    2014-07-21

    Measurements of the grand total and total positronium formation cross sections for positron scattering from uracil have been performed for energies between 1 and 180 eV, using a trap-based beam apparatus. Angular, quasi-elastic differential cross section measurements at 1, 3, 5, 10, and 20 eV are also presented and discussed. These measurements are compared to existing experimental results and theoretical calculations, including our own calculations using a variant of the independent atom approach.

  17. 7Li neutron-induced elastic scattering cross section measurement using a slowing-down spectrometer

    Heusch M.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A new integral measurement of the 7Li neutron induced elastic scattering cross section was determined in a wide neutron energy range. The measurement was performed on the LPSC-PEREN experimental facility using a heterogeneous graphite-LiF slowing-down time spectrometer coupled with an intense pulsed neutron generator (GENEPI-2. This method allows the measurement of the integral elastic scattering cross section in a slowing-down neutron spectrum. A Bayesian approach coupled to Monte Carlo calculations was applied to extract naturalC, 19F and 7Li elastic scattering cross sections.

  18. Anomalous neutron Compton scattering cross section in zirconium hydride

    Abdul-Redah, T.; Krzystyniak, M.; Mayers, J.; Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    In the last few years we observed a shortfall of intensity of neutrons scattered from protons in various materials including metal hydrogen systems using neutron Compton scattering (NCS) on the VESUVIO instrument (ISIS, UK). This anomaly has been attributed to the existence of short-lived quantum entangled states of protons in these materials. Here we report on results of very recent NCS measurements on ZrH 2 at room temperature. Also here an anomalous shortfall of scattering intensity due to protons is observed. In contrast to previous experiments on NbH 0.8 , the anomalies found in ZrH 2 are independent of the scattering angle (or momentum transfer). These different results are discussed in the light of recent criticisms and experimental tests related to the data analysis procedure on VESUVIO

  19. Absolute measurement of the critical scattering cross section in cobalt

    Glinka, C.J.; Minkiewicz, V.J.; Passell, L.

    1975-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering techniques have been used to study the angular distribution of the critical scattering from cobalt above T/sub c/. These measurements have been put on an absolute scale by calibrating the critical scattering directly against the nuclear incoherent scattering from cobalt. In this way the interaction range r 1 , which appears in the classical and modified Ornstein--Zernike expressions for the asymptotic form of the spin pair correlation function and is related to the strength of the spin correlations, has been determined. We obtain r 1 /a = 0.46 +- 0.03 for the ratio of the interaction range to the nearest-neighbor distance in cobalt. This result is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Lack of agreement among previous determinations of the ratio r 1 /a made in iron failed to provide a definitive comparison with theory

  20. Basis for calculating cross sections for nuclear magnetic resonance spin-modulated polarized neutron scattering.

    Kotlarchyk, Michael; Thurston, George M

    2016-12-28

    In this work we study the potential for utilizing the scattering of polarized neutrons from nuclei whose spin has been modulated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). From first principles, we present an in-depth development of the differential scattering cross sections that would arise in such measurements from a hypothetical target system containing nuclei with non-zero spins. In particular, we investigate the modulation of the polarized scattering cross sections following the application of radio frequency pulses that impart initial transverse rotations to selected sets of spin-1/2 nuclei. The long-term aim is to provide a foundational treatment of the scattering cross section associated with enhancing scattering signals from selected nuclei using NMR techniques, thus employing minimal chemical or isotopic alterations, so as to advance the knowledge of macromolecular or liquid structure.

  1. Scaling relations in elastic scattering cross sections between multiply charged ions and hydrogen

    Rodriguez, V.D.

    1991-01-01

    Differential elastic scattering cross sections of bare ions from hydrogen are calculated using the eikonal approximation. The results satisfy a scaling relation involving the scattering angle, the ion charge and a factor related to the ion mass. A semiclassical explanation in terms of a distant collision hypothesis for small scattering angle is proposed. A unified picture of related scaling rules found in direct processes is discussed. (author)

  2. Direct measurement of the Rayleigh scattering cross section in various gases

    Sneep, Maarten; Ubachs, Wim

    2005-01-01

    Using the laser-based technique of cavity ring-down spectroscopy extinction measurements have been performed in various gases straightforwardly resulting in cross sections for Rayleigh scattering. For Ar and N 2 measurements are performed in the range 470-490nm, while for CO 2 cross sections are determined in the wider range 470-570nm. In addition to these gases also for N 2 O, CH 4 , CO, and SF 6 the scattering cross section is determined at 532nm, a wavelength of importance for lidar applications and combustion laser diagnostics. In O 2 the cross section at 532nm is found to depend on pressure due to collision-induced light absorption. The obtained cross sections validate the cross sections for Rayleigh scattering as derived from refractive indices and depolarization ratios through Rayleigh's theory at the few %-level, although somewhat larger discrepancies are found for CO, N 2 O and CH 4

  3. Calculation of total and ionization cross sections for electron scattering by primary benzene compounds

    Singh, Suvam; Naghma, Rahla; Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby

    2016-07-01

    The total and ionization cross sections for electron scattering by benzene, halobenzenes, toluene, aniline, and phenol are reported over a wide energy domain. The multi-scattering centre spherical complex optical potential method has been employed to find the total elastic and inelastic cross sections. The total ionization cross section is estimated from total inelastic cross section using the complex scattering potential-ionization contribution method. In the present article, the first theoretical calculations for electron impact total and ionization cross section have been performed for most of the targets having numerous practical applications. A reasonable agreement is obtained compared to existing experimental observations for all the targets reported here, especially for the total cross section.

  4. Calculation of total and ionization cross sections for electron scattering by primary benzene compounds

    Singh, Suvam; Naghma, Rahla; Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby, E-mail: bka.ism@gmail.com [Atomic and Molecular Physics Lab, Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India)

    2016-07-21

    The total and ionization cross sections for electron scattering by benzene, halobenzenes, toluene, aniline, and phenol are reported over a wide energy domain. The multi-scattering centre spherical complex optical potential method has been employed to find the total elastic and inelastic cross sections. The total ionization cross section is estimated from total inelastic cross section using the complex scattering potential-ionization contribution method. In the present article, the first theoretical calculations for electron impact total and ionization cross section have been performed for most of the targets having numerous practical applications. A reasonable agreement is obtained compared to existing experimental observations for all the targets reported here, especially for the total cross section.

  5. Homogenization of linearly anisotropic scattering cross sections in a consistent B1 heterogeneous leakage model

    Marleau, G.; Debos, E.

    1998-01-01

    One of the main problems encountered in cell calculations is that of spatial homogenization where one associates to an heterogeneous cell an homogeneous set of cross sections. The homogenization process is in fact trivial when a totally reflected cell without leakage is fully homogenized since it involved only a flux-volume weighting of the isotropic cross sections. When anisotropic leakages models are considered, in addition to homogenizing isotropic cross sections, the anisotropic scattering cross section must also be considered. The simple option, which consists of using the same homogenization procedure for both the isotropic and anisotropic components of the scattering cross section, leads to inconsistencies between the homogeneous and homogenized transport equation. Here we will present a method for homogenizing the anisotropic scattering cross sections that will resolve these inconsistencies. (author)

  6. Hydrogen scattering cross section, 1H(n,n)1H

    Stewart, L.

    1979-07-01

    The status of the hydrogen scattering cross section is reviewed with particular emphasis on standards applications. The ENDF/B-V evaluation is described in detail and compared with experimental data. 58 references

  7. Progress on calculation of direct inelastic scattering cross section of neutron

    Zhenpeng, Chen [Qinghua Univ., Beijing, BJ (China). Dept. of Physics

    1996-06-01

    For n+ {sup 238}U inelastic scattering cross, there exist discrepancies among the available evaluations in various libraries. This is partly duo to the difference of direct inelastic scattering cross section calculated with coupled channel optical model (CCOM). The research on the level frame used in CCOM calculation, the research on used parameters of spherical optical model in CCOM calculation and the research on the amplitude of octupole phonon {beta}{sub 3} were presented. (2 figs.).

  8. Total and ionization cross sections of electron scattering by fluorocarbons

    Antony, B K; Joshipura, K N; Mason, N J

    2005-01-01

    Electron impact total cross sections (50-2000 eV) and total ionization cross sections (threshold to 2000 eV) are calculated for typical plasma etching molecules CF 4 , C 2 F 4 , C 2 F 6 , C 3 F 8 and CF 3 I and the CF x (x 1-3) radicals. The total elastic and inelastic cross sections are determined in the spherical complex potential formalism. The sum of the two gives the total cross section and the total inelastic cross section is used to calculate the total ionization cross sections. The present total and ionization cross sections are found to be consistent with other theories and experimental measurements, where they exist. Our total cross section results for CF x (x = 1-3) radicals presented here are first estimates on these species

  9. Model of homogeneous nucleus. Total and inelastic cross sections of nucleon-nucleus scattering

    Ponomarev, L.A.; Smorodinskaya, N.Ya.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the nucleon-nuckleus scattering amplitude at high energy can be easily calculated by generalization of the nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude and satisfies a simple factorization relation. As distinct from the Glauber model, the suggested approach makes no use of the nucleonic structure of the nucleus and the hadron-nucleus scattering amplitude is not expressed in terms of hadron-nucleon scattering amplitudes. The energy dependence of total and inelastic cross sections is successfully described for a number of nuclei

  10. Inversion of the total cross sections for electron-molecule and electron-atom scattering

    Lun, D.R.; Amos, K.; Allen, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    Inverse scattering theory has been applied to construct the interaction potentials from total cross sections as a function of energy for electrons scattered off of atoms and molecules. The underlying potentials are assumed to be real and energy independent and are evaluated using the Eikonal approximation and with real phase shifts determined from the total cross sections. The inversion potentials have been determined using either a high energy limit approximation or by using a fixed energy inversion method at select energies. These procedures have been used to analyse e - - CH 4 , e - - SiH 4 , e - -Kr and e - -Xe scattering data in particular. 14 refs., 1 tabs., 3 figs

  11. Self-scattering cross-section of molecules in a beam

    Lou, Y.S.

    1974-01-01

    Molecular collision cross-section has always been measured by the beam scattering method, or by the measurements of thermal conductivity and/or viscosity coefficient, etc. The cross-section thus obtained has been found to be different, qualitatively, from that of the self-scattering of the molecules moving within a molecular beam. By perturbing the zeroth order solution of the Boltzmann equation with a B-G-K kinetic model for the gas upstream to the orifice, and performing particle scattering calculation for molecules within the beam downstream to the orifice, such self-scattering collision cross-section can be determined from the experimental data of velocity distribution functions of molecules in the beam

  12. Measurement of Scattering Cross Section with a Spectrophotometer with an Integrating Sphere Detector.

    Gaigalas, A K; Wang, Lili; Karpiak, V; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Choquette, Steven

    2012-01-01

    A commercial spectrometer with an integrating sphere (IS) detector was used to measure the scattering cross section of microspheres. Analysis of the measurement process showed that two measurements of the absorbance, one with the cuvette placed in the normal spectrometer position, and the second with the cuvette placed inside the IS, provided enough information to separate the contributions from scattering and molecular absorption. Measurements were carried out with microspheres with different diameters. The data was fitted with a model consisting of the difference of two terms. The first term was the Lorenz-Mie (L-M) cross section which modeled the total absorbance due to scattering. The second term was the integral of the L-M differential cross section over the detector acceptance angle. The second term estimated the amount of forward scattered light that entered the detector. A wavelength dependent index of refraction was used in the model. The agreement between the model and the data was good between 300 nm and 800 nm. The fits provided values for the microsphere diameter, the concentration, and the wavelength dependent index of refraction. For wavelengths less than 300 nm, the scattering cross section had significant spectral structure which was inversely related to the molecular absorption. This work addresses the measurement and interpretation of the scattering cross section for wavelengths between 300 nm and 800 nm.

  13. Low energy neutron scattering for energy dependent cross sections. General considerations

    Rothenstein, W; Dagan, R [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-01

    We consider in this paper some aspects related to neutron scattering at low energies by nuclei which are subject to thermal agitation. The scattering is determined by a temperature dependent joint scattering kernel, or the corresponding joint probability density, which is a function of two variables, the neutron energy after scattering, and the cosine of the angle of scattering, for a specified energy and direction of motion of the neutron, before the interaction takes place. This joint probability density is easy to calculate, when the nucleus which causes the scattering of the neutron is at rest. It can be expressed by a delta function, since there is a one to one correspondence between the neutron energy change, and the cosine of the scattering angle. If the thermal motion of the target nucleus is taken into account, the calculation is rather more complicated. The delta function relation between the cosine of the angle of scattering and the neutron energy change is now averaged over the spectrum of velocities of the target nucleus, and becomes a joint kernel depending on both these variables. This function has a simple form, if the target nucleus behaves as an ideal gas, which has a scattering cross section independent of energy. An energy dependent scattering cross section complicates the treatment further. An analytic expression is no longer obtained for the ideal gas temperature dependent joint scattering kernel as a function of the neutron energy after the interaction and the cosine of the scattering angle. Instead the kernel is expressed by an inverse Fourier Transform of a complex integrand, which is averaged over the velocity spectrum of the target nucleus. (Abstract Truncated)

  14. Measurement of Z dependence of elastic scattering cross-sections of 0. 145 MeV gamma rays

    Ghumman, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1981-11-01

    The Z dependence of elastic scattering cross-sections of 0.145 MeV gamma rays is investigated at large scattering angles. Measurements are made with scatterers of Pb, W, Sn, Ag, Mo, Zn, Cu, Fe and Al at scattering angles from 75 deg to 150 deg. The experimental results are compared with the available theoretical and experimental data.

  15. Endpoint behavior of high-energy scattering cross sections

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul

    2010-01-01

    In high-energy processes near the endpoint, there emerge new contributions associated with spectator interactions. Away from the endpoint region, these new contributions are suppressed compared to the leading contribution, but the leading contribution becomes suppressed as we approach the endpoint and the new contributions become comparable. We present how the new contributions scale as we reach the endpoint and show that they are comparable to the suppressed leading contributions in deep inelastic scattering by employing a power-counting analysis. The hadronic tensor in deep inelastic scattering is shown to factorize including the spectator interactions, and it can be expressed in terms of the light cone distribution amplitudes of initial hadrons. We also consider the contribution of the spectator contributions in Drell-Yan processes. Here the spectator interactions are suppressed compared to double parton annihilation according to the power counting.

  16. On calculating phase shifts and performing fits to scattering cross sections or transport properties

    Hepburn, J.W.; Roy, R.J. Le

    1978-01-01

    Improved methods of calculating quantum mechanical phase shifts and for performing least-squares fits to scattering cross sections or transport properties, are described. Their use in a five-parameter fit to experimental differential cross sections reduces the computer time by a factor of 4-7. (Auth.)

  17. Experiment to measure total cross sections, differential cross sections and polarization effects in pp elastic scattering at RHIC

    Guryn, W.

    1998-02-01

    The authors are describing an experiment to study proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Using both polarized and unpolarized beams, the experiment will study pp elastic scattering from √s = 50 GeV to √s = 500 GeV in two kinematical regions. In the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region, 0.0005 2 , they will measure and study the s dependence of the total and elastic cross sections, σ tot and σ el ; the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, ρ; and the nuclear slope parameter of the pp elastic scattering, b. In the medium |t|-region, |t| 2 , they plan to study the evolution of the dip structure with s, as observed at ISR in the differential elastic cross section, dσ el /dt, and the s and |t| dependence of b. With the polarized beams the following can be measured: the difference in the total cross sections as function of initial transverse spin states Δσ T , the analyzing power, A N , and the transverse spin correlation parameter A NN . The behavior of the analyzing power A N at RHIC energies in the dip region of dσ el /dt, where a pronounced structure was found at fixed-target experiments will be studied. The relation of pp elastic scattering to the beam polarization measurement at RHIC is also discussed

  18. On the classical and quantum scattering cross-sections on the impenetrable sphere

    Afanasiev, G.N.; Dobromyslov, M.B.; Schpakov, V.P.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of the difference of particle scattering cross sections on the impenetrable sphere is considered in the frame of quantum mechanics and classical mechanics. Using plane waves for the incident particles and the solutions of the Schroedinger equation with the definite energy and momenta for the wave functions quantum and classical cross sections are compared. It is shown that these cross sections are the same if the incident flow is defined similarly in both cases and if the measuring apparatus is ideal

  19. Study of scattering cross section of a plasma column using Green's function volume integral equation method

    Soltanmoradi, Elmira; Shokri, Babak

    2017-05-01

    In this article, the electromagnetic wave scattering from plasma columns with inhomogeneous electron density distribution is studied by the Green's function volume integral equation method. Due to the ready production of such plasmas in the laboratories and their practical application in various technological fields, this study tries to find the effects of plasma parameters such as the electron density, radius, and pressure on the scattering cross-section of a plasma column. Moreover, the incident wave frequency influence of the scattering pattern is demonstrated. Furthermore, the scattering cross-section of a plasma column with an inhomogeneous collision frequency profile is calculated and the effect of this inhomogeneity is discussed first in this article. These results are especially used to determine the appropriate conditions for radar cross-section reduction purposes. It is shown that the radar cross-section of a plasma column reduces more for a larger collision frequency, for a relatively lower plasma frequency, and also for a smaller radius. Furthermore, it is found that the effect of the electron density on the scattering cross-section is more obvious in comparison with the effect of other plasma parameters. Also, the plasma column with homogenous collision frequency can be used as a better shielding in contrast to its inhomogeneous counterpart.

  20. Angular finite volume method for solving the multigroup transport equation with piecewise average scattering cross sections

    Calloo, A.; Vidal, J.F.; Le Tellier, R.; Rimpault, G., E-mail: ansar.calloo@cea.fr, E-mail: jean-francois.vidal@cea.fr, E-mail: romain.le-tellier@cea.fr, E-mail: gerald.rimpault@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DER/SPRC/LEPh, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with the solving of the multigroup integro-differential form of the transport equation for fine energy group structure. In that case, multigroup transfer cross sections display strongly peaked shape for light scatterers and the current Legendre polynomial expansion is not well-suited to represent them. Furthermore, even if considering an exact scattering cross sections representation, the scattering source in the discrete ordinates method (also known as the Sn method) being calculated by sampling the angular flux at given directions, may be wrongly computed due to lack of angular support for the angular flux. Hence, following the work of Gerts and Matthews, an angular finite volume solver has been developed for 2D Cartesian geometries. It integrates the multigroup transport equation over discrete volume elements obtained by meshing the unit sphere with a product grid over the polar and azimuthal coordinates and by considering the integrated flux per solid angle element. The convergence of this method has been compared to the S{sub n} method for a highly anisotropic benchmark. Besides, piecewise-average scattering cross sections have been produced for non-bound Hydrogen atoms using a free gas model for thermal neutrons. LWR lattice calculations comparing Legendre representations of the Hydrogen scattering multigroup cross section at various orders and piecewise-average cross sections for this same atom are carried out (while keeping a Legendre representation for all other isotopes). (author)

  1. Angular finite volume method for solving the multigroup transport equation with piecewise average scattering cross sections

    Calloo, A.; Vidal, J.F.; Le Tellier, R.; Rimpault, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the solving of the multigroup integro-differential form of the transport equation for fine energy group structure. In that case, multigroup transfer cross sections display strongly peaked shape for light scatterers and the current Legendre polynomial expansion is not well-suited to represent them. Furthermore, even if considering an exact scattering cross sections representation, the scattering source in the discrete ordinates method (also known as the Sn method) being calculated by sampling the angular flux at given directions, may be wrongly computed due to lack of angular support for the angular flux. Hence, following the work of Gerts and Matthews, an angular finite volume solver has been developed for 2D Cartesian geometries. It integrates the multigroup transport equation over discrete volume elements obtained by meshing the unit sphere with a product grid over the polar and azimuthal coordinates and by considering the integrated flux per solid angle element. The convergence of this method has been compared to the S_n method for a highly anisotropic benchmark. Besides, piecewise-average scattering cross sections have been produced for non-bound Hydrogen atoms using a free gas model for thermal neutrons. LWR lattice calculations comparing Legendre representations of the Hydrogen scattering multigroup cross section at various orders and piecewise-average cross sections for this same atom are carried out (while keeping a Legendre representation for all other isotopes). (author)

  2. Total scattering cross sections and interatomic potentials for neutral hydrogen and helium on some noble gases

    Ruzic, D.N.; Cohen, S.A.

    1985-04-01

    Measurements of energy-dependent scattering cross sections for 30 to 1800 eV D incident on He, Ne, Ar, and Kr, and for 40 to 850 eV He incident on He, Ar, and Kr are presented. They are determined by using the charge-exchange efflux from the Princeton Large Torus tokamak as a source of D or He. These neutrals are passed through a gas-filled scattering cell and detected by a time-of-flight spectrometer. The cross section for scattering greater than the effective angle of the apparatus (approx. =20 mrad) is found by measuring the energy-dependent attenuation of D or He as a function of pressure in the scattering cell. The interatomic potential is extracted from the data

  3. Absolute cross sections from the ''boomerang model'' for resonant electron-molecule scattering

    Dube, L.; Herzenberg, A.

    1979-01-01

    The boomerang model is used to calculate absolute cross sections near the 2 Pi/sub g/ shape resonance in e-N 2 scattering. The calculated cross sections are shown to satisfy detailed balancing. The exchange of electrons is taken into account. A parametrized complex-potential curve for the intermediate N 2 /sup ts-/ ion is determined from a small part of the experimental data, and then used to calculate other properties. The calculations are in good agreement with the absolute cross sections for vibrational excitation from the ground state, the absolute cross section v = 1 → 2, and the absolute total cross section

  4. Quantal inversion of cross-section for the elastic scattering of 200 MeV protons from 12C

    Allen, L.J.; Amos, K.; Dortmans, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Fixed energy quantal inverse scattering theory has been used to analyse the differential cross-section from the elastic scattering of 200 MeV protons from 12 C. Ambiguities in obtaining the scattering function from the differential cross-section are discussed and by means of example it is illustrated that not all scattering functions lead to physically reasonable potentials. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  5. Effective response and scattering cross section of spherical inclusions in a medium

    Alexopoulos, A., E-mail: Aris.Alexopoulos@dsto.defence.gov.a [Electronic Warfare and Radar Division, Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO), PO Box 1500, Edinburgh 5111 (Australia)

    2009-08-24

    The Maxwell-Garnett theory for a right-handed homogeneous system is extended in order to investigate the effective response of a medium consisting of low density distributed 3-dimensional inclusions. The polarisability factor is modified to account for inclusions with binary layered volumes and it is shown that such a configuration can yield doubly negative effective permittivity and permeability. Terms representing second-order scattering interactions between binary inclusions in the medium are derived and are used to reformulate conventional effective medium theory. In the appropriate limit, the one-body theory of Maxwell-Garnett is recovered. The scattering cross section of the spherical inclusions is determined and comparison is made to homogeneous dielectric scatterers in the Rayleigh limit. It is found that the scattering resonances can be manipulated using the inclusion parameters. Furthermore, the effect that two-interacting spherical inclusions in a medium have on the scattering cross section is investigated via higher order dipole moments while the issue of reducing the scattering cross section to zero is also examined.

  6. Some remarks on the neutron elastic- and enelastic-scattering cross sections of palladium

    Chiba, S.; Guenther, P.T.; Smith, A.B.

    1989-05-01

    The cross sections for the elastic-scattering of 5.9, 7.1 and 8.0 MeV neutrons from elemental palladium were measured at forty scattering angles distributed between ∼15/degree/ and 160/degree/. The inelastic-scattering cross sections for the excitation of palladium levels at energies of 260 keV to 560 keV were measured with high resolution at the same energies, and at a scattering angle of 80/degree/. The experimental results were combined with lower-energy values previously obtained by this group to provide a comprehensive data base extending from near the inelastic-scattering threshold to 8 MeV. That data base was interpreted in terms of a coupled-channel model, including the inelastic excitation of one- and two-phonon vibrational levels of the even isotopes of palladium. It was concluded that the palladium inelastic-scattering cross section, at the low energies of interest in assessment of fast-fission-reactor performance, are large (∼50% greater than given in widely used evaluated fission-product data files). They primarily involve compound-nucleus processes, with only a small direct-reaction component attributable to the excitation of the one-phonon, 2 + , vibrational levels of the even isotopes of palladium. 24 refs., 6 figs

  7. Scattering chamber facility for double-differential cross-section

    inducedcharged-particle productions is very important for estimating the nuclear heating and radiation damage of a fusion reactor. Only a few experimental data are available even though the nuclear reaction cross-section data of structural materials are ...

  8. Scattering and absorption differential cross sections for double ...

    degraded gamma quanta at the same time as the recoil electron. ... [2–4] are confined to energy, angular distribution, collision differential cross section and ... The positions of the two detectors are adjusted in such a way that they do not ... the energy values weighted in proportion to the probability for occurrence of this ...

  9. Collective scattering of electromagnetic waves and cross-B plasma diffusion

    Gresillon, D.; Cabrit, B.; Truc, A.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetized plasmas occuring in nature as well as in fusion laboratories are oftenly irregularly shaked by magnetic field fluctuations. The so-called ''coherent scattering'' of electromagnetic wave from nonuniform, irregularly moving plasmas is investigated in the case where the scattering wavelength is large compared to the Debye length, but of the order of the irregularities correlation length. The scattered signal frequency spectrum is shown to be a transform of the plasma motion statistical characteristics. When the scattering wavelength is larger than the plasma motion correlation length, the frequency spectrum is shown to be of a lorentzian shape, with a frequency width that provides a direct measurement of the cross-B particle diffusion coefficient. This is illustrated by two series of recently obtained experimental results: radar coherent backscattering observations of the auroral plasma, and far infrared scattering from tokamak fusion plasma. Radar coherent backscattering shows the transition from Gauss to Lorentz scattered frequency spectra. In infrared Laser coherent scattering experiments from the Tore-Supra tokamak, a particular frequency line is observed to present a Lorentzian shape, that directly provides an electron cross-field diffusion coefficient. This diffusion coefficient agrees with the electron heat conductivity coefficient that is obtained from the observation of temperature profiles and energy balance. (Author)

  10. Proton-Nucleus Elastic Cross Sections Using Two-Body In-Medium Scattering Amplitudes

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, a method was developed of extracting nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross sections in the medium directly from experiment. The in-medium NN cross sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the Langley Research Center. The ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium was investigated. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium NN cross sections to calculate elastic proton-nucleus cross sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions.

  11. New type of cross section singularity in backward scattering: the Coulomb glory

    Demkov, Y.N.; Ostrovskii, V.N.; Tel'nov, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    For classical scattering by a central potential that exhibits Coulomb behavior (i.e., that is attractive) at small distances, the scattering angle theta tends to π as the orbital angular momentum L decreases. The differential cross section for scattering through angles close to π can be characterized by the power series expansion of the difference theta(L)--π in small L, only odd powers of L being present in this expansion. Expressions are found for the coefficients in the linear (c 1 ) and cubic (c 3 ): in L: terms. It is shown that, for a broad class of screened Coulomb potentials, the coefficient c 1 vanishes at some value of the collision energy E 0 . At the energy E = E 0 the classical cross section diverges in the case of backward scattering (the Coulomb glory); in wave mechanics the cross section possesses a maximum. The behavior of the cross section for energies close to E 0 is computed. The application of the theory to electron scattering by atoms, in which the Coulomb interaction at small distances is determined by the interaction with the nucleus (charge Z) and E 0 = 0.0103Z 4 /sup // 3 keV, is discussed

  12. Distribution of Off-Diagonal Cross Sections in Quantum Chaotic Scattering: Exact Results and Data Comparison.

    Kumar, Santosh; Dietz, Barbara; Guhr, Thomas; Richter, Achim

    2017-12-15

    The recently derived distributions for the scattering-matrix elements in quantum chaotic systems are not accessible in the majority of experiments, whereas the cross sections are. We analytically compute distributions for the off-diagonal cross sections in the Heidelberg approach, which is applicable to a wide range of quantum chaotic systems. Thus, eventually, we fully solve a problem that already arose more than half a century ago in compound-nucleus scattering. We compare our results with data from microwave and compound-nucleus experiments, particularly addressing the transition from isolated resonances towards the Ericson regime of strongly overlapping ones.

  13. Fast-neutron total and elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental indium

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    Broad-resolution neutron total cross sections of elemental indium were measured from 0.8 to 4.5 MeV. Differential-elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from approx. = 1.5 to 3.8 MeV at intervals of approx. = 50 to 200 keV and at scattering angles in the range 20 to 160 degrees. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of the optical-statistical model and are compared with respective values given in ENDF/B-V

  14. MUTIL, Asymmetry Factor of Mott Cross-Sections for Electron, Positron Scattering

    Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The asymmetry factor S of Mott's differential cross section for the scattering of electrons and positrons by point nuclei without screening is calculated for any energy, atomic number and angle of scattering. 2 - Method of solution: We have summed the conditionally convergent series, F and G, appearing in the asymmetry factor using two consecutive transformations: The one of Yennie, Ravenhall and Wilson and that of Euler till we have seven times six significant figures repeated in the factor S. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Those appearing in the use of Mott's cross section for unscreened point nuclei

  15. Elastic scattering and total reaction cross section for the 6He + 27Al system

    Benjamim, E.A.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Mendes Junior, D.R.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Guimaraes, V.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Chamon, L.C.; Hussein, M.S.; Moro, A.M.; Arazi, A.; Padron, I.; Alcantara Nunez, J.; Assuncao, M.; Barioni, A.; Camargo, O.; Denke, R.Z.; Faria, P.N. de; Pires, K.C.C.

    2007-01-01

    The elastic scattering of the radioactive halo nucleus 6 He on 27 Al target was measured at four energies close to the Coulomb barrier using the RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil) facility. The Sao Paulo Potential (SPP) was used and its diffuseness and imaginary strength were adjusted to fit the elastic scattering angular distributions. Reaction cross-sections were extracted from the optical model fits. The reduced reaction cross-sections of 6 He on 27 Al are similar to those for stable, weakly bound projectiles as 6,7 Li, 9 Be and larger than stable, tightly bound projectile as 16 O on 27 Al

  16. Modified automatic term selection v2: A faster algorithm to calculate inelastic scattering cross-sections

    Rusz, Ján, E-mail: jan.rusz@fysik.uu.se

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • New algorithm for calculating double differential scattering cross-section. • Shown good convergence properties. • Outperforms older MATS algorithm, particularly in zone axis calculations. - Abstract: We present a new algorithm for calculating inelastic scattering cross-section for fast electrons. Compared to the previous Modified Automatic Term Selection (MATS) algorithm (Rusz et al. [18]), it has far better convergence properties in zone axis calculations and it allows to identify contributions of individual atoms. One can think of it as a blend of MATS algorithm and a method described by Weickenmeier and Kohl [10].

  17. Experiment to measure total cross sections, differential cross sections and polarization effects in pp elastic scattering at RHIC

    Guryn, W.

    1995-01-01

    The author is describing an experiment to study proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Using both polarized and unpolarized beams, the experiment will study pp elastic scattering from √s = 60 GeV to √s = 500 GeV in two kinematical regions .In the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region, 0.0005 2 , we will measure and study the s dependence of the total and elastic cross sections, σ tot and σ el ; the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, ρ; and the nuclear slope parameter of the pp elastic scattering, b. In the medium |t|, |t| ≤ 1.5 (GeV/c) 2 , we plan to study the evolution of the dip structure with s, as observed at ISR in the differential elastic cross section, dσ el /dt, and the s and |t| dependence of b. With the polarized beams the following can be measured: the difference in the total cross sections as function of initial transverse spin stated Δσ T , the analyzing power, A N , and the transverse spin correlation parameter A NN . The behavior of the analyzing power A N at RHIC energies in the dip region of dσ el /dt, where a pronounced structure was found at fixed-target experiments will be studied

  18. The Glauber model and heavy ion reaction and elastic scattering cross sections

    Mehndiratta, Ajay [Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati (India); Shukla, Prashant, E-mail: pshukla@barc.gov.in [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2017-05-15

    We revisit the Glauber model to study the heavy ion reaction cross sections and elastic scattering angular distributions at low and intermediate energies. The Glauber model takes nucleon–nucleon cross sections and nuclear densities as inputs and has no free parameter and thus can predict the cross sections for unknown systems. The Glauber model works at low energies down to Coulomb barrier with very simple modifications. We present new parametrization of measured total cross sections as well as ratio of real to imaginary parts of the scattering amplitudes for pp and np collisions as a function of nucleon kinetic energy. The nuclear (charge) densities obtained by electron scattering form factors measured in large momentum transfer range are used in the calculations. The heavy ion reaction cross sections are calculated for light and heavy systems and are compared with available data measured over large energy range. The model gives excellent description of the data. The elastic scattering angular distributions are calculated for various systems at different energies. The model gives good description of the data at small momentum transfer but the calculations deviate from the data at large momentum transfer.

  19. Absolute differential cross sections for elastic scattering of electrons by helium, neon, argon and molecular nitrogen

    Jansen, R.H.J.; De Heer, F.J.; Luyken, H.J.; Van Wingerden, B.

    1976-01-01

    An electron spectrometer has been constructed for the study of elastic and inelastic electron scattering processes. Up to now the apparatus has been used to measure differential cross sections of electrons elastically scattered by He, Ne, Ar and N 2 . Direct absolute cross section measurements were performed on N 2 at 500 eV impact energy and at scattering angles between 5 0 and 9 0 . Relative cross section measurements were done on He, Ne, Ar and N 2 at impact energies between 100 and 3000 eV and scattering angles between 5 0 and 55 0 . The relative cross sections were put on an absolute scale by means of the apparatus calibration factor derived from the absolute measurements on N 2 . The experimental apparatus and procedure are described in detail. The results are discussed and compared with those of other experimental and theoretical groups. Analysis of the exponential behaviour of the differential cross section as a function of momentum transfer yielded apparent polarizabilities of the target. (author)

  20. Impurity scattering in unconventional density waves: non-crossing approximation for arbitrary scattering rate

    Vanyolos, Andras; Dora, Balazs; Maki, Kazumi; Virosztek, Attila

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical study on the thermodynamic properties of impure quasi-one-dimensional unconventional charge and spin density waves in the framework of mean-field theory. The impurities are of the ordinary non-magnetic type. Making use of the full self-energy that takes into account all ladder- and rainbow-type diagrams, we are able to calculate the relevant low temperature quantities for arbitrary scattering rates. These are the density of states, specific heat and the shift in the chemical potential. Our results therefore cover the whole parameter space: they include both the self-consistent Born and the resonant unitary limits, and most importantly give exact results in between

  1. The investigation of the elastic photon scattering cross sections by copper atoms and ions

    Kuplyauskene, A.B.

    1976-01-01

    The differential cross sections of coherent scattering of photons on a copper atom and ions Cu + and Cu 2+ and also on ions Zn + and Ga 2+ in their ground states have been studied theoretically. The energy of an incident photon has varied in the range from 0.5 keV to 200 keV, and the scattering cross sections are given for angles of 30 deg, 60 deg, 90 deg, 120 deg, 150 deg. The calculations are performed in the formfactor approximation with the use of generalized hydrogen-like analytical radial orbitals. To clarify the contribution from individual shells the cross sections of photon scattering on individual electron of shells are calculated. It follows from the calculations that when the energies of the incident photon are less than 4 keV, the main contribution into the differential cross section is made by external electrons. Then, alongside with the increase of the energy, the contribution of the electrons decreases, and the inner shells begin to play a more important role. Therefore the photon cross sections for the energies greater than 50 keV practically coincide for atoms and ions of copper. The general regularities of the cross section variation accompanying the increase of the photon energy are similar for all the elements under study. The angular dependences of cross sections are such that they decrease first and after reaching the minimum at angles of 90 deg - 120 deg increase again

  2. Neutron total and scattering cross sections of 6Li in the few MeV region

    Smith, A.; Guenther, P.; Whalen, J.

    1980-02-01

    Neutron total cross sections of 6 Li are measured from approx. 0.5 to approx. 4.8 MeV at intervals of approx. 10 scattering angles and at incident-neutron intervals of approx.< 100 keV. Neutron differential inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured in the incident-energy range 3.5 to 4.0 MeV. The experimental results are extended to lower energies using measured neutron total cross sections recently reported elsewhere by the authors. The composite experimental data (total cross sections from 0.1 to 4.8 MeV and scattering cross sections from 0.22 to 4.0 MeV) are interpreted in terms of a simple two-level R-matrix model which describes the observed cross sections and implies the reaction cross section in unobserved channels; notably the (n;α)t reaction (Q = 4.783 MeV). The experimental and calculational results are compared with previously reported results as summarized in the ENDF/B-V evaluated nuclear data file

  3. A semi-empirical formula for total cross sections of electron scattering from diatomic molecules

    Liu Yufang; Sun Jinfeng; Henan Normal Univ., Xinxiang

    1996-01-01

    A fitting formula based on the Born approximation is used to fit the total cross sections for electron scattering by diatomic molecules (CO, N 2 , NO, O 2 and HCl) in the intermediate- and high-energy range. By analyzing the fitted parameters and the total cross sections, we found that the internuclear distance of the constituent atoms plays an important role in the e-diatomic molecule collision process. Thus a new semi-empirical formula has been obtained. There is no free parameter in the formula, and the dependence of the total cross sections on the internuclear distance has been reflected clearly. The total cross sections for electron scattering by CO, N 2 , NO, O 2 and HCl have been calculated over an incident energy range of 10-4000 eV. The results agree well with other available experimental and calculation data. (orig.)

  4. State-to-state differential cross sections for rotationally inelastic scattering of Na2 by He

    Bergmann, K.; Hefter, U.; Witt, J.

    1980-01-01

    State-to-state differential cross sections for rotational transitions of Na 2 in collisions with He are measured in the electronic and vibrational ground state at thermal collision energies using a new laser technique. Single rotational levels j/sub i/ are labelled by modulation of their population via laser optical pumping using a dye laser. The modulation of the fluorescence induced by an Ar + laser tuned to the level j/sub f/=28 is proportional to the cross section for collisional transfer j/sub i/→j/sub f/ and is detected at the scattering angle theta. A single optical fiber and a fiber bundle provide a flexible connection between the detector and the laser and photomultiplier, respectively. Transitions as large as Δj=20 are observed. At small angles elastic scattering is dominant, but rotationally inelastic processes become increasingly important at larger scattering angles. Rotational rainbow structure causing a steep onset of the cross section with the scattering angle theta (at fixed Δj) or a sharp cutoff with Δj (at fixed theta) is found. Preliminary results on rotational energy transfer in v=1 indicates that vibrational motion of the molecule favors larger rotational quantum jumps. semiclassical picture for the scattering of a hard ellipsoid gives a

  5. A new modelling of the multigroup scattering cross section in deterministic codes for neutron transport

    Calloo, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    In reactor physics, calculation schemes with deterministic codes are validated with respect to a reference Monte Carlo code. The remaining biases are attributed to the approximations and models induced by the multigroup theory (self-shielding models and expansion of the scattering law using Legendre polynomials) to represent physical phenomena (resonant absorption and scattering anisotropy respectively). This work focuses on the relevance of a polynomial expansion to model the scattering law. Since the outset of reactor physics, the latter has been expanded on a truncated Legendre polynomial basis. However, the transfer cross sections are highly anisotropic, with non-zero values for a very small range of the cosine of the scattering angle. Besides, the finer the energy mesh and the lighter the scattering nucleus, the more exacerbated is the peaked shape of this cross section. As such, the Legendre expansion is less suited to represent the scattering law. Furthermore, this model induces negative values which are non-physical. In this work, various scattering laws are briefly described and the limitations of the existing model are pointed out. Hence, piecewise-constant functions have been used to represent the multigroup scattering cross section. This representation requires a different model for the diffusion source. The discrete ordinates method which is widely employed to solve the transport equation has been adapted. Thus, the finite volume method for angular discretization has been developed and implemented in Paris environment which hosts the S n solver, Snatch. The angular finite volume method has been compared to the collocation method with Legendre moments to ensure its proper performance. Moreover, unlike the latter, this method is adapted for both the Legendre moments and the piecewise-constant functions representations of the scattering cross section. This hybrid-source method has been validated for different cases: fuel cell in infinite lattice

  6. The effect of background absorption on the compound cross-section in resonance scattering

    Frenkel, A.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of channel-channel correlations in the compound cross-section is studied in a model of a resonance above a compound background characterized by equal absorption in all open channels. A general rule which cannot be derived from unitarity alone is proved for the fluctuating cross-section. It provides new understanding of level-level correlations in scattering through compound nucleus states. (author)

  7. Numerical computation of discrete differential scattering cross sections for Monte Carlo charged particle transport

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Palmer, Todd S.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Generation of discrete differential scattering angle and energy loss cross sections. • Gauss–Radau quadrature utilizing numerically computed cross section moments. • Development of a charged particle transport capability in the Milagro IMC code. • Integration of cross section generation and charged particle transport capabilities. - Abstract: We investigate a method for numerically generating discrete scattering cross sections for use in charged particle transport simulations. We describe the cross section generation procedure and compare it to existing methods used to obtain discrete cross sections. The numerical approach presented here is generalized to allow greater flexibility in choosing a cross section model from which to derive discrete values. Cross section data computed with this method compare favorably with discrete data generated with an existing method. Additionally, a charged particle transport capability is demonstrated in the time-dependent Implicit Monte Carlo radiative transfer code, Milagro. We verify the implementation of charged particle transport in Milagro with analytic test problems and we compare calculated electron depth–dose profiles with another particle transport code that has a validated electron transport capability. Finally, we investigate the integration of the new discrete cross section generation method with the charged particle transport capability in Milagro.

  8. SCATLAW: a code of scattering law and cross sections calculation for liquids and solids

    Padureanu, I.; Rapeanu, S.; Rotarascu, G.; Craciun, C.

    1978-11-01

    A code for calculation of the scattering law S(Q,ω), differential and double differential cross sections and scattering kernels in the energy range E(0 - 683 meV) and wave-vector transfer Q(0 - 40 A -1 ) is presented. The code can be used both for solids and liquids which are coherent or incoherent scatterer. For liquids the calculations are based on the most recent theoretical models involving the correlation functions and generalized field approach. The phonon expansion model and the free gas model are also analysed in term of frequency spectra obtained from inelastic neutron scattering using time-of-flight technique. Several results on liquid sodium at T = 233 deg C and on liquid bismuth at T = 286 deg C and T = 402 deg C are presented. (author)

  9. SFERXS, Photoabsorption, Coherent, Incoherent Scattering Cross-Sections Function for Shielding

    Legarda, F.; Mtz de la Fuente, O.; Herranz, M.

    2002-01-01

    Description of program or function: The use of electromagnetic radiation cross-sections in radiation shielding calculations and more generally in transport theory applications actually requires an interpolation between values which are tabulated for certain values of the energy. In order to facilitate this process and to reduce the computer memory requirements, we have developed, by a least squares method, a set of functions which represents the cross-sections for the photoelectric absorption, the coherent (Rayleigh) and the incoherent (Compton) scattering (1). For this purpose we have accepted as true values the ones tabulated by Storm and Israel (2) for the photoeffect, by Hubbell et Al. (3) for the incoherent scattering and by Hubbell and Overbo (4) for the coherent scattering

  10. Accurate Calculations of Rotationally Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections Using Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory.

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-01-16

    For computational treatment of rotationally inelastic scattering of molecules, we propose to use the mixed quantum/classical theory, MQCT. The old idea of treating translational motion classically, while quantum mechanics is used for rotational degrees of freedom, is developed to the new level and is applied to Na + N2 collisions in a broad range of energies. Comparison with full-quantum calculations shows that MQCT accurately reproduces all, even minor, features of energy dependence of cross sections, except scattering resonances at very low energies. The remarkable success of MQCT opens up wide opportunities for computational predictions of inelastic scattering cross sections at higher temperatures and/or for polyatomic molecules and heavier quenchers, which is computationally close to impossible within the full-quantum framework.

  11. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of 103Rh

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-07-01

    Fast-neutron total cross sections of 103 Rh are measured with 30 to 50 keV resolutions from 0.7 to 4.5 MeV. Differential elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.45 to 3.85 MeV. Scattered-neutron groups corresponding to excited levels at 334 +- 13, 536 +- 7, 648 +- 25, 796 +- 20, 864 +- 22, 1120 +- 22, 1279 +- 50, 1481 +- 27, 1683 +- 39, 1840 +- 79, 1991 +- 71 and 2050 (tentative) keV are observed. An optical-statistical model is derived from the elastic-scattering results. The experimental values are compared with comparable quantities given in the ENDF/B-V evaluation

  12. Inelastic neutron scattering cross-section measurements on 7Li and 63,65Cu

    Nyman, Markus; Belloni, Francesca; Ichinkhorloo, Dagvadorj; Pirovano, Elisa; Plompen, Arjan; Rouki, Chariklia

    2017-09-01

    The γ-ray production cross section for the 477.6-keV transition in 7Li following inelastic neutron scattering has been measured from the reaction threshold up to 18 MeV. This cross section is interesting as a possible standard for other inelastic scattering measurements. The experiment was conducted at the Geel Electron LINear Accelerator (GELINA) pulsed white neutron source with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) spectrometer. Previous measurements of this cross section are reviewed and compared with our results. Recently, this cross section has also been calculated using the continuum discretized coupled-channels (CDCC) method. Experiments for studying neutrinoless double-β decay (2β0ν) or other very rare processes require greatly reducing the background radiation level (both intrinsic and external). Copper is a common shielding and structural material, used extensively in experiments such as COBRA, CUORE, EXO, GERDA, and MAJORANA. Understanding the background contribution arising from neutron interactions in Cu is important when searching for very weak experimental signals. Neutron inelastic scattering on natCu was investigated with GAINS. The results are compared with previous experimental data and evaluated nuclear data libraries.

  13. Inelastic neutron scattering cross-section measurements on 7Li and 63,65Cu

    Nyman Markus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The γ-ray production cross section for the 477.6-keV transition in 7Li following inelastic neutron scattering has been measured from the reaction threshold up to 18 MeV. This cross section is interesting as a possible standard for other inelastic scattering measurements. The experiment was conducted at the Geel Electron LINear Accelerator (GELINA pulsed white neutron source with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS spectrometer. Previous measurements of this cross section are reviewed and compared with our results. Recently, this cross section has also been calculated using the continuum discretized coupled-channels (CDCC method. Experiments for studying neutrinoless double-β decay (2β0ν or other very rare processes require greatly reducing the background radiation level (both intrinsic and external. Copper is a common shielding and structural material, used extensively in experiments such as COBRA, CUORE, EXO, GERDA, and MAJORANA. Understanding the background contribution arising from neutron interactions in Cu is important when searching for very weak experimental signals. Neutron inelastic scattering on natCu was investigated with GAINS. The results are compared with previous experimental data and evaluated nuclear data libraries.

  14. Characteristics of angular cross correlations studied by light scattering from two-dimensional microsphere films

    Schroer, M. A.; Gutt, C.; Grübel, G.

    2014-07-01

    Recently the analysis of scattering patterns by angular cross-correlation analysis (CCA) was introduced to reveal the orientational order in disordered samples with special focus to future applications on x-ray free-electron laser facilities. We apply this CCA approach to ultra-small-angle light-scattering data obtained from two-dimensional monolayers of microspheres. The films were studied in addition by optical microscopy. This combined approach allows to calculate the cross-correlations of the scattering patterns, characterized by the orientational correlation function Ψl(q), as well as to obtain the real-space structure of the monolayers. We show that CCA is sensitive to the orientational order of monolayers formed by the microspheres which are not directly visible from the scattering patterns. By mixing microspheres of different radii the sizes of ordered monolayer domains is reduced. For these samples it is shown that Ψl(q) quantitatively describes the degree of hexagonal order of the two-dimensional films. The experimental CCA results are compared with calculations based on the microscopy images. Both techniques show qualitatively similar features. Differences can be attributed to the wave-front distortion of the laser beam in the experiment. This effect is discussed by investigating the effect of different wave fronts on the cross-correlation analysis results. The so-determined characteristics of the cross-correlation analysis will be also relevant for future x-ray-based studies.

  15. Integral cross sections for π+p scattering between 52 and 126 MeV

    Friedman, E.; Goldring, A.; Wagner, G.J.; Altman, A.; Johnson, R.R.; Meirav, O.; Hanna, M.; Jennings, B.K.

    1989-06-01

    Integral cross-sections for the elastic scattering of π + on p from 20 degrees and 30 degrees to 180 degrees were measured at seven energies between 52 and 126 MeV. These integrals are found to be in good agreement with predictions made with currently accepted phase-shifts. (Author) 15 refs., tab., 2 figs

  16. Resonance effects in elastic cross sections for electron scattering on pyrimidine: Experiment and theory.

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent; Mašín, Zdeněk; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D

    2016-01-14

    We measured differential cross sections for elastic (rotationally integrated) electron scattering on pyrimidine, both as a function of angle up to 180(∘) at electron energies of 1, 5, 10, and 20 eV and as a function of electron energy in the range 0.1-14 eV. The experimental results are compared to the results of the fixed-nuclei Schwinger variational and R-matrix theoretical methods, which reproduce satisfactorily the magnitudes and shapes of the experimental cross sections. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. Resonant structures are observed at 0.2, 0.7, and 4.35 eV and calculations for different symmetries confirm their assignment as the X̃(2)A2, Ã(2)B1, and B̃(2)B1 shape resonances. As a consequence of superposition of coherent resonant amplitudes with background scattering the B̃(2)B1 shape resonance appears as a peak, a dip, or a step function in the cross sections recorded as a function of energy at different scattering angles and this effect is satisfactorily reproduced by theory. The dip and peak contributions at different scattering angles partially compensate, making the resonance nearly invisible in the integral cross section. Vibrationally integrated cross sections were also measured at 1, 5, 10 and 20 eV and the question of whether the fixed-nuclei cross sections should be compared to vibrationally elastic or vibrationally integrated cross section is discussed.

  17. 14N + 10B fusion and elastic scattering cross section measurements near the interaction barrier

    Wu, S.C.; Overley, J.C.; Barnes, C.A.; Switkowski, Z.E.

    1979-01-01

    The 14 N + 10 B fusion reactions were studied at c.m. energies between 2.9 and 7.5 MeV by measuring the yields of γ-rays from the residual nuclei formed by particle evaporation from the compound system. Cross sections for formation of the evaporation residues 16 O, 19 F, 19 Ne, 20 Ne, 21 Ne, 22 Ne, 22 Na, 23 Na and 23 Mg, as well as the total cross section, were deduced from these yields with the aid of statistical model calculations. 14 N + 10 B elastic scattering differential cross sections were measured from 4.3 to 9.1 MeV at THETA 74.4 degrees, and from 3.3 to 8.3 MeV at THETA = 90.0 degrees. The elastic scattering cross sections were analyzed within the framework of the incoming-wave boundary condition (IWBC) model. The fusion cross sections calculated for the real ion-ion potential deduced from the IWBC model fit to the elastic scattering are in good agreement with the measured values

  18. Elastic and inelastic vibrational cross sections for positron scattering by carbon monoxide

    Tenfen, W. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Fronteira Sul, 85770-000, Realeza, Paraná (Brazil); Arretche, F., E-mail: fartch@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Michelin, S.E.; Mazon, K.T. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil)

    2015-11-01

    The vibrational cross sections of the CO molecule induced by positron impact is the focus of this work. The positron–molecule interaction is represented by the static potential plus a model potential designed to take into account the positron–target correlations. To calculate the vibrational cross sections, we applied the multichannel version of the continued fractions method in the close-coupling scheme. We present vibrational excitation cross sections and elastic ones, for the ground and excited vibrational states. The results are interpreted in terms of the vibrational coupling-scheme used in the scattering model.

  19. Compton Scattering Cross Section on the Proton at High Momentum Transfer

    A. Danagoulian; V.H. Mamyan; M. Roedelbronn; K.A. Aniol; J.R.M. Annand; P.Y. Bertin; L. Bimbot; P. Bosted; J.R. Calarco; A. Camsonne; C.C. Chang; T.-H. Chang; J.-P. Chen; Seonho Choi; E. Chudakov; P. Degtyarenko; C.W. de Jager; A. Deur; D. Dutta; K. Egiyan; H. Gao; F. Garibaldi; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; A. Glamazdin; C. Glashausser; J. Gomez; D.J. Hamilton; J.-O. Hansen; D. Hayes; D.W. Higinbotham; W. Hinton; T. Horn; C. Howell; T. Hunyady; C.E. Hyde-Wright; X. Jiang; M.K. Jones; M. Khandaker; A. Ketikyan; V. Koubarovski; K. Kramer; G. Kumbartzki; G. Laveissiere; J. LeRose; R.A. Lindgren; D.J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; P. Moussiegt; S. Nanda; A.M. Nathan; D.M. Nikolenko; V. Nelyubin; B.E. Norum; K. Paschke; L. Pentchev; C.F. Perdrisat; E. Piasetzky; R. Pomatsalyuk; V.A. Punjabi; I. Rachek; A. Radyushkin; B. Reitz; R. Roche; G. Ron; F. Sabatie; A. Saha; N. Savvinov; A. Shahinyan; Y. Shestakov; S. Sirca; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; P. Stoler; S. Tajima; V. Sulkosky; L. Todor; B. Vlahovic; L.B. Weinstein; K. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; H. Voskanyan; H. Xiang; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

    2007-01-01

    Cross-section values for Compton scattering on the proton were measured at 25 kinematic settings over the range s = 5-11 and -t = 2-7 GeV2 with statistical accuracy of a few percent. The scaling power for the s-dependence of the cross section at fixed center of mass angle was found to be 8.0 +/- 0.2, strongly inconsistent with the prediction of perturbative QCD. The observed cross section values are in fair agreement with the calculations using the handbag mechanism, in which the external photons couple to a single quark

  20. Theory of Thomson scattering in a strong magnetic field, 2. [Relativistic quantum theory, cross sections

    Hamada, T [Ibaraki Univ., Mito (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1975-07-01

    A relativistic quantum theory is formulated for the Compton scattering by electrons in a strong magnetic field. It is shown that the relativistic quantum (Klein-Nishina) cross section in the center of drift system reduces exactly to the classical Thomson cross section in the limit h..omega../2..pi..<cross section is valid irrespective of the magnitudes of ..omega.. and ..omega..sub(c); the forward scattering in the direction of the magnetic field by an electron in the ground state.

  1. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of sup 58 Ni and nuclear models

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Chiba, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment)

    1991-07-01

    The neutron total cross sections of {sup 58}Ni were measured from {approx} 1 to > 10 MeV using white-source techniques. Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from {approx} 4.5 to 10 MeV at {approx} 0.5 MeV intervals with {ge} 75 differential values per distribution. Differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured, corresponding to fourteen levels with excitations up to 4.8 MeV. The measured results, combined with relevant values available in the literature, were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical and coupled-channels model using both vibrational and rotational coupling schemes. The physical implications of the experimental results nd their interpretation are discussed in the contexts of optical-statistical, dispersive-optical, and coupled-channels models. 61 refs.

  2. X-ray resonant Raman scattering cross sections of Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn

    Sanchez, Hector Jorge; Valentinuzzi, MarIa Cecilia; Perez, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectra present singular characteristics produced by the different scattering processes. When atoms are irradiated with incident energy lower and close to an absorption edge, scattering peaks appear due to an inelastic process known as resonant Raman scattering. It constitutes an important contribution to the background of the fluorescent line. The resonant Raman scattering must be taken into account in the determination of low concentration contaminants, especially when the elements have proximate atomic numbers. The values of the mass attenuation coefficients experimentally obtained when materials are analysed with monochromatic x-ray beams under resonant conditions differ from the theoretical values (between 5% and 10%). This difference is due, in part, to the resonant Raman scattering. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used to study the Raman effect on pure samples of Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn. Energy scans were carried out in different ranges of energy near the absorption edge of the target element. As the Raman peak has a non-symmetric shape, theoretical models for the differential cross section, convoluted with the instrument function, were used to determine the RRS cross section as a function of the incident energy

  3. Measurement of angular differential cross sections at the SSL Atomic Scattering Facility

    Kvale, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    The design of the SSL Atomic Scattering Facility (ASF) located at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center as well as some of the initial experiments to be performed with it, are covered. The goal is to develop an apparatus capable of measuring angular differential cross sections (ADCS) for the scattering of 2 to 14 eV atomic oxygen from various gaseous targets. At present little is known about atomic oxygen scattering with kinetic energies of a few eV. This apparatus is designed to increase the understanding of collisions in this energy region. Atomic oxygen scattering processes are of vital interest to NASA because the space shuttle as well as other low earth orbit satellites will be subjected to a flux of 5 eV atomic oxygen on the ram surfaces while in orbit. The primary experiments will involve the measurements of ADCS for atomic oxygen scattering from gaseous targets (in particular, molecular nitrogen). These, as well as the related initial experiments involving thermal He scattering from N2 and O2 targets will be described

  4. New relations between lN-scattering cross sections and neutral current parameters

    Bednyakov, V.A.; Kovalenko, S.G.

    1989-01-01

    New relations which connect cross sections with neutral current parameters have been obtained in deep inelastic and (quasi-)elastic ν(ν-bar)N, e ± (μ ± )N scattering. The relations are independent of the structure functions and formfactors of the nucleon. A known example is the Paschos-Wolfenstein relation in ν(ν-bar)N scattering. The relations have been obtained with allowance for the contribution of the extra Z' bozon which makes it possible to use them both for extractions of the standard model parameters (ρ, sin 2 Θ W ) and for the search for some manifestations of new physics. 21 refs.; 1 tab

  5. Fast-neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental tin

    Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Guenther, P.T.; Smith, A.

    1982-07-01

    Broad-resolution neutron-elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental tin are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV. Incident-energy intervals are approx. 50 keV below 3.0 MeV and approx. 200 keV at higher energies. Ten to twenty scattering angles are used, distributed between approx. 20 and 160 0 . The experimental results are used to deduce the parameters of a spherical optical-statistical model and they are also compared with corresponding values given in ENDF/B-V

  6. Neutron scattering differential cross sections of carbon and bismuth at 37 MeV

    Zhou Zuying; Tang Hongqing; Qi Bujia; Zhou Chenwei; Du Yanfeng; Xia Haihong; Walter, R.L.; Tornow, W.; Howell, C.; Braun, R.; Roper, C.; Chen Zemin; Chen Zhengpeng; Chen Yingtang

    1997-01-01

    Elastic differential cross sections of 37 MeV neutrons scattered from carbon and bismuth were measured in the angular range 11 to 160 degrees by means of the multi-detector TOF facility. The 37 MeV neutrons were produced via the T(d,n) 4 He reaction in a tritium gas target. The pulsed 20 MeV deuteron beam was provided by the HI-13 tandem accelerator. The angular distribution of scattered neutrons from carbon and bismuth were measured in the angular range 11 degree to 145 degree and 11 degree to 160 degree respectively in steps of about 3 degree

  7. Cross-correlation time-of-flight analysis of molecular beam scattering

    Nowikow, C.V.; Grice, R.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of the cross-correlation method of time-of-flight analysis is presented in a form which highlights its formal similarity to the conventional method. A time-of-flight system for the analysis of crossed molecular beam scattering is described, which is based on a minicomputer interface and can operate in both the cross-correlation and conventional modes. The interface maintains the synchronisation of chopper disc rotation and channel advance indefinitely in the cross-correlation method and can acquire data in phase with the beam modulation in both methods. The shutter function of the cross-correlation method is determined and the deconvolution analysis of the data is discussed. (author)

  8. Mixed Legendre moments and discrete scattering cross sections for anisotropy representation

    Calloo, A.; Vidal, J. F.; Le Tellier, R.; Rimpault, G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the resolution of the integro-differential form of the Boltzmann transport equation for neutron transport in nuclear reactors. In multigroup theory, deterministic codes use transfer cross sections which are expanded on Legendre polynomials. This modelling leads to negative values of the transfer cross section for certain scattering angles, and hence, the multigroup scattering source term is wrongly computed. The first part compares the convergence of 'Legendre-expanded' cross sections with respect to the order used with the method of characteristics (MOC) for Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) type cells. Furthermore, the cross section is developed using piecewise-constant functions, which better models the multigroup transfer cross section and prevents the occurrence of any negative value for it. The second part focuses on the method of solving the transport equation with the above-mentioned piecewise-constant cross sections for lattice calculations for PWR cells. This expansion thereby constitutes a 'reference' method to compare the conventional Legendre expansion to, and to determine its pertinence when applied to reactor physics calculations. (authors)

  9. Observational constraints on dark matter-dark energy scattering cross section

    Kumar, Suresh [BITS Pilani, Department of Mathematics, Rajasthan (India); Nunes, Rafael C. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Departamento de Fisica, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-15

    In this letter, we report precise and robust observational constraints on the dark matter-dark energy scattering cross section, using the latest data from cosmic microwave background (CMB) Planck temperature and polarization, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) measurements and weak gravitational lensing data from Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). The scattering scenario consists of a pure momentum exchange between the dark components, and we find σ{sub d} < 10{sup -29} cm{sup 2} (m{sub dm}c{sup 2}/GeV) at 95% CL from the joint analysis (CMB + BAO + CFHTLenS), where m{sub dm} is a typical dark matter particle mass. We notice that the scattering among the dark components may influence the growth of large scale structure in the Universe, leaving the background cosmology unaltered. (orig.)

  10. Coherent photon scattering cross sections for helium near the delta resonance

    Delli Carpini, D.; Booth, E.C.; Miller, J.P.; Igarashi, R.; Bergstrom, J.; Caplan, H.; Doss, M.; Hallin, E.; Rangacharyulu, C.; Skopik, D.; Lucas, M.A.; Nathan, A.M.; Wells, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    The angular distributions for coherent photon scattering from 4 He were measured at average laboratory bremsstrahlung energies of 187, 235, and 280 MeV. The experiment was performed at the Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory using the new high duty factor electron beam. The scattered photons were observed with a high-resolution NaI(Tl) total absorption scintillation detector. These measurements are intended to investigate modification of the Δ properties inside the nuclear medium and the treatment of nonresonant contributions to the scattering cross sections. The results are compared to theoretical calculations in the isobar-hole model. Clear deviations from the theory are evident at all energies, especially at 187 MeV

  11. Measurement of x-ray scattering cross sections of hydrogen and helium with synchrotron radiation

    Ice, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    Total x-ray scattering is a two-electron expectation value. The prominence of the electron correlation effect was demonstrated in recent theoretical work. Only one measurement of x-ray scattering from H 2 has been reported heretofore, nearly fifty years ago. New measurements were carried out using the virtually monochromatic, intense flux of synchrotron radiation in the SSRP EXAFS line. The targets, at 1 atm pressure, were UHP He and ultrapure H 2 that had been passed through a hot Pd--Ag alloy diffusion purifier. The scattered-photon spectra were measured with a Xe-filled proportional counter and fast multichannel analyzer. The incident flux was monitored with a parallel-plate ion chamber, calibrated by direct counting of the absorber-attenuated beam. Measurements were performed at 5, 6, and 7 keV photon energy, as a function of scattering angle (60, 90, and 135 deg) and azimuthal angle (i.e., polarization). The relative total differential photon scattering cross sections for H 2 over the range 3.0 less than or equal to x = 4πsin (theta/2)lambda less than or equal to 5.6 A -1 agree to within approx. 1% with the correlated calculations of Bentley and Stewart. The ratios of measured cross sections for H 2 to those for He at x = 3.0 and 5.6 A -1 agree to within 1% with the ratios of the Bentley--Stewart H 2 cross sections to the correlated wave-function calculations of Brown for He

  12. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of elemental palladium

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-06-01

    Neutron total cross sections of palladium are measured from approx. = 0.6 to 4.5 MeV with resolutions of approx. = 30 to 70 keV at intervals of less than or equal to 50 keV. Differential neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.4 to 3.85 MeV at intervals of 50 to 100 keV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between approx. = 20 and 160/sup 0/. The experimental results are compared with respective quantities given in ENDF/B-V and used to deduce an optical potential that provides a good description of the measured values.

  13. Measurement of the Raman scattering cross section of the breathing mode in KDP and DKDP crystals.

    Demos, Stavros G; Raman, Rajesh N; Yang, Steven T; Negres, Raluca A; Schaffers, Kathleen I; Henesian, Mark A

    2011-10-10

    The spontaneous Raman scattering cross sections of the main peaks (related to the A1 vibrational mode) in rapid and conventional grown potassium dihydrogen phosphate and deuterated crystals are measured at 532 nm, 355 nm, and 266 nm. The measurement involves the use of the Raman line of water centered at 3400 cm-1 as a reference to obtain relative values of the cross sections which are subsequently normalized against the known absolute value for water as a function of excitation wavelength. This measurement enables the estimation of the transverse stimulated Raman scattering gain of these nonlinear optical materials in various configurations suitable for frequency conversion and beam control in high-power, large-aperture laser systems.

  14. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of elemental palladium

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.

    1982-06-01

    Neutron total cross sections of palladium are measured from approx. = 0.6 to 4.5 MeV with resolutions of approx. = 30 to 70 keV at intervals of less than or equal to 50 keV. Differential neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.4 to 3.85 MeV at intervals of 50 to 100 keV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between approx. = 20 and 160 0 . The experimental results are compared with respective quantities given in ENDF/B-V and used to deduce an optical potential that provides a good description of the measured values

  15. Measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section at low Q2 and x at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Preda, T.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Boer, Y. de; Roeck, A. de; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Glazov, A.; Grell, B.R.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Janssen, M.E.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; List, J.; Marti, L.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nozicka, M.; Olsson, J.E.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Rurikova, Z.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Driesch, M. von den; Wissing, C.; Wuensch, E.; Asmone, A.; Stella, B.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Volchinski, V.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Li, G.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Gouzevitch, M.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Murin, P.; Tomasz, F.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Liptaj, A.; Olivier, B.; Raspiareza, A.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Petrukhin, A.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Trinh, T.N.; Vallee, C.; Cerny, K.; Pejchal, O.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cozzika, G.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Rahmat, A.J.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Del Degan, M.; Grab, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Sauter, M.; Zimmermann, T.; Dodonov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Povh, B.; Eckstein, D.; Glushkov, I.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lobodzinska, E.; Naumann, T.; Piec, S.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Falkiewicz, A.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Habib, S.; Jemanov, V.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Naroska, B.; Hansson, M.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Meier, K.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Tchoulakov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Nowak, K.; Robmann, P.; Schmitz, C.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Schoening, A.; Tsakov, I.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section is presented in the region of low momentum transfers, 0.2 GeV 2 ≤Q 2 ≤12 GeV 2 , and low Bjorken x, 5.10 -6 ≤x≤0.02. The result is based on two data sets collected in dedicated runs by the H1 Collaboration at HERA at beam energies of 27.6 GeV and 920 GeV for positrons and protons, respectively. A combination with data previously published by H1 leads to a cross section measurement of a few percent accuracy. A kinematic reconstruction method exploiting radiative ep events extends the measurement to lower Q 2 and larger x. The data are compared with theoretical models which apply to the transition region from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering. (orig.)

  16. Measurement of the Inclusive ep Scattering Cross Section at Low Q^2 and x at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lastovicka, T.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section is presented in the region of low momentum transfers, 0.2 GeV^2 < Q^2 < 12 GeV^2, and low Bjorken x, 5x10^-6 < x < 0.02. The result is based on two data sets collected in dedicated runs by the H1 Collaboration at HERA at beam energies of 27.6 GeV and 920 GeV for positrons and protons, respectively. A combination with data previously published by H1 leads to a cross section measurement of a few percent accuracy. A kinematic reconstruction method exploiting radiative ep events extends the measurement to lower Q^2 and larger x. The data are compared with theoretical models which apply to the transition region from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering.

  17. Total and elastic electron scattering cross sections from Xe at intermediate and high energies

    Garcia, G; Pablos, J L de; Blanco, F; Williart, A

    2002-01-01

    Experimental total electron scattering cross sections from Xe in the energy range 300-5000 eV have been obtained with experimental errors of about 3%. The method was based on the measurement of the attenuation of a linear electron beam through a Xe gas cell in combination with an electron spectroscopy technique to analyse the energy of the transmitted electrons. Differential and integral elastic cross sections have been calculated using a scattering potential method which includes relativistic effects. The consistency of our theoretical and experimental results is also discussed in the paper. Finally, analytical formulae depending on two parameters, namely the number of target electrons and the atomic polarizability, are given to reproduce the experimental data for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe in the energy range 500-10 000 eV

  18. Intrinsic acoustical cross sections in the multiple scattering by a pair of rigid cylindrical particles in 2D

    Mitri, F. G.

    2017-08-01

    The multiple scattering effects occurring between two scatterers are described based upon the multipole expansion formalism as well as the addition theorem of cylindrical wave functions. An original approach is presented in which an effective incident acoustic field on a particular object, which includes both the primary and re-scattered waves from the other particle is determined first, and then used with the scattered field to derive closed-form analytical expressions for the inherent (i.e. intrinsic) cross-sections based on the far-field scattering. This method does not introduce any approximation in the calculation of the intrinsic cross-sections since the procedure is reduced to the one-body problem. The mathematical expressions for the intrinsic cross-sections are formulated in partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) in cylindrical coordinates involving the angle of incidence, the addition theorem for the cylindrical wave functions, and the expansion coefficients of the scatterers. Numerical examples illustrate the analysis for two rigid circular cylindrical cross-sections with different radii immersed in a non-viscous fluid. Computations for the dimensionless extrinsic and intrinsic extinction cross-section factors are evaluated with particular emphasis on varying the angle of incidence, the interparticle distance, as well as the sizes of the particles. A symmetric behavior is observed for the dimensionless extrinsic extinction cross-section, while asymmetry arises for the intrinsic extinction cross-section of each particle with respect to the angle of incidence. The present analysis provides a complete analytical and computational method for the prediction of the intrinsic (local) scattering, absorption and extinction cross-sections in the multiple acoustic scatterings of plane progressive waves of arbitrary incidence by a pair of scatterers. The results and computational analyses can be used as a priori information for future applications to guide the

  19. Intrinsic acoustical cross sections in the multiple scattering by a pair of rigid cylindrical particles in 2D

    Mitri, F G

    2017-01-01

    The multiple scattering effects occurring between two scatterers are described based upon the multipole expansion formalism as well as the addition theorem of cylindrical wave functions. An original approach is presented in which an effective incident acoustic field on a particular object, which includes both the primary and re-scattered waves from the other particle is determined first, and then used with the scattered field to derive closed-form analytical expressions for the inherent (i.e. intrinsic) cross-sections based on the far-field scattering. This method does not introduce any approximation in the calculation of the intrinsic cross-sections since the procedure is reduced to the one-body problem. The mathematical expressions for the intrinsic cross-sections are formulated in partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) in cylindrical coordinates involving the angle of incidence, the addition theorem for the cylindrical wave functions, and the expansion coefficients of the scatterers. Numerical examples illustrate the analysis for two rigid circular cylindrical cross-sections with different radii immersed in a non-viscous fluid. Computations for the dimensionless extrinsic and intrinsic extinction cross-section factors are evaluated with particular emphasis on varying the angle of incidence, the interparticle distance, as well as the sizes of the particles. A symmetric behavior is observed for the dimensionless extrinsic extinction cross-section, while asymmetry arises for the intrinsic extinction cross-section of each particle with respect to the angle of incidence. The present analysis provides a complete analytical and computational method for the prediction of the intrinsic (local) scattering, absorption and extinction cross-sections in the multiple acoustic scatterings of plane progressive waves of arbitrary incidence by a pair of scatterers. The results and computational analyses can be used as a priori information for future applications to guide the

  20. Effective inelastic scattering cross-sections for background analysis in HAXPES of deeply buried layers

    Risterucci, P., E-mail: paul.risterucci@gmail.com [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Renault, O., E-mail: olivier.renault@cea.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Zborowski, C. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005, Paris (France); Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Bertrand, D.; Torres, A. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Rueff, J.-P. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers Saint-Aubin, BP 48 91192, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005, Paris (France); Ceolin, D. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers Saint-Aubin, BP 48 91192, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Grenet, G. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Tougaard, S. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • An effective approach for quantitative background analysis in HAXPES spectra of buried layer underneath complex overlayer structures is proposed. • The approach relies on using a weighted sum of inelastic scattering cross section of the pure layers. • The method is validated by the study of an advanced power transistor stack after successive annealing steps. • The depth distribution of crucial elements (Ti, Ga) is determined reliably at depths up to nearly 50 nm. - Abstract: Inelastic background analysis of HAXPES spectra was recently introduced as a powerful method to get access to the elemental distribution in deeply buried layers or interfaces, at depth up to 60 nm below the surface. However the accuracy of the analysis highly relies on suitable scattering cross-sections able to describe effectively the transport of photoelectrons through overlayer structures consisting of individual layers with potentially very different scattering properties. Here, we show that within Tougaard’s practical framework as implemented in the Quases-Analyze software, the photoelectron transport through thick (25–40 nm) multi-layer structures with widely different cross-sections can be reliably described with an effective cross-section in the form of a weighted sum of the individual cross-section of each layer. The high-resolution core-level analysis partly provides a guide for determining the nature of the individual cross-sections to be used. We illustrate this novel approach with the practical case of a top Al/Ti bilayer structure in an AlGaN/GaN power transistor device stack before and after sucessive annealing treatments. The analysis provides reliable insights on the Ti and Ga depth distributions up to nearly 50 nm below the surface.

  1. Analytical calculation of the average scattering cross sections using fourier series

    Palma, Daniel A.P.; Goncalves, Alessandro C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando C. da

    2009-01-01

    The precise determination of the Doppler broadening functions is very important in different applications of reactors physics, mainly in the processing of nuclear data. Analytical approximations are obtained in this paper for average scattering cross section using expansions in Fourier series, generating an approximation that is simple and precise. The results have shown to be satisfactory from the point-of-view of accuracy and do not depend on the type of resonance considered. (author)

  2. Analytical calculation of the average scattering cross sections using fourier series

    Palma, Daniel A.P. [Instituto Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: dpalmaster@gmail.com; Goncalves, Alessandro C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando C. da [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear], e-mail: asilva@con.ufrj.br, e-mail: agoncalves@con.ufrj.br, e-mail: aquilino@lmp.ufrj.br, e-mail: fernando@con.ufrj.br

    2009-07-01

    The precise determination of the Doppler broadening functions is very important in different applications of reactors physics, mainly in the processing of nuclear data. Analytical approximations are obtained in this paper for average scattering cross section using expansions in Fourier series, generating an approximation that is simple and precise. The results have shown to be satisfactory from the point-of-view of accuracy and do not depend on the type of resonance considered. (author)

  3. A critical comparison of electron scattering cross sections measured by single collision and swarm techniques

    Buckman, S.J.; Brunger, M.J.

    1996-07-01

    Electron scattering cross sections (elastic, rotational and vibrational excitation) for a number of atomic and (relatively) single molecular systems are examined. Particular reference is made to the level of agreement which is obtained from the application of the completely different measurement philosophies embodied in 'beam' and 'swarm' techniques. The range of energies considered is generally restricted to the region below 5 eV. 142 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs

  4. Revision of the inelastic scattering cross section evaluation of 238U for CENDL-2.1

    Tang Guoyou; Zhang Guohui; Shi Zhaomin; Chen Jinxiang

    1995-11-01

    Revised evaluated data for the inelastic neutron scattering cross-section and the secondary neutron spectrum are presented for U-238 in graphical form, compared with the earlier data that exist in the evaluated nuclear data libraries ENDF/B-6 and JENDL-3. The new data will be included in the Chinese evaluated nuclear data library CENDL-2.1. (author). 14 refs, 9 figs

  5. Total electron scattering cross sections for methanol and ethanol at intermediate energies

    Silva, D G M; Tejo, T; Lopes, M C A; Muse, J; Romero, D; Khakoo, M A

    2010-01-01

    Absolute total cross section (TCS) measurements of electron scattering from gaseous methanol and ethanol molecules are reported for impact energies from 60 to 500 eV, using the linear transmission method. The attenuation of intensity of a collimated electron beam through the target volume is used to determine the absolute TCS for a given impact energy, using the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Besides these experimental measurements, we have also determined TCS using the additivity rule.

  6. Comparison of inelastic electron and positron scattering cross sections on 12C and 27Al

    Hartwig, S.; Heimlich, F.H.; Huber, G.; Roessle, E.; Koebberling, M.; Moritz, J.; Schmidt, K.H.; Wegener, D.; Zeller, D.; Bleckwenn, J.

    1977-06-01

    The +/- ratio R of the cross sections for inelastic positron and electron scattering on 12 C and 27 Al has been measured for four momentum transfers (0.08 - 0.45) GeV 2 /c 2 of the virtual photon and invariant masses 0.95 GeV +- 0.0007), no q 2 respectively W dependence of the ratio is observed. (orig.) [de

  7. Measurement of jet production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Cvach, Jaroslav; Ferencei, Jozef; Hladký, Jan; Reimer, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 4 (2017), s. 1-41, č. článku 215. ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14033 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : jet cross sections * neutral current deep-inelastic scattering * perturbative QCD Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 5.331, year: 2016

  8. Jet cross sections in γ*γ-scattering at e+e- colliders in NLO QCD

    Poetter, B.

    1999-01-01

    Recent results from NLO QCD calculations for inclusive jet cross sections in γ*γ-scattering at e + e - colliders, especially for LEP, are reported. The virtuality Q 2 of the virtual photon is non-zero and can be unlimited large. The virtuality of the second photon is zero and the spectrum is calculated with the Weizsaecker-Williams approximation. Four components of the cross sections have to be distinguished, involving direct and resolved real and virtual photon contributions. Since Q 2 is non-zero, the virtual photon structure function is needed to calculate the contributions involving a resolved virtual photon

  9. The effective cross section for double parton scattering within a holographic AdS/QCD approach

    Traini, Marco, E-mail: marcoclaudio.traini@unitn.it [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); INFN - TIFPA, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Rinaldi, Matteo [Departament de Fisica Teòrica, Universitat de València and Institut de Fisica Corpuscular, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 46100 Burjassot, València (Spain); Scopetta, Sergio [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Vento, Vicente [Departament de Fisica Teòrica, Universitat de València and Institut de Fisica Corpuscular, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 46100 Burjassot, València (Spain)

    2017-05-10

    A first attempt to apply the AdS/QCD framework for a bottom–up approach to the evaluation of the effective cross section for double parton scattering in proton–proton collisions is presented. The main goal is the analytic evaluation of the dependence of the effective cross section on the longitudinal momenta of the involved partons, obtained within the holographic Soft-Wall model. If measured in high-energy processes at hadron colliders, this momentum dependence could open a new window on 2-parton correlations in a proton.

  10. Differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of intermediate energy electrons from sodium

    Teubner, P.J.O.; Buckner, S.J.; Noble, C.J.

    1977-11-01

    Differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of electrons from sodium have been measured with high angular resolution for incident energies of 54.4, 75, 100 and 150 eV and over an angular range of 12 0 to 140 0 . The experimental data are compared with calculations based on the First Born approximation, the Glauber approximation and a close coupling impact parameter calculation. Calculations have been carried out for an optical model using the prescription of Vanderpoorten for localizing the absorptive part of the potential. Of the theoretical calculations the optical model is found to best reproduce the general features of the cross section at all energies. (Author)

  11. Potentials and scattering cross sections for collisions of He atoms with adsorbed CO

    Liu, W.K.; Gumhalter, B.

    1986-05-01

    Ab initio calculations of the total scattering cross section for the collision system He → CO/Pt(111) within the renormalized distorted wave Born approximation are reported. The interaction potential for this atom-adsorbate system consists of the usual two-body gas phase-like potential as well as two additional substrate mediated van de Waals contributions, all with similar long range behaviour. Comparison of the calculated cross sections for various incident velocities and angles with available experimental data is made without using any adjustable parameters to fit the data, and the importance of including the substrate-mediated forces is emphasized. (author)

  12. Topological cross sections in hadron-nucleus collisions and multiple scattering theory

    Zoller, V.R.

    1987-01-01

    The multiple scattering theory supplemented with cutting rules of Abramovsky, V.A., Gribov, V.N., Kancheli, O.V. is applied to calculation of the hadron-nucleus interaction cross sections. In contrast to standard Glauber approach neither smalness of the interaction radius compared to the nuclear radii nor Gaussian form of the hN-interaction profile function are assumed. The theory of the supercritical pomeron are used. However all the results are more general and do not depend on the parametrization of the pomeron pole amplitude. The region of validity of the widely used approximate formulae for topological and total hA-interaction cross sections are discussed

  13. Covariance Matrix of a Double-Differential Doppler-Broadened Elastic Scattering Cross Section

    Arbanas, G.; Becker, B.; Dagan, R.; Dunn, M. E.; Larson, N. M.; Leal, L. C.; Williams, M. L.

    2012-05-01

    Legendre moments of a double-differential Doppler-broadened elastic neutron scattering cross section on 238U are computed near the 6.67 eV resonance at temperature T = 103 K up to angular order 14. A covariance matrix of these Legendre moments is computed as a functional of the covariance matrix of the elastic scattering cross section. A variance of double-differential Doppler-broadened elastic scattering cross section is computed from the covariance of Legendre moments. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  14. Neutron-scattering cross section of the S=1/2 Heisenberg triangular antiferromagnet

    Lefmann, K.; Hedegård, P.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we use a Schwinger-boson mean-field approach to calculate the neutron-scattering cross section from the S = 1/2 antiferromagnet with nearest-neighbor isotropic Heisenberg interaction on a two-dimensional triangular lattice. We investigate two solutions for T = 0: (i) a state with lo...... no elastic, but a set of broader dispersive spin excitations around kappa almost-equal-to (1/2, 0) and around kappa almost-equal-to (1/3, 1/3) for omega/E(g) = 2.5-4. It should thus be possible to distinguish these two states in a neutron-scattering experiment.......In this paper we use a Schwinger-boson mean-field approach to calculate the neutron-scattering cross section from the S = 1/2 antiferromagnet with nearest-neighbor isotropic Heisenberg interaction on a two-dimensional triangular lattice. We investigate two solutions for T = 0: (i) a state with long......-range order resembling the Neel state and (ii) a resonating valence bond or ''spin liquid'' state with an energy gap, E(g) almost-equal-to 0.17J, for the elementary excitations (spinons). For solution (ii) the neutron cross section shows Bragg rods at kappa = K = (1/3, 1/3), whereas solution (ii) shows...

  15. Cross Sections of Charged Current Neutrino Scattering off 132Xe for the Supernova Detection

    P. C. Divari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The total cross sections as well as the neutrino event rates are calculated in the charged current neutrino and antineutrino scattering off 132Xe isotope at neutrino energies Ev<100 MeV. Transitions to excited nuclear states are calculated in the framework of quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The contributions from different multipoles are shown for various neutrino energies. Flux-averaged cross sections are obtained by convolving the cross sections with a two-parameter Fermi-Dirac distribution. The flux-averaged cross sections are also calculated using terrestrial neutrino sources based on conventional sources (muon decay at rest or on low-energy beta-beams.

  16. Multi-jet cross sections in charged current e{sup {+-}}p scattering at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-02-15

    Jet cross sections were measured in charged current deep inelastic e{sup {+-}}p scattering at high boson virtualities Q{sup 2} with the ZEUS detector at HERA II using an integrated luminosity of 0.36 fb{sup -1}. Differential cross sections are presented for inclusive-jet production as functions of Q{sup 2}, Bjorken x and the jet transverse energy and pseudorapidity. The dijet invariant mass cross section is also presented. Observation of three- and four-jet events in charged-current e{sup {+-}}p processes is reported for the first time. The predictions of next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD calculations are compared to the measurements. The measured inclusive-jet cross sections are well described in shape and normalization by the NLO predictions. The data have the potential to constrain the u and d valence quark distributions in the proton if included as input to global fits. (orig.)

  17. Multi-jet cross sections in charged current e±p scattering at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-02-01

    Jet cross sections were measured in charged current deep inelastic e ± p scattering at high boson virtualities Q 2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA II using an integrated luminosity of 0.36 fb -1 . Differential cross sections are presented for inclusive-jet production as functions of Q 2 , Bjorken x and the jet transverse energy and pseudorapidity. The dijet invariant mass cross section is also presented. Observation of three- and four-jet events in charged-current e ± p processes is reported for the first time. The predictions of next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD calculations are compared to the measurements. The measured inclusive-jet cross sections are well described in shape and normalization by the NLO predictions. The data have the potential to constrain the u and d valence quark distributions in the proton if included as input to global fits. (orig.)

  18. Code implementation of partial-range angular scattering cross sections: GAMMER and MORSE

    Ward, J.T. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A partial-range (finite-element) method has been previously developed for representing multigroup angular scattering in Monte Carlo photon transport. Computer application of the method, with preliminary quantitative results is discussed here. A multigroup photon cross section processing code, GAMMER, was written which utilized ENDF File 23 point data and the Klein--Nishina formula for Compton scattering. The cross section module of MORSE, along with several execution routines, were rewritten to permit use of the method with photon transport. Both conventional and partial-range techniques were applied for comparison to calculating angular and spectral penetration of 6-MeV photons through a six-inch iron slab. GAMMER was found to run 90% faster than SMUG, with further improvement evident for multiple-media situations; MORSE cross section storage was reduced by one-third; cross section processing, greatly simplified; and execution time, reduced by 15%. Particle penetration was clearly more forward peaked, as moment accuracy is retained to extremly high order. This method of cross section treatment offers potential savings in both storage and handling, as well as improved accuracy and running time in the actual execution phase. 3 figures, 4 tables

  19. Integral elastic, electronic-state, ionization, and total cross sections for electron scattering with furfural

    Jones, D. B.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Brunger, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    We report absolute experimental integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of bands of electronic-states in furfural, for incident electron energies in the range 20-250 eV. Wherever possible, those results are compared to corresponding excitation cross sections in the structurally similar species furan, as previously reported by da Costa et al. [Phys. Rev. A 85, 062706 (2012)] and Regeta and Allan [Phys. Rev. A 91, 012707 (2015)]. Generally, very good agreement is found. In addition, ICSs calculated with our independent atom model (IAM) with screening corrected additivity rule (SCAR) formalism, extended to account for interference (I) terms that arise due to the multi-centre nature of the scattering problem, are also reported. The sum of those ICSs gives the IAM-SCAR+I total cross section for electron-furfural scattering. Where possible, those calculated IAM-SCAR+I ICS results are compared against corresponding results from the present measurements with an acceptable level of accord being obtained. Similarly, but only for the band I and band II excited electronic states, we also present results from our Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials calculations. Those results are found to be in good qualitative accord with the present experimental ICSs. Finally, with a view to assembling a complete cross section data base for furfural, some binary-encounter-Bethe-level total ionization cross sections for this collision system are presented.

  20. Medium modified two-body scattering amplitude from proton-nucleus total cross-sections

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    Recently (R.K. Tripathi, J.W. Wilson, F.A. Cucinotta, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 145 (1998) 277; R.K. Tripathi, F.A. Cucinotta, J.W. Wilson, NASA-TP-1998-208438), we have extracted nucleon-nucleon (N-N) cross-sections in the medium directly from experiment. The in-medium N-N cross-sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Here, we investigate the ratio of real to imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium N-N cross-sections to calculate total proton-nucleus cross-sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross-sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions. c2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Integral elastic, electronic-state, ionization, and total cross sections for electron scattering with furfural

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Costa, R. F. da [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, 29075-910, Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-04-14

    We report absolute experimental integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of bands of electronic-states in furfural, for incident electron energies in the range 20–250 eV. Wherever possible, those results are compared to corresponding excitation cross sections in the structurally similar species furan, as previously reported by da Costa et al. [Phys. Rev. A 85, 062706 (2012)] and Regeta and Allan [Phys. Rev. A 91, 012707 (2015)]. Generally, very good agreement is found. In addition, ICSs calculated with our independent atom model (IAM) with screening corrected additivity rule (SCAR) formalism, extended to account for interference (I) terms that arise due to the multi-centre nature of the scattering problem, are also reported. The sum of those ICSs gives the IAM-SCAR+I total cross section for electron–furfural scattering. Where possible, those calculated IAM-SCAR+I ICS results are compared against corresponding results from the present measurements with an acceptable level of accord being obtained. Similarly, but only for the band I and band II excited electronic states, we also present results from our Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials calculations. Those results are found to be in good qualitative accord with the present experimental ICSs. Finally, with a view to assembling a complete cross section data base for furfural, some binary-encounter-Bethe-level total ionization cross sections for this collision system are presented.

  2. Integral elastic, electronic-state, ionization, and total cross sections for electron scattering with furfural

    Jones, D. B.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Brunger, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report absolute experimental integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of bands of electronic-states in furfural, for incident electron energies in the range 20–250 eV. Wherever possible, those results are compared to corresponding excitation cross sections in the structurally similar species furan, as previously reported by da Costa et al. [Phys. Rev. A 85, 062706 (2012)] and Regeta and Allan [Phys. Rev. A 91, 012707 (2015)]. Generally, very good agreement is found. In addition, ICSs calculated with our independent atom model (IAM) with screening corrected additivity rule (SCAR) formalism, extended to account for interference (I) terms that arise due to the multi-centre nature of the scattering problem, are also reported. The sum of those ICSs gives the IAM-SCAR+I total cross section for electron–furfural scattering. Where possible, those calculated IAM-SCAR+I ICS results are compared against corresponding results from the present measurements with an acceptable level of accord being obtained. Similarly, but only for the band I and band II excited electronic states, we also present results from our Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials calculations. Those results are found to be in good qualitative accord with the present experimental ICSs. Finally, with a view to assembling a complete cross section data base for furfural, some binary-encounter-Bethe-level total ionization cross sections for this collision system are presented.

  3. 54Fe neutron elastic and inelastic scattering differential cross sections from 2-6 MeV

    Vanhoy, J. R.; Liu, S. H.; Hicks, S. F.; Combs, B. M.; Crider, B. P.; French, A. J.; Garza, E. A.; Harrison, T.; Henderson, S. L.; Howard, T. J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Nigam, S.; Pecha, R. L.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ramirez, A. P. D.; Rice, B. G.; Ross, T. J.; Santonil, Z. C.; Sidwell, L. C.; Steves, J. L.; Thompson, B. K.; Yates, S. W.

    2018-04-01

    Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections from 54Fe were performed for nine incident neutron energies between 2 and 6 MeV. Measured differential scattering cross sections are compared to those from previous measurements and the ENDF, JENDL, and JEFF data evaluations. TALYS calculations were performed and modifications of the default parameters are found to better describe the experimental cross sections. A spherical optical model treatment is generally adequate to describe the cross sections in this energy region; however, in 54Fe the direct coupling is found to increase suddenly above 4 MeV and requires an increase in the DWBA deformation parameter by approximately 25%. This has little effect on the elastic scattering differential cross sections but makes a significant improvement in both the strength and shape of the inelastic scattering angular distribution, which are found to be very sensitive to the size and extent of the surface absorption region.

  4. Neutron Elastic Scattering Cross Sections Experimental Data and Optical Model Cross Section Calculations. A Compilation of Neutron Data from the Studsvik Neutron Physics Laboratory

    Holmqvist, B; Wiedling, T

    1969-06-15

    Neutron elastic scattering cross section measurements have been going on for a long period at the Studsvik Van de Graaff laboratory. The cross sections of a range of elements have been investigated in the energy interval 1.5 to 8 MeV. The experimental data have been compared with cross sections calculated with the optical model when using a local nuclear potential.

  5. Program package for calculation of cross sections of neutron scattering on deformed nuclei by the coupled-channel method

    Kloss, Yu.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Program package and numerical solution of the problem for a system of coupled equations used in optical model to solve a problem on low and mean energy neutron scattering on deformed nuclei, is considered. With these programs differnet scattering cross sections depending on the incident neutron energy on even-even and even-odd nuclei were obtained. The programm permits to obtain different scattering cross sections (elastic, inelastic), excitation cross sections of the first three energy levels of rotational band depending on the energy, angular distributions and neutron polarizations including excited channels. In the program there is possibility for accounting even-even nuclei octupole deformation

  6. Total cross sections for slow-electron (1--20 eV) scattering in solid H2O

    Michaud, M.; Sanche, L.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical method is proposed to determine absolute total cross sections per scatterer and related mean free paths for low-energy electron scattering in disordered molecular solid films. The procedure is based on a two-stream multiple-scattering model of the thickness dependence of the film reflectivity for elastic electrons. The expected analytical behavior and accuracy are tested on a model sample whose scattering properties are generated by a Monte Carlo simulation from initially known parameters. The effects of multiple scattering inside the film and at its interfaces are taken into account and discussed. The thickness dependence of the elastic electron reflectivity of H 2 O film condensed at 14 K is reported between 1 and 20 eV incident energy with a spectrometer resolution of 10 MeV. The proposed method is applied to extract from these measurements the energy dependence of the total effective and total inelastic cross sections for electron scattering in amorphous ice

  7. Cross sections and spin polarizations of electrons elastically scattered from oriented molecules (CH3I)

    Fink, M.; Ross, A.W.; Fink, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Elastic differential cross sections and spin polarizations for electrons elastically scattered from CH 3 I are calculated using the independent atom model. Three molecular orientations with respect to the incident electron wavevector are considered - first, the molecule is oriented randomly, second, the electron wave front and molecular bond are parallel, and third, the wavefront and the bond axis are perpendicular. It will be seen to what extent orientational averaging weakens features of the cross section and spin polarization. The calculations show that cross section and spin polarization measurements are a possible tool for determining the degree of molecular orientation. There is no degeneracy between I-C and C-I in cross section and spin polarization measurements. The results presented here for 200 eV and 600 eV electrons scattered by CH 3 I should be considered as a case study and it should be possible to find molecules and electron energies for which even more dramatic differences between the various orientations between the molecules and the electrons can be expected. (orig.)

  8. Experimental and theoretical electron-scattering cross-section data for dichloromethane

    Krupa, K.; Lange, E.; Blanco, F.; Barbosa, A. S.; Pastega, D. F.; Sanchez, S. d'A.; Bettega, M. H. F.; García, G.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Ferreira da Silva, F.

    2018-04-01

    We report on a combination of experimental and theoretical investigations into the elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) and integral cross sections for electron interactions with dichloromethane, C H2C l2 , in the incident electron energy over the 7.0-30 eV range. Elastic electron-scattering cross-section calculations have been performed within the framework of the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with pseudopotentials (SMCPP), and the independent-atom model with screening-corrected additivity rule including interference-effects correction (IAM-SCAR+I). The present elastic DCSs have been found to agree reasonably well with the results of IAM-SCAR+I calculations above 20 eV and also with the SMC calculations below 30 eV. Although some discrepancies were found for 7 eV, the agreement between the two theoretical methodologies is remarkable as the electron-impact energy increases. Calculated elastic DCSs are also reported up to 10000 eV for scattering angles from 0° to 180° together with total cross section within the IAM-SCAR+I framework.

  9. Study of the elastic scattering differential cross sections of a proton beam by a cesium target

    El Maddarsi, Mohamed.

    1978-01-01

    The elastic differential cross section of H + on Cs is studied experimentally and theoretically. The experimental device is described, after which the differential cross-section values obtained as a function of the laboratory angle are given for four incident energies: 13.4 eV, 15.1 eV, 17.7 eV and 24.2 eV. By means of an interaction potential of the quasi-molecule H + Cs the differential cross sections are calculated for the same incident energies; this calculation uses the semi-classical method of stationary phases which shows clearly the limits of conventional description and the changes introduced by quantum effects. Very good agreement is obtained between theoretical and experimental results, which shows that elastic scattering is very little perturbed by inelastic channels in this energy range. The estimated inelastic cross section at 24 eV is about 1.9 10 -15 cm 2 , corresponding to 1.6% of the scattering process [fr

  10. Atlas cross section for scattering of muonic hydrogen atoms on hydrogen isotope molecules

    Adamczak, A.; Faifman, M.P.; Ponomarev, L.I.

    1996-01-01

    The total cross sections of the elastic, spin-flip, and charge-exchange processes for the scattering of muonic hydrogen isotope atoms (pμ, dμ, tμ) in the ground state on the hydrogen isotope molecules (H 2 , D 2 , T 2 , HD, HT, DT) are calculated. The scattering cross sections of muonic hydrogen isotope atoms on hydrogen isotope nuclei obtained earlier in the multichannel adiabatic approach are used in the calculations. Molecular effects (electron screening, rotational and vibrational excitations of target molecules, etc.) are taken into account. The spin effects of the target molecules and of the incident muonic atoms are included. the cross sections are averaged over the Boltzmann distribution of the molecule rotational states and the Maxwellian distribution of the target molecule kinetic energies for temperatures 30, 100, 300, and 1000 K. The cross sections are given for kinetic energies of the incident muonic atoms ranging from 0.001 to 100 eV in the laboratory frame. 45 refs., 6 tabs

  11. Measurements of Positronium Formation Cross Sections for Positron-Kr, Xe Scattering

    Kauppila, W. E.; Kwan, C. K.; Li, H.; Stein, T. S.; Zhou, S.

    1997-04-01

    Our experimental approach(S. Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 236 (1994).) for measuring Ps formation cross sections (Q_Ps) involves passing a variable energy positron beam through a gas scattering cell and detecting the 511 keV annihilation gamma rays resulting from the decay of para-Ps and from the interaction of ortho-Ps with the walls of the scattering cell. It is found that the Q_Ps curves for both Kr and Xe rise rapidly from their formation threshold energies of 7.2 and 5.3 eV, reach maxima within about 10 eV of their thresholds and then decrease to become rather small (less than 10% of the peak heights) above 100 eV. At the maxima Q_Ps accounts for more than 50% of the total scattering cross sections. There is some evidence of possible small scale structure in the Q_Ps curves between 10 and 100 eV. The present results are consistent with the prior measurements of Diana et al.( L.M. Diana et al., in "Atomic Physics with Positrons", edited by J.W. Humberston and E.A.G. Armour (Plenum, New York and London, 1987), p. 55; and in "Positron Annihilation", edited by L. Dorikens-Vanpraet et al. (World Scientific, Singapore, 1989), p. 311.) from near threshold to 70 eV for Kr and from 15 to 100 eV for Xe.

  12. Cross sections for inelastic scattering of electrons by atoms: selected topics related to electron microscopy

    Inokuti, M.; Manson, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    We begin with a resume of the Bethe theory, which provides a general framework for discussing the inelastic scattering of fast electrons and leads to powerful criteria for judging the reliability of cross-section data. The central notion of the theory is the generalized oscillator strength as a function of both the energy transfer and the momentum transfer, and is the only non-trivial factor in the inelastic-scattering cross section. Although the Bethe theory was initially conceived for free atoms, its basic ideas apply to solids, with suitable generalizations; in this respect, the notion of the dielectric response function is the most fundamental. Topics selected for discussion include the generalized oscillator strengths for the K-shell and L-shell ionization for all atoms with Z less than or equal to 30, evaluated by use of the Hartree-Slater potential. As a function of the energy transfer, the generalized oscillator strength most often shows a non-monotonic structure near the K-shell and L-shell thresholds, which has been interpreted as manifestations of electron-wave propagation through atomic fields. For molecules and solids, there are additional structures due to the scattering of ejected electrons by the fields of other atoms

  13. PELINSCA, Elastic Scattering and Total Cross-Sections and Polarization by Hauser-Feshbach

    Engelbrecht, C.A.; Fiedeldey, H.; Tepel, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    1 - Nature of the physical problem solved: Calculates differential and total Cross sections as well as polarization for nuclear elastic scattering of spin 0 or spin 1/2 particles. Calculates Cross sections (differential and total) and decay gamma ray angular correlation for inelastic processes by means of standard Hauser-Feshbach (HF) theory or with modified HF theory including width fluctuation corrections. In elastic scattering optical model parameters may be optimized in a least squares procedure involving experimental measurements. 2 - Method of solution: Schroedinger equation for complex potentials is solved according to Fox-Goodwin method of numerical integration. Coulomb wave functions are calculated by using recurrence relations depending on range of Coulomb and energy parameters. Least squares fits are made using parameter grid and direction of steepest descent. Statistical model calculations are made using closed mathematical expressions. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Elastic scattering calculations limited to spin 0 or spin 1/2 particles. Number of partial waves limited to 51. Statistical model calculations on targets with spin less or equal to 5 and with partial waves up to l=6. Not suitable for heavy-ion Hauser- Feshbach calculations without first removing dimensional limitations. Program handles up to 3 reaction types simultaneously, e.g. (p,p), (p,n) and (p,alpha), each reaction channel having up to 33 final nuclear states

  14. A New Scaling Law of Resonance in Total Scattering Cross Section in Gases

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2009-10-01

    Electrical discharges in gases continue to be an active area of research because of industrial applications such as power systems, environmental clean up, laser technology, semiconductor fabrication etc. A fundamental knowledge of electron-gas neutral interaction is indispensable and, the total scattering cross section is one of the quantities that have been measured extensively. The energy dependence of the total cross sections shows peaks or resonance processes that are operative in the collision process. These peaks and the energies at which they occur are shown to satisfy a broad relationship involving the polarizability and the dipole moment of the target particle. Data on 62 target particles belonging to the following species are analyzed. (Eq 1) Rare gas atoms (Eq 2) Di-atomic molecules with combinations of polar, non-polar, attaching, and non-attaching properties Poly-atomic molecules with combinations of polar, non-polar, attaching, and non-attaching properties. Methods of improving the newly identified scaling law and possible application have been identified. 1 INTRODUCTION: Data on electron-neutral interactions are one of the most fundamental in the study of gaseous electronics and an immense literature, both experimental and theoretical, has become available since about the year 1920. [1-5]. In view of the central role which these data play in all facets of gas discharges and plasma science, it is felt that a critical review of available data is timely, mainly for the community of high voltage engineers and industries connected with plasma science in general. The electron-neutral interaction, often referred to as scattering in the scientific literature, is quantified by using the quantity called the total scattering cross section (QT, m^2). In the literature on cross section, total cross section and total scattering cross section are terms used synonymously and we follow the same practice. A definition may be found in reference [1]. This paper concerns

  15. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; Fry, J.; Gericke, M.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hamblen, J.; Hayes, C.; Kucuker, S.; Mahurin, R.; Maldonado-Velázquez, M.; Martin, E.; McCrea, M.; Mueller, P. E.; Musgrave, M.; Nann, H.; Penttilä, S. I.; Snow, W. M.; Tang, Z.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2015-05-01

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g (r ) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section d/σ d Ω from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component) using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. We describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.

  16. Monte Carlo Calculation of Thermal Neutron Inelastic Scattering Cross Section Uncertainties by Sampling Perturbed Phonon Spectra

    Holmes, Jesse Curtis

    Nuclear data libraries provide fundamental reaction information required by nuclear system simulation codes. The inclusion of data covariances in these libraries allows the user to assess uncertainties in system response parameters as a function of uncertainties in the nuclear data. Formats and procedures are currently established for representing covariances for various types of reaction data in ENDF libraries. This covariance data is typically generated utilizing experimental measurements and empirical models, consistent with the method of parent data production. However, ENDF File 7 thermal neutron scattering library data is, by convention, produced theoretically through fundamental scattering physics model calculations. Currently, there is no published covariance data for ENDF File 7 thermal libraries. Furthermore, no accepted methodology exists for quantifying or representing uncertainty information associated with this thermal library data. The quality of thermal neutron inelastic scattering cross section data can be of high importance in reactor analysis and criticality safety applications. These cross sections depend on the material's structure and dynamics. The double-differential scattering law, S(alpha, beta), tabulated in ENDF File 7 libraries contains this information. For crystalline solids, S(alpha, beta) is primarily a function of the material's phonon density of states (DOS). Published ENDF File 7 libraries are commonly produced by calculation and processing codes, such as the LEAPR module of NJOY, which utilize the phonon DOS as the fundamental input for inelastic scattering calculations to directly output an S(alpha, beta) matrix. To determine covariances for the S(alpha, beta) data generated by this process, information about uncertainties in the DOS is required. The phonon DOS may be viewed as a probability density function of atomic vibrational energy states that exist in a material. Probable variation in the shape of this spectrum may be

  17. Multiphoton effects in electron-ion scattering: A limitation of the cross-section treatment

    Torres Silva, H.; Sakanaka, P.H.; Braga, L.C.

    1991-07-01

    The differential cross-section for inelastic scattering in the presence of an intense laser field, when applied to the calculation of energy balance and heating by multiphoton process, is a problem which is not completely solved yet. One of the main difficulties is the calculation of the absorption coefficients α-bar for a monoenergetic beam of electrons scattered by a static potential. There are contradictory results shown by different authors. Here we have derived α-bar starting under the framework of quantum mechanics and then making the classical correspondence (h/2π → 0) according to the kinetic theory, and show that the absorption coefficient is always positive for all values of the particle incoming velocity, v-vector i . Furthermore, we show that in the calculation of α-bar we recover the Coulomb logarithm term. (author). 18 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  18. Time-Dependent Wave Packet Dynamics Calculations of Cross Sections for Ultracold Scattering of Molecules

    Huang, Jiayu; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H.; Krems, Roman V.

    2018-04-01

    Because the de Broglie wavelength of ultracold molecules is very large, the cross sections for collisions of molecules at ultracold temperatures are always computed by the time-independent quantum scattering approach. Here, we report the first accurate time-dependent wave packet dynamics calculation for reactive scattering of ultracold molecules. Wave packet dynamics calculations can be applied to molecular systems with more dimensions and provide real-time information on the process of bond rearrangement and/or energy exchange in molecular collisions. Our work thus makes possible the extension of rigorous quantum calculations of ultracold reaction properties to polyatomic molecules and adds a new powerful tool for the study of ultracold chemistry.

  19. The LXCat project: Electron scattering cross sections and swarm parameters for low temperature plasma modeling

    Pancheshnyi, S.; Biagi, S.; Bordage, M.C.; Hagelaar, G.J.M.; Morgan, W.L.; Phelps, A.V.; Pitchford, L.C.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: LXCat is an open-access website containing data needed for low temperature plasma modeling as well as on-line tools useful for their manipulation. Highlights: ► LXCat: an open-access website with data for low temperature plasma modeling. ► Contains compilations of electron scattering cross sections and transport data. ► Data from different contributors for many neutral, ground-state species. ► On-line tools for browsing, plotting, up/downloading data. ► On-line Boltzmann solver for calculating electron swarm parameters. - Abstract: LXCat is a dynamic, open-access, website for collecting, displaying, and downloading ELECtron SCATtering cross sections and swarm parameters (mobility, diffusion coefficient, reaction rates, etc.) required for modeling low temperature, non-equilibrium plasmas. Contributors set up individual databases, and the available databases, indicated by the contributor’s chosen title, include mainly complete sets of electron-neutral scattering cross sections, although the option for introducing partial sets of cross sections exists. A database for measured swarm parameters is also part of LXCat, and this is a growing activity. On-line tools include options for browsing, plotting, and downloading cross section data. The electron energy distribution functions (edfs) in low temperature plasmas are in general non-Maxwellian, and LXCat provides an option for execution of an on-line Boltzmann equation solver to calculate the edf in homogeneous electric fields. Thus, the user can obtain electron transport and rate coefficients (averages over the edfs) in pure gases or gas mixtures over a range of values of the reduced electric fields strength, E/N, the ratio of the electric field strength to the neutral density, using cross sections from the available databases. New contributors are welcome and anyone wishing to create a database and upload data can request a username and password. LXCat is part of a larger, community

  20. ZZ ELAST2, Database of Cross Sections for the Elastic Scattering of Electrons and Positrons by Atoms

    2002-01-01

    1 - Historical background and information: This database is an extension of the earlier database, 'Elastic Scattering of Electrons and Positrons by Atoms: Database ELAST', Report NISTIR 5188, 1993. Cross sections for the elastic scattering of electrons and positrons by atoms were calculated at energies from 1 KeV to 100 MeV. Up to 10 MeV the RELEL code of Riley was used. Above 10 MeV the ELSCAT code was used, which calculated the factored cross sections and evaluates the screening factor Kscr in WKB approximation. 2 - Application of the data: This database was developed to provide input for the transport codes, such as ETRAN, and includes differential cross sections, the total cross section, and the transport cross sections. In addition, a code TRANSX is provided that generates transport cross section of arbitrary order needed as input for the calculation of Goudsmit-Saunderson multiple-scattering angular distribution 3 - Source and scope of data: The database includes cross sections at 61 energies for electrons and 41 energies from positrons, covering the energy region from 1 KeV to 100 MeV. The number of deflection angles included in the database is 314 angles. Total and transport cross sections are also included in this package. The data files have an extension (jjj) that represents the atomic number of the target atom. The database includes auxiliary data files that enable the ELASTIC code to include the following optional modifications: (i) the inclusion of the exchange correction for electrons scattering; (ii) the conversion of the cross sections for scattering by free atoms to cross sections for scattering by atoms in solids; (iii) ti reduction of the cross sections at large angles and at high energies when the nucleus is treated as an extended rather than a point charge

  1. γ production and neutron inelastic scattering cross sections for 76Ge

    Rouki, C.; Domula, A. R.; Drohé, J. C.; Koning, A. J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Zuber, K.

    2013-11-01

    The 2040.7-keV γ ray from the 69th excited state of 76Ge was investigated in the interest of Ge-based double-β-decay experiments like the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment. The predicted transition could interfere with valid 0νββ events at 2039.0 keV, creating false signals in large-volume 76Ge enriched detectors. The measurement was performed with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) at the Geel Electron Linear Accelerator (GELINA) white neutron source, using the (n,n'γ) technique and focusing on the strongest γ rays originating from the level. Upper limits obtained for the production cross section of the 2040.7-keV γ ray showed no possible influence on GERDA data. Additional analysis of the data yielded high-resolution cross sections for the low-lying states of 76Ge and related γ rays, improving the accuracy and extending existing data for five transitions and five levels. The inelastic scattering cross section for 76Ge was determined for incident neutron energies up to 2.23 MeV, significantly increasing the energy range for which experimental data are available. Comparisons with model calculations using the talys code are presented indicating that accounting for the recently established asymmetric rotor structure should lead to an improved description of the data.

  2. Measurement of the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering cross section with a leading proton at HERA

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2010-06-15

    The cross section for the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process ep{yields}eXp is measured, with the leading final state proton detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The data sample covers the range x{sub P} < 0.1 in fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss, 0.1< vertical stroke t vertical stroke <0.7 GeV{sup 2} in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4cross section is measured four-fold differentially in t, x{sub P},Q{sup 2} and {beta}=x/x{sub P}, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. The t and x{sub P} dependences are interpreted in terms of an effective pomeron trajectory and a sub-leading exchange. The data are compared to perturbative QCD predictions at next-to-leading order based on diffractive parton distribution functions previously extracted from complementary measurements of inclusive diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The ratio of the diffractive to the inclusive ep cross section is studied as a function of Q{sup 2}, {beta} and x{sub P}. (orig.)

  3. Measurement and QCD analysis of diffractive jet cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Mozer, M.U.

    2006-07-24

    Differential cross sections for the production of two jets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at HERA are presented. The process studied is of the type ep{yields}eXY, where the central hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated from the system Y by a gap in rapidity. The forward system Y consists of an elastically scattered proton or a low mass dissociation system. The data were taken with the H1 detector during the years of 1999 and 2000 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 51.5 pb{sup -1}. The measured cross sections are compared to fixed order NLO QCD predictions, that use diffractive parton densities which have previously been determined by a NLO QCD analysis of inclusive diffractive DIS at H1. The prediction and the data show significant differences. However, the dijet cross section is dominated by the diffractive gluon density, which can be extracted by the above mentioned analysis only with considerable uncertainty. Hence a combined QCD analysis of the previously published inclusive diffractive data and the dijet data is performed. This combined fit analysis allows the determination of diffractive quark and gluon densities with comparable precision. The common description of inclusive diffractive data and the dijet data confirms QCD factorization. (orig.)

  4. Multichannel analysis of He*(21S)+Ne elastic and inelastic scattering in crossed atomic beams

    Martin, D.W.; Fukuyama, T.; Siska, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    State-to-state elastic and inelastic angular distribution and time-of-flight measurements are reported for the scattering of He*(2 1 S) by Ne in crossed supersonic atom beams at four collision energies in the range 0.6--2.8 kcal/mol. The inelastic collision products He+Ne*(nl), where nl=3d', 4p, 4p', 5s, 5s', and 4d, are scattered predominantly forward with respect to the direction of incidence, except for endothermic states near threshold. The data are analyzed with a numerically exact multichannel curve-crossing model that yields good agreement with experimental cross section branching fractions and total quenching and state-to-state rate constants as well as the angular measurements. The model suggests the importance of intermediate ''chaperone'' states, in which the excited electron is temporarily trapped in a d or f Rydberg Ne orbital, in channeling flux into the 4s' and 5s' upper laser states of Ne by energy transfer from He*(2s 1,3 S)

  5. Measurement of differential incoherent scattering cross-sections of 145 keV photons from K-shell electrons

    Acharya, V B; Ghumman, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1980-06-01

    Differential cross-sections for incoherent scattering of 145 keV photons from K-shell electrons of tin, silver and molybdenum have been measured at 110deg to investigate the effect of electron binding on differential cross-sections in the low energy region. The incoherent scattered photons are selected in coincidence with X-rays which follow the vacancies caused by the ejection of the electrons. NaI(Tl) scintillators are used for the detection of scattered photons and emitted X-rays. The experimental results are compared with the available theoretical data.

  6. Simulation study on cross polarization scattering of ultrashort-pulse electromagnetic waves

    Katsuragawa, Naoki; Hojo, Hitoshi; Mase, Atushi

    1996-11-01

    Simulation study on cross polarization scattering of ultrashort-pulse electromagnetic waves due to magnetic fluctuations is presented. One-dimensional coupled wave equations for the ordinary and extraordinary modes are solved for incident unipolar sub-cycle pulses in an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma. It is shown that the peak frequencies in the frequency-spectral signals of the mode-converted reflected waves are determined from the Bragg resonance condition in the wave numbers of the ordinary mode, the extraordinary mode and the magnetic fluctuations for relatively short-wavelength localized magnetic fluctuations. (author)

  7. Calculation of total cross sections for electron and positron scattering on sodium and potassium

    McCarthy, I.E.; Ratnavelu, K.; Zhou, Y.

    1993-02-01

    Total cross sections for electron and positron scattering on sodium and potassium are calculated at various energies and compared with experiment. The method use is the coupled-channels-optical method with the equivalent-local polarisation potential, which takes all channels into account. For electrons the calculations are checked by comparison with coupled-channels-optical calculations using a detailed polarisation potential that makes only one approximation, that of weak coupling in the ionisation space. The polarisation potential for positrons includes effects of ionisation and positronium formation. 13 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Measurement of Jet Production Cross Sections in Deep-inelastic ep Scattering at HERA

    Andreev, Vladimir; Begzsuren, Khurelbaatar; Belousov, Anatoli; Bolz, Arthur; Boudry, Vincent; Brandt, Gerhard; Brisson, Violette; Britzger, Daniel; Buniatyan, Armen; Bylinkin, Alexander; Bystritskaya, Lena; Campbell, Alan; Cantun Avila, Karla Beatriz; Cerny, Karel; Chekelian, Vladimir; Contreras, Guillermo; Cvach, Jaroslav; Dainton, John; Daum, Karin; Diaconu, Cristinel; Dobre, Monica; Dodonov, Vitaliy; Eckerlin, Guenter; Egli, Stephan; Elsen, Eckhard; Favart, Laurent; Fedotov, Alexandre; Feltesse, Joel; Ferencei, Jozef; Fleischer, Manfred; Fomenko, Alexander; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gayler, Joerg; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, Lidia; Gogitidze, Nelly; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grab, Christoph; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Greenshaw, Timothy; Grindhammer, Guenter; Haidt, Dieter; Henderson, Rob~CW; Hladky, Jan; Hoffmann, Dirk; Horisberger, Roland; Hreus, Tomas; Huber, Florian; Jacquet, Marie; Janssen, Xavier; Jung, Hannes; Kapichine, Mikhail; Katzy, Judith; Kiesling, Christian; Klein, Max; Kleinwort, Claus; Kogler, Roman; Kostka, Peter; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kruecker, Dirk; Krueger, Katja; Landon, Murrough; Lange, Wolfgang; Laycock, Paul; Lebedev, Andrei; Levonian, Sergey; Lipka, Katerina; List, Benno; List, Jenny; Lobodzinski, Bogdan; Malinovski, Evgenij; Martyn, Hans-Ulrich; Maxfield, Steve~J; Mehta, Andrew; Meyer, Andreas; Meyer, Hinrich; Meyer, Joachim; Mikocki, Stanislav; Morozov, Anatoly; Mueller, Katharina; Naumann, Thomas; Newman, Paul~R; Niebuhr, Carsten; Nowak, Grazyna; Olsson, Jan~Erik; Ozerov, Dmitri; Pascaud, Christian; Patel, Girish; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrukhin, Alexey; Picuric, Ivana; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Polifka, Richard; Radescu, Voica; Raicevic, Natasa; Ravdandorj, Togoo; Reimer, Petr; Rizvi, Eram; Robmann, Peter; Roosen, Robert; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Rotaru, Marina; Salek, David; Sankey, Dave~PC; Sauter, Michel; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Schmitt, Stefan; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Sefkow, Felix; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Soloviev, Yuri; Sopicki, Pawel; South, David; Spaskov, Vladimir; Specka, Arnd; Steder, Michael; Stella, Bruno; Straumann, Ulrich; Sykora, Tomas; Thompson, Paul; Traynor, Daniel; Truoel, Peter; Tsakov, Ivan; Tseepeldorj, Baatar; Valkarova, Alice; Vallee, Claude; VanMechelen, Pierre; Vazdik, Iakov; Wegener, Dietrich; Wuensch, Eberhard; Zacek, Jozef; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zlebcik, Radek; Zohrabyan, Hamlet

    2017-04-04

    A precision measurement of jet cross sections in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering for photon virtualities $5.5cross sections are measured simultaneously and are presented as a function of jet transverse momentum observables and as a function of $Q^2$. Jet cross sections normalised to the inclusive neutral current DIS cross section in the respective $Q^2$-interval are also determined. Previous results of inclusive jet cross sections in the range $150

  9. Measurement of jet production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Vazdik, Y.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Bolz, A.; Huber, F.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; Boudry, V.; Specka, A.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Haidt, D.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Kruecker, D.; Krueger, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Olsson, J.E.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E.; Buniatyan, A.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Avila, K.B.C.; Contreras, J.G.; Cerny, K.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R.; Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Lobodzinski, B.; Cvach, J.; Hladky, J.; Reimer, P.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Vallee, C.; Dobre, M.; Rotaru, M.; Egli, S.; Horisberger, R.; Ozerov, D.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Mechelen, P. van; Feltesse, J.; Schoeffel, L.; Ferencei, J.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Petrukhin, A.; Grab, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Spaskov, V.; Kogler, R.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Perez, E.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Rostovtsev, A.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Stella, B.; Sykora, T.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Wegener, D.

    2017-01-01

    A precision measurement of jet cross sections in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering for photon virtualities 5.5 < Q"2 < 80 GeV"2 and inelasticities 0.2 < y < 0.6 is presented, using data taken with the H1 detector at HERA, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 290 pb"-"1. Double-differential inclusive jet, dijet and trijet cross sections are measured simultaneously and are presented as a function of jet transverse momentum observables and as a function of Q"2. Jet cross sections normalised to the inclusive neutral current DIS cross section in the respective Q"2-interval are also determined. Previous results of inclusive jet cross sections in the range 150 < Q"2 < 15,000 GeV"2 are extended to low transverse jet momenta 5 < P_T"j"e"t < 7 GeV. The data are compared to predictions from perturbative QCD in next-to-leading order in the strong coupling, in approximate next-to-next-to-leading order and in full next-to-next-to-leading order. Using also the recently published H1 jet data at high values of Q"2, the strong coupling constant α_s(M_Z) is determined in next-to-leading order. (orig.)

  10. Measurement of jet production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T. [Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bolz, A.; Huber, F.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Boudry, V.; Specka, A. [LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Brandt, G. [Universitaet Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen (Germany); Brisson, V.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Haidt, D.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Kruecker, D.; Krueger, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Olsson, J.E.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Buniatyan, A.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Bylinkin, A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Avila, K.B.C.; Contreras, J.G. [CINVESTAV, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Cerny, K.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Lobodzinski, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Cvach, J.; Hladky, J.; Reimer, P. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Daum, K.; Meyer, H. [Fachbereich C, Universitaet Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Vallee, C. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille (France); Dobre, M.; Rotaru, M. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest (Romania); Egli, S.; Horisberger, R.; Ozerov, D. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Mechelen, P. van [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (Belgium); Feltesse, J.; Schoeffel, L. [Irfu/SPP, CE Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ferencei, J. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the CAS, Rez (Czech Republic); Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Gouzevitch, M.; Petrukhin, A. [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France); Grab, C. [Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Henderson, R.C.W. [University of Lancaster, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Jung, H. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (Belgium); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Spaskov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kogler, R. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D. [University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, London (United Kingdom); Lange, W.; Naumann, T. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Martyn, H.U. [I. Physikalisches Institut der RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Perez, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [University of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (Montenegro); Polifka, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); University of Toronto, Department of Physics, Toronto, ON (CA); Radescu, V. [Oxford University, Department of Physics, Oxford (GB); Rostovtsev, A. [Institute for Information Transmission Problems RAS, Moscow (RU); Sankey, D.P.C. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire (GB); Sauvan, E. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille (FR); Universite de Savoie, LAPP, Annecy-le-Vieux (FR); Shushkevich, S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (RU); Soloviev, Y. [DESY, Hamburg (DE); Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU); Stella, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Roma Tre (IT); INFN Roma 3, Rome (IT); Sykora, T. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (BE); Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (CZ); Tsakov, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (BG); Tseepeldorj, B. [Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian, Ulaanbaatar (MN); Ulaanbaatar University, Ulaanbaatar (MN); Wegener, D. [Institut fuer Physik, TU Dortmund, Dortmund (DE); Collaboration: H1 Collaboration

    2017-04-15

    A precision measurement of jet cross sections in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering for photon virtualities 5.5 < Q{sup 2} < 80 GeV{sup 2} and inelasticities 0.2 < y < 0.6 is presented, using data taken with the H1 detector at HERA, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 290 pb{sup -1}. Double-differential inclusive jet, dijet and trijet cross sections are measured simultaneously and are presented as a function of jet transverse momentum observables and as a function of Q{sup 2}. Jet cross sections normalised to the inclusive neutral current DIS cross section in the respective Q{sup 2}-interval are also determined. Previous results of inclusive jet cross sections in the range 150 < Q{sup 2} < 15,000 GeV{sup 2} are extended to low transverse jet momenta 5 < P{sub T}{sup jet} < 7 GeV. The data are compared to predictions from perturbative QCD in next-to-leading order in the strong coupling, in approximate next-to-next-to-leading order and in full next-to-next-to-leading order. Using also the recently published H1 jet data at high values of Q{sup 2}, the strong coupling constant α{sub s}(M{sub Z}) is determined in next-to-leading order. (orig.)

  11. MEASUREMENTS OF THE ABSORPTION AND SCATTERING CROSS SECTIONS FOR THE INTERACTION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES WITH SUNSPOTS

    Zhao, Hui; Chou, Dean-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The solar acoustic waves are modified by the interaction with sunspots. The interaction can be treated as a scattering problem: an incident wave propagating toward a sunspot is scattered by the sunspot into different modes. The absorption cross section and scattering cross section are two important parameters in the scattering problem. In this study, we use the wavefunction of the scattered wave, measured with a deconvolution method, to compute the absorption cross section σ ab and the scattering cross section σ sc for the radial order n = 0–5 for two sunspots, NOAA 11084 and NOAA 11092. In the computation of the cross sections, the random noise and dissipation in the measured acoustic power are corrected. For both σ ab and σ sc , the value of NOAA 11092 is greater than that of NOAA 11084, but their overall n dependence is similar: decreasing with n . The ratio of σ ab of NOAA 11092 to that of NOAA 11084 approximately equals the ratio of sunspot radii for all n , while the ratio of σ sc of the two sunspots is greater than the ratio of sunspot radii and increases with n . This suggests that σ ab is approximately proportional to the sunspot radius, while the dependence of σ sc on radius is faster than the linear increase.

  12. MEASUREMENTS OF THE ABSORPTION AND SCATTERING CROSS SECTIONS FOR THE INTERACTION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES WITH SUNSPOTS

    Zhao, Hui [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 200012 (China); Chou, Dean-Yi, E-mail: chou@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Physics Department, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2016-05-01

    The solar acoustic waves are modified by the interaction with sunspots. The interaction can be treated as a scattering problem: an incident wave propagating toward a sunspot is scattered by the sunspot into different modes. The absorption cross section and scattering cross section are two important parameters in the scattering problem. In this study, we use the wavefunction of the scattered wave, measured with a deconvolution method, to compute the absorption cross section σ {sub ab} and the scattering cross section σ {sub sc} for the radial order n = 0–5 for two sunspots, NOAA 11084 and NOAA 11092. In the computation of the cross sections, the random noise and dissipation in the measured acoustic power are corrected. For both σ {sub ab} and σ {sub sc}, the value of NOAA 11092 is greater than that of NOAA 11084, but their overall n dependence is similar: decreasing with n . The ratio of σ {sub ab} of NOAA 11092 to that of NOAA 11084 approximately equals the ratio of sunspot radii for all n , while the ratio of σ {sub sc} of the two sunspots is greater than the ratio of sunspot radii and increases with n . This suggests that σ {sub ab} is approximately proportional to the sunspot radius, while the dependence of σ {sub sc} on radius is faster than the linear increase.

  13. Rosetta Mission: Electron Scattering Cross Sections—Data Needs and Coverage in BEAMDB Database

    Bratislav P. Marinković

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The emission of [O I] lines in the coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the Rosetta mission have been explained by electron impact dissociation of water rather than the process of photodissociation. This is the direct evidence for the role of electron induced processing has been seen on such a body. Analysis of other emission features is handicapped by a lack of detailed knowledge of electron impact cross sections which highlights the need for a broad range of electron scattering data from the molecular systems detected on the comet. In this paper, we present an overview of the needs for electron scattering data relevant for the understanding of observations in coma, the tenuous atmosphere and on the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the Rosetta mission. The relevant observations for elucidating the role of electrons come from optical spectra, particle analysis using the ion and electron sensors and mass spectrometry measurements. To model these processes electron impact data should be collated and reviewed in an electron scattering database and an example is given in the BEAMD, which is a part of a larger consortium of Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre—VAMDC.

  14. Inclusive-jet and dijet cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2006-08-15

    Inclusive-jet and dijet differential cross sections have been measured in neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering for exchanged boson virtualities Q{sup 2}>125 GeV{sup 2} with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 82 pb{sup -1}. Jets were identified in the Breit frame using the k{sub T} cluster algorithm. Jet cross sections are presented as functions of several kinematic and jet variables. The results are also presented in different regions of Q{sup 2}. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations describe the measurements well. Regions of phase space where the theoretical uncertainties are small have been identified. Measurements in these regions have the potential to constrain the gluon density in the proton when used as inputs to global fits of the proton parton distribution functions. (orig.)

  15. Inclusive-jet and dijet cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2006-08-01

    Inclusive-jet and dijet differential cross sections have been measured in neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering for exchanged boson virtualities Q 2 >125 GeV 2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 82 pb -1 . Jets were identified in the Breit frame using the k T cluster algorithm. Jet cross sections are presented as functions of several kinematic and jet variables. The results are also presented in different regions of Q 2 . Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations describe the measurements well. Regions of phase space where the theoretical uncertainties are small have been identified. Measurements in these regions have the potential to constrain the gluon density in the proton when used as inputs to global fits of the proton parton distribution functions. (orig.)

  16. Inclusive dijet cross sections in neutral current deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Abramowicz, H.; Adamczyk, L.

    2010-10-01

    Single- and double-differential inclusive dijet cross sections in neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 374 pb -1 . The measurement was performed at large values of the photon virtuality, Q 2 , between 125 and 20 000 GeV 2 . The jets were reconstructed with the k T cluster algorithm in the Breit reference frame and selected by requiring their transverse energies in the Breit frame, E jet T,B , to be larger than 8 GeV. In addition, the invariant mass of the dijet system, M jj , was required to be greater than 20 GeV. The cross sections are described by the predictions of next-to-leading-order QCD. (orig.)

  17. Inclusive dijet cross sections in neutral current deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences; Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Cracow Univ. of Technology (Poland). Faculty of Physics, Mathematics and Applied Computer Science; Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (PL). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] (and others)

    2010-10-15

    Single- and double-differential inclusive dijet cross sections in neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 374 pb{sup -1}. The measurement was performed at large values of the photon virtuality, Q{sup 2}, between 125 and 20 000 GeV{sup 2}. The jets were reconstructed with the k{sub T} cluster algorithm in the Breit reference frame and selected by requiring their transverse energies in the Breit frame, E{sup jet}{sub T,B}, to be larger than 8 GeV. In addition, the invariant mass of the dijet system, M{sub jj}, was required to be greater than 20 GeV. The cross sections are described by the predictions of next-to-leading-order QCD. (orig.)

  18. High-frequency limit of the transport cross section in scattering by an obstacle with impedance boundary conditions

    Aleksenko, A I; Cruz, J P; Lakshtanov, E L [Department of Mathematics, Aveiro University, Aveiro 3810 (Portugal)], E-mail: lakshtanov@rambler.ru

    2008-06-27

    The scalar scattering of a plane wave by a strictly convex obstacle with impedance boundary conditions is considered. A uniform bound of the total cross section for all values of the frequency is presented. The high-frequency limit of the transport cross section is calculated and presented as a classical functional of the variational calculus.

  19. Determination of the potential scattering parameter and parameterization of neutron cross-sections in the low-energy region

    Novoselov, G.M.; Litvinskij, L.L

    2001-01-01

    Different cross-section parameterization methods in the low-energy region are considered. It is shown that the potential scattering parameter value derived from analysis of experimental cross-section data is dependent essentially on the method used to take account of the nearest resonances. A formula describing this dependence is obtained. The results are verified by numerical model calculations. (author)

  20. High-frequency limit of the transport cross section in scattering by an obstacle with impedance boundary conditions

    Aleksenko, A I; Cruz, J P; Lakshtanov, E L

    2008-01-01

    The scalar scattering of a plane wave by a strictly convex obstacle with impedance boundary conditions is considered. A uniform bound of the total cross section for all values of the frequency is presented. The high-frequency limit of the transport cross section is calculated and presented as a classical functional of the variational calculus

  1. Moments of the Bethe surface and total inelastic x-ray scattering cross sections for H2

    Sharma, B.S.; Thakkar, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Moments, S(j,K), of the generalized oscillator strength distribution are global properties of the Bethe surface. Apart from S(-1,K) which is related to the Waller-Hartree incoherent scattering factor, little is known about these moments for nonzero K. This paper describes high-accuracy calculations of S(1,K) and S(2,K) for molecular hydrogen. Comparison with experiment is made, and the utility of simple asymptotic approximations is confirmed. The moments are used to calculate differential cross sections for the inelastic scattering of x rays using the constant-momentum-transfer and constant-angle theories of Bonham. These cross sections differ from the Waller-Hartree cross sections at large angles thus demonstrating the importance of making corrections to the Waller-Hartree theory if the incoherent scattering factor S(K) is to be extracted from experimental inelastic cross sections. Total cross sections for scattering of 6- and 7-keV photons from H 2 are compared with synchrotron radiation scattering experiments. The calculations suggest that the Bonham constant-angle cross sections agree best with experiment. However, further experimental and theoretical work is needed to obtain firm conclusions about the limitations of Waller-Hartree theory

  2. Differential cross sections for elastic scattering of electrons by atoms and solids

    Jablonski, A.; Salvat, F.; Powell, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) for elastic scattering of electrons by neutral atoms are extensively used in studies of electron transport in solids and liquids. A new NIST database has recently been released with DCSs calculated from a relativistic Dirac partial-wave analysis in which the potentials were obtained from Dirac-Hartree-Fock electron densities computed self-consistently for free atoms. We have compared calculated DCSs with measured DCSs for argon for electron energies between 50 eV and 3 keV, and found good agreement for electron energies above about 1 keV but with increasing deviations as the energy is reduced. These deviations are due to the neglect of absorption and polarizability effects in the calculations. Nevertheless, DCSs for neutral atoms have been successfully used in simulations of elastic backscattering of electrons by solid surfaces with energies down to 300 eV as well as for many other applications. It is suggested that this success might be due at least partially to the smaller absorption correction for the DCSs in solids on account of the smaller total inelastic scattering cross sections than for the corresponding free atoms

  3. The importance of fast neutron scattering cross sections for neutron dosimetry in soft tissues

    Jahr, R.; Brede, H.J.

    1979-05-01

    Tissue equivalent plastic materials are used for the construction of accurate neutron dosemeters. As compared to real tissue, in materials most of the oxygen content is replaced by carbon. In order to determine the dose to human tissue a kerma correction factor has to be used. It is shown that the uncertainty (corresponding to 1 delta) of the correction factor at E = 14.5 MeV amounts to at least 5.2%. An important contribution to the uncertainties results from the lack of experimental data of the 12 C(n, n' 3α), 16 O(n,n'p) and 16 O(n,n'α)-cross-sections. These data are to be calculated by subtracting all other cross sections from the total cross section of ( 16 O + n) and ( 12 C + n). It is shown that the uncertainties of the kerma correction factor can be considerably reduced by an accurate measurement of the scattering cross sections of carbon and oxygen. (orig.) [de

  4. Jet-radius dependence of inclusive-jet cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2006-12-01

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured for different jet radii in neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering for boson virtualities Q 2 >125 GeV 2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 81.7 pb -1 . Jets were identified in the Breit frame using the k T cluster algorithm in the longitudinally inclusive mode for different values of the jet radius R. Differential cross sections are presented as functions of Q 2 and the jet transverse energy, E T,B jet . The dependence on R of the inclusive-jet cross section has been measured for Q 2 > 125 and 500 GeV 2 and found to be linear with R in the range studied. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements for 0.5 s (M Z ) has been extracted from the measurements of the inclusive-jet cross-section dσ/dQ 2 with R=1 for Q 2 > 500 GeV 2 : α s (M Z )=0.1207±0.0014(stat.) -0.0028 +0.0030 (exp.) -0.0 023 +0.0022 (th.). The variation of α s with E T,B jet is in good agreement with the running of α s as predicted by QCD. (orig.)

  5. Inclusive proton spectra and total reaction cross sections for proton-nucleus scattering at 800 MeV

    McGill, J.A.

    1981-08-01

    Current applications of multiple scattering theory to describe the elastic scattering of medium energy protons from nuclei have been shown to be quite successful in reproducing the experimental cross sections. These calculations use the impulse approximation, wherein the scattering from individual nucleons in the nucleus is described by the scattering amplitude for a free nucleon. Such an approximation restricts the inelastic channels to those initiated by nucleon-nucleon scattering. As a first step in determining the nature of p + nucleus scattering at 800 MeV, both total reaction cross sections and (p,p') inclusive cross sections were measured and compared to the free p + p cross sections for hydrogen, deuterium, calcium 40, carbon 12, and lead 208. It is concluded that as much as 85% of all reactions in a nucleus proceed from interactions with a single nucleon in the nucleus, and that the impulse approximation is a good starting point for a microscopic description of p + nucleus interactions at 800 MeV

  6. Proof of the formula for the ideal gas scattering kernel for nuclides with strongly energy dependent scattering cross sections

    Rothenstein, W.

    2004-01-01

    The current study is a sequel to a paper by Rothenstein and Dagan [Ann. Nucl. Energy 25 (1998) 209] where the ideal gas based kernel for scatterers with internal structure was introduced. This double differential kernel includes the neutron energy after scattering as well as the cosine of the scattering angle for isotopes with strong scattering resonances. A new mathematical formalism enables the inclusion of the new kernel in NJOY [MacFarlane, R.E., Muir, D.W., 1994. The NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System Version 91 (LA-12740-m)]. Moreover the computational time of the new kernel is reduced significantly, feasible for practical application. The completeness of the new kernel is proven mathematically and demonstrated numerically. Modifications necessary to remove the existing inconsistency of the secondary energy distribution in NJOY are presented

  7. Inclusive diffractive cross sections in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Sola, Valentina

    2012-04-01

    Diffractive deep-inelastic scattering events in ep collisions at HERA are the subject of this thesis. The cross sections for inclusive diffraction, ep → eXp, measured by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations were combined, providing a model-independent check of the data consistency and a cross calibration between the two experiments, and resulting in single data sets with improved accuracy and precision. Two sets of combined results were obtained. The cross sections measured using the proton-spectrometer data were combined, both in the range of t, the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex, common to the two experiments (0.09 2 ) and in the extended t-range vertical stroke t vertical stroke 2 . The resulting cross sections cover the region 2.5≤ Q 2 ≤200 GeV 2 in photon virtualities, 0.0003≤x P ≤0.09 in the proton fractional momentum losses and 0.0018≤ β ≤0.816 in β=x/x P , where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. The cross sections obtained from data with the large rapidity gap signature were also combined in the kinematic range 2.5≤ Q 2 ≤1600 GeV 2 , 0.0003≤x P ≤0.03 and 0.0017≤ β ≤0.8, for masses of the hadronic final state M X >4 GeV. The inclusive diffractive reduced cross section σ r D(3) was measured with data collected by the ZEUS detector, at two different centre-of-mass energies, 318 and 225 GeV. The diffractive data were selected with the large rapidity gap method in the kinematic region 20 2 2 , 0.05 P or similar 0.55), the inelasticity of the interaction.

  8. Measurement of scattering cross sections of liquid and solid hydrogen, deuterium and deuterium hydride for thermal neutrons

    Seiffert, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    The scattering cross sections for liquid and solid normal hydrogen, para-hydrogen, deuterium and deuterium hydride were measured for thermal neutrons at various temperatures. Solid samples of para-hydrogen exhibit distinct Bragg scattering. Liquid samples of deuterium and para-hydrogen also exhibit distinct coherence phenomena, which is indicative of strong local ordering of the molecules. In para-hydrogen and deuterium hydride, the threshold for scattering with excitation of rotations is distinctly visible. The positions of the thresholds show that the molecules in liquid hydrogen are not unhindered in their movement. After the beginning of the rotational excitation the scattering cross sections of liquid and solid para-hydrogen have different shapes which is to be explained by the differences in the dynamics of the liquid and the solid specimen. 22 references

  9. Finite-difference time-domain analysis on radar cross section of conducting cube scatterer covered with plasmas

    Liu Shaobin; Zhang Guangfu; Yuan Naichang

    2004-01-01

    A PLJERC-FDTD algorithm is applied to the study of the scattering of perfectly conducting cube covered with homogeneous isotropic plasmas. The effects of plasma thickness, density and collision frequency on the radar cross section (RCS) of the conducting cube scatterer have been obtained. The results illustrate that the plasma cloaking can greatly reduce the RCS of radar targets, and the RCS of the perfectly conducting cube scatterer decreases with increasing plasma thickness when the plasma frequency is greatly less than the electromagnetic (EM) wave frequency; the RCS of the perfectly conducting cube scatterer decreases with increasing plasma thickness and plasma collision frequency when the plasma frequency is almost half as much as the EM wave frequency; the effects of plasma thickness and collision frequency on the RCS of the perfectly conducting cube scatterer is small when the plasma frequency is close to the EM wave frequency

  10. Cross section measurements for quasi-elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering with the MINOS near detector

    Dorman, Mark Edward [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Chicago, Illinois. MINOS measures neutrino interactions in two large iron-scintillator tracking/sampling calorimeters; the Near Detector on-site at FNAL and the Far Detector located in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The Near Detector has recorded a large number of neutrino interactions and this high statistics dataset can be used to make precision measurements of neutrino interaction cross sections. The cross section for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering has been measured by a number of previous experiments and these measurements disagree by up to 30%. A method to select a quasi-elastic enriched sample of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector is presented and a procedure to fit the kinematic distributions of this sample and extract the quasi-elastic cross section is introduced. The accuracy and robustness of the fitting procedure is studied using mock data and finally results from fits to the MINOS Near Detector data are presented.

  11. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of 58Ni

    Jorgensen, C.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Smith, A.B.; Whalen, J.F.

    1981-09-01

    Neutron total cross sections of 58 Ni were measured at 25 keV intervals from 0.9 to 4.5 MeV with 50 to 100 keV resolutions. Attention was given to self-shielding corrections to the observed total cross sections. Differential elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured at 50 keV intervals from 1.35 to 4.0 MeV with 50 to 100 keV resolutions. Inelastic excitation of levels at 1.458 +- 0.009, 2.462 +- 0.010, 2.791 +- 0.015, 2.927 +- 0.012 and 3.059 +- 0.025 MeV was observed. The experimental results were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical and coupled-channels models. A spherical optical-statistical model was found generally descriptive of an energy-average of the experimental results. However, detailed considerations suggested significant contributions from direct-vibrational interactions, particularly associated with the excitation of the first 2+ level

  12. Cross section measurements for quasi-elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering with the MINOS near detector

    Dorman, Mark Edward

    2008-01-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Chicago, Illinois. MINOS measures neutrino interactions in two large iron-scintillator tracking/sampling calorimeters; the Near Detector on-site at FNAL and the Far Detector located in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The Near Detector has recorded a large number of neutrino interactions and this high statistics dataset can be used to make precision measurements of neutrino interaction cross sections. The cross section for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering has been measured by a number of previous experiments and these measurements disagree by up to 30%. A method to select a quasi-elastic enriched sample of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector is presented and a procedure to fit the kinematic distributions of this sample and extract the quasi-elastic cross section is introduced. The accuracy and robustness of the fitting procedure is studied using mock data and finally results from fits to the MINOS Near Detector data are presented

  13. Quantification of Material Fluorescence and Light Scattering Cross Sections Using Ratiometric Bandwidth-Varied Polarized Resonance Synchronous Spectroscopy.

    Xu, Joanna Xiuzhu; Hu, Juan; Zhang, Dongmao

    2018-05-25

    Presented herein is the ratiometric bandwidth-varied polarized resonance synchronous spectroscopy (BVPRS2) method for quantification of material optical activity spectra. These include the sample light absorption and scattering cross-section spectrum, the scattering depolarization spectrum, and the fluorescence emission cross-section and depolarization spectrum in the wavelength region where the sample both absorbs and emits. This ratiometric BVPRS2 spectroscopic method is a self-contained technique capable of quantitatively decoupling material fluorescence and light scattering signal contribution to its ratiometric BVPRS2 spectra through the linear curve-fitting of the ratiometric BVPRS2 signal as a function of the wavelength bandwidth used in the PRS2 measurements. Example applications of this new spectroscopic method are demonstrated with materials that can be approximated as pure scatterers, simultaneous photon absorbers/emitters, simultaneous photon absorbers/scatterers, and finally simultaneous photon absorbers/scatterers/emitters. Because the only instruments needed for this ratiometric BVPRS2 technique are the conventional UV-vis spectrophotometer and spectrofluorometer, this work should open doors for routine decomposition of material UV-vis extinction spectrum into its absorption and scattering component spectra. The methodology and insights provided in this work should be of broad significance to all chemical research that involves photon/matter interactions.

  14. Accurate calculation of the differential cross section of compton scattering with electron mixed chain propagator in SM

    Chen Xuewen; Fang Zhenyun; Shi Chengye

    2012-01-01

    By using the electroweak standard model (SM), we analyzed the framework of electron mixed chain propagator which composed of serious of different physical loops participating in electroweak interaction and completed the relevant analytical calculation. Then, we obtained the analytical result of electron mixed chain propagator. By applying our result to Compton scattering, the differential cross section of Compton scattering dσ SM (chain) /dcosθ is counted accurately. This result is compared with the lowest order differential cross section dσ (tree) /dcosθ and the electronic chain propagator Compton scattering differential cross section dσ QED (chain) /dcosθ in quantum electrodynamics (QED). It can be seen that dσ SM (chain ) /dcosθ can show the radiation correction more subtly than dσ QED (chain) /dcosθ. (authors)

  15. Anomalous diffraction approximation for light scattering cross section: Case of random clusters of non-absorbent spheres

    Jacquier, Sandra [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 F-St. Etienne (France); Gruy, Frederic [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 F-St. Etienne (France)], E-mail: fgruy@emse.fr

    2008-11-15

    We previously [Jacquier S, Gruy F. Approximation of the light scattering cross-section for aggregated spherical non-absorbent particles. JQSRT 2008;109:789-810] reformulated the anomalous diffraction (AD) approximation to calculate the light scattering cross section of aggregates by introducing their chord length distribution (CLD). It was applied to several ordered aggregates. This new method is entitled ADr, with the r for rapid because this one is at least 100 times faster than the standard AD method. In this article, we are searching for an approximated expression for CLD suitable all at once for ordered and disordered aggregates. The corresponding scattering cross-section values are compared to the ones coming from the standard AD approximation.

  16. Anomalous diffraction approximation for light scattering cross section: Case of random clusters of non-absorbent spheres

    Jacquier, Sandra; Gruy, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    We previously [Jacquier S, Gruy F. Approximation of the light scattering cross-section for aggregated spherical non-absorbent particles. JQSRT 2008;109:789-810] reformulated the anomalous diffraction (AD) approximation to calculate the light scattering cross section of aggregates by introducing their chord length distribution (CLD). It was applied to several ordered aggregates. This new method is entitled ADr, with the r for rapid because this one is at least 100 times faster than the standard AD method. In this article, we are searching for an approximated expression for CLD suitable all at once for ordered and disordered aggregates. The corresponding scattering cross-section values are compared to the ones coming from the standard AD approximation

  17. Cross section measurements of the elastic electron - deuteron scattering at MAMI

    Kohl, Yvonne [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Collaboration: A1-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The electromagnetic form factors of light nuclei provide a sensitive test of our understanding of nuclei. Because the deuteron has spin one, three form factors are needed to fully describe the electromagnetic structure of the deuteron. Especially the deuteron charge radius is a favourite observable to compare experiment and calculation. Recently, an extensive measurement campaign has been performed at MAMI (Mainzer Microtron) to determine the deuteron charge radius using elastic electron scattering - with the aim to halve the error compared to previous such experiments. The experiment took place at the 3-spectrometer facility of the A1-collaboration. Cross section measurements of the elastic electron-deuteron scattering have been performed for 180 different kinematic settings in the low momentum transfer region. From these, the charge form factor can precisely be determined. Fitting the form factor with an appropiate fit function, the radius can then be determined from the slope at zero momentum transfer. The determined radius could then be used as a counterweight to the value obtained from the advanced atomic Lamb shift measurements, thus providing additional insight to the proton radius puzzle.

  18. Exotic behavior of elastic scattering differential cross-sections of weakly bound nucleus 17F at small angles

    Han Jianlong; Hu Zhengguo; Zhang Xueyin; Yuan Xiaohua; Xu Huagen; Qi Huirong; Wang Yue; Jia Fei; Wu Lijie; Ding Xianli; Gao Qi; Gao Hui; Bai Zhen

    2006-01-01

    The differential cross-sections for elastic scattering of 17 F and 17 O on 208 Pb have been measured at Radioactive Ion Beam Line at Lanzhou (RIBLL). The variation of the logarithms of differential cross-sections with the square of scattering angles shows clearly that there exists a turning point in the range of small scattering angles (6 degree-20 degree) for 17 F having exotic structure, while no turning point was observed in the 17 O elastic scattering. The experimental results have been compared with previous data. Systematical analysis on the available data seems to conclude that there is an exotic behavior of elastic scattering differential cross-sections of weakly bound nuclei with halo or skin structure as compared with that of the ordinary nuclei near stable line. Therefore the fact that the turning point of the logarithms of differential cross-sections appears at small angle for weakly bound nuclei could be used as a new probe to investigate the halo and skin phenomenon. (authors)

  19. Proton-proton elastic scattering excitation functions at intermediate energies: Cross sections and analyzing powers

    Hinterberger, F; Altmeier, M; Bauer, F; Bisplinghoff, J; Büsser, K; Busch, M; Colberg, T; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuk, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    2000-01-01

    The EDDA experiment at the cooler synchrotron COSY measures proton-proton elastic scattering excitation functions in the momentum range 0.8 - 3.4 GeV/c. In phase 1 of the experiment, spin-averaged differential cross sections were measured continuously during acceleration with an internal polypropylene (CH sub 2) fiber target, taking particular care to monitor luminosity as a function of beam momentum. In phase 2, excitation functions of the analyzing power A sub N and the polarization correlation parameters A sub N sub N , A sub S sub S and A sub S sub L are measured using a polarized proton beam and a polarized atomic hydrogen beam target. The paper presents recent d sigma/d OMEGA and A sub N data. The results provide excitation functions and angular distributions of high precision and internal consistency. No evidence for narrow structures was found. The data are compared to recent phase shift solutions.

  20. A precision measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section at HERA

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Alimujiang, K. [DESY Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2009-03-15

    A measurement of the inclusive deep-inelastic neutral current e{sup +}p scattering cross section is reported in the region of four-momentum transfer squared, 12 GeV{sup 2} {<=} Q{sup 2} {<=} 150 GeV{sup 2}, and Bjorken x, 2. 10{sup -4} {<=} x {<=}0.1. The results are based on data collected by the H1 Collaboration at the ep collider HERA at positron and proton beam energies of E{sub e}=27.6 GeV and E{sub p}=920 GeV, respectively. The data are combined with previously published data, taken at E{sub p} = 820 GeV. The accuracy of the combined measurement is typically in the range of 1.3-2%. A QCD analysis at next-to-leading order is performed to determine the parton distributions in the proton based on H1 data. (orig.)

  1. Measurement and QCD Interpretation of the Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering Cross Section by H1

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Deep inelastic electron proton collisions are a straightforward tool to study the QCD dynamics between quarks and gluons in the proton. A recent measurement and QCD analysis of the deep inelastic scattering cross section by the H1 experiment at HERA are presented. In a NLO QCD analysis of H1 structure function data, the gluon distribution in the proton is extracted to typically 3% experimental accuracy at low Bjorken x.. In a combined analysis of H1 and high precision µp data by the CERN muon experiment BCDMS, the gluon distribution at low x and the strong coupling constant as were for the first time extracted simultaneously.The strong coupling constant is determined with about 1% experimental accuracy, and QCD at NLO is confirmed over 5 orders of magnitude of Bjorken x at a new level of precision.

  2. A Precision Measurement of the Inclusive ep Scattering Cross Section at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Asmone, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wallny, R.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive deep-inelastic neutral current e+p scattering cross section is reported in the region of four-momentum transfer squared, 12<=Q^2<=150 GeV^2, and Bjorken x, 2x10^-4<=x<=0.1. The results are based on data collected by the H1 Collaboration at the ep collider HERA at positron and proton beam energies of E_e=27.6 GeV and E_p=920 GeV, respectively. The data are combined with previously published data, taken at E_p=820 GeV. The accuracy of the combined measurement is typically in the range of 1.3-2%. A QCD analysis at next-to-leading order is performed to determine the parton distributions in the proton based on H1 data.

  3. Elastic scattering and total reaction cross section for the 6He +58Ni system

    Morcelle, V.; Lichtenthäler, R.; Lépine-Szily, A.; Guimarães, V.; Mendes, D. R., Jr.; Pires, K. C. C.; de Faria, P. N.; Barioni, A.; Gasques, L.; Morais, M. C.; Shorto, J. M. B.; Zamora, J. C.; Scarduelli, V.; Condori, R. Pampa; Leistenschneider, E.

    2014-11-01

    Elastic scattering measurements of 6He + 58Ni system have been performed at the laboratory energy of 21.7 MeV. The 6He secondary beam was produced by a transfer reaction 9Be (7Li , 6He ) and impinged on 58Ni and 197Au targets, using the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, RIBRAS, installed in the Pelletron Laboratory of the Institute of Physics of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. The elastic angular distribution was obtained in the angular range from 15° to 80° in the center of mass frame. Optical model calculations have been performed using a hybrid potential to fit the experimental data. The total reaction cross section was derived.

  4. A Time of flight spectrometer for measurements of double differential neutron scattering cross sections

    Padron, I.; Dominguez, O.; Sarria, P. Sandin, C.

    1996-01-01

    The time -of-Flight neutron spectrometry technique by associated particle method was improved using a D-T neutron generator at Laboratory of Nuclear Analysis. This technique was implemented for double differential cross section measurements and supported by the IAEA Project CUB/01/005. An stilbene scintillation detector (dia=100 mm, length=50 mm) was used as principal neutron detector detector and was situated outside a hole in the concrete wall. This way the fligth path was extended and the scattered neutron cone accurate collimated throught the 2 m concrete wall. For the associated particle α detection a thin plastic NE-102 scint illator was used, as well as, two scintilation detectors and a long counter for the neutron flux monitoring. In this TOF neutron spectrometer (3.40 m flight path) a 1.7 nseg. temporal resolution was obtained

  5. Combined Measurement and QCD Analysis of the Inclusive ep Scattering Cross Sections at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Antunovic, B.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Bachynska, O.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A.N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Bizot, J.C.; Blohm, C.; Bold, T.; Boos, E.G.; Borodin, M.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boudry, V.; Boutle, S.K.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brummer, N.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bussey, P.J.; Butterworth, J.M.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C.D.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J.B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Favereau, J.; Delcourt, B.; del Peso, J.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R.K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R.C.E.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Drugakov, V.; Dubak, A.; Durkin, L.S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P.F.; Eskreys, A.; Falkiewicz, A.; Fang, S.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M.I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gabathuler, E.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L.K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu.A.; Gottlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grell, B.R.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J.C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K.H.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Holm, U.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Horton, K.; Hreus, T.; Huttmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z.A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H.P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T.W.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Jungst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I.I.; Katzy, J.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kenyon, I.R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L.A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J.Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Koffeman, E.; Kogler, R.; Kollar, D.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Kotz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kutak, K.; Kuze, M.; Kuzmin, V.A.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B.B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Li, G.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T.Y.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Lohr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J.H.; Loktionova, N.; Long, K.R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukasik, J.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Luzniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makankine, A.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Marage, P.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Marti, Ll.; Martin, J.F.; Martyn, H.U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Mattingly, M.C.K.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.D.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Nicholass, D.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R.J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.E.; Oh, B.Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Osman, S.; Ota, O.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J.M.; Pawlik, B.; Pejchal, O.; Pelfer, P.G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Plucinski, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A.S.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D.D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y.D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salek, D.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A.A.; Saxon, D.H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W.B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schonberg, V.; Schoning, A.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Sloan, T.; Slominski, W.; Smiljanic, I.; Smith, W.H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sorokin, Iu.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T.P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Sunar, D.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A.D.; Tassi, E.; Tchoulakov, V.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Urban, K.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, V.; Vinokurova, S.; Vlasov, N.N.; Volchinski, V.; Volynets, O.; von den Driesch, M.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W.A.T.; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J.J.; Whyte, J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wunsch, E.; Yagues-Molina, A.G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zeniaev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B.O.; Zhokin, A.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolko, M.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D.S.

    2010-01-01

    A combination is presented of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised ep scattering at HERA during the period 1994-2000. The data span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q^2, and in Bjorken x. The combination method used takes the correlations of systematic uncertainties into account, resulting in an improved accuracy. The combined data are the sole input in a NLO QCD analysis which determines a new set of parton distributions HERAPDF1.0 with small experimental uncertainties. This set includes an estimate of the model and parametrisation uncertainties of the fit result.

  6. A precision measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Preda, T.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Zus, R.; Alimujiang, K.; Antunovic, B.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Boer, Y. de; Roeck, A. de; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grell, B.R.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Janssen, M.E.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; List, J.; Marti, Ll.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nozicka, M.; Olsson, J.E.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Rurikova, Z.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Driesch, M. von den; Wissing, C.; Wuensch, E.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Asmone, A.; Stella, B.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Volchinski, V.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Li, G.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Brinkmann, M.; Habib, S.; Jemanov, V.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Naroska, B.; Pokorny, B.; Toll, T.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Murin, P.; Tomasz, F.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Liptaj, A.; Olivier, B.; Raspiareza, A.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Petrukhin, A.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Trinh, T.N.; Vallee, C.; Cerny, K.; Pejchal, O.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cozzika, G.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Rahmat, A.J.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Degan, M. del; Grab, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Sauter, M.; Zimmermann, T.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Dodonov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Falkiewicz, A.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Glushkov, I.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Piec, S.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Tchoulakov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Nowak, K.; Robmann, P.; Schmitz, C.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Wallny, R.; Schoening, A.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Tsakov, I.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive deep inelastic neutral current e + p scattering cross section is reported in the region of four-momentum transfer squared, 12 GeV 2 ≤Q 2 ≤150 GeV 2 , and Bjorken x, 2 x 10 -4 ≤x≤0.1. The results are based on data collected by the H1 Collaboration at the ep collider HERA at positron and proton beam energies of E e =27.6 GeV and E p =920 GeV, respectively. The data are combined with previously published data, taken at E p =820 GeV. The accuracy of the combined measurement is typically in the range of 1.3-2%. A QCD analysis at next-to-leading order is performed to determine the parton distributions in the proton based on H1 data. (orig.)

  7. Forward elastic scattering and total cross-section at very high energies

    Castaldi, R.

    1985-01-01

    The successful cooling technique of antiproton beams at CERN has recently allowed the acceleration of proton and antiproton bunches simultaneously circulating in opposite directions in the SPS. Hadron-hadron collisions could so be produced at a centre-of-mass energy one order of magnitude higher than previously available, thus opening a new wide range of energies to experimentation. This technique also made it possible to replace one of the two proton beams in the ISR by a beam of antiprotons, allowing a direct precise comparison, by the same detectors, of pp and anti pp processes at the same energies. The recent results are summarized of the forward elastic scattering and total cross-section in this new energy domain. (Mori, K.)

  8. Laser resolution of unpolarized-electron scattering cross sections into spin-conserved and spin-flip components

    Ritchie, B.

    1981-01-01

    The theory is presented for one-photon free-free absorption by electrons scattering from high-Z atoms. The absorption cross section provides sufficient information to resolve the unpolarized-electron total cross section, Vertical Barf(theta)Vertical Bar 2 +Vertical Barg(theta)Vertical Bar 2 , into its individual components for spin-nonflip, Vertical Barf(theta)Vertical Bar 2 , and spin-flip, Vertical Barg(theta)Vertical Bar 2 , scattering. The observation of a spin-polarization effect for a spin-independent process (free-free absorption) is analogous to the Fano effect for bound-free absorption

  9. Program POD; A computer code to calculate nuclear elastic scattering cross sections with the optical model and neutron inelastic scattering cross sections by the distorted-wave born approximation

    Ichihara, Akira; Kunieda, Satoshi; Chiba, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Osamu; Shibata, Keiichi; Nakagawa, Tsuneo; Fukahori, Tokio; Katakura, Jun-ichi

    2005-07-01

    The computer code, POD, was developed to calculate angle-differential cross sections and analyzing powers for shape-elastic scattering for collisions of neutron or light ions with target nucleus. The cross sections are computed with the optical model. Angle-differential cross sections for neutron inelastic scattering can also be calculated with the distorted-wave Born approximation. The optical model potential parameters are the most essential inputs for those model computations. In this program, the cross sections and analyzing powers are obtained by using the existing local or global parameters. The parameters can also be inputted by users. In this report, the theoretical formulas, the computational methods, and the input parameters are explained. The sample inputs and outputs are also presented. (author)

  10. Jet-radius dependence of inclusive-jet cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2006-12-15

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured for different jet radii in neutral current deep inelastic ep scattering for boson virtualities Q{sup 2}>125 GeV{sup 2} with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 81.7 pb{sup -1}. Jets were identified in the Breit frame using the k{sub T} cluster algorithm in the longitudinally inclusive mode for different values of the jet radius R. Differential cross sections are presented as functions of Q{sup 2} and the jet transverse energy, E{sub T,B}{sup jet}. The dependence on R of the inclusive-jet cross section has been measured for Q{sup 2} > 125 and 500 GeV{sup 2} and found to be linear with R in the range studied. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements for 0.5<=R<=1. A value of {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}) has been extracted from the measurements of the inclusive-jet cross-section d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2} with R=1 for Q{sup 2} > 500 GeV{sup 2}: {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z})=0.1207{+-}0.0014(stat.){sub -0.0028}{sup +0.0030}(exp.){sub -0.0023}{sup +0.0022}(th.). The variation of {alpha}{sub s} with E{sub T,B}{sup jet} is in good agreement with the running of {alpha}{sub s} as predicted by QCD. (orig.)

  11. Measurement and QCD analysis of the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering cross section at HERA

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.

    2006-05-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process ep→eXY, where Y is a proton or a low mass proton excitation carrying a fraction 1-x P >0.95 of the incident proton longitudinal momentum and the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex satisfies t 2 . Using data taken by the H1 experiment, the cross section is measured for photon virtualities in the range 3.5 ≤Q 2 ≤1600 GeV 2 , triple differentially in x P , Q 2 and β=x/x P , where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. At low x P , the data are consistent with a factorisable x P dependence, which can be described by the exchange of an effective pomeron trajectory with intercept α P (0)=1.118 ±0.008(exp.) +0.029 -0.010 (model). Diffractive parton distribution functions and their uncertainties are determined from a next-to-leading order DGLAP QCD analysis of the Q 2 and β dependences of the cross section. The resulting gluon distribution carries an integrated fraction of around 70% of the exchanged momentum in the Q 2 range studied. Total and differential cross sections are also measured for the diffractive charged current process e + p → anti ν e XY and are found to be well described by predictions based on the diffractive parton distributions. The ratio of the diffractive to the inclusive neutral current ep cross sections is studied. Over most of the kinematic range, this ratio shows no significant dependence on Q 2 at fixed x P and x or on x at fixed Q 2 and β. (Orig.)

  12. Measurement and QCD analysis of the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering cross section at HERA

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Coppens, Y. R.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, C. L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Marti, L.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Stoilov, A.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wissing, C.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2006-12-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process ep→eXY, where Y is a proton or a low mass proton excitation carrying a fraction 1-xIP>0.95 of the incident proton longitudinal momentum and the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex satisfies |t|<1 GeV2. Using data taken by the H1 experiment, the cross section is measured for photon virtualities in the range 3.5≤Q2≤1600 GeV2, triple differentially in xIP, Q2 and β=x/xIP, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. At low xIP, the data are consistent with a factorisable xIP dependence, which can be described by the exchange of an effective pomeron trajectory with intercept αIP(0)=1.118±0.008(exp.)+0.029 -0.010(model). Diffractive parton distribution functions and their uncertainties are determined from a next-to-leading order DGLAP QCD analysis of the Q2 and β dependences of the cross section. The resulting gluon distribution carries an integrated fraction of around 70% of the exchanged momentum in the Q2 range studied. Total and differential cross sections are also measured for the diffractive charged current process e+p→ν¯eXY and are found to be well described by predictions based on the diffractive parton distributions. The ratio of the diffractive to the inclusive neutral current ep cross sections is studied. Over most of the kinematic range, this ratio shows no significant dependence on Q2 at fixed xIP and x or on x at fixed Q2 and β.

  13. Measurement of charged and neutral current e-p deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high Q2

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R.L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Haas, T.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.; Katz, U.F.; Mari, S.M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, C.; Schattevoy, R.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G.P.; Heath, H.F.; Llewellyn, T.J.; Morgado, C.J.S.; Norman, D.J.P.; O'Mara, J.A.; Tapper, R.J.; Wilson, S.S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R.R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J.A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P.B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jelen, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajac, J.; Kotanski, A.; Przybycien, M.; Bauerdick, L.A.T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J.K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasinski, M.; Gilkinson, D.J.; Glasman, C.; Goettlicher, P.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Hessling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Koepke, L.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Loehr, B.; Loewe, M.; Lueke, D.; Manczak, O.; Ng, J.S.T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.

    1995-01-01

    Deep inelastic e - p scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared Q 2 above 400GeV 2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections dσ/dQ 2 are presented. From the Q 2 dependence of the CC cross section, the mass term in the CC propagator is determined to be M W =76±16±13 GeV

  14. A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements

    Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M.; Papka, P.; Dobson, R. T.

    2010-01-01

    Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of 6 Li and 12 C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

  15. Inclusive diffractive cross sections in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Sola, Valentina

    2012-04-15

    Diffractive deep-inelastic scattering events in ep collisions at HERA are the subject of this thesis. The cross sections for inclusive diffraction, ep {yields} eXp, measured by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations were combined, providing a model-independent check of the data consistency and a cross calibration between the two experiments, and resulting in single data sets with improved accuracy and precision. Two sets of combined results were obtained. The cross sections measured using the proton-spectrometer data were combined, both in the range of t, the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex, common to the two experiments (0.09< vertical stroke t vertical stroke <0.55 GeV{sup 2}) and in the extended t-range vertical stroke t vertical stroke <1 GeV{sup 2}. The resulting cross sections cover the region 2.5{<=} Q{sup 2} {<=}200 GeV{sup 2} in photon virtualities, 0.0003{<=}x{sub P}{<=}0.09 in the proton fractional momentum losses and 0.0018{<=} {beta} {<=}0.816 in {beta}=x/x{sub P}, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. The cross sections obtained from data with the large rapidity gap signature were also combined in the kinematic range 2.5{<=} Q{sup 2} {<=}1600 GeV{sup 2}, 0.0003{<=}x{sub P}{<=}0.03 and 0.0017{<=} {beta} {<=}0.8, for masses of the hadronic final state M{sub X}>4 GeV. The inclusive diffractive reduced cross section {sigma}{sub r}{sup D(3)} was measured with data collected by the ZEUS detector, at two different centre-of-mass energies, 318 and 225 GeV. The diffractive data were selected with the large rapidity gap method in the kinematic region 20< Q{sup 2} <130 GeV{sup 2}, 0.05< {beta} <0.85 and 0.00063or similar 0.55), the inelasticity of the interaction.

  16. Measurement of the inelastic neutron scattering cross section of 56Fe

    Nolte R.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available At the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf the neutron time-of-flight facility nELBE has become operational. Fast neutrons in the energy range from 200 keV to 10 MeV are produced by the pulsed electron beam from ELBE impinging on a liquid lead circuit as a radiator. The short beam pulses of 10 ps provide the basis for an excellent time resolution for neutron time-of-flight experiments, giving an energy resolution of about <1% at 1 MeV with a short flight path of 5 m. By means of a “double-time-of-flight” setup the (n,nâγ cross section to the first excited state of 56Fe has been measured over the whole energy range without knowledge about cross sections of higher-lying levels. Plastic scintillators were used to detect the inelastically scattered neutron and BaF2 detectors to detect the correlated γ-ray.

  17. Measurement and QCD Analysis of the Diffractive Deep-Inelastic Scattering Cross Section at HERA

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Coppens, Y.R.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.I.; Lueders, H.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Marti, L.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schilling, F.P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Stoilov, A.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wissing, C.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2006-01-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process $ep\\to eXY$, where $Y$ is a proton or a low mass proton excitation carrying a fraction $1 - \\xpom > 0.95$ of the incident proton longitudinal momentum and the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex satisfies $|t|<1 {\\rm GeV^2}$. Using data taken by the H1 experiment, the cross section is measured for photon virtualities in the range $3.5 \\leq Q^2 \\leq 1600 \\rm GeV^2$, triple differentially in $\\xpom$, $Q^2$ and $\\beta = x / \\xpom$, where $x$ is the Bjorken scaling variable. At low $\\xpom$, the data are consistent with a factorisable $\\xpom$ dependence, which can be described by the exchange of an effective pomeron trajectory with intercept $\\alphapom(0)= 1.118 \\pm 0.008 {\\rm (exp.)} ^{+0.029}_{-0.010} {\\rm (model)}$. Diffractive parton distribution functions and their uncertainties are determined from a next-to-leading order DGLAP QCD analysis of the $Q^2$ and $\\beta$ dependences of the cross section. The res...

  18. Differential elastic electron scattering cross sections for CCl4 by 1.5-100 eV energy electron impact

    Limão-Vieira, P.; Horie, M.; Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Buckman, S. J.; Tanaka, H.

    2011-12-01

    We report absolute elastic differential, integral and momentum transfer cross sections for electron interactions with CCl4. The incident electron energy range is 1.5-100 eV, and the scattered electron angular range for the differential measurements varies from 15°-130°. The absolute scale of the differential cross section was set using the relative flow technique with helium as the reference species. Comparison with previous total cross sections shows good agreement. Atomic-like behaviour in this scattering system is shown here for the first time, and is further investigated by comparing the CCl4 elastic cross sections to recent results on the halomethanes and atomic chlorine at higher impact energies [H. Kato, T. Asahina, H. Masui, M. Hoshino, H. Tanaka, H. Cho, O. Ingólfsson, F. Blanco, G. Garcia, S. J. Buckman, and M. J. Brunger, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074309 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3319761.

  19. Measurement of high-Q2 charged current cross sections in e+p deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Rautenberg, J.

    2004-06-01

    Cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering have been measured in e + p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the running periods 1999 and 2000 correspond to an integrated luminosity of 61 pb -1 . Single differential cross sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy have been measured for Q 2 >200 GeV 2 , as well as the double differential reduced cross section d 2 σ/dxdQ 2 in the kinematic range 280 GeV 2 2 2 and 0.008 - p charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections. The helicity structure is investigated in particular. The mass of the space-like W boson propagator has been determined from a fit to dσ/dQ 2 . (orig.)

  20. Neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections of 232Th, 233U, 235U, 238U, 239Pu and 240Pu

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    Differential-neutron-emission cross sections of 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu and 240 Pu are measured between approx. = 1.0 and 3.5 MeV with the angle and magnitude detail needed to provide angle-integrated emission cross sections to approx. 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U and 238 U inelastic-scattering values, poor agreement is observed for 240 Pu, and a serious discrepancy exists in the case of 239 Pu

  1. STAX-2, Neutron Scattering Cross-Sections by Optical Model and Moldauer Theory with Hauser-Feshbach

    Tomita, Y.

    1972-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: The program calculates neutron scattering cross sections by means of the optical model and Moldauer's theory, and can search for potential parameters which reproduce measured cross sections. The Hauser-Feshbach calculation is also possible. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The maximum number of levels is 25. The largest value of the orbital angular momentum is 10

  2. Measurement of dijet cross sections in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Theedt, Thorben

    2009-11-15

    Dijet cross sections have been measured in deep inelastic neutral current electron-proton scattering at HERA. Cross sections have been measured differentially as functions of the photon virtuality, Q{sup 2}, the scaling variable, Bjorken x, the mean transverse jet energy, E{sub T}, the invariant dijet mass, M{sub jj}, the difference in jet pseudorapidity, {eta}'= vertical stroke {eta}{sup jet{sub 1}}-{eta}{sup jet{sub 2}} vertical stroke and the momentum fraction, {xi}. Cross sections as function of {xi} have also been measured in different regions of the photon virtuality. The analysed data were recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV with the ZEUS detector in the years 1998, 1999, and 2000 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 81.74 pb{sup -1}. The phase space of the analysis is defined by 125

  3. Prediction of e± elastic scattering cross-section ratio based on phenomenological two-photon exchange corrections

    Qattan, I. A.

    2017-06-01

    I present a prediction of the e± elastic scattering cross-section ratio, Re+e-, as determined using a new parametrization of the two-photon exchange (TPE) corrections to electron-proton elastic scattering cross section σR. The extracted ratio is compared to several previous phenomenological extractions, TPE hadronic calculations, and direct measurements from the comparison of electron and positron scattering. The TPE corrections and the ratio Re+e- show a clear change of sign at low Q2, which is necessary to explain the high-Q2 form factors discrepancy while being consistent with the known Q2→0 limit. While my predictions are in generally good agreement with previous extractions, TPE hadronic calculations, and existing world data including the recent two measurements from the CLAS and VEPP-3 Novosibirsk experiments, they are larger than the new OLYMPUS measurements at larger Q2 values.

  4. Shell-model computed cross sections for charged-current scattering of astrophysical neutrinos off 40Ar

    Kostensalo, Joel; Suhonen, Jouni; Zuber, K.

    2018-03-01

    Charged-current (anti)neutrino-40Ar cross sections for astrophysical neutrinos have been calculated. The initial and final nuclear states were calculated using the nuclear shell model. The folded solar-neutrino scattering cross section was found to be 1.78 (23 ) ×10-42cm2 , which is higher than what the previous papers have reported. The contributions from the 1- and 2- multipoles were found to be significant at supernova-neutrino energies, confirming the random-phase approximation (RPA) result of a previous study. The effects of neutrino flavor conversions in dense stellar matter (matter oscillations) were found to enhance the neutrino-scattering cross sections significantly for both the normal and inverted mass hierarchies. For the antineutrino scattering, only a small difference between the nonoscillating and inverted-hierarchy cross sections was found, while the normal-hierarchy cross section was 2-3 times larger than that of the nonoscillating cross section, depending on the adopted parametrization of the Fermi-Dirac distribution. This property of the supernova-antineutrino signal could probably be used to distinguish between the two hierarchies in megaton LAr detectors.

  5. Measurement of high-Q2 deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Kooijman, P.

    2006-01-01

    The cross sections for charged and neutral current deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam have been measured using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The results, based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 23.8 pb−1 at , are given for both

  6. Maxima of the scattering cross section, the wave vector being quasi orthogonal to the confining magnetic field

    Meyer, R.-L.

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of the scattering cross section maximas of an electromagnetic wave by a magnetoplasma, the angle between the wave vector and the confining magnetic field approaching π/2 were computed. It is shown that the maximas are shifted toward the roots of the electrostatic dispersion relation in perpendicular propagation. These roots are not exactly the electron cyclotron harmonics [fr

  7. The difference between the classical and quantum mechanical definitions of scattering cross sections and the problem of the classical limit

    Sen, D.; Basu, A.N.; Sengupta, S.

    1994-01-01

    A critical analysis of the difference between the classical and quantum mechanical definitions of scattering cross sections for particles is presented. This leads to a clarification of the classical limit problem and suggests precise criteria for its validity. In particular these criteria are derived for both finite and infinite range potentials. (orig.)

  8. Hauser-Feshbach cross-section calculations for elastic and inelastic scattering of alpha particles-program CORA

    Hartman, A.; Siemaszko, M.; Zipper, W.

    1975-01-01

    The program CORA was prepared on the basis of Hauser and Feshbach compound reaction formalism. It allows the differential cross-section distributions for the elastic and inelastic scattering of alpha particles (via compound nucleus state) to be calculated. The transmission coefficients are calculated on the basis of a four parameter optical model. The search procedure is also included. (author)

  9. Direct measurement of the cross section of neutron-neutron scattering at the YAGUAR reactor. Substantiation of the experiment technique

    Chernukhin, Yu.G.; Kandiev, Ya.Z.; Lartsev, V.D.; Levakov, B.G.; Modestov, D.G.; Simonenko, V.A.; Streltsov, S.I.; Khmel'nitskij, D.V.

    2006-01-01

    The main stage of experiment for direct measurement of cross section of neutron-neutron scattering σ nn at low energies (E nn determination. It was shown, that for achieving the criterion ε ∼ 4% it will be necessary to have 40-50 pulses of a reactor [ru

  10. Radiation damage in molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes

    Veljkovic, S; Milasin, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Department of Reactor Materials, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-04-15

    The effects of radiation on molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes are presented. The changes induced, particularly defects with a high migration activation energy, are analyzed. The correlation of these changes with the basic concepts of radiation damage in solids is considered. An attempt is made to relate the defects studied with the changes in macroscopic properties (author)

  11. Radiation damage in molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes

    Veljkovic, S.; Milasin, N.

    1964-01-01

    The effects of radiation on molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes are presented. The changes induced, particularly defects with a high migration activation energy, are analyzed. The correlation of these changes with the basic concepts of radiation damage in solids is considered. An attempt is made to relate the defects studied with the changes in macroscopic properties (author)

  12. Intermolecular potential for Ar + D2O from differential scattering cross sections, and its implications for the water pair potential

    Brooks, R.; Porter, R.A.R.; Kalos, F.; Grosser, A.E.

    1975-01-01

    A velocity selected molecular beam of D 2 O was crossed with a nozzle beam of Ar and the angular distribution of the scattered D 2 O was measured mass spectrometrically. By varying the velocity of the D 2 O beam, the differential cross section was measured at two collision energies. The experimental results were compared with synthetic differential cross sections calculated from Lennard-Jones and Kihara-Stockmayer trial potentials to determine potential parameters. Implications for the H 2 O pair potential are discussed

  13. Total cross sections for electron scattering by CO2 molecules in the energy range 400 endash 5000 eV

    Garcia, G.; Manero, F.

    1996-01-01

    Total cross sections for electron scattering by CO 2 molecules in the energy range 400 endash 5000 eV have been measured with experimental errors of ∼3%. The present results have been compared with available experimental and theoretical data. The dependence of the total cross sections on electron energy shows an asymptotic behavior with increasing energies, in agreement with the Born-Bethe approximation. In addition, an analytical formula is provided to extrapolate total cross sections to higher energies. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  14. Dispersion corrections to the forward Rayleigh scattering amplitudes of tantalum, mercury and lead derived using photon interaction cross sections

    Appaji Gowda, S.B. [Department of Studies in Physics, Manasagangothri, University of Mysore, Mysore 570006 (India); Umesh, T.K. [Department of Studies in Physics, Manasagangothri, University of Mysore, Mysore 570006 (India)]. E-mail: tku@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in

    2006-01-15

    Dispersion corrections to the forward Rayleigh scattering amplitudes of tantalum, mercury and lead in the photon energy range 24-136 keV have been determined by a numerical evaluation of the dispersion integral that relates them through optical theorem to the photo effect cross sections. The photo effect cross sections have been extracted by subtracting the coherent and incoherent scattering contribution from the measured total attenuation cross section, using high-resolution high-purity germanium detector in a narrow beam good geometry set up. The real part of the dispersion correction to which the relativistic corrections calculated by Kissel and Pratt (S-matrix approach) or Creagh and McAuley (multipole corrections) have been included are in better agreement with the available theoretical values.

  15. Measure of back angle cross sections of antiproton-nucleus elastic scattering at 48 and 180 MeV

    Berrada, M.

    1986-04-01

    Antiproton-nucleus elastic scattering was studied in the LEAR ring at CERN. The scattering cross section at back angles (θ LAB = 142 to 164 deg inclusive) was measured using plastic scintillation detectors. Analysis of experimental data at 47 MeV for a CH target and at 182 MeV for CH, C12, 016, and 018 targets produces differential cross sections for back angles less than or equal to a few dozen microbarns. These results agree with theoretical microscopic predictions. The analysis improves understanding of antiproton-nucleus interaction and introduces a constraint on the construction of optical potentials. The antiproton-nucleus potential is shown to be highly absorbing, thereby excluding S type potentials, and removing the ambiguity arising from the analysis of antiprotonic atoms. The results also show that there is no attractive pocket in the real potential likely to lead to an increase of the back angle cross sections [fr

  16. Measurement of the cross section for diffractive deep-inelastic scattering with a leading proton at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kraemer, M.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Driesch, M. von den; Wuensch, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Ceccopieri, F.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C.; Dobre, M.; List, B.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Grab, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Radescu, V.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Stella, B.; Tsakov, I.

    2011-01-01

    The cross section for the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process ep→eXp is measured, with the leading final state proton detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The data sample covers the range x P 2 in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4 2 2 in photon virtuality. The cross section is measured four-fold differentially in t,x P ,Q 2 and β=x/x P , where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. The t and x P dependences are interpreted in terms of an effective pomeron trajectory and a sub-leading exchange. The data are compared with perturbative QCD predictions at next-to-leading order based on diffractive parton distribution functions previously extracted from complementary measurements of inclusive diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The ratio of the diffractive to the inclusive ep cross section is studied as a function of Q 2 ,β and x P . (orig.)

  17. Re-evaluation of the neutron scattering dynamics in heavy water, generation of multigroup cross sections for THERM-126

    Keinert, J.

    1982-06-01

    In providing THERM-126 with cross section matrices for deuterium bound in heavy water the IKE phonon spectrum was reevaluated. The changes are modifications in the acoustic part and in the frequency of the second oscillator. Contrary to the phonon spectrum model for D in D 2 O in ENDF/B-IV the broad band of hindered rotations is assumed to be temperature dependent taking into account the diffusive motion of the molecule. With the new model scattering law data S (α, β) are generated in the temperature range 293.6 K-673.6 K. The THERM-126 scattering cross section matrices are calculated up to P 3 . As a validity check a lot of differential and integral cross sections are compared to experiments and benchmarks are recalculated. (orig.) [de

  18. Incoherent scattering of gamma rays by K-shell electrons. [Differential cross sections, 145 to 662 KeV

    Spitale, G.C.; Bloom, S.D.

    1976-05-12

    Differential cross sections for incoherent scattering by K-shell electrons were measured, using coincidence techniques, for incident photons having energies of 662 keV, 320 keV, and 145 keV. The spectral distributions of the scattered photons emerging at scattering angles from 20/sup 0/ to about 140/sup 0/ are reported. Target materials were iron, tin, holmium, and gold at 320 keV; tin and gold at 662 keV; and iron and tin at 145 keV. A typical energy spectrum consists of a scattered peak that is much narrower than would be expected from the bound state electron motion. The peak also, typically, reaches a broad maximum width for scattering angles between 45/sup 0/ and 60/sup 0/. Rather than monotonically increasing with atomic number the peak width reaches a broad maximum, generally, between Z = 50 and Z = 67, and then decreases with increasing atomic number. No Compton defect appears in any of the peaks to within +- 20 keV. A discussion of the expected magnitude of the Compton defect is included. The peak is superimposed on a continuum that diverges at the low end of the scattered photon spectrum for the following cases: gold, holmium, and tin targets for 320-keV incident photons; gold and possibly tin targets for 662-keV photons incident. This infrared divergence is expected on theoretical grounds and has been predicted. It is very nearly isotropic.

  19. Validity of the independent-processes approximation for resonance structures in electron-ion scattering cross sections

    Badnell, N.R.; Pindzola, M.S.; Griffin, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The total inelastic cross section for electron-ion scattering may be found in the independent-processes approximation by adding the resonant cross section to the nonresonant background cross section. We study the validity of this approximation for electron excitation of multiply charged ions. The resonant-excitation cross section is calculated independently using distorted waves for various Li-like and Na-like ions using (N+1)-electron atomic-structure methods previously developed for the calculation of dielectronic-recombination cross sections. To check the effects of interference between the two scattering processes, we also carry out detailed close-coupling calculations for the same atomic ions using the R-matrix method. For low ionization stages, interference effects manifest themselves sometimes as strong window features in the close-coupling cross section, which are not present in the independent-processes cross section. For higher ionization stages, however, the resonance features found in the independent-processes approximation are found to be in good agreement with the close-coupling results

  20. On measurement of cross sections for scattering of pμ - and d μ -atoms in hydrogen and deuterium

    Bystritskij, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    The paper is a brief review of all experiments on measurement of cross sections for scattering of pμ - atoms in hydrogen and dμ - atoms in hydrogen and deuterium. The experimental results are analysed and compared both with one another and with calculated results. A program for further investigation of scattering of muonic atoms of hydrogen isotopes is proposed in order to clarify the nature of discrepancies between some experimental results and to get more precise information about the above processes. (author.). 24 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  1. Neutron total, scattering and inelastic gamma-ray cross sections of yttrium at few MeV energies

    Budtz-Joergensen, C.; Guenther, P.; Smith, A.; Whalen, J.; McMurray, W.R.; Renan, M.J.; Heerden, I.J. van

    1984-01-01

    Neutron total, scattering and (n; n', γ) cross sections of elemental yttrium ( 89 Y) were measured in the few-MeV region. The neutron total-cross-section measurements were made with broad resolutions from approx.=0.5 to 4.2 MeV in steps of < or approx.0.1 MeV. Neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured from approx.=1.5 to 4.0 MeV, at incident-neutron energy intervals of approx.=50 keV and at ten or more scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 degrees using neutron detection. Inelastic-scattering cross sections were also determined using the (n; n', γ) reaction at incident energies from 1.6 to 3.8 MeV at intervals of 0.1 MeV. Gamma-rays and/or inelastically-scattered neutrons were observed corresponding to the excitation of levels at: 909.0+-0.5, 1,507.4+-0.3, 1,744.5+-0.3, 2,222.6+-0.5, 2,530+-0.8, 2,566.4+-1.0, 2,622.5+-1.0, 2,871.9+-1.5, 2,880.6+-2.0, 3,067.0+-2.0, 3,107.0+-2.0, 3,140.0+-2.0, 3,410.0+-2.0, 3,450.0+-2.0, 3,504.0+-1.5, 3,514.0+-2.0, 3,556.0+-2.0, 3,619.0+-3.0, 3,629.0+-3.0 and 3,715.0+-3.0 keV. The experimental results are discussed in terms of the spherical-optical-statistical, coupled-channels, and core-coupling models, and in the context of previously reported excited-level structure. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-12-01

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e - p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb -1 collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is given for positively and negatively polarised electron beams. The differential cross-sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy are presented for Q 2 >200 GeV 2 . The double-differential cross-section d 2 σ/dxdQ 2 is presented in the kinematic range 280 2 and 0.015< x<0.65. The measured cross sections are compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of charged and neutral current e-p deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high Q2

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-03-01

    Deep inelastic e - p scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared, Q 2 , between 400 GeV 2 and the kinematic limit of 87500 GeV 2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections, dσ/dQ 2 , are presented. For Q 2 ∝M W 2 , where M W is the mass of the W boson, the CC and NC cross sections have comparable magnitudes, demonstrating the equal strengths of the weak and electromagnetic interactions at high Q 2 . The Q 2 dependence of the CC cross section determines the mass term in the CC propagator to be M W =76±16±13 GeV. (orig.)

  4. Differential cross sections of proton Compton scattering at photon laboratory energies between 700 and 1000 MeV

    Jung, M.; Kattein, J.; Kueck, H.; Leu, P.; Marne, K.D. de; Wedemeyer, R.; Wermes, N.

    1981-05-01

    Differential cross sections of proton Compton scattering have been measured at the Bonn 2.5 GeV synchrotron. 78 data points are presented as angular distributions at photon lab energies of 700, 750, 800, 850, 900, and 950 MeV. The c.m. scattering angle ranges from 40 0 to 130 0 , corresponding to a variation of the four momentum transfer squared between t = -0.10 to t = -0.96 GeV 2 at 700 and 950 MeV, respectively. Two additional differential cross sections have been measured at 1000 MeV, 35.6 0 and 47.4 0 . The angular distributions show forward peaks whose extrapolations to 0 0 are consistent with calculated forward cross sections taken from literature. The small angle data ( vertical stroke t vertical stroke approx. 2 ) together with the calculated cross sections at 0 0 are also consistent with the assumption of a slope parameter B of 5 GeV -2 . For the first time a re-rise of the angular distributions towards backward angles has been observed. It becomes less steep with increasing energy. The most interesting feature of the angular distributions is a sharp structure which appears between t = -0.55 GeV 2 at 700 MeV and t = -0.72 GeV 2 at 950 MeV. Such a rapid variation of the differential cross section with t has never been observed in elastic hadron-hadron scattering or photoproduction processes. It indicates the existence of a dynamical mechanism which could be a peculiarity of Compton scattering. (orig.)

  5. Neutron scattering cross sections for 232Th and 238U inferred from proton scattering and charge exchange measurements

    Hansen, L.F.; Grimes, S.M.; Pohl, B.A.; Poppe, C.H.; Wong, C.

    1980-01-01

    Differential cross sections for the (p,n) reactions to the isobaric analog states (IAS) of 232 Th and 238 U targets were measured at 26 and 27 MeV. The analysis of the data was done in conjunction with the proton elastic and inelastic (2 + , 4 + , 6 + ) differential cross sections measured at 26 MeV. Because collective effects are important in this mass region, deformed coupled-channels calculations were carried out for the simultaneous analysis of the proton and neutron outgoing channels. The sensitivity of the calculations was studied with respect to the optical model parameters used in the calculations, the shape of the nuclear charge distribution, the type of coupling scheme assumed among the levels, the magnitude of the deformation parameters, and the magnitude of the isovector potentials, V 1 and W 1 . A Lane model-consistent analysis of the data was used to infer optical potential parameters for 6- to 7-MeV neutrons. The neutron elastic differential cross sections obtained from these calculations are compared with measurements available in the literature, and with results obtained using neutron parameters from global sets reported at these energies. 7 figures, 3 tables

  6. Signatures of projectile-nucleus scattering in three-dimensional (e,2e) cross sections for argon

    Ren Xueguang; Senftleben, Arne; Pflueger, Thomas; Dorn, Alexander; Ullrich, Joachim [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bartschat, Klaus, E-mail: Xueguang.Ren@mpi-hd.mpg.d, E-mail: Alexander.Dorn@mpi-hd.mpg.d [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa 50311 (United States)

    2010-02-14

    Electron impact ionization (E{sub 0} = 195 eV) of the 3p-orbital in argon is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The triple-differential cross sections (TDCS) obtained using a multi-particle momentum spectrometer (reaction microscope) cover more than 80% of the full solid angle for the slow emitted electron up to an energy of 25 eV and a range of projectile scattering angles from -5 deg. to -15 deg. Inside the projectile scattering plane the TDCS shape is in rather good agreement with a hybrid distorted-wave plus R-matrix (DWBA-RM) calculation. Outside the scattering plane relatively strong electron emission is observed which is reproduced by theory in magnitude but not in shape. A systematic study of the TDCS behaviour and structure in this region indicates that its origin lies in high-order projectile-target interaction.

  7. Description of nuclear structure and cross sections for nucleon-nucleus scattering on the basis of effective Skyrme forces

    Kuprikov, V. I.; Pilipenko, V. V.; Soznik, A. P.; Tarasov, V. N.; Shlyakhov, N. A.

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of constructing such new versions of effective nucleon-nucleon forces that would make it possible to describe simultaneously the cross sections for nucleon-nucleus scattering and quantities characterizing nuclear matter and the structure of finite even-even nuclei is investigated on the basis of a microscopic nucleon-nucleus optical potential that is calculated by using effective Skyrme interaction. A procedure for optimizing the parameters of Skyrme forces by employing fits to specific angular distributions for neutron-nucleus scattering and by simultaneously testing the features of nuclear matter, the binding energy of the target nucleus, and its proton root-mean-square radius is proposed. A number of versions of modified Skyrme forces that ensure a reasonable description of both nucleon-nucleus scattering and the properties of nuclear structure are found on the basis of this procedure.

  8. FAIR-DDX, Double Diffusion Cross-Sections Scattering Matrix Generated from ENDF/B-4 or JENDL-2

    Minami, Kazuyoshi; Yamano, Naoki

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: FAIR-DDX produces double differential (energy and angle) cross sections (DDX) in the form of group-to-group scattering matrices using the evaluated nuclear data libraries JENDL-2 or ENDF/B-IV. The DDX form is useful for verification of the evaluated data, such as the inelastic scattering, through comparison with the experimental DDX values. 2 - Method of solution: DDX uses the file 4 data (angular distribution of secondary neutrons) and the energy and momentum conservation laws. For continuum region reactions, file 5 (energy spectrum of secondary neutrons) is used. To express the angular distribution of secondary neutrons in group-to-group scattering matrices FAIR-DDX adopts a direct angular representation method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The maximum number of energy groups is 200

  9. Differential and integral cross sections for the rotationally inelastic scattering of methyl radicals with H2 and D2

    Tkáč, Ondřej; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Rusher, Cassandra A.; Greaves, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Comparisons are presented of experimental and theoretical studies of the rotationally inelastic scattering of CD 3 radicals with H 2 and D 2 collision partners at respective collision energies of 680 ± 75 and 640 ± 60 cm −1 . Close-coupling quantum-mechanical calculations performed using a newly constructed ab initio potential energy surface (PES) provide initial-to-final CD 3 rotational level (n, k → n′, k′) integral and differential cross sections (ICSs and DCSs). The DCSs are compared with crossed molecular beam and velocity map imaging measurements of angular scattering distributions, which serve as a critical test of the accuracy of the new PES. In general, there is very good agreement between the experimental measurements and the calculations. The DCSs for CD 3 scattering from both H 2 and D 2 peak in the forward hemisphere for n′ = 2–4 and shift more to sideways and backward scattering for n′ = 5. For n′ = 6–8, the DCSs are dominated by backward scattering. DCSs for a particular CD 3 n → n′ transition have a similar angular dependence with either D 2 or H 2 as collision partner. Any differences between DCSs or ICSs can be attributed to mass effects because the PES is unchanged for CD 3 −H 2 and CD 3 –D 2 collisions. Further comparisons are drawn between the CD 3 –D 2 scattering and results for CD 3 –He presented in our recent paper [O. Tkáč, A. G. Sage, S. J. Greaves, A. J. Orr-Ewing, P. J. Dagdigian, Q. Ma, and M. H. Alexander, Chem. Sci. 4, 4199 (2013)]. These systems have the same reduced mass, but are governed by different PESs

  10. Total electron scattering cross section from pyridine molecules in the energy range 10-1000 eV

    Dubuis, A. Traoré; Costa, F.; da Silva, F. Ferreira; Limão-Vieira, P.; Oller, J. C.; Blanco, F.; García, G.

    2018-05-01

    We report on experimental total electron scattering cross-section (TCS) from pyridine (C5H5N) for incident electron energies between 10 and 1000 eV, with experimental uncertainties within 5-10%, as measured with a double electrostatic analyser apparatus. The experimental results are compared with our theoretical calculations performed within the independent atom model complemented with a screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) procedure which has been updated by including interference effects. A good level of agreement is found between both data sources within the experimental uncertainties. The present TCS results for electron impact energy under study contribute, together with other scattering data available in the literature, to achieve a consistent set of cross section data for modelling purposes.

  11. Evaluation of scattering laws and cross sections for calculation of production and transport of cold and ultracold neutrons

    Bernnat, W.; Keinert, J.; Mattes, M.

    2004-01-01

    For the calculation of neutron spectra in cold and super thermal sources scattering laws for a variety of liquid and solid cyrogenic materials were evaluated and prepared for use in deterministic and Monte Carlo transport calculations. For moderator materials like liquid and solid H 2 O, liquid He, liquid D 2 O, liquid and solid H 2 and D 2 , solid CH 4 and structure materials such as Al, Bi, Pb, ZrHx, and graphite scattering law data and cross sections are available. The evaluated data were validated by comparison with measured cross sections and comparison of measured and calculated neutron spectra as far as available. Further applications are the calculation of production and transport and storing of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) in different UCN sources. The data structures of the evaluated data are prepared for the common S N -transport codes and the Monte Carlo Code MCNP. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of scattering laws and cross sections for calculation of production and transport of cold and ultracold neutrons

    Bernnat, W.; Keinert, J.; Mattes, M. [Inst. for Nuclear Energy and Energy Systems, Univ. of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    For the calculation of neutron spectra in cold and super thermal sources scattering laws for a variety of liquid and solid cyrogenic materials were evaluated and prepared for use in deterministic and Monte Carlo transport calculations. For moderator materials like liquid and solid H{sub 2}O, liquid He, liquid D{sub 2}O, liquid and solid H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}, solid CH{sub 4} and structure materials such as Al, Bi, Pb, ZrHx, and graphite scattering law data and cross sections are available. The evaluated data were validated by comparison with measured cross sections and comparison of measured and calculated neutron spectra as far as available. Further applications are the calculation of production and transport and storing of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) in different UCN sources. The data structures of the evaluated data are prepared for the common S{sub N}-transport codes and the Monte Carlo Code MCNP. (orig.)

  13. Measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section at low Q{sup 2} and x at HERA

    Aaron, F.D. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev (P.N.) Physical Inst., Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2009-02-15

    A measurement of the inclusive ep scattering cross section is presented in the region of low momentum transfers, 0.2 GeV{sup 2}{<=}Q{sup 2}{<=}12 GeV{sup 2}, and low Bjorken x, 5.10{sup -6}cross section measurement of a few percent accuracy. A kinematic reconstruction method exploiting radiative ep events extends the measurement to lower Q{sup 2} and larger x. The data are compared with theoretical models which apply to the transition region from photoproduction to deep inelastic scattering. (orig.)

  14. Scattering-angle dependence of doubly differential cross sections for fragmentation of H2 by proton impact

    Egodapitiya, K. N.; Sharma, S.; Laforge, A. C.; Schulz, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have measured double differential cross sections (DDCS) for proton fragment formation for fixed projectile energy losses as a function of projectile scattering angle in 75 keV p + H 2 collisions. An oscillating pattern was observed in the angular dependence of the DDCS with a frequency about twice as large as what we found earlier for nondissociative ionization. Possible origins for this frequency doubling are discussed.

  15. Dispersion relation for the 3. -->. 3 forward scattering amplitude and the generalized optical theorem. [Crossing properties, dispersion relations

    Logunov, A A; Medvedev, B V; Mestvirishvili, M A; Pavlov, V P; Polivanov, M K; Sukhanov, A D [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov. Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij

    1977-11-01

    Investigation of analytical structure of the three-particle forward scattering amplitude with respect to energy variable of one of particles is performed. The results obtained make it possible to draw the conclusions on crossing properties of the amplitude and to derive the generalized optical theorem relating the discontinuity of the amplitude to the distribution function of an inclusive process. For a special case when two of three particles are of zero mass, a dispersion relation is proved.

  16. Measurement of neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering cross sections with longitudinally polarized positrons with ZEUS at HERA

    Wlasenko, Michal

    2009-05-01

    Measurements of neutral current deep inelastic scattering of protons colliding with longitudinally polarized positrons, performed with data recorded in years 2006 and 2007 with the ZEUS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L=113.3 pb -1 , are presented. The single-differential cross sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx, dσ/dy and the double-differential reduced cross section σ were measured in the kinematic region of 185 2 2 and y + and the generalized structure function x F 3 were extracted. All measurements agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  17. Combination of Differential D^{*\\pm} Cross-Section Measurements in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA

    Abramowicz, H.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Belousov, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E.G.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brook, N.H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Buniatyan, A.; Bussey, P.J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C.D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Contreras, J.G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Dementiev, R.K.; Devenish, R.C.E.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Figiel, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L.K.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hladky, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z.A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N.Z.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Kotz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levchenko, B.B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lohr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Idris, F.Mohamad; Morozov, A.; Nasir, N.Muhammad; Muller, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, R.J.; Olsson, J.E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Paul, E.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Polifka, R.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Saxon, D.H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W.B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shushkevich, S.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Slominski, W.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stanco, L.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Thompson, P.D.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Traynor, D.; Trofymov, A.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W.A.T.; Wegener, D.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Wunsch, E.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zacek, J.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B.O.; Zhmak, N.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    H1 and ZEUS have published single-differential cross sections for inclusive D^{*\\pm}-meson production in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from their respective final data sets. These cross sections are combined in the common visible phase-space region of photon virtuality Q2 > 5 GeV2, electron inelasticity 0.02 1.5 GeV and pseudorapidity |eta(D^*)| 1.5 GeV2. Perturbative next-to-leadingorder QCD predictions are compared to the results.

  18. Absolute values of inelastic neutron scattering cross-sections calculated with account taken of the pre-equilibrium mechanism

    Jahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    Absolute values of secondary energy-dependent inelastic neutron scattering cross sections can be calculated either with the master equation pre-equilibrium formalism of Cline and Blann or with Blann's more recent geometry-dependent hybrid model. The master equation formalism was used at Dubna and Dresden to reproduce experimental results for 14 MeV incident energy. The geometry-dependent hybrid model was used at Karlsruhe to cover for a number of materials the whole range from 5 to 14 MeV incident energy and to reproduce smoothed experimental spectra at 7.45 and 14 MeV. Only the geometry-dependent hybrid model accounts for scattering in the diffuse nuclear surface and thus for a certain average over the direct interaction. It is also free of any fit parameters other than those of the usual optical model. The master equation calculations, on the other hand, are based on nucleon-nucleon scattering cross sections inserted into the high-energy approximation of Kikuchi and Kawai for the intranuclear transition rate. Other approaches require either mass- or energy-dependent or more global fit parameters for a satisfactory reproduction of experimental results, but a genuine prediction of the incident-energy dependence of the inelastic neutron cross section, especially below 14 MeV, is needed for transport and shielding calculations for instance in connection with fusion reactor design studies. (author)

  19. Absolute total electronically elastic differential e--H2 scattering cross-section measurements from 1 to 19 eV

    Furst, J.; Mahgerefteh, M.; Golden, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    Absolute e - -H 2 total electronically elastic differential scattering cross sections have been determined from relative scattered-electron angular distribution measurements in the energy range from 1 to 19 eV by comparison to absolute e - -He elastic differential scattering cross sections measured in the same apparatus. Integrated total cross sections have been determined as well. Absolute differences as large as 50% between the present results and some previous results have been found, although the agreement as to shape is quite good in many cases. The present results are generally in excellent agreement with recent full rovibrational laboratory-frame close-coupling calculations

  20. The effect of the new nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering data in LAHET trademark Version 2.8 on neutron displacement cross section calculations

    Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.; Russell, G.J.; Prael, R.E.; Madland, D.G.; Court, J.D.; Daemen, L.L.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    The latest release of the medium-energy Monte Carlo transport code LAHET includes a new nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering treatment based on a global medium-energy phenomenological optical-model potential. Implementation of this new model in LAHET allows nuclear elastic scattering for neutrons with energies greater than 15 MeV and for protons with energies greater than 50 MeV. Previous investigations on the impact of the new elastic scattering data revealed that the addition of the proton elastic scattering channel can lead to a significant increase in the calculated damage energy under certain conditions. The authors report here results on the impact of the new elastic scattering data on calculated displacement cross sections in various elements for neutrons with energies in the range 16 to 3,160 MeV. Calculated displacement cross sections at 20 MeV in low-mass materials are in better agreement with SPECTER-calculated cross sections

  1. Real part of amplitude and hadron scattering cross section at superhigh energies

    Troshin, S.M.; Tyurin, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    New data on measuring the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward scattering amplitude: ρ pp-bar (√s=546 GeV)=0.24±0.04 have been considered. This result is shown to agree with the behaviour of σ tot (s), predicted by the U-matrix model. A possibility of transition to antishadow scattering mode at superhigh energies is stated

  2. Combination and QCD analysis of charm production cross section measurements in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] [and others; Collaboration: H1 and ZEUS Collaboration

    2012-10-15

    Measurements of open charm production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations are combined. Reduced cross sections {sigma}{sup c} {sup anti} {sup c}{sub red} for charm production are obtained in the kinematic range of photon virtuality 2.5 {<=} Q{sup 2} {<=} 2000 GeV{sup 2} and Bjorken scaling variable 3.10{sup -5}{<=}x{<=}5.10{sup -2}. The combination method accounts for the correlations of the systematic uncertainties among the different data sets. The combined charm data together with the combined inclusive deepinelastic scattering cross sections from HERA are used as input for a detailed NLO QCD analysis to study the influence of different heavy flavour schemes on the parton distribution functions. The optimal values of the charm mass as a parameter in these different schemes are obtained. The implications on the NLO predictions for W{sup {+-}} and Z production cross sections at the LHC are investigated. Using the fixed flavour number scheme, the running mass of the charm quark is determined.

  3. Taking account of sample finite dimensions in processing measurements of double differential cross sections of slow neutron scattering

    Lisichkin, Yu.V.; Dovbenko, A.G.; Efimenko, B.A.; Novikov, A.G.; Smirenkina, L.D.; Tikhonova, S.I.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a method of taking account of finite sample dimensions in processing measurement results of double differential cross sections (DDCS) of slow neutron scattering. A necessity of corrective approach to the account taken of the effect of sample finite dimensions is shown, and, in particular, the necessity to conduct preliminary processing of DDCS, the account being taken of attenuation coefficients of single scattered neutrons (SSN) for measurements on the sample with a container, and on the container. Correction for multiple scattering (MS) calculated on the base of the dynamic model should be obtained, the account being taken of resolution effects. To minimize the effect of the dynamic model used in calculations it is preferred to make absolute measurements of DDCS and to use the subraction method. The above method was realized in the set of programs for the BESM-5 computer. The FISC program computes the coefficients of SSN attenuation and correction for MS. The DDS program serves to compute a model DDCS averaged as per the resolution function of an instrument. The SCATL program is intended to prepare initial information necessary for the FISC program, and permits to compute the scattering law for all materials. Presented are the results of using the above method while processing experimental data on measuring DDCS of water by the DIN-1M spectrometer

  4. Measurement of the cross-section of electron-positron scattering at high energy and quantum electrodynamics testing

    Lalanne, D.

    1970-01-01

    The experiment we have performed on the ACO (Orsay Collider Ring) is one of the most accurate tests of quantum electrodynamics over very short interaction distances (10 -14 cm). We have studied the electron-positron elastic scattering at very wide angle. This work is divided into 4 parts. The first part reviews recent tests of quantum electrodynamics and presents the electron-positron elastic scattering. The second part describes the measurement of brightness: the experimental device, data analysis and accuracy. The measurement of brightness has been performed by detecting the photons emitted in the double Bremsstrahlung reaction: e + e - → e + e - γγ. The third part deals with the measurement of the number of Bhabha events. The last part compares the experimental value of the Bhabha scattering with the theoretically expected value. We have got the following results: the number of Bhabha events: 757 events, the experimental value for Bhabha scattering cross-section: [1.97 ± 0.09 (stat.) ± 0.10 (syst.)]*10 -31 cm 2 . The comparison of this experimental value with the expected value has allowed us to set the lower limit of the cutting parameter Λ: Λ > 2 GeV

  5. Complex Correlation Kohn-T Method of Calculating Total and Elastic Cross Sections. Part 1; Electron-Hydrogen Elastic Scattering

    Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report on the first part of a study of electron-hydrogen scattering, using a method which allows for the ab initio calculation of total and elastic cross sections at higher energies. In its general form the method uses complex 'radial' correlation functions, in a (Kohn) T-matrix formalism. The titled method, abbreviated Complex Correlation Kohn T (CCKT) method, is reviewed, in the context of electron-hydrogen scattering, including the derivation of the equation for the (complex) scattering function, and the extraction of the scattering information from the latter. The calculation reported here is restricted to S-waves in the elastic region, where the correlation functions can be taken, without loss of generality, to be real. Phase shifts are calculated using Hylleraas-type correlation functions with up to 95 terms. Results are rigorous lower bounds; they are in general agreement with those of Schwartz, but they are more accurate and outside his error bounds at a couple of energies,

  6. Measurement of Elastic Scattering and of Total Cross-Section at the CERN $\\bar{p}p$ Collider

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to measure elastic scattering and the total cross-section at the $\\bar{p}p$ collider. \\\\ \\\\ Up to 1983 the experimental apparatus was composed of two parts : \\item 1) Telescopes of high accuracy drift and proportional chambers and counters inserted into vertically moveable sections of the vacuum chamber ('Roman pots'), detect elastic scattering in the angular region from .5 mrad up to about 3 mrad. \\item 2) The total inelastic rate is measured with a forward/backward system of drift chambers and counter hodoscopes and the UA2 central detector covering together @= 4@p solid angle. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ With these two set-ups, the measured value of the total cross-section confirms extrapolation with (ln s)|2 behaviour. Elastic scattering and diffraction dissociation were measured in the range .03~$<$~-t~$<$~1.6~GeV|2. \\\\ \\\\ From 1984 on, six horizontally moveable ``Roman Pots'' have been installed farther away from the intersection region (up to 100~m). Using an especially desi...

  7. Combination of differential D*± cross-section measurements in deep-inelastc ep scattering at HERA

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.

    2015-03-01

    H1 and ZEUS have published single-differential cross sections for inclusive D *± -meson production in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from their respective final data sets. These cross sections are combined in the common visible phase-space region of photon virtuality Q 2 >5 GeV 2 , electron inelasticity 0.021.5 GeV and pseudorapidity vertical stroke η(D * ) vertical stroke <1.5. The combination procedure takes into account all correlations, yielding significantly reduced experimental uncertainties. Double-differential cross sections d 2 σ/dQ 2 dy are combined with earlier D *± data, extending the kinematic range down to Q 2 >1.5 GeV 2 . Perturbative next-to-leadingorder QCD predictions are compared to the results.

  8. Helium Atom Scattering from C2H6, F2HCCH3, F3CCH2F and C2F6 in Crossed Molecular Beams

    Hammer, Markus; Seidel, Wolfhart

    1997-10-01

    Rotationally unresolved differential cross sections were measured in crossed molecular beam experiments by scattering Helium atoms from Ethane, 1,1-Difluoroethane, 1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane and Hexafluoroethane. The damping of observed diffraction oscillations was used to extract anisotropic interaction potentials for these scattering systems applying the infinite order sudden approximation (IOSA). Binary macroscopic parameters such as second heterogeneous virial coefficients and the coefficients of diffusion and viscosity were computed from these potentials and compared to results from macroscopic experiments.

  9. Paramagnetic scattering cross-sections of Nd and Dy at neutron wavelength between 0.5 A0 - 4 A0

    Maayouf, R.M.A.; Abdelkawy, A.; Adib, M.; Hamouda, I.

    1984-01-01

    The paramagnetic scattering cross-sections of Nd and Dy are calculated, for neutron wavelengths between 0.5-4 A, theoretically and deduced from available experimental data. The theoretical calculations are carried out using magnetic form factors deduced from Hartree-Fock radial wave functions for the 4 f electrons. The resulting theoretical curves of the paragnetic scattering cross-sections are compared with those deduced from data obtained using the transmission measurements. Both theoretical and experimental values found to be consistant

  10. Determination of the potential and coherent scattering cross-sections of the elements Si, Ca, Cr, Mn, Co, Zn, Zr, Sb and Ta

    Adib, M.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Hamouda, I.

    1976-01-01

    The potential scattering cross-sections for slow neutrons have been measured for Si, Ca, Cr, Mn, Co, Zn, Zr, Sb and Ta in order to determine the nuclear potential radius and to investigate the prediction of nuclear optical model. The coherent scattering cross-sections for these elements have been measured from the obtained values of the Bragg cut-offs observed in the behaviour of the total cross-sections at cold neutron energies. The measurements were based on the total neutron cross-sections resulting from transmission experiments performed with the neutron chopper at ET-RR-1 reactor

  11. Measurement of proton-proton inelastic scattering cross-section at $\\sqrt{s}$= 7 TeV

    Antchev, G; Atanassov, I.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Bozzo, M.; Brogi, P.; Brücken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.S.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M.G.; Covault, C.; Csanad, M.; Csörgö, T.; Deile, M.; Doubek, M.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Grzanka, L.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Intonti, R.A.; Kaspar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrat, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leszko, T.; Lippmaa, E.; Lokajicek, M.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Macri, M.; Mäki, T.; Mercadante, A.; Minafra, N.; Minutoli, S.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Österberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Prochazka, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Santroni, A.; Scribano, A.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Vitek, M.; Welti, J.; Whitmore, J.; Wyszkowski, P.

    2013-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has measured the inelastic proton-proton cross-section at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV in a β* = 90 m run with low inelastic pile-up. The measurement was based on events with at least one charged particle in the T2 telescope acceptance of 5.3 < |η| < 6.5 in pseudorapidity. Combined with data from the T1 telescope, covering 3.1 < |η| < 4.7, the cross-section for inelastic events with at least one |η| < 6.5 final state particle was determined to be 70.5 2.9 mb. Based on models for low mass diffraction, the total inelastic cross-section was deduced to be 73.7 3.4 mb. An upper limit of 6.31 mb at 95 % confidence level on the cross-section for events with diffractive masses below 3.4 GeV was obtained from the difference between the overall inelastic cross-section obtained by TOTEM using elastic scattering and the cross-section for inelastic events with at least one |η| < 6.5 final state particle.

  12. Measurement of the cross section for diffractive deep-inelastic scattering with a leading proton at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [Univ. of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (ME); Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Inst., Yerevan (Armenia); Barrelet, E. [Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Univ. Denis Diderot Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Paris (France); Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kraemer, M.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Driesch, M. von den; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Inst. of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, LAL, Orsay (France); Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A. [Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, LLR, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (RS); Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [Univ. of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    The cross section for the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process ep{yields}eXp is measured, with the leading final state proton detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The data sample covers the range x{sub P}<0.1 in fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss, 0.1< vertical stroke t vertical stroke <0.7 GeV{sup 2} in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4cross section is measured four-fold differentially in t,x{sub P},Q {sup 2} and {beta}=x/x{sub P}, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable. The t and x{sub P} dependences are interpreted in terms of an effective pomeron trajectory and a sub-leading exchange. The data are compared with perturbative QCD predictions at next-to-leading order based on diffractive parton distribution functions previously extracted from complementary measurements of inclusive diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The ratio of the diffractive to the inclusive ep cross section is studied as a function of Q{sup 2},{beta} and x{sub P}. (orig.)

  13. The Crossed-Beam Scattering Method in Studies of Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics

    Herman, Zdeněk

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 212, - (2001), s. 413-443 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : ion-molecule reaction dynamics * ion scattering * experimental methods Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.176, year: 2001

  14. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e{sup -}p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is given for positively and negatively polarised electron beams. The differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy are presented for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}. The double-differential cross-section d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} is presented in the kinematic range 280cross sections are compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  15. Importance of Cross-redistribution in Scattering Polarization of Spectral Lines: The Cases of {sup 3}P−{sup 3}S Triplets of Mg i and Ca i

    Sampoorna, M.; Nagendra, K. N., E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in, E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034 (India)

    2017-04-01

    Scattering on a multi-level atomic system has dominant contributions from resonance and Raman scattering. While initial and final levels are the same for resonance scattering, they are different for Raman scattering. The frequency redistribution for resonance scattering is described by the usual partial frequency redistribution functions of Hummer, while that for Raman scattering is described by cross-redistribution (XRD) function. In the present paper, we investigate the importance of XRD on linear polarization profiles of {sup 3}P−{sup 3}S triplets of Mg i and Ca i formed in an isothermal one-dimensional atmosphere. We show that XRD produces significant effects on the linear polarization profiles when the wavelength separations between the line components of the multiplet are small, like in the cases of Mg i b and Ca i triplets.

  16. Scattering of thermal He beams by crossed atomic and molecular beams. I. Sensitivity of the elastic differential cross section to the interatomic potential

    Keil, M.; Kuppermann, A.

    1978-01-01

    The ability of diffraction oscillations in atomic beam scattering experiments to uniquely determine interatomic potentials for highly quantal systems is examined. Assumed but realistic potentials are used to generate, by scattering calculations and incorporation of random errors, differential cross sections which are then treated as if they were ''experimental'' data. From these, attempts are made to recover the initial potential by varying the parameters of assumed mathematical forms different from the original one, until a best fit to the ''experimental'' results is obtained. It is found that the region of the interaction potential around the van der Waals minimum is accurately determined by the ''measured'' differential cross sections over a range of interatomic separations significantly wider than would be expected classically. It is also found, for collision energies at which the weakly repulsive wall is appreciably sampled, that the SPF--Dunham and double Morse--van der Waals types of potentials lead to accurate determinations of the interatomic potential, whereas many other mathematical forms do not. Analytical parameterizations most appropriate for obtaining accurate interatomic potentials from thermal DCS experiments, for a given highly quantal system, may depend on the collision energy used

  17. Measurement of local, internal magnetic fluctuations via cross-polarization scattering in the DIII-D tokamak (invited)

    Barada, K., E-mail: kshitish@ucla.edu; Rhodes, T. L.; Crocker, N. A.; Peebles, W. A. [University of California-Los Angeles, P.O. Box 957099, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We present new measurements of internal magnetic fluctuations obtained with a novel eight channel cross polarization scattering (CPS) system installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Measurements of internal, localized magnetic fluctuations provide a window on an important physics quantity that we heretofore have had little information on. Importantly, these measurements provide a new ability to challenge and test linear and nonlinear simulations and basic theory. The CPS method, based upon the scattering of an incident microwave beam into the opposite polarization by magnetic fluctuations, has been significantly extended and improved over the method as originally developed on the Tore Supra tokamak. A new scattering geometry, provided by a unique probe beam, is utilized to improve the spatial localization and wavenumber range. Remotely controllable polarizer and mirror angles allow polarization matching and wavenumber selection for a range of plasma conditions. The quasi-optical system design, its advantages and challenges, as well as important physics validation tests are presented and discussed. Effect of plasma beta (ratio of kinetic to magnetic pressure) on both density and magnetic fluctuations is studied and it is observed that internal magnetic fluctuations increase with beta. During certain quiescent high confinement operational regimes, coherent low frequency modes not detected by magnetic probes are detected locally by CPS diagnostics.

  18. Combined inclusive diffractive cross sections measured with forward proton spectrometers in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A.N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Bizot, J.C.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E.G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bold, T.; Brummer, N.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bussey, P.J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C.D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J.B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R.K.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R.C.E.; De Pasquale, S.; De Wolf, E.A.; del Peso, J.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dolinska, G.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Drugakov, V.; Dubak, A.; Durkin, L.S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P.F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M.I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L.K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu.A.; Gottlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Huttmann, A.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J.C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z.A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H.P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T.W.; Jonsson, L.; Jungst, M.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I.I.; Kaur, P.; Kaur, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L.A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J.Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Koffeman, E.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Kotz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kramer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B.B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T.Y.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lohmann, W.; Lohr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K.R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J.F.; Martyn, H.U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M.C.K.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Idris, F.Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Morris, J.D.; Mujkic, K.; Muller, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R.J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.E.; Oh, B.Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J.M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P.G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Plucinski, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A.S.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D.D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y.D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salek, D.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A.A.; Saxon, D.H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W.B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schonberg, V.; Schoning, A.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Slominski, W.; Sloan, T.; Smith, W.H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T.P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, J.; Szuba, D.; Tapper, A.D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Trusov, V.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vazquez, M.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N.N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W.A.T.; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J.J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wunsch, E.; Yagues-Molina, A.G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B.O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhokin, A.; Zichichi, A.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D.S.; Zarnecki, A.F.

    2012-10-10

    A combination of the inclusive diffractive cross section measurements made by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at HERA is presented. The analysis uses samples of diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering data at a centre-of-mass energy sqrt(s) = 318 GeV where leading protons are detected by dedicated spectrometers. Correlations of systematic uncertainties are taken into account, resulting in an improved precision of the cross section measurement which reaches 6% for the most precise points. The combined data cover the range 2.5 < Q2 < 200 GeV2 in photon virtuality, 0.00035 < xIP < 0.09 in proton fractional momentum loss, 0.09 < |t| < 0.55 GeV2 in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 0.0018 < beta < 0.816 in beta = x/xIP, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable.

  19. Absolute differential cross sections for π±p elastic scattering at 30 ≤ Tπ ≤ 67 MeV

    Brack, J.T.; Ristinen, R.A.; Kraushaar, J.J.

    1989-11-01

    Absolute π±p differential cross sections have been measured at incident pion energies of 30.0, 45.0, and 66.8 MeV, using active targets of scintillator plastic (CH 1.1 ) to detect recoil protons in coincidence with scattered pions. Statistical uncertainties are typically ±3%; systematic uncertainties are ±2%. The results are consistent with two earlier measurements by this group employing different experimental techniques at 67 MeV and higher incident pion energies. The π - p cross sections are in good agreement with currently accepted phase-shift analyses, but the corresponding π + p predictions are typically 15% higher at large angles than the π + p data reported here

  20. Effect of different electron elastic-scattering cross sections on inelastic mean free paths obtained from elastic-backscattering experiments

    Jablonskiz, A.; Salvatz, F.; Powellz, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) of electrons with energies between 100 eV and 5,000 eV have been frequently obtained from measurements of elastic-backscattering probabilities for different specimen materials. A calculation of these probabilities is also required to determine IMFPs. We report calculations of elastic-backscattering probabilities for gold at energies of 100 eV and 500 eV with differential elastic-scattering cross sections obtained from the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac potential and the more reliable Dirac-Hartree-Fock potential. For two representative experimental configurations, the average deviation between IMFPs obtained with cross sections from the two potentials was 11.4 %. (author)

  1. The measurement of antiproton-proton total cross sections and small-angle elastic scattering at low momentum

    Linssen, L.H.A.J.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis two low-momentum antiproton-proton (anti pp) experiments are described. The first one is a set of 24 high statistics anti pp total cross section measurements as a function of the incoming antiproton momentum between p=388 MeV/c and p=599 MeV/c. These measurements simultaneously yield the charge exchange cross section (anti pp → anti nn). The second one comprises two high statistics anti pp small-angle elastic scattering measurements at p=233 MeV/c and p=272 MeV/c. The measurements were carried out using the high quality antiproton beam extracted from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. The physics motivation for these experiments is a search for anti pp resonances or bound states on one hand, and a detailed study of the anti pp interaction on the other hand. (orig.)

  2. Experimental and theoretical total neutron scattering cross-section of water confined in silica microspheres

    Muhrer, G., E-mail: muhrer@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, 87545 NM (United States); Hartl, M.; Mocko, M.; Tovesson, F.; Daemen, L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, 87545 NM (United States)

    2012-07-21

    In the search for moderator materials encapsulated materials have been discussed, but very little is known regarding the effect of encapsulation on neutron moderation properties. As a first step toward a better understanding, we present the measured total neutron cross-section of water confined in silica microspheres and compare the measured data to the predicted theoretical cross-section.

  3. Measurement of neutron inelastic scattering cross section of {sup 238}U

    Miura, Takako; Baba, Mamoru; Ibaraki, Masanobu; Sanami, Toshiya; Win, Than; Hirasawa, Yoshitaka; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Neutron scattering from the 0{sup +}, 2{sup +} (1-st) and 4{sup +} (2nd) levels of {sup 238}U was measured for incident energies between 0.4 and 0.85 MeV at the Tohoku University 4.5 MV Dynamitron facility, using the time-of-flight (TOF) method with monoenergetic pulsed neutrons by the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction. The results are presented in comparison with other experimental data and evaluated data. (author)

  4. Scattering of thermal He beams by crossed atomic and molecular beams. II. The He--Ar van der Waals potential

    Keilb, M.; Slankas, J.T.; Kuppermann, A.

    1979-01-01

    Differential cross sections for He--Ar scattering at room temperature have been measured. The experimental consistency of these measurements with others performed in different laboratories is demonstrated. Despite this consistency, the present van der Waals well depth of 1.78 meV, accurate to 10%, is smaller by 20% to 50% than the experimental values obtained previously. These discrepancies are caused by differences between the assumed mathematical forms or between the assumed dispersion coefficients of the potentials used in the present paper and those of previous studies. Independent investigations have shown that the previous assumptions are inappropriate for providing accurate potentials from fits to experimental differential cross section data for He--Ar. We use two forms free of this inadequacy in the present analysis: a modified version of the Simons--Parr--Finlan--Dunham (SPFD) potential, and a double Morse--van der Waals (M 2 SV) type of parameterization. The resulting He--Ar potentials are shown to be equal to with experimental error, throughout the range of interatomic distances to which the scattering data are sensitive. The SPFD or M 2 SV potentials are combined with a repulsive potential previously determined exclusively from fits to gas phase bulk properties. The resulting potentials, valid over the extended range of interatomic distances r> or approx. =2.4 A, are able to reproduce all these bulk properties quite well, without adversely affecting the quality of the fits to the DCS

  5. Theory of inelastic multiphonon scattering and carrier capture by defects in semiconductors: Application to capture cross sections

    Barmparis, Georgios D.; Puzyrev, Yevgeniy S.; Zhang, X.-G.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-12-01

    Inelastic scattering and carrier capture by defects in semiconductors are the primary causes of hot-electron-mediated degradation of power devices, which holds up their commercial development. At the same time, carrier capture is a major issue in the performance of solar cells and light-emitting diodes. A theory of nonradiative (multiphonon) inelastic scattering by defects, however, is nonexistent, while the theory for carrier capture by defects has had a long and arduous history. Here we report the construction of a comprehensive theory of inelastic scattering by defects, with carrier capture being a special case. We distinguish between capture under thermal equilibrium conditions and capture under nonequilibrium conditions, e.g., in the presence of an electrical current or hot carriers where carriers undergo scattering by defects and are described by a mean free path. In the thermal-equilibrium case, capture is mediated by a nonadiabatic perturbation Hamiltonian, originally identified by Huang and Rhys and by Kubo, which is equal to linear electron-phonon coupling to first order. In the nonequilibrium case, we demonstrate that the primary capture mechanism is within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (adiabatic transitions), with coupling to the defect potential inducing Franck-Condon electronic transitions, followed by multiphonon dissipation of the transition energy, while the nonadiabatic terms are of secondary importance (they scale with the inverse of the mass of typical atoms in the defect complex). We report first-principles density-functional-theory calculations of the capture cross section for a prototype defect using the projector-augmented wave, which allows us to employ all-electron wave functions. We adopt a Monte Carlo scheme to sample multiphonon configurations and obtain converged results. The theory and the results represent a foundation upon which to build engineering-level models for hot-electron degradation of power devices and the performance

  6. Non-Rutherford cross-sections for alpha elastic scattering off Z = 28-38 elements in the energy range up to 10 MeV

    Gurbich, A. F.; Bokhovko, M. V.

    2018-04-01

    The alpha elastic scattering cross-sections for Ni, Cu, and Y were measured at the energies above the onset of the non-Rutherford scattering. The obtained experimental data along with data from literature were incorporated into the theoretical analysis in the framework of the optical model. The optimization of the model parameters provided a basis for the calculations of the differential cross-sections for Z = 28-38 elements in the energy range up to 10 MeV. The obtained cross sections were made available for common use through the SigmaCalc web site at http://sigmacalc.iate.obninsk.ru/.

  7. The total cross section as a function of energy for elastic scattering of noble gas atoms

    Linse, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    Precise relative measurements of the total cross-sections as a function of velocity is presented for the systems Ar-Ar, Ar-Kr, Kr-Ar, Ar-Xe, Ne-Ar, Ne-Kr, and Ne-Xe, the primary beam particle being mentioned first. A discription of the apparatus is given. Then the method for extracting total cross-sections from the measured beam attenuation is analyzed. A comparison is made with total cross-sections calculated from various potentials that have been proposed in the literature

  8. The Measurement of the Quasi-Elastic Neutrino-Nucleon Scattering Cross Section at the Tevatron

    Suwonjandee, Narumon [Cincinnati U.

    2004-01-01

    The quasi-elastic neutrino nucleon cross section measurement has been measured in the low energy region less than 100 Ge V. The data agree well with the model proposed by C. H. Llewellyn Smith. This model predicts that the quasi-elastic cross section should be constant in the high enery region. The NuTeV experiment at Fermilab provides data which allows us to measure the quasi-elastic cross section for both neutrinos and anti-neutrinos at high energy. We find that $\\sigma^{Neucleon}_{qe}(v) = 0.94 \\pm 0.03(stat.) \\pm 0.07(syst.)$, and $\\sigma^{Neucleon}_{qe}(\\bar\

  9. Analytic amplitudes for hadronic forward scattering and the Heisenberg ln{sup 2} s behaviour of total cross sections

    Nicolescu, Basarab [LPNHE, Unite de Recherche des Universites Paris 6 et Paris 7, associee au CNRS, Theory Group, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2004-07-01

    We consider several classes of analytic parametrizations of hadronic scattering amplitudes (the COMPETE analysis), and compare their predictions to all available forward data (pp, {pi}p, Kp, {gamma}p, {gamma}{gamma}, {sigma}p). Although these parametrizations are very close for {radical}s {>=} 9 GeV, it turns out that they differ markedly at low energy, where a universal Pomeron term {approx} ln{sup 2} s enables one to extend the fit down to {radical}s = 4 GeV. We present predictions on the total cross sections and on the ratio of the real part to the imaginary part of the elastic amplitude ({rho} parameter) for present and future pp colliders, and on total cross sections for {gamma}p {yields} hadrons at cosmic-ray energies and for it{gamma}{gamma} {yields} hadrons up to {radical}s = 1 TeV. The ln{sup 2} s behaviour of total cross sections, first obtained by Heisenberg 50 years ago, receives now increased interest both on phenomenological and theoretical levels. We present a modification of the Heisenberg's model in connection with the presence of glueballs and we show that it leads to a realistic description of all existing hadron total cross-sections data, in agreement with the COMPETE analysis.

  10. Database of Nucleon-Nucleon Scattering Cross Sections by Stochastic Simulation, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A database of nucleon-nucleon elastic differential and total cross sections will be generated by stochastic simulation of the quantum Liouville equation in the...

  11. High-energy behaviour of e--H scattering cross section

    Saha, B.C.; Chaudhuri, J.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    An integral form of the close coupling equation has been employed to investigate the high energy behaviour of the elastic and 2s excitation cross sections of hydrogen atom by electron impact retaining the 1s and 2s states. The results, with and without exchange, for both the total and the differential cross sections are presented. The effects of exchange as well as of couplings to the 1s-2s states on the elastic cross section have been studied. The FBA results for the elastic cross section differ from the present results appreciably in the energy range 100 to 200 eV where FBA is considered to be valid. On the other hand, the present 1s-2s excitation results are very close to the corresponding FBA results in the said energy region. (auth.)

  12. Investigation of magnon dispersion relations and neutron scattering cross sections with special attention to anisotropy effects

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Kowalska, A.; Laut, Peter

    1967-01-01

    curves are suggested. The magnon cross section for unpolarized neutrons is calculated and shown to be dependent on the anisotropy in the spin interaction. Thus in principle it allows the detection of anisotropy in the exchange interaction. Some remarks are made concerning antiferromagnetic and plane...... for the exchange interaction seem to be necessary for agreement with experimental dispersion curves be obtained. The effect of the anisotropy in the cross section is estimated and shown to be important for small magnon energies....

  13. Argon intermolecular potential from a measurement of the total scattering cross-section

    Wong, Y.W.

    1975-01-01

    An inversion method to obtain accurate intermolecular potentials from experimental total cross section measurements is presented. This method is based on the high energy Massey--Smith approximation. The attractive portion of the potential is represented by a multi-parameter spline function and the repulsive part by a Morse function. The best fit potential is obtained by a least squares minimization based on comparison of experimental cross sections with those obtained by a Fourier transform of the reduced Massey--Smith phase shift curve. An experimental method was developed to obtain the total cross sections needed for the above inversion procedure. In this technique, integral cross sections are measured at various resolutions and the total cross section is obtained by extrapolating to infinite resolution. Experimental results obtained for the Ar--Ar system are in excellent agreement with total cross sections calculated using the Barker-Fisher-Watts potential. Inversion of the data to obtain a potential distinguishable from the BFW-potential requires an extension of the method based on the Massey--Smith approximation to permit use of JWKB phase shifts and was not attempted

  14. Dependence of radar auroral scattering cross section on the ambient electron density and the destabilizing electric field

    Haldoupis, C.; Nielsen, E.; Schlegel, K.

    1990-01-01

    By using a data set that includes simultaneous STARE and EISCAT measurements made at a common magnetic flux tube E region in the ionosphere, we investigate the dependence of relative scattering cross section of 1-meter auroral irregularities on the destabilizing E x B electron drift, or alternatively the electric field, and the E region ambient electron density. The analysis showed that both, the E field and mean electron density are the decisive factors in determining the strength of radar auroral echoes at magnetic aspect angles near perpendicularity. We have found that at instability threshold, i.e., when the E field strength is in the 15 to 20 mV/m range, the backscatter power level is affected strongly by the mean electron density. Above threshold, the wave saturation amplitudes are determined mainly by the combined action of electron drift velocity magnitude, V d , and mean electron density, N e , in a way that the scattering cross section, or the electron density fluctuation level, increases with electric field magnitude but at a rate which is larger when the ambient electron density is lower. The analysis enabled us to infer an empirical functional relationship which is capable of predicting reasonably well the intensity of STARE echoes from EISCAT E field and electron density data. In this functional relationship, the received power at threshold depends on N e 2 whereas, from threshold to perhaps more than 50 mV/m, the power increases nonlinearly with drift velocity as V d n where the exponent n is approximately proportional to N e -1/2 . The results support the Farley-Bunemann instability as the primary instability mechanism, but the existing nonlinear treatment of the theory, which includes wave-induced cross field diffusion, cannot account for the observed role of electron density in the saturation of irregularity amplitudes

  15. Scattering of polarized electrons from polarized targets: Coincidence reactions and prescriptions for polarized half-off-shell single-nucleon cross sections

    Caballero, J.A.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA; Donnelly, T.W.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA; Poulis, G.I.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA

    1993-01-01

    Coincidence reactions of the type vector A( vector e, e'N)B involving the scattering of polarized electrons from polarized targets are discussed within the context of the plane-wave impulse approximation. Prescriptions are developed for polarized half-off single-nucleon cross sections; the different prescriptions are compared for typical quasi-free kinematics. Illustrative results are presented for coincidence polarized electron scattering from typical polarized nuclei. (orig.)

  16. Review and calculation of Mott scattering cross section by unscreened point nuclei

    Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F.

    1992-01-01

    A new tabulation of the ratio of the ''exact'' Mott cross section for unscreened point nuclei to the classical Rutherford cross section for electrons and positions has been made. Because of the infinite slowly converging series appearing in this ratio we have made two series transformations. With this evaluation the ratio reached convergence within six significant figures after less than a hundred terms and very low computing time. So the ratios evaluated have less relative error than those in the literature and covers a greater range of energy and atomic number. (orig.)

  17. Combination of differential D{sup *±} cross-section measurements in deep-inelastc ep scattering at HERA

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science; Collaboration: The H1 and ZEUS Collaborations; and others

    2015-03-15

    H1 and ZEUS have published single-differential cross sections for inclusive D{sup *±}-meson production in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from their respective final data sets. These cross sections are combined in the common visible phase-space region of photon virtuality Q{sup 2}>5 GeV{sup 2}, electron inelasticity 0.021.5 GeV and pseudorapidity vertical stroke η(D{sup *}) vertical stroke <1.5. The combination procedure takes into account all correlations, yielding significantly reduced experimental uncertainties. Double-differential cross sections d{sup 2}σ/dQ{sup 2}dy are combined with earlier D{sup *±} data, extending the kinematic range down to Q{sup 2}>1.5 GeV{sup 2}. Perturbative next-to-leadingorder QCD predictions are compared to the results.

  18. Differential cross sections for intermediate-energy electron scattering from α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol: Excitation of electronic-states

    Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Thorn, P. A.; Pettifer, Z. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Silva, G. B. da [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Limão-Vieira, P. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Duflot, D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules, UMR CNRS 8523, Université Lille, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); and others

    2014-07-14

    We report on measurements of differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of Rydberg electronic-states in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). The energy range of these experiments was 20–50 eV, while the scattered electron was detected in the 10°–90° angular range. There are currently no other experimental data or theoretical computations against which we can directly compare the present measured results. Nonetheless, we are able to compare our THFA DCSs with earlier cross section measurements for Rydberg-state electronic excitation for tetrahydrofuran, a similar cyclic ether, from Do et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144302 (2011)]. In addition, “rotationally averaged” elastic DCSs, calculated using our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction approach are also reported. Those latter results give integral cross sections consistent with the optical theorem, and supercede those from the only previous study of Milosavljević et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 40, 107 (2006)].

  19. Improved treatment for determining the group cross section for elastic down-scattering into the adjacent group

    Woll, D.

    1985-04-01

    In the group cross section libraries usually applied for reactor calculations, the energy dependent probabilities of interactions between neutrons and the materials existing in the reactor are represented by weighted average values over certain energy ranges with a neutron energy spectrum regarded as representative. The influence of the resonance structure of the cross sections via the neutron spectrum and the resultant effect on the averaged group cross sections is taken into account in an approximate way by so-called resonance self-shielding factors. The approximations indicated are of considerable importance for the elastic down scattering. They can be improved by the so-called REMO correction, which takes into account the neutron energy distribution existing in the reactor model. Because such detailed neutron distributions are very expensive to prepare, especially in multi-dimensional models, automatic program runs were established which, in some cases by simplifications of the model, allow collision densities to be made available at relatively little expenditure which permit many nuclear quantities to be calculated with a sufficient degree of accuracy. This report describes the program runs set up and the experience acquired in testing them by the examples of the MASURCA 3B experiment and the SNEAK 11B2 assembly. This report deals especially with the influence of the collision density used for the REMO correction on the ksub(eff) value and other parameters of the reactor models considered. (orig.) [de

  20. On the application of the theory of the translational Brownian movement to the calculation of the differential cross-sections for the incoherent scattering of slow neutrons

    Coffey, W.T.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown how three models (based on the theory of the Brownian movement) for the translational motion of an atom in a fluid may be used to calculate explicitly the intermediate scattering functions and differential cross-sections for the incoherent scattering of slow neutrons. In the first model the translational motion of the atom is represented by the motion of a particle in space subjected to no forces other than those arising from the thermal motion of its surroundings. The differential scattering cross-section for this model is then obtained as a continued fraction similar to that given by Sack (Proc. Phys. Soc.; B70:402 and 414 (1957)) for the electric polarisability in his investigation of the role of inertial effects in dielectric relaxation. The second model is a corrected version of the itinerant oscillator model of Sears (Proc. Phys. Soc.; 86:953 (1965)). Here the differential cross-section is obtained in the form of a series and a closed-form expression is found for the intermediate scattering function. The last model to be considered is the harmonically bound particle where again a closed form expression is obtained for the intermediate scattering function. In each case the intermediate scattering function has a mathematical form which is similar to the after-effect function describing the decay of electric polarisation for the rotational versions of the models. (author)

  1. Improved surface-roughness scattering and mobility models for multi-gate FETs with arbitrary cross-section and biasing scheme

    Lizzit, D.; Badami, O.; Specogna, R.; Esseni, D.

    2017-06-01

    We present a new model for surface roughness (SR) scattering in n-type multi-gate FETs (MuGFETs) and gate-all-around nanowire FETs with fairly arbitrary cross-sections, its implementation in a complete device simulator, and the validation against experimental electron mobility data. The model describes the SR scattering matrix elements as non-linear transformations of interface fluctuations, which strongly influences the root mean square value of the roughness required to reproduce experimental mobility data. Mobility simulations are performed via the deterministic solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for a 1D-electron gas and including the most relevant scattering mechanisms for electronic transport, such as acoustic, polar, and non-polar optical phonon scattering, Coulomb scattering, and SR scattering. Simulation results show the importance of accounting for arbitrary cross-sections and biasing conditions when compared to experimental data. We also discuss how mobility is affected by the shape of the cross-section as well as by its area in gate-all-around and tri-gate MuGFETs.

  2. Acoustic scattering behavior of a 2D flame with heat exchanger in cross-flow

    Chen, L.S.; Polifke, W.; Hosseini, N.; Teerling, O. J.; Arteaga, I.L.; Kornilov, V.; De Goey, P.

    2016-01-01

    In practical heat production systems, premixed flames with cold heat exchanger in cross-flow is a widely used configuration. Self-excited thermoacoustic instabilities often occur in such systems. A practical way to predict the presence of the instabilities is the network model approach. In the

  3. New approximations of the differential electron-atom elastic scattering cross-sections

    Niculescu, V.I.R.; Catana, D.

    1994-01-01

    In the present note concerning the electron-atom interaction a cubic Spline method was used to obtain approximations of the differential cross-sections. These approximations gave a 20 times reduction of the computing time preserving also the accuracy (2%). The example is for Al in the 1-256 keV electron energy range. (Author) 2 Tabs., 3 Refs

  4. Comparison of neutron scattering cross sections with the JLM microscopic optical model

    Kailas, S.; Gupta, S.K.

    Recently Jeukenne et al have determined microscopically the nucleon-nucleus optical potential from Reid's nucleon-nucleon interaction. Microscopic neutron-nucleus optical potentials are constructed using accurate matter densities. Reasonable success has been obtained in describing the total and elastic cross section and angular distributions at Esub(n)=8.05 MeV without modifying the microscopically calculated potentials. (auth.)

  5. The measurement of neutron differential scattering cross sections for 12C, 14N and 16O in the energy range 20-26 Mev

    Petler, J.S.; Finlay, R.W.; Meigooni, A.S.; Islam, M.S.; Rapaport, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Ohio University Beam Swinger provides a high resolution, low back-ground time-of-flight facility for the measurement of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering. It has been used to obtain a comprehensive set of differential scattering cross sections for 12 C, 14 N, 16 O and 40 Ca between 18 and 26 MeV. The elastic cross sections can be used directly to obtain partial kerma factors and, combined with the known total cross sections, provide accurate values for the reaction cross sections. Angular distributions have been measured for inelastic scattering from all the nuclear levels that cannot decay by particle emission thus providing (by subtraction) a limit on the sum of all charged-particle producing reactions. The integrated cross sections for inelastic scattering from some particle-unstable states in 12 C are in excellent agreement with the cross sections for three-body breakup obtained by Antolkovic et al. The differential data have been used, together with higher energy proton scattering data to produce energy-dependent optical model parameters for each of these nuclei in the energy range 20-60 MeV. It has been found that the elastic differential cross sections at theta > 100 0 for 12 C, 14 N and 16 O cannot be well described by a spherical optical model. Explicit consideration of coupled-channel effects, and in the case of 12 C, deformation of the ground state, improves the agreement between calculation and experiment. Heavy ion recoil kerma factors and reaction cross sections have been obtained for each element and compared with previous calculations and measurements

  6. Measurements of Atomic Rayleigh Scattering Cross-Sections: A New Approach Based on Solid Angle Approximation and Geometrical Efficiency

    Rao, D. V.; Takeda, T.; Itai, Y.; Akatsuka, T.; Seltzer, S. M.; Hubbell, J. H.; Cesareo, R.; Brunetti, A.; Gigante, G. E.

    Atomic Rayleigh scattering cross-sections for low, medium and high Z atoms are measured in vacuum using X-ray tube with a secondary target as an excitation source instead of radioisotopes. Monoenergetic Kα radiation emitted from the secondary target and monoenergetic radiation produced using two secondary targets with filters coupled to an X-ray tube are compared. The Kα radiation from the second target of the system is used to excite the sample. The background has been reduced considerably and the monochromacy is improved. Elastic scattering of Kα X-ray line energies of the secondary target by the sample is recorded with Hp Ge and Si (Li) detectors. A new approach is developed to estimate the solid angle approximation and geometrical efficiency for a system with experimental arrangement using X-ray tube and secondary target. The variation of the solid angle is studied by changing the radius and length of the collimators towards and away from the source and sample. From these values the variation of the total solid angle and geometrical efficiency is deduced and the optimum value is used for the experimental work. The efficiency is larger because the X-ray fluorescent source acts as a converter. Experimental results based on this system are compared with theoretical estimates and good agreement is observed in between them.

  7. Neutron inelastic scattering cross sections of 232Th obtained from (n,n/prime/sub gamma/) measurements

    Egan, J.J.; Menachery, J.D.; Kegel, G.H.R.; Pullen, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    The /sup 232/Th(n,n/prime/sub gamma/) reaction has been studied up to 2.1 MeV bombarding energy for states with excitation energies from 700 to 1700 keV. Seventy-five gamma-ray transitions from forty-three above the first excited state have been observed from a disk scatterer with a 40-cm/sup 3/ Ge(Li) detector surrounded by an anti-Compton annulus of NaI(Tl). The time-of-flight technique was employed to further reduce background. Cross sections for twenty-two states are reported here. The data have been corrected for the finite sample effects of neutron and gamma-ray attenuation, and neutron multiple scattering. The results are compared to those of McMurray et al. and to the predictions of the compound nucleus statistical model. A compound nucleus plus direct interaction calculation is also shown for the 1/sup -/ state at 714 kev. 7 refs

  8. A comparison of three time-dependent wave packet methods for calculating electron--atom elastic scattering cross sections

    Judson, R.S.; McGarrah, D.B.; Sharafeddin, O.A.; Kouri, D.J.; Hoffman, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    We compare three time-dependent wave packet methods for performing elastic scattering calculations from screened Coulomb potentials. The three methods are the time-dependent amplitude density method (TDADM), what we term a Cayley-transform method (CTM), and the Chebyshev propagation method of Tal-Ezer and Kosloff. Both the TDADM and the CTM are based on a time-dependent integral equation for the wave function. In the first, we propagate the time-dependent amplitude density, |ζ(t)right-angle=U|ψ(t)right-angle, where U is the interaction potential and |ψ(t)right-angle is the usual time-dependent wave function. In the other two, the wave function is propagated. As a numerical example, we calculate phase shifts and cross sections using a screened Coulomb, Yukawa type potential over the range 200--1000 eV. One of the major advantages of time-dependent methods such as these is that we get scattering information over this entire range of energies from one propagation. We find that in most cases, all three methods yield comparable accuracy and are about equally efficient computationally. However for l=0, where the Coulomb well is not screened by the centrifugal potential, the TDADM requires smaller grid spacings to maintain accuracy

  9. Elastic scattering and total reaction cross section for the {sup 6}He+{sup 58}Ni system

    Morcelle, V. [Instituto de Física - Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and Universidade Federal de Itajubá, 35900-030, Itabira (Brazil); Lichtenthäler, R.; Lépine-Szily, A.; Guimarães, V.; Gasques, L.; Scarduelli, V.; Condori, R. Pampa; Leistenschneider, E. [Depto de Física Nuclear, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05389-970, São Paulo (Brazil); Mendes Jr, D. R.; Faria, P. N. de [Instituto de Física - Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-346, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pires, K. C. C. [Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, 86300-000, Cornélio Procópio (Brazil); Barioni, A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340, Bahia (Brazil); Morais, M. C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Shorto, J. M. B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares- IPEN, 05508-000, São Paulo (Brazil); Zamora, J. C. [Departament of Physics, Technische Universität Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-11-11

    Elastic scattering measurements of {sup 6}He + {sup 58}Ni system have been performed at the laboratory energy of 21.7 MeV. The {sup 6}He secondary beam was produced by a transfer reaction {sup 9}Be ({sup 7}Li, {sup 6}He) and impinged on {sup 58}Ni and {sup 197}Au targets, using the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, RIBRAS, installed in the Pelletron Laboratory of the Institute of Physics of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. The elastic angular distribution was obtained in the angular range from 15° to 80° in the center of mass frame. Optical model calculations have been performed using a hybrid potential to fit the experimental data. The total reaction cross section was derived.

  10. Combined measurement and QCD analysis of the inclusive e{sup {+-}}p scattering cross sections at HERA

    Aaron, F.D. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics; Max-Planck-Institute, Muenchen (Germany); Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (DE)] (and others)

    2009-10-15

    A combination is presented of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised e{sup {+-}}p scattering at HERA during the period 1994-2000. The data span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q{sup 2}, and in Bjorken x. The combination method used takes the correlations of systematic uncertainties into account, resulting in an improved accuracy. The combined data are the sole input in a NLO QCD analysis which determines a new set of parton distributions HERAPDF1.0 with small experimental uncertainties. This set includes an estimate of the model and parametrisation uncertainties of the fit result. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of the Hadronic Cross-Section for the Scattering of Two Virtual Photons at LEP

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Couchman, J.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Stumpf, L.; Surrow, B.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of virtual photons is investigated using the reaction e+e- -> e+e- hadrons based on data taken by the OPAL experiment at e+e- centre-of-mass energies sqrt(s_ee)=189-209 GeV, for W>5 GeV and at an average Q^2 of 17.9 GeV^2. The measured cross-sections are compared to predictions of the Quark Parton Model (QPM), to the Leading Order QCD Monte Carlo model PHOJET to the NLO prediction for the reaction e+e- -> e+e-qqbar, and to BFKL calculations. PHOJET, NLO e+e- -> e+e-qqbar, and QPM describe the data reasonably well, whereas the cross-section predicted by a Leading Order BFKL calculation is too large.

  12. Elastic differential cross sections for small-angle scattering of 25-, 40-, and 60-keV protons by atomic hydrogen

    Rille, E.; Peacher, J.L.; Redd, E.; Kvale, T.J.; Seely, D.G.; Blankenship, D.M.; Olson, R.E.; Park, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    Elastic angular differential cross sections for small-angle scattering of protons by atomic hydrogen have been measured. The technique utilized unambigously distinguishes the elastically and inelastically scattered ions. The cross sections fall monotonically by 3 orders of magnitude in the angular range from 0.5 to 3.0 mrad, in the center-of-mass system. The experimental data obtained are in very good agreement with a multistate calculation and in fair agreement with both our Glauber-approximation and classical-trajectory Monte Carlo results

  13. Electron scattering on N2O-from cross sections to diffusion coefficients

    Mechlinska-Drewko, J.; Wroblewski, T.; Petrovic, Z.L.; Novakovic, V.; Karwasz, G.P.

    2003-01-01

    Results of measurements of the ratio of transverse (D T /μ) and longitudinal (D L /μ) diffusion coefficients to mobility and drift velocity (W) as function of reduced electrical field (E/N) for electrons in nitrous oxide are presented. The coefficients D T /μ and D L /μ have been determined by applying the Townsend-Huxley method. The drift velocities were obtained by using the Bradbury-Nielsen technique. Also the deduced set of total and partial cross sections has been used to calculate the D T /μ and W

  14. Differential cross sections for inelastic scattering of electrons on Kr and Xe atoms at intermediate energies

    Filipovic, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Electron-impact excitation of the larger- number noble-gas atoms is a way of understanding excitation mechanisms in atomic collisional processes. Krypton and xenon have the largest atomic number of all the stable noble gases. Therefore, effects dependent on the size of a target atom, such as alignment and orientation of the atomic outer shell charge cloud after collisional excitation, are best observed by studying these atoms. Normalized, absolute differential cross sections (DCS's) for the lowest electronic states of Kr and Xe atoms, at intermediate energies, are the subject of this report

  15. Measurement of proton-proton elastic scattering and total cross-section at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    Antchev, G; Atanassov, I; Avati, V; Baechler, J; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Bossini, E; Bozzo, M; Brogi, P; Brucken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F S; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G; Covault, C.; Csanad, M.; Csorgo, T.; Deile, M.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Grzanka, L.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Intonti, R.A.; Kaspar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrat, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leszko, T.; Lippmaa, E.; Lokajıcek, M.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macrı, M.; Maki, T.; Mercadante, A.; Minafra, N.; Minutoli, S.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Osterberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Prochazka, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Robutti, E.; Rodrıguez, F.L.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Santroni, A.; Scribano, A.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Vıtek, M.; Welti, J.; Whitmore, J.

    2013-01-01

    At the LHC energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV, under various beam and background conditions, luminosities, and Roman Pot positions, TOTEM has measured the differential cross-section for proton-proton elastic scattering as a function of the four-momentum transfer squared t. The results of the different analyses are in excellent agreement demonstrating no sizeable dependence on the beam conditions. Due to the very close approach of the Roman Pot detectors to the beam center ( around 5 $\\sigma$ beam) in a dedicated run with $\\beta$* = 90m, abs(t)-values down to 5 10**-3 GeV**2 were reached. The exponential slope of the differential elastic cross-section in this newly explored abs(t)-region remained unchanged and thus an exponential fit with only one constant B = (19.90+/-0.3)GeV-2 over the large abs(t)-range from 0.005 to 0.2GeV**2 describes the differential distribution well. The high precision of the measurement and the large fit range lead to an error on the slope parameter B which is remarkably small compared to p...

  16. Measurement of the Antineutrino Double-Differential Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering Cross Section at MINERvA

    Patrick, Cheryl [Northwestern U.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments, such as DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande, hope to measure charge-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector. In order to do this, they must dramatically reduce their current levels of uncertainty, particularly those due to neutrino-nucleus interaction models. As CP violation is a measure of the difference between the oscillation properties of neutrinos and antineutrinos, data about how the less-studied antineutrinos interact is especially valuable. We present the MINERvA experiment's first double-differential scattering cross sections for antineutrinos on scintillator, in the few-GeV range relevant to experiments such as DUNE and NOvA. We also present total antineutrino-scintillator quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of energy, which we compare to measurements from previous experiments. As well as being useful to help reduce oscillation experiments' uncertainty, our data can also be used to study the prevalence of various cor relation and final-state interaction effects within the nucleus. We compare to models produced by different model generators, and are able to draw first conclusions about the predictions of these models.

  17. Combination of Measurements of Inclusive Deep Inelastic $e^{\\pm}p$ Scattering Cross Sections and QCD Analysis of HERA Data

    Abramowicz, H.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antunovic, B.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt Dubak, A.; Behrens, U.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E.G.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brook, N.H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Buniatyan, A.; Bussey, P.J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C.D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Contreras, J.G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Dementiev, R.K.; Devenish, R.C.E.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Figiel, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L.K.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henkenjohann, P.; Hladky, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z.A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N.Z.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Kotz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levchenko, B.B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lohr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Idris, F.Mohamad; Morozov, A.; Nasir, N.Muhammad; Muller, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, R.J.; Olsson, J.E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Paul, E.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Polifka, R.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Saxon, D.H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W.B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shushkevich, S.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Slominski, W.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stanco, L.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Thompson, P.D.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Traynor, D.; Trofymov, A.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W.A.T.; Wegener, D.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Wunsch, E.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zacek, J.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B.O.; Zhmak, N.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D.S.

    2015-12-08

    A combination is presented of all inclusive deep inelastic cross sections previously published by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at HERA for neutral and charged current $e^{\\pm}p$ scattering for zero beam polarisation. The data were taken at proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV and an electron beam energy of 27.5 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb$^{-1}$ and span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, $Q^2$, and Bjorken $x$. The correlations of the systematic uncertainties were evaluated and taken into account for the combination. The combined cross sections were input to QCD analyses at leading order, next-to-leading order and at next-to-next-to-leading order, providing a new set of parton distribution functions, called HERAPDF2.0. In addition to the experimental uncertainties, model and parameterisation uncertainties were assessed for these parton distribution functions. Variants of HERAPDF2.0 with an alternative gluon parameterisatio...

  18. Combined inclusive diffractive cross sections measured with foreward proton spectrometers in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (DE)] (and others)

    2012-07-15

    A combination of the inclusive diffractive cross section measurements made by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at HERA is presented. The analysis uses samples of diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering data at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}(s)=318 GeV where leading protons are detected by dedicated spectrometers. Correlations of systematic uncertainties are taken into account, resulting in an improved precision of the cross section measurement which reaches 6% for the most precise points. The combined data cover the range 2.5

  19. Electron scattering cross sections for SF6 and SF5CF3 at intermediate and high energies (100-10000 eV)

    Limao-Vieira, P.; Blanco, F.; Oller, J.C.; Munoz, A.; Perez, J.M.; Vinodkumar, M.; Garcia, G.; Mason, N.J.

    2005-01-01

    A modified experimental apparatus with improved angular resolution and stability has been used to measure the total electron scattering cross sections for SF 6 and SF 5 CF 3 in the energy range of 100-5000 eV. A detailed analysis of the experimental error sources is provided. The experimental results are compared with integral elastic and inelastic cross sections calculated using the independent atom model approximation and a modified single-center additivity rule for electron energies ranging from 1 to 10,000 eV. The accuracy of these approximations method is discussed through a comparison with the experimental results. Previous cross-sectional data for SF 6 are compared with the present theoretical and experimental results. For SF 5 CF 3 , we present the first electron scattering cross-sectional data for the 100-10,000 eV energy range, as well as the first empirical determination of the molecular polarizability

  20. Neutron scattering cross sections for 204,206Pb and neutron and proton amplitudes of E2 and E3 excitations

    Hicks, S.F.; Hanly, J.M.; Hicks, S.E.; Shen, G.R.; McEllistrem, M.T.

    1994-01-01

    Differential elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections have been measured for neutrons incident on 204 Pb and 206 Pb at energies of 2.5, 4.6, and 8.0 MeV and total cross sections in 100-keV steps from 250 keV to 4.0 MeV. Both spherical and coupled-channels analyses have been used to interpret this large set of data, together with other cross sections extending to 8 MeV. Several purposes motivate this work. The first is to establish the dispersion-corrected mean field appropriate for these nuclei. A consistent description of the energy dependent neutron scattering potential includes a dispersion relation connecting the real and imaginary parts of the potential; the resultant potential relates the energy dependent scattering field to one representing bound single particle levels. Dispersion relations using both the single channel and coupled-channels models have been examined; both give very similar results. The second motivation is to deduce neutron and proton excitation strengths of the lowest-energy quadrupole and octupole excitations seen via neutron scattering, and to compare those strengths with similar values derived from electromagnetic exciton, heavy-ion and pion scattering. The role of target neutrons in both collective excitations was found to be enhanced compared to the proton role

  1. Measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering and total cross section at a centre-of-mass energy of 546 GeV

    Swol, R.W. van.

    1985-01-01

    The transformation of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) from a fixed target machine into a colliding beam facility allowed the study of antiproton-proton scattering at a centre-of-mass (CM) energy of 546 GeV. This thesis describes the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering and the antiproton-proton total cross section, sigmasub(tot)(anti pp), at the CERN anti pp Collider. The aim of the experiment is to establish the considerable rise with energy of the total cross section, which was predicted after the discovery of rising proton-proton total cross sections at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR), covering an energy range of 20-60 GeV. The experimental method used for measuring sigmasub(tot)(anti pp) with an accuracy of 1-2% consists of the simultaneous measurement of both the elastic scattering event rate at small scattering angles and the inelastic interaction rate. Using the optical theorem, the total and the elastic cross sections can then be obtained without a determination of the machine luminosity. (Auth.)

  2. Determination of integral K-shell Compton scattering cross-sections in elements 41>=Z>=51 for 1250 keV photons

    Verma, S L; Allawadhi, K L; Sood, B S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1978-04-01

    Integral K-shell Compton scattering cross-sections in elements Nb, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sn and Sb have been determined for 1250 keV photons. The results when compared with theory suggest that K-shell electrons in the elements under investigation behave as free electrons.

  3. Exclusion limits on the WIMP nucleon elastic scattering cross-section from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Golwala, Sunil Ramanlal [UC, Berkeley

    2000-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that a large fraction of the matter in the universe is nonluminous, nonbaryonic, and “cold” — nonrelativistic at the time matter began to dominate the energy density of the universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are an excellent candidate for nonbaryonic, cold dark matter. Minimal supersymmetry provides a natural WIMP candidate in the form of the lightest superpartner, with a typical mass Mδ ~ 100 GeV c-2 . WIMPs are expected to have collapsed into a roughly isothermal, spherical halo within which the visible portion of our galaxy resides. They would scatter off nuclei via the weak interaction, potentially allowingtheir direct detection. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) employs Ge and Si detectors to search for WIMPs via their elastic-scatteringinteractions with nuclei while discriminatingagainst interactions of background particles. The former yield nuclear recoils while the latter produce electron recoils. The ionization yield (the ratio of ionization production to recoil energy in a semiconductor) of a particle interaction differs greatly for nuclear and electron recoils. CDMS detectors measure phonon and electron-hole-pair production to determine recoil energy and ionization yield for each event and thereby discriminate nuclear recoils from electron recoils. This dissertation reports new limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic-scattering cross section that exclude unexplored parameter space above 10 GeV c-2 WIMP mass and, at > 75% CL, the entire 3σ allowed region for the WIMP signal reported by the DAMA experiment. The experimental apparatus, detector performance, and data analysis are fully described.

  4. Validation of the U-238 inelastic scattering neutron cross section through the EXCALIBUR dedicated experiment

    Leconte Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available EXCALIBUR is an integral transmission experiment based on the fast neutron source produced by the bare highly enriched fast burst reactor CALIBAN, located in CEA/DAM Valduc (France. Two experimental campaigns have been performed, one using a sphere of diameter 17 cm and one using two cylinders of 17 cm diameter 9 cm height, both made of metallic Uranium 238. A set of 15 different dosimeters with specific threshold energies have been employed to provide information on the neutron flux attenuation as a function of incident energy. Measurements uncertainties are typically in the range of 0.5–3% (1σ. The analysis of these experiments is performed with the TRIPOLI4 continuous energy Monte Carlo code. A calculation benchmark with validated simplifications is defined in order to improve the statistical convergence under 2%. Various 238U evaluations have been tested: JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.1 and the IB36 evaluation from IAEA. A sensitivity analysis is presented to identify the contribution of each reaction cross section to the integral transmission rate. This feedback may be of interest for the international effort on 238U, through the CIELO project.

  5. Validation of the U-238 inelastic scattering neutron cross section through the EXCALIBUR dedicated experiment

    Leconte, Pierre; Bernard, David

    2017-09-01

    EXCALIBUR is an integral transmission experiment based on the fast neutron source produced by the bare highly enriched fast burst reactor CALIBAN, located in CEA/DAM Valduc (France). Two experimental campaigns have been performed, one using a sphere of diameter 17 cm and one using two cylinders of 17 cm diameter 9 cm height, both made of metallic Uranium 238. A set of 15 different dosimeters with specific threshold energies have been employed to provide information on the neutron flux attenuation as a function of incident energy. Measurements uncertainties are typically in the range of 0.5-3% (1σ). The analysis of these experiments is performed with the TRIPOLI4 continuous energy Monte Carlo code. A calculation benchmark with validated simplifications is defined in order to improve the statistical convergence under 2%. Various 238U evaluations have been tested: JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.1 and the IB36 evaluation from IAEA. A sensitivity analysis is presented to identify the contribution of each reaction cross section to the integral transmission rate. This feedback may be of interest for the international effort on 238U, through the CIELO project.

  6. Measurement of the {upsilon} meson productin cross section in ep scattering at HERA

    Rubinskiy, Igor

    2009-04-15

    This thesis presents a measurement of {upsilon} meson production in ep collisions with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 468 pb{sup -1}. The {upsilon} mesons were identified using the decay channel {upsilon}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. The measurements were performed for exclusive diffractive production in the kinematic range Q{sup 2}<1 GeV{sup 2}, 60cross sections are compared to and agree well with theoretical predictions within the perturbative QCD framework such as Martin-Ryskin-Teubner two gluon exchange and NRQCD. As the technical part of this thesis, work related to the commissioning of the Straw Tube Tracker (STT) and to the Zeus Event Visualisation (ZEVIS) software package are presented. STT developments include: the STT DSP (Digital Signal Processor) quality monitor was developed, the pattern recognition algorithm was optimised for speed, and used in the Third Level Trigger (TLT) in order to reduce the accepted event rate by rejecting non-physics background. The TLT Charge Current(CC) slot rate was reduced by an order of magnitude, offering a rate reduction for the total accepted TLT rate by {approx}2%. ZEVIS developments include: the STT hit visualisation scheme in 2D, 3D and tan({theta})-{phi} view, and a user-friendly interface called ''EasyTool'' for global ZEUS track and hit visualisation for all ZEUS components. (orig.)

  7. Measurement of the Υ meson productin cross section in ep scattering at HERA

    Rubinskiy, Igor

    2009-04-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of Υ meson production in ep collisions with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 468 pb -1 . The Υ mesons were identified using the decay channel Υ→μ + μ - . The measurements were performed for exclusive diffractive production in the kinematic range Q 2 2 , 60 2 2 , 60 2 is virtuality of the exchanged photon and W is the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy. A feasibility study for the Υ meson inelastic production has also been performed. The measured cross sections are compared to and agree well with theoretical predictions within the perturbative QCD framework such as Martin-Ryskin-Teubner two gluon exchange and NRQCD. As the technical part of this thesis, work related to the commissioning of the Straw Tube Tracker (STT) and to the Zeus Event Visualisation (ZEVIS) software package are presented. STT developments include: the STT DSP (Digital Signal Processor) quality monitor was developed, the pattern recognition algorithm was optimised for speed, and used in the Third Level Trigger (TLT) in order to reduce the accepted event rate by rejecting non-physics background. The TLT Charge Current(CC) slot rate was reduced by an order of magnitude, offering a rate reduction for the total accepted TLT rate by ∼2%. ZEVIS developments include: the STT hit visualisation scheme in 2D, 3D and tan(θ)-φ view, and a user-friendly interface called ''EasyTool'' for global ZEUS track and hit visualisation for all ZEUS components. (orig.)

  8. Elastic scattering of. pi. /sup -/ mesons on protons in the Coulomb-nuclear interference region at 33-60 GeV/c. [Total and differential cross sections,scattering amplitude

    Apokin, V D; Vasiliev, A N; Derevshchikov, A A; Matulenko, Yu A; Meschanin, A P; Mysnik, A I; Nurushev, S B; Saraykin, A I; Siksin, V V; Smirnov, E V [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov. Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij

    1976-04-19

    Differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of negative pions on protons, as well as total cross sections have been measured for the incident momentum range from 33 up to 60 GeV/c. The values for four-momentum transfer were within the limits of -(10/sup -3/-8x10/sup -2/) (GeV/c)/sup 2/. The energy dependence of the ratio rho(0) of the real part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude to the imaginary part has been determined from the experimental data. The magnitude rho(0) smoothly increases from (-10.9+-1.2)% at momenta 33.52 GeV/c up to (-1.8+-1.8)% at 59.4 GeV/c. The results obtained are compared with the predictions of theoretical models.

  9. The effective differential cross section for elastic scattering of electrons by atoms and its use for Monte Carlo simulation of electron passage through matter

    Sheikin, E G

    2010-01-01

    The effective differential cross section (DCS) for elastic scattering of electrons by atoms is proposed that reproduces known energy dependences for the first and second transport cross sections but provides a total elastic cross section that is significantly small compared with the known energy dependences. The number of elastic collisions of electrons in matter when using the effective DCS in Monte Carlo simulations is significantly lower than that when using the real DCS. The results of our Monte Carlo simulation of electron propagation in aluminium using the proposed DCS are in good agreement with experimental data.

  10. How strong is the strong interaction? The πNN coupling constant and the shape and normalization of np scattering cross sections

    Blomgren, J.; Olsson, N.; Rahm, J.

    2000-01-01

    The world data base on np scattering differential cross section data from 100 to 1000 MeV incident neutron energy has been reviewed. In addition, the status of the np total cross section and the pp → dπ + total cross section is discussed, as these have frequently been used to normalize np scattering data. It appears that the shapes of the largest np data sets tend to fall into two groups, with different steepness at backward angles. Also, it seems as the two major techniques for normalizing data yield incompatible results. Both these effects have consequences when using np data to determine the pion-nucleon coupling constant, g 2 πNN , which is currently under debate. (orig.)

  11. Differential cross section measurement of elastic scattering 12C(p,p)12C in the astrophysical range of energy

    Baktibayev, M.K.; Burminskii, V.P.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzazairov -Kakhramanov, V.; Hassan, S.F.; Satpaev, N.K.; Zazulin, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The fulfillment of planned works on measurements of differential cross sections of elastic scattering of protons on nuclear 12 C at the energy region of 350†1050 keV suggests the preparation of thin self - supporting carbon target. The self - supporting target is necessary in order to perform investigations in the total angular range. In the future last data will be used in order to determine optical potentials and scattering phases for this nuclear in the energy range of astrophysical interest. There was prepared target layer of the 12 C with natural composition of carbon and of thickness of 17.4 μg/cm 2 . The spraying was conducted in the vacuum evaporation installation (VUP - 4) by an electron bombardment method. Carbon was sprayed on a glass plate with previously deposited of layer salt. After a heating during 12 hours at the temperature of 150 o C the film of carbon was floated from glass plate and self - supporting target has been picked up on the specially prepared target frame. In order to determine thickness of target there was used the resonance chamber, installed in the protons channel of the accelerator RAC - 2 - 1 (INP NNC RK), with the help of which there was measured energy loss of the protons beam during the passage through target, disposed in the central chamber. For this purpose there was used the reaction 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si with narrow resonance with E R = 992 keV and with detection of gamma-quanta with E γ = 1779 keV. On shift of the resonance E R =992 keV in the reaction 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si, which takes place owing to protons energy loss in the thickness of carbon film, and using table values of brake quantities S(E p )[MeV·cm 2 /g] [1], there was determined thickness of this fine film. Such the method allows to determine thicknesses of films in the interval of (10 † 100) mcg/cm 2 with the accuracy of not worse than 5%. In the present work there were carried out measurements of angular distributions of cross sections of the

  12. Cross sections for Scattering and Mobility of OH- and H3 O+ ions in H2 O

    Petrovic, Zoran; Stojanovic, Vladimir; Maric, Dragana; Jovanovic, Jasmina

    2016-05-01

    Modelling of plasmas in liquids and in biological and medical applications requires data for scattering of all charged and energetic particles in water vapour. We present swarm parameters for OH- and H3 O+, as representatives of principal negative and positive ions at low pressures in an attempt to provide the data that are not yet available. We applied Denpoh-Nanbu procedure to calculate cross section sets for collisions of OH- and H3 O+ ions with H2 O molecule. Swarm parameters for OH- and H3 O+ ions in H2 O are calculated by using a well tested Monte Carlo code for a range of E / N(E -electric field, N-gas density) at temperature T = 295 K, in the low pressure limit. Non-conservative processes were shown to strongly influence the transport properties even for OH- ions above the average energy of 0.2 eV(E / N >200 Td). The data are valid for low pressure water vapour or small amounts in mixtures. They will provide a basis for calculating properties of ion-water molecule clusters that are most commonly found at higher pressures and for modelling of discharges in liquids. Acknowledgment to Ministry of Education, Science and Technology of Serbia.

  13. Analysis of elastic scattering cross-section for 18O + 206Pb in the CRC formalism and dependence on the choice of double folding potential

    Sonika; Roy, B.J.; Parmar, A.; Jha, V.; Pal, U.K.; Pandit, S.K.; Parkar, V.V.; Ramachandran, K.; Mahata, K.; Pal, A.; Santra, S.; Mohanty, A.K.; Sinha, T.; Parihari, A.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement and detailed analysis of elastic scattering and inelastic excitations in 206 Pb( 18 O, 18 O) have been reported here. First, the elastic scattering cross-section was calculated with a bare double folded real potential. The DF potential consists of folding of a harmonic oscillator density distribution to simulate 18 O with the sum of two Fermi density distributions for the proton and neutron in 206 Pb with correct normalizations. Our measured higher energy data for the same system was first analyzed with this DF potential

  14. Circumstances under which various approximate relativistic and nonrelativistic theories yield accurate Compton scattering doubly differential cross sections at high photon energy

    LaJohn, L A; Pratt, R H

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the increase in error with increasing nuclear charge Z in the use of the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA) for the calculation of Compton K-shell scattering doubly differential cross sections (DDCS). We also show that nonrelativistic (nr) expressions can be used to obtain accurate peak region DDCS at scattering angles less than about 35 0 even at incident photon energies ω i exceeding 1 MeV, if Z<30. This is possible because in the Compton peak region, as θ→0, a low momentum transfer limit is being approached.

  15. Calculation of the flux attenuation and multiple scattering correction factors in time of flight technique for double differential cross section measurements

    Martin, G.; Coca, M.; Capote, R.

    1996-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo method technique , a computer code which simulates the time of flight experiment to measure double differential cross section was developed. The correction factor for flux attenuation and multiple scattering, that make a deformation to the measured spectrum, were calculated. The energy dependence of the correction factor was determined and a comparison with other works is shown. Calculations for Fe 56 at two different scattering angles were made. We also reproduce the experiment performed at the Nuclear Analysis Laboratory for C 12 at 25 celsius degree and the calculated correction factor for the is measured is shown. We found a linear relation between the scatter size and the correction factor for flux attenuation

  16. Phenomenological extraction of two-photon exchange amplitudes from elastic electron-proton scattering cross section data

    Qattan, I. A.

    2017-05-01

    Background: The inconsistency in the results obtained from the Rosenbluth separation method and the high-Q2 recoil polarization results on the ratio μpGEp/GMp implies a systematic difference between the two techniques. Several studies suggest that missing higher-order radiative corrections to elastic electron-proton scattering cross section σR(ɛ ,Q2) and in particular hard two-photon-exchange (TPE) contributions could account for the discrepancy. Purpose: In this work, I improve on and extend to low and high Q2 values the extractions of the ɛ dependence of the real parts of the TPE amplitudes relative to the magnetic form factor, as well as the ratio Pl/PlBorn(ɛ ,Q2) by using world data on σR(ɛ ,Q2) with an emphasis on precise new data covering the low-momentum region which is sensitive to the large-scale structure of the nucleon. Method: I combine cross section and polarization measurements of elastic electron-proton scattering to extract the TPE amplitudes. Because the recoil polarization data were confirmed "experimentally" to be essentially independent of ɛ , I constrain the ratio Pt/Pl(ɛ ,Q2) to its ɛ -independent term (Born value) by setting the TPE contributions to zero. This allows for the amplitude YM(ɛ ,Q2) and σR(ɛ ,Q2) to be expressed in terms of the remaining two amplitudes YE(ɛ ,Q2) and Y3(ɛ ,Q2) which in turn are parametrized as second-order polynomials in ɛ and Q2 to reserve as possible the linearity of σR(ɛ ,Q2) as well as to account for possible nonlinearities in the TPE amplitudes. Furthermore, I impose the Regge limit which ensures the vanishing of the TPE contributions to σR(ɛ ,Q2) and the TPE amplitudes in the limit ɛ →1 . Results: I provide simple parametrizations of the TPE amplitudes, along with an estimate of the fit uncertainties. The extracted TPE amplitudes are compared with previous phenomenological extractions and TPE calculations. The Pl/PlBorn ratio is extracted by using the new parametrizations of the TPE

  17. Differential cross section for neutron scattering from 209Bi at 37 MeV and the weak particle-core coupling

    Zhou Zuying; Ruan Xichao; Du Yanfeng; Qi Bujia; Tang Hongqing; Xia Haihong; Walter, R. L.; Braun, R. T.; Howell, C. R.; Tornow, W.; Weisel, G. J.; Dupuis, M.; Delaroche, J. P.; Chen Zemin; Chen Zhenpeng; Chen Yingtang

    2010-01-01

    Differential scattering cross-section data have been measured at 43 angles from 11 deg. to 160 deg. for 37-MeV neutrons incident on 209 Bi. The primary motivation for the measurements is to address the scarcity of neutron scattering data above 30 MeV and to improve the accuracy of optical-model predictions at medium neutron energies. The high-statistics measurements were conducted at the China Institute of Atomic Energy using the 3 H(d,n) 4 He reaction as the neutron source, a pulsed deuteron beam, and time-of-flight (TOF) techniques. Within the resolution of the TOF spectrometer, the measurements included inelastic scattering components. The sum of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections was computed in joint optical-model and distorted-wave Born approximation calculations under the assumption of the weak particle-core coupling. The results challenge predictions from well-established spherical optical potentials. Good agreement between data and calculations is achieved at 37 MeV provided that the balance between surface and volume absorption in a recent successful model [A. J. Koning and J. P. Delaroche, Nucl. Phys. A 713, 231 (2003)] is modified, thus suggesting the need for global optical-model improvements at medium neutron energies.

  18. Mean free paths and in-medium scattering cross sections of energetic nucleons in neutron-rich nucleonic matter within the relativistic impulse approximation

    Jiang Weizhou; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen

    2007-01-01

    The mean free paths and in-medium scattering cross sections of energetic nucleons in neutron-rich nucleonic matter are investigated using the nucleon optical potential obtained within the relativistic impulse approximation with the empirical nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitudes and the nuclear densities obtained in the relativistic mean-field model. It is found that the isospin-splitting of nucleon mean free paths, sensitive to the imaginary part of the symmetry potential, changes its sign at certain high kinetic energy. The in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections are analytically and numerically demonstrated to be essentially independent of the isospin asymmetry of the medium and increase linearly with density in the high-energy region where the relativistic impulse approximation is applicable

  19. Total electron scattering cross sections of molecules containing H, C, N, O and F in the energy range 0.2–6.0 keV

    Gurung, Meera Devi; Ariyasinghe, W.M., E-mail: wickram_ariyasinghe@baylor.edu

    2017-03-15

    Based on the effective atomic total electron scattering cross sections (EATCS) of atoms in a molecular environment, a simple model is proposed to predict the total electron scattering cross sections (TCS) of H, C, N, O, and F containing molecules. The EATCS for these five atoms are reported for 0.2–6.0 keV energies. The predicted TCS by this model are compared with experimental TCS in the literature. The experimental TCS of CHF{sub 3}, C{sub 2}F{sub 4}, C{sub 2}F{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 4}F{sub 6}, and c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} have been obtained for 0.2–4.5 keV electrons by measuring the attenuation of the electron beam through a gas cell.

  20. Integral test of niobium differential elastic scattering cross-sections of 60 and 120 degrees for high-energy neutrons

    Selvi, Saim; Shin, Kazuo; Hyodo, Tomonori

    1984-01-01

    Spectra of scattered neutrons from a niobium disc were measured at the scattering angles of 60 deg and 120 deg by an NE-213 scintillator. Comparison of the experimental data with the point-to-point Monte Carlo calculations, using the evaluated data from the ENDF/B-IV file, showed good agreement at 60 deg, but considerable discrepancy at 120 deg. (author)

  1. Application of a generalisation of the Kohn variational method to the calculation of cross sections for low-energy positron-hydrogen-molecule scattering

    Armour, E.A.G.

    1984-01-01

    The phaseshift corresponding to the lowest partial wave and the associated approximation to the total cross section are calculated for low-energy positron-hydrogen-molecule scattering using a generalisation of the Kohn variational method. The trial wavefunction is expressed in terms of confocal elliptical coordinates. Except at incident positron energies below about 2 eV, reasonable agreement with experiment is obtained below the positronium formation threshold at 8.63 eV. (author)

  2. Differential cross sections for the scattering of Na 2Ssub(1/2) and Na 2Psub(3/2) by Xe 1S0

    Deventer, J.M.M. van.

    1980-01-01

    An atomic crossed-beam apparatus has been built and tested in which experiments were carried out on the scattering of alkali atoms in the ground state and an excited state by inert neutral gas atoms or molecules in the thermal energy region. Measurements have been performed on Na/Xe and Na*/Xe systems to extract information about the interaction potentials. (G.T.H.)

  3. Measurement of the real part of the forward scattering amplitude in K/sup + -/p elastic scattering at 10. 4 and 14 GeV/c. [Differential cross sections, interference, coulomb and nuclear interactions

    Carnegie, R K; Cashmore, R J; Davier, M; Leith, D W.G.S.; Richard, F; Schacht, P; Walden, P; Williams, S H [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Calif. (USA)

    1975-11-10

    The differential cross section for K/sup + -/p elastic scattering has been measured in the very low t region (0.003scattering amplitude. At 10.4 GeV/c the authors measure ..cap alpha..(K/sup +/p)=-0.21+-0.06 and ..cap alpha..(K/sup -/p)=0.08+-0.04, and at 14 GeV/c, ..cap alpha..(K/sup +/p)=-0.13+-0.03 and ..cap alpha..(K/sup -/p)=0.00+-0.04 in agreement with the predictions of dispersion theory calculations.

  4. Differential cross sections for carbon neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from 8.0 to 14.5 MeV

    Haouat, G.; Lachkar, J.; Patin, Y.; Sigaud, J.; Cocu, F.

    1975-06-01

    Differential elastic and inelastic cross sections for fast neutrons scattered by carbon have been measured between 8.0 and 14.5 MeV. No experimental results on {sup 12}C seem to have been reported, at this time, between 9 and 14 MeV. A complete and consistent set of data on carbon, including total, elastic and inelastic, (n,α) and (n,n'3α) cross sections, is now available for energies below 14.5MeV.

  5. Scattering of a cross-polarized linear wave by a soliton at an optical event horizon in a birefringent nanophotonic waveguide.

    Ciret, Charles; Gorza, Simon-Pierre

    2016-06-15

    The scattering of a linear wave on an optical event horizon, induced by a cross-polarized soliton, is experimentally and numerically investigated in integrated structures. The experiments are performed in a dispersion-engineered birefringent silicon nanophotonic waveguide. In stark contrast with copolarized waves, the large difference between the group velocity of the two cross-polarized waves enables a frequency conversion almost independent of the soliton wavelength. It is shown that the generated idler is only shifted by 10 nm around 1550 nm over a pump tuning range of 350 nm. Simulations using two coupled full vectorial nonlinear Schrödinger equations fully support the experimental results.

  6. Differential and integral electron scattering cross sections from tetrahydrofuran (THF) over a wide energy range: 1-10.000 eV

    Fuss, M.C.; Sanz, A.G.; Blanco, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Brunger, M.J.; Garcia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahydrofuran (THF, C 4 H 8 O) has a molecular structure that is similar to the ribose in the DNA backbone and is used as a surrogate of ribose to get electron scattering cross sections. Total, integral inelastic and integral and differential elastic cross sections have been calculated with the screening-corrected additivity rule (SCAR) method based on the independent atom model (IAM) for electron scattering from THF. Since the permanent dipole moment of THF enhances rotational excitation particularly at low energies and for small angles, an estimate of the rotational excitation cross section was also computed by assuming the interaction with a free electric dipole as an independent, additional process. Our theoretical results compare very favourably to the existing experimental data. Finally, a self-consistent set of integral and differential interaction cross-sections for the incident energy range 1 eV - 10 keV is established for use in our low energy particle track simulation (LEPTS). All cross section data are supplied numerically in tabulated form. (authors)

  7. Differential cross sections of proton Compton scattering at photon laboratory energies between 1.2 and 1.7 GeV

    Duda, J.; Hoefner, F.W.; Jung, M.; Kleissler, R.; Kueck, H.; Leu, P.; Marne, K.D. de; Munk, B.; Vogl, W.; Wedemeyer, R.

    1982-11-01

    Differential cross sections of proton Compton scattering have been measured at the Bonn 2.5 GeV synchrotron. The experiment covers photon laboratory energies between 1.2 GeV and 1.7 GeV and the square of the four-momentum transfer ranges from t = -0.17 GeV 2 to -0.98 GeV 2 corresponding to c.m. scattering angles between 35 0 and 80 0 . The cross sections exhibit a forward peak followed by a monotone fall-off up to the largest measured vertical stroketvertical stroke-values. Fits of the form dsigma/dt = A.exp(Bt) to the data points with vertical stroketvertical stroke 2 yield forward cross sections A, which are consistent with the 0 0 cross sections calculated from the measured total photon-proton cross section. The average slope is B = 5.6 +- 0.14 GeV 2 . (orig.)

  8. Scatter and cross-talk correction for one-day acquisition of 123I-BMIPP and 99mtc-tetrofosmin myocardial SPECT.

    Kaneta, Tomohiro; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Hakamatsuka, Takashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Maruoka, Shin; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Shoki; Yamada, Shogo

    2004-12-01

    123I-15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) and 99mTc-tetrofosmin (TET) are widely used for evaluation of myocardial fatty acid metabolism and perfusion, respectively. ECG-gated TET SPECT is also used for evaluation of myocardial wall motion. These tests are often performed on the same day to minimize both the time required and inconvenience to patients and medical staff. However, as 123I and 99mTc have similar emission energies (159 keV and 140 keV, respectively), it is necessary to consider not only scattered photons, but also primary photons of each radionuclide detected in the wrong window (cross-talk). In this study, we developed and evaluated the effectiveness of a new scatter and cross-talk correction imaging protocol. Fourteen patients with ischemic heart disease or heart failure (8 men and 6 women with a mean age of 69.4 yr, ranging from 45 to 94 yr) were enrolled in this study. In the routine one-day acquisition protocol, BMIPP SPECT was performed in the morning, with TET SPECT performed 4 h later. An additional SPECT was performed just before injection of TET with the energy window for 99mTc. These data correspond to the scatter and cross-talk factor of the next TET SPECT. The correction was performed by subtraction of the scatter and cross-talk factor from TET SPECT. Data are presented as means +/- S.E. Statistical analyses were performed using Wilcoxon's matched-pairs signed-ranks test, and p corrected total count was 26.0 +/- 5.3%. EDV and ESV after correction were significantly greater than those before correction (p = 0.019 and 0.016, respectively). After correction, EF was smaller than that before correction, but the difference was not significant. Perfusion scores (17 segments per heart) were significantly lower after as compared with those before correction (p correction revealed significant differences in EDV, ESV, and perfusion scores. These observations indicate that scatter and cross-talk correction is required for one

  9. Electron scattering from tetrahydrofuran

    Fuss, M C; Sanz, A G; García, G; Muñoz, A; Oller, J C; Blanco, F; Do, T P T; Brunger, M J; Almeida, D; Limão-Vieira, P

    2012-01-01

    Electron scattering from Tetrahydrofuran (C 4 H 8 O) was investigated over a wide range of energies. Following a mixed experimental and theoretical approach, total scattering, elastic scattering and ionization cross sections as well as electron energy loss distributions were obtained.

  10. Differential elastic and inelastic cross sections in 1. 5 <= E/sub 0/ <= 25 keV He/sup +/-H collisions at scattering angles thetasub(lab) ranging from 5' to 2/sup 0/

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Nouet, P.; Boutonnet, A.; Bergnes, C.; Dagnac, R.

    1987-09-14

    Elastic and inelastic cross sections, differential in energy loss and scattering angle, have been determined from the energy loss spectra of 1.5 - 25 keV He/sup +/ scattered from atomic hydrogen at scattering angles from 5'-2/sup 0/ (laboratory frame). The experimental results compare favourably with the experimental and theoretical data obtained at low incident energies by other authors, but for the higher energies, the present results exhibit a strong disagreement with many of the reported calculations.

  11. Thermal Neutron Capture and Thermal Neutron Burn-up of K isomeric state of 177mLu: a way to the Neutron Super-Elastic Scattering cross section

    Roig, O.; Belier, G.; Meot, V.; Daugas, J.-M.; Romain, P.; Aupiais, J.; Jutier, Ch.; Le Petit, G.; Letourneau, A.; Marie, F.; Veyssiere, Ch.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal neutron radiative capture and burn-up measurements of the K isomeric state in 177Lu form part of an original method to indirectly obtain the neutron super-elastic scattering cross section at thermal energy. Neutron super-elastic scattering, also called neutron inelastic acceleration, occurs during the neutron collisions with an excited nuclear level. In this reaction, the nucleus could partly transfer its excitation energy to the scattered neutron

  12. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} charged current cross sections in e{sup +}p deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Rautenberg, J

    2004-06-01

    Cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering have been measured in e{sup +}p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the running periods 1999 and 2000 correspond to an integrated luminosity of 61 pb{sup -1}. Single differential cross sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy have been measured for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}, as well as the double differential reduced cross section d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} in the kinematic range 280 GeV{sup 2}scattering cross sections. The helicity structure is investigated in particular. The mass of the space-like W boson propagator has been determined from a fit to d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}. (orig.)

  13. Simple systematization of vibrational excitation cross-section calculations for resonant electron-molecule scattering in the boomerang and impulse models.

    Sarma, Manabendra; Adhikari, S; Mishra, Manoj K

    2007-01-28

    Vibrational excitation (nu(f), where psi(nu(i))(R,t) approximately =e(-iH(A(2))-(R)t/h phi(nu(i))(R) with time evolution under the influence of the resonance anionic Hamiltonian H(A(2) (-))(A(2) (-)=N(2)(-)/H(2) (-)) implemented using Lanczos and fast Fourier transforms. The target (A(2)) vibrational eigenfunctions phi(nu(i))(R) and phi(nu(f))(R) are calculated using Fourier grid Hamiltonian method applied to potential energy (PE) curves of the neutral target. Application of this simple systematization to calculate vibrational structure in e-N(2) and e-H(2) scattering cross-sections provides mechanistic insights into features underlying presence/absence of structure in e-N(2) and e-H(2) scattering cross-sections. The results obtained with approximate PE curves are in reasonable agreement with experimental/calculated cross-section profiles, and cross correlation functions provide a simple demarcation between the boomerang and impulse models.

  14. Summary Report of the Technical Meeting on Inelastic Scattering and Capture Cross-section Data of Major Actinides in the Fast Neutron Region

    Plompen, Arjan; Kawano, Toshihiko; Capote Noy, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Recently, tight target uncertainties on the capture and inelastic scattering data for major actinides were derived from advanced reactor sensitivity studies. A Technical Meeting on 'Inelastic Scattering and Capture Cross-section Data of Major Actinides in the Fast Neutron Region' was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria to review the status of nuclear data libraries for these cross sections, the status of the experimental results by which these can be tested and to evaluate what advances in nuclear modeling and measurement technique may bring to improve the knowledge of these cross sections. The participants compared recent evaluations with various modeling approaches that have not yet been adopted in data libraries. Several points of interest were found. First, different evaluations may show very similar performance for macroscopic benchmarks. Second, recent modeling improvements from different communities and using different codes tend to converge on the principles in the case of coupled channel calculations. In particular, it was shown that meaningful results require convergence with respect to the number of coupled channels and the use of the dispersive coupled channels potential based with an isospin dependent term to treat neutrons and protons in a coherent manner appears to be uncontested. Also, the issue regarding the use of transmission coefficients from coupled channels calculations in the Hauser Feshbach model was tackled. Recent and ongoing experimental efforts were presented for capture and inelastic scattering on the major actinides. Results from these are likely to become available in a period from 2 to 5 years. A discussion on the representation of the data in EXFOR revealed that care must be taken interpreting the numbers given in the case of inelastic scattering. It has been a long time since capture data were obtained for fissile nuclei and it is exciting to find new efforts are being considered at LANL, CERN and CENBG/IRMM. It was finally

  15. Solid State Track Recorder fission rate measurements at high neutron fluence and high temperature

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.

    1985-01-01

    Solid State Track Recorder (SSTR) techniques have been used to measure 239-Pu, 235-U, and 237-Np fission rates for total neutron fluences approaching 5 x 10 17 n/cm 2 at temperatures in the range 680 to 830 0 F. Natural quartz crystal SSTRs were used to withstand the high temperature environment and ultra low-mass fissionable deposits of the three isotopes were required to yield scannable track densities at the high neutron fluences. The results of these high temperature, high neutron fluence measurements are reported

  16. Investigation of the leading and subleading high-energy behavior of hadron-hadron total cross sections using a best-fit analysis of hadronic scattering data

    Giordano, M.; Meggiolaro, E.; Silva, P. V. R. G.

    2017-08-01

    In the present investigation we study the leading and subleading high-energy behavior of hadron-hadron total cross sections using a best-fit analysis of hadronic scattering data. The parametrization used for the hadron-hadron total cross sections at high energy is inspired by recent results obtained by Giordano and Meggiolaro [J. High Energy Phys. 03 (2014) 002, 10.1007/JHEP03(2014)002] using a nonperturbative approach in the framework of QCD, and it reads σtot˜B ln2s +C ln s ln ln s . We critically investigate if B and C can be obtained by means of best-fits to data for proton-proton and antiproton-proton scattering, including recent data obtained at the LHC, and also to data for other meson-baryon and baryon-baryon scattering processes. In particular, following the above-mentioned nonperturbative QCD approach, we also consider fits where the parameters B and C are set to B =κ Bth and C =κ Cth, where Bth and Cth are universal quantities related to the QCD stable spectrum, while κ (treated as an extra free parameter) is related to the asymptotic value of the ratio σel/σtot. Different possible scenarios are then considered and compared.

  17. Differential electron scattering cross sections for the 3 (2)S to 3 (2)P0 h, k transitions in Mg II - Comparison of experiment and theory

    Williams, I. D.; Chutjian, A.; Msezane, A. Z.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Angular differential electron scattering cross sections are reported for the unresolved inelastic 3s (2)S to 3p (2)P0 h, k transitions in Mg II for the first time. Relative differential cross sections have been measured at 35 eV and 50 eV in the angular range of Theta between 6 and 17 deg using the newly developed electron energy loss technique in a crossed electron-ion beam geometry. Theoretical values have been calculated in a five-state close-coupling approximation in which 3s, 3p, 3d, 4s, and 4p states were included, and to which measurements were normalized at Theta = 12 deg.

  18. Measurement of the muon antineutrino double-differential cross section for quasielastic-like scattering on hydrocarbon at Eν˜3.5 GeV

    Patrick, C. E.; Aliaga, L.; Bashyal, A.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Caceres v., G. F. R.; Carneiro, M. F.; Chavarria, E.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Gran, R.; Han, J. Y.; Harris, D. A.; Henry, S.; Hurtado, K.; Jena, D.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Lu, X.-G.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; McFarland, K. S.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nowak, G. M.; Nuruzzaman, Paolone, V.; Perdue, G. N.; Peters, E.; Ramírez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Sultana, M.; Sánchez Falero, S.; Teklu, A. M.; Valencia, E.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Yaeggy, B.; Zhang, D.; Miner ν A Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    We present double-differential measurements of antineutrino charged-current quasielastic scattering in the MINERvA detector. This study improves on a previous single-differential measurement by using updated reconstruction algorithms and interaction models and provides a complete description of observed muon kinematics in the form of a double-differential cross section with respect to muon transverse and longitudinal momentum. We include in our signal definition zero-meson final states arising from multinucleon interactions and from resonant pion production followed by pion absorption in the primary nucleus. We find that model agreement is considerably improved by a model tuned to MINERvA inclusive neutrino scattering data that incorporates nuclear effects such as weak nuclear screening and two-particle, two-hole enhancements.

  19. High resolution measurements of the He-He total scattering cross section for reduced collision energies between 0.2 and 200

    Feltgen, R.; Koehler, K.A.; Pauly, H.; Torello, F.; Vehmeyer, H.

    1974-01-01

    The energy dependence of the total scattering cross section is measured for the isotopic systems He 4 -He 4 and He 3 -He 3 using a velocity selected He primary beam and a He target in a scattering chamber maintained at 1.57 deg K. In the low energy region both systems show a pronounced atomic Ramsauer-Townsend effect. At higher energies 13 backward glory extrema in the case of He 4 -He 4 and 10 extrema for He 3 -He 3 are observed. From these extrema the energy dependence of the s-phase shift can be derived. Applying the semiclassical inversion method proposed by Miller it is possible to compute the repulsive potential in the energy range of the measurement

  20. The Structure of Nuclei Joint Analysis of Elastic, Inelastic Scattering and Total Reactions Cross-Sections for ^{90,94}Zr-Particles Data

    Duysebaev, A D; Kuchtina, I N; Sadykov, B M; Slusarenko, L I; Tokarevsky, V V; Fayans, S A

    2001-01-01

    A complex analysis of experimental data of elastic, inelastic scattering and total reactions cross-sections of alpha-particles on ^{90,94}Zr nuclei is performed. Values of the deformation lengths and neutron-proton multipole matrix elements relations for 2_{1}^{+}- and 3_{1}^{+}-states of ^{90,92,94,96}Zr nuclei for different types of particles are obtained. A comparative analysis is made. Experimental data for inelastic scattering of 35.4, 40.0, 50.1 and 65.0 MeV alpha-particles on ^{90,94}Zr nuclei are analysed for understanding the phase shifts in frames of the unified approach.

  1. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Cross Sections of Cu-63 and Cu-65 in the Energy Region 0.7 to 1.4 MeV

    Holmqvist, B; Wiedling, T

    1964-08-15

    The gamma ray spectra from, the {sup 63}Cu (n, n'{gamma}) and {sup 65}Cu (n, n'{gamma}) reactions have been studied for seven neutron energies in the energy range 0.7 - 1.4 MeV using a Nal(Tl) scintillation spectrometer and time-of-flight techniques. Scatterers of natural copper have been used. Experimental excitation curves have been obtained for the two lowest excited levels in each of the Cu and Cu isotopes. The experimental (n, n') cross sections for the individual levels at 668 keV and 961 keV in {sup 63}Cu and 764 keV and 1114 keV in {sup 65}Cu have been compared to a modified Hauser-Feshbach theory for inelastic neutron scattering. This experiment has confirmed by other methods determined spins of these levels, i.e. 1/2{sup -} and 5/2{sup -} respectively.

  2. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton-proton elastic scattering at small angles, using ANKE-COSY facility

    Bagdasarian, Zara [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The most accepted approach to describe nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction is the partial wave analysis (PWA). The goal of many experiments held at COSY-Juelich has been to provide PWA with valuable precision measurements at different energies aiming to cover the full angular range. This contribution reports on the differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering that has been measured at a beam energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV at centre-of-mass angles between about 10 and 30 degrees. The ANKE collaboration and the COSY machine crew have jointly developed a very accurate method for determining the absolute luminosity in an experiment at an internal target position. The technique relies on measuring the energy losses due to the electromagnetic interactions of the beam as it passes repeatedly through the thin target and measuring the shift of the revolution frequency by studying the Schottky spectrum. This powerful technique allows one to measure the absolute differential cross section for elastic pp scattering with the accuracy of typically 3%. After extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations. Finally, it is shown that the data have a significant impact on the partial wave analysis.

  3. Study of elastic pion scattering from /sup 9/Be, /sup 28/Si, /sup 58/Ni, and /sup 208/Pb at 162 MeV. [Total and differential cross sections, scattering yields, scattering amplitudes

    Devereux, M.J.

    1979-05-01

    Elastic pion scattering from /sup 9/Be, /sup 28/Si, /sup 58/Ni, and /sup 208/Pb at 162 MeV is analyzed and compared with an optical model theory which incorporates a pion--nucleon range. Excellent fits to the data are obtained in all but one case. The fitted values of the pion--nucleon range, as well as other fitted values are listed. 108 references.

  4. State-to-state integral cross sections for the inelastic scattering of CH(X 2Pi)+He: Rotational rainbow and orbital alignment

    Macdonald, R.G.; Liu, K.

    1989-01-01

    The state-to-state integral cross sections for the inelastic scattering of CH(X 2 Pi) with He were measured in a newly constructed crossed molecular beam machine. Use of laser-induced fluorescence in an unconventional flux mode of detection provided single fine-structure state specific detection of the products. Two types of measurements were performed to further our understanding of the collision dynamics of open shell systems: (1) the product state distribution at a fixed and well-defined collision energy and (2) the dependence on collision energy of product state-resolved cross sections. A qualitative understanding of the collision dynamics can be obtained by properly factoring out features dependent on the fine-structure states, i.e., effects involving individual Λ-doublet states and features dependent on the rotational level alone, i.e., effects remaining after summing over all four fine-structure states associated with a given rotational quantum number. As for the fine-structure effects, a preferential population of product Λ-doublet states with reflection symmetry Pi(A'') was observed. The physical origin of this observed electronic orbital alignment can be attributed to a quantum interference phenomenon, as detailed in the accompanying paper. At the rotational level, the dominance of rotational rainbow scattering is unambiguously identified from both the existence of dynamical thresholds and a strong correlation between rotational level distributions at fixed translational energy and level specific excitation functions. These effects combined with other experimental observations lead us to visualize the CH+He scattering dynamics in a novel fashion. The collision can be regarded as a series of approximately independent sequential events each mediated by different regions of the interaction potential during the course of the whole encounter

  5. Measurements of cross-section of charge current inclusive of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using carbon, iron, lead and scintillator at MINER$\

    Rakotondravohitra, Laza [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Neutrino physics is one of the most active fields in the domaine of high energy physics during the last century. The need of precise measurement of neutrino-nucleus interactions required by the neutrino oscillation experiments is a an exiting step. These measurements of cross-section are more than essential for neutrino oscillation experiment. Over the year, many measurements from varieties of experiments have been presented. MINERνA is one of the world leaders in measuring cross-section of neutrino and antineutrino -nucleus interactions. MINERνA is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment installed in the few-GeV NuMI beam line at Fermilab. In order to study nuclear dependence, MINERνA is endowed with different types of solid nuclear targets as well are liquid targets such as helium and water. This thesis presents measurements of cross-section of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using a variety of solid nuclear targets, carbon, iron, lead and also polystyrene scintillator (CH). The data set of antineutrino used for this analysis was taken between March and July 2010 with a total of 1.60X1020 protons on target. Charged current inclusive interactions were selected by requiring a positive muon and kinematics limitation of acceptance of the muon spectrometer are applied. The analysis requires neutrino energy between 2GeV et 20GeV and the angle of muon θmu < 17degree . The absolute cross-section # as function of neutrino energy and the differential cross-section dσ/ dxbj measured and shown the corresponding systematics for each nuclear targets. Data results are compared with prediction of the models implemented in the neutrino events generators GENIE 2.6.2 used by the experiment.

  6. Measurement of asymmetries and differential cross sections in antiproton-proton elastic scattering at momenta between 497 and 1550 MeV/c

    Kunne, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    An intermediate energy antiproton proton (anti pp) elastic scattering experiment is described. The data comprise a set of 15 measurements of the differential cross section and the asymmetry between 497 and 1550 MeV/c antiproton momentum. The measurements were carried out using the high quality antiproton beam provided by the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. A conventional polarized target was used, consisting of pentanol. The motivation for the measurements is the study of the anti pp interaction by providing data on the spin observable A on in a momentum range where it has never been measured before. 56 refs.; 55 figs.; 40 tabs

  7. Measurement of the D*± meson production cross section and F2cantic at high Q2 in ep scattering at HERA

    Brinkmann, Martin

    2010-04-01

    The inclusive production cross section of D *± (2010) mesons in deep-inelastic e ± p scattering is measured in the kinematic region of photon virtuality 100 2 2 and inelasticity 0.02 * meson production are measured in the visible range defined by vertical stroke η(D * ) vertical stroke T (D * )>1.5 GeV. The data were collected by the H1 experiment during the period from 2004 to 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 351 pb -1 . The charm contribution, F 2 c anti c , to the proton structure function F 2 is determined. The measurements are compared with QCD predictions. (orig.)

  8. Measurement of the cross-section ratio σn/σp in inelastic muon-nucleon scattering at very low x and Q2

    Papavassiliou, V.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented on the measurement of the cross-section ratio σ n /σ p inelastic μN scattering obtained by the E-665 experiment using the Fermilab 490 GeV/c muon beam and liquid H 2 and D 2 targets. The results extend the previously measured x range by two orders of magnitude, down to 2 x 10 -5 , at Q 2 > 10 -2 GeV 2 /C 2 . The ratio is consistent with 1 throughout the new range

  9. Elastic Scattering and Total Cross-Section in p+p reactions measured by the LHC Experiment TOTEM at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    Collaboration, T. Csörgő for the TOTEM; :; Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Atanassov, I.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Bozzo, M.; Brogi, P.; Brücken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured by the TOTEM experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at $\\sqrt{s} = 7 $ TeV in special runs with the Roman Pot detectors placed as close to the outgoing beam as seven times the transverse beam size. The differential cross-section measurements are reported in the |t|-range of 0.36 to 2.5 GeV^2. Extending the range of data to low t values from 0.02 to 0.33 GeV^2,and utilizing the luminosity measurements of CMS, the total proton-proton cros...

  10. Regularized unfolding of jet cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA and determination of the strong coupling constant

    Britzger, Daniel Andreas

    2013-10-01

    In this thesis double-differential cross sections for jet production in neutral current deep-inelastic e ± p scattering (DIS) are presented at the center-of-mass energy of √(s)=319 GeV, and in the kinematic range of the squared four-momentum transfer 150 2 2 and the inelasticity 0.2 T -algorithm and are constrained to the pseudorapidity range -1.0 lab jet T jet T jet s (M Z ) at the scale of the mass of the Z 0 boson in the framework of perturbative quantum chromodynamics in next-to-leading order. Values are derived separately for the absolute and normalized jet cross section measurements. A higher sensitivity to α s (M Z ) is obtained in a simultaneous least-square-minimization procedure to the three jet cross sections, taking the statistical correlations and correlations due to other experimental uncertainties into account. The most precise value is obtained from all normalized jet cross sections, yielding α s (M Z )=0.1165±0.0008, which benefits from the high statistical precision of the inclusive jet measurement, the increased sensitivity to α s (M Z ) of the trijet cross section, and from the cancellation of normalization uncertainties. However, the value of the strong coupling constant is currently only determinable from this measurement with a precision of 3 to 4% due to the limited precision of the theoretical predictions at next-to-leading order.

  11. Definition and calculation of bottom quark cross-sections in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA and De termination of their uncertainties

    Carli, T. E-mail: tancredi.carli@cern.ch; Chiochia, V.; Klimek, K

    2003-09-01

    The uncertainties involved in the calculation of bottom quark cross-sections in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA are studied in different phase space regions. Besides the inclusive bottom quark cross-section, definitions closer to the detector acceptance requiring at least one high energetic muon from the semi-leptonic bottom quark decay or a jet with high transverse energy are investigated. For each case the uncertainties due to the choice of the renormalisation and factorisation scale as well as the bottom quark mass are estimated in the perturbative NLO QCD calculation and furthermore uncertainties in the fragmentation of the bottom quark to a B-meson and in its semi-leptonic decay are discussed. (author)

  12. Definition and calculation of bottom quark cross-sections in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA and determination of their uncertainties

    Carli, T.; Chiochia, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Klimek, K. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik

    2003-05-01

    The uncertainties involved in the calculation of bottom quark (b-quark) cross-sections in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA are studied in different phase space regions. Besides the inclusive b-quark cross-section, definitions closer to the detector acceptance requiring at least one high energetic muon from the semi-leptonic b-quark decay or a jet with high transverse energy are investigated. For each case the uncertainties due to the choice of the renormalisation and factorisation scale as well as the b-quark mass are estimated in the perturbative NLO QCD calculation and furthermore uncertainties in the fragmentation of the b-quark to a B-meson and in its semi-leptonic decay are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Elastic Scattering and Total Cross-Section in p+p reactions as measured by the LHC Experiment TOTEM at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    Csörgö, Tamás; Aspell, P; Atanassov, I; Avati, V; Baechler, J; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Bossini, E; Bozzo, M; Brogi, P; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F S; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G; Covault, C; Csanád, M; Deile, M; Dimovasili, E; Doubek, M; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferretti, R; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; Garcia, F; Giani, S; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hilden, T; Intonti, M R; Janda, M; Kaspar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, T; Lippmaa, E; Lokajícek, M; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodríguez, F; Macrí, M; Magaletti, L; Magazzù, G; Mercadante, A; Meucci, M; Minutoli, S; Nemes, F; Niewiadomski, H; Noschis, E; Novák, T; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Palazzi, P; Perrot, A-L; Pedreschi, E; Petäjäjärvi, J; Procházka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Ruggiero, G; Saarikko, H; Sanguinetti, G; Santroni, A; Scribano, A; Sette, G; Snoeys, W; Spinella, F; Sziklai, J; Taylor, C; Turini, N; Vacek, V; Vítek, M; Welti, J; Whitmore, J

    2012-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured by the TOTEM experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at $\\sqrt{s} = 7 $ TeV in special runs with the Roman Pot detectors placed as close to the outgoing beam as seven times the transverse beam size. The differential cross-section measurements are reported in the |t|-range of 0.36 to 2.5 GeV$^2$. Extending the range of data to low t values from 0.02 to 0.33 GeV$^2$,and utilizing the luminosity measurements of CMS, the total proton-proton cross section at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV is measured to be $(98.3 \\pm 0.2^{stat} \\pm 2.8^{syst})$ mb.

  14. Elastic Scattering and Total Cross-Section in p+p Reactions --As Measured by the LHC Experiment TOTEM at √{s} = 7 TeV--

    Csörgő, T.; Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Atanassov, I.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Bozzo, M.; Brogi, P.; Brücken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F. S.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M. G.; Covault, C.; Csanád, M.; Deile, M.; Dimovasili, E.; Doubek, M.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Grzanka, L.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Intonti, M. R.; Janda, M.; Kašpar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrát, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leszko, T.; Lippmaa, E.; Lokajíček, M.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodríguez, F.; Macrí, M.; Magaletti, L.; Magazzù, G.; Mercadante, A.; Meucci, M.; Minutoli, S.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Noschis, E.; Novák, T.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Österberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Perrot, A.-L.; Pedreschi, E.; PetäJäjärvi, J.; Procházka, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Sanguinetti, G.; Santroni, A.; Scribano, A.; Sette, G.; Snoeys, W.; Spinella, F.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Vítek, M.; Welti, J.; Whitmore, J.; Totem Collaboration

    Proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured by the TOTEMexperiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at √{s} = 7 TeV in special runs with the Roman Pot detectors placed as close to the outgoing beam as seven times the transverse beam size. The differential cross-section measurements are reported in the |t|-range of 0.36 to 2.5 GeV^{2}. Extending the range of data to low t values from 0.02 to 0.33 GeV^2, and utilizing the luminosity measurements of CMS, the total proton-proton cross section at √{s} = 7 TeV is measured to be (98.3 ± 0.2^{stat} ± 2.8^{syst}) mb.

  15. Measurement of doubly differential collision cross-sections for double-photon Compton scattering of 0.662 MeV gamma rays

    Datta, Gulshan; Saddi, M.B.; Singh, B.; Sandhu, B.S.

    2007-01-01

    The doubly differential collision cross-sections of the double-photon Compton process have been measured experimentally for 0.662 MeV incident gamma photons. The measurements are carried out using a single gamma detector, a technique avoiding the use of the complicated slow-fast coincidence set-up used till now for observing this higher order QED process. The energy spectra of detected photons are observed as a long tail to the single-photon Compton line on the lower side of the full energy peak in the recorded scattered energy spectrum. The measured values of the cross-section for different independent energy levels of one of the two final photons are of the same magnitude but show deviation from the corresponding values obtained from the theory. However, the present measurements are first of its kind and in view of the nature and order of deviations, the agreement of measured values with theory is quite satisfactory

  16. Measurement of neutral current deep inelastic e{sup +}p scattering cross sections with longitudinally polarized positrons with ZEUS at HERA

    Wlasenko, Michal

    2009-05-15

    Measurements of neutral current deep inelastic scattering of protons colliding with longitudinally polarized positrons, performed with data recorded in years 2006 and 2007 with the ZEUS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L=113.3 pb{sup -1}, are presented. The single-differential cross sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx, d{sigma}/dy and the double-differential reduced cross section {sigma} were measured in the kinematic region of 185

  17. Electron-neutral scattering cross sections for CO2: a complete and consistent set and an assessment of dissociation

    Grofulović, Marija; Alves, Luís L; Guerra, Vasco

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes a complete and consistent set of cross sections for electron collisions with carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) molecules to be published in the IST-Lisbon database with LXCat. The set is validated from the comparison between swarm parameters calculated using a two-term Boltzmann solver and the available experimental data. The importance of superelastic collisions with CO 2 (0 1 0) molecules at low values of the reduced electric field is discussed. Due to significant uncertainties, there are ongoing debates regarding the deconvolution of cross sections that describe generic energy losses at specific energy thresholds into cross sections that describe individual processes. An important example of these uncertainties is with the dissociation of CO 2 , for which the total electron impact dissociation cross section has not yet been unambiguously identified. The available dissociation cross sections are evaluated and discussed, and a strategy to obtain electron-impact dissociation rate coefficients is suggested. (paper)

  18. Improved cross-calibration of Thomson scattering and electron cyclotron emission with ECH on DIII-D

    Brookman, M. W., E-mail: brookmanmw@fusion.gat.com [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Austin, M. E.; McLean, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Livermore, California 94500 (United States); Carlstrom, T. N.; Hyatt, A. W.; Lohr, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92122 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Thomson scattering produces n{sub e} profiles from measurement of scattered laser beam intensity. Rayleigh scattering provides a first calibration of the relation n{sub e} ∝ I{sub TS}, which depends on many factors (e.g., laser alignment and power, optics, and measurement systems). On DIII-D, the n{sub e} calibration is adjusted against an absolute n{sub e} from the density-driven cutoff of the 48 channel 2nd harmonic X-mode electron cyclotron emission system. This method has been used to calibrate Thomson n{sub e} from the edge to near the core (r/a > 0.15). Application of core electron cyclotron heating improves the quality of cutoff and depth of its penetration into the core, and also changes underlying MHD activity, minimizing crashes which confound calibration. Less fueling is needed as “ECH pump-out” generates a plasma ready to take up gas. On removal of gyrotron power, cutoff penetrates into the core as channels fall successively and smoothly into cutoff.

  19. Evolution from the coplanar to the perpendicular plane geometry of helium (e,2e) differential cross sections symmetric in scattering angle and energy

    Murray, A.J.; Read, F.H.

    1993-01-01

    Experimentally determined differential cross sections are presented for the (e,2e) process in helium, in which the two outgoing electrons have the same energy and the same scattering angle with respect to the incident beam. At four incident energies from 20 to 50 eV above the ionization threshold the detection plane defined by the outgoing electrons was varied from being coplanar with the incident beam to being perpendicular to the beam. The differential cross section evolves from a two-peak structure in coplanar geometry to a three-peak structure in the perpendicular plane. At the lowest energy the forward-scattering coplanar peak is smaller than the backscatter peak, in contrast to the results at higher energies. A deep minimum is seen at an intermediate plane angle of 67.5 degree, this minimum being deepest at 40 eV above the ionization threshold. The results are normalized to an absolute scale using previous coplanar measurements as discussed in the text. The spectrometer used to collect these results is fully computer controlled and real-time computer optimized

  20. The differential cross section and polarization for the elastic scattering of 2.9 MeV neutrons by Fe, Cu, I, Hg and Pb

    Galloway, R.B.; Waheed, A.

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements are presented of the angular dependence of polarization due to elastic scattering and of the elastic differential cross section for 2.9 MeV neutrons. The angular range covered is 20 0 to 160 0 for samples of Fe, Cu, I, Hg and Pb. The measurements are compared with the results of combining optical model and Hauser-Feshbach calculations. The optical model calculations were performed using 'global fit' parameters as well as with parameters suggested previously for the particular nuclei. The Hauser-Feshbach calculations were performed both with and without the level width fluctuation correction. It is clear that the calculations made without the level width fluctuation correction provide a better fit to the data for Fe, Cu, I and Hg and only for Pb does inclusion of the level width fluctuation correction provide a better fit. These optical model parameter sets are shown not to be very successful in fitting both differential cross-section and polarization data. The results of searches for the parameters which give the best fit for the data are presented. These parameter sets are compared with one another and with the results of 8 and 11 MeV neutron scattering studies for trends in the variation of the parameters. (Auth.)

  1. Measurements of prompt fission neutron spectra and double-differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections for 238U and 232Th

    Baba, Mamoru; Itoh, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuto; Hirakawa, Naohiro; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka.

    1989-10-01

    This report presents the summary of experimental studies of prompt fission neutron spectra and double-differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections of 238 U and 232 Th. The experiments were performed at Tohoku University Fast Neutron Laboratory employing a time-of-flight technique and Dynamitron accelerator as the pulsed neutron generator. From the experiments, we obtained the following data for both nuclei; 1. prompt fission neutron spectrum for 2 MeV neutrons, 2. double-differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections for 1.2, 2.0, 4.2, 6.1 and 14.1 MeV incident neutrons. Both in experiments and data processing, cares were taken to obtain reliable data by avoiding systematic uncertainty. The experimental data were compared with those by other experiments, evaluations and model calculations. Through the data comparison, some fundamental problems were found in the experiments by previous authors and the evaluations. The present data will provide useful data base for refinement of the evaluated data and theoretical models. (author)

  2. Measurements of differential cross sections with electrons of intermediate energy (300-1000 eV) scattered by atom and molecule

    Barbieri, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    Differential Elastic Cross Sections for electrons scattered by osub(2) and Ar in the angular range 5 sup(0)- 140 sup(0) were measured in the energy range between 300 and 1000 eV. The Relative Flow Technique proposed by SRIVASTAVA et alii (1975) was used. Absolute Differential Elastic Cross Section data from DuBOIS and RUDD (1976) for Nsub(2) were stablished as a secondary standard. Our obtained results for Ar at 400, 800 and 1000 eV were compared against experimental and theoretical results available in the literature. For molecular Oxygen at 300, 400, 800 and 1000 eV our experimental data were compared with values from other authors and also theoretical values from Independent Atom Model including Multiple Intramolecular Scattering. Results for Ar at 1000 eV in the angular range between 60 sup(0) and 140 sup(0) and for osub(2) at 800 and 100 eV, between 5 sup(0) and 120 sup(0), were reported for the first time. (author)

  3. Determination of the total cross section in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at √(s) = 8 TeV from elastic scattering using the ALFA sub-detector of ATLAS

    Heinz, Christian; Dueren, Michael; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Stenzel, Hasko [JLU Giessen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The ALFA (Absolute Luminosity for ATLAS) Roman Pot detector system is part of the forward instrumentation of ATLAS located about 240 m away from the interaction point in the LHC tunnel. ALFA consists of a scintillating fibre tracker housed in vertical Roman Pots which enables the measurement of elastic proton-proton scattering at small scattering angles. In 2012 data were recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of √(s) = 8 TeV during a fill with special beam optics of the LHC with β* = 90 m and parallel-to-point focusing. The four-momentum transfer t is measured for elastically scattered protons and the differential elastic cross section is measured. In this talk a preliminary determination of the total cross section and of the slope of the elastic cross section at small vertical stroke t vertical stroke obtained from a fit to the differential cross section using the optical theorem is reported.

  4. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics; Max-Planck-Inst., Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (PL). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] (and others)

    2010-08-15

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e{sup +}p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 132 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is presented at positive and negative values of the longitudinal polarisation of the positron beams. The single-differential cross sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy are presented for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}. The reduced cross-section {sigma} is presented in the kinematic range 200

  5. H + H2 on LEPS and Porter-Karplus surfaces;Quasiclassical differential cross sections for reactive scattering

    Jorgensen, A.D.; Gislason, E.A.; Hillenbrand, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    The reactive differential cross section is determined by the use of a fourier sine series for the H + H 2 reaction on the Porter Karplus and LEPS surfaces. The A + BC program was used to run quasiclassical trajectories. Saddle-point properties are compared, including those for SLTH surfaces. The use of the Fourier sine series enables one to obtain very accurate differential cross sections, allowing precise comparison of the reaction dynamics on different potential energy surfaces and at different energies

  6. BARC 75 - A 75 group neutron-photon coupled cross-section library with P5- anisotropic scattering matrices

    Garg, S.B.

    1990-01-01

    A 75 group neutron-photon coupled cross-section library has been developed for 42 reactor nuclides utilizing the basic cross-section files - ENDF/B-IV for neutrons and DLC-7F for photons. 50 neutron energy groups and gamma energy groups are included in this library which should be well suited to carry out safety, shielding and core physics studies of nuclear reactors based on fission or fusion processes. This library is also adequate for oil logging and mineral exploration investigations. (author). 11 refs., 3 tabs

  7. Neutron scattering and magnetism

    Mackintosh, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Those properties of the neutron which make it a unique tool for the study of magnetism are described. The scattering of neutrons by magnetic solids is briefly reviewed, with emphasis on the information on the magnetic structure and dynamics which is inherent in the scattering cross-section. The contribution of neutron scattering to our understanding of magnetic ordering, excitations and phase transitions is illustrated by experimental results on a variety of magnetic crystals. (author)

  8. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e-p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-12-01

    Measurements of the neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e - p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised electron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy and the double-differential cross sections in Q 2 and x are measured in the kinematic region y 2 > 185GeV 2 for both positively and negatively polarised electron beams and for each polarisation state separately. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 169.9 pb -1 taken with the ZEUS detector in 2005 and 2006 at a centre-of-mass energy of 318GeV. The structure functions xF 3 and xF 3 γZ are determined by combining the e - p results presented in this paper with previously measured e + p neutral current data. The asymmetry parameter A - is used to demonstrate the parity violating effects of electroweak interactions at large spacelike photon virtuality. The measurements agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  9. Combination of differential D{sup ∗±} cross-section measurements in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Abramowicz, H. [Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Adamus, M. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Collaboration: The H1 and ZEUS collaboration; and others

    2015-09-22

    H1 and ZEUS have published single-differential cross sections for inclusive D{sup ∗±}-meson production in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from their respective final data sets. These cross sections are combined in the common visible phase-space region of photon virtuality Q{sup 2}>5 GeV{sup 2}, electron inelasticity 0.021.5 GeV and pseudorapidity |η(D{sup ∗})|<1.5. The combination procedure takes into account all correlations, yielding significantly reduced experimental uncertainties. Double-differential cross sections d{sup 2}σ/dQ{sup 2}dy are combined with earlier D{sup ∗±} data, extending the kinematic range down to Q{sup 2}>1.5 GeV{sup 2}. Perturbative next-to-leading-order QCD predictions are compared to the results.

  10. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} neutral current deep inelastic e{sup -}p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    Measurements of the neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e{sup -}p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised electron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy and the double-differential cross sections in Q{sup 2} and x are measured in the kinematic region y < 0.9 and Q{sup 2} > 185GeV{sup 2} for both positively and negatively polarised electron beams and for each polarisation state separately. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 169.9 pb{sup -1} taken with the ZEUS detector in 2005 and 2006 at a centre-of-mass energy of 318GeV. The structure functions xF{sub 3} and xF{sub 3}{sup {gamma}}{sup Z} are determined by combining the e{sup -}p results presented in this paper with previously measured e{sup +}p neutral current data. The asymmetry parameter A{sup -} is used to demonstrate the parity violating effects of electroweak interactions at large spacelike photon virtuality. The measurements agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of the Cross Section for High-$p_T$ Hadron Production in Scattering of 160 GeV/c Muons off Nucleons

    Adolph, C; Alexakhin, V Yu; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Antonov, A A; Austregesilo, A; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Baum, G; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bertini, R; Bettinelli, M; Bicker, K; Bieling, J; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Braun, C; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Burtin, E; Chiosso, M; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Das, S; Dasgupta, S S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dünnweber, W; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Elia, C; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Filin, A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; du Fresne von Hoheneschedu, N; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gnesi, I; Gobbo, B; Goertz, S; Grabmüller, S; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Gushterski, R; Guskov, A; Guthörl, T; Haas, F; von Harrach, D; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hess, C; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; Höppner, Ch; d'Hose, N; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, O; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jary, V; Jasinski, P; Joosten, R; Kabuss, E; Kang, D; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koblitz, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Königsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Korzenev, A; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Krämer, M; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuhn, R; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Lauser, L; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Liska, T; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Mann, A; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matsuda, T; Meshcheryakov, G; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Moinester, M A; Morreale, A; Mutter, A; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Negrini, T; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Nowak, W -D; Nunes, A S; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Padee, A; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Perevalova, E; Pesaro, G; Peshekhonov, D V; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polak, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Quaresma, M; Quintans, C; Rajotte, J -F; Ramos, S; Rapatsky, V; Reicherz, G; Richter, A; Rocco, E; Rondio, E; Rossiyskaya, N S; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Sapozhnikov, M G; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schlüter, T; Schmidt, K; Schmitt, L; Schönning, K; Schopferer, S; Schott, M; Schröder, W; Shevchenko, O Yu; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sissakian, A N; Slunecka, M; Smirnov, G I; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Steiger, L; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Sznajder, P; Takekawa, S; Ter Wolbeek, J; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Tkatchev, L G; Uhl, S; Uman, I; Vandenbroucke, M; Virius, M; Vlassov, N V; Wang, L; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zhuravlev, N; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The cross section for production of charged hadrons with high transverse momenta in scattering of 160 GeV/c muons off nucleons at low photon virtualities has been measured at the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The results, which cover transverse momenta from 1.1 to 3.6 GeV/c, are compared to a next-to-leading order perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (NLO pQCD) calculation in order to evaluate the applicability of pQCD to this process in the kinematic domain of the experiment. The shape of the calculated differential cross section as a function of transverse momentum is found to be in good agreement with the experimental data, but the normalization is underestimated by NLO pQCD. This discrepancy may point towards the relevance of terms beyond NLO in the pQCD framework. The dependence of the cross section on the pseudo-rapidity and on the charge of the hadrons is also discussed.

  12. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} neutral current deep inelastic e{sup +}p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] [and others; Collaboration: ZEUS Collaboration

    2012-08-15

    Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e{sup +}p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy and the reduced cross-section {sigma} were measured in the kinematic region Q{sup 2}>185 GeV{sup 2} and y<0.9, where Q{sup 2} is the four-momentum transfer squared, x the Bjorken scaling variable, and y the inelasticity of the interaction. The measurements were performed separately for positively and negatively polarised positron beams. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 135.5 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007 at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions F{sub 3} and F{sup {gamma}Z}{sub 3} were determined by combining the e{sup +}p results presented in this paper with previously published e{sup -}p neutral current results. The asymmetry parameter A{sup +} is used to demonstrate the parity violation predicted in electroweak interactions. The measurements are well described by the predictions of the Standard Model.

  13. Reaction cross sections and elastic scattering energy dependence around the Coulomb barrier for the {sup 7}Be+{sup 27}Al system

    Morcelle, Viviane; Gomes, P.R.S.; Lubian, J.; Mendes Junior, D.R. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Lichtenthaeler, R.; Guimaraes, V.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Camargo, O.; Faria, P.N. de; Gasquez, L.; Morais, M.C.; Condori, R.P.; Pires, K.C.C.; Scarduelli, V. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Barioni, A. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Shorto, J.M.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zamora, J.C. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Aguilera, E.; Martinez-Quiroz, E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico); Kolata, J.; Jiang, H. [University of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Bechetti, F.D.; Lamm, L.O. [Michigan University, MI (United States); Lizcano, D. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Elastic scattering measurements were performed at energies around the Coulomb barrier at the Tandem Accelerators of the Sao Paulo (USP - Brazil ) and Notre Dame (UND - USA) Universities. The {sup 7}Be is a radioactive nucleus and has been produced by the reaction {sup 6}He({sup 6}Li,{sup 9}Be) and impinged on {sup 27}Al and {sup 197}Au secondary targets using a double superconducting systems RIBRAS ( USP ) and Twinsol (UND). The elastic scattering angular distributions were analyzed through the optical model calculations, using the Woods- Saxon form factors [1] and the Sao Paulo potential [2] to fit the experimental data. The total reaction cross sections were also derived and compared with others presented at the literature for other systems. In addition, a study of the nuclear potential energy dependence has been carried out in this work in the dispersion relation context. Due to the fact that {sup 7}Be has a small breakup threshold energy, the results can provide significant information of the influence of the breakup channel on the reactions involving this projectile. For this purpose, {chi}{sup 2}- data analysis with different kind of potentials were performed to identify the energy dependence of the real (V) and imaginary (W) parts of the potential. [1] L.C. Chamon et al., Phys. Rev. C 66, (2002) 014610. [2] R.D. Wood e D.S. Saxon, Phys. Rev. 95 ( 1954) 577. (author)

  14. Tailoring surface plasmon resonance and dipole cavity plasmon modes of scattering cross section spectra on the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod

    Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Lim, Chee Ming; Kumara, N. T. R. N.; Yoong, Voo Nyuk; Lee, Chuanyo; Huang, Hung Ji; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2016-01-01

    Tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and dipole cavity plasmon modes of the scattering cross section (SCS) spectra on the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod have been numerically investigated by using the finite element method. Various effects, such as the influence of SCS spectra under x- and y-polarizations on the surface of the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod, are discussed in detail. With the single gold-shell nanorod, one can independently tune the relative SCS spectrum width by controlling the rod length and rod diameter, and the surface scattering by varying the shell thickness and polarization direction, as well as the dipole peak energy. These behaviors are consistent with the properties of localized SPRs and offer a way to optically control and produce selected emission wavelengths from the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod. The electric field and magnetic distributions provide us a qualitative idea of the geometrical properties of the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod on plasmon resonance.

  15. Low-momentum-transfer nonrelativistic limit of the relativistic impulse approximation expression for Compton-scattering doubly differential cross sections and characterization of their relativistic contributions

    LaJohn, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    The nonrelativistic (nr) impulse approximation (NRIA) expression for Compton-scattering doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) for inelastic photon scattering is recovered from the corresponding relativistic expression (RIA) of Ribberfors [Phys. Rev. B 12, 2067 (1975)] in the limit of low momentum transfer (q→0), valid even at relativistic incident photon energies ω 1 >m provided that the average initial momentum of the ejected electron i > is not too high, that is, i > b 1 >m using nr expressions when θ is small. For example, a 1% accuracy can be obtained when ω 1 =1 MeV if θ 1 increases into the MeV range, the maximum θ at which an accurate Compton peak can be obtained from nr expressions approaches closer to zero, because the θ at which the relativistic shift of CP to higher energy is greatest, which starts at 180 deg. when ω 1 min ,ρ rel ) (where p min is the relativistic version of the z component of the momentum of the initial electron and ρ rel is the relativistic charge density) and K(p min ) on p min . This characterization approach was used as a guide for making the nr QED S-matrix expression for the Compton peak kinematically relativistic. Such modified nr expressions can be more readily applied to large systems than the fully relativistic version.

  16. Electron scattering from pyrimidine

    Colmenares, Rafael; Fuss, Martina C; García, Gustavo; Oller, Juan C; Muñoz, Antonio; Blanco, Francisco; Almeida, Diogo; Limão-Vieira, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Electron scattering from pyrimidine (C 4 H 4 N 2 ) was investigated over a wide range of energies. Following different experimental and theoretical approaches, total, elastic and ionization cross sections as well as electron energy loss distributions were obtained.

  17. Influence of the ordered structure of short-chain polymer molecule all-trans-β-carotene on Raman scattering cross section in liquid

    Qu Guan-Nan; Li Zuo-Wei; Sun Cheng-Lin; Ou Yang Shun-Li; Wang Wei-Wei; Men Zhi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    We measured the resonant Raman spectra of all-trans-β-carotene in solvents with different densities and concentrations at different temperatures. The results demonstrated that the Raman scattering cross section (RSCS) of short-chain polymer all-trans-β-carotene is extremely high in liquid. Resonance and strong coherent weakly damped CC bond vibrating properties play important roles under these conditions. Coherent weakly damped CC bond vibration strength is associated with molecular ordered structure. All-trans-β-carotene has highly ordered structure and strong coherent weakly damped CC bond vibrating properties, which lead to large RSCS in the solvent with large density and low concentration at low temperature. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  18. Differential cross section measurements of the π-p elastic scattering in the Coulomb interference region between 30 and 140 GeV

    Ille, B.

    1979-01-01

    The differential cross section of elastic π - -p scattering in the Coulomb interference region from 30 GeV to 140 GeV has been measured at the CERN SPS using in conjunction an ionization chamber recoil spectrometer and a forward multiwire proportional chamber-magnet spectrometer. The phase of the π - -p forward hadronic amplitude was found to go four negative value (at 30 GeV) to positive value (at 140 GeV), passing through zero at about 60 GeV. The logarithmic slope at small /t/ (/t/ approximately 0.03 (GeV/c) 2 ) has also been measured and was found to be higher by about 3 (GeV/c) -2 than the values determined at higher /t/ (/t/ = 0.2 (GeV/c) 2 ) [fr

  19. Measurement of the Inclusive e{\\pm}p Scattering Cross Section at High Inelasticity y and of the Structure Function FL

    Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baghdasaryan, S; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Behrend, O; Belov, P; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, D; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bylinkin, A; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Ceccopieri, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dobre, M; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Grebenyuk, A; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C.W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Huber, F; Jacquet, M; Janssen, X; Jonsson, L; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Kretzschmar, J; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P.J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lipka, K; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Pahl, P; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pirumov, H; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Radescu, V; Raicevic, N; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P.C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sykora, T; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas, A; Vazdik, Y; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

    2011-01-01

    A measurement is presented of the inclusive neutral current e\\pm p scattering cross section using data collected by the H1 experiment at HERA during the years 2003 to 2007 with proton beam energies Ep of 920, 575, and 460 GeV. The kinematic range of the measurement covers low absolute four-momentum transfers squared, 1.5 GeV2 < Q2 < 120 GeV2, small values of Bjorken x, 2.9 \\cdot 10-5 < x < 0.01, and extends to high inelasticity up to y = 0.85. The structure function FL is measured by combining the new results with previously published H1 data at Ep = 920 GeV and Ep = 820 GeV. The new measurements are used to test several phenomenological and QCD models applicable in this low Q2 and low x kinematic domain.

  20. Measurement of the inclusive e±p scattering cross section at high inelasticity y and of the structure function FL

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kraemer, M.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; South, D.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas, A.; Driesch, M. von den; Wuensch, E.; Behrend, O.; Wegener, D.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Shushkevich, S.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Ceccopieri, F.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roosen, R.; Mechelen, P. van; Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Tsurin, I.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C.; Dobre, M.; List, B.; Placakyte, R.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Grab, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Radescu, V.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Stella, B.; Sykora, T.; Tsakov, I.

    2011-01-01

    A measurement is presented of the inclusive neutral current e ± p scattering cross section using data collected by the H1 experiment at HERA during the years 2003 to 2007 with proton beam energies E p of 920, 575, and 460 GeV. The kinematic range of the measurement covers low absolute four-momentum transfers squared, 1.5 GeV 2 2 2 , small values of Bjorken x, 2.9 .10 -5 L is measured by combining the new results with previously published H1 data at E p =920 GeV and E p =820 GeV. The new measurements are used to test several phenomenological and QCD models applicable in this low Q 2 and low x kinematic domain. (orig.)

  1. FORTRAN 4 programs for the extraction of potential well parameters from the energy dependence of total elastic scattering cross sections

    Labudde, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt has been made to keep the programs as subroutine oriented as possible. Usually only the main programs are directly concerned with the problem of total cross sections. In particular the subroutines POLFIT, BILINR, GASS59/MAXLIK, SYMOR, MATIN, STUDNT, DNTERP, DIFTAB, FORDIF, EPSALG, REGFAL and ADSIMP are completely general, and are concerned only with the problems of numerical analysis and statistics. Each subroutine is independently documented.

  2. Pulsed and monoenergetic beams for neutron cross-section measurements using activation and scattering techniques at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    Hutcheson, A. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)]. E-mail: hutch@tunl.duke.edu; Angell, C.T. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Becker, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Boswell, M. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Crowell, A.S. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Dashdorj, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Fallin, B. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Fotiades, N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Howell, C.R.; Karwowski, H.J.; Kelley, J.H.; Kiser, M. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Macri, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Nelson, R.O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Pedroni, R.S. [NC A and T State University, 1601 East Market Street, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Tonchev, A.P.; Tornow, W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Vieira, D.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Weisel, G.J. [Penn State Altoona, 3000 Ivyside Park, Altoona, PA 16601 (United States); Wilhelmy, J.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    In support of the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances initiative, an experimental program has been developed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure (n,xn) cross-sections with both in-beam and activation techniques with the goal of improving the partial cross-section database for the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. First experimental efforts include excitation function measurements on {sup 235,238}U and {sup 241}Am using pulsed and monoenergetic neutron beams with E {sub n} = 5-15 MeV. Neutron-induced partial cross-sections were measured by detecting prompt {gamma} rays from the residual nuclei using various combinations of clover and planar HPGe detectors in the TUNL shielded neutron source area. Complimentary activation measurements using DC neutron beams have also been performed in open geometry in our second target area. The neutron-induced activities were measured in the TUNL low-background counting area. In this presentation, we include detailed information about the irradiation procedures and facilities and preliminary data on first measurements using this capability.

  3. Deeply virtual compton scattering on the nucleon with the Clas Detector of Jefferson Lab: measurement of the polarized and unpolarized cross sections

    Jo, H.S.

    2007-03-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), introduced in the 1990's, provide the most complete description of the structure (in quarks and gluons) of the nucleon. The Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), which corresponds to the 'hard' exclusive electroproduction of photons on the nucleon, is a key process among the reactions allowing access to the GPDs. A DVCS-dedicated experiment was carried out in 2005 with the CLAS detector of Jefferson Lab, using a polarized electron beam of 5.776 GeV and a hydrogen target. For this experiment, we built and used a dedicated electromagnetic calorimeter capable of detecting the final-state photon. The collected data allowed us to study the DVCS in the widest kinematic range ever accessed for this reaction: 1 2 2 , 0.1 B 2 . The work performed during this PhD includes simulation work done for the preparation of the experiment, timing calibration of one of the CLAS subsystems, and data analysis. The aim of the data analysis was the extraction of the unpolarized cross sections of the studied reaction and of the difference of the polarized cross sections, this latter observable being linearly proportional to the GPDs. The obtained results were compared to DVCS theoretical calculations based on one of the most up-to-date GPD parametrizations. (author)

  4. New approximations for the interference term applied to the calculation of scattering cross section of the {sup 238} U isotope

    Palma, Daniel Artur Pinheiro [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Quimica de Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: dpalma@cefeteq.br; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Goncalves, Alessandro C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: agoncalves@con.ufrj.br; aquilino@lmp.ufrj.br

    2008-07-01

    The calculation of the Doppler broadening function and the interference term are very important in the generation of nuclear data. Recent papers have proposed analytical formulations for both functions and, despite their being simple and precise, they contain the error function with a complex argument. With the intention of simplifying the mathematical treatment two approximations are proposed in this paper. The first one consists of using an expansion in the form of series to treat the error function. The other approximation is based on simplifications in the differential equations that govern the Doppler broadening function. For validation purpose the result obtained is compared to the one obtained in the calculation of the cross sections for isotope {sup 238}U for different resonances. Results obtained have proved satisfactory from the standpoint of accuracy. (author)

  5. New approximations for the interference term applied to the calculation of scattering cross section of the 238 U isotope

    Palma, Daniel Artur Pinheiro; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Goncalves, Alessandro C.

    2008-01-01

    The calculation of the Doppler broadening function and the interference term are very important in the generation of nuclear data. Recent papers have proposed analytical formulations for both functions and, despite their being simple and precise, they contain the error function with a complex argument. With the intention of simplifying the mathematical treatment two approximations are proposed in this paper. The first one consists of using an expansion in the form of series to treat the error function. The other approximation is based on simplifications in the differential equations that govern the Doppler broadening function. For validation purpose the result obtained is compared to the one obtained in the calculation of the cross sections for isotope 238 U for different resonances. Results obtained have proved satisfactory from the standpoint of accuracy. (author)

  6. Absolute vibrational excitation cross sections for 1-18 eV electron scattering from condensed dimethyl phosphate (DMP)

    Lemelin, V.; Bass, A. D.; Wagner, J. R.; Sanche, L.

    2017-12-01

    Absolute cross sections (CSs) for vibrational excitation by 1-18 eV electrons incident on condensed dimethyl phosphate (DMP) were measured with a high-resolution electron energy loss (EEL) spectrometer. Absolute CSs were extracted from EEL spectra of DMP condensed on multilayer film of Ar held at about 20 K under ultra-high vacuum (˜1 × 10-11 Torr). Structures observed in the energy dependence of the CSs around 2, 4, 7, and 12 eV were compared with previous results of gas- and solid-phase experiments and with theoretical studies on dimethyl phosphate and related molecules. These structures were attributed to the formation of shape resonances.

  7. Improved adiabatic calculation of muonic-hydrogen-atom cross sections. I. Isotopic exchange and elastic scattering in asymmetric collisions

    Cohen, J.S.; Struensee, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The improved adiabatic representation is used in calculations of elastic and isotopic-exchange cross sections for asymmetric collisions of pμ, dμ, and tμ with bare p, d, and t nuclei and with H, D, and T atoms. This formulation dissociates properly, correcting a well-known deficiency of the standard adiabatic method for muonic-atom collisions, and includes some effects at zeroth order that are normally considered nonadiabatic. The electronic screening is calculated directly and precisely within the improved adiabatic description; it is found to be about 30% smaller in magnitude than the previously used value at large internuclear distances and to deviate considerably from the asymptotic form at small distances. The reactance matrices, needed for calculations of molecular-target effects, are given in tables

  8. Empirical parametrization of the two-photon-exchange effect contributions to the electron-proton elastic scattering cross section

    Qattan, I. A.; Alsaad, A.

    2011-01-01

    The most recent electron-proton elastic scattering data were re-analyzed using an empirical parametrization of the two-photon-exchange (TPE) effect contributions to σ R . The TPE effect contribution F(Q 2 ,ε) was double Taylor series expanded as a polynomial of order n keeping only terms linear in ε to account for the experimentally observed and verified linearity of the Rosenbluth plots. We fix the ratio R=G Ep /G Mp to be that obtained from a fit to the recoil-polarization data and parametrize σ R first by a three-parameter formula (fit I) and then by a two-parameter formula (fit III). In contrast to previous analyses, the fit parameter G Mp 2 as obtained from these fits is either smaller or equal to the values obtained from our conventional Rosenbluth fit (fit II) but never larger. The ratio g(Q 2 )/G Mp 2 which represents the ratio of the TPE and one-photon-exchange (OPE) effect contributions to the intercept of σ R is large and it ranges 3%-88%. The ratio R 1γx2γ =τf(Q 2 )/G Ep 2 which represents the ratio of the TPE and OPE effect contributions to the slope of σ R is also large, reaching a value of 12.0-14.4 at Q 2 = 5.25 (GeV/c) 2 . The ratio R 1γx2γ as obtained from fits I and III is consistent, within error, with those obtained from previous analyses. Our formulas seem to explain the linearity of σ R . Moreover, our analysis shows that the extracted G Ep 2 and G Mp 2 using the conventional Rosenbluth separation method can in fact be broken into the usual OPE and TPE contributions. Therefore, σ R can in fact be derived under weaker conditions than those imposed by the Born approximation. Our results show that the TPE amplitudes, g(Q 2 )/G Mp 2 and f(Q 2 )/G Mp 2 , are sizable and grow with Q 2 value up to Q 2 ∼6 (GeV/c) 2 in agreement with previous studies. A revision of and comparison to previous analyses are also presented.

  9. Combination of Measurements of Inclusive Deep Inelastic e{sup ±}p Scattering Cross Sections and QCD Analysis of HERA Data

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science; Collaboration: H1 and ZEUS Collaborations; and others

    2015-06-15

    A combination is presented of all inclusive deep inelastic cross sections previously published by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at HERA for neutral and charged current e{sup ±}p scattering for zero beam polarisation. The data were taken at proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV and an electron beam energy of 27.5 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb{sup -1} and span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q{sup 2}, and Bjorken x. The correlations of the systematic uncertainties were evaluated and taken into account for the combination. The combined cross sections were input to QCD analyses at leading order, next-to-leading order and at next-to-next-to-leading order, providing a new set of parton distribution functions, called HERAPDF2.0. In addition to the experimental uncertainties, model and parameterisation uncertainties were assessed for these parton distribution functions. Variants of HERAPDF2.0 with an alternative gluon parameterisation, HERAPDF2.0AG, and using fixed-flavour-number schemes, HERAPDF2.0FF, are presented. The analysis was extended by including HERA data on charm and jet production, resulting in the variant HERAPDF2.0Jets. The inclusion of jet-production cross sections made a simultaneous determination of these parton distributions and the strong coupling constant possible, resulting in α{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup 2})=0.1183±0.0009(exp)±0.0005(model/parameterisation)±0.00 12(hadronisation){sub -0.0030}{sup +0.0037}(scale). An extraction of xF{sub 3}{sup γZ} and results on electroweak unification and scaling violations are also presented.

  10. Combination of measurements of inclusive deep inelastic e{sup ±}p scattering cross sections and QCD analysis of HERA data

    Abramowicz, H. [I. Physikalisches Institut der RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Kraków (Poland); Adamus, M. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); and others

    2015-12-08

    A combination is presented of all inclusive deep inelastic cross sections previously published by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at HERA for neutral and charged current e{sup ±}p scattering for zero beam polarisation. The data were taken at proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV and an electron beam energy of 27.5 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb{sup -1} and span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q{sup 2}, and Bjorken x. The correlations of the systematic uncertainties were evaluated and taken into account for the combination. The combined cross sections were input to QCD analyses at leading order, next-to-leading order and at next-to-next-to-leading order, providing a new set of parton distribution functions, called HERAPDF2.0. In addition to the experimental uncertainties, model and parameterisation uncertainties were assessed for these parton distribution functions. Variants of HERAPDF2.0 with an alternative gluon parameterisation, HERAPDF2.0AG, and using fixed-flavour-number schemes, HERAPDF2.0FF, are presented. The analysis was extended by including HERA data on charm and jet production, resulting in the variant HERAPDF2.0Jets. The inclusion of jet-production cross sections made a simultaneous determination of these parton distributions and the strong coupling constant possible, resulting in α{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup 2})=0.1183±0.0009(exp)±0.0005(model/parameterisation)±0.0012 (hadronisation){sub -0.0030}{sup +0.0037}(scale). An extraction of xF{sub 3}{sup γZ} and results on electroweak unification and scaling violations are also presented.

  11. Combination of measurements of inclusive deep inelastic e{sup ±}p scattering cross sections and QCD analysis of HERA data

    Abramowicz, H. [I. Physikalisches Institut der RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Tel Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Lobodzinski, B.; Verbytskyi, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L.; Guzik, M.; Kisielewska, D.; Przybycien, M. [AGH-University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Adamus, M.; Tymieniecka, T. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Antonelli, S. [University Bologna (Italy); INFN Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Antunovic, B. [Univerzitet u Banjoj Luci, Arhitektonsko-gradko-geodetski Fakultet, Banja Luka (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Aushev, V. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); National Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Department of Nuclear Physics, Kyiv (Ukraine); Aushev, Y. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Department of Nuclear Physics, Kyiv (Ukraine); Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T. [Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Dodonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gizhko, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kruecker, D.; Krueger, K.; Kuprash, O.; Levonian, S.; Libov, V.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loehr, B.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Notz, D.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Rubinsky, I.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Szuba, J.; Wolf, G.; Wuensch, E.; Zenaiev, O. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Behrendt Dubak, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); University of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (Montenegro); Belov, P.; Jung, H. [Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Brussels (Belgium); Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerpen (Belgium); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Bertolin, A.; Dusini, S.; Stanco, L. [INFN Padova, Padova (Italy); Bloch, I.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Boos, E.G.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Zhautykov, B.O. [Institute of Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education and Science of Kazakhstan, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Boudry, V.; Specka, A. [LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Brandt, G. [Universitaet Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen (Germany); Brisson, V.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Brock, I.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Paul, E. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Brook, N.H. [University College London, Physics and Astronomy Department, London (United Kingdom); Brugnera, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Universita, Padua (Italy); INFN, Padua (Italy); Bruni, A.; Corradi, M. [INFN Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Buniatyan, A.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Bussey, P.J.; Saxon, D.H.; Skillicorn, I.O. [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Bylinkin, A. [Univerzitet u Banjoj Luci, Arhitektonsko-gradko-geodetski Fakultet, Banja Luka (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G. [CINVESTAV, Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Yucatan (Mexico); Capua, M.; Schioppa, M.; Tassi, E. [Calabria University, Physics Department, Cosenza (Italy); INFN, Cosenza (Italy); Catterall, C.D. [York University, Department of Physics, Ontario (Canada); Ceccopieri, F.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Mechelen, P. van [Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Brussels (Belgium); Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerpen (Belgium); Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Chwastowski, J.; Figiel, J.; Goerlich, L.; Krupa, B.; Mikocki, S.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Stopa, P.; Turnau, J.; Zawiejski, L. [Polish Academy of Sciences, The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Ciborowski, J. [Universitaet Bielefeld, Bielefeld (Germany); University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Ciesielski, R. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Devenish, R.C.E.; Gwenlan, C.; Walczak, R. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Corriveau, F. [McGill University, Department of Physics, Montreal, QC (Canada); Cvach, J.; Hladka, J.; Reimer, P. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Daum, K. [INFN Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Fachbereich C, Universitaet Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Dementiev, R.K.; Gladilin, L.K.; Golubkov, Yu.A.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Levchenko, B.B.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Zotkin, D.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (RU); Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Vallee, C. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille (FR); Dobre, M.; Rotaru, M. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (RO); Egli, S.; Horisberger, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (CH); Feltesse, J.; Schoeffel, L. [CEA, DSM/Irfu, CE-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (FR); Ferencei, J. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Institute of Experimental Physics, Kosice (SK); Foster, B. [University Bologna (IT); INFN Bologna, Bologna (IT); Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (DE); Gach, G. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (DE); AGH-University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (PL); Gallo, E. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (DE); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (DE); Collaboration: H1 and ZEUS Collaborations; and others

    2015-12-15

    A combination is presented of all inclusive deep inelastic cross sections previously published by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at HERA for neutral and charged current e{sup ±}p scattering for zero beam polarisation. The data were taken at proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV and an electron beam energy of 27.5 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb{sup -1} and span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q{sup 2}, and Bjorken x. The correlations of the systematic uncertainties were evaluated and taken into account for the combination. The combined cross sections were input to QCD analyses at leading order, next-to-leading order and at next-to-next-to-leading order, providing a new set of parton distribution functions, called HERAPDF2.0. In addition to the experimental uncertainties, model and parameterisation uncertainties were assessed for these parton distribution functions. Variants of HERAPDF2.0 with an alternative gluon parameterisation, HERAPDF2.0AG, and using fixed-flavour-number schemes, HERAPDF2.0FF, are presented. The analysis was extended by including HERA data on charm and jet production, resulting in the variant HERAPDF2.0Jets. The inclusion of jet-production cross sections made a simultaneous determination of these parton distributions and the strong coupling constant possible, resulting in α{sub s} (M{sub Z}{sup 2}) = 0.1183±0.0009(exp)±0.0005(model/parameterisation)±0.0012(hadronisation) {sub -0.0030}{sup +0.0037}(scale). An extraction of xF{sub 3}{sup γZ} and results on electroweak unification and scaling violations are also presented. (orig.)

  12. Proposal for the Simultaneous Measurement of the Neutron-Neutron and Neutron-Proton Quasi-Free Scattering Cross Section via the Neutron-Deuteron Breakup Reaction at E n = 19 MeV

    Tornow, W.; Howell, C. R.; Crowell, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    In order to confirm or refute the present discrepancy between data and calculation for the neutron-neutron quasi-free scattering cross section in the neutron-deuteron breakup reaction, we describe a new experimental approach currently being pursued at TUNL.

  13. Proposal for the Simultaneous Measurement of the Neutron–Neutron and Neutron–Proton Quasi-Free Scattering Cross Section via the Neutron–Deuteron Breakup Reaction at En = 19 MeV

    Tornow, W.; Howell, C. R.; Crowell, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    In order to confirm or refute the present discrepancy between data and calculation for the neutron–neutron quasi-free scattering cross section in the neutron–deuteron breakup reaction, we describe a new experimental approach currently being pursued at TUNL. (author)

  14. Regularized unfolding of jet cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA and determination of the strong coupling constant

    Britzger, Daniel Andreas

    2013-10-15

    In this thesis double-differential cross sections for jet production in neutral current deep-inelastic e{sup {+-}}p scattering (DIS) are presented at the center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=319 GeV, and in the kinematic range of the squared four-momentum transfer 150< Q{sup 2}<15 000 GeV{sup 2} and the inelasticity 0.2cross sections normalized to the inclusive neutral current DIS cross section and ratios of jet cross sections are obtained, since the statistical correlations between these observables are known. The jet cross sections are used to determine the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}) at the scale of the mass of the Z{sup 0} boson in the framework of perturbative quantum chromodynamics in next-to-leading order. Values are derived separately for the absolute

  15. How to measure a complete set of polarization-dependent differential cross sections in a scattering experiment with aligned reagents?

    Wang, Fengyan; Lin, Jui-San; Liu, Kopin

    2014-01-01

    Polarization-dependent differential cross section (PDDCS) is one of the three-vector correlations (k, k ′ , j) in molecular collisions, which provides the most detailed insights into the steric requirements of chemical reactions, i.e., how the reactivity depends on the polarization of reagents. Only quite recently has such quantity been fully realized experimentally in the study of the reaction of the aligned CHD 3 (v 1 = 1, |jK〉 = |10〉) molecules with Cl( 2 P 3/2 ) atoms. Theoretically, PDDCS is a relatively new concept; experimental realization of the theoretical construct requires some careful considerations that are not readily available in the literature. Here, we present the “know-how” behind the full PDDCS measurements to fill the gaps and to provide a clear roadmap for future applications. To make the connection apparent between the methodology presented here and the stereodynamics revealed in previous reports, the same Cl + aligned CHD 3 reaction is used for illustration

  16. Thermal-neutron multiple scattering: critical double scattering

    Holm, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    A quantum mechanical formulation for multiple scattering of thermal-neutrons from macroscopic targets is presented and applied to single and double scattering. Critical nuclear scattering from liquids and critical magnetic scattering from ferromagnets are treated in detail in the quasielastic approximation for target systems slightly above their critical points. Numerical estimates are made of the double scattering contribution to the critical magnetic cross section using relevant parameters from actual experiments performed on various ferromagnets. The effect is to alter the usual Lorentzian line shape dependence on neutron wave vector transfer. Comparison with corresponding deviations in line shape resulting from the use of Fisher's modified form of the Ornstein-Zernike spin correlations within the framework of single scattering theory leads to values for the critical exponent eta of the modified correlations which reproduce the effect of double scattering. In addition, it is shown that by restricting the range of applicability of the multiple scattering theory from the outset to critical scattering, Glauber's high energy approximation can be used to provide a much simpler and more powerful description of multiple scattering effects. When sufficiently close to the critical point, it provides a closed form expression for the differential cross section which includes all orders of scattering and has the same form as the single scattering cross section with a modified exponent for the wave vector transfer

  17. The measurement of the real part of the proton-antiproton elastic scattering amplitude at a C.M.S. energy of 546 GEV and the rise of the total cross section

    Kluit, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the experimental study of the elastic scattering of protons and anti-protons at a centre of mass energy of 546 GeV at the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN. The measurement of ρ, i.e. the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the nuclear part of elastic scattering amplitude for proton-antiproton at zero momentum transfer squared (-t = 0 GeV 2 ), at a centre of mass energy of √s = 546 GeV is described. The implications of the result of this measurement for the behaviour of the total cross section in the TeV domain are derived. The hypothesis is investigated whether there is a relation between the rise of the total cross section and the rise of the total jet cross section, as calculated in perturbative QCD and observed by the UA1 experiment. 104 refs.; 40 figs.; 16 tabs

  18. Scattering angle-integrated (total) and magnetic sublevel cross-sections and degree of linear polarization for electron and proton induced excitation [HeI (1snp) sup 1 P sup 0 (n=2-5)] of helium

    Merabet, H; Hanni, J; Bailey, M; Godunov, A L; McGuire, J H; Fursa, D V; Bray, I; Bartschat, K; Tseng, H C; Lin, C D

    2003-01-01

    Experimental scattering-angle-integrated (total) cross-sections sigma-bar, (scattering) angle-integrated magnetic sublevel cross-sections sigma-bar sub M sub sub L , and degree of linear polarization data have been measured in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength region following decay of HeI (1snp) sup 1 P sup 0 (n=2-5) states induced by electron and proton impact on a neutral helium target. These measurements are compared with a first Born approach as well as more sophisticated theoretical calculations. Specifically, theoretical values for electron impact include convergent close-coupling (CCC) and R-matrix with pseudo states (RMPS) methods in addition to first Born (Born 1) approximation while proton induced excitation cross-sections are compared with atomic-orbital close-coupling (AOCC) and first Born predictions.

  19. Double Regge pole exchange model analysis of a 7 Gev/c. pi. /sup -/p experiment. [Absolute cross sections, one-particle exchange, diffraction scattering

    Chao, A C.L.

    1973-01-01

    A double Regge Pole Exchange Model is used to analyze Quasi-Three-Body final states selected from a 7 GeV/c - /sup -/p experiment. Three sets of data are analyzed namely: I ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. p..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup -/; II ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. p..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/; III ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup -/n. The final states, selected from data sets I, II and III are (rho/sup 0/..pi../sup -/p, f/sup 0/..pi../sup -/p, ..pi../sup -/..pi../sup -/..delta../sup + +/), (rho/sup 0/..pi../sup -/..delta../sup +/, rho/sup -/..pi..-..delta../sup + +/, ..omega pi../sup -/p) and (rho/sup 0/..pi../sup -/..delta../sup +/), respectively. It is found that these channels after appropriate kinematic cuts can be well described by exchanging two Regge Trajectories. Predictions for the absolute cross-sections were also obtained by taking limits of one particle exchange and a diffraction scattering approximation. (auth)

  20. Measurement of the inclusive e{sup {+-}}p scattering cross section at high inelasticity y and of the structure function F{sub L}

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2010-12-15

    A measurement is presented of the inclusive neutral current e{sup {+-}}p scattering cross section using data collected by the H1 experiment at HERA during the years 2003 to 2007 with proton beam energies E{sub p} of 920, 575, and 460 GeV. The kinematic range of the measurement covers low absolute four-momentum transfers squared, 1.5 GeV{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 120 GeV{sup 2}, small values of Bjorken x, 2.9 . 10{sup -5} < x < 0.01, and extends to high inelasticity up to y=0.85. The structure function FL is measured by combining the new results with previously published H1 data at E{sub p} = 920 GeV and E{sub p} = 820 GeV. The new measurements are used to test several phenomenological and QCD models applicable in this low Q{sup 2} and low x kinematic domain. (orig.)

  1. Volume cross section of auroral radar backscatter and RMS plasma fluctuations inferred from coherent and incoherent scatter data: a response on backscatter volume parameters

    M. V. Uspensky

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Norway and Finland STARE radar measurements in the eastward auroral electrojet are combined with EISCAT CP-1 measurements of the electron density and electric field vector in the common scattering volume to investigate the variation of the auroral radar volume cross section (VCS with the flow angle of observations (radar look direction with respect to the E×B electron drift. The data set available consists of ~6000 points for flow angles of 40–85° and electron drifts between 500 and 2000 m s−1. The EISCAT electron density N(h-profile data are used to estimate the effective electron density, aspect angle and thickness of the backscattering layer. It is shown that the flow angle variation of the VCS is rather weak, only ~5 dB within the range of the considered flow angles. The VCS values themselves respond almost linearly to the square of both the electron drift velocity magnitude and the effective electron density. By adopting the inferred shape of the VCS variation with the flow angle and the VCS dependence upon wavelength, the relative amplitude of electrostatic electron density fluctuations over all scales is estimated. Inferred values of 2–4 percent react nearly linearly to the electron drift velocity in the range of 500–1000 m s−1 but the rate of increase slows down at electron drifts >1000 m s−1 and density fluctuations of ~5.5 percent due to, perhaps, progressively growing nonlinear wave losses.

  2. Dual parametrization of the proton generalized parton distribution functions H and E, and description of the deeply virtual Compton scattering cross sections and asymmetries

    Guzey, V.; Teckentrup, T.

    2006-01-01

    We develop the minimal model of a new leading order parametrization of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) introduced by Polyakov and Shuvaev. The model for GPDs H and E is formulated in terms of the forward quark distributions, the Gegenbauer moments of the D-term, and the forward limit of the GPD E. The model is designed primarily for small and medium-size values of x B , x B ≤0.2. We examine two different models of the t dependence of the GPDs: the factorized exponential model and the nonfactorized Regge-motivated model. Using our model, we successfully described the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) cross section measured by H1 and ZEUS, the moments of the beam-spin A LU sinφ , the beam-charge A C cosφ , and the transversely polarized target A UT sinφcosφ DVCS asymmetries measured by HERMES and A LU sinφ measured by CLAS. The data on A C cosφ prefer the Regge-motivated model of the t dependence of the GPDs. The data on A UT sinφcosφ indicate that the u and d quarks carry only a small fraction of the proton total angular momentum

  3. Measurement of the cross section for forward Compton scattering by /sup 4//sub 2/ He nuclei at energies E/sub. gamma. / = 1. 8--3. 8 GeV

    Aleksanyan, A.S.; Babayan, G.E.; Voskanyan, A.V.; Gasparyan, A.D.; Gevorkyan, S.R.; Karapetyan, S.N.; Ketikyan, A.Z.; Megrabyan, G.K.; Movsisyan, K.A.; Oganesyan, G.A.; and others

    1987-04-01

    The differential cross sections for Compton scattering by nuclei of /sup 4//sub 2/ He have been measured at the momentum transfers 0.02less than or equal tochemically bondtchemically bond<0.14 (GeV/c)/sup 2/ in the energy region E/sub ..gamma../ = 1.8--3.8 GeV. On the basis of the diffraction theory of multiple scattering the values of the differential cross sections at t = 0, of the slope parameters of the diffraction cone, and of the /sup 4//sub 2/ He nucleus radius have been determined. Experimental values are given for the phase of the scattering amplitude by nucleons, ..cap alpha..( f/sup 0//sub i/) = Re f/sup 0//sub i// Im f/sup 0//sub i/. On the basis of the differential cross sections at t = 0 the total photoabsorption cross section and the photon screening coefficient are determined for the /sup 4//sub 2/ He nucleus.

  4. Determination of the total cross section in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at √(s) = 8 from elastic scattering using the ALFA sub-detector of ATLAS

    Heinz, Christian; Stenzel, Hasko; Dueren, Michael [2. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Giessen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The ALFA (Absolute Luminosity for ATLAS) Roman Pot detector system is part of the forward instrumentation of ATLAS located about 240 m away from the interaction point in the LHC tunnel in both directions. ALFA consists of a scintillating fibre tracker housed in vertical Roman Pots which enables the measurement of elastic proton-proton scattering at small scattering angles. In 2012 data were recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of √(s) = 8 TeV during a fill with special beam optics of the LHC with β* = 90 m and parallel-to-point focusing. The four-momentum transfer t is measured for elastically scattered protons and used to extract the differential elastic cross section. In this talk a preliminary determination of the total cross section and of the slope of the elastic cross section at small vertical stroke t vertical stroke obtained from a fit to the differential cross section using the optical theorem is reported. In addition a second run at √(s) = 8 TeV with a special beam optics of β* = 1 km, providing access to the Coulomb-nuclear interference region, is being analysed. Preliminary analysis results from this run are presented as well.

  5. Light scattering and extinction measurements combined with laser-induced incandescence for the real-time determination of soot mass absorption cross section.

    Wei, Yiyi; Ma, Lulu; Cao, Tingting; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Jun; Buseck, Peter R; Thompson, J E

    2013-10-01

    An aerosol albedometer was combined with laser-induced incandescence (LII) to achieve simultaneous measurements of aerosol scattering, extinction coefficient, and soot mass concentration. Frequency doubling of a Nd:YAG laser line resulted in a colinear beam of both λ = 532 and 1064 nm. The green beam was used to perform cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), with simultaneous measurements of scattering coefficient made through use of a reciprocal sphere nephelometer. The 1064 nm beam was selected and directed into a second integrating sphere and used for LII of light-absorbing kerosene lamp soot. Thermal denuder experiments showed the LII signals were not affected by the particle mixing state when laser peak power was 1.5-2.5 MW. The combined measurements of optical properties and soot mass concentration allowed determination of mass absorption cross section (M.A.C., m(2)/g) with 1 min time resolution when soot concentrations were in the low microgram per cubic meter range. Fresh kerosene nanosphere soot (ns-soot) exhibited a mean M.A.C and standard deviation of 9.3 ± 2.7 m(2)/g while limited measurements on dry ambient aerosol yielded an average of 8.2 ± 5.9 m(2)/g when soot was >0.25 μg/m(3). The method also detected increases in M.A.C. values associated with enhanced light absorption when polydisperse, laboratory-generated ns-soot particles were embedded within or coated with ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate, and glycerol. Glycerol coatings produced the largest fractional increase in M.A.C. (1.41-fold increase), while solid coatings of ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate produced increases of 1.10 and 1.06, respectively. Fresh, ns-soot did not exhibit increased M.A.C. at high relative humidity (RH); however, lab-generated soot coated with ammonium nitrate and held at 85% RH exhibited M.A.C. values nearly double the low-humidity case. The hybrid instrument for simultaneously tracking soot mass concentration and aerosol optical properties in real time is a

  6. Inelastic Light Scattering Processes

    Fouche, Daniel G.; Chang, Richard K.

    1973-01-01

    Five different inelastic light scattering processes will be denoted by, ordinary Raman scattering (ORS), resonance Raman scattering (RRS), off-resonance fluorescence (ORF), resonance fluorescence (RF), and broad fluorescence (BF). A distinction between fluorescence (including ORF and RF) and Raman scattering (including ORS and RRS) will be made in terms of the number of intermediate molecular states which contribute significantly to the scattered amplitude, and not in terms of excited state lifetimes or virtual versus real processes. The theory of these processes will be reviewed, including the effects of pressure, laser wavelength, and laser spectral distribution on the scattered intensity. The application of these processes to the remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants will be discussed briefly. It will be pointed out that the poor sensitivity of the ORS technique cannot be increased by going toward resonance without also compromising the advantages it has over the RF technique. Experimental results on inelastic light scattering from I(sub 2) vapor will be presented. As a single longitudinal mode 5145 A argon-ion laser line was tuned away from an I(sub 2) absorption line, the scattering was observed to change from RF to ORF. The basis, of the distinction is the different pressure dependence of the scattered intensity. Nearly three orders of magnitude enhancement of the scattered intensity was measured in going from ORF to RF. Forty-seven overtones were observed and their relative intensities measured. The ORF cross section of I(sub 2) compared to the ORS cross section of N2 was found to be 3 x 10(exp 6), with I(sub 2) at its room temperature vapor pressure.

  7. Scattering on magnetic monopoles

    Petry, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    The time-dependent scattering theory of charged particles on magnetic monopoles is investigated within a mathematical frame-work, which duely pays attention to the fact that the wavefunctions of the scattered particles are sections in a non-trivial complex line-bundle. It is found that Moeller operators have to be defined in a way which takes into account the peculiar long-range behaviour of the monopole field. Formulas for the scattering matrix and the differential cross-section are derived, and, as a by-product, a momentum space picture for particles, which are described by sections in the underlying complex line-bundle, is presented. (orig.)

  8. High neutronic efficiency, low current targets for accelerator-based BNCT applications

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1998-01-01

    The neutronic efficiency of target/filters for accelerator-based BNCT applications is measured by the proton current required to achieve a desirable neutron current at the treatment port (10 9 n/cm 2 /s). In this paper the authors describe two possible targeyt/filter concepts wihch minimize the required current. Both concepts are based on the Li-7 (p,n)Be-7 reaction. Targets that operate near the threshold energy generate neutrons that are close tothe desired energy for BNCT treatment. Thus, the filter can be extremely thin (∼ 5 cm iron). However, this approach has an extremely low neutron yield (n/p ∼ 1.0(-6)), thus requiring a high proton current. The proposed solutino is to design a target consisting of multiple extremely thin targets (proton energy loss per target ∼ 10 keV), and re-accelerate the protons between each target. Targets operating at ihgher proton energies (∼ 2.5 MeV) have a much higher yield (n/p ∼ 1.0(-4)). However, at these energies the maximum neutron energy is approximately 800 keV, and thus a neutron filter is required to degrade the average neutron energy to the range of interest for BNCT (10--20 keV). A neutron filter consisting of fluorine compounds and iron has been investigated for this case. Typically a proton current of approximately 5 mA is required to generate the desired neutron current at the treatment port. The efficiency of these filter designs can be further increased by incorporating neutron reflectors that are co-axial with the neutron source. These reflectors are made of materials which have high scattering cross sections in the range 0.1--1.0 MeV

  9. Delbrueck scattering of monoenergetic photons

    Kahane, S.

    1978-05-01

    The Delbrueck effect was experimentally investigated in high Z nuclei with monoenergetic photons in the range 6.8-11.4 MeV. Two different methods were used for measurements of the differential scattering cross-section, in the 25-140 deg range and in the forward direction (theta = 1.5 deg), respectively. The known Compton scattering cross-section was used in a new and unique way for the determination of the elastic scattering cross-section. Isolation of the contribution of the real Delbrueck amplitudes to the cross-section was crried out successfully. Experimental confirmation of the theoretical calculations of Papatzacos and Mork and measurement, for the first time, of the Rayleigh scattering in the 10 MeV region are also reported. One of the most interesting findings is the presence of Coulomb corrections in Delbrueck scattering at these energies. More theoretical effort is needed in this last direction. (author)

  10. Measurement of cross sections for the scattering of neutrons in the energy range from 2 MeV to 4 MeV with the 15N(p,n) reaction as neutron source

    Poenitz, Erik

    2010-01-01

    In future nuclear facilities, the materials lead and bismuth can play a more important role than in today's nuclear reactors. Reliable cross section data are required for the design of those facilities. In particular the neutron transport in the lead spallation target of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Reactor strongly depends on the inelastic neutron scattering cross sections in the energy region from 0.5 MeV to 6 MeV. In the recent 20 years, elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections were measured with high precision for a variety of elements at the PTB time-of-flight spectrometer. The D(d,n) reaction was primarily used for the production of neutrons. Because of the Q value of the reaction and the available deuteron energies, neutrons in the energy range from 6 MeV to 16 MeV can be produced. For the cross section measurement at lower energies, however, another neutron producing reaction is required. The 15 N(p,n) 15 O reaction was chosen, as it allows the production of monoenergetic neutrons with up to 5.7MeV energy. In this work, the 15 N(p,n) reaction was studied with focus on the suitability as a source for monoenergetic neutrons in scattering experiments. This includes the measurement of differential cross sections for the neutron producing reaction and the choice of optimum target conditions. Differential elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections were measured for lead at four energies in the region from 2 MeV to 4 MeV incident neutron energy using the time-of-flight technique. A lead sample with natural isotopic composition was used. NE213 liquid scintillation detectors with well-known detection efficiencies were used for the detection of the scattered neutrons. Angle-integrated cross sections were determined by a Legendre polynomial expansion using least-squares methods. Additionally, measurements were carried out for isotopically pure 209 Bi and 181 Ta samples at 4 MeV incident neutron energy. Results are compared with other

  11. Small angle X-ray scattering and cross-linking for data assisted protein structure prediction in CASP 12 with prospects for improved accuracy

    Ogorzalek, Tadeusz L.

    2018-01-04

    Experimental data offers empowering constraints for structure prediction. These constraints can be used to filter equivalently scored models or more powerfully within optimization functions toward prediction. In CASP12, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry (CLMS) data, measured on an exemplary set of novel fold targets, were provided to the CASP community of protein structure predictors. As HT, solution-based techniques, SAXS and CLMS can efficiently measure states of the full-length sequence in its native solution conformation and assembly. However, this experimental data did not substantially improve prediction accuracy judged by fits to crystallographic models. One issue, beyond intrinsic limitations of the algorithms, was a disconnect between crystal structures and solution-based measurements. Our analyses show that many targets had substantial percentages of disordered regions (up to 40%) or were multimeric or both. Thus, solution measurements of flexibility and assembly support variations that may confound prediction algorithms trained on crystallographic data and expecting globular fully-folded monomeric proteins. Here, we consider the CLMS and SAXS data collected, the information in these solution measurements, and the challenges in incorporating them into computational prediction. As improvement opportunities were only partly realized in CASP12, we provide guidance on how data from the full-length biological unit and the solution state can better aid prediction of the folded monomer or subunit. We furthermore describe strategic integrations of solution measurements with computational prediction programs with the aim of substantially improving foundational knowledge and the accuracy of computational algorithms for biologically-relevant structure predictions for proteins in solution. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Small angle X-ray scattering and cross-linking for data assisted protein structure prediction in CASP 12 with prospects for improved accuracy

    Ogorzalek, Tadeusz L.; Hura, Greg L.; Belsom, Adam; Burnett, Kathryn H.; Kryshtafovych, Andriy; Tainer, John A.; Rappsilber, Juri; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Fidelis, Krzysztof

    2018-01-01

    Experimental data offers empowering constraints for structure prediction. These constraints can be used to filter equivalently scored models or more powerfully within optimization functions toward prediction. In CASP12, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry (CLMS) data, measured on an exemplary set of novel fold targets, were provided to the CASP community of protein structure predictors. As HT, solution-based techniques, SAXS and CLMS can efficiently measure states of the full-length sequence in its native solution conformation and assembly. However, this experimental data did not substantially improve prediction accuracy judged by fits to crystallographic models. One issue, beyond intrinsic limitations of the algorithms, was a disconnect between crystal structures and solution-based measurements. Our analyses show that many targets had substantial percentages of disordered regions (up to 40%) or were multimeric or both. Thus, solution measurements of flexibility and assembly support variations that may confound prediction algorithms trained on crystallographic data and expecting globular fully-folded monomeric proteins. Here, we consider the CLMS and SAXS data collected, the information in these solution measurements, and the challenges in incorporating them into computational prediction. As improvement opportunities were only partly realized in CASP12, we provide guidance on how data from the full-length biological unit and the solution state can better aid prediction of the folded monomer or subunit. We furthermore describe strategic integrations of solution measurements with computational prediction programs with the aim of substantially improving foundational knowledge and the accuracy of computational algorithms for biologically-relevant structure predictions for proteins in solution. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement of the proton-proton total cross section at √(s) = 7 TeV via elastic scattering with the ALFA sub-detector of ATLAS at the LHC

    Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Dueren, Michael; Heinz, Christian; Stenzel, Hasko [2. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Giessen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The ALFA (Absolute Luminosity for ATLAS) detector is one of the ATLAS forward detectors located about 240 m away from the interaction point in the LHC tunnel. ALFA is a scintillating fibre tracking detector housed in Roman pots and designed to measure elastic proton-proton scattering up to the smallest scattering angles. In 2011 data were taken at a centre-of-mass energy of √(s) = 7 TeV during a special low intensity fill of LHC with high β* = 90 m beam optics. Results of the measurement of the differential elastic cross section dσ/dt, the total cross section σ{sub tot}, the nuclear slope B and other derived quantities are presented in this talk. In the analysis the luminosity determination, the fine tuning of beam optics parameters and a data-driven method to determine the reconstruction efficiency are emphasized.

  14. Diffraction in nuclear scattering

    Wojciechowski, H.

    1986-01-01

    The elastic scattering amplitudes for charged and neutral particles have been decomposed into diffractive and refractive parts by splitting the nuclear elastic scattering matrix elements into components responsible for these effects. It has been shown that the pure geometrical diffractive effect which carries no information about the nuclear interaction is always predominant at forward angle of elastic angular distributions. This fact suggests that for strongly absorbed particles only elastic cross section at backward angles, i.e. the refractive cross section, can give us basic information about the central nuclear potential. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  15. The determination of sulphur in materials of high neutron absorption cross-section by fast-neutron activation analysis; Determination du soufre dans les matieres de forte section efficace d'absorption neutronique, au moyen d'une analyse par activation avec des neutrons rapides; Opredelenie sery v materialakh s bol'shim secheniem pogloshcheniya nejtronov metodom aktivatsionnogo analiza bystrykh nejtronov; Determinacion del azufre en sustancias de elevada seccion eficaz de absorcion neutronica mediante analisis por activacion con neutrones rapidos

    Gibbons, D; Simpson, H [Wantage Research Laboratory (A.E.R.E.), Wantage, Berks. (United Kingdom)

    1962-01-15

    The production of radiophosphorus by the fast neutron (n, p) reaction on sulphur is used for the determination of sulphur by activation analysis. Using this technique it is possible to determine sulphur in materials of high thermal-neutron absorption cross-section because the absorption cross-sections for fast neutrons are, in general, much lower than those for slow neutrons, so that self-shielding errors are considerably reduced. Interference due to the slow neutron (n, {gamma}) reaction on neutral phosphorus is eliminated by a double irradiation technique involving irradiation in regions of differing slow/fast flux-ratios. The method has been applied to the determination of sulphur in chromium and arsenic. (author) [French] La production de radiophosphore par reaction (n, p) de neutrons rapides sur le soufre est utilisee pour la determination du soufre au moyen d'une analyse par activation. Cette methode permet la determination du soufre dans les matieres de forte section efficace d'absorption des neutrons thermiques; en effet, les sections efficaces d'absorption des neutrons rapides sont, d'une maniere generale, beaucoup plus faibles que pour les neutrons lents, de sorte que les erreurs d'autoprotection se trouvent considerablement reduites. L'interference due a la reaction (n, {gamma}) des neutrons lents sur le phosphore naturel est eliminee par une double irradiation, qui implique une irradiation dans les regions ou le rapport du flux de neutrons lents au flux de neutrons rapides a des valeurs differentes. La methode a ete appliquee a la determination du soufre dans le chrome et l'arsenic. (author) [Spanish] La formacion de fosforo radiactivo por la accion de los neutrones rapidos sobre el azufre, reaccion (n, p), puede servir para determinar este elemento mediante analisis por activacion. El empleo de esta tecnica permite efectuar determinaciones de azufre en materiales de elevada seccion eficaz de absorcion de neutrones termicos porque, en general, las

  16. Cross sections measurements for the forward elastic scattering of 13 MeV 6,7 Li and 24 MeV 16 O by 9 Be, 12 C, 16 O and 28 Si

    Liendo, J.A.; Gonzalez, A.C.; Fletcher, N.R.; Caussyn, D.D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Absolute elastic cross sections have been measured for targets of 9 Be, 12 C 16 O, 28 Si and 197 Au being bombarded by beams of 13 MeV 6 7 Li and 24 MeV 16 O. The relevant yields were collected simultaneously at 12.450, 16.450, 20.450 and 280. The confidence of a forward elastic scattering method proposed previously to carry out multi-elemental analysis of evaporated liquid samples depends on the precision and accuracy of the cross sections reported in this work.The 24 MeV 16 0 + 197 Au reaction was used to determine the detector solid angles with uncertainties of approximately 3%. Some of the 16 O-beam reactions Some of the 16 O beam reactions have been shown to be consistent with the Rutherford formula predictions at several angles. This allowed us to obtain target thickness independent cross sections for the lithium beam initiated reactions with uncertainties close to 7%. In general, the 6 7 Li-beam reaction cross sections were found not to be consistent with the Coulomb scattering formula. In order to test the internal consistency of our measured cross sections, they were used to determine the elemental densities of several selected targets containing beryllium, carbon, oxygen and silicon. These targets were bombarded with the same beam types and energies used to measure the cross sections and, for every element of interest contained in each target, elemental density values were obtained at some of the scattering angles quoted above. Agreements between some of our results and those of a previous work support the validity of our measurements. (Author)

  17. High-resolution measurements of sup(58,60,62)Ni(p,p) scattering cross section in the proton energy range of 3.0 to 4.0 MeV

    Arai, Eiichi; Ogawa, Masao

    1976-01-01

    Differential cross sections were measured at four angles for proton scattering on sup(58,60,62)Ni at energies from 3.0 to 4.0 MeV by using a high-resolution beam from the Tokyo Institute of Technology 4 MV Van de Graaff. An overall resolution of 400 eV (FWHM) was realized using thin solid targets. (author)

  18. Experimental-theoretical comparisons of 1/sup 1/S. -->. 3/sup 1/P differential magnetic sublevel cross sections for electron-helium scattering at 80 and 100 eV

    Chutjian, A [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, Calif. (USA)

    1976-07-11

    Experimental normalized absolute differential cross sections (DCS) for the excitation 1/sup 1/S ..-->.. 3/sup 1/P in helium are reported at incident electron energies of 80 and 100 eV, and at scattering angles between 7/sup 0/ and 135/sup 0/. The measurements are combined with results of recent electron-photon coincidence studies, and absolute DCS for the excitation of the magnetic sublevels 3/sup 1/P/sub 0/ and 3/sup 1/Psub(+-1) are obtained. These experimental sublevel cross sections, and their sum, are compared with results of recent calculations in the multichannel eikonal and distorted-wave polarized-orbital theories.

  19. Constraints on the double-parton scattering cross section from same-sign W boson pair production in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Ambrogi, F.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Grossmann, J.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, N.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Madlener, T.; Mikulec, I.; Pree, E.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Spanring, M.; Spitzbart, D.; Waltenberger, W.; Wittmann, J.; Wulz, C.-E.; Zarucki, M.; Chekhovsky, V.; Mossolov, V.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; De Wolf, E. A.; Di Croce, D.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; De Bruyn, I.; De Clercq, J.; Deroover, K.; Flouris, G.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Beghin, D.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Dorney, B.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Khvastunov, I.; Poyraz, D.; Roskas, C.; Salva, S.; Tytgat, M.; Verbeke, W.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caputo, C.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Coelho, E.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Melo De Almeida, M.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Misheva, M.; Rodozov, M.; Shopova, M.; Sultanov, G.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Gao, X.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liao, H.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. 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S.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Moon, C. S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Lee, A.; Kim, H.; Moon, D. H.; Oh, G.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Goh, J.; Kim, T. J.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Ha, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Almond, J.; Kim, J.; Kim, J. S.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.; Nam, K.; Oh, S. B.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Seo, S. h.; Yang, U. K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yu, G. B.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Choi, Y.; Hwang, C.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Reyes-Almanza, R.; Ramirez-Sanchez, G.; Duran-Osuna, M. C.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Rabadan-Trejo, R. 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V.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Voytishin, N.; Yuldashev, B. S.; Zarubin, A.; Zhiltsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Stepennov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Aushev, T.; Bylinkin, A.; Chadeeva, M.; Parygin, P.; Philippov, D.; Polikarpov, S.; Popova, E.; Rusinov, V.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Terkulov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Khein, L.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Lukina, O.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Blinov, V.; Shtol, D.; Skovpen, Y.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Dordevic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Barrio Luna, M.; Cerrada, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Moran, D.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Álvarez Fernández, A.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Cuevas, J.; Erice, C.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; González Fernández, J. R.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Vischia, P.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chazin Quero, B.; Curras, E.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bianco, M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; Chapon, E.; Chen, Y.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dobson, M.; du Pree, T.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Everaerts, P.; Fallavollita, F.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gilbert, A.; Gill, K.; Glege, F.; Gulhan, D.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Karacheban, O.; Kieseler, J.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kornmayer, A.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Krammer, M.; Lange, C.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Meijers, F.; Merlin, J. A.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Milenovic, P.; Moortgat, F.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Ngadiuba, J.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Selvaggi, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Sphicas, P.; Stakia, A.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Verweij, M.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Caminada, L.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Wiederkehr, S. A.; Bäni, L.; Berger, P.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Klijnsma, T.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Reichmann, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Shchutska, L.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Vesterbacka Olsson, M. L.; Wallny, R.; Zhu, D. H.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; De Cosa, A.; Del Burgo, R.; Donato, S.; Galloni, C.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Seitz, C.; Takahashi, Y.; Zucchetta, A.; Candelise, V.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Steen, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Bakirci, M. N.; Boran, F.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kara, O.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Polatoz, A.; Topakli, H.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I. S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Tekten, S.; Yetkin, E. A.; Agaras, M. N.; Atay, S.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Davignon, O.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Auzinger, G.; Bainbridge, R.; Borg, J.; Breeze, S.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Di Maria, R.; Elwood, A.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; James, T.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Matsushita, T.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Palladino, V.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Scott, E.; Seez, C.; Shtipliyski, A.; Summers, S.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wardle, N.; Winterbottom, D.; Wright, J.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Smith, C.; Bartek, R.; Dominguez, A.; Buccilli, A.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; West, C.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Cutts, D.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Hogan, J. M.; Kwok, K. H. M.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Pazzini, J.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Yu, D.; Band, R.; Brainerd, C.; Breedon, R.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Shalhout, S.; Shi, M.; Smith, J.; Stolp, D.; Tos, K.; Tripathi, M.; Wang, Z.; Bachtis, M.; Bravo, C.; Cousins, R.; Dasgupta, A.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Mccoll, N.; Regnard, S.; Saltzberg, D.; Schnaible, C.; Valuev, V.; Bouvier, E.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Ghiasi Shirazi, S. M. A.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Si, W.; Wang, L.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Hashemi, B.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Kole, G.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Masciovecchio, M.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Amin, N.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Franco Sevilla, M.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Qu, H.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Newman, H. B.; Nguyen, T.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Ferguson, T.; Mudholkar, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Weinberg, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Alyari, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Apyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Canepa, A.; Cerati, G. B.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cremonesi, M.; Duarte, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Freeman, J.; Gecse, Z.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Schneider, B.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strait, J.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Joshi, Y. R.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Kolberg, T.; Martinez, G.; Perry, T.; Prosper, H.; Saha, A.; Santra, A.; Sharma, V.; Yohay, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Cavanaugh, R.; Chen, X.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hangal, D. A.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Kamin, J.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trauger, H.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Royon, C.; Sanders, S.; Schmitz, E.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Azzolini, V.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; D'Alfonso, M.; Demiragli, Z.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Tatar, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Loukas, N.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Higginbotham, S.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Mei, K.; Ojalvo, I.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Malik, S.; Norberg, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Das, S.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Khatiwada, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Peng, C. C.; Schulte, J. F.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Cheng, T.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Ciesielski, R.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Montalvo, R.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Delannoy, A. G.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Padeken, K.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Joyce, M.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Sturdy, J.; Zaleski, S.; Brodski, M.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Hussain, U.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2018-02-01

    A first search for same-sign WW production via double-parton scattering is performed based on proton-proton collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV using dimuon and electron-muon final states. The search is based on the analysis of data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. No significant excess of events is observed above the expected single-parton scattering yields. A 95% confidence level upper limit of 0.32 pb is set on the inclusive cross section for same-sign WW production via the double-parton scattering process. This upper limit is used to place a 95% confidence level lower limit of 12.2 mb on the effective double-parton cross section parameter, closely related to the transverse distribution of partons in the proton. This limit on the effective cross section is consistent with previous measurements as well as with Monte Carlo event generator predictions.

  20. Neutral pion electroproduction and virtual Compton scattering on proton with four-momentum transfer squared Q2 = 1 GeV2. Measurement of cross-sections and of generalized polarizabilities

    Laveissiere, G.

    2001-11-01

    In hadronic physics, the nucleon structure and the quarks confinement are still topical issues. The neutral pion electroproduction and virtual Compton scattering (VCS) reactions allow us to access new observables that describe this structure. This work is focussed on the VCS experiment performed at Jefferson Lab in 1998. The 4 GeV electron beam is scattered off a cryogenic hydrogen target, and the scattered electron and recoiled proton are detected in coincidence in the twin hall A spectrometers. The photon (pion) is reconstructed using a missing particle technique. The data analysis allowed to extract the cross sections relative to both process at four-momentum transfer squared Q 2 = 1 GeV 2 . The VCS cross section has been extracted for the first time in the proton resonance region (W between 1.O and 2.0 GeV) through the photon electroproduction reaction. Around the pion-production threshold up to the Delta(1232) resonance region, these results lead to the measurement of the generalized polarizabilities, that describe the proton structure in the same way as the elastic form factors. Moreover, the neutral pion electroproduction cross section measurement in the resonance region has brought new constraints on the existing phenomenological models. (author)

  1. Measurement of elastic pp scattering at √(s) = 8 TeV in the Coulomb-nuclear interference region: determination of the ρ-parameter and the total cross-section

    Antchev, G.; Atanassov, I.; Broulim, P.; Eremin, V.; Georgiev, V.; Hammerbauer, J.; Linhart, R.; Oriunno, M.; Palocko, L.; Peroutka, Z. [University of West Bohemia, Pilsen (Czech Republic); Aspell, P.; Baechler, J.; Burkhardt, H.; Giani, S.; Karev, A.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Oliveri, E.; Palazzi, P.; Radermacher, E.; Ravotti, F.; Redaelli, S.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Salvachua, B.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Valentino, G.; Wenninger, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Avati, V. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Berardi, V.; Quinto, M. [INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica di Bari, Bari (Italy); Berretti, M. [Universita degli Studi di Siena and Gruppo Collegato INFN di Siena, Siena (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bossini, E.; Bottigli, U.; Latino, G.; Losurdo, L.; Turini, N. [Universita degli Studi di Siena and Gruppo Collegato INFN di Siena, Siena (Italy); Bozzo, M.; Lo Vetere, M. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Buzzo, A.; Ferro, F.; Macri, M.; Minutoli, S.; Robutti, E. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Cafagna, F.S.; Catanesi, M.G.; Fiergolski, A.; Mercadante, A.; Radicioni, E. [INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Campanella, C.E.; De Leonardis, F.; D' Orazio, A.; Guaragnella, C.; Passaro, V.; Petruzzelli, V.; Politi, T.; Prudenzano, F. [INFN Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica e dell' Informazione - Politecnico di Bari, Bari (Italy); Csanad, M.; Nemes, F.; Sziklai, J. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Csoergo, T. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); KRF University College, Gyoengyoes (Hungary); Deile, M. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica e dell' Informazione - Politecnico di Bari, Bari (Italy); Doubek, M.; Vacek, V. [Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Eggert, K.; Niewiadomski, H.; Taylor, C. [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Physics, Cleveland, OH (United States); Garcia, F.; Heino, J.; Lauhakangas, R. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Grzanka, L.; Wyszkowski, P.; Zielinski, K. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Kaspar, J. [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kopal, J.; Kundrat, V.; Lokajicek, M.V.; Prochazka, J. [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Lami, S.; Scribano, A. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Lippmaa, E.; Lippmaa, J. [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics NICPB, Tallinn (Estonia); Minafra, N. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica di Bari, Bari (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Naaranoja, T.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oesterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Welti, J. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    The TOTEM experiment at the CERN LHC has measured elastic proton-proton scattering at the centre-of-mass energy √(s) = 8 TeV and four-momentum transfers squared, vertical stroke t vertical stroke, from 6 x 10{sup -4} to 0.2 GeV{sup 2}. Near the lower end of the t-interval the differential cross-section is sensitive to the interference between the hadronic and the electromagnetic scattering amplitudes. This article presents the elastic cross-section measurement and the constraints it imposes on the functional forms of the modulus and phase of the hadronic elastic amplitude. The data exclude the traditional Simplified West and Yennie interference formula that requires a constant phase and a purely exponential modulus of the hadronic amplitude. For parametrisations of the hadronic modulus with second- or third-order polynomials in the exponent, the data are compatible with hadronic phase functions giving either central or peripheral behaviour in the impact parameter picture of elastic scattering. In both cases, the ρ-parameter is found to be 0.12 ± 0.03. The results for the total hadronic cross-section are σ{sub tot} = (102.9 ± 2.3) mb and (103.0 ± 2.3) mb for central and peripheral phase formulations, respectively. Both are consistent with previous TOTEM measurements. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of elastic pp scattering at √(s) = 8 TeV in the Coulomb-nuclear interference region: determination of the ρ-parameter and the total cross-section

    Antchev, G.; Atanassov, I.; Broulim, P.; Eremin, V.; Georgiev, V.; Hammerbauer, J.; Linhart, R.; Oriunno, M.; Palocko, L.; Peroutka, Z.; Aspell, P.; Baechler, J.; Burkhardt, H.; Giani, S.; Karev, A.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Oliveri, E.; Palazzi, P.; Radermacher, E.; Ravotti, F.; Redaelli, S.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Salvachua, B.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Valentino, G.; Wenninger, J.; Avati, V.; Berardi, V.; Quinto, M.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Bottigli, U.; Latino, G.; Losurdo, L.; Turini, N.; Bozzo, M.; Lo Vetere, M.; Buzzo, A.; Ferro, F.; Macri, M.; Minutoli, S.; Robutti, E.; Cafagna, F.S.; Catanesi, M.G.; Fiergolski, A.; Mercadante, A.; Radicioni, E.; Campanella, C.E.; De Leonardis, F.; D'Orazio, A.; Guaragnella, C.; Passaro, V.; Petruzzelli, V.; Politi, T.; Prudenzano, F.; Csanad, M.; Nemes, F.; Sziklai, J.; Csoergo, T.; Deile, M.; Doubek, M.; Vacek, V.; Eggert, K.; Niewiadomski, H.; Taylor, C.; Garcia, F.; Heino, J.; Lauhakangas, R.; Grzanka, L.; Wyszkowski, P.; Zielinski, K.; Kaspar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrat, V.; Lokajicek, M.V.; Prochazka, J.; Lami, S.; Scribano, A.; Lippmaa, E.; Lippmaa, J.; Minafra, N.; Naaranoja, T.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oesterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Welti, J.

    2016-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the CERN LHC has measured elastic proton-proton scattering at the centre-of-mass energy √(s) = 8 TeV and four-momentum transfers squared, vertical stroke t vertical stroke, from 6 x 10"-"4 to 0.2 GeV"2. Near the lower end of the t-interval the differential cross-section is sensitive to the interference between the hadronic and the electromagnetic scattering amplitudes. This article presents the elastic cross-section measurement and the constraints it imposes on the functional forms of the modulus and phase of the hadronic elastic amplitude. The data exclude the traditional Simplified West and Yennie interference formula that requires a constant phase and a purely exponential modulus of the hadronic amplitude. For parametrisations of the hadronic modulus with second- or third-order polynomials in the exponent, the data are compatible with hadronic phase functions giving either central or peripheral behaviour in the impact parameter picture of elastic scattering. In both cases, the ρ-parameter is found to be 0.12 ± 0.03. The results for the total hadronic cross-section are σ_t_o_t = (102.9 ± 2.3) mb and (103.0 ± 2.3) mb for central and peripheral phase formulations, respectively. Both are consistent with previous TOTEM measurements. (orig.)

  3. Crossed-beam experiment for the scattering of low- and intermediate-energy electrons from BF{sub 3}: A comparative study with XF{sub 3} (X = C, N, and CH) molecules

    Hoshino, M., E-mail: masami-h@sophia.ac.jp; Suga, A.; Kato, H.; Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Limão-Vieira, P. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Ferreira da Silva, F. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-14

    Absolute differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron interaction with BF{sub 3} molecules have been measured in the impact energy range of 1.5–200 eV and recorded over a scattering angle range of 15°–150°. These angular distributions have been normalized by reference to the elastic DCSs of the He atom and integrated by employing a modified phase shift analysis procedure to generate integral cross sections (ICSs) and momentum transfer cross sections (MTCSs). The calculations of DCSs and ICSs have been carried out using an independent atom model under the screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR). The present elastic DCSs have been found to agree well with the results of IAM-SCAR calculation above 20 eV, and also with a recent Schwinger multichannel calculation below 30 eV. Furthermore, in the comparison with the XF{sub 3} (X = B, C, N, and CH) molecules, the elastic DCSs reveal a similar angular distribution which are approximately equal in magnitude from 30 to 200 eV. This feature suggests that the elastic scattering is dominated virtually by the 3-outer fluorine atoms surrounding the XF{sub 3} molecules. The vibrational DCSs have also been obtained in the energy range of 1.5–15 eV and vibrational analysis based on the angular correlation theory has been carried out to explain the nature of the shape resonances. Limited experiments on vibrational inelastic scattering confirmed the existence of a shape resonance with a peak at 3.8 eV, which is also observed in the vibrational ICS. Finally, the estimated elastic ICSs, MTCSs, as well as total cross sections are compared with the previous cross section data available.

  4. Weak Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    Ales Psaker; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2006-01-01

    We extend the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process to the weak interaction sector in the generalized Bjorken limit. The virtual Compton scattering amplitudes for the weak neutral and charged currents are calculated at the leading twist within the framework of the nonlocal light-cone expansion via coordinate space QCD string operators. Using a simple model, we estimate cross sections for neutrino scattering off the nucleon, relevant for future high intensity neutrino beam facilities

  5. Inversion assuming weak scattering

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    due to the complex nature of the field. A method based on linear inversion is employed to infer information about the statistical properties of the scattering field from the obtained cross-spectral matrix. A synthetic example based on an active high-frequency sonar demonstrates that the proposed...

  6. Concrete resource analysis of the quantum linear-system algorithm used to compute the electromagnetic scattering cross section of a 2D target

    Scherer, Artur; Valiron, Benoît; Mau, Siun-Chuon; Alexander, Scott; van den Berg, Eric; Chapuran, Thomas E.

    2017-03-01

    We provide a detailed estimate for the logical resource requirements of the quantum linear-system algorithm (Harrow et al. in Phys Rev Lett 103:150502, 2009) including the recently described elaborations and application to computing the electromagnetic scattering cross section of a metallic target (Clader et al. in Phys Rev Lett 110:250504, 2013). Our resource estimates are based on the standard quantum-circuit model of quantum computation; they comprise circuit width (related to parallelism), circuit depth (total number of steps), the number of qubits and ancilla qubits employed, and the overall number of elementary quantum gate operations as well as more specific gate counts for each elementary fault-tolerant gate from the standard set { X, Y, Z, H, S, T, { CNOT } }. In order to perform these estimates, we used an approach that combines manual analysis with automated estimates generated via the Quipper quantum programming language and compiler. Our estimates pertain to the explicit example problem size N=332{,}020{,}680 beyond which, according to a crude big-O complexity comparison, the quantum linear-system algorithm is expected to run faster than the best known classical linear-system solving algorithm. For this problem size, a desired calculation accuracy ɛ =0.01 requires an approximate circuit width 340 and circuit depth of order 10^{25} if oracle costs are excluded, and a circuit width and circuit depth of order 10^8 and 10^{29}, respectively, if the resource requirements of oracles are included, indicating that the commonly ignored oracle resources are considerable. In addition to providing detailed logical resource estimates, it is also the purpose of this paper to demonstrate explicitly (using a fine-grained approach rather than relying on coarse big-O asymptotic approximations) how these impressively large numbers arise with an actual circuit implementation of a quantum algorithm. While our estimates may prove to be conservative as more efficient

  7. A hybrid Scatter/Transform cloaking model

    Gad Licht

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new Scatter/Transform cloak is developed that combines the light bending of refraction characteristic of a Transform cloak with the scatter cancellation characteristic of a Scatter cloak. The hybrid cloak incorporates both Transform’s variable index of refraction with modified linear intrusions to maximize the Scatter cloak effect. Scatter/Transform improved the scattering cross-section of cloaking in a 2-dimensional space to 51.7% compared to only 39.6% or 45.1% respectively with either Scatter or Transform alone. Metamaterials developed with characteristics based on the new ST hybrid cloak will exhibit superior cloaking capabilities.

  8. Measurement of the cross-section of electron-positron scattering at high energy and quantum electrodynamics testing; Mesure de la section efficace de diffusion electron-positron a haute energie et validite de l'electrodynamique quantique

    Lalanne, D.

    1970-07-17

    The experiment we have performed on the ACO (Orsay Collider Ring) is one of the most accurate tests of quantum electrodynamics over very short interaction distances (10{sup -14} cm). We have studied the electron-positron elastic scattering at very wide angle. This work is divided into 4 parts. The first part reviews recent tests of quantum electrodynamics and presents the electron-positron elastic scattering. The second part describes the measurement of brightness: the experimental device, data analysis and accuracy. The measurement of brightness has been performed by detecting the photons emitted in the double Bremsstrahlung reaction: e{sup +}e{sup -} → e{sup +}e{sup -}γγ. The third part deals with the measurement of the number of Bhabha events. The last part compares the experimental value of the Bhabha scattering with the theoretically expected value. We have got the following results: the number of Bhabha events: 757 events, the experimental value for Bhabha scattering cross-section: [1.97 ± 0.09 (stat.) ± 0.10 (syst.)]*10{sup -31} cm{sup 2}. The comparison of this experimental value with the expected value has allowed us to set the lower limit of the cutting parameter Λ: Λ > 2 GeV.

  9. Measurement of Elastic pp Scattering at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV in the Coulomb-Nuclear Interference Region – Determination of the $\\rho$ Parameter and the Total Cross-Section

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069260; Aspell, P.; Atanassov, I.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Broulím, P.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.S.; Campanella, C.E.; Catanesi, M.G.; Csanád, M.; Csörgö, T.; Deile, M.; De Leonardis, F.; D'Orazio, A.; Doubek, M.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Georgiev, V.; Giani, S.; Grzanka, L.; Guaragnella, C.; Hammerbauer, J.; Heino, J.; Karev, A.; Kašpar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrát, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Linhart, R.; Lippmaa, E.; Lippmaa, J.; Lokajíček, M.V.; Losurdo, L; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Macrí, M.; Mercadante, A.; Minafra, N.; Minutoli, S.; Naaranoja, T.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Österberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Paločko, L.; Passaro, V.; Peroutka, Z.; Petruzzelli, V.; Politi, T.; Procházka, J.; Prudenzano, F.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Scribano, A.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Welti, J.; Wyszkowski, P.; Zielinski, K.

    2016-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the CERN LHC has measured elastic proton-proton scattering at the centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and four-momentum transfers squared, $|t|$, from $6\\times10^{-4}$ GeV$^2$ to 0.2 GeV$^2$. Near the lower end of the $t$-interval the differential cross-section is sensitive to the interference between the hadronic and the electromagnetic scattering amplitudes. This article presents the elastic cross-section measurement and the constraints it imposes on the functional forms of the modulus and phase of the hadronic elastic amplitude. The data exclude the traditional Simplified West and Yennie interference formula that requires a constant phase and a purely exponential modulus of the hadronic amplitude. For parametrisations of the hadronic modulus with second- or third-order polynomials in the exponent, the data are compatible with hadronic phase functions giving either central or peripheral behaviour in the impact parameter picture of elastic scattering. In both cases, the $\\rho$-pa...

  10. Analytical formulae for total cross sections for electron scattering by atoms (N, O, F, Ne, P, S, Cl, Ar, As, Se, Br, Kr) between 0.5-10 keV

    Williart, A.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical formulae for total cross sections for electron scattering by atoms which are close to the noble gases (Ne, Ar and Kr), for electron energies ranging from 0.5 to 10 keV, have been obtained in this study. We have shown, previously, that molecular total cross sections, at these energies, depend on target polarizability and the number of target electrons. A similar behaviour has been supposed for total cross sections of some atoms (N, O, F, P, S, Cl, As, Se and Br). The obtained expression depends on atomic parameters and it is based in some correlation derived from noble gases. The applicability of the formula has been checked by comparison with available data for atomic oxygen. (orig.)

  11. Analytical formulae for total cross sections for electron scattering by atoms (N, O, F, Ne, P, S, Cl, Ar, As, Se, Br, Kr) between 0.5-10 keV

    Williart, A. [Univ. Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica de los Materiales; Garcia, G. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-10-01

    Analytical formulae for total cross sections for electron scattering by atoms which are close to the noble gases (Ne, Ar and Kr), for electron energies ranging from 0.5 to 10 keV, have been obtained in this study. We have shown, previously, that molecular total cross sections, at these energies, depend on target polarizability and the number of target electrons. A similar behaviour has been supposed for total cross sections of some atoms (N, O, F, P, S, Cl, As, Se and Br). The obtained expression depends on atomic parameters and it is based in some correlation derived from noble gases. The applicability of the formula has been checked by comparison with available data for atomic oxygen. (orig.)

  12. High Neutron Fluence Survivability Testing of Advanced Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Fielder, Robert S.; Klemer, Daniel; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.

    2004-01-01

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. The purpose of the high-neutron fluence testing was to demonstrate the survivability of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in a fission reactor environment. 520 FBGs were installed in the Ford reactor at the University of Michigan. The reactor was operated for 1012 effective full power hours resulting in a maximum neutron fluence of approximately 5x1019 n/cm2, and a maximum gamma dose of 2x103 MGy gamma. This work is significant in that, to the knowledge of the authors, the exposure levels obtained are approximately 1000 times higher than for any previously published experiment. Four different fiber compositions were evaluated. An 87% survival rate was observed for fiber Bragg gratings located at the fuel centerline. Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), originally developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, can be used to interrogate several thousand low-reflectivity FBG strain and/or temperature sensors along a single optical fiber. A key advantage of the OFDR sensor technology for space nuclear power is the extremely low mass of the sensor, which consists of only a silica fiber 125μm in diameter. The sensors produced using this technology will fill applications in nuclear power for current reactor plants, emerging Generation-IV reactors, and for space nuclear power. The reported research was conducted by Luna Innovations and was funded through a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center

  13. Neutron Elastic Scattering Cross Sections of Iron and Zinc in the Energy Region 2.5 to 8.1 MeV

    Holmqvist, B.; Johansson, S.G.; Lodin, G.; Wiedling, T.; Kiss, A.

    1966-12-01

    Angular distributions were measured for the elastic scattering of neutrons from iron at five energies between 3.0 and 8. 1 MeV and from zinc at eight energies between 2.5 and 8.1 MeV. Time-of-flight technique was used. Corrections for neutron flux attenuation, multiple elastic scattering, and the finite geometry of the source-sample detector system were made by using a Monte Carlo program. An optical model potential with Saxon-Woods form factors was used to fit theoretical angular distributions to the experimental ones. The parameter values giving the best fits to the experimental distributions were calculated by a computer

  14. Differential cross sections and spin flip for inelastic scattering of 15.0-18.25 MeV neutrons on carbon 12

    Thumm, M.

    1976-01-01

    The angular distribution of the spin-flip analysing power is stronly energy-dependent, supporting the assumption of structure effects. Elastic scattering data were also measured and analysed together with results of other authors in the frame work of the optical model. An interpretation of the inelastic scattering data was only possible by the assumption of a strong, energy-dependent deformation of the spin-orbit potential. Therefore the results of the inelastic channel were also compared with a microscopic DWBA theory. In the framework of this formalism, the energy dependence could be reproduced quite well. (BJ) [de

  15. Neutron Elastic Scattering Cross Sections of Iron and Zinc in the Energy Region 2.5 to 8.1 MeV

    Holmqvist, B; Johansson, S G; Lodin, G; Wiedling, T [AB Atomenergi, Nyko eping (Sweden); Kiss, A [Inst. for Experimental Physics, Univ. of Debrecen, De brecen (Hungary)

    1966-12-15

    Angular distributions were measured for the elastic scattering of neutrons from iron at five energies between 3.0 and 8. 1 MeV and from zinc at eight energies between 2.5 and 8.1 MeV. Time-of-flight technique was used. Corrections for neutron flux attenuation, multiple elastic scattering, and the finite geometry of the source-sample detector system were made by using a Monte Carlo program. An optical model potential with Saxon-Woods form factors was used to fit theoretical angular distributions to the experimental ones. The parameter values giving the best fits to the experimental distributions were calculated by a computer.

  16. Quasiresonant scattering

    Hategan, Cornel; Comisel, Horia; Ionescu, Remus A.

    2004-01-01

    The quasiresonant scattering consists from a single channel resonance coupled by direct interaction transitions to some competing reaction channels. A description of quasiresonant Scattering, in terms of generalized reduced K-, R- and S- Matrix, is developed in this work. The quasiresonance's decay width is, due to channels coupling, smaller than the width of the ancestral single channel resonance (resonance's direct compression). (author)

  17. Thomson Scattering

    Donne, A. J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Thomson scattering is a very powerful diagnostic which is applied at nearly every magnetic confinement device. Depending on the experimental conditions different plasma parameters can be diagnosed. When the wave vector is much larger than the plasma Debye length, the total scattered power is

  18. Inelastic magnon scattering

    Robert de Mello Koch

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the worldsheet S-matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS5×S5. The D-brane is either a giant graviton or a dual giant graviton. In the gauge theory, the operators we consider belong to the su(2|3 sector of the theory. Magnon excitations of open strings can exhibit both elastic (when magnons in the bulk of the string scatter and inelastic (when magnons at the endpoint of an open string participate scattering. Both of these S-matrices are determined (up to an overall phase by the su(2|22 global symmetry of the theory. In this note we study the S-matrix for inelastic scattering. We show that it exhibits poles corresponding to boundstates of bulk and boundary magnons. A crossing equation is derived for the overall phase. It reproduces the crossing equation for maximal giant gravitons, in the appropriate limit. Finally, scattering in the su(2 sector is computed to two loops. This two loop result, which determines the overall phase to two loops, will be useful when a unique solution to the crossing equation is to be selected.

  19. Neutron scattering lengths of 3He

    Alfimenkov, V.P.; Akopian, G.G.; Wierzbicki, J.; Govorov, A.M.; Pikelner, L.B.; Sharapov, E.I.

    1976-01-01

    The total neutron scattering cross-section of 3 He has been measured in the neutron energy range from 20 meV to 2 eV. Together with the known value of coherent scattering amplitude it leads to the two sts of n 3 He scattering lengths

  20. Three-dimensional integral equation approach to light scattering, extinction cross sections, local density of states, and quasi-normal modes

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Mørk, Jesper; Kristensen, Philip Trøst

    2013-01-01

    We present a numerical formalism for solving the Lippmann–Schwinger equation for the electric field in three dimensions. The formalism may be applied to scatterers of different shapes and embedded in different background media, and we develop it in detail for the specific case of spherical scatte...

  1. Diffractive scattering on nuclei in multiple scattering theory with inelastic screening

    Zoller, V.R.

    1988-01-01

    The cross sections for the diffractive scattering of hadrons on nuclei are calculated in the two-channel approximation of multiple scattering theory. In contrast to the standard Glauber approach, it is not assumed that the nucleon scattering profile is a Gaussian or that the Regge radius of the hadron is small compared to the nuclear radius. The AGK Reggeon diagrammatic technique is used to calculate the topological cross sections and the cross sections for coherent and incoherent diffractive dissociation and quasielastic scattering. The features of hadron-nucleus scattering at superhigh energies are discussed

  2. Absolute elastic differential cross sections from electron scattering from S F6 in the 75-1000 eV range

    Nogueira, J.C.; Dallavalli, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Absolute elastic differential cross sections have been measured for incident electron energies between 75 and 1000 eV and in the angular range between 10 0 to 120 0 . The relative flow technique was used and nitrogen was the secondary gas standard. Integral cross sections have also been determined from extrapolation of the differential cross sections. The data are compared with previous experimental data, showing good agreement. (author)

  3. Scattering theory

    Sitenko, A.

    1991-01-01

    This book emerged out of graduate lectures given by the author at the University of Kiev and is intended as a graduate text. The fundamentals of non-relativistic quantum scattering theory are covered, including some topics, such as the phase-function formalism, separable potentials, and inverse scattering, which are not always coverded in textbooks on scattering theory. Criticisms of the text are minor, but the reviewer feels an inadequate index is provided and the citing of references in the Russian language is a hindrance in a graduate text

  4. Cold moderator scattering kernels

    MacFarlane, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    New thermal-scattering-law files in ENDF format have been developed for solid methane, liquid methane liquid ortho- and para-hydrogen, and liquid ortho- and para-deuterium using up-to-date models that include such effects as incoherent elastic scattering in the solid, diffusion and hindered vibration and rotations in the liquids, and spin correlations for the hydrogen and deuterium. These files were generated with the new LEAPR module of the NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System. Other modules of this system were used to produce cross sections for these moderators in the correct format for the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code (MCNP) being used for cold-moderator-design calculations at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE). 20 refs., 14 figs

  5. High precision absolute differential cross-section measurements for proton-proton elastic scattering at 491.9, 575.5, 641.6, 728.2, and 793.0 MeV

    Simon, A.J.

    1993-07-01

    The proton-proton absolute elastic differential cross section, σ pp (θ), has been measured at incident proton beam energies of 491.9, 575.5, 641.6, 728.2, and 793.0 MeV at laboratory scattering angles of ∼15 degree to ∼42 degree with a total uncertainty on the order of 1%. The measurements were made at the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and employed a new beam counting technique which provided a better overall beam normalization compared to previous experiments of this type. The cross section was measured with CH 2 targets and a primary liquid, LH 2 , target to determine the uncertainties in some systematic corrections. Extreme care was taken to reduce individual systematic errors to less than 0.5%

  6. Ab initio calculations of scattering cross sections of the three-body system (p ¯,e+,e- ) between the e-+H ¯(n =2 ) and e-+H ¯(n =3 ) thresholds

    Valdes, Mateo; Dufour, Marianne; Lazauskas, Rimantas; Hervieux, Paul-Antoine

    2018-01-01

    The ab initio method based on the Faddeev-Merkuriev equations is used to calculate cross sections involving the (p ¯,e+,e-) three-body system, with an emphasis on antihydrogen formation (H ¯) via antiproton (p ¯) scattering on positronium. This system is studied in the energy range between the e-+H ¯(n =2 ) and the e-+H ¯(n =3 ) thresholds, where precisely calculated cross sections can be useful for future experiments (GBAR, AEGIS, etc.) aiming to produce antihydrogen atoms. A special treatment is developed to take into account the long-range charge-dipole interaction effect on the wave function. Emphasis is placed on the impact of Feshbach resonances and Gailitis-Damburg oscillations appearing in the vicinity of the p ¯+Ps (n =2 ) threshold.

  7. Measurement of the D{sup *{+-}} meson production cross section and F{sub 2}{sup c} {sup anti} {sup c} at high Q{sup 2} in ep scattering at HERA

    Brinkmann, Martin

    2010-04-15

    The inclusive production cross section of D{sup *{+-}}(2010) mesons in deep-inelastic e{sup {+-}}p scattering is measured in the kinematic region of photon virtuality 100cross sections for inclusive D{sup *} meson production are measured in the visible range defined by vertical stroke {eta}(D{sup *}) vertical stroke <1.5 and p{sub T}(D{sup *})>1.5 GeV. The data were collected by the H1 experiment during the period from 2004 to 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 351 pb{sup -1}. The charm contribution, F{sub 2}{sup c} {sup anti} {sup c}, to the proton structure function F{sub 2} is determined. The measurements are compared with QCD predictions. (orig.)

  8. Neutron Elastic Scattering Cross Sections of the Elements Ni, Co, and Cu between 1.5 and 8.0 MeV

    Holmqvist, B; Wiedling, T

    1967-12-15

    Angular distributions of elastically scattered neutrons have been measured for natural nickel at seven energies between 3.0 and 8.1 MeV and for cobalt and copper at ten energies between 1.5 and 8.1 MeV, by using time-of-flight technique. The observed angular distributions were corrected for neutron flux attenuation, multiple elastic scattering, and the finite geometry of the source-sample-detector system by using a Monte Carlo computer program. Theoretical angular distributions have been fitted to the experimental angular distributions by using an optical model potential with Saxon-Woods form factors. A computer program was used to find parameter values of the potential giving the best fittings to the experimental angular distributions.

  9. ENDF/B-VIII.0: The 8th Major Release of the Nuclear Reaction Data Library with CIELO-project Cross Sections, New Standards and Thermal Scattering Data

    Brown, D. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Capote, R.; Kahler, A. C.; Trkov, A.; Herman, M. W.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Danon, Y.; Carlson, A. D.; Dunn, M.; Smith, D. L.; Hale, G. M.; Arbanas, G.; Arcilla, R.; Bates, C. R.; Beck, B.; Becker, B.; Brown, F.; Casperson, R. J.; Conlin, J.; Cullen, D. E.; Descalle, M.-A.; Firestone, R.; Gaines, T.; Guber, K. H.; Hawari, A. I.; Holmes, J.; Johnson, T. D.; Kawano, T.; Kiedrowski, B. C.; Koning, A. J.; Kopecky, S.; Leal, L.; Lestone, J. P.; Lubitz, C.; Márquez Damián, J. I.; Mattoon, C. M.; McCutchan, E. A.; Mughabghab, S.; Navratil, P.; Neudecker, D.; Nobre, G. P. A.; Noguere, G.; Paris, M.; Pigni, M. T.; Plompen, A. J.; Pritychenko, B.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Roubtsov, D.; Rochman, D.; Romano, P.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Simakov, S.; Sin, M.; Sirakov, I.; Sleaford, B.; Sobes, V.; Soukhovitskii, E. S.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.; Thompson, I.; van der Marck, S.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Wiarda, D.; White, M.; Wormald, J. L.; Wright, R. Q.; Zerkle, M.; Žerovnik, G.; Zhu, Y.

    2018-02-01

    We describe the new ENDF/B-VIII.0 evaluated nuclear reaction data library. ENDF/B-VIII.0 fully incorporates the new IAEA standards, includes improved thermal neutron scattering data and uses new evaluated data from the CIELO project for neutron reactions on 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235U, 238U and 239Pu described in companion papers in the present issue of Nuclear Data Sheets. The evaluations benefit from recent experimental data obtained in the U.S. and Europe, and improvements in theory and simulation. Notable advances include updated evaluated data for light nuclei, structural materials, actinides, fission energy release, prompt fission neutron and γ-ray spectra, thermal neutron scattering data, and charged-particle reactions. Integral validation testing is shown for a wide range of criticality, reaction rate, and neutron transmission benchmarks. In general, integral validation performance of the library is improved relative to the previous ENDF/B-VII.1 library.

  10. ENDF/B-VIII.0: The 8 th Major Release of the Nuclear Reaction Data Library with CIELO-project Cross Sections, New Standards and Thermal Scattering Data

    Brown, D. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Capote, R.; Kahler, A. C.; Trkov, A.; Herman, M. W.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Danon, Y.; Carlson, A. D.; Dunn, M.; Smith, D. L.; Hale, G. M.; Arbanas, G.; Arcilla, R.; Bates, C. R.; Beck, B.; Becker, B.; Brown, F.; Casperson, R. J.; Conlin, J.; Cullen, D. E.; Descalle, M. -A.; Firestone, R.; Gaines, T.; Guber, K. H.; Hawari, A. I.; Holmes, J.; Johnson, T. D.; Kawano, T.; Kiedrowski, B. C.; Koning, A. J.; Kopecky, S.; Leal, L.; Lestone, J. P.; Lubitz, C.; Márquez Damián, J. I.; Mattoon, C. M.; McCutchan, E. A.; Mughabghab, S.; Navratil, P.; Neudecker, D.; Nobre, G. P. A.; Noguere, G.; Paris, M.; Pigni, M. T.; Plompen, A. J.; Pritychenko, B.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Roubtsov, D.; Rochman, D.; Romano, P.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Simakov, S.; Sin, M.; Sirakov, I.; Sleaford, B.; Sobes, V.; Soukhovitskii, E. S.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.; Thompson, I.; van der Marck, S.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Wiarda, D.; White, M.; Wormald, J. L.; Wright, R. Q.; Zerkle, M.; Žerovnik, G.; Zhu, Y.

    2018-02-01

    We describe the new ENDF/B-VIII.0 evaluated nuclear reaction data library. ENDF/B-VIII.0 fully incorporates the new IAEA standards, includes improved thermal neutron scattering data and uses new evaluated data from the CIELO project for neutron reactions on 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235U, 238U and 239Pu described in companion papers in the present issue of Nuclear Data Sheets. The evaluations benefit from recent experimental data obtained in the U.S. and Europe, and improvements in theory and simulation. Notable advances include updated evaluated data for light nuclei, structural materials, actinides, fission energy release, prompt fission neutron and γ-ray spectra, thermal neutron scattering data, and charged-particle reactions. Integral validation testing is shown for a wide range of criticality, reaction rate, and neutron transmission benchmarks. In general, integral validation performance of the library is improved relative to the previous ENDF/B-VII.1 library.

  11. Critical scattering

    Stirling, W.G.; Perry, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO 3 is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs

  12. Measurement of the Q2 dependence of the charged and neutral current cross sections in e±p scattering at HERA

    Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.

    1996-03-01

    The Q 2 dependence and the total cross sections for charged and neutral current processes are measured in e ± p reactions for transverse momenta of the outgoing lepton larger than 25 GeV. Comparable size of cross sections for the neutral current process and for the weak charged current process are observed above Q 2 ∼5000 GeV 2 . Using the shape and magnitude of the charged current cross section we determine a propagator mass of m W =84 -7 +10 GeV. (orig.)

  13. Analysis of inelastic neutron scattering cross-sections to 2{sup +} states in even mass palladium nuclides. Final report. Pt. 1

    Meister, A

    1994-09-01

    Starting from experimental {gamma}-ray emission cross sections, measured recently at IRMM Geel, the (n, n`) cross sections for the isolated states are derived. The neutron energy range is extended from the reaction threshold up to 1.3 MeV, when cascade {gamma}-ray emissions complicate the analysis. In the case of Pd-110 it was possible to deduce the (n, n`) excitation function from the experimental data up to a neutron energy of 3.3 MeV. The experimental cross sections are corrected for anisotropy of {gamma}-ray emission. The analysis of the cross sections is carried out by compound nucleus reaction theory and vibrational excitations. The coupled channels code ECIS88 is used. The theoretical description of the experimental data for the first and second 2+ states is accurate; without doing any special adjustments of parameters. (orig.).

  14. Reasons why Plutonium 242 is the best fission chamber deposit to monitor the fast component of a high neutron flux

    Filliatre, P.; Oriol, L.; Jammes, C.; Vermeeren, L.

    2008-01-01

    The FNDS project aims at developing fission chambers to measure on-line the fast component of a high neutron flux (∼10 14 ncm -2 s -1 or more) with a significant thermal component. We identify with simulations the deposits of fission chambers that are best suited to this goal. We address the question of the evolution of the deposit by radiative capture and decay. A deposit of 242 Pu appears as the best choice, with a high initial sensitivity to fast neutrons only slowly degrading under irradiation. The effect of unavoidable impurities was assessed: small concentrations of 241 Pu and 239 Pu can be tolerated

  15. New calculations of cross-sections and charge asymmetries for lepton pair production and wide angle Bhabha scattering in e+e- collisions near the Z-peak

    Field, J. H.

    1994-03-01

    A new event generator for lepton pair production and wide angle Bhabha scattering, BHAGENE3, is presented. Both electroweak and higher order (beyond O(α) QED corrections are included. Comparisons are made with results from the programs, based on the structure function formalism, ALIBABA, TOPAZ0 and ZFITTER. For the case of the final states l+l-γγ ( l = e, μ, τ) BHAGENE3 results are compared with those of Monte Carlo generators that use the exact O( α2) amplitudes.

  16. Scattering of acoustic waves by small crustaceans

    Andreeva, I. B.; Tarasov, L. L.

    2003-03-01

    Features of underwater sound scattering by small crustaceans are considered. The scattering data are obtained with the use of unique instrumentation that allows one to measure quantitative scattering characteristics (backscattering cross sections and angular scattering patterns) for crustaceans of different sizes, at different frequencies (20 200 kHz) and different insonification aspects. A computational model of crustaceans is considered with allowance for both the soft tissues of the main massive part of the animal's body and the stiff armour. The model proves to be advantageous for explaining some scattering features observed in the experiments. The scattering cross sections of crustaceans measured by other researchers are presented in a unified form appropriate for comparison. Based on such a quantitative comparison, relatively simple approximate empirical formulas are proposed for estimating the backscattering cross sections of small (within several centimeters) marine crustaceans in a broad frequency range.

  17. WLWL scattering at the SSC

    Bagger, J.; Valencia, G.

    1990-01-01

    We use higher-order chiral Lagrangians to study W L W L scattering at the SSC. We analyze a model that is consistent with crossing, unitarity and chiral symmetry, with no resonant behavior at SSC energies. The only signal is a slightly enhanced rate for W L W L scattering. Our results indicate the level of sensitivity that must be reached before the SSC can be assured of discovering the mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Compton scattering

    Botto, D.J.; Pratt, R.H.

    1979-05-01

    The current status of Compton scattering, both experimental observations and the theoretical predictions, is examined. Classes of experiments are distinguished and the results obtained are summarized. The validity of the incoherent scattering function approximation and the impulse approximation is discussed. These simple theoretical approaches are compared with predictions of the nonrelativistic dipole formula of Gavrila and with the relativistic results of Whittingham. It is noted that the A -2 based approximations fail to predict resonances and an infrared divergence, both of which have been observed. It appears that at present the various available theoretical approaches differ significantly in their predictions and that further and more systematic work is required

  19. Compton scattering

    Botto, D.J.; Pratt, R.H.

    1979-05-01

    The current status of Compton scattering, both experimental observations and the theoretical predictions, is examined. Classes of experiments are distinguished and the results obtained are summarized. The validity of the incoherent scattering function approximation and the impulse approximation is discussed. These simple theoretical approaches are compared with predictions of the nonrelativistic dipole formula of Gavrila and with the relativistic results of Whittingham. It is noted that the A/sup -2/ based approximations fail to predict resonances and an infrared divergence, both of which have been observed. It appears that at present the various available theoretical approaches differ significantly in their predictions and that further and more systematic work is required.

  20. Measurement of the total cross section from elastic scattering in pp collisions at s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    M. Aaboud

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A measurement of the total pp cross section at the LHC at s=8 TeV is presented. An integrated luminosity of 500 μb−1 was accumulated in a special run with high-β⋆ beam optics to measure the differential elastic cross section as a function of the Mandelstam momentum transfer variable t. The measurement is performed with the ALFA sub-detector of ATLAS. Using a fit to the differential elastic cross section in the −t range from 0.014 GeV2 to 0.1 GeV2 to extrapolate t→0, the total cross section, σtot(pp→X, is measured via the optical theorem to beσtot(pp→X=96.07±0.18(stat.±0.85(exp.±0.31(extr.mb, where the first error is statistical, the second accounts for all experimental systematic uncertainties and the last is related to uncertainties in the extrapolation t→0. In addition, the slope of the exponential function describing the elastic cross section at small t is determined to be B=19.74±0.05(stat.±0.23(syst.GeV−2.