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Sample records for high-mobility group a1

  1. High mobility group A1 enhances tumorigenicity of human cholangiocarcinoma and confers resistance to therapy

    Quintavalle, Cristina; Burmeister, Katharina; Piscuoglio, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    High mobility group A1 (HMGA1) protein has been described to play an important role in numerous types of human carcinoma. By the modulation of several target genes HMGA1 promotes proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells. However, its role in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) has...

  2. High mobility group A1 protein modulates autophagy in cancer cells.

    Conte, Andrea; Paladino, Simona; Bianco, Gaia; Fasano, Dominga; Gerlini, Raffaele; Tornincasa, Mara; Renna, Maurizio; Fusco, Alfredo; Tramontano, Donatella; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria

    2017-11-01

    High Mobility Group A1 (HMGA1) is an architectural chromatin protein whose overexpression is a feature of malignant neoplasias with a causal role in cancer initiation and progression. HMGA1 promotes tumor growth by several mechanisms, including increase of cell proliferation and survival, impairment of DNA repair and induction of chromosome instability. Autophagy is a self-degradative process that, by providing energy sources and removing damaged organelles and misfolded proteins, allows cell survival under stress conditions. On the other hand, hyper-activated autophagy can lead to non-apoptotic programmed cell death. Autophagy deregulation is a common feature of cancer cells in which has a complex role, showing either an oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity, depending on cellular context and tumor stage. Here, we report that depletion of HMGA1 perturbs autophagy by different mechanisms. HMGA1-knockdown increases autophagosome formation by constraining the activity of the mTOR pathway, a major regulator of autophagy, and transcriptionally upregulating the autophagy-initiating kinase Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1). Consistently, functional experiments demonstrate that HMGA1 binds ULK1 promoter region and negatively regulates its transcription. On the other hand, the increase in autophagosomes is not associated to a proportionate increase in their maturation. Overall, the effects of HMGA1 depletion on autophagy are associated to a decrease in cell proliferation and ultimately impact on cancer cells viability. Importantly, silencing of ULK1 prevents the effects of HMGA1-knockdown on cellular proliferation, viability and autophagic activity, highlighting how these effects are, at least in part, mediated by ULK1. Interestingly, this phenomenon is not restricted to skin cancer cells, as similar results have been observed also in HeLa cells silenced for HMGA1. Taken together, these results clearly indicate HMGA1 as a key regulator of the autophagic pathway in cancer cells

  3. Unique case of oligoastrocytoma with recurrence and grade progression: Exhibiting differential expression of high mobility group-A1 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase

    Gandhi, Puneet; Khare, Richa; Niraj, Kavita; Garg, Nitin; Sorte, Sandeep K; Gulwani, Hanni

    2016-01-01

    Mixed gliomas, primarily oligoastrocytomas, account for about 5%-10% of all gliomas. Distinguishing oligoastrocytoma based on histological features alone has limitations in predicting the exact biological behavior, necessitating ancillary markers for greater specificity. In this case report, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and high mobility group-A1 (HMGA1); markers of proliferation and stemness, have been quantitatively analyzed in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of a 34 years old patient with oligoastrocytoma. Customized florescence-based immunohistochemistry protocol with enhanced sensitivity and specificity is used in the study. The patient presented with a history of generalized seizures and his magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed infiltrative ill-defined mass lesion with calcified foci within the left frontal white matter, suggestive of glioma. He was surgically treated at our center for four consecutive clinical events. Histopathologically, the tumor was identified as oligoastrocytoma-grade II followed by two recurrence events and final progression to grade III. Overall survival of the patient without adjuvant therapy was more than 9 years. Glial fibrillary acidic protein, p53, Ki-67, nuclear atypia index, pre-operative neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, are the other parameters assessed. Findings suggest that hTERT and HMGA1 are linked to tumor recurrence and progression. Established markers can assist in defining precise histopathological grade in conjuction with conventional markers in clinical setup. PMID:27672647

  4. Interaction of a non-histone chromatin protein (high-mobility group protein 2) with DNA

    Goodwin, G.H.; Shooter, K.V.; Johns, E.W.

    1975-01-01

    The interaction with DNA of the calf thymus chromatin non-histone protein termed the high-mobility group protein 2 has been studied by sedimentation analysis in the ultracentrifuge and by measuring the binding of the 125 I-labelled protein to DNA. The results have been compared with those obtained previously by us [Eur. J. Biochem. (1974) 47, 263-270] for the interaction of high-mobility group protein 1 with DNA. Although the binding parameters are similar for these two proteins, high-mobility group protein 2 differs from high-mobility group protein 1 in that the former appears to change the shape of the DNA to a more compact form. The molecular weight of high-mobility group protein 2 has been determined by equilibrium sedimentation and a mean value of 26,000 was obtained. A low level of nuclease activity detected in one preparation of high-mobility group protein 2 has been investigated. (orig.) [de

  5. New Mutation Identified in the SRY Gene High Mobility Group (HMG

    Feride İffet Şahin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the SRY gene prevent the differentiation of the fetal gonads to testes and cause developing female phenotype, and as a result sex reversal and pure gonadal dysgenesis (Swyer syndrome can be developed. Different types of mutations identified in the SRY gene are responsible for 15% of the gonadal dysgenesis. In this study, we report a new mutation (R132P in the High Mobility Group (HMG region of SRY gene was detected in a patient with primary amenorrhea who has 46,XY karyotype. This mutation leads to replacement of the polar and basic arginine with a nonpolar hydrophobic proline residue at aminoacid 132 in the nuclear localization signal region of the protein. With this case report we want to emphasize the genetic approach to the patients with gonadal dysgenesis. If Y chromosome is detected during cytogenetic analysis, revealing the presence of the SRY gene and identification of mutations in this gene by sequencing analysis is become important in.

  6. The role of high mobility group box 1(HMGB1)in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases

    Qingjie Chen; Xiaofeng Guan; Xiaocong Zuo; Jianglin Wang; Wenjun Yin

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1(HMGB1) is a nuclear protein that can bind to DNA and act as a co-factor for gene transcription. When released into extracellular fluid, it plays a proinflammatory role by acting as a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule(DAMP)(also known as an alarmin) to initiate innate immune responses by activating multiple cell surface receptors such as the receptor for advanced glycation end-products(RAGE) and toll-like receptors(TLRs), TLR2, TLR4 or TLR9. This proinflammatory role is now considered to be important in the pathogenesis of a wide range of kidney diseases whether they result from hemodynamic changes, renal tubular epithelial cell apoptosis, kidney tissue fibrosis or inflammation. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of HMGB1 in kidney diseases and how the HMGB1-mediated signaling pathway may constitute a new strategy for the treatment of kidney diseases.

  7. Hemoadsorption of high-mobility-group box 1 using a porous polymethylmethacrylate fiber in a swine acute liver failure model.

    Amemiya, Ryusuke; Shinoda, Masahiro; Yamada, Masayuki; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Shimada, Kaoru; Fujieda, Hiroaki; Yagi, Hiroshi; Mizota, Takamasa; Nishiyama, Ryo; Oshima, Go; Yamada, Shingo; Matsubara, Kentaro; Abe, Yuta; Hibi, Taizo; Kitago, Minoru; Obara, Hideaki; Itano, Osamu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2018-04-01

    High-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 has been identified as an important mediator of various kinds of acute and chronic inflammation. In this study, we aimed to develop a column that effectively adsorbs high-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 by altering the pore size of the fiber. First, we produced three types of porous polymethylmethacrylate fiber by altering the concentration of polymethylmethacrylate dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide. We then selected a fiber based on the results of an in vitro incubation test of high-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 adsorption. Using the selected fiber, we constructed a new column and tested its high-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 adsorption capacity during 4-h extracorporeal hemoperfusion in a swine acute liver failure model. Electron microscope observation showed that the three types of fibers had different pore sizes on the surface and in cross section, which were dependent on the concentration of polymethylmethacrylate. In the in vitro incubation test, fiber with moderate-sized pores demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity. In the in vivo hemoperfusion study, the ratio of the high-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 concentration at the outlet versus the inlet of the column was significantly lower with the new column than with the control column during 4-h extracorporeal hemoperfusion. The normalized plasma level of high-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 at 12 h after the completion of hemoperfusion was significantly lower with the new column than with the control column. The newly developed polymethylmethacrylate column adsorbs high-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 during hemoperfusion in swine ALF model.

  8. Expression and mechanism of high mobility group box protein-1 in retinal tissue of diabetic rats

    Shuang Jiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the expression and mechanism of high mobility group box protein-1(HMGB1in the retina of diabetic rats. METHODS:Sixty SD rats were randomly divided into diabetic group and control group. Diabetic rat model was produced by intraperitioneal injection of 1% STZ with 60mg/Kg weight. The rats in control group received intraperitioneal injection of normal saline with same dosage. After injection, the rats were sacrificed and eyeballs were enucleated for HE staining, the retina fluorescence angiography, TUNEL and Western Blot detection at 1, 2 and 4mo for the expressions of HMGB1 and NF-κB. RESULTS:Compared with the control group, the retinal cells disorder, cell densities decreases, microvasculars occlusion were founded with inner and outer nuclear layer thinning and ganglion cell apoptosis. The fluorescence angiography showed that peripheral capillaries became circuitous and vascular occlusion and non-perfusion area could be seen. The expressions of HMGB1 and NF-κB were higher than those of control with time dependence and they had significant positive correlations(PCONCLUSION:The expression of HMGB1 increases in diabetic rat retina, which may involve in the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy through the NF- κB pathway.

  9. Evolution of high mobility group nucleosome-binding proteins and its implications for vertebrate chromatin specialization.

    González-Romero, Rodrigo; Eirín-López, José M; Ausió, Juan

    2015-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG)-N proteins are a family of small nonhistone proteins that bind to nucleosomes (N). Despite the amount of information available on their structure and function, there is an almost complete lack of information on the molecular evolutionary mechanisms leading to their exclusive differentiation. In the present work, we provide evidence suggesting that HMGN lineages constitute independent monophyletic groups derived from a common ancestor prior to the diversification of vertebrates. Based on observations of the functional diversification across vertebrate HMGN proteins and on the extensive silent nucleotide divergence, our results suggest that the long-term evolution of HMGNs occurs under strong purifying selection, resulting from the lineage-specific functional constraints of their different protein domains. Selection analyses on independent lineages suggest that their functional specialization was mediated by bursts of adaptive selection at specific evolutionary times, in a small subset of codons with functional relevance-most notably in HMGN1, and in the rapidly evolving HMGN5. This work provides useful information to our understanding of the specialization imparted on chromatin metabolism by HMGNs, especially on the evolutionary mechanisms underlying their functional differentiation in vertebrates. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    Sánchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Malarkey, C. S. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Saperas, N. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Churchill, M. E. A., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Campos, J. L., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an unmodified AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. A new mode of DNA recognition for HMG box proteins is found in which two box A domains bind in an unusual configuration generating a highly kinked DNA structure. High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1–DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA.

  11. Anti-high mobility group box-1 antibody therapy for traumatic brain injury.

    Okuma, Yu; Liu, Keyue; Wake, Hidenori; Zhang, Jiyong; Maruo, Tomoko; Date, Isao; Yoshino, Tadashi; Ohtsuka, Aiji; Otani, Naoki; Tomura, Satoshi; Shima, Katsuji; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hideo K; Mori, Shuji; Nishibori, Masahiro

    2012-09-01

    High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) plays an important role in triggering inflammatory responses in many types of diseases. In this study, we examined the involvement of HMGB1 in traumatic brain injury (TBI) and evaluated the ability of intravenously administered neutralizing anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to attenuate brain injury. Traumatic brain injury was induced in rats or mice by fluid percussion. Anti-HMGB1 mAb or control mAb was administered intravenously after TBI. Anti-HMGB1 mAb remarkably inhibited fluid percussion-induced brain edema in rats, as detected by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging; this was associated with inhibition of HMGB1 translocation, protection of blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, suppression of inflammatory molecule expression, and improvement of motor function. In contrast, intravenous injection of recombinant HMGB1 dose-dependently produced the opposite effects. Experiments using receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE)(-/-) , toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4)(-/-) , and TLR2(-/-) mice suggested the involvement of RAGE as the predominant receptor for HMGB1. Anti-HMGB1 mAb may provide a novel and effective therapy for TBI by protecting against BBB disruption and reducing the inflammatory responses induced by HMGB1. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  12. Increased serum levels of high mobility group box 1 protein in patients with autistic disorder.

    Emanuele, Enzo; Boso, Marianna; Brondino, Natascia; Pietra, Stefania; Barale, Francesco; Ucelli di Nemi, Stefania; Politi, Pierluigi

    2010-05-30

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a highly conserved, ubiquitous protein that functions as an activator for inducing the immune response and can be released from neurons after glutamate excitotoxicity. The objective of the present study was to measure serum levels of HMGB1 in patients with autistic disorder and to study their relationship with clinical characteristics. We enrolled 22 adult patients with autistic disorder (mean age: 28.1+/-7.7 years) and 28 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean age: 28.7+/-8.1 years). Serum levels of HMGB1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared with healthy subjects, serum levels of HMGB1 were significantly higher in patients with autistic disorder (10.8+/-2.6 ng/mL versus 5.6+/-2.5 ng/mL, respectively, Pautistic disorder. Increased HMGB1 may be a biological correlate of the impaired reciprocal social interactions in this neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Expression and Effects of High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Cervical Cancer

    Xiaoao Pang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the significance of high- mobility group box1 (HMGB1 and T-cell-mediated immunity and prognostic value in cervical cancer. HMGB1, forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3 (Foxp3, IL-2, and IL-10 protein expression was analyzed in 100 cervical tissue samples including cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN, and healthy control samples using immunohistochemistry. Serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag was immunoradiometrically measured in 32 serum samples from 37 cases of squamous cervical cancer. HMGB1 and SCC-Ag were then correlated to clinicopathological characteristics. HMGB1 expression tends to increase as cervical cancer progresses and it was found to be significantly correlated to FIGO stage and lymph node metastasis. These findings suggest that HMGB1 may be a useful prognostic indicator of cervical carcinoma. In addition, there were significant positive relationships between HMGB1 and FOXP3 or IL-10 expression (both p < 0.05. In contrast, HMGB1 and IL-2 expression was negatively correlated (p < 0.05. HMGB1 expression may activate Tregs or facilitate Th2 polarization to promote immune evasion of cervical cancer. Elevated HMGB1 protein in cervical carcinoma samples was associated with a high recurrence of HPV infection in univariate analysis (p < 0.05. HMGB1 expression and levels of SCC-Ag were directly correlated in SCC (p < 0.05. Thus, HMGB1 may be a useful biomarker for patient prognosis and cervical cancer prediction and treatment.

  14. High Mobility Group B Proteins, Their Partners, and Other Redox Sensors in Ovarian and Prostate Cancer

    Aida Barreiro-Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells try to avoid the overproduction of reactive oxygen species by metabolic rearrangements. These cells also develop specific strategies to increase ROS resistance and to express the enzymatic activities necessary for ROS detoxification. Oxidative stress produces DNA damage and also induces responses, which could help the cell to restore the initial equilibrium. But if this is not possible, oxidative stress finally activates signals that will lead to cell death. High mobility group B (HMGB proteins have been previously related to the onset and progressions of cancers of different origins. The protein HMGB1 behaves as a redox sensor and its structural changes, which are conditioned by the oxidative environment, are associated with different functions of the protein. This review describes recent advances in the role of human HMGB proteins and other proteins interacting with them, in cancerous processes related to oxidative stress, with special reference to ovarian and prostate cancer. Their participation in the molecular mechanisms of resistance to cisplatin, a drug commonly used in chemotherapy, is also revised.

  15. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    Sánchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J.; Malarkey, C. S.; Saperas, N.; Churchill, M. E. A.; Campos, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an unmodified AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. A new mode of DNA recognition for HMG box proteins is found in which two box A domains bind in an unusual configuration generating a highly kinked DNA structure. High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1–DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA

  16. High Expression of High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Menstrual Blood: Implications for Endometriosis.

    Shimizu, Keiko; Kamada, Yasuhiko; Sakamoto, Ai; Matsuda, Miwa; Nakatsuka, Mikiya; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2017-11-01

    Endometriosis is a benign gynecologic disease characterized by the presence of ectopic endometrium and associated with inflammation and immune abnormalities. However, the molecular basis for endometriosis is not well understood. To address this issue, the present study examined the expression of high-mobility group box (HMGB) 1 in menstrual blood to investigate its role in the ectopic growth of human endometriotic stromal cells (ESCs). A total of 139 patients were enrolled in this study; 84 had endometriosis and 55 were nonendometriotic gynecological patients (control). The HMGB1 levels in various fluids were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in eutopic and ectopic endometrium was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and RAGE and vascular endothelial growth factor ( VEGF) messenger RNA expression in HMGB1- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated ESCs was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The HMGB1 concentration was higher in menstrual blood than in serum or peritoneal fluid ( P endometriosis following retrograde menstruation when complexed with other factors such as LPS by inducing inflammation and angiogenesis.

  17. Therapeutic potential of an anti-high mobility group box-1 monoclonal antibody in epilepsy.

    Zhao, Junli; Wang, Yi; Xu, Cenglin; Liu, Keyue; Wang, Ying; Chen, Liying; Wu, Xiaohua; Gao, Feng; Guo, Yi; Zhu, Junming; Wang, Shuang; Nishibori, Masahiro; Chen, Zhong

    2017-08-01

    Brain inflammation is a major factor in epilepsy, and the high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein is known to contribute significantly to the generation of seizures. Here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of an anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in epilepsy. anti-HMGB1 mAb attenuated both acute seizure models (maximal electroshock seizure, pentylenetetrazole-induced and kindling-induced), and chronic epilepsy model (kainic acid-induced) in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, the anti-HMGB1 mAb also attenuated seizure activities of human brain slices obtained from surgical resection from drug-resistant epilepsy patients. The mAb showed an anti-seizure effect with a long-term manner and appeared to be minimal side effects at even very high dose (no disrupted physical EEG rhythm and no impaired basic physical functions, such as body growth rate and thermoregulation). This anti-seizure effect of mAb results from its inhibition of translocated HMGB1 from nuclei following seizures, and the anti-seizure effect was absent in toll-like receptor 4 knockout (TLR4 -/- ) mice. Interestingly, the anti-HMGB1 mAb also showed a disease-modifying anti-epileptogenetic effect on epileptogenesis after status epileptics, which is indicated by reducing seizure frequency and improving the impaired cognitive function. These results indicate that the anti-HMGB1 mAb should be viewed as a very promising approach for the development of novel therapies to treat refractory epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-dependent cell responses by extracellular high mobility group box 1 protein.

    Marco Pedrazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein can operate in a synergistic fashion with different signal molecules promoting an increase of cell Ca(2+ influx. However, the mechanisms responsible for this effect of HMGB1 are still unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that, at concentrations of agonist per se ineffective, HMGB1 potentiates the activation of the ionotropic glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR in isolated hippocampal nerve terminals and in a neuroblastoma cell line. This effect was abolished by the NMDA channel blocker MK-801. The HMGB1-facilitated NMDAR opening was followed by activation of the Ca(2+-dependent enzymes calpain and nitric oxide synthase in neuroblastoma cells, resulting in an increased production of NO, a consequent enhanced cell motility, and onset of morphological differentiation. We have also identified NMDAR as the mediator of HMGB1-stimulated murine erythroleukemia cell differentiation, induced by hexamethylenebisacetamide. The potentiation of NMDAR activation involved a peptide of HMGB1 located in the B box at the amino acids 130-139. This HMGB1 fragment did not overlap with binding sites for other cell surface receptors of HMGB1, such as the advanced glycation end products or the Toll-like receptor 4. Moreover, in a competition assay, the HMGB1((130-139 peptide displaced the NMDAR/HMGB1 interaction, suggesting that it comprised the molecular and functional site of HMGB1 regulating the NMDA receptor complex. CONCLUSION: We propose that the multifunctional cytokine-like molecule HMGB1 released by activated, stressed, and damaged or necrotic cells can facilitate NMDAR-mediated cell responses, both in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues, independently of other known cell surface receptors for HMGB1.

  19. High mobility group box1 (HMGB1) in relation to cutaneous inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    Abdulahad, D.A.; Westra, J.; Reefman, E.; Zuidersma, E.; Bijzet, J.; Limburg, P.C.; Kallenberg, C.G.M.; Bijl, M.

    2013-01-01

    Photosensitivity is characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Upon ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure, patients develop inflammatory skin lesions in the vicinity of sunburn cells (SBCs). High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is released from apoptotic and activated cells and exerts inflammatory

  20. Sequence-specific high mobility group box factors recognize 10-12-base pair minor groove motifs

    van Beest, M; Dooijes, D; van De Wetering, M

    2000-01-01

    Sequence-specific high mobility group (HMG) box factors bind and bend DNA via interactions in the minor groove. Three-dimensional NMR analyses have provided the structural basis for this interaction. The cognate HMG domain DNA motif is generally believed to span 6-8 bases. However, alignment...

  1. Disulfide high mobility group box-1 causes bladder pain through bladder Toll-like receptor 4.

    Ma, Fei; Kouzoukas, Dimitrios E; Meyer-Siegler, Katherine L; Westlund, Karin N; Hunt, David E; Vera, Pedro L

    2017-05-25

    Bladder pain is a prominent symptom in several urological conditions (e.g. infection, painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis, cancer). Understanding the mechanism of bladder pain is important, particularly when the pain is not accompanied by bladder pathology. Stimulation of protease activated receptor 4 (PAR4) in the urothelium results in bladder pain through release of urothelial high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1). HGMB1 has two functionally active redox states (disulfide and all-thiol) and it is not known which form elicits bladder pain. Therefore, we investigated whether intravesical administration of specific HMGB1 redox forms caused abdominal mechanical hypersensitivity, micturition changes, and bladder inflammation in female C57BL/6 mice 24 hours post-administration. Moreover, we determined which of the specific HMGB1 receptors, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) or receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), mediate HMGB1-induced changes. Disulfide HMGB1 elicited abdominal mechanical hypersensitivity 24 hours after intravesical (5, 10, 20 μg/150 μl) instillation. In contrast, all-thiol HMGB1 did not produce abdominal mechanical hypersensitivity in any of the doses tested (1, 2, 5, 10, 20 μg/150 μl). Both HMGB1 redox forms caused micturition changes only at the highest dose tested (20 μg/150 μl) while eliciting mild bladder edema and reactive changes at all doses. We subsequently tested whether the effects of intravesical disulfide HMGB1 (10 μg/150 μl; a dose that did not produce inflammation) were prevented by systemic (i.p.) or local (intravesical) administration of either a TLR4 antagonist (TAK-242) or a RAGE antagonist (FPS-ZM1). Systemic administration of either TAK-242 (3 mg/kg) or FPS-ZM1 (10 mg/kg) prevented HMGB1 induced abdominal mechanical hypersensitivity while only intravesical TLR4 antagonist pretreatment (1.5 mg/ml; not RAGE) had this effect. The disulfide form of HMGB1 mediates bladder pain directly (not

  2. High mobility group protein DSP1 negatively regulates HSP70 transcription in Crassostrea hongkongensis

    Miao, Zongyu; Xu, Delin; Cui, Miao; Zhang, Qizhong, E-mail: zhangqzdr@126.com

    2016-06-10

    HSP70 acts mostly as a molecular chaperone and plays important roles in facilitating the folding of nascent peptides as well as the refolding or degradation of the denatured proteins. Under stressed conditions, the expression level of HSP70 is upregulated significantly and rapidly, as is known to be achieved by various regulatory factors controlling the transcriptional level. In this study, a high mobility group protein DSP1 was identified by DNA-affinity purification from the nuclear extracts of Crassostrea hongkongensis using the ChHSP70 promoter as a bait. The specific interaction between the prokaryotically expressed ChDSP1 and the FITC-labeled ChHSP70 promoter was confirmed by EMSA analysis. ChDSP1 was shown to negatively regulate ChHSP70 promoter expression by Luciferase Reporter Assay in the heterologous HEK293T cells. Both ChHSP70 and ChDSP1 transcriptions were induced by either thermal or CdCl{sub 2} stress, while the accumulated expression peaks of ChDSP1 were always slightly delayed when compared with that of ChHSP70. This indicates that ChDSP1 is involved, very likely to exert its suppressive role, in the recovery of the ChHSP70 expression from the induced level to its original state. This study is the first to report negative regulator of HSP70 gene transcription, and provides novel insights into the mechanisms controlling heat shock protein expression. -- Highlights: •HMG protein ChDSP1 shows affinity to ChHSP70 promoter in Crassostrea hongkongensis. •ChDSP1 negatively regulates ChHSP70 transcription. •ChHSP70 and ChDSP1 transcriptions were coordinately induced by thermal/Cd stress. •ChDSP1 may contribute to the recovery of the induced ChHSP70 to its original state. •This is the first report regarding negative regulator of HSP70 transcription.

  3. Retinol-induced changes in the phosphorylation levels of histones and high mobility group proteins from Sertoli cells

    Moreira J.C.F.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins play a role in the organization and functions of DNA. Covalent modifications of nuclear proteins modulate their interactions with DNA sequences and are probably one of the multiple factors involved in the process of switch on/off transcriptionally active regions of DNA. Histones and high mobility group proteins (HMG are subject to many covalent modifications that may modulate their capacity to bind to DNA. We investigated the changes induced in the phosphorylation pattern of cultured Wistar rat Sertoli cell histones and high mobility group protein subfamilies exposed to 7 µM retinol for up to 48 h. In each experiment, 6 h before the end of the retinol treatment each culture flask received 370 KBq/ml [32P]-phosphate. The histone and HMGs were isolated as previously described [Moreira et al. Medical Science Research (1994 22: 783-784]. The total protein obtained by either method was quantified and electrophoresed as described by Spiker [Analytical Biochemistry (1980 108: 263-265]. The gels were stained with Coomassie brilliant blue R-250 and the stained bands were cut and dissolved in 0.5 ml 30% H2O2 at 60oC for 12 h. The vials were chilled and 5.0 ml scintillation liquid was added. The radioactivity in each vial was determined with a liquid scintillation counter. Retinol treatment significantly changed the pattern of each subfamily of histone and high mobility group proteins.

  4. Clinical Value of High Mobility Group Box 1 and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in Head and Neck Cancer: A Systematic Review

    Nguyen, Austin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction High mobility group box 1 is a versatile protein involved in gene transcription, extracellular signaling, and response to inflammation. Extracellularly, high mobility group box 1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Expression of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products has been described in many cancers. Objectives To systematically review the available literature using PubMed and Web of Science to evaluate the clinical value of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Data synthesis A total of eleven studies were included in this review. High mobility group box 1 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis and many clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients. Additionally, the receptor for advanced glycation end-products demonstrates potential value as a clinical indicator of tumor angiogenesis and advanced staging. In diagnosis, high mobility group box 1 demonstrates low sensitivity. Conclusion High mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products are associated with clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Further investigation of the prognostic and diagnostic value of these molecules is warranted.

  5. [Changing laws of serum high mobility group box 1 protein in septic rats and the intervention effect of xuebijing].

    Zhao, Shi-bing; He, Xian-di; Wang, Hua-xue; Zheng, Sheng-yong; Deng, Xi-ming; Duan, Li-bin

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the changing laws of serum high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) in septic rats and intervention effect of Xuebijing on it. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg/kg BW) was intravenously injected into the tail vein of healthy male Wistar rats to prepare the sepsis rat model. In Experiment 1: 50 Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups, i.e., the normal group (A, n=10); the LPS model group (B, n=10), the LPS +Xuebijing treatment group (C, n=30). Rats in the C group were further divided into three subgroups, i.e., 2 h before LPS injection (group C1), 2 h after LPS injection (group C2), and 8 h after LPS injection (group C3), 10 in each group. Blood samples were collected from the caudal vein to detect serum HMGB1 levels by Western blot at 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after LPS injection. Experiment 2: 30 Wistar rats were equally divided into the LPS model group (D) and the LPS + Xuebijing treatment group (E), 15 in each group. They were treated as rats in the B group and the C1 group respectively. Five rats were sacrificed at 12, 24, and 48 h after LPS injection in the two groups. Blood as well as the tissue samples were harvested to measure such indices as ALT, AST, Cr, and BUN, as well as pathological changes of liver, lung, and kidney. (1) Compared with the A group, serum HMGB1 levels were higher at various time points in the B group (P decrement in the C3 group was less than that in the C1 and C2 groups (P multiple organ dysfunction. Xuebijing could reduce the serum levels of HMGB1, improve biochemical parameters, and attenuate severe inflammatory response of liver, lung, and kidney tissues in septic rats. Besides, the earlier use, the better effect obtained.

  6. Phenotypic analysis of newly isolated short-lifespan Neurospora crassa mutant deficient in a high mobility group box protein.

    Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Li, ZhengHao; Ishimori, Keisuke; Kuwabara, Kazuki; Hatakeyama, Shin; Tanaka, Shuuitsu

    2017-08-01

    To elucidate genetic mechanisms affecting the lifespan of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, we attempted to identify a gene of which a defect causes a short-lifespan. By screening a Neurospora knockout library, provided by the Fungal Genetics Stock Center at Kansas State University, several KO strains with a short-lifespan were isolated. FGSC#11693 is one of these, which shows similar phenotypes to known Neurospora short-lifespan mutants as follows: 1) hyphal growth ceases after about 2weeks of cultivation, despite that of the wild-type continuing for over 2years, 2) viability of conidia is lower than that of the wild-type, and 3) high sensitivity to mutagens such as methyl methanesulfonate, ultraviolet radiation, and hydroxyl urea is exhibited. The NCU number of the knocked-out gene in the KO strain is NCU02695, and recovery from the short-lifespan and mutagen sensitivity was achieved by the introduction of this gene from the wild-type. The putative amino acid sequence of the knocked-out gene contains two high mobility group box domains and a mitochondrial localization signal is found at the N-terminal of this sequence. Upon analyzing the subcellular localization of the gene product fused with GFP, GFP signals were detected in mitochondria. From these observations, the gene and KO strain were named mitochondrial high mobility group box protein 1 (MHG1) and mhg1 KO strain, respectively. The amount of mtDNA relative to the nuclear amount was lower in the mhg1 KO strain than in the wild-type. mtDNA aberration was also observed in the mhg1 KO strain. These results suggest that the MHG1 protein plays an important role in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA, and mitochondrial abnormality caused by mtDNA aberration is responsible for the short-lifespan of the mhg1 KO strain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of high mobility group box-1 and protection of growth hormone and somatostatin in severe acute pancreatitis

    Wang, Y.F. [Department of Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Wu, M. [Department of Surgery, Jinshan Pavilion Forest Hospital, Shanghai (China); Ma, B.J.; Cai, D.A.; Yin, B.B. [Department of Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-09-12

    In this study, we investigated the potential role of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the effects of growth hormone (G) and somatostatin (S) in SAP rats. The rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 each: sham-operated, SAP, SAP+saline, SAP+G, SAP+S and SAP+G+S. Ileum and pancreas tissues of rats in each group were evaluated histologically. HMGB1 mRNA expression was measured by reverse transcription-PCR. Levels of circulating TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were also measured. In the SAP group, interstitial congestion and edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and interstitial hemorrhage occurred in ileum and pancreas tissues. The levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and endotoxin were significantly up-regulated in the SAP group compared with those in the sham-operated group, and the 7-day survival rate was 0%. In the SAP+G and SAP+S groups, the inflammatory response of the morphological structures was alleviated, the levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were significantly decreased compared with those in the SAP group, and the survival rate was increased. Moreover, in the SAP+G+S group, all histological scores were significantly improved and the survival rate was significantly higher compared with the SAP group. In conclusion, HMGB1 might participate in pancreas and ileum injury in SAP. Growth hormone and somatostatin might play a therapeutic role in the inflammatory response of SAP.

  8. Role of high mobility group box-1 and protection of growth hormone and somatostatin in severe acute pancreatitis

    Wang, Y.F.; Wu, M.; Ma, B.J.; Cai, D.A.; Yin, B.B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential role of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the effects of growth hormone (G) and somatostatin (S) in SAP rats. The rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 each: sham-operated, SAP, SAP+saline, SAP+G, SAP+S and SAP+G+S. Ileum and pancreas tissues of rats in each group were evaluated histologically. HMGB1 mRNA expression was measured by reverse transcription-PCR. Levels of circulating TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were also measured. In the SAP group, interstitial congestion and edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and interstitial hemorrhage occurred in ileum and pancreas tissues. The levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and endotoxin were significantly up-regulated in the SAP group compared with those in the sham-operated group, and the 7-day survival rate was 0%. In the SAP+G and SAP+S groups, the inflammatory response of the morphological structures was alleviated, the levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were significantly decreased compared with those in the SAP group, and the survival rate was increased. Moreover, in the SAP+G+S group, all histological scores were significantly improved and the survival rate was significantly higher compared with the SAP group. In conclusion, HMGB1 might participate in pancreas and ileum injury in SAP. Growth hormone and somatostatin might play a therapeutic role in the inflammatory response of SAP

  9. Purpurogallin, a Natural Phenol, Attenuates High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Induced Vasospasm in a Rat Model

    Chih-Zen Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 was shown to be an important extracellular mediator involved in vascular inflammation of animals following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. This study is of interest to examine the efficacy of purpurogallin, a natural phenol, on the alternation of cytokines and HMGB1 in a SAH model. A rodent double hemorrhage SAH model was employed. Basilar arteries (BAs were harvested to examine HMGB1 mRNA and protein expression (Western blot. CSF samples were to examine IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α (rt-PCR. Deformed endothelial wall, tortuous elastic lamina, and necrotic smooth muscle were observed in the vessels of SAH groups but were absent in the purpurogallin group. IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the SAH only and SAH plus vehicle groups were significantly elevated (P<0.01. Purpurgallin dose-dependently reduced HMGB1 protein expression. Likewise, high dose purpurogallin reduced TNF-α and HMGB1 mRNA levels. In conclusion, purpurogallin exerts its neuroinflammation effect through the dual effect of inhibiting IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression and reducing HMGB1 protein and mRNA expression. This study supports purpurogallin could attenuate both proinflammatory cytokines and late-onset inflammasome in SAH induced vasospasm.

  10. Necrotic enlargement of cone photoreceptor cells and the release of high-mobility group box-1 in retinitis pigmentosa

    Murakami, Y; Ikeda, Y; Nakatake, S; Tachibana, T; Fujiwara, K; Yoshida, N; Notomi, S; Nakao, S; Hisatomi, T; Miller, J W; Vavvas, DG; Sonoda, KH; Ishibashi, T

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal degenerations resulting form rod and cone photoreceptor cell death. The rod cell death due to deleterious genetic mutations has been shown to occur mainly through apoptosis, whereas the mechanisms and features of the secondary cone cell death have not been fully elucidated. Our previous study showed that the cone cell death in rd10 mice, an animal model of RP, involves necrotic features and is partly mediated by the receptor interacting protein kinase. However, the relevancy of necrotic cone cell death in human RP patients remains unknown. In the present study, we showed that dying cone cells in rd10 mice exhibited cellular enlargement, along with necrotic changes such as cellular swelling and mitochondrial rupture. In human eyes, live imaging of cone cells by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy revealed significantly increased percentages of enlarged cone cells in the RP patients compared with the control subjects. The vitreous of the RP patients contained significantly higher levels of high-mobility group box-1, which is released extracellularly associated with necrotic cell death. These findings suggest that necrotic enlargement of cone cells is involved in the process of cone degeneration, and that necrosis may be a novel target to prevent or delay the loss of cone-mediated central vision in RP. PMID:27551484

  11. Adsorption of the Inflammatory Mediator High-Mobility Group Box 1 by Polymers with Different Charge and Porosity

    Carla Tripisciano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 is a conserved protein with a variety of biological functions inside as well as outside the cell. When released by activated immune cells, it acts as a proinflammatory cytokine. Its delayed release has sparked the interest in HMGB1 as a potential therapeutic target. Here, we studied the adsorption of HMGB1 to anionic methacrylate-based polymers as well as to neutral polystyrene-divinylbenzene copolymers. Both groups of adsorbents exhibited efficient binding of recombinant HMGB1 and of HMGB1 derived from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The adsorption characteristics depended on particle size, porosity, accessibility of the pores, and charge of the polymers. In addition to these physicochemical parameters of the adsorbents, modifications of the molecule itself (e.g., acetylation, phosphorylation, and oxidation, interaction with other plasma proteins or anticoagulants (e.g., heparin, or association with extracellular microvesicles may influence the binding of HMGB1 to adsorbents and lead to preferential depletion of HMGB1 subsets with different biological activity.

  12. The role of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1) in the diabetic retinopathy inflammation and apoptosis.

    Yu, Yao; Yang, Lu; Lv, Jinlei; Huang, Xu; Yi, Jinglin; Pei, Chonggang; Shao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common complications of the late phase diabetes, and also a common cause of blindness. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1) is considered to be an inflammatory mediator in the late phase that promotes inflammation and neovascularization in diabetes. Therefore, this paper discussed the role of HMGB-1 in diabetic retinopathy inflammation and neovascularization. 96 adult SD rats were randomly divided into control and diabetes group. The diabetic rat model was established by intraperitoneal injection of streptomycin (0.1 mol/L). Western blot was applied to determine HMGB-1 and its receptor RAGE and TLR2 protein expression in the serum. TUNEL was used to detect retinal apoptosis. Immunofluorescence was performed to test HMGB1 protein expression in retina. HBGM-1 and RAGE expression in diabetic rat retina was significantly higher than the control (P detection showed that diabetic rat retinal cells presented obviously higher apoptosis rate (P diabetic rat retinal cells (P diabetic retinopathy by binding with RAGE receptor to accelerate rat retinal cells apoptosis.

  13. Overexpression of high mobility group box 1 contributes to progressive clinicopathological features and poor prognosis of human bladder urothelial carcinoma

    Huang CK

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Changkun Huang,* Zhichao Huang,* Xiaokun Zhao, Yinhuai Wang, Hongqing Zhao, Zhaohui Zhong, Lang Wang Department of Urology, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a versatile protein with intranuclear and extracellular functions, plays an important role in a variety of human cancers. However, the clinical/prognostic significance of HMGB1 expression in human bladder urothelial carcinoma (BUC remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the HMGB1 expression in human BUC with regard to its clinical and prognostic significance.Patients and methods: HMGB1 mRNA and protein expressions in tumor and paired normal bladder tissues were detected in 20 BUC cases by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and Western blot. HMGB1 protein expression in 165 primary BUC tissues was evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC, and its correlations with clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis were also analyzed. Student’s t-test, χ2 test, Kaplan–Meier plots, and Cox proportional hazard regression model were performed to analyze the data. Results: By using qRT-PCR and Western blot, the upregulated expression of HMGB1 mRNA and protein was detected in BUC, compared with paired normal tissue (P<0.05. By using IHC, high HMGB1 expression was examined in 84 of 165 (51.0% BUC cases. High HMGB1 expression was significantly correlated with poorer differentiation and higher T and N classification (all P<0.05. Univariate analysis showed that high HMGB1 expression was significantly associated with a shortened patients’ overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS; both P<0.001. In different subgroups of BUC patients, HMGB1 expression was a prognostic factor in patients with different histological grades or T classification (all P<0.05, pN− (both P<0.001 for OS and DFS, and

  14. Overexpression of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Human Dental Pulp Inflammation

    Salunya Tancharoen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a nonhistone DNA-binding protein, is released into the extracellular space and promotes inflammation. HMGB1 binds to related cell signaling transduction receptors, including receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, which actively participate in vascular and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the pathogenesis of pulpitis and investigate the effect of Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia lipopolysaccharide (LPS on RAGE and HMGB1 expression in odontoblast-like cells (OLC-1. RAGE and HMGB1 expression levels in clinically inflamed dental pulp were higher than those in healthy dental pulp. Upregulated expression of RAGE was observed in odontoblasts, stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells, and endothelial-like cell lining human pulpitis tissue. Strong cytoplasmic HMGB1 immunoreactivity was noted in odontoblasts, whereas nuclear HMGB1 immunoreactivity was seen in stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells in human pulpitis tissue. LPS stimulated OLC-1 cells produced HMGB1 in a dose-dependent manner through RAGE. HMGB1 translocation towards the cytoplasm and secretion from OLC-1 in response to LPS was inhibited by TPCA-1, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that RAGE and HMGB1 play an important role in the pulpal immune response to oral bacterial infection.

  15. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells

    Zhang, Xufang; Jiang, Hongwei; Gong, Qimei; Fan, Chen; Huang, Yihua; Ling, Junqi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • HMGB1 translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm during dental pulp inflammation. • HMGB1and its receptor RAGE were up-regulated in hDPCs under LPS stimulation. • HMGB1 enhanced hDPCs migration and induces cytoskeleton reorganization. • HMGB1 may play a critical role in dental pulp repair during inflamed state. - Abstract: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects on proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration

  16. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells

    Zhang, Xufang, E-mail: xufang.zhang@student.qut.edu.au [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059 (Australia); Jiang, Hongwei, E-mail: jianghw@163.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Gong, Qimei, E-mail: gongqmei@gmail.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Fan, Chen, E-mail: c3.fan@student.qut.edu.au [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059 (Australia); Huang, Yihua, E-mail: enu0701@163.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Ling, Junqi, E-mail: lingjq@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • HMGB1 translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm during dental pulp inflammation. • HMGB1and its receptor RAGE were up-regulated in hDPCs under LPS stimulation. • HMGB1 enhanced hDPCs migration and induces cytoskeleton reorganization. • HMGB1 may play a critical role in dental pulp repair during inflamed state. - Abstract: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects on proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration.

  17. Activation of Plant Innate Immunity by Extracellular High Mobility Group Box 3 and Its Inhibition by Salicylic Acid.

    Hyong Woo Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs signal the presence of tissue damage to induce immune responses in plants and animals. Here, we report that High Mobility Group Box 3 (HMGB3 is a novel plant DAMP. Extracellular HMGB3, through receptor-like kinases BAK1 and BKK1, induced hallmark innate immune responses, including i MAPK activation, ii defense-related gene expression, iii callose deposition, and iv enhanced resistance to Botrytis cinerea. Infection by necrotrophic B. cinerea released HMGB3 into the extracellular space (apoplast. Silencing HMGBs enhanced susceptibility to B. cinerea, while HMGB3 injection into apoplast restored resistance. Like its human counterpart, HMGB3 binds salicylic acid (SA, which results in inhibition of its DAMP activity. An SA-binding site mutant of HMGB3 retained its DAMP activity, which was no longer inhibited by SA, consistent with its reduced SA-binding activity. These results provide cross-kingdom evidence that HMGB proteins function as DAMPs and that SA is their conserved inhibitor.

  18. Up-regulation of TLR2 and TLR4 in high mobility group Box1-stimulated macrophages in pulpitis patients

    Mahmoudi, Javad; Sabermarouf, Babak; Baradaran, Behzad; Sadat-Hatamnezhad, Leila; Shotorbani, Siamak Sandoghchian

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): High Mobility Group Box1 (HMGB1) is a nonhistone, DNA-binding protein that serves a crucial role in regulating gene transcription and is involved in a variety of proinflammatory, extracellular activities. The aim of this study was to explore whether HMGB1 stimulation can up-regulate the expression of Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2) and Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) on macrophages from pulpitis and to clarify the subsequent events involving Th17 cells and Th17 cell-associated cytokine changes. Materials and Methods: Having prepared dental pulp tissues of pulpitis and healthy controls, macrophage were isolated and cultured. Macrophages were thereafter stimulated by HMGB1 time course. RT-QPCR, flowcytometer, immunofluorescence, Western blotting, and ELISA techniques were used in the present research. Results: Our results showed that the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 on macrophages stimulated with HMGB1 increased in pulpitis compared with controls (macrophages without HMGB1 stimulation) with a statistical significance (Ppulpitis increased, and NF-kB, the downstream target of TLR2 and TLR4, also showed a marked elevation after macrophages’ stimulation by HMGB1. Conclusion: The evidence from the present study suggests that the enhanced TLR2 and TLR4 pathways and Th17 cell polarization may be due to HMGB1 stimulation in pulpitis. PMID:28293399

  19. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Disrupts Metabolic Function with Cigarette Smoke Exposure in a Ceramide-Dependent Manner

    Oliver J. Taylor

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously found that cigarette smoke disrupts metabolic function, in part, by increasing muscle ceramide accrual. To further our understanding of this, we sought to determine the role of the cytokine high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, which is increased with smoke exposure, in smoke-induced muscle metabolic perturbations. To test this theory, we determined HMGB1 from lungs of human smokers, as well as from lung cells from mice exposed to cigarette smoke. We also treated cells and mice directly with HMGB1, in the presence or absence of myriocin, an inhibitor of serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in ceramide biosynthesis. Outcomes included assessments of insulin resistance and muscle mitochondrial function. HMGB1 was significantly increased in both human lungs and rodent alveolar macrophages. Further testing revealed that HMGB1 treatment elicited a widespread increase in ceramide species and reduction in myotube mitochondrial respiration, an increase in reactive oxygen species, and reduced insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Inhibition of ceramide biosynthesis with myriocin was protective. In mice, by comparing treatments of HMGB1 injections with or without myriocin, we found that HMGB1 injections resulted in increased muscle ceramides, especially C16 and C24, which were necessary for reduced muscle mitochondrial respiration and compromised insulin and glucose tolerance. In conclusion, HMGB1 may be a necessary intermediate in the ceramide-dependent metabolic consequences of cigarette smoke exposure.

  20. Essential roles of high-mobility group box 1 in the development of murine colitis and colitis-associated cancer

    Maeda, Shin; Hikiba, Yohko; Shibata, Wataru; Ohmae, Tomoya; Yanai, Ayako; Ogura, Keiji; Yamada, Shingo; Omata, Masao

    2007-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear factor released extracellularly as a proinflammatory cytokine. We measured the HMGB1 concentration in the sera of mice with chemically induced colitis (DSS; dextran sulfate sodium salt) and found a marked increase. Inhibition of HMGB1 by neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody resulted in reduced inflammation in DSS-treated colons. In macrophages, HMGB1 induces several proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, which are regulated by NF-κB activation. Two putative sources of HMGB1 were explored: in one, bacterial factors induce HMGB1 secretion from macrophages and in the other, necrotic epithelial cells directly release HMGB1. LPS induced a small amount of HMGB1 in macrophages, but macrophages incubated with supernatant prepared from necrotic cells and containing large amounts of HMGB1 activated NF-κB and induced IL-6. Using the colitis-associated cancer model, we demonstrated that neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody decreases tumor incidence and size. These observations suggest that HMGB1 is a potentially useful target for IBD treatment and the prevention of colitis-associated cancer

  1. C-reactive protein and high mobility group box 1 in dogs with gastric dilatation and volvulus.

    Uhrikova, Ivana; Rauserova-Lexmaulova, Leona; Rehakova, Kristina; Scheer, Peter; Doubek, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    To (1) measure C-reactive protein (CRP) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and (2) evaluate their prognostic value and relationship to severity of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, routine hematological and acid-base parameters in dogs with gastric dilatation volvulus (GDV). Prospective observational study from September 2010 to June 2012. Veterinary teaching hospital. Forty-one client-owned dogs with GDV. None. Blood was collected before surgery (baseline), postsurgery, 6-10 hours postsurgery, and 18-22 hours postsurgery. CRP and HMGB1 were measured in all samples, and routine hematological, biochemical, and acid-base analyses were performed. Only baseline and postsurgery samples were used from nonsurvivors (n = 10). CRP increased significantly from postsurgery sampling to 18-22 hours postsurgery, while HMGB1 did not change over time. There was a significant difference in HMGB1 between survivors and nonsurvivors over time. Both proteins correlated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome severity, total leukocyte, segmented neutrophils, and band counts. HMGB1 correlated also with acid-base parameters (pH, bicarbonate, base excess). HMGB1 and CRP behaved differently in regards to their kinetic patterns, with HMGB1 appearing to better reflect the severity of tissue injury in dogs with GDV than CRP. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  2. Vagal modulation of high mobility group box-1 protein mediates electroacupuncture-induced cardioprotection in ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Zhang, Juan; Yong, Yue; Li, Xing; Hu, Yu; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong-qiang; Song, Wei; Chen, Wen-ting; Xie, Jian; Chen, Xue-mei; Lv, Xin; Hou, Li-li; Wang, Ke; Zhou, Jia; Wang, Xiang-rui; Song, Jian-gang

    2015-10-26

    Excessive release of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein from ischemic cardiomyocytes activates inflammatory cascades and enhances myocardial injury after reperfusion. Here we report evidence that electroacupuncture of mice at Neiguan acupoints can inhibit the up-regulation of cardiac HMGB1 following myocardial ischemia and attenuate the associated inflammatory responses and myocardial injury during reperfusion. These benefits of electroacupuncture were partially reversed by administering recombinant HMGB1 to the mice, and further potentiated by administering anti-HMGB1 antibody. Electroacupuncture-induced inhibition of HMGB1 release was markedly reduced by unilateral vagotomy or administration of nicotinic receptor antagonist, but not by chemical sympathectomy. The cholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine mimicked the effects of electroacupuncture on HMGB1 release and myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Culture experiments with isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes showed that acetylcholine, but not noradrenaline, inhibited hypoxia-induced release of HMGB1 via a α7nAchR-dependent pathway. These results suggest that electroacupuncture acts via the vagal nerve and its nicotinic receptor-mediated signaling to inhibit HMGB1 release from ischemic cardiomyocytes. This helps attenuate pro-inflammatory responses and myocardial injury during reperfusion.

  3. Protective effect of Sestrin2 on apoptosis of dendritic cells induced by high mobility group box-1 protein

    Li-xue WANG

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the potential role of Sestrin2 (SESN2 in regulating the apoptosis of dendritic cells (DCs induced by high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1. Methods DCs (the murine DC cell line DC2.4 were cultured with or without HMGB1 stimulation (cultured with 10ng/ml HMGB1 for 8, 24 and 48 hours, or cultured with HMGB1 for 48 hours at different concentrations of 1, 10 and 100ng/ml, respectively, n=4. The protein level of SESN2, cleaved-caspase-3 and Bcl-2 were analyzed with Western blotting. Localization of SESN2 in cells was observed under confocal laser microscope (LSCM. Cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry. In addition, DC2.4 cells were transfected with lentivirus containing SESN2 LV-RNA, SESN2 siRNA sequence expressing plasmids or blank vector (NC, NS, n=4. These cells were then stimulated with HMGB1 (100ng/ml for 48 hours, and the apoptosis was accessed as mentioned above. Results Compared with the control group, the expression of SESN2 was obviously up-regulated after HMGB1 (10ng/ml stimulation for 24 and 48 hours (P<0.05. In a dose-dependent response, the expression of SESN2 was markedly enhanced in treatment with 1, 10, 100ng/ml HMGB1 for 48 hours (P<0.05. Compared with the control group (7.35%±1.33%, the percentage of apoptosis was significantly increased with 10, 100ng/ml HMGB1 for 48 hours [(17.02%±4.85%, 17.48%±4.04%, respectively, P<0.05 or P<0.01]. After transfection, compared with blank vector group, the apoptosis of SESN2 siRNA group obviously elevated [(65.96%±2.50% vs. (50.01%±2.07%, P<0.05], and cleaved-caspase-3 expression significantly increased while Bcl-2 expression obviously decreased. In SESN2 LV-RNA group, the apoptosis significantly decreased [(35.57%±1.69% vs. (49.04%±4.87%, P<0.05], and cleaved-caspase-3 expression decreased and Bcl-2 expression obviously increased compared with blank vector group (P<0.05. Conclusion SESN2 has a protective effect against HMGB1 induced apoptosis of DC2

  4. [Expression of high mobility group box-1 in the lung tissue and serum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Yang, Xiao-min; Yang, Hua

    2013-07-01

    To explore the expression of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in the lung tissue and serum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and to explore its relationship with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin(IL)-1β. Sixty samples of lung tissues were obtained from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who had underwent pneumonectomy in Department of Chest Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical College from June 2010 to December 2011. At the same period, 40 normal lung samples were also obtained from patients with pulmonary contusion and lung cancer by surgical resections as the control group. The mRNA expressions of HMGB1 was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the protein level of HMGB1 was measured by immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays in lung tissue. Blood samples were taken from 89 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (pulmonary tuberculosis group), including hematogenous disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis (type II) in 35 cases and secondary pulmonary tuberculosis (type III) in 54 cases, and 50 healthy volunteers (control group). Furthermore, the 54 patients with secondary pulmonary tuberculosis were divided into different subgroups according to cavity formation and the lung fields involved: patients without lung cavity (35 cases) vs those with lung cavity (19 cases), patients with involvement of pulmonary tuberculosis (69 ± 29) was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (22 ± 12) (t = 2.389, P pulmonary tuberculosis (786 ± 86) was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (202 ± 60) (t = 3.872, P pulmonary tuberculosis group were (5.0 ± 3.2) µg/L, (118 ± 77) ng/L and (33 ± 20) ng/L, respectively, which were significantly higher than those in the control group [(1.7 ± 1.0) µg/L, (40 ± 11) ng/L and (18 ± 12) ng/L, respectively], the respective t values being -0.928, 4.268 and 11.064, all P pulmonary tuberculosis, the serum concentration of HMGB

  5. [Effects of exogenous high mobility group protein box 1 on angiogenesis in ischemic zone of early scald wounds of rats].

    Dai, L; Guo, X; Huang, H J; Liao, X M; Luo, X Q; Li, D; Zhou, H; Gao, X C; Tan, M Y

    2018-04-20

    Objective: To observe effects of exogenous high mobility group protein box 1 (HMGB1) on angiogenesis in ischemic zone of early scald wounds of rats. Methods: Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into HMGB1 group and simple scald (SS) group according to the random number table, with 18 rats in each group. Comb-like copper mould was placed on the back of rats for 20 s after being immersed in 100 ℃ hot water for 3 to 5 min to make three ischemic zones of wound. Immediately after scald, rats in HMGB1 group were subcutaneously injected with 0.4 μg HMGB1 and 0.1 mL phosphate buffer solution (PBS), and rats in SS group were subcutaneously injected with 0.1 mL PBS from boarders of ischemic zone of scald wound. At post scald hour (PSH) 24, 48, and 72, 6 rats in each group were collected. Protein expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in ischemic zone of wound at PSH 24, 48, and 72 and protein expressions of CD31 in ischemic zone of wound at PSH 48 and 72 were detected by immunohistochemistry. The number of microvessel in CD31 immunohistochemical sections of ischemic zone of wound at PSH 48 and 72 was calculated after observing by the microscope. The mRNA expressions of VEGF and CD31 in ischemic zone of wound were detected by real-time fluorescence quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction at PSH 24, 48, and 72. Data were processed with analysis of variance of factorial design, t test, and Bonferroni correction. Results: (1) At PSH 24, 48, and 72, protein expressions of VEGF in ischemic zone of wound of rats in HMGB1 group were significantly higher than those of rats in SS group ( t =7.496, 4.437, 5.402, P zone of wound of rats in HMGB1 group were 0.038 8±0.007 9 and 0.057 7±0.001 2 respectively, significantly higher than 0.013 4±0.004 9 and 0.030 3±0.004 0 of rats in SS group ( t =10.257, 15.055, P zone of wound of rats in HMGB1 group was obviously more than that of rats in SS group ( t =3.536, 4.000, P zone of wound of

  6. The Role of Serum High Mobility Group Box 1 and Interleukin-6 Levels in Acute Pancreatitis: A Meta-Analysis.

    Li, Nuo; Wang, Bao-Ming; Cai, Shuang; Liu, Peng-Liang

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to comprehensively investigate the correlation between high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in relation to acute pancreatitis. A highly regulated exploration of various electronic databases, supplemented by manual searching methods, was performed in an attempt to identify pertinent articles of a useful nature. Subsequently, high-quality cohort studies that were deemed to comply with the arduous inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected for our meta-analysis. The extensive data analyses reported in our meta-analysis were conducted in connection with the Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2.0 (CMA 2.0). A total of 395 studies (135 Chinese studies and 260 English studies) were initially retrieved. 27 of those studies were selected for our meta-analysis, comprising of 896 cases of mild acute pancreatitis (MAP), 700 cases of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) as well as 312 healthy controls. Pooled data suggested that serum HMGB1 and IL-6 levels of SAP and MAP patients were higher than in healthy controls. Moreover, serum HMGB1 and IL-6 levels of SAP patients exhibited significantly higher levels than in that of MAP patients. Based on the rigorous investigation of our meta-analysis, it was concluded that serum HMGB1 and IL-6 levels might be used as effective indicators for pancreatic lesions as well as the degree of inflammatory response, owing ultimately to the observations and data analyses, suggesting that serum HMGB1 and IL-6 levels share a close correlation with the severity of pancreatitis. J. Cell. Biochem. 119: 616-624, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. High mobility group box-1 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C zeta and secreted in colon cancer cells

    Lee, Hanna; Park, Minhee; Shin, Nara; Kim, Gamin [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Gi [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jeon-Soo [Department of Microbiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hoguen, E-mail: hkyonsei@yuhs.ac [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific enzyme for HMGB1 phosphorylation and its secretion is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of PKC-{zeta} leads to significant reduction of the secreted HMGB1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation of specific site of HMGB1 redirects its secretion in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of PKC-{zeta} in cancers explains the enhanced HMGB1 secretion. -- Abstract: High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, is overexpressed and secreted in cancer cells. Phosphorylation on two different nuclear localization signal regions are known to be important for the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic transport and secretion of HMGB1. However, little is known about the biochemical mechanism of HMGB1 modifications and its subsequent secretion from cancer cells. To identify the specific enzyme and important sites for HMGB1 phosphorylation, we screened the protein kinase C (PKC) family in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116) for HMGB1 binding by pull-down experiments using a 3XFLAG-HMGB1 construct. Strong interactions between atypical PKCs (PKC-{zeta}, {lambda}, and {iota}) and cytoplasmic HMGB1 were observed in HCT116 cells. We further identified the most critical PKC isotype that regulates HMGB1 secretion is PKC-{zeta} by using PKC inhibitors and siRNA experiments. The serine residues at S39, S53 and S181 of HMGB1 were related to enhancing HMGB1 secretion. We also demonstrated overexpression and activation of PKC-{zeta} in colon cancer tissues. Our findings suggest that PKC-{zeta} is involved in the phosphorylation of HMGB1, and the phosphorylation of specific serine residues in the nuclear localization signal regions is related to enhanced HMGB1 secretion in colon cancer cells.

  8. Urinary levels of high mobility group box-1 are associated with disease activity in antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis.

    Tian-Tian Ma

    Full Text Available High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1, a kind of pro-inflammatory mediator, is associated with inflammatory conditions and tissue damage. Our previous study demonstrated that the circulating levels of HMGB1 correlated with disease activity of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV. In the current study, we aimed to measure urinary levels of HMGB1 in AAV patients, correlated them to clinical activity index and analysed the immunohistochemical HMGB1 staining in kidney specimens.50 patients with AAV in active stage and 56 patients with AAV in remission were recruited. The urinary levels of HMGB1 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, renal biopsy specimens from 27 patients with active AAV were randomly collected to evaluate the deposition of HMGB1.Urinary HMGB1 levels in AAV patients in active stage were significantly higher than those in AAV patients in remission and healthy controls (1.46 [0.56-3.43] versus 0.38 [0.10-1.35] mg/μmolCr, P=0.001; 1.46 [0.56-3.43] versus 0.48 [0.40-0.60] mg/μmolCr, P=0.000, respectively. Further analysis found that urinary levels of HMGB1 correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r=0.354, p=0.012, C-reactive protein (r=0.289, p=0.042, and Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (r=0.350, p=0.013. Renal tissue of active AAV patients showed HMGB1 was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm and the extracellular space. The percentage of HMGB1-negative nuclei in renal tissue of patients with active AAV was significantly higher than that in normal controls (60.6±20.2 % versus 2.7±0.6 %, p<0.01.Urinary levels of HMGB1 may be associated with the disease activity in AAV patients.

  9. Extracellular high-mobility group box 1 mediates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Ying; Yu, Peng; Tong, Rui; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Shuning; Yao, Kang; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation plays a key role in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, but the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which is increased in myocardium under pressure overload, may be involved in pressure overload-induced cardiac injury. The objectives of this study are to determine the role of HMGB1 in cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction under pressure overload. Pressure overload was imposed on the heart of male wild-type mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC), while recombinant HMGB1, HMGB1 box A (a competitive antagonist of HMGB1) or PBS was injected into the LV wall. Moreover, cardiac myocytes were cultured and given sustained mechanical stress. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed after the operation and sections for histological analyses were generated from paraffin-embedded hearts. Relevant proteins and genes were detected. Cardiac HMGB1 expression was increased after TAC, which was accompanied by its translocation from nucleus to both cytoplasm and intercellular space. Exogenous HMGB1 aggravated TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction, as demonstrated by echocardiographic analyses, histological analyses and foetal cardiac genes detection. Nevertheless, the aforementioned pathological change induced by TAC could partially be reversed by HMGB1 inhibition. Consistent with the in vivo observations, mechanical stress evoked the release and synthesis of HMGB1 in cultured cardiac myocytes. This study indicates that the activated and up-regulated HMGB1 in myocardium, which might partially be derived from cardiac myocytes under pressure overload, may be of crucial importance in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  10. Involvement of high mobility group box 1 in the development and maintenance of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Nishida, Takeshi; Tsubota, Maho; Kawaishi, Yudai; Yamanishi, Hiroki; Kamitani, Natsuki; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Liu, Keyue; Nishibori, Masahiro; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-01-01

    Given that high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, once released to the extracellular space, promotes nociception, we asked if inactivation of HMGB1 prevents or reverses chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy in rats and also examined possible involvement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the receptor for advanced glycation endproduct (RAGE), known as targets for HMGB1. Painful neuropathy was produced by repeated i.p. administration of paclitaxel or vincristine in rats. Nociceptive threshold was determined by the paw pressure method and/or von Frey test in the hindpaw. Tissue protein levels were determined by immunoblotting. Repeated i.p. administration of the anti-HMGB1-neutralizing antibody or recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rhsTM), known to inactivate HMGB1, prevented the development of hyperalgesia and/or allodynia induced by paclitaxel or vincristine in rats. A single i.p. or intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of the antibody or rhsTM reversed the chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A single i.pl. administration of a TLR4 antagonist or low molecular weight heparin, known to inhibit RAGE, attenuated the hyperalgesia caused by i.pl. HMGB1 and also the chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy. Paclitaxel or vincristine treatment significantly decreased protein levels of HMGB1 in the dorsal root ganglia, but not sciatic nerves. HMGB1 thus participates in both development and maintenance of chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy, in part through RAGE and TLR4. HMGB1 inactivation is considered useful to prevent and treat the chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy.

  11. High mobility group box-1 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C zeta and secreted in colon cancer cells

    Lee, Hanna; Park, Minhee; Shin, Nara; Kim, Gamin; Kim, Yun Gi; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Kim, Hoguen

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Specific enzyme for HMGB1 phosphorylation and its secretion is proposed. ► Inhibition of PKC-ζ leads to significant reduction of the secreted HMGB1. ► Phosphorylation of specific site of HMGB1 redirects its secretion in cancer cells. ► Activation of PKC-ζ in cancers explains the enhanced HMGB1 secretion. -- Abstract: High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, is overexpressed and secreted in cancer cells. Phosphorylation on two different nuclear localization signal regions are known to be important for the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic transport and secretion of HMGB1. However, little is known about the biochemical mechanism of HMGB1 modifications and its subsequent secretion from cancer cells. To identify the specific enzyme and important sites for HMGB1 phosphorylation, we screened the protein kinase C (PKC) family in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116) for HMGB1 binding by pull-down experiments using a 3XFLAG-HMGB1 construct. Strong interactions between atypical PKCs (PKC-ζ, λ, and ι) and cytoplasmic HMGB1 were observed in HCT116 cells. We further identified the most critical PKC isotype that regulates HMGB1 secretion is PKC-ζ by using PKC inhibitors and siRNA experiments. The serine residues at S39, S53 and S181 of HMGB1 were related to enhancing HMGB1 secretion. We also demonstrated overexpression and activation of PKC-ζ in colon cancer tissues. Our findings suggest that PKC-ζ is involved in the phosphorylation of HMGB1, and the phosphorylation of specific serine residues in the nuclear localization signal regions is related to enhanced HMGB1 secretion in colon cancer cells.

  12. Spinal high-mobility group box 1 contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of bone cancer pain

    Tong, Wei; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Ren, Ning; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Li, Yong-Qi

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying bone cancer-induced pain are largely unknown. Previous studies indicate that neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn is especially involved. Being first reported as a nonhistone chromosomal protein, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is now implicated as a mediator of inflammation. We hypothesized that HMGB1 could trigger the release of cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn and contribute to bone cancer pain. To test this hypothesis, we first built a bone cancer pain model induced by intratibal injection of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells. The structural damage to the tibia was monitored by radiological analysis. The mechanical allodynia was measured and the expression of spinal HMGB1 and IL-1β was evaluated. We observed that inoculation of cancer cells, but not heat-killed cells, induced progressive bone destruction from 9 d to 21 d post inoculation. Behavioral tests demonstrated that the significant nociceptive response in the cancer cells-injected rats emerged on day 9 and this kind of mechanical allodynia lasted at least 21 d following inoculation. Tumor cells inoculation significantly increased HMGB1 expression in the spinal dorsal horn, while intrathecal injecting a neutralizing antibody against HMGB1 showed an effective and reliable anti-allodynia effect with a dose-dependent manner. IL-1β was significantly increased in caner pain rats while intrathecally administration of anti-HMGB1 could decrease IL-1β. Together with previous reports, we predict that bone cancer induces HMGB1 production, enhancing spinal IL-1β expression and thus modulating spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and pain response.

  13. High mobility group box 1 levels are not associated with subclinical carotid atherosclerosis in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis but are reduced by glucocorticoids and statins

    Silva de Souza, Alexandre; De Leeuw, Karina; Westra, Johanna; Smit, Andries J.; Van Der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Nienhuis, Hans L.A.; Bijzet, Johan; Limburg, Pieter C.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Purpose: High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a non-histone DNA binding protein that is passively released by dying cells or actively secreted by immunocompetent cells and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is one of its receptors. Higher levels of HMGB1 have been

  14. High-mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end products contribute to lung injury during Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia

    Achouiti, Ahmed; van der Meer, Anne Jan; Florquin, Sandrine; Yang, Huan; Tracey, Kevin J.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F.; van der Poll, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus has emerged as an important cause of necrotizing pneumonia. Lung injury during S. aureus pneumonia may be enhanced by local release of damage associated molecular patterns such as high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In the current study we sought to determine the functional

  15. Identification and characterization of the direct interaction between methotrexate (MTX and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein.

    Yuki Kuroiwa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methotrexate (MTX is an agent used in chemotherapy of tumors and autoimmune disease including rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In addition, MTX has some anti-inflammatory activity. Although dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR is a well-known target for the anti-tumor effect of MTX, the mode of action for the anti-inflammatory activity of MTX is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/RESULT: Here, we performed a screening of MTX-binding proteins using T7 phage display with a synthetic biotinylated MTX derivative. We then characterized the interactions using surface plasmon resonance (SPR analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. Using a T7 phage display screen, we identified T7 phages that displayed part of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein (K86-V175. Binding affinities as well as likely binding sites were characterized using genetically engineered truncated versions of HMGB1 protein (Al G1-K87, Bj: F88-K181, indicating that MTX binds to HMGB1 via two independent sites with a dissociation constants (KD of 0.50±0.03 µM for Al and 0.24 ± 0.01 µM for Bj. Although MTX did not inhibit the binding of HMGB1 to DNA via these domains, HMGB1/RAGE association was impeded in the presence of MTX. These data suggested that binding of MTX to part of the RAGE-binding region (K149-V175 in HMGB1 might be significant for the anti-inflammatory effect of MTX. Indeed, in murine macrophage-like cells (RAW 264.7, TNF-α release and mitogenic activity elicited by specific RAGE stimulation with a truncated monomeric HMGB1 were inhibited in the presence of MTX. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that HMGB1 is a direct binding protein of MTX. Moreover, binding of MTX to RAGE-binding region in HMGB1 inhibited the HMGB1/RAGE interaction at the molecular and cellular levels. These data might explain the molecular basis underlying the mechanism of action for the anti-inflammatory effect of MTX.

  16. Serum High-Mobility-Group Box 1 as a Biomarker and a Therapeutic Target during Respiratory Virus Infections.

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge C G

    2018-03-13

    Host-derived "danger-associated molecular patterns" (DAMPs) contribute to innate immune responses and serve as markers of disease progression and severity for inflammatory and infectious diseases. There is accumulating evidence that generation of DAMPs such as oxidized phospholipids and high-mobility-group box 1 (HMGB1) during influenza virus infection leads to acute lung injury (ALI). Treatment of influenza virus-infected mice and cotton rats with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist Eritoran blocked DAMP accumulation and ameliorated influenza virus-induced ALI. However, changes in systemic HMGB1 kinetics during the course of influenza virus infection in animal models and humans have yet to establish an association of HMGB1 release with influenza virus infection. To this end, we used the cotton rat model that is permissive to nonadapted strains of influenza A and B viruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and human rhinoviruses (HRVs). Serum HMGB1 levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prior to infection until day 14 or 18 post-infection. Infection with either influenza A or B virus resulted in a robust increase in serum HMGB1 levels that decreased by days 14 to 18. Inoculation with the live attenuated vaccine FluMist resulted in HMGB1 levels that were significantly lower than those with infection with live influenza viruses. RSV and HRVs showed profiles of serum HMGB1 induction that were consistent with their replication and degree of lung pathology in cotton rats. We further showed that therapeutic treatment with Eritoran of cotton rats infected with influenza B virus significantly blunted serum HMGB1 levels and improved lung pathology, without inhibiting virus replication. These findings support the use of drugs that block HMGB1 to combat influenza virus-induced ALI. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus is a common infectious agent causing serious seasonal epidemics, and there is urgent need to develop an alternative treatment

  17. Cell-Free DNA, High-Mobility Group Box-1, and Procalcitonin Concentrations in Dogs With Gastric Dilatation–Volvulus Syndrome

    Roberta Troia; Massimo Giunti; Stefano Calipa; Robert Goggs

    2018-01-01

    Canine gastric dilatation–volvulus (GDV) is a life-threatening disease characterized by extensive tissue ischemia, tissue hypoperfusion, and systemic inflammation. Biomarkers that better reflect the severity of gastric necrosis and systemic inflammation would aid clinicians in the management of these patients. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA), high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), and procalcitonin (PCT) in dogs with GDV. Concentrations of cfDN...

  18. Relationships between High-mobility Group Protein B1 and Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells Concentrations in Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Chronic Periodontitis.

    Paknejad, Mojgan; Sattari, Mandana; Roozbahani, Zohreh; Ershadi, Morteza; Mehrfard, Ali

    2016-10-01

    One of the inflammatory mediators which is secreted by inflammatory cells is high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1). Interaction of HMGB1 and toll-like receptors (TLRs) leads to increased production of inflammatory cytokines. On the other hand, it was shown that triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM-1) also can be activated by TLRs, and its soluble form (sTREM-1) can be formed by cleaving of membrane-bound form of TREM-1 proteinases. Since there is not enough knowledge about the precise role of HMGB1 and sTREM-1 in periodontal diseases, the aim of this study was to evaluate the concentration of HMGB1 and sTREM-1 in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples of patients with chronic periodontitis. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were obtained from a total of 24 individuals with clinically healthy gingiva and 24 patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis. For collecting GCF samples, periopapers were placed at the entrance of the crevice and left in position for 30 seconds. Then, they were stored at -80°C. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for measuring the concentration of HMGB1 and sTREM-1 in GCF samples. The concentration of HMGB1 (pchronic periodontitis group. In addition, there was a significant positive correlation between HMGB1 and sTREM-1 concentration in chronic periodontitis group (pperiodontal tissues and they can promote inflammatory process, which leads to tissue destruction.

  19. SOXE transcription factors form selective dimers on non-compact DNA motifs through multifaceted interactions between dimerization and high-mobility group domains.

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Jankowski, Aleksander; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Prabhakar, Shyam; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-05-27

    The SOXE transcription factors SOX8, SOX9 and SOX10 are master regulators of mammalian development directing sex determination, gliogenesis, pancreas specification and neural crest development. We identified a set of palindromic SOX binding sites specifically enriched in regulatory regions of melanoma cells. SOXE proteins homodimerize on these sequences with high cooperativity. In contrast to other transcription factor dimers, which are typically rigidly spaced, SOXE group proteins can bind cooperatively at a wide range of dimer spacings. Using truncated forms of SOXE proteins, we show that a single dimerization (DIM) domain, that precedes the DNA binding high mobility group (HMG) domain, is sufficient for dimer formation, suggesting that DIM : HMG rather than DIM:DIM interactions mediate the dimerization. All SOXE members can also heterodimerize in this fashion, whereas SOXE heterodimers with SOX2, SOX4, SOX6 and SOX18 are not supported. We propose a structural model where SOXE-specific intramolecular DIM:HMG interactions are allosterically communicated to the HMG of juxtaposed molecules. Collectively, SOXE factors evolved a unique mode to combinatorially regulate their target genes that relies on a multifaceted interplay between the HMG and DIM domains. This property potentially extends further the diversity of target genes and cell-specific functions that are regulated by SOXE proteins.

  20. SOXE transcription factors form selective dimers on non-compact DNA motifs through multifaceted interactions between dimerization and high-mobility group domains

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Jankowski, Aleksander; Cheah, Kathryn S. E.; Prabhakar, Shyam; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The SOXE transcription factors SOX8, SOX9 and SOX10 are master regulators of mammalian development directing sex determination, gliogenesis, pancreas specification and neural crest development. We identified a set of palindromic SOX binding sites specifically enriched in regulatory regions of melanoma cells. SOXE proteins homodimerize on these sequences with high cooperativity. In contrast to other transcription factor dimers, which are typically rigidly spaced, SOXE group proteins can bind cooperatively at a wide range of dimer spacings. Using truncated forms of SOXE proteins, we show that a single dimerization (DIM) domain, that precedes the DNA binding high mobility group (HMG) domain, is sufficient for dimer formation, suggesting that DIM : HMG rather than DIM:DIM interactions mediate the dimerization. All SOXE members can also heterodimerize in this fashion, whereas SOXE heterodimers with SOX2, SOX4, SOX6 and SOX18 are not supported. We propose a structural model where SOXE-specific intramolecular DIM:HMG interactions are allosterically communicated to the HMG of juxtaposed molecules. Collectively, SOXE factors evolved a unique mode to combinatorially regulate their target genes that relies on a multifaceted interplay between the HMG and DIM domains. This property potentially extends further the diversity of target genes and cell-specific functions that are regulated by SOXE proteins. PMID:26013289

  1. Diabetes-Induced Oxidative Stress in Endothelial Progenitor Cells May Be Sustained by a Positive Feedback Loop Involving High Mobility Group Box-1

    Han Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is considered to be a critical factor in diabetes-induced endothelial progenitor cell (EPC dysfunction, although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the role of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1 in diabetes-induced oxidative stress. HMGB-1 was upregulated in both serum and bone marrow-derived monocytes from diabetic mice compared with control mice. In vitro, advanced glycation end productions (AGEs induced, expression of HMGB-1 in EPCs and in cell culture supernatants in a dose-dependent manner. However, inhibition of oxidative stress with N-acetylcysteine (NAC partially inhibited the induction of HMGB-1 induced by AGEs. Furthermore, p66shc expression in EPCs induced by AGEs was abrogated by incubation with glycyrrhizin (Gly, while increased superoxide dismutase (SOD activity in cell culture supernatants was observed in the Gly treated group. Thus, HMGB-1 may play an important role in diabetes-induced oxidative stress in EPCs via a positive feedback loop involving the AGE/reactive oxygen species/HMGB-1 pathway.

  2. Elevated levels of von Willebrand factor and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) are associated with disease severity and clinical outcome of scrub typhus.

    Chen, Hongliu; Ning, Zong; Qiu, Ying; Liao, Yuanli; Chang, Haihua; Ai, Yuanyuan; Wei, Yinghua; Deng, Yiming; Shen, Ying

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether von Willebrand factor (vWF) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) are associated with the severity and clinical outcome of scrub typhus and to seek novel biomarkers for surveillance and prediction of the prognosis of this infection. Serum concentrations of vWF and HMGB1 were measured twice by ELISA for scrub typhus patients (n=103), once prior to doxycycline therapy and then on day 7 of doxycycline therapy; concentrations were measured once for healthy controls (n=32). Among the total 103 patients enrolled, 38 had disease complicated by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Serum concentrations of vWF and HMGB1 were significantly higher in all the patients than in the healthy controls, both prior to doxycycline treatment and on day 7 of doxycycline treatment (pscrub typhus (area under the curve (AUC)=0.864, p=0.001, and AUC=0.862, p=0.001, respectively). Elevated levels of vWF and HMGB1 are associated with the severity and clinical outcome of scrub typhus. These represent possible new biomarkers for use in the assessment and prognostic prediction of this infection. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasma concentration of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) after 100 drop to vertical jumps and after a 1200-km bicycle race.

    Behringer, M; Kilian, Y; Montag, J; Geesmann, B; Mester, J

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has recently been reported to be involved in proinflammation and tissue repair. Therefore, we hypothesized that HMGB1 is released into the bloodstream after eccentric exercises or prolonged endurance activities. Blood samples from 11 participants that performed 100 drop to vertical jumps (DVJ) and from 10 participants that took part in the 1200-km 'Paris-Brest-Paris' bicycle race (PBP) were tested for HMGB1 and creatine kinase (CK) levels. CK increased after both DVJ (pre: 150.6 ± 81.5 U/L; post: 188.8 ± 95.5 U/L 8 h: 790.5 ± 346.4 U/L) and PBP (pre: 81.3 ± 36.4 U/L; post: 725.2 ± 229.5 U/L; 12 h: 535.8 ± 188.6 U/L), indicating membrane damage. However, HMGB1 plasma levels remained below the detection limit (78 pg/mL) of the applied enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit for all blood samples analysed. That is, neither high intensity eccentric exercises (DVJ) nor prolonged endurance events (PBP) seemed to affect HMGB1 levels in blood at selected time points.

  4. Serum levels of high mobility group box 1 protein and its association with quality of life and psychological and functional status in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Oktayoglu, Pelin; Tahtasiz, Mehmet; Bozkurt, Mehtap; Em, Serda; Ucar, Demet; Yazmalar, Levent; Mete, Nuriye; Nas, Kemal; Gezer, Orhan

    2013-08-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a proinflammatory cytokine. Previous studies have suggested that HMGB1 can play an important role in the pathogenesis of many rheumatic diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum levels of HMGB1 in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and its association with quality of life and psychological and functional status in these patients. Twenty-nine patients who met the 1990 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for the classification of FM and 29 healthy controls (HC) were included in the present study. Serum samples were collected from both the patients and the HC, and HMGB1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) was used to assess the disease severity and functional status in patients with FM. Furthermore, the Nottingham Health Profile was used to assess quality of life in all subjects, as well as the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to assess depression and anxiety. The serum levels of HMGB1 protein were positively correlated with the FIQ scores in patients with FM (P = 0.002). Mean serum levels of HMGB1 were higher in patients with FM than in HC but this difference was not statistically significant. HMGB1 protein might be a good laboratory-sourced candidate for the assessment of functional status and disease severity in patients with FM. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Mediates Fibroblast Activity via RAGE-MAPK and NF-κB Signaling in Keloid Scar Formation

    Jihee Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Emerging studies have revealed the involvement of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 in systemic fibrotic diseases, yet its role in the cutaneous scarring process has not yet been investigated. We hypothesized that HMGB1 may promote fibroblast activity to cause abnormal cutaneous scarring. In vitro wound healing assay with normal and keloid fibroblasts demonstrated that HMGB1 administration promoted the migration of both fibroblasts with increased speed and a greater traveling distance. Treatment of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizic acid (GA showed an opposing effect on both activities. To analyze the downstream mechanism, the protein levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, protein kinase B (AKT, and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB were measured by western blot analysis. HMGB1 increased the expression levels of ERK1/2, AKT, and NF-κB compared to the control, which was suppressed by GA. HMGB1 promoted both normal and keloid fibroblasts migration to a degree equivalent to that achieved with TGF-β. We concluded that HMGB1 activates fibroblasts via the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE—mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK and NF-κB interaction signaling pathways. Further knowledge of the relationship of HMGB1 with skin fibrosis may lead to a promising clinical approach to manage abnormal scarring.

  6. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Mediates Fibroblast Activity via RAGE-MAPK and NF-κB Signaling in Keloid Scar Formation.

    Kim, Jihee; Park, Jong-Chul; Lee, Mi Hee; Yang, Chae Eun; Lee, Ju Hee; Lee, Won Jai

    2017-12-28

    Emerging studies have revealed the involvement of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in systemic fibrotic diseases, yet its role in the cutaneous scarring process has not yet been investigated. We hypothesized that HMGB1 may promote fibroblast activity to cause abnormal cutaneous scarring. In vitro wound healing assay with normal and keloid fibroblasts demonstrated that HMGB1 administration promoted the migration of both fibroblasts with increased speed and a greater traveling distance. Treatment of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizic acid (GA) showed an opposing effect on both activities. To analyze the downstream mechanism, the protein levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, protein kinase B (AKT), and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) were measured by western blot analysis. HMGB1 increased the expression levels of ERK1/2, AKT, and NF-κB compared to the control, which was suppressed by GA. HMGB1 promoted both normal and keloid fibroblasts migration to a degree equivalent to that achieved with TGF-β. We concluded that HMGB1 activates fibroblasts via the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE)-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and NF-κB interaction signaling pathways. Further knowledge of the relationship of HMGB1 with skin fibrosis may lead to a promising clinical approach to manage abnormal scarring.

  7. High mobility group protein number17 cross-links primarily to histone H2A in the reconstituted HMG 17 - nucleosome core particle complex

    Cook, G.R.; Yau, P.; Yasuda, H.; Traut, R.R.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The neighbor relationship of lamb thymus High Mobility Group (HMG) protein 17 to native HeLa nucleosome core particle histones in the reconstituted complex has been studied. 125 I-labeled HMG 17 was cross-linking to core histones using the protein-protein cross-linking reagent 2-iminothiolane. Specific cross-linked products were separated on a two-dimensional Triton-acid-urea/SDS gel system, located by autoradiography, excised and quantified. Disulfide bonds in the cross links were then cleaved and the protein constituents were identified by SDS gel electrophoresis. HMG 17 cross-linked primarily to histone H2A while lower levels of cross-linking occurred between HMG 17 and the other histones. In contrast, cross-linking between two HMG 17 molecules bound on the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that H2A comprises part of the HMG 17 binding site but that HMG 17 is sufficiently elongated and mobile to permit cross-linking to the other histones and to a second HMG 17 molecule. These results are in agreement with the current model for the structure of the nucleosome and the proposed binding sites for HMG 17

  8. Association of high mobility group BOX-1 and receptor for advanced glycation endproducts with clinicopathological features of haematological malignancies: a systematic review

    Austin H. Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 is a versatile protein with nuclear and extracellular functions. In the extracellular milieu, HMGB1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE. The expressions of HMGB1 and RAGE have been described in a variety of cancers. However, the clinical values of HMGB1 and RAGE in haematological malignancies have yet to be evaluated. A systematic search through PubMed and the Web of Science for articles discussing the role of HMGB1 and RAGE in haematological malignancies produced 15 articles. Overexpression of HMGB1 was reported to be associated with malignancy and, in certain studies, poor prognosis and tumour aggressiveness. Only one included study investigated the clinical value of RAGE, in which no significant difference was found between expression of RAGE in CLL neoplastic cells and nonmalignant controls. The discussed associations of HMGB1 and RAGE with clinicopathological characteristics of patients with haematological malignancies warrants further investigation into the prognostic and diagnostic value of both of these molecules.

  9. Intracellular high mobility group B1 protein (HMGB1) represses HIV-1 LTR-directed transcription in a promoter- and cell-specific manner

    Naghavi, Mojgan H.; Nowak, Piotr; Andersson, Jan; Soennerborg, Anders; Yang Huan; Tracey, Kevin J.; Vahlne, Anders

    2003-01-01

    We investigated whether the high mobility group B 1 (HMGB1), an abundant nuclear protein in all mammalian cells, affects HIV-1 transcription. Intracellular expression of human HMGB1 repressed HIV-1 gene expression in epithelial cells. This inhibitory effect of HMGB1 was caused by repression of long terminal repeat (LTR)-mediated transcription. Other viral promoters/enhancers, including simian virus 40 or cytomegalovirus, were not inhibited by HMGB1. In addition, HMGB1 inhibition of HIV-1 subtype C expression was dependent on the number of NFκB sites in the LTR region. The inhibitory effect of HMGB1 on viral gene expression observed in HeLa cells was confirmed by an upregulation of viral replication in the presence of antisense HMGB1 in monocytic cells. In contrast to what was found in HeLa cells and monocytic cells, endogenous HMGB1 expression did not affect HIV-1 replication in unstimulated Jurkat cells. Thus, intracellular HMGB1 affects HIV-1 LTR-directed transcription in a promoter- and cell-specific manner

  10. High mobility group box associated with cell proliferation appears to play an important role in hepatocellular carcinogenesis in rats and humans.

    Suzuki, Shugo; Takeshita, Kentaro; Asamoto, Makoto; Takahashi, Satoru; Kandori, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Kazunari; Saito, Fumiyo; Masuko, Kazuo; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-31

    To identify genes important in hepatocellular carcinogenesis, especially processes involved in malignant transformation, we focused on differences in gene expression between adenomas and carcinomas by DNA microarray. Eighty-one genes for which expression was specific in carcinomas were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software and Gene Ontology, and found to be associated with TP53 and regulators of cell proliferation. In the genes associated with TP53, we selected high mobility group box (HMGB) for detailed analysis. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of HMGBs in carcinomas to be significantly higher than in other lesions among both human and rat liver, and a positive correlation between HMGBs and TP53 was detected in rat carcinomas. Knock-down of HMGB 2 expression in a rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line by RNAi resulted in inhibition of cell growth, although no effects on invasion were evident in vitro. These results suggest that acquisition of malignant potential in the liver requires specific signaling pathways related to high cell proliferation associated with TP53. In particular, HMGBs appear to have an important role for progression and cell proliferation associated with loss of TP53 function in rat and in human hepatocarcinogenesis.

  11. A dimer of the lymphoid protein RAG1 recognizes the recombination signal sequence and the complex stably incorporates the high mobility group protein HMG2.

    Rodgers, K K; Villey, I J; Ptaszek, L; Corbett, E; Schatz, D G; Coleman, J E

    1999-07-15

    RAG1 and RAG2 are the two lymphoid-specific proteins required for the cleavage of DNA sequences known as the recombination signal sequences (RSSs) flanking V, D or J regions of the antigen-binding genes. Previous studies have shown that RAG1 alone is capable of binding to the RSS, whereas RAG2 only binds as a RAG1/RAG2 complex. We have expressed recombinant core RAG1 (amino acids 384-1008) in Escherichia coli and demonstrated catalytic activity when combined with RAG2. This protein was then used to determine its oligomeric forms and the dissociation constant of binding to the RSS. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays show that up to three oligomeric complexes of core RAG1 form with a single RSS. Core RAG1 was found to exist as a dimer both when free in solution and as the minimal species bound to the RSS. Competition assays show that RAG1 recognizes both the conserved nonamer and heptamer sequences of the RSS. Zinc analysis shows the core to contain two zinc ions. The purified RAG1 protein overexpressed in E.coli exhibited the expected cleavage activity when combined with RAG2 purified from transfected 293T cells. The high mobility group protein HMG2 is stably incorporated into the recombinant RAG1/RSS complex and can increase the affinity of RAG1 for the RSS in the absence of RAG2.

  12. High mobility group box associated with cell proliferation appears to play an important role in hepatocellular carcinogenesis in rats and humans

    Suzuki, Shugo; Takeshita, Kentaro; Asamoto, Makoto; Takahashi, Satoru; Kandori, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Kazunari; Saito, Fumiyo; Masuko, Kazuo; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-01

    To identify genes important in hepatocellular carcinogenesis, especially processes involved in malignant transformation, we focused on differences in gene expression between adenomas and carcinomas by DNA microarray. Eighty-one genes for which expression was specific in carcinomas were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software and Gene Ontology, and found to be associated with TP53 and regulators of cell proliferation. In the genes associated with TP53, we selected high mobility group box (HMGB) for detailed analysis. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of HMGBs in carcinomas to be significantly higher than in other lesions among both human and rat liver, and a positive correlation between HMGBs and TP53 was detected in rat carcinomas. Knock-down of HMGB 2 expression in a rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line by RNAi resulted in inhibition of cell growth, although no effects on invasion were evident in vitro. These results suggest that acquisition of malignant potential in the liver requires specific signaling pathways related to high cell proliferation associated with TP53. In particular, HMGBs appear to have an important role for progression and cell proliferation associated with loss of TP53 function in rat and in human hepatocarcinogenesis

  13. High plasma levels of high mobility group box 1 is associated with the risk of sepsis in severe blunt chest trauma patients: a prospective cohort study.

    Wang, Xiao-Wen; Karki, Avash; Zhao, Xing-Ji; Xiang, Xiao-Yong; Lu, Zhi-Qian

    2014-08-02

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a late mediator of systemic inflammation. Extracellular HMGB1 play a central pathogenic role in critical illness. The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between plasma HMGB1 concentrations and the risk of poor outcomes in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. The plasma concentrations of HMGB1 in patients with severe blunt chest trauma (AIS ≥ 3) were measured by a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at four time points during seven days after admission, and the dynamic release patterns were monitored. The biomarker levels were compared between patients with sepsis and non-sepsis, and between patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and non-MODS. The related factors of prognosis were analyzed by using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The short-form 36 was used to evaluate the quality of life of patients at 12 months after injury. Plasma HMGB1 levels were significantly higher both in sepsis and MODS group on post-trauma day 3, 5, and 7 compared with the non-sepsis and non-MODS groups, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that HMGB1 levels and ISS were independent risk factors for sepsis and MODS in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. Plasma HMGB1 levels were significantly elevated in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. HMGB1 levels were associated with the risk of poor outcome in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. Daily HMGB1 levels measurements is a potential useful tool in the early identification of post-trauma complications. Further studies are needed to determine whether HMGB1 intervention could prevent the development of sepsis and MODS in patients with severe blunt chest trauma.

  14. Cell-Free DNA, High-Mobility Group Box-1, and Procalcitonin Concentrations in Dogs With Gastric Dilatation–Volvulus Syndrome

    Roberta Troia

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Canine gastric dilatation–volvulus (GDV is a life-threatening disease characterized by extensive tissue ischemia, tissue hypoperfusion, and systemic inflammation. Biomarkers that better reflect the severity of gastric necrosis and systemic inflammation would aid clinicians in the management of these patients. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA, high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1, and procalcitonin (PCT in dogs with GDV. Concentrations of cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT were measured in citrated plasma samples collected from 29 dogs with GDV at hospital admission. Additional data collected included baseline lactate concentrations, APPLEfast score, evidence of gastric necrosis, occurrence of postoperative complications, and outcome. Twenty-four healthy dogs were sampled as controls. Continuous variables between groups were compared with the Mann–Whitney U and correlations between continuous variables were assessed by calculation of Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Alpha was set at 0.05. Dogs with GDV had significantly greater concentrations of cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT compared to controls (P = 0.0009, P = 0.004, and P = 0.009, respectively. PCT concentrations were significantly higher in non-survivors compared to survivors (P = 0.008. Dogs with gastric necrosis had significantly greater lactate concentrations compared to dogs without gastric necrosis (P = 0.0005. The APPLEfast score was not prognostic. Lactate and PCT concentrations were moderately, positively correlated (rs 0.51, P = 0.0005. Concentrations of the inflammatory biomarkers cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT are increased in canine GDV. Only lactate and PCT concentrations were prognostic in this population of GDV dogs and were predictive of the presence of gastric necrosis and of non-survival to hospital discharge, respectively.

  15. Cell-Free DNA, High-Mobility Group Box-1, and Procalcitonin Concentrations in Dogs With Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus Syndrome.

    Troia, Roberta; Giunti, Massimo; Calipa, Stefano; Goggs, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Canine gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) is a life-threatening disease characterized by extensive tissue ischemia, tissue hypoperfusion, and systemic inflammation. Biomarkers that better reflect the severity of gastric necrosis and systemic inflammation would aid clinicians in the management of these patients. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA), high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), and procalcitonin (PCT) in dogs with GDV. Concentrations of cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT were measured in citrated plasma samples collected from 29 dogs with GDV at hospital admission. Additional data collected included baseline lactate concentrations, APPLE fast score, evidence of gastric necrosis, occurrence of postoperative complications, and outcome. Twenty-four healthy dogs were sampled as controls. Continuous variables between groups were compared with the Mann-Whitney U and correlations between continuous variables were assessed by calculation of Spearman's correlation coefficient. Alpha was set at 0.05. Dogs with GDV had significantly greater concentrations of cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT compared to controls ( P  = 0.0009, P  = 0.004, and P  = 0.009, respectively). PCT concentrations were significantly higher in non-survivors compared to survivors ( P  = 0.008). Dogs with gastric necrosis had significantly greater lactate concentrations compared to dogs without gastric necrosis ( P  = 0.0005). The APPLE fast score was not prognostic. Lactate and PCT concentrations were moderately, positively correlated ( r s 0.51, P  = 0.0005). Concentrations of the inflammatory biomarkers cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT are increased in canine GDV. Only lactate and PCT concentrations were prognostic in this population of GDV dogs and were predictive of the presence of gastric necrosis and of non-survival to hospital discharge, respectively.

  16. Cell-Free DNA, High-Mobility Group Box-1, and Procalcitonin Concentrations in Dogs With Gastric Dilatation–Volvulus Syndrome

    Troia, Roberta; Giunti, Massimo; Calipa, Stefano; Goggs, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Canine gastric dilatation–volvulus (GDV) is a life-threatening disease characterized by extensive tissue ischemia, tissue hypoperfusion, and systemic inflammation. Biomarkers that better reflect the severity of gastric necrosis and systemic inflammation would aid clinicians in the management of these patients. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA), high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), and procalcitonin (PCT) in dogs with GDV. Concentrations of cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT were measured in citrated plasma samples collected from 29 dogs with GDV at hospital admission. Additional data collected included baseline lactate concentrations, APPLEfast score, evidence of gastric necrosis, occurrence of postoperative complications, and outcome. Twenty-four healthy dogs were sampled as controls. Continuous variables between groups were compared with the Mann–Whitney U and correlations between continuous variables were assessed by calculation of Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Alpha was set at 0.05. Dogs with GDV had significantly greater concentrations of cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT compared to controls (P = 0.0009, P = 0.004, and P = 0.009, respectively). PCT concentrations were significantly higher in non-survivors compared to survivors (P = 0.008). Dogs with gastric necrosis had significantly greater lactate concentrations compared to dogs without gastric necrosis (P = 0.0005). The APPLEfast score was not prognostic. Lactate and PCT concentrations were moderately, positively correlated (rs 0.51, P = 0.0005). Concentrations of the inflammatory biomarkers cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT are increased in canine GDV. Only lactate and PCT concentrations were prognostic in this population of GDV dogs and were predictive of the presence of gastric necrosis and of non-survival to hospital discharge, respectively. PMID:29686994

  17. High expression of high-mobility group box 1 in the blood and lungs is associated with the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in smokers.

    Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Hsu, Wen-Hu; Hsieh, Chih-Cheng; Lien, Te-Cheng; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Kou, Yu Ru

    2014-02-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an important mediator in multiple pathological conditions, but the expression of HMGB1 in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has not yet been completely investigated. We aimed to analyze the relationship between HMGB1 expression in blood and lung tissue and the development of COPD. Twenty-eight patients admitted for single pulmonary surgical intervention were enrolled. The expression of HMGB1 in blood and lung tissue was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis and immunohistochemistry stain, respectively. The study patients were divided into smokers with COPD (n = 11), smokers without COPD (n = 8) and non-smoker healthy controls (n = 9). Smokers with COPD compared with smokers without COPD and healthy controls were older in age, with lower post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV1 /FVC) ratio (63.1 ± 5.5 vs 77.6 ± 3.6 and 84.5 ± 5.8, P vs 7.3 ± 4.8 and 17.0 ± 19.6 ng/mL, P = 0.016 and P = 0.021, respectively). In smokers with COPD, the numbers and portion of HMGB1-expressing cells in epithelium and submucosal areas were significantly increased. Notably, plasma HMGB1 levels negatively correlated with post-bronchodilator FEV1 /FVC ratio (r = -0.585, P = 0.008) in smokers, but not in non-smokers. In smokers, high expression of HMGB1 in the blood and lungs is related to the lung function impairment and appears to be associated with the development of COPD. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  18. Effects of subconjunctival administration of anti-high mobility group box 1 on dry eye in a mouse model of Sjӧgren's syndrome.

    Kim, Kyeong Hwan; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Ryu, Jin Suk; Kim, Yu Jeong; Oh, Joo Youn; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) acts as a damage associated molecular pattern molecule through the Toll-like receptor to promote autoreactive B cell activation, which may be involved in the pathogenesis of Sjӧgren's syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of subconjunctival administration of anti-HMGB1 on dry eye in a mouse model of Sjӧgren's syndrome. Ten weeks-old NOD.B10.H2b mice were subconjunctivally injected with 0.02 to 2 μg of anti-HMGB1 antibodies or PBS twice a week for two consecutive weeks. Tear volume and corneal staining scores were measured and compared between before- and after-treatment. Goblet cell density was counted in PAS stained forniceal conjunctiva and inflammatory foci score (>50 cells/focus) was measured in extraorbital glands. Flow cytometry was performed to evaluate the changes in BrdU+ cells, IL-17-, IL-10-, or IFNγ-secreting cells, functional B cells, and IL-22 secreting innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) in cervical lymph nodes. The level of IL-22 in intraorbital glands was measured by ELISA. Injection of 2 μg or 0.02 μg anti-HMGB1 attenuated corneal epithelial erosions and increased tear secretion (pdry eye. The improvement of dry eye may involve an increase of ILC3s, rather than modulation of B or plasma cells, as shown using a mouse model of Sjӧgren's syndrome.

  19. Receptor for advanced glycation end products and its ligand high-mobility group box-1 mediate allergic airway sensitization and airway inflammation.

    Ullah, Md Ashik; Loh, Zhixuan; Gan, Wan Jun; Zhang, Vivian; Yang, Huan; Li, Jian Hua; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Armour, Carol L; Hughes, J Margaret; Phipps, Simon; Sukkar, Maria B

    2014-08-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) shares common ligands and signaling pathways with TLR4, a key mediator of house dust mite (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) (HDM) sensitization. We hypothesized that RAGE and its ligand high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) cooperate with TLR4 to mediate HDM sensitization. To determine the requirement for HMGB1 and RAGE, and their relationship with TLR4, in airway sensitization. TLR4(-/-), RAGE(-/-), and RAGE-TLR4(-/-) mice were intranasally exposed to HDM or cockroach (Blatella germanica) extracts, and features of allergic inflammation were measured during the sensitization or challenge phase. Anti-HMGB1 antibody and the IL-1 receptor antagonist Anakinra were used to inhibit HMGB1 and the IL-1 receptor, respectively. The magnitude of allergic airway inflammation in response to either HDM or cockroach sensitization and/or challenge was significantly reduced in the absence of RAGE but not further diminished in the absence of both RAGE and TLR4. HDM sensitization induced the release of HMGB1 from the airway epithelium in a biphasic manner, which corresponded to the sequential activation of TLR4 then RAGE. Release of HMGB1 in response to cockroach sensitization also was RAGE dependent. Significantly, HMGB1 release occurred downstream of TLR4-induced IL-1α, and upstream of IL-25 and IL-33 production. Adoptive transfer of HDM-pulsed RAGE(+/+)dendritic cells to RAGE(-/-) mice recapitulated the allergic responses after HDM challenge. Immunoneutralization of HMGB1 attenuated HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. The HMGB1-RAGE axis mediates allergic airway sensitization and airway inflammation. Activation of this axis in response to different allergens acts to amplify the allergic inflammatory response, which exposes it as an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Real-time Kinetics of High-mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) Oxidation in Extracellular Fluids Studied by in Situ Protein NMR Spectroscopy*

    Zandarashvili, Levani; Sahu, Debashish; Lee, Kwanbok; Lee, Yong Sun; Singh, Pomila; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Iwahara, Junji

    2013-01-01

    Some extracellular proteins are initially secreted in reduced forms via a non-canonical pathway bypassing the endoplasmic reticulum and become oxidized in the extracellular space. One such protein is HMGB1 (high-mobility group box 1). Extracellular HMGB1 has different redox states that play distinct roles in inflammation. Using a unique NMR-based approach, we have investigated the kinetics of HMGB1 oxidation and the half-lives of all-thiol and disulfide HMGB1 species in serum, saliva, and cell culture medium. In this approach, salt-free lyophilized 15N-labeled all-thiol HMGB1 was dissolved in actual extracellular fluids, and the oxidation and clearance kinetics were monitored in situ by recording a series of heteronuclear 1H-15N correlation spectra. We found that the half-life depends significantly on the extracellular environment. For example, the half-life of all-thiol HMGB1 ranged from ∼17 min (in human serum and saliva) to 3 h (in prostate cancer cell culture medium). Furthermore, the binding of ligands (glycyrrhizin and heparin) to HMGB1 significantly modulated the oxidation kinetics. Thus, the balance between the roles of all-thiol and disulfide HMGB1 proteins depends significantly on the extracellular environment and can also be artificially modulated by ligands. This is important because extracellular HMGB1 has been suggested as a therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases and cancer. Our work demonstrates that the in situ protein NMR approach is powerful for investigating the behavior of proteins in actual extracellular fluids containing an enormous number of different molecules. PMID:23447529

  1. High-mobility group box 1 released by autophagic cancer-associated fibroblasts maintains the stemness of luminal breast cancer cells.

    Zhao, Xi-Long; Lin, Yong; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Zhuo; Yang, Shuai; Lu, Lu; Liang, Yan; Liu, Xue; Tan, Jiao; Hu, Xu-Gang; Niu, Qin; Fu, Wen-Juan; Yan, Ze-Xuan; Guo, De-Yu; Ping, Yi-Fang; Wang, Ji Ming; Zhang, Xia; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Yao, Xiao-Hong

    2017-11-01

    Cancer stem cells/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) and their microenvironmental niche play a vital role in malignant tumour recurrence and metastasis. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are major components of the niche of breast cancer-initiating cells (BCICs), and their interactions may profoundly affect breast cancer progression. Autophagy has been considered to be a critical process for CIC maintenance, but whether it is involved in the cross-talk between CAFs and CICs to affect tumourigenesis and pathological significance has not been determined. In this study, we found that the presence of CAFs containing high levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3II), a marker of autophagosomes, was associated with more aggressive luminal human breast cancer. CAFs in human luminal breast cancer tissues with high autophagy activity enriched BCICs with increased tumourigenicity. Mechanistically, autophagic CAFs released high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which activated its receptor, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, expressed by luminal breast cancer cells, to enhance their stemness and tumourigenicity. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry of 180 luminal breast cancers revealed that high LC3II/TLR4 levels predicted an increased relapse rate and a poorer prognosis. Our findings demonstrate that autophagic CAFs play a critical role in promoting the progression of luminal breast cancer through an HMGB1-TLR4 axis, and that both autophagy in CAFs and TLR4 on breast cancer cells constitute potential therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. High-mobility group (HMG) protein HMG-1 and TATA-binding protein-associated factor TAF(II)30 affect estrogen receptor-mediated transcriptional activation.

    Verrier, C S; Roodi, N; Yee, C J; Bailey, L R; Jensen, R A; Bustin, M; Parl, F F

    1997-07-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to a family of ligand-inducible nuclear receptors that exert their effects by binding to cis-acting DNA elements in the regulatory region of target genes. The detailed mechanisms by which ER interacts with the estrogen response element (ERE) and affects transcription still remain to be elucidated. To study the ER-ERE interaction and transcription initiation, we employed purified recombinant ER expressed in both the baculovirus-Sf9 and his-tagged bacterial systems. The effect of high-mobility group (HMG) protein HMG-1 and purified recombinant TATA-binding protein-associated factor TAF(II)30 on ER-ERE binding and transcription initiation were assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and in vitro transcription from an ERE-containing template (pERE2LovTATA), respectively. We find that purified, recombinant ER fails to bind to ERE in spite of high ligand-binding activity and electrophoretic and immunological properties identical to ER in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. HMG-1 interacts with ER and promotes ER-ERE binding in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The effectiveness of HMG-1 to stimulate ER-ERE binding in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay depends on the sequence flanking the ERE consensus as well as the position of the latter in the oligonucleotide. We find that TAF(II)30 has no effect on ER-ERE binding either alone or in combination with ER and HMG-1. Although HMG-1 promotes ER-ERE binding, it fails to stimulate transcription initiation either in the presence or absence of hormone. In contrast, TAF(II)30, while not affecting ER-ERE binding, stimulates transcription initiation 20-fold in the presence of HMG-1. These results indicate that HMG-1 and TAF(II)30 act in sequence, the former acting to promote ER-ERE binding followed by the latter to stimulate transcription initiation.

  3. The dengue vector Aedes aegypti contains a functional high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein with a unique regulatory C-terminus.

    Fabio Schneider Ribeiro

    Full Text Available The mosquito Aedes aegypti can spread the dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. Thus, the search for key molecules involved in the mosquito survival represents today a promising vector control strategy. High Mobility Group Box (HMGB proteins are essential nuclear factors that maintain the high-order structure of chromatin, keeping eukaryotic cells viable. Outside the nucleus, secreted HMGB proteins could alert the innate immune system to foreign antigens and trigger the initiation of host defenses. In this work, we cloned and functionally characterized the HMGB1 protein from Aedes aegypti (AaHMGB1. The AaHMGB1 protein typically consists of two HMG-box DNA binding domains and an acidic C-terminus. Interestingly, AaHMGB1 contains a unique alanine/glutamine-rich (AQ-rich C-terminal region that seems to be exclusive of dipteran HMGB proteins. AaHMGB1 is localized to the cell nucleus, mainly associated with heterochromatin. Circular dichroism analyses of AaHMGB1 or the C-terminal truncated proteins revealed α-helical structures. We showed that AaHMGB1 can effectively bind and change the topology of DNA, and that the AQ-rich and the C-terminal acidic regions can modulate its ability to promote DNA supercoiling, as well as its preference to bind supercoiled DNA. AaHMGB1 is phosphorylated by PKA and PKC, but not by CK2. Importantly, phosphorylation of AaHMGB1 by PKA or PKC completely abolishes its DNA bending activity. Thus, our study shows that a functional HMGB1 protein occurs in Aedes aegypt and we provide the first description of a HMGB1 protein containing an AQ-rich regulatory C-terminus.

  4. Neogambogic acid prevents silica-induced fibrosis via inhibition of high-mobility group box 1 and MCP-1-induced protein 1

    Zhang, Wei [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes and Human Disease, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Department of Respiration, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Zhang, Mei, E-mail: meizhang1717@163.com [Department of Respiration, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Wang, Zhongjiang [Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Cheng, Yusi; Liu, Haijun [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Zhou, Zewei [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Han, Bing [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Chen, Baoan [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Yao, Honghong, E-mail: yaohh@seu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes and Human Disease, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Chao, Jie, E-mail: chaojie@seu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes and Human Disease, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Department of Respiration, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Background: Silicosis is a systemic disease caused by inhaling silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}); early stages are characterized by alveolar inflammation, and later stages are characterized by progressive lung fibrosis. Mounting evidence indicates that high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is involved in pulmonary fibrosis. Whether neogambogic acid (NGA) inhibits macrophage and fibroblast activation induced by SiO{sub 2} by targeting HMGB1 remains unclear. Methods and results: Experiments using cultured mouse macrophages (RAW264.7 cells) demonstrated that SiO{sub 2} treatment induces the expression of HMGB1 in a time- and dose-dependent manner via mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway; in turn, this expression causes macrophage apoptosis and fibroblast activation. Pretreating macrophages with NGA inhibited the HMGB1 expression induced by SiO{sub 2} and attenuated both macrophage apoptosis and fibroblast activation. Moreover, NGA directly inhibited MCP-1-induced protein 1 (MCPIP1) expression, as well as markers of fibroblast activation and migration induced by SiO{sub 2}. Furthermore, the effects of NGA on macrophages and fibroblasts were confirmed in vivo by exposing mice to SiO{sub 2}. Conclusion: NGA can prevent SiO{sub 2}-induced macrophage activation and apoptosis via HMGB1 inhibition and SiO{sub 2}-induced fibrosis via the MCPIP1 pathway. Targeting HMGB1 and MCPIP1 with NGA could provide insights into the potential development of a therapeutic approach for alleviating the inflammation and fibrosis induced by SiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • The SiO{sub 2} induced HMGB1 in alveolar macrophage and MCPIP1 in fibroblast. • NGA rescued the SiO{sub 2}-induced apoptosis of alveolar macrophages via HMGB1 signaling. • NGA inhibited the fibroblast activation induced by SiO{sub 2} via MCPIP1 signaling. • NGA might represent a potential therapeutic approach for silicosis.

  5. Beneficial Effects of Ethyl Pyruvate through Inhibiting High-Mobility Group Box 1 Expression and TLR4/NF-κB Pathway after Traumatic Brain Injury in the Rat

    Xingfen Su

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethyl pyruvate (EP has demonstrated neuroprotective effects against acute brain injury through its anti-inflammatory action. The nuclear protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 can activate inflammatory pathways when released from dying cells. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of EP against secondary brain injury in rats after Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI. Adult male rats were randomly divided into three groups: (1 Sham + vehicle group, (2 TBI + vehicle group, and (3 TBI + EP group (n=30 per group. Right parietal cortical contusion was made by using a weight-dropping TBI method. In TBI + EP group, EP was administered intraperitoneally at a dosage of 75 mg/kg at 5 min, 1 and 6 h after TBI. Brain samples were harvested at 24 h after TBI. We found that EP treatment markedly inhibited the expressions of HMGB1 and TLR4, NF-κB DNA binding activity and inflammatory mediators, such as IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. Also, EP treatment significantly ameliorated beam walking performance, brain edema, and cortical apoptotic cell death. These results suggest that the protective effects of EP may be mediated by the reduction of HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response in the injured rat brain.

  6. Receptor for advanced glycation end products - membrane type1 matrix metalloproteinase axis regulates tissue factor expression via RhoA and Rac1 activation in high-mobility group box-1 stimulated endothelial cells.

    Koichi Sugimoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is understood to be a blood vessel inflammation. High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1 plays a key role in the systemic inflammation. Tissue factor (TF is known to lead to inflammation which promotes thrombus formation. Membrane type1 matrix metalloprotease (MT1-MMP associates with advanced glycation endproducts (AGE triggered-TF protein expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB. However, it is still unclear about the correlation of MT1-MMP and HMBG-1-mediated TF expression. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of TF expression in response to HMGB-1 stimulation and the involvement of MT1-MMP in endothelial cells. METHODS AND RESULTS: Pull-down assays and Western blotting revealed that HMGB-1 induced RhoA/Rac1 activation and NF-kB phosphorylation in cultured human aortic endothelial cells. HMGB-1 increased the activity of MT1-MMP, and inhibition of RAGE or MT1-MMP by siRNA suppressed HMGB-1-induced TF upregulation as well as HMGB-1-triggered RhoA/Rac1 activation and NF-kB phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed that RAGE/MT1-MMP axis modified HMBG-1-mediated TF expression through RhoA and Rac1 activation and NF-κB phosphorylation in endothelial cells. These results suggested that MT1-MMP was involved in vascular inflammation and might be a good target for treating atherosclerosis.

  7. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm2 V−1 s−1. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m−2 and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics. PMID:26620323

  8. Unfractionated Heparin Alleviates Human Lung Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction Induced by High Mobility Group Box 1 Through Regulation of P38–GSK3β–Snail Signaling Pathway

    Zhenggang Luan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 has been regarded as an important inflammatory mediator. Previous studies showed the involvement of HMGB1 protein in the dysfunction of endothelial barrier function during acute lung injury. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Methods: In this study, we used recombinant human HMGB1 (rhHMGB1 and HMGB1 plasmid to treat human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMECs. We examined endothelial permeability by measuring TEER value and HRP flux. Western blot and real-time PCR were used to examined change of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT markers and related pathways. Immunofluorescence was used to examine localization and expression of ZO-1 and VE-cadherin. SB203580.was used to block p38 pathway. Unfractionated heparin (UFH and RAGE siRNA were also used to antagonize the effect of HMGB1. Results: We showed that HMGB1 induced EndoMT with downregulation of ZO-1 and VE-cadherin at both mRNA and protein levels in HPMECs. We also demonstrated that HMGB1 upregulated endothelial permeability by measuring TEER value and HRP flux. Moreover, HMGB1 activated p38/GSK3β/Snail signaling pathway and treatment with p38 inhibitor SB203580 abolished its biological effects. In addition, we found that UFH was able to reverse the effect of HMGB1 on EndoMT and endothelial permeability through inhibition of p38 signaling in a dose-dependent manner. We discovered that RAGE, a membrane receptor of HMGB1, transduced p38/Snail pathway to EndoMT. RAGE siRNA inhibited the effect of HMGB1 induced EndoMT in HPMECs. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that HMGB1 induced EndoMT through RAGE receptor and p38/GSK3β/Snail pathway. While UFH antagonized HMGB1 and maintained the integrity of the endothelial barrier through p38 inhibition.

  9. Polymorphisms of UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*27 & UGT1A1*28 in three major ethnic groups from Malaysia.

    Teh, L K; Hashim, H; Zakaria, Z A; Salleh, M Z

    2012-08-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) have been associated with a wide variation of responses among patients prescribed with irinotecan. Lack of this enzyme is known to be associated with a high incidence of severe toxicity. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of three different variants of UGT1A1 (UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*27 and UGT1A1*28), which are associated with reduced enzyme activity and increased irinotecan toxicity, in the three main ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malays, Chinese and Indians). A total of 306 healthy unrelated volunteers were screened for UGT1A1*28, UGT1A1*6 and UGT1A1*27. Blood samples (5 ml) were obtained from each subject and DNA was extracted. PCR based methods were designed and validated for detection of UGT1A1*, UUGT1A1*27 and UUGT1A1*28. Direct DNA sequencing was performed to validate the results of randomly selected samples. Malays and Indian have two-fold higher frequency of homozygous of UGT1A1*28 (7TA/7TA) which was 8 and 8.8 per cent, respectively compared to the Chinese (4.9%). However, the distribution of UGT1A1*6 and UGT1A1*27 showed no significant differences among them. UGT1A1*27 which has not been detected in Caucasian and African American population, was found in the Malaysian Malays (3.33%) and Malaysian Chinese (2.0%). There was interethnic variability in the frequency of UGT1A1*28 in the Malaysian population. Our results suggest that genotyping of UUGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A1*27 need to be performed before patients are prescribed with irinotecan due to their high prevalence of allelic variant which could lead to adverse drug reaction.

  10. Evaluation of group A1B erythrocytes converted to type as group O: studies of markers of function and compatibility

    Gao, Hong-Wei; Zhuo, Hai-Long; Zhang, Xue; Ji, Shou-Ping; Tan, Ying-Xia; Li, Su-Bo; Jia, Yan-Jun; Xu, Hua; Wu, Qing-Fa; Yun, Zhi-Min; Luo, Qun; Gong, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Enzymatic conversion of blood group A1B red blood cells (RBC) to group O RBC (ECO) was achieved by combined treatment with α-galactosidase and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase. The aim of this study was to evaluate the function and safety of these A1B-ECO RBC in vitro. Materials and methods A 20% packed volume of A1B RBC was treated with enzymes in 250 mM glycine buffer, pH 6.8. The efficiency of the conversion of A and B antigen was evaluated by traditional typing in test tubes, gel column agglutination technology and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. The physiological and metabolic parameters of native and ECO RBC were compared, including osmotic fragility, erythrocyte deformation index, levels of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, ATP, methaemoglobin, free Na+, and free K+. The morphology of native and ECO RBC was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Residual α-galactosidase or α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase in A1B-ECO RBC was detected by double-antibody sandwich ELISA method. Manual cross-matching was applied to ensure blood compatibility. Results The RBC agglutination tests and FACS results showed that A1B RBC were efficiently converted to O RBC. Functional analysis suggested that the conversion process had little impact on the physiological and metabolic parameters of the RBC. The residual amounts of either α-galactosidase or α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase in the A1B-ECO RBC were less than 10 ng/mL of packed RBC. About 18% of group B and 55% of group O sera reacted with the A1B-ECO RBC in a sensitive gel column cross-matching test. Discussion The conversion process does not appear to affect the morphological, physiological or metabolic parameters of A1B-ECO RBC. However, the A1B-ECO RBC still reacted with some antigens. More research on group O and B sera, which may partly reflect the complexity of group A1 the safety of A1B-ECO RBC is necessary before the application of these RBC in clinical transfusion. PMID:26509826

  11. High mobility and quantum well transistors design and TCAD simulation

    Hellings, Geert

    2013-01-01

    For many decades, the semiconductor industry has miniaturized transistors, delivering increased computing power to consumers at decreased cost. However, mere transistor downsizing does no longer provide the same improvements. One interesting option to further improve transistor characteristics is to use high mobility materials such as germanium and III-V materials. However, transistors have to be redesigned in order to fully benefit from these alternative materials. High Mobility and Quantum Well Transistors: Design and TCAD Simulation investigates planar bulk Germanium pFET technology in chapters 2-4, focusing on both the fabrication of such a technology and on the process and electrical TCAD simulation. Furthermore, this book shows that Quantum Well based transistors can leverage the benefits of these alternative materials, since they confine the charge carriers to the high-mobility material using a heterostructure. The design and fabrication of one particular transistor structure - the SiGe Implant-Free Qu...

  12. High mobility transparent conducting oxides for thin film solar cells

    Calnan, S.; Tiwari, A.N.

    2010-01-01

    A special class of transparent conducting oxides (TCO) with high mobility of > 65 cm 2 V -1 s -1 allows film resistivity in the low 10 -4 Ω cm range and a high transparency of > 80% over a wide spectrum, from 300 nm to beyond 1500 nm. This exceptional coincidence of desirable optical and electrical properties provides opportunities to improve the performance of opto-electronic devices and opens possibilities for new applications. Strategies to attain high mobility (HM) TCO materials as well as the current status of such materials based on indium and cadmium containing oxides are presented. Various concepts used to understand the underlying mechanisms for high mobility in HMTCO films are discussed. Examples of HMTCO layers used as transparent electrodes in thin film solar cells are used to illustrate possible improvements in solar cell performance. Finally, challenges and prospects for further development of HMTCO materials are discussed.

  13. Interface-controlled, high-mobility organic transistors

    Jurchescu, Oana D.; Popinciuc, Mihaita; van Wees, Bart J.; Palstra, Thomas T. M.

    2007-01-01

    The achievement of high mobilities in field-effect transistors (FETs) is one of the main challenges for the widespread application of organic conductors in devices. Good device performance of a single-crystal pentacene FET requires both removal of impurity molecules from the bulk and the

  14. High mobility polymer gated organic field effect transistor using zinc ...

    Organic thin film transistors were fabricated using evaporated zinc phthalocyanine as the active layer. Parylene film ... At room temperature, these transistors exhibit p-type conductivity with field-effect ... Keywords. Organic semiconductor; field effect transistor; phthalocyanine; high mobility. ... The evaporation rate was kept at ...

  15. Successful ABO-Incompatible Renal Transplantation:  Blood Group A1B Donor Into A2B Recipient With Anti-A1 Isoagglutinins.

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Stratta, Robert J; Farney, Alan C; Pomper, Gregory J

    2016-08-01

    Transplantation of the blood group A2B in a recipient was successfully performed in the setting of receiving a deceased donor kidney from an "incompatible" A1B donor. The donor and recipient were both typed for ABO blood group, including ABO genotyping. The donor and recipient were tested for ABO, non-ABO, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. The donor and recipient were typed for HLA antigens, including T- and B-flow cytometry crossmatch tests. The recipient's RBCs were negative with A1 lectin, and immunoglobulin G anti-A1 was demonstrated in the recipient's plasma. The donor-recipient pair was a four-antigen HLA mismatch, but final T- and B-flow cytometry crossmatch tests were compatible. The transplant procedure was uneventful; the patient experienced immediate graft function with no episodes of rejection or readmissions more than 2 years later. It may be safe to transplant across the A1/A2 blood group AB mismatch barrier in the setting of low titer anti-A1 isoagglutinins without the need for pretransplant desensitization even if the antibody produced reacts with anti-human globulin. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. High mobility solution-processed hybrid light emitting transistors

    Walker, Bright; Kim, Jin Young; Ullah, Mujeeb; Burn, Paul L.; Namdas, Ebinazar B.; Chae, Gil Jo; Cho, Shinuk; Seo, Jung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of high-performance, solution-processed hybrid (inorganic-organic) light emitting transistors (HLETs). The devices employ a high-mobility, solution-processed cadmium sulfide layer as the switching and transport layer, with a conjugated polymer Super Yellow as an emissive material in non-planar source/drain transistor geometry. We demonstrate HLETs with electron mobilities of up to 19.5 cm 2 /V s, current on/off ratios of >10 7 , and external quantum efficiency of 10 −2 % at 2100 cd/m 2 . These combined optical and electrical performance exceed those reported to date for HLETs. Furthermore, we provide full analysis of charge injection, charge transport, and recombination mechanism of the HLETs. The high brightness coupled with a high on/off ratio and low-cost solution processing makes this type of hybrid device attractive from a manufacturing perspective

  17. Electrical spin injection into high mobility 2D systems.

    Oltscher, M; Ciorga, M; Utz, M; Schuh, D; Bougeard, D; Weiss, D

    2014-12-05

    We report on spin injection into a high mobility 2D electron system confined at an (Al,Ga)As/GaAs interface, using (Ga,Mn)As Esaki diode contacts as spin aligners. We measured a clear nonlocal spin valve signal, which varies nonmonotonically with the applied bias voltage. The magnitude of the signal cannot be described by the standard spin drift-diffusion model, because at maximum this would require the spin polarization of the injected current to be much larger than 100%, which is unphysical. A strong correlation of the spin signal with contact width and electron mean free path suggests that ballistic transport in the 2D region below ferromagnetic contacts should be taken into account to fully describe the results.

  18. Baecklund transformation for supersymmetric self-dual theories for semisimple gauge groups and a hierarchy of A1 solutions

    Devchand, C.

    1994-01-01

    We present a Baecklund transformation (a discrete symmetry transformation) for the self-duality equations for supersymmetric gauge theories in N-extended super-Minkowski space M 4vertical stroke 4N for an arbitrary semisimple gauge group. For the case of an A 1 gauge algebra we integrate the transformation starting with a given solution and iterating the process we construct a hierarchy of explicit solutions. (orig.)

  19. Effects of Different Types of Electroacupuncture on Expression of High Mobility Group Box Pro-tein-1 and Interleukin-10 in Hippocampus of APP/PS1 Mice%不同电针法对APP/PS1小鼠海马高迁移率族蛋白B1和白细胞介素-10表达的影响

    赵江豪; 姚海江; 王远征; 卢梦晗; 李昱颉; 宋萌; 杨利娟; 刘俊彤; 李志刚

    2018-01-01

    high mobility group box pro-tein-1 (HMGB1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in hippocampus were measured with immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Results The escape latency shortened inEA groups compared with that of the model group since the fourth day of Morris water maze training (P0.05). The ex-pression of HMGB1 decreased (P<0.05) and the expression of IL-10 increased (P<0.05) in EA groups com-pared with that of the model group, and HMGB1 decreased more and IL-10 increased more in the music-EA group than in the impulse-EA group (P<0.05), according to the measurement in immunohistochemistry, not in Western blotting. Conclusion Both impulse-EA and music-EA based on Tongdu Qishen can promote the recovery of the learning and memory in APP/PS1 mice, and music-EA may do more effectively in inhibition of pro-inflammatory factors and promotion of the anti-inflammatory factors.

  20. Diketopyrrolopyrrole-diketopyrrolopyrrole-based conjugated copolymer for high-mobility organic field-effect transistors

    Kanimozhi, Catherine K.; Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Chou, Kang Wei; Amassian, Aram; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Patil, Satish P.

    2012-01-01

    In this communication, we report the synthesis of a novel diketopyrrolopyrrole-diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP-DPP)-based conjugated copolymer and its application in high-mobility organic field-effect transistors. Copolymerization of DPP with DPP yields a

  1. Stimulation of V(D)J cleavage by high mobility group proteins

    D.C. van Gent (Dik); K. Hiom; T.T. Paull; M. Gellert

    1997-01-01

    textabstractV(D)J recombination requires a pair of signal sequences with spacer lengths of 12 and 23 bp between the conserved heptamer and nonamer elements. The RAG1 and RAG2 proteins initiate the reaction by making double-strand DNA breaks at both signals, and must thus be able to

  2. Differential epigenetic regulation of TOX subfamily high mobility group box genes in lung and breast cancers.

    Mathewos Tessema

    Full Text Available Aberrant cytosine methylation affects regulation of hundreds of genes during cancer development. In this study, a novel aberrantly hypermethylated CpG island in cancer was discovered within the TOX2 promoter. TOX2 was unmethylated in normal cells but 28% lung (n = 190 and 23% breast (n = 80 tumors were methylated. Expression of two novel TOX2 transcripts identified was significantly reduced in primary lung tumors than distant normal lung (p<0.05. These transcripts were silenced in methylated lung and breast cancer cells and 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment re-expressed both. Extension of these assays to TOX, TOX3, and TOX4 genes that share similar genomic structure and protein homology with TOX2 revealed distinct methylation profiles by smoking status, histology, and cancer type. TOX was almost exclusively methylated in breast (43% than lung (5% cancer, whereas TOX3 was frequently methylated in lung (58% than breast (30% tumors. TOX4 was unmethylated in all samples and showed the highest expression in normal lung. Compared to TOX4, expression of TOX, TOX2 and TOX3 in normal lung was 25, 44, and 88% lower, respectively, supporting the premise that reduced promoter activity confers increased susceptibility to methylation during lung carcinogenesis. Genome-wide assays revealed that siRNA-mediated TOX2 knockdown modulated multiple pathways while TOX3 inactivation targeted neuronal development and function. Although these knockdowns did not result in further phenotypic changes of lung cancer cells in vitro, the impact on tissue remodeling, inflammatory response, and cell differentiation pathways suggest a potential role for TOX2 in modulating tumor microenvironment.

  3. The Sox2 high mobility group transcription factor inhibits mature osteoblast function in transgenic mice

    Holmes, Greg; Bromage, Timothy G.; Basilico, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that in osteoblasts Sox2 expression can be induced by Fgfs, and can inhibit Wnt signaling and differentiation. Furthermore, in mice in which Sox2 is conditionally deleted in the osteoblastic lineage, bones are osteopenic, and Sox2 inactivation in cultured osteoblasts leads to a loss of proliferative ability with a senescent phenotype. To help understand the role of Sox2 in osteoblast development we have specifically expressed Sox2 in bone from a Col1α1 promoter, which extended Sox2 expression into more mature osteoblasts. In long bones, trabecular cartilage remodeling was delayed and the transition from endochondral to cortical bone was disrupted, resulting in porous and undermineralized cortical bone. Collagen deposition was disorganized, and patterns of osteoclast activity were altered. Calvarial bones were thinner and parietal bones failed to develop the diploic space. Microarray analysis showed significant up- or downregulation of a variety of genes coding for non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins, with a number of genes typical of mature osteoblasts being downregulated. Our results position Sox2 as a negative regulator of osteoblast maturation in vivo. PMID:21703370

  4. Strukturelle und funktionelle Analyse ausgewählter High Mobility Group Gene des Haushundes

    Soller, Jan Thies

    2010-01-01

    Medical advances due to scientific research made remarkable progress in the past decades fighting cancer. Nevertheless according to the United Nation s World Cancer Report 2008 tumour diseases are the leading cause of death with 7.6 million deaths and 12.4 million the new cancer cases a year. According to cancer the dog as an animal model joins the popular rodent model in order to study and understand the molecular genetics of tumour diseases and to develop new therapeutic strategies against ...

  5. Sequence of a cDNA encoding turtle high mobility group 1 protein.

    Zheng, Jifang; Hu, Bi; Wu, Duansheng

    2005-07-01

    In order to understand sequence information about turtle HMG1 gene, a cDNA encoding HMG1 protein of the Chinese soft-shell turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) was amplified by RT-PCR from kidney total RNA, and was cloned, sequenced and analyzed. The results revealed that the open reading frame (ORF) of turtle HMG1 cDNA is 606 bp long. The ORF codifies 202 amino acid residues, from which two DNA-binding domains and one polyacidic region are derived. The DNA-binding domains share higher amino acid identity with homologues sequences of chicken (96.5%) and mammalian (74%) than homologues sequence of rainbow trout (67%). The polyacidic region shows 84.6% amino acid homology with the equivalent region of chicken HMG1 cDNA. Turtle HMG1 protein contains 3 Cys residues located at completely conserved positions. Conservation in sequence and structure suggests that the functions of turtle HMG1 cDNA may be highly conserved during evolution. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HMG1 cDNA sequence in any reptilian.

  6. High-mobility ultrathin semiconducting films prepared by spin coating.

    Mitzi, David B; Kosbar, Laura L; Murray, Conal E; Copel, Matthew; Afzali, Ali

    2004-03-18

    The ability to deposit and tailor reliable semiconducting films (with a particular recent emphasis on ultrathin systems) is indispensable for contemporary solid-state electronics. The search for thin-film semiconductors that provide simultaneously high carrier mobility and convenient solution-based deposition is also an important research direction, with the resulting expectations of new technologies (such as flexible or wearable computers, large-area high-resolution displays and electronic paper) and lower-cost device fabrication. Here we demonstrate a technique for spin coating ultrathin (approximately 50 A), crystalline and continuous metal chalcogenide films, based on the low-temperature decomposition of highly soluble hydrazinium precursors. We fabricate thin-film field-effect transistors (TFTs) based on semiconducting SnS(2-x)Se(x) films, which exhibit n-type transport, large current densities (>10(5) A cm(-2)) and mobilities greater than 10 cm2 V(-1) s(-1)--an order of magnitude higher than previously reported values for spin-coated semiconductors. The spin-coating technique is expected to be applicable to a range of metal chalcogenides, particularly those based on main group metals, as well as for the fabrication of a variety of thin-film-based devices (for example, solar cells, thermoelectrics and memory devices).

  7. High-mobility ultrathin semiconducting films prepared by spin coating

    Mitzi, David B.; Kosbar, Laura L.; Murray, Conal E.; Copel, Matthew; Afzali, Ali

    2004-03-01

    The ability to deposit and tailor reliable semiconducting films (with a particular recent emphasis on ultrathin systems) is indispensable for contemporary solid-state electronics. The search for thin-film semiconductors that provide simultaneously high carrier mobility and convenient solution-based deposition is also an important research direction, with the resulting expectations of new technologies (such as flexible or wearable computers, large-area high-resolution displays and electronic paper) and lower-cost device fabrication. Here we demonstrate a technique for spin coating ultrathin (~50Å), crystalline and continuous metal chalcogenide films, based on the low-temperature decomposition of highly soluble hydrazinium precursors. We fabricate thin-film field-effect transistors (TFTs) based on semiconducting SnS2-xSex films, which exhibit n-type transport, large current densities (>105Acm-2) and mobilities greater than 10cm2V-1s-1-an order of magnitude higher than previously reported values for spin-coated semiconductors. The spin-coating technique is expected to be applicable to a range of metal chalcogenides, particularly those based on main group metals, as well as for the fabrication of a variety of thin-film-based devices (for example, solar cells, thermoelectrics and memory devices).

  8. High-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Raghavan, Santosh; Schumann, Timo; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Jack Y.; Cain, Tyler A.; Stemmer, Susanne, E-mail: stemmer@mrl.ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility perovskite BaSnO{sub 3} films are of significant interest as new wide bandgap semiconductors for power electronics, transparent conductors, and as high mobility channels for epitaxial integration with functional perovskites. Despite promising results for single crystals, high-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} films have been challenging to grow. Here, we demonstrate a modified oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach, which supplies pre-oxidized SnO{sub x}. This technique addresses issues in the MBE of ternary stannates related to volatile SnO formation and enables growth of epitaxial, stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3}. We demonstrate room temperature electron mobilities of 150 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} in films grown on PrScO{sub 3}. The results open up a wide range of opportunities for future electronic devices.

  9. Sing Your Lungs Out-a community singing group for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a 1-year pilot study.

    McNaughton, Amanda; Weatherall, Mark; Williams, Mathew; McNaughton, Harry; Aldington, Sarah; Williams, Gayle; Beasley, Richard

    2017-01-24

    Singing group participation may benefit patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies are limited by small numbers of participants and short duration of generally hospital-based singing group intervention. This study examines the feasibility of long-term participation in a community singing group for patients with COPD who had completed pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). This was a feasibility cohort study. Patients with COPD who had completed PR and were enrolled in a weekly community exercise group were recruited to a new community-based singing group which met weekly for over 1 year. Measurements at baseline, 4 months and 1 year comprised comprehensive pulmonary function tests including lung volumes, 6 min walk test (6MWT), Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and hospital admission days for acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) for 1 year before and after the first singing group session. There were 28 participants with chronic lung disease recruited from 140 people approached. Five withdrew in the first month. 21 participants meeting Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease criteria for COPD completed 4-month and 18 completed 1-year assessments. The mean attendance was 85%. For the prespecified primary outcome measure, total HADS score, difference between baseline and 12 months was -0.9, 95% CI -3.0 to 1.2, p=0.37. Of the secondary measures, a significant reduction was observed for HADS anxiety score after 1 year of -0.9 (95% CI -1.8 to -0.1) points, p=0.038 and an increase in the 6MWT at 1 year, of 65 (95% CI 35 to 99) m compared with baseline psinging group for adults with COPD who have completed PR and are enrolled in a weekly community exercise group and provide evidence of improved exercise capacity and a reduction in anxiety. ACTRN12615000736549; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  10. A 1-year videoconferencing-based psychoeducational group intervention following bariatric surgery: results of a randomized controlled study.

    Wild, Beate; Hünnemeyer, Katharina; Sauer, Helene; Hain, Bernhard; Mack, Isabelle; Schellberg, Dieter; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Weiner, Rudolf; Meile, Tobias; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Königsrainer, Alfred; Zipfel, Stephan; Herzog, Wolfgang; Teufel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    For severely obese patients, bariatric surgery has been recommended as an effective therapy. The Bariataric Surgery and Education (BaSE) study aimed to assess the efficacy of a videoconferencing-based psychoeducational group intervention in patients after bariatric surgery. The BaSE study is a randomized, controlled multicenter clinical trial involving 117 patients undergoing bariatric surgery (mean preoperative body mass index [BMI] 49.9 kg/m(2), SD 6.4). Patients were enrolled between May 2009 and November 2012 and were randomly assigned to receive either conventional postsurgical visits or, in addition, a videoconferencing-based 1-year group program. Primary outcome measures were weight in kilograms, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and general self-efficacy (GSE). Secondary outcome measures were depression symptoms and eating behavior. 94% of the patients completed the study. Mean weight loss for all patients was 45.9 kg (SD 16.4) 1 year after surgery (mean excess weight loss [EWL] 63%). Intention-to-treat analyses revealed no differences in weight loss, EWL, HRQOL, or self-efficacy between study groups at 1 year after surgery. However, patients with clinically significant depression symptoms (CSD) at baseline assigned to the intervention group (n = 29) had a significantly better HRQOL (P = .03), lower depression scores (P = .02), and a trend for a better EWL (.06) 1 year after surgery compared with the control group (n = 20). We could not prove the efficacy of the group program for the whole study sample. However, results indicate that the intervention is effective for the important subgroup of patients with CSD. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sing Your Lungs Out—a community singing group for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a 1-year pilot study

    McNaughton, Amanda; Weatherall, Mark; Williams, Mathew; McNaughton, Harry; Aldington, Sarah; Williams, Gayle; Beasley, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Objective Singing group participation may benefit patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies are limited by small numbers of participants and short duration of generally hospital-based singing group intervention. This study examines the feasibility of long-term participation in a community singing group for patients with COPD who had completed pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Methods This was a feasibility cohort study. Patients with COPD who had completed PR and were enrolled in a weekly community exercise group were recruited to a new community-based singing group which met weekly for over 1 year. Measurements at baseline, 4 months and 1 year comprised comprehensive pulmonary function tests including lung volumes, 6 min walk test (6MWT), Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and hospital admission days for acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) for 1 year before and after the first singing group session. Findings There were 28 participants with chronic lung disease recruited from 140 people approached. Five withdrew in the first month. 21 participants meeting Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease criteria for COPD completed 4-month and 18 completed 1-year assessments. The mean attendance was 85%. For the prespecified primary outcome measure, total HADS score, difference between baseline and 12 months was −0.9, 95% CI −3.0 to 1.2, p=0.37. Of the secondary measures, a significant reduction was observed for HADS anxiety score after 1 year of −0.9 (95% CI −1.8 to −0.1) points, p=0.038 and an increase in the 6MWT at 1 year, of 65 (95% CI 35 to 99) m compared with baseline psinging group for adults with COPD who have completed PR and are enrolled in a weekly community exercise group and provide evidence of improved exercise capacity and a reduction in anxiety. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000736549; Results. PMID:28119393

  12. Followup Audit: DLA Officials Took Appropriate Actions to Address Concerns With Repair Parts for the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle

    2016-04-29

    Followup Audit : DLA Officials Took Appropriate Actions to Address Concerns With Repair Parts for the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle A P R I L...Results in Brief Followup Audit : DLA Officials Took Appropriate Actions to Address Concerns With Repair Parts for the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled...and Maritime Paid Too Much for High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle Repair Parts,” (HMMWV) was issued on April 4, 2014. The audit

  13. Atomic layer deposition of high-mobility hydrogen-doped zinc oxide

    Macco, B.; Knoops, H.C.M.; Verheijen, M.A.; Beyer, W.; Creatore, M.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been employed to prepare high-mobility H-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:H) films. Hydrogen doping was achieved by interleaving the ZnO ALD cycles with H2 plasma treatments. It has been shown that doping with H2 plasma offers key advantages over traditional

  14. Considering the Geographic Dispersion of Homeless and Highly Mobile Students and Families

    Miller, Peter M.; Bourgeois, Alexis K.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses school and community-level issues associated with the expanding crisis of student homelessness in the United States. We note that while an increased geographic dispersion of homeless and highly mobile (HHM) families is largely attributed to the widespread effects of the economic recession, it is also furthered by shifting…

  15. Highly Mobile Students: Educational Problems and Possible Solutions. ERIC/CUE Digest, Number 73.

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, New York, NY.

    The following two types of student mobility stand out as causing educational problems: (1) inner-city mobility, which is prompted largely by fluctuations in the job market; and (2) intra-city mobility, which is caused by upward mobility or by poverty and homelessness. Most research indicates that high mobility negatively affects student…

  16. Temporal HbA1c patterns amongst patients with type 2 diabetes referred for specialist care: Data from the S4S-DINGO-Diabetes Informatics Group.

    Lam, Teresa; Hoffman, David M; Cukier, Kimberly; Darnell, David; Greenfield, Jerry R; Harrison, Natalie; Hng, Tien-Ming; Morrow, Anthony F; Cheung, N Wah

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the achievement of HbA1c targets in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in specialist practice. This audit was undertaken by members of the S4S Diabetes Informatics Group (DINGO), a consortium of Australian endocrinologists in private practice who contribute de-identified data from their electronic medical record, Audit 4 (Software 4 Specialists, S4S, Australia & New Zealand) for audit purposes. Data from patients with type 2 diabetes was extracted. Inclusion criteria were: initial ageHbA1c>7% (53mmol/mol), with at least another HbA1c recorded in the next 2years, and a minimum of 2years follow-up. Data was analysed using a linear mixed effects model. Of the 4796 patients in the dataset with type 2 diabetes mellitus, 1379 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria. The median age at initial consultation was 57 (49-64)years. The median baseline HbA1c was 8.7 (7.8-9.8)% (72mmol/mol). There was a 1.0% reduction in HbA1c to 7.7 (7.1-8.6)% (61mmol/mol) (pHbA1c. Referral of patients with type 2 diabetes to an endocrinologist reduces HbA1c, and the effect is sustained over the medium term; however only a minority of patients reach targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    Pelliccione, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bartel, J.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Sciambi, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called “virtual scanning tunneling microscopy” that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  18. Dietary differentiation and the evolution of population genetic structure in a highly mobile carnivore.

    Małgorzata Pilot

    Full Text Available Recent studies on highly mobile carnivores revealed cryptic population genetic structures correlated to transitions in habitat types and prey species composition. This led to the hypothesis that natal-habitat-biased dispersal may be responsible for generating population genetic structure. However, direct evidence for the concordant ecological and genetic differentiation between populations of highly mobile mammals is rare. To address this we analyzed stable isotope profiles (δ(13C and δ(15N values for Eastern European wolves (Canis lupus as a quantifiable proxy measure of diet for individuals that had been genotyped in an earlier study (showing cryptic genetic structure, to provide a quantitative assessment of the relationship between individual foraging behavior and genotype. We found a significant correlation between genetic distances and dietary differentiation (explaining 46% of the variation in both the marginal test and crucially, when geographic distance was accounted for as a co-variable. These results, interpreted in the context of other possible mechanisms such as allopatry and isolation by distance, reinforce earlier studies suggesting that diet and associated habitat choice are influencing the structuring of populations in highly mobile carnivores.

  19. The Effect of Group Counseling on Physiological Aspect of Self-care and HbA1C Level of Patients with Diabetes Type II

    Seyedreza Mazlom

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most important underlying cause of death in diabetic patients is poor self-care. The effect of education on self-care promotion has been widely investigated; however, the advisory role and impact of the treatment team have been scarcely investigated.  Aim: Determining the effect of group counseling on the psychological aspect of self-care and level of glycosylated hemoglobin in the patients with diabetes type II. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 73 patients with type II diabetes mellitus, who had been referred to Parsian Diabetes clinic of Mashhad in 2014, were divided into two groups of intervention and control. The group counseling program was performed in five 1.5-hour sessions with 3-day intervals, and each groups consisted of 8 to 10 people. The content of the meetings was problems in nutrition, exercise, diabetes mellitus disease, diabetes-related mental health problems, diabetes medications, and self-control of blood glucose. Researcher-made diabetes care questionnaire was filled and HbA1c test was measured before and two months after the intervention. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 11.5 using paired sample and independent t-tests. Results: In this study,27.3 percent of the subjects were male and 72.7 were female with the mean age of 49.1 ± 8.3. The scores of physiological aspect of self-care and HbA1C of the diabetic patients before the intervention was not significantly different between the groups; but in the post-intervention phase, the self-care in intervention group (49.1±5.8 significantly increased compared to the control group (31.8±12.2 (p

  20. The cysteine 34 residue of A1M/α1-microglobulin is essential for protection of irradiated cell cultures and reduction of carbonyl groups.

    Rutardottir, S; Nilsson, E J C; Pallon, J; Gram, M; Åkerström, B

    2013-07-01

    α1-microglobulin (A1M) is a 26 kDa plasma and a tissue protein belonging to the lipocalin family. The reductase and free radical scavenger A1M has been shown to protect cells and extracellular matrix against oxidative and irradiation-induced damage. The reductase activity was previously shown to depend upon an unpaired cysteinyl side-chain, C34, and three lysyl side-chains, K92, 118, and 130, located around the open end of the lipocalin pocket. The aim of this work was to investigate whether the cell and matrix protection by A1M is a result of its reductase activity by using A1M-variants with site-directed mutations of the C34, K92, K118, and K130 positions. The results show that the C34 side-chain is an absolute requirement for protection of HepG2 cell cultures against alpha-particle irradiation-induced cell death, upregulation of stress response and cell cycle regulation genes. Mutation of C34 also resulted in loss of the reduction capacity toward heme- and hydrogen peroxide-oxidized collagen, and the radical species 2,2´-azino-bis (3-ethyl-benzo-thiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS). Furthermore, mutation of C34 significantly suppressed the cell-uptake of A1M. The K92, K118, and K130 side-chains were of minor importance in cell protection and reduction of oxidized collagen but strongly influenced the reduction of the ABTS-radical. It is concluded that antioxidative protection of cells and collagen by A1M is totally dependent on its C34 amino acid residue. A model of the cell protection mechanism of A1M should be based on the redox activity of the free thiolyl group of the C34 side-chain and a regulatory role of the K92, K118, and K130 residues.

  1. Conductance fluctuations in high mobility monolayer graphene: Nonergodicity, lack of determinism and chaotic behavior.

    da Cunha, C R; Mineharu, M; Matsunaga, M; Matsumoto, N; Chuang, C; Ochiai, Y; Kim, G-H; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Ferry, D K; Aoki, N

    2016-09-09

    We have fabricated a high mobility device, composed of a monolayer graphene flake sandwiched between two sheets of hexagonal boron nitride. Conductance fluctuations as functions of a back gate voltage and magnetic field were obtained to check for ergodicity. Non-linear dynamics concepts were used to study the nature of these fluctuations. The distribution of eigenvalues was estimated from the conductance fluctuations with Gaussian kernels and it indicates that the carrier motion is chaotic at low temperatures. We argue that a two-phase dynamical fluid model best describes the transport in this system and can be used to explain the violation of the so-called ergodic hypothesis found in graphene.

  2. Investigation of the High Mobility IGZO Thin Films by Using Co-Sputtering Method

    Hsu, Chao-Ming; Tzou, Wen-Cheng; Yang, Cheng-Fu; Liou, Yu-Jhen

    2015-01-01

    High transmittance ratio in visible range, low resistivity, and high mobility of IGZO thin films were prepared at room temperature for 30 min by co-sputtering of Zn2Ga2O5 (Ga2O3 + 2 ZnO, GZO) ceramic and In2O3 ceramic at the same time. The deposition power of pure In2O3 ceramic target was fixed at 100 W and the deposition power of GZO ceramic target was changed from 80 W to 140 W. We chose to investigate the deposition power of GZO ceramic target on the properties of IGZO thin films. From the...

  3. Data dissemination in the wild: A testbed for high-mobility MANETs

    Vingelmann, Peter; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Heide, Janus

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of efficient data dissemination in Mobile Ad hoc NETworks (MANETs) with high mobility. A testbed is presented; which provides a high degree of mobility in experiments. The testbed consists of 10 autonomous robots with mobile phones mounted on them. The mobile...... information, and the goal is to convey that information to all devices. A strategy is proposed that uses UDP broadcast transmissions and random linear network coding to facilitate the efficient exchange of information in the network. An application is introduced that implements this strategy on Nokia phones...

  4. Random demographic household surveys in highly mobile pastoral communities in Chad.

    Weibel, Daniel; Béchir, Mahamat; Hattendorf, Jan; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Zinsstag, Jakob; Schelling, Esther

    2011-05-01

    Reliable demographic data is a central requirement for health planning and management, and for the implementation of adequate interventions. This study addresses the lack of demographic data on mobile pastoral communities in the Sahel. A total of 1081 Arab, Fulani and Gorane women and 2541 children (1336 boys and 1205 girls) were interviewed and registered by a biometric fingerprint scanner in five repeated random transect demographic and health surveys conducted from March 2007 to January 2008 in the Lake Chad region in Chad. Important determinants for the planning and implementation of household surveys among mobile pastoral communities include: environmental factors; availability of women for interviews; difficulties in defining "own" children; the need for information-education-communication campaigns; and informed consent of husbands in typically patriarchal societies. Due to their high mobility, only 5% (56/1081) of registered women were encountered twice. Therefore, it was not possible to establish a demographic and health cohort. Prospective demographic and health cohorts are the most accurate method to assess child mortality and other demographic indices. However, their feasibility in a highly mobile pastoral setting remains to be shown. Future interdisciplinary scientific efforts need to target innovative methods, tools and approaches to include marginalized communities in operational health and demographic surveillance systems.

  5. High mobility AlGaN/GaN devices for β{sup −}-dosimetry

    Schmid, Martin; Howgate, John; Ruehm, Werner [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Thalhammer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@physik.uni-augsburg.de [Universität Augsburg, Universitätsstraße 1, 86159 Augsburg (Germany)

    2016-05-21

    There is a high demand in modern medical applications for dosimetry sensors with a small footprint allowing for unobtrusive or high spatial resolution detectors. To this end we characterize the sensoric response of radiation resistant high mobility AlGaN/GaN semiconductor devices when exposed to β{sup −}-emitters. The samples were operated as a floating gate transistor, without a field effect gate electrode, thus excluding any spurious effects from β{sup −}-particle interactions with a metallic surface covering. We demonstrate that the source–drain current is modulated in dependence on the kinetic energy of the incident β{sup −}-particles. Here, the signal is shown to have a linear dependence on the absorbed energy calculated from Monte Carlo simulations. Additionally, a stable and reproducible sensor performance as a β{sup −}-dose monitor is shown for individual radioisotopes. Our experimental findings and the characteristics of the AlGaN/GaN high mobility layered devices indicate their potential for future applications where small sensor size is necessary, like for instance brachytherapy.

  6. Appendicectomies in Albanians in Greece: outcomes in a highly mobile immigrant patient population

    2001-01-01

    Background Albanian immigrants in Greece comprise a highly mobile population with unknown health care profile. We aimed to assess whether these immigrants were more or less likely to undergo laparotomy for suspected appendicitis with negative findings (negative appendicectomy), by performing a controlled study with individual (1:4) matching. We used data from 6 hospitals in the Greek prefecture of Epirus that is bordering Albania. Results Among a total of 2027 non-incidental appendicectomies for suspected appendicitis performed in 1994-1999, 30 patients with Albanian names were matched (for age, sex, time of operation and hospital) to 120 patients with Greek names. The odds for a negative appendicectomy were 3.4-fold higher (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-9.31, p = 0.02) in Albanian immigrants than in matched Greek-name subjects. The difference was most prominent in men (odds ratio 20.0, 95% CI, 1.41-285, p = 0.02) while it was not formally significant in women (odds ratio 1.56, 95% CI, 0.44-5.48). The odds for perforation were 1.25-fold higher in Albanian-name immigrants than in Greek-name patients (95% CI 0.44- 3.57). Conclusions Albanian immigrants in Greece are at high risk for negative appendicectomies. Socioeconomic, cultural and language parameters underlying health care inequalities in highly mobile immigrant populations need better study. PMID:11472640

  7. Determination of the coherence length in high-mobility semiconductor-coupled Josephson weak links

    Kleinsasser, A.W.

    1991-01-01

    A Nb-InAs-Nb superconductor-semiconductor-superconductor weak link based on a high-mobility homoepitaxial n-InAs film was reported recently [Akazaki, Kawakami, and Nittu J. Appl. Phys. 66, 6121 (1989)]. Measurements of the electron concentration, effective mass, and mobility allowed the coherence length in the normal link to be calculated. The mobility was high enough that the dirty limit was not applicable in the temperature range (∼2--7 K) over which the device critical current was measured. The temperature dependence of the critical current could not be fit by the usual theoretical form, even though an expression for the coherence length was used that should be applicable in both the clean and dirty limits. In this paper is demonstrated an excellent fit to the data, obtained by using the magnitude of the coherence length as a fitting parameter and assuming the dirty limit temperature dependence. This implies a coherence length proportional to T -1/2 but far shorter than that calculated from the known material parameters. It is suggested that a different scaling length may apply in high-mobility devices

  8. High mobility AlGaN/GaN devices for β"−-dosimetry

    Schmid, Martin; Howgate, John; Ruehm, Werner; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    There is a high demand in modern medical applications for dosimetry sensors with a small footprint allowing for unobtrusive or high spatial resolution detectors. To this end we characterize the sensoric response of radiation resistant high mobility AlGaN/GaN semiconductor devices when exposed to β"−-emitters. The samples were operated as a floating gate transistor, without a field effect gate electrode, thus excluding any spurious effects from β"−-particle interactions with a metallic surface covering. We demonstrate that the source–drain current is modulated in dependence on the kinetic energy of the incident β"−-particles. Here, the signal is shown to have a linear dependence on the absorbed energy calculated from Monte Carlo simulations. Additionally, a stable and reproducible sensor performance as a β"−-dose monitor is shown for individual radioisotopes. Our experimental findings and the characteristics of the AlGaN/GaN high mobility layered devices indicate their potential for future applications where small sensor size is necessary, like for instance brachytherapy.

  9. High-mobility pyrene-based semiconductor for organic thin-film transistors.

    Cho, Hyunduck; Lee, Sunyoung; Cho, Nam Sung; Jabbour, Ghassan E; Kwak, Jeonghun; Hwang, Do-Hoon; Lee, Changhee

    2013-05-01

    Numerous conjugated oligoacenes and polythiophenes are being heavily studied in the search for high-mobility organic semiconductors. Although many researchers have designed fused aromatic compounds as organic semiconductors for organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs), pyrene-based organic semiconductors with high mobilities and on-off current ratios have not yet been reported. Here, we introduce a new pyrene-based p-type organic semiconductor showing liquid crystal behavior. The thin film characteristics of this material are investigated by varying the substrate temperature during the deposition and the gate dielectric condition using the surface modification with a self-assembled monolayer, and systematically studied in correlation with the performances of transistor devices with this compound. OTFT fabricated under the optimum deposition conditions of this compound, namely, 1,6-bis(5'-octyl-2,2'-bithiophen-5-yl)pyrene (BOBTP) shows a high-performance transistor behavior with a field-effect mobility of 2.1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an on-off current ratio of 7.6 × 10(6) and enhanced long-term stability compared to the pentacene thin-film transistor.

  10. Random demographic household surveys in highly mobile pastoral communities in Chad

    Béchir, Mahamat; Hattendorf, Jan; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Zinsstag, Jakob; Schelling, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Problem Reliable demographic data is a central requirement for health planning and management, and for the implementation of adequate interventions. This study addresses the lack of demographic data on mobile pastoral communities in the Sahel. Approach A total of 1081 Arab, Fulani and Gorane women and 2541 children (1336 boys and 1205 girls) were interviewed and registered by a biometric fingerprint scanner in five repeated random transect demographic and health surveys conducted from March 2007 to January 2008 in the Lake Chad region in Chad. Local setting Important determinants for the planning and implementation of household surveys among mobile pastoral communities include: environmental factors; availability of women for interviews; difficulties in defining “own” children; the need for information-education-communication campaigns; and informed consent of husbands in typically patriarchal societies. Relevant changes Due to their high mobility, only 5% (56/1081) of registered women were encountered twice. Therefore, it was not possible to establish a demographic and health cohort. Lessons learnt Prospective demographic and health cohorts are the most accurate method to assess child mortality and other demographic indices. However, their feasibility in a highly mobile pastoral setting remains to be shown. Future interdisciplinary scientific efforts need to target innovative methods, tools and approaches to include marginalized communities in operational health and demographic surveillance systems. PMID:21556307

  11. Photo-Detection on Narrow-Bandgap High-Mobility 2D Semiconductors

    Charnas, Adam; Qiu, Gang; Deng, Yexin; Wang, Yixiu; Du, Yuchen; Yang, Lingming; Wu, Wenzhuo; Ye, Peide

    Photo-detection and energy harvesting device concepts have been demonstrated widely in 2D materials such as graphene, TMDs, and black phosphorus. In this work, we demonstrate anisotropic photo-detection achieved using devices fabricated from hydrothermally grown narrow-bandgap high-mobility 2D semiconductor. Back-gated FETs were fabricated by transferring the 2D flakes onto a Si/SiO2 substrate and depositing various metal contacts across the flakes to optimize the access resistance for optoelectronic devices. Photo-responsivity was measured and mapped by slightly biasing the devices and shining a laser spot at different locations of the device to observe and map the resulting photo-generated current. Optimization of the Schottky barrier height for both n and p at the metal-2D interfaces using asymmetric contact engineering was performed to improve device performance.

  12. Accurate on-chip measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high mobility small molecule organic semiconductors

    Warwick, C. N.; Venkateshvaran, D.; Sirringhaus, H.

    2015-09-01

    We present measurements of the Seebeck coefficient in two high mobility organic small molecules, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) and 2,9-didecyl-dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (C10-DNTT). The measurements are performed in a field effect transistor structure with high field effect mobilities of approximately 3 cm2/V s. This allows us to observe both the charge concentration and temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient. We find a strong logarithmic dependence upon charge concentration and a temperature dependence within the measurement uncertainty. Despite performing the measurements on highly polycrystalline evaporated films, we see an agreement in the Seebeck coefficient with modelled values from Shi et al. [Chem. Mater. 26, 2669 (2014)] at high charge concentrations. We attribute deviations from the model at lower charge concentrations to charge trapping.

  13. Dithiopheneindenofluorene (TIF) Semiconducting Polymers with Very High Mobility in Field-Effect Transistors

    Chen, Hu

    2017-07-19

    The charge-carrier mobility of organic semiconducting polymers is known to be enhanced when the energetic disorder of the polymer is minimized. Fused, planar aromatic ring structures contribute to reducing the polymer conformational disorder, as demonstrated by polymers containing the indacenodithiophene (IDT) repeat unit, which have both a low Urbach energy and a high mobility in thin-film-transistor (TFT) devices. Expanding on this design motif, copolymers containing the dithiopheneindenofluorene repeat unit are synthesized, which extends the fused aromatic structure with two additional phenyl rings, further rigidifying the polymer backbone. A range of copolymers are prepared and their electrical properties and thin-film morphology evaluated, with the co-benzothiadiazole polymer having a twofold increase in hole mobility when compared to the IDT analog, reaching values of almost 3 cm2 V−1 s−1 in bottom-gate top-contact organic field-effect transistors.

  14. Task Phase Recognition for Highly Mobile Workers in Large Building Complexes

    Stisen, Allan; Mathisen, Andreas; Krogh, Søren

    2016-01-01

    requirements on the accuracy of the indoor positioning, and thus come with low deployment and maintenance effort in real-world settings. We evaluated the proposed methods in a large hospital complex, where the highly mobile workers were recruited among the non-clinical workforce. The evaluation is based......-scale indoor work environments, namely from a WiFi infrastructure providing coarse grained indoor positioning, from inertial sensors in the workers’ mobile phones, and from a task management system yielding information about the scheduled tasks’ start and end locations. The methods presented have low...... on manually labelled real-world data collected over 4 days of regular work life of the mobile workforce. The collected data yields 83 tasks in total involving 8 different orderlies from a major university hospital with a building area of 160, 000 m2. The results show that the proposed methods can distinguish...

  15. A southern African origin and cryptic structure in the highly mobile plains zebra

    Pedersen, Casper-Emil T; Albrechtsen, Anders; Etter, Paul D.

    2018-01-01

    insights into the past phylogeography of the species. The results identify a southern African location as the most likely source region from which all extant populations expanded around 370,000 years ago. We show evidence for inclusion of the extinct and phenotypically divergent quagga (Equus quagga quagga......The plains zebra (Equus quagga) is an ecologically important species of the African savannah. It is also one of the most numerous and widely distributed ungulates, and six subspecies have been described based on morphological variation. However, the within-species evolutionary processes have been...... difficult to resolve due to its high mobility and a lack of consensus regarding the population structure. We obtained genome-wide DNA polymorphism data from more than 167,000 loci for 59 plains zebras from across the species range, encompassing all recognized extant subspecies, as well as three mountain...

  16. Accurate on-chip measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high mobility small molecule organic semiconductors

    C. N. Warwick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of the Seebeck coefficient in two high mobility organic small molecules, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT and 2,9-didecyl-dinaphtho[2,3-b:2′,3′-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (C10-DNTT. The measurements are performed in a field effect transistor structure with high field effect mobilities of approximately 3 cm2/V s. This allows us to observe both the charge concentration and temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient. We find a strong logarithmic dependence upon charge concentration and a temperature dependence within the measurement uncertainty. Despite performing the measurements on highly polycrystalline evaporated films, we see an agreement in the Seebeck coefficient with modelled values from Shi et al. [Chem. Mater. 26, 2669 (2014] at high charge concentrations. We attribute deviations from the model at lower charge concentrations to charge trapping.

  17. Diketopyrrolopyrrole-diketopyrrolopyrrole-based conjugated copolymer for high-mobility organic field-effect transistors

    Kanimozhi, Catherine K.

    2012-10-10

    In this communication, we report the synthesis of a novel diketopyrrolopyrrole-diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP-DPP)-based conjugated copolymer and its application in high-mobility organic field-effect transistors. Copolymerization of DPP with DPP yields a copolymer with exceptional properties such as extended absorption characteristics (up to ∼1100 nm) and field-effect electron mobility values of >1 cm 2 V -1 s -1. The synthesis of this novel DPP-DPP copolymer in combination with the demonstration of transistors with extremely high electron mobility makes this work an important step toward a new family of DPP-DPP copolymers for application in the general area of organic optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. Highly mobile charge-transfer excitons in two-dimensional WS2/tetracene heterostructures

    Zhu, Tong; Yuan, Long; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Mingwei; Wan, Yan; Mei, Jianguo; Huang, Libai

    2018-01-01

    Charge-transfer (CT) excitons at heterointerfaces play a critical role in light to electricity conversion using organic and nanostructured materials. However, how CT excitons migrate at these interfaces is poorly understood. We investigate the formation and transport of CT excitons in two-dimensional WS2/tetracene van der Waals heterostructures. Electron and hole transfer occurs on the time scale of a few picoseconds, and emission of interlayer CT excitons with a binding energy of ~0.3 eV has been observed. Transport of the CT excitons is directly measured by transient absorption microscopy, revealing coexistence of delocalized and localized states. Trapping-detrapping dynamics between the delocalized and localized states leads to stretched-exponential photoluminescence decay with an average lifetime of ~2 ns. The delocalized CT excitons are remarkably mobile with a diffusion constant of ~1 cm2 s−1. These highly mobile CT excitons could have important implications in achieving efficient charge separation. PMID:29340303

  19. High Thermoelectric Power Factor of High-Mobility 2D Electron Gas.

    Ohta, Hiromichi; Kim, Sung Wng; Kaneki, Shota; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2018-01-01

    Thermoelectric conversion is an energy harvesting technology that directly converts waste heat from various sources into electricity by the Seebeck effect of thermoelectric materials with a large thermopower ( S ), high electrical conductivity (σ), and low thermal conductivity (κ). State-of-the-art nanostructuring techniques that significantly reduce κ have realized high-performance thermoelectric materials with a figure of merit ( ZT = S 2 ∙σ∙ T ∙κ -1 ) between 1.5 and 2. Although the power factor (PF = S 2 ∙σ) must also be enhanced to further improve ZT , the maximum PF remains near 1.5-4 mW m -1 K -2 due to the well-known trade-off relationship between S and σ. At a maximized PF, σ is much lower than the ideal value since impurity doping suppresses the carrier mobility. A metal-oxide-semiconductor high electron mobility transistor (MOS-HEMT) structure on an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is prepared. Applying a gate electric field to the MOS-HEMT simultaneously modulates S and σ of the high-mobility electron gas from -490 µV K -1 and ≈10 -1 S cm -1 to -90 µV K -1 and ≈10 4 S cm -1 , while maintaining a high carrier mobility (≈1500 cm 2 V -1 s -1 ). The maximized PF of the high-mobility electron gas is ≈9 mW m -1 K -2 , which is a two- to sixfold increase compared to state-of-the-art practical thermoelectric materials.

  20. A guide to calculating habitat-quality metrics to inform conservation of highly mobile species

    Bieri, Joanna A.; Sample, Christine; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Diffendorfer, James E.; Earl, Julia E.; Erickson, Richard A.; Federico, Paula; Flockhart, D. T. Tyler; Nicol, Sam; Semmens, Darius J.; Skraber, T.; Wiederholt, Ruscena; Mattsson, Brady J.

    2018-01-01

    Many metrics exist for quantifying the relative value of habitats and pathways used by highly mobile species. Properly selecting and applying such metrics requires substantial background in mathematics and understanding the relevant management arena. To address this multidimensional challenge, we demonstrate and compare three measurements of habitat quality: graph-, occupancy-, and demographic-based metrics. Each metric provides insights into system dynamics, at the expense of increasing amounts and complexity of data and models. Our descriptions and comparisons of diverse habitat-quality metrics provide means for practitioners to overcome the modeling challenges associated with management or conservation of such highly mobile species. Whereas previous guidance for applying habitat-quality metrics has been scattered in diversified tracks of literature, we have brought this information together into an approachable format including accessible descriptions and a modeling case study for a typical example that conservation professionals can adapt for their own decision contexts and focal populations.Considerations for Resource ManagersManagement objectives, proposed actions, data availability and quality, and model assumptions are all relevant considerations when applying and interpreting habitat-quality metrics.Graph-based metrics answer questions related to habitat centrality and connectivity, are suitable for populations with any movement pattern, quantify basic spatial and temporal patterns of occupancy and movement, and require the least data.Occupancy-based metrics answer questions about likelihood of persistence or colonization, are suitable for populations that undergo localized extinctions, quantify spatial and temporal patterns of occupancy and movement, and require a moderate amount of data.Demographic-based metrics answer questions about relative or absolute population size, are suitable for populations with any movement pattern, quantify demographic

  1. Interplay between human high mobility group protein 1 and replication protein A on psoralen-cross-linked DNA

    Reddy, Madhava C; Christensen, Jesper; Vasquez, Karen M

    2005-01-01

    -DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) to a specific site to determine the effect of HMGB proteins on recognition of these lesions. Our results reveal that human HMGB1 (but not HMGB2) binds with high affinity and specificity to psoralen ICLs, and interacts with the essential NER protein, replication protein A (RPA......), at these lesions. RPA, shown previously to bind tightly to these lesions, also binds in the presence of HMGB1, without displacing HMGB1. A discrete ternary complex is formed, containing HMGB1, RPA, and psoralen-damaged DNA. Thus, HMGB1 has the ability to recognize ICLs, can cooperate with RPA in doing so...

  2. High mobility group box-1 protein in patients with suspected community-acquired infections and sepsis: a prospective study

    Gaïni, Shahin; Pedersen, Svend Stenvang; Koldkjaer, Ole Graesbøll

    2008-01-01

    -infected patients and all infected patients, the area under the curve for HMGB1 was 0.59 (P white blood cell count, neutrophils, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, procalcitonin, and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (P

  3. Transformational Electronics: Towards Flexible Low-Cost High Mobility Channel Materials

    Nassar, Joanna M.

    2014-05-01

    For the last four decades, Si CMOS technology has been advancing with Moore’s law prediction, working itself down to the sub-20 nm regime. However, fundamental problems and limitations arise with the down-scaling of transistors and thus new innovations needed to be discovered in order to further improve device performance without compromising power consumption and size. Thus, a lot of studies have focused on the development of new CMOS compatible architectures as well as the discovery of new high mobility channel materials that will allow further miniaturization of CMOS transistors and improvement of device performance. Pushing the limits even further, flexible and foldable electronics seem to be the new attractive topic. By being able to make our devices flexible through a CMOS compatible process, one will be able to integrate hundreds of billions of more transistors in a small volumetric space, allowing to increase the performance and speed of our electronics all together with making things thinner, lighter, smaller and even interactive with the human skin. Thus, in this thesis, we introduce for the first time a cost-effective CMOS compatible approach to make high-k/metal gate devices on flexible Germanium (Ge) and Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) platforms. In the first part, we will look at the various approaches in the literature that has been developed to get flexible platforms, as well as we will give a brief overview about epitaxial growth of Si1-xGex films. We will also examine the electrical properties of the Si1-xGex alloys up to Ge (x=1) and discuss how strain affects the band structure diagram, and thus the mobility of the material. We will also review the material growth properties as well as the state-of-the-art results on high mobility metal-oxide semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) using strained SiGe films. Then, we will introduce the flexible process that we have developed, based on a cost-effective “trench-protect-release-reuse” approach, utilizing

  4. Magnetotransport of High Mobility Holes in Monolayer and Bilayer WSe2

    Tutuc, Emanuel

    Transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted significant interest because of their two-dimensional crystal structure, large band-gap, and strong spin-orbit interaction which leads to spin-valley locking. Recent advances in sample fabrication have allowed the experimental study of low temperature magneto-transport of high mobility holes in WSe2. We review here the main results of these studies which reveal clear quantum Hall states in mono- and bilayer WSe2. The data allows the extraction of an effective hole mass of m* = 0.45me (me is the bare electron mass) in both mono and bilayer WSe2. A systematic study of the carrier distribution in bilayer WSe2 determined from a Fourier analysis of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations indicates that the two layers are weakly coupled. The individual layer density dependence on gate bias shows negative compressibility, a signature of strong electron-electron interaction in these materials associated with the large effective mass. We discuss the interplay between cyclotron and Zeeman splitting using the dependence of the quantum Hall state sequence on carrier density, and the angle between the magnetic field and the WSe2 plane. Work done in collaboration with B. Fallahazad, H. C. P. Movva, K. Kim, S. K. Banerjee, T. Taniguchi, and K. Watanabe. This work supported by the Nanoelectronics Research Initiative SWAN center, Intel Corp., and National Science Foundation.

  5. Comprehensive review on the development of high mobility in oxide thin film transistors

    Choi, Jun Young; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2017-11-01

    Oxide materials are one of the most advanced key technology in the thin film transistors (TFTs) for the high-end of device applications. Amorphous oxide semiconductors (AOSs) have leading technique for flat panel display (FPD), active matrix organic light emitting display (AMOLED) and active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) due to their excellent electrical characteristics, such as field effect mobility ( μ FE ), subthreshold swing (S.S) and threshold voltage ( V th ). Covalent semiconductor like amorphous silicon (a-Si) is attributed to the anti-bonding and bonding states of Si hybridized orbitals. However, AOSs have not grain boundary and excellent performances originated from the unique characteristics of AOS which is the direct orbital overlap between s orbitals of neighboring metal cations. High mobility oxide TFTs have gained attractive attention during the last few years and today in display industries. It is progressively developed to increase the mobility either by exploring various oxide semiconductors or by adopting new TFT structures. Mobility of oxide thin film transistor has been rapidly increased from single digit to higher than 100 cm2/V·s in a decade. In this review, we discuss on the comprehensive review on the mobility of oxide TFTs in a decade and propose bandgap engineering and novel structure to enhance the electrical characteristics of oxide TFTs.

  6. Investigation of the High Mobility IGZO Thin Films by Using Co-Sputtering Method

    Hsu, Chao-Ming; Tzou, Wen-Cheng; Yang, Cheng-Fu; Liou, Yu-Jhen

    2015-01-01

    High transmittance ratio in visible range, low resistivity, and high mobility of IGZO thin films were prepared at room temperature for 30 min by co-sputtering of Zn2Ga2O5 (Ga2O3 + 2 ZnO, GZO) ceramic and In2O3 ceramic at the same time. The deposition power of pure In2O3 ceramic target was fixed at 100 W and the deposition power of GZO ceramic target was changed from 80 W to 140 W. We chose to investigate the deposition power of GZO ceramic target on the properties of IGZO thin films. From the SEM observations, all of the deposited IGZO thin films showed a very smooth and featureless surface. From the measurements of XRD patterns, only the amorphous structure was observed. We aimed to show that the deposition power of GZO ceramic target had large effect on the Eg values, Hall mobility, carrier concentration, and resistivity of IGZO thin films. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis in the thicknesses’ profile of IGZO thin films found that In and Ga elements were uniform distribution and Zn element were non-uniform distribution. The SIMS analysis results also showed the concentrations of Ga and Zn elements increased and the concentrations of In element was almost unchanged with increasing deposition power.

  7. Investigation of the High Mobility IGZO Thin Films by Using Co-Sputtering Method

    Chao-Ming Hsu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available High transmittance ratio in visible range, low resistivity, and high mobility of IGZO thin films were prepared at room temperature for 30 min by co-sputtering of Zn2Ga2O5 (Ga2O3 + 2 ZnO, GZO ceramic and In2O3 ceramic at the same time. The deposition power of pure In2O3 ceramic target was fixed at 100 W and the deposition power of GZO ceramic target was changed from 80 W to 140 W. We chose to investigate the deposition power of GZO ceramic target on the properties of IGZO thin films. From the SEM observations, all of the deposited IGZO thin films showed a very smooth and featureless surface. From the measurements of XRD patterns, only the amorphous structure was observed. We aimed to show that the deposition power of GZO ceramic target had large effect on the Eg values, Hall mobility, carrier concentration, and resistivity of IGZO thin films. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS analysis in the thicknesses’ profile of IGZO thin films found that In and Ga elements were uniform distribution and Zn element were non-uniform distribution. The SIMS analysis results also showed the concentrations of Ga and Zn elements increased and the concentrations of In element was almost unchanged with increasing deposition power.

  8. A southern African origin and cryptic structure in the highly mobile plains zebra.

    Pedersen, Casper-Emil T; Albrechtsen, Anders; Etter, Paul D; Johnson, Eric A; Orlando, Ludovic; Chikhi, Lounes; Siegismund, Hans R; Heller, Rasmus

    2018-03-01

    The plains zebra (Equus quagga) is an ecologically important species of the African savannah. It is also one of the most numerous and widely distributed ungulates, and six subspecies have been described based on morphological variation. However, the within-species evolutionary processes have been difficult to resolve due to its high mobility and a lack of consensus regarding the population structure. We obtained genome-wide DNA polymorphism data from more than 167,000 loci for 59 plains zebras from across the species range, encompassing all recognized extant subspecies, as well as three mountain zebras (Equus zebra) and three Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi). Surprisingly, the population genetic structure does not mirror the morphology-based subspecies delineation, underlining the dangers of basing management units exclusively on morphological variation. We use demographic modelling to provide insights into the past phylogeography of the species. The results identify a southern African location as the most likely source region from which all extant populations expanded around 370,000 years ago. We show evidence for inclusion of the extinct and phenotypically divergent quagga (Equus quagga quagga) in the plains zebra variation and reveal that it was less divergent from the other subspecies than the northernmost (Ugandan) extant population.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of high-mobility solution-based chalcogenide thin-film transistors

    Mejia, Israel I.; Salas Villaseñ or, Ana L.; Cha, Dong Kyu; Alshareef, Husam N.; Gnade, Bruce E.; Quevedo-Ló pez, Manuel Angel Quevedo

    2013-01-01

    We report device and material considerations for the fabrication of high-mobility thin-film transistors (TFTs) compatible with large-area and inexpensive processes. In particular, this paper reports photolithographically defined n-type TFTs (n-TFTs) based on cadmium sulfide (CdS) films deposited using solution-based techniques. The integration process consists of four mask levels with a maximum processing temperature of 100 °C. The TFT performance was analyzed in terms of the CdS semiconductor thickness and as a function of postdeposition annealing in a reducing ambient. The IonI off ratios are ∼107 with field-effect mobilities of ∼5.3 and ∼4.7cm2V̇s for Al and Au source-drain contacts, respectively, using 70 nm of CdS. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were used to analyze the CdS-metal interfaces. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of ballistic transport in high-mobility channels

    Sabatini, G; Marinchio, H; Palermo, C; Varani, L; Daoud, T; Teissier, R [Institut d' Electronique du Sud (CNRS UMR 5214) - Universite Montpellier II (France); Rodilla, H; Gonzalez, T; Mateos, J, E-mail: sabatini@ies.univ-montp2.f [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada - Universidad de Salamanca (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    By means of Monte Carlo simulations coupled with a two-dimensional Poisson solver, we evaluate directly the possibility to use high mobility materials in ultra fast devices exploiting ballistic transport. To this purpose, we have calculated specific physical quantities such as the transit time, the transit velocity, the free flight time and the mean free path as functions of applied voltage in InAs channels with different lengths, from 2000 nm down to 50 nm. In this way the transition from diffusive to ballistic transport is carefully described. We remark a high value of the mean transit velocity with a maximum of 14x10{sup 5} m/s for a 50 nm-long channel and a transit time shorter than 0.1 ps, corresponding to a cutoff frequency in the terahertz domain. The percentage of ballistic electrons and the number of scatterings as functions of distance are also reported, showing the strong influence of quasi-ballistic transport in the shorter channels.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of ballistic transport in high-mobility channels

    Sabatini, G; Marinchio, H; Palermo, C; Varani, L; Daoud, T; Teissier, R; Rodilla, H; Gonzalez, T; Mateos, J

    2009-01-01

    By means of Monte Carlo simulations coupled with a two-dimensional Poisson solver, we evaluate directly the possibility to use high mobility materials in ultra fast devices exploiting ballistic transport. To this purpose, we have calculated specific physical quantities such as the transit time, the transit velocity, the free flight time and the mean free path as functions of applied voltage in InAs channels with different lengths, from 2000 nm down to 50 nm. In this way the transition from diffusive to ballistic transport is carefully described. We remark a high value of the mean transit velocity with a maximum of 14x10 5 m/s for a 50 nm-long channel and a transit time shorter than 0.1 ps, corresponding to a cutoff frequency in the terahertz domain. The percentage of ballistic electrons and the number of scatterings as functions of distance are also reported, showing the strong influence of quasi-ballistic transport in the shorter channels.

  12. High mobility, low access thwarts interventions among seasonal workers in the Greater Mekong Sub-region: lessons from the malaria containment project.

    Canavati, Sara E; Quintero, Cesia E; Lawford, Harriet L S; Yok, Sovann; Lek, Dysoley; Richards, Jack S; Whittaker, Maxine Anne

    2016-08-26

    During the process of malaria elimination in the Greater Mekong Sub-region, mobile and migrant populations (MMPs) have been identified as the most at-risk demographic. An important sub-group of MMPs are seasonal workers, and this paper presents an evaluation of the reach and effectiveness of interventions tailored towards this group and was carried out as part of the Containment Project from 2009-11. A mixed-methods study was conducted in Pailin Province in Western Cambodia. Three-hundred-and-four seasonal workers were surveyed using a structured questionnaire. Qualitative data were gathered through a total of eight focus group discussions and 14 in-depth interviews. Data triangulation of the qualitative and quantitative data was used during analysis. High mobility and low access of the target population to the interventions, as well as lack of social and anthropological research that led to implementation oversights, resulted in under-exposure of seasonal workers to interventions. Consequently, their reach and impact were severely limited. Some services, particularly Mobile Malaria Workers, had the ability to significantly impact key factors, such as risky behaviours among those they did reach. Others, like Listening and Viewing Clubs and mass media campaigns, showed little impact. There is potential in two of the interventions assessed, but high mobility and inadequate exposure of seasonal workers to these interventions must be considered in the development and planning of future interventions to avoid investing in low-impact activities and ensure that all interventions perform according to their maximum potential. This will be critical in order for Cambodia to achieve its aim of malaria elimination. The lessons learned from this study can be extrapolated to other areas of health care in Cambodia and other countries in order to reduce the gap between healthcare provided to MMPs, especially seasonal workers, and to the general population.

  13. Field effect in the quantum Hall regime of a high mobility graphene wire

    Barraud, C., E-mail: cbarraud@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: clement.barraud@univ-paris-diderot.fr; Choi, T.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Butti, P.; Shorubalko, I. [Swiss Federal Laboratories of Materials Science and Technologies, EMPA Elect. Metrol. Reliabil. Lab., CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-08-21

    In graphene-based electronic devices like in transistors, the field effect applied thanks to a gate electrode allows tuning the charge density in the graphene layer and passing continuously from the electron to the hole doped regime across the Dirac point. Homogeneous doping is crucial to understand electrical measurements and for the operation of future graphene-based electronic devices. However, recently theoretical and experimental studies highlighted the role of the electrostatic edge due to fringing electrostatic field lines at the graphene edges [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008); F. T. Vasko and I. V. Zozoulenko, Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 092115 (2010)]. This effect originates from the particular geometric design of the samples. A direct consequence is a charge accumulation at the graphene edges giving a value for the density, which deviates from the simple picture of a plate capacitor and also varies along the width of the graphene sample. Entering the quantum Hall regime would, in principle, allow probing this accumulation thanks to the extreme sensitivity of this quantum effect to charge density and the charge distribution. Moreover, the presence of an additional and counter-propagating edge channel has been predicted [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008)] giving a fundamental aspect to this technological issue. In this article, we investigate this effect by tuning a high mobility graphene wire into the quantum Hall regime in which charge carriers probe the electrostatic potential at high magnetic field close to the edges. We observe a slight deviation to the linear shift of the quantum Hall plateaus with magnetic field and we study its evolution for different filling factors, which correspond to different probed regions in real space. We discuss the possible origins of this effect including an increase of the charge density towards the edges.

  14. Novel HIV-1 recombinants spreading across multiple risk groups in the United Kingdom: the identification and phylogeography of Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF 50_A1D.

    Geraldine M Foster

    Full Text Available An increase in non-B HIV-1 infections among men who have sex with men (MSM in the United Kingdom (UK has created opportunities for novel recombinants to arise and become established. We used molecular mapping to characterize the importance of such recombinants to the UK HIV epidemic, in order to gain insights into transmission dynamics that can inform control strategies.A total of 55,556 pol (reverse transcriptase and protease sequences in the UK HIV Drug Resistance Database were analyzed using Subtype Classification Using Evolutionary Algorithms (SCUEAL. Overall 72 patients shared the same A1/D recombination breakpoint in pol, comprising predominantly MSM but also heterosexuals and injecting drug users (IDUs. In six MSM, full-length single genome amplification of plasma HIV-1 RNA was performed in order to characterize the A1/D recombinant. Subtypes and recombination breakpoints were identified using sliding window and jumping profile hidden markov model approaches. Global maximum likelihood trees of gag, pol and env genes were drawn using FastTree version 2.1. Five of the six strains showed the same novel A1/D recombinant (8 breakpoints, which has been classified as CRF50_A1D. The sixth strain showed a complex CRF50_A1D/B/U structure. Divergence dates and phylogeographic inferences were determined using Bayesian Evolutionary Analysis using Sampling Trees (BEAST. This estimated that CRF50_A1D emerged in the UK around 1992 in MSM, with subsequent transmissions to heterosexuals and IDUs. Analysis of CRF50_A1D/B/U demonstrated that around the year 2000 CRF50_A1D underwent recombination with a subtype B strain.We report the identification of CRF50_A1D, a novel circulating recombinant that emerged in UK MSM around 1992, with subsequent onward transmission to heterosexuals and IDUs, and more recent recombination with subtype B. These findings highlight the changing dynamics of HIV transmission in the UK and the converging of the two previously

  15. Moving to an A1C-based diagnosis of diabetes has a different impact on prevalence in different ethnic groups

    Christensen, Dirk L; Witte, Daniel R; Kaduka, Lydia

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare screen-detected diabetes prevalence and the degree of diagnostic agreement by ethnicity with the current oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-based and newly proposed A1C-based diagnostic criteria. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Six studies (1999-2009) from Denmark, the U.K., Aust...

  16. The Influence of Daily Stress on Sedentary Behavior: Group and Person (N of 1) Level Results of a 1-Year Observational Study.

    Diaz, Keith M; Thanataveerat, Anusorn; Parsons, Faith E; Yoon, Sunmoo; Cheung, Ying Kuen; Alcantara, Carmela; Duran, Andrea T; Ensari, Ipek; Krupka, David J; Schwartz, Joseph E; Burg, Matthew M; Davidson, Karina W

    2018-05-24

    The purpose of this study, which used mobile technologies to continuously collect data over 1 year, was to examine the association of psychological stress with objectively measured sedentary behavior in adults at both the group (e.g. nomothetic approach) and individual (e.g. idiographic approach) level. Data were collected in an observational study of healthy adults (n=79) residing in the New York City metro area who were studied for 365 days from 2014-2015. Sedentary behavior was objectively measured via accelerometry. A smartphone-based electronic diary was used to assess level of stress ("Overall, how stressful was your day?"; 0-10 scale) and sources of stress. The end-of-day stress rating was not associated with total sedentary time (B= -1.34, p=0.767) at the group-level. When specific sources of stress were evaluated at the group-level, argument-related stress was associated with increased sedentariness; while running late- and work-related stress were associated with decreased sedentariness. There was a substantial degree of inter-individual variability in the relationship of stress with sedentary behavior. Both the level and sources of stress were associated with increased sedentariness for some, decreased sedentariness for others, and had no effect for many (within-person variance p-value stress on sedentary behavior varies by source of stress and from person-to-person. A precision medicine approach may be warranted to target reductions in sedentary time; although further studies are needed to confirm the observed findings in light of study limitations including a small sample size and enrollment of participants from a single, urban metropolitan area.

  17. Unconventional Face-On Texture and Exceptional In-Plane Order of a High Mobility n-Type Polymer

    Rivnay, Jonathan; Toney, Michael F.; Zheng, Yan; Kauvar, Isaac V.; Chen, Zhihua; Wagner, Veit; Facchetti, Antonio; Salleo, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Substantial in-plane crystallinity and dominant face-on stacking are observed in thin films of a high-mobility n-type rylene-thiophene copolymer. Spun films of the polymer, previously thought to have little or no order are found to exhibit an ordered microstructure at both interfaces, and in the bulk. The implications of this type of packing and crystalline morphology are discussed as they relate to thin-film transistors. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Unconventional Face-On Texture and Exceptional In-Plane Order of a High Mobility n-Type Polymer

    Rivnay, Jonathan

    2010-07-09

    Substantial in-plane crystallinity and dominant face-on stacking are observed in thin films of a high-mobility n-type rylene-thiophene copolymer. Spun films of the polymer, previously thought to have little or no order are found to exhibit an ordered microstructure at both interfaces, and in the bulk. The implications of this type of packing and crystalline morphology are discussed as they relate to thin-film transistors. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Role of transport band edge variation on delocalized charge transport in high-mobility crystalline organic semiconductors

    Kadashchuk, Andrey; Tong, Fei; Janneck, Robby; Fishchuk, Ivan I.; Mityashin, Alexander; Pavlica, Egon; Köhler, Anna; Heremans, Paul; Rolin, Cedric; Bratina, Gvido; Genoe, Jan

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate that the degree of charge delocalization has a strong impact on polarization energy and thereby on the position of the transport band edge in organic semiconductors. This gives rise to long-range potential fluctuations, which govern the electronic transport through delocalized states in organic crystalline layers. This concept is employed to formulate an analytic model that explains a negative field dependence coupled with a positive temperature dependence of the charge mobility observed by a lateral time-of-flight technique in a high-mobility crystalline organic layer. This has important implications for the further understanding of the charge transport via delocalized states in organic semiconductors.

  20. Impact of Quaternary climatic changes and interspecific competition on the demographic history of a highly mobile generalist carnivore, the coyote.

    Koblmüller, Stephan; Wayne, Robert K; Leonard, Jennifer A

    2012-08-23

    Recurrent cycles of climatic change during the Quaternary period have dramatically affected the population genetic structure of many species. We reconstruct the recent demographic history of the coyote (Canis latrans) through the use of Bayesian techniques to examine the effects of Late Quaternary climatic perturbations on the genetic structure of a highly mobile generalist species. Our analysis reveals a lack of phylogeographic structure throughout the range but past population size changes correlated with climatic changes. We conclude that even generalist carnivorous species are very susceptible to environmental changes associated with climatic perturbations. This effect may be enhanced in coyotes by interspecific competition with larger carnivores.

  1. High mobility In0.75Ga0.25As quantum wells in an InAs phonon lattice

    Chen, C.; Holmes, S. N.; Farrer, I.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2018-03-01

    InGaAs based devices are great complements to silicon for CMOS, as they provide an increased carrier saturation velocity, lower operating voltage and reduced power dissipation (International technology roadmap for semiconductors (www.itrs2.net)). In this work we show that In0.75Ga0.25As quantum wells with a high mobility, 15 000 to 20 000 cm2 V-1 s-1 at ambient temperature, show an InAs-like phonon with an energy of 28.8 meV, frequency of 232 cm-1 that dominates the polar-optical mode scattering from  ˜70 K to 300 K. The measured optical phonon frequency is insensitive to the carrier density modulated with a surface gate or LED illumination. We model the electron scattering mechanisms as a function of temperature and identify mechanisms that limit the electron mobility in In0.75Ga0.25As quantum wells. Background impurity scattering starts to dominate for temperatures  <100 K. In the high mobility In0.75Ga0.25As quantum well, GaAs-like phonons do not couple to the electron gas unlike the case of In0.53Ga0.47As quantum wells.

  2. High mobility amorphous InGaZnO{sub 4} thin film transistors formed by CO{sub 2} laser spike annealing

    Chung, Chen-Yang; Zhu, Bin; Ast, Dieter G.; Thompson, Michael O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Greene, Raymond G. [Corning Incorporated, Corning, New York 14831 (United States)

    2015-03-23

    Amorphous InGaZnO{sub 4} (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) hold great potential for large area and flexible electronics with current research focused on improving the mobility and stability. In this work, we report on properties of IGZO TFTs fabricated using laser spike annealing (LSA) with a scanned continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser. For peak annealing temperatures near 430 °C and a 1 ms dwell, TFTs exhibit saturation field-effect mobilities above 70 cm{sup 2}/V-s (V{sub on} ∼ −3 V), a value over 4 times higher than furnace-annealed control samples (∼16 cm{sup 2}/V-s). A model linking oxygen deficient defect structures with limited structural relaxation after the LSA anneal is proposed to explain the observed high mobility. This mobility is also shown to be comparable to the estimated trap-free mobility in oxide semiconductors and suggests that shallow traps can be removed by transient thermal annealing under optimized conditions.

  3. Mobility Analyses of Standard- and High-Mobility Tactical Support Vehicles (HIMO Study)

    1976-02-01

    l, APPENDIX G: PARTICIPANTS IN SCENARIO EXERCISES ... ....... Gl I ?S LIST OF TABLES Table Page I Summary of Vehicle Caracteristics and Some...15 1 :1010 2 :1111 Organid silts and clays ( plastic ) >7-30 0 11212 1 1 1313Peat (nou plastic ) _._>_3_0 0 .1414 Li Groups with Different Materiai in 0...diameter LL = Liquid limit PI - Plasticity index Drainage potential classified by occurrence of water table as follows: Class 0 Water table occurs at

  4. Wide-bandgap high-mobility ZnO thin-film transistors produced at room temperature

    Fortunato, Elvira M.C.; Barquinha, Pedro M.C.; Pimentel, Ana C.M.B.G.; Goncalves, Alexandra M.F.; Marques, Antonio J.S.; Martins, Rodrigo F.P.; Pereira, Luis M.N.

    2004-01-01

    We report high-performance ZnO thin-film transistor (ZnO-TFT) fabricated by rf magnetron sputtering at room temperature with a bottom gate configuration. The ZnO-TFT operates in the enhancement mode with a threshold voltage of 19 V, a saturation mobility of 27 cm 2 /V s, a gate voltage swing of 1.39 V/decade and an on/off ratio of 3x10 5 . The ZnO-TFT presents an average optical transmission (including the glass substrate) of 80% in the visible part of the spectrum. The combination of transparency, high mobility, and room-temperature processing makes the ZnO-TFT a very promising low-cost optoelectronic device for the next generation of invisible and flexible electronics

  5. Long-lived nanosecond spin coherence in high-mobility 2DEGs confined in double and triple quantum wells

    Ullah, S.; Gusev, G. M.; Hernandez, F. G. G., E-mail: felixggh@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bakarov, A. K. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics and Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-07

    We investigated the spin coherence of high-mobility two-dimensional electron gases confined in multilayer GaAs quantum wells. The dynamics of the spin polarization was optically studied using pump-probe techniques: time-resolved Kerr rotation and resonant spin amplification. For double and triple quantum wells doped beyond the metal-to-insulator transition, the spin-orbit interaction was tailored by the sample parameters of structural symmetry (Rashba constant), width, and electron density (Dresselhaus linear and cubic constants) which allow us to attain long dephasing times in the nanoseconds range. The determination of the scales, namely, transport scattering time, single-electron scattering time, electron-electron scattering time, and spin polarization decay time further supports the possibility of using n-doped multilayer systems for developing spintronic devices.

  6. Optical conductivity and optical effective mass in a high-mobility organic semiconductor: Implications for the nature of charge transport

    Li, Yuan

    2014-12-03

    We present a multiscale modeling of the infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data that point to nonmonotonic features in the optical conductivity spectrum and small optical effective masses. We find that, in the static-disorder approximation, the nonlocal electron-phonon interactions stemming from low-frequency lattice vibrations can decrease the optical effective masses and lead to lighter quasiparticles. On the other hand, the charge-transport and infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal at room temperature are demonstrated to be governed by localized carriers driven by inherent thermal disorders. Our findings underline that the presence of apparently light carriers in high-mobility organic semiconductors does not necessarily imply bandlike transport.

  7. High mobility n-type organic thin-film transistors deposited at room temperature by supersonic molecular beam deposition

    Chiarella, F., E-mail: fabio.chiarella@spin.cnr.it; Barra, M.; Ciccullo, F.; Cassinese, A. [CNR-SPIN and Physics Department, University of Naples, Piazzale Tecchio 80, I-80125 Naples (Italy); Toccoli, T.; Aversa, L.; Tatti, R.; Verucchi, R. [IMEM-CNR-FBK Division of Trento, Via alla Cascata 56/C, I-38123 Povo (Italy); Iannotta, S. [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, I-43124 Parma (Italy)

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication of N,N′-1H,1H-perfluorobutil dicyanoperylenediimide (PDIF-CN{sub 2}) organic thin-film transistors by Supersonic Molecular Beam Deposition. The devices exhibit mobility up to 0.2 cm{sup 2}/V s even if the substrate is kept at room temperature during the organic film growth, exceeding by three orders of magnitude the electrical performance of those grown at the same temperature by conventional Organic Molecular Beam Deposition. The possibility to get high-mobility n-type transistors avoiding thermal treatments during or after the deposition could significantly extend the number of substrates suitable to the fabrication of flexible high-performance complementary circuits by using this compound.

  8. Optical conductivity and optical effective mass in a high-mobility organic semiconductor: Implications for the nature of charge transport

    Li, Yuan; Yi, Yuanping; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    We present a multiscale modeling of the infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data that point to nonmonotonic features in the optical conductivity spectrum and small optical effective masses. We find that, in the static-disorder approximation, the nonlocal electron-phonon interactions stemming from low-frequency lattice vibrations can decrease the optical effective masses and lead to lighter quasiparticles. On the other hand, the charge-transport and infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal at room temperature are demonstrated to be governed by localized carriers driven by inherent thermal disorders. Our findings underline that the presence of apparently light carriers in high-mobility organic semiconductors does not necessarily imply bandlike transport.

  9. Tunable electron heating induced giant magnetoresistance in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system.

    Wang, Zhuo; Samaraweera, R L; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Mani, R G

    2016-12-07

    Electron-heating induced by a tunable, supplementary dc-current (I dc ) helps to vary the observed magnetoresistance in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system. The magnetoresistance at B = 0.3 T is shown to progressively change from positive to negative with increasing I dc , yielding negative giant-magnetoresistance at the lowest temperature and highest I dc . A two-term Drude model successfully fits the data at all I dc and T. The results indicate that carrier heating modifies a conductivity correction σ 1 , which undergoes sign reversal from positive to negative with increasing I dc , and this is responsible for the observed crossover from positive- to negative- magnetoresistance, respectively, at the highest B.

  10. High mobility organic field-effect transistor based on water-soluble deoxyribonucleic acid via spray coating

    Shi, Wei; Han, Shijiao; Huang, Wei; Yu, Junsheng, E-mail: jsyu@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-01-26

    High mobility organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) by inserting water-soluble deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) buffer layer between electrodes and pentacene film through spray coating process were fabricated. Compared with the OFETs incorporated with DNA in the conventional organic solvents of ethanol and methanol: water mixture, the water-soluble DNA based OFET exhibited an over four folds enhancement of field-effect mobility from 0.035 to 0.153 cm{sup 2}/Vs. By characterizing the surface morphology and the crystalline structure of pentacene active layer through atomic force microscope and X-ray diffraction, it was found that the adoption of water solvent in DNA solution, which played a key role in enhancing the field-effect mobility, was ascribed to both the elimination of the irreversible organic solvent-induced bulk-like phase transition of pentacene film and the diminution of a majority of charge trapping at interfaces in OFETs.

  11. Reliability of high mobility SiGe channel MOSFETs for future CMOS applications

    Franco, Jacopo; Groeseneken, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Due to the ever increasing electric fields in scaled CMOS devices, reliability is becoming a showstopper for further scaled technology nodes. Although several groups have already demonstrated functional Si channel devices with aggressively scaled Equivalent Oxide Thickness (EOT) down to 5Å, a 10 year reliable device operation cannot be guaranteed anymore due to severe Negative Bias Temperature Instability. This book focuses on the reliability of the novel (Si)Ge channel quantum well pMOSFET technology. This technology is being considered for possible implementation in next CMOS technology nodes, thanks to its benefit in terms of carrier mobility and device threshold voltage tuning. We observe that it also opens a degree of freedom for device reliability optimization. By properly tuning the device gate stack, sufficiently reliable ultra-thin EOT devices with a 10 years lifetime at operating conditions are demonstrated. The extensive experimental datasets collected on a variety of processed 300mm wafers and pr...

  12. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis, an Ammonia Oxidizing, Extremely Thermophilic Archaeon with a Highly Mobile Genome

    Sophie S. Abby

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are widespread in moderate environments but their occurrence and activity has also been demonstrated in hot springs. Here we present the first enrichment of a thermophilic representative with a sequenced genome, which facilitates the search for adaptive strategies and for traits that shape the evolution of Thaumarchaeota. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis has been enriched from a hot spring in Ischia, Italy. It grows optimally at 68°C under chemolithoautotrophic conditions on ammonia or urea converting ammonia stoichiometrically into nitrite with a generation time of approximately 23 h. Phylogenetic analyses based on ribosomal proteins place the organism as a sister group to all known mesophilic AOA. The 1.58 Mb genome of Ca. N. cavascurensis harbors an amoAXCB gene cluster encoding ammonia monooxygenase and genes for a 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway for autotrophic carbon fixation, but also genes that indicate potential alternative energy metabolisms. Although a bona fide gene for nitrite reductase is missing, the organism is sensitive to NO-scavenging, underlining the potential importance of this compound for AOA metabolism. Ca. N. cavascurensis is distinct from all other AOA in its gene repertoire for replication, cell division and repair. Its genome has an impressive array of mobile genetic elements and other recently acquired gene sets, including conjugative systems, a provirus, transposons and cell appendages. Some of these elements indicate recent exchange with the environment, whereas others seem to have been domesticated and might convey crucial metabolic traits.

  13. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis, an Ammonia Oxidizing, Extremely Thermophilic Archaeon with a Highly Mobile Genome.

    Abby, Sophie S; Melcher, Michael; Kerou, Melina; Krupovic, Mart; Stieglmeier, Michaela; Rossel, Claudia; Pfeifer, Kevin; Schleper, Christa

    2018-01-01

    Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are widespread in moderate environments but their occurrence and activity has also been demonstrated in hot springs. Here we present the first enrichment of a thermophilic representative with a sequenced genome, which facilitates the search for adaptive strategies and for traits that shape the evolution of Thaumarchaeota. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis has been enriched from a hot spring in Ischia, Italy. It grows optimally at 68°C under chemolithoautotrophic conditions on ammonia or urea converting ammonia stoichiometrically into nitrite with a generation time of approximately 23 h. Phylogenetic analyses based on ribosomal proteins place the organism as a sister group to all known mesophilic AOA. The 1.58 Mb genome of Ca. N. cavascurensis harbors an amo AXCB gene cluster encoding ammonia monooxygenase and genes for a 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway for autotrophic carbon fixation, but also genes that indicate potential alternative energy metabolisms. Although a bona fide gene for nitrite reductase is missing, the organism is sensitive to NO-scavenging, underlining the potential importance of this compound for AOA metabolism. Ca. N. cavascurensis is distinct from all other AOA in its gene repertoire for replication, cell division and repair. Its genome has an impressive array of mobile genetic elements and other recently acquired gene sets, including conjugative systems, a provirus, transposons and cell appendages. Some of these elements indicate recent exchange with the environment, whereas others seem to have been domesticated and might convey crucial metabolic traits.

  14. Discovery of Novel, Highly Potent, and Selective Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 Inhibitors with a 1,2,4-Triazol-3-yl Moiety as a Zinc Binding Group Using a Structure-Based Design Approach.

    Nara, Hiroshi; Kaieda, Akira; Sato, Kenjiro; Naito, Takako; Mototani, Hideyuki; Oki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Kuno, Haruhiko; Santou, Takashi; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Terauchi, Jun; Uchikawa, Osamu; Kori, Masakuni

    2017-01-26

    On the basis of a superposition study of X-ray crystal structures of complexes of quinazoline derivative 1 and triazole derivative 2 with matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 catalytic domain, a novel series of fused pyrimidine compounds which possess a 1,2,4-triazol-3-yl group as a zinc binding group (ZBG) was designed. Among the herein described and evaluated compounds, 31f exhibited excellent potency for MMP-13 (IC 50 = 0.036 nM) and selectivities (greater than 1,500-fold) over other MMPs (MMP-1, -2, -3, -7, -8, -9, -10, and -14) and tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE). Furthermore, the inhibitor was shown to protect bovine nasal cartilage explants against degradation induced by interleukin-1 and oncostatin M. In this article, we report the discovery of extremely potent, highly selective, and orally bioavailable fused pyrimidine derivatives that possess a 1,2,4-triazol-3-yl group as a novel ZBG for selective MMP-13 inhibition.

  15. Effect of electron-electron interaction on cyclotron resonance in high-mobility InAs/AlSb quantum wells

    Krishtopenko, S. S., E-mail: sergey.krishtopenko@mail.ru; Gavrilenko, V. I. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod, GSP-105 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University, 23 Prospekt Gagarina, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Ikonnikov, A. V. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod, GSP-105 (Russian Federation); Orlita, M. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses (LNCMI-G), CNRS, 25 rue des Martyrs, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble (France); Sadofyev, Yu. G. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991, GSP-1, 53 Leninskiy Prospect (Russian Federation); Goiran, M. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses (LNCMI-T), CNRS, 143 Avenue de Rangueil, 31400 Toulouse (France); Teppe, F.; Knap, W. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb (L2C), UMR CNRS 5221, GIS-TERALAB, Universite Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier (France)

    2015-03-21

    We report observation of electron-electron (e-e) interaction effect on cyclotron resonance (CR) in InAs/AlSb quantum well heterostructures. High mobility values allow us to observe strongly pronounced triple splitting of CR line at noninteger filling factors of Landau levels ν. At magnetic fields, corresponding to ν > 4, experimental values of CR energies are in good agreement with single-electron calculations on the basis of eight-band k ⋅ p Hamiltonian. In the range of filling factors 3 < ν < 4 pronounced, splitting of CR line, exceeding significantly the difference in single-electron CR energies, is discovered. The strength of the splitting increases when occupation of the partially filled Landau level tends to a half, being in qualitative agreement with previous prediction by MacDonald and Kallin [Phys. Rev. B 40, 5795 (1989)]. We demonstrate that such behaviour of CR modes can be quantitatively described if one takes into account both electron correlations and the mixing between conduction and valence bands in the calculations of matrix elements of e-e interaction.

  16. Limiting scattering processes in high-mobility InSb quantum wells grown on GaSb buffer systems

    Lehner, Ch. A.; Tschirky, T.; Ihn, T.; Dietsche, W.; Keller, J.; Fält, S.; Wegscheider, W.

    2018-05-01

    We present molecular beam epitaxial grown single- and double-side δ -doped InAlSb/InSb quantum wells with varying distances down to 50 nm to the surface on GaSb metamorphic buffers. We analyze the surface morphology as well as the impact of the crystalline quality on the electron transport. Comparing growth on GaSb and GaAs substrates indicates that the structural integrity of our InSb quantum wells is solely determined by the growth conditions at the GaSb/InAlSb transition and the InAlSb barrier growth. The two-dimensional electron gas samples show high mobilities of up to 349 000 cm2/Vs at cryogenic temperatures and 58 000 cm2/Vs at room temperature. With the calculated Dingle ratio and a transport lifetime model, ionized impurities predominantly remote from the quantum well are identified as the dominant source of scattering events. The analysis of the well-pronounced Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations reveals a high spin-orbit coupling with an effective g -factor of -38.4 in our samples. Along with the smooth surfaces and long mean free paths demonstrated, our InSb quantum wells are increasingly competitive for nanoscale implementations of Majorana mode devices.

  17. Complex quantum transport in a modulation doped strained Ge quantum well heterostructure with a high mobility 2D hole gas

    Morrison, C., E-mail: c.morrison.2@warwick.ac.uk; Casteleiro, C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-05

    The complex quantum transport of a strained Ge quantum well (QW) modulation doped heterostructure with two types of mobile carriers has been observed. The two dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in the Ge QW exhibits an exceptionally high mobility of 780 000 cm{sup 2}/Vs at temperatures below 10 K. Through analysis of Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance of this 2DHG below 2 K, the hole effective mass is found to be 0.065 m{sub 0}. Anomalous conductance peaks are observed at higher fields which deviate from standard Shubnikov de-Haas and quantum Hall effect behaviour due to conduction via multiple carrier types. Despite this complex behaviour, analysis using a transport model with two conductive channels explains this behaviour and allows key physical parameters such as the carrier effective mass, transport, and quantum lifetimes and conductivity of the electrically active layers to be extracted. This finding is important for electronic device applications, since inclusion of highly doped interlayers which are electrically active, for enhancement of, for example, room temperature carrier mobility, does not prevent analysis of quantum transport in a QW.

  18. Complex quantum transport in a modulation doped strained Ge quantum well heterostructure with a high mobility 2D hole gas

    Morrison, C.; Casteleiro, C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.

    2016-09-01

    The complex quantum transport of a strained Ge quantum well (QW) modulation doped heterostructure with two types of mobile carriers has been observed. The two dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in the Ge QW exhibits an exceptionally high mobility of 780 000 cm2/Vs at temperatures below 10 K. Through analysis of Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance of this 2DHG below 2 K, the hole effective mass is found to be 0.065 m0. Anomalous conductance peaks are observed at higher fields which deviate from standard Shubnikov de-Haas and quantum Hall effect behaviour due to conduction via multiple carrier types. Despite this complex behaviour, analysis using a transport model with two conductive channels explains this behaviour and allows key physical parameters such as the carrier effective mass, transport, and quantum lifetimes and conductivity of the electrically active layers to be extracted. This finding is important for electronic device applications, since inclusion of highly doped interlayers which are electrically active, for enhancement of, for example, room temperature carrier mobility, does not prevent analysis of quantum transport in a QW.

  19. Air-stable π-conjugated amorphous copolymer field-effect transistors with high mobility of 0.3 cm2/Vs

    Georgakopoulos, S.; Gu, Y.; Nielsen, Martin Meedom

    2012-01-01

    We have fabricated organic bottom-contact top-gate field-effect transistors with an indenofluorene-phenanthrene co-polymer semiconductor, exhibiting ON/OFF ratio of 10(7) and uncommonly high mobility for an amorphous conjugated polymer of up to 0.3 cm(2)/Vs. Lack of crystallinity in this material...

  20. Human-induced changes in landscape configuration influence individual movement routines: lessons from a versatile, highly mobile species.

    Carlos Camacho

    Full Text Available Landscape conversion by humans may have detrimental effects on animal populations inhabiting managed ecosystems, but human-altered areas may also provide suitable environments for tolerant species. We investigated the spatial ecology of a highly mobile nocturnal avian species-the red-necked nightjar (Caprimulgus ruficollis-in two contrastingly managed areas in Southwestern Spain to provide management recommendations for species having multiple habitat requirements. Based on habitat use by radiotagged nightjars, we created maps of functional heterogeneity in both areas so that the movements of breeding individuals could be modeled using least-cost path analyses. In both the natural and the managed area, nightjars used remnants of native shrublands as nesting sites, while pinewood patches (either newly planted or natural mature and roads were selected as roosting and foraging habitats, respectively. Although the fraction of functional habitat was held relatively constant (60.9% vs. 74.1% in the natural and the managed area, respectively, landscape configuration changed noticeably. As a result, least-cost routes (summed linear distances from nest locations to the nearest roost and foraging sites were three times larger in the natural than in the managed area (mean ± SE: 1356±76 m vs. 439±32 m. It seems likely that the increased proximity of functional habitats in the managed area relative to the natural one is underlying the significantly higher abundances of nightjars observed therein, where breeders should travel shorter distances to link together essential resources, thus likely reducing their energy expenditure and mortality risks. Our results suggest that landscape configuration, but not habitat availability, is responsible for the observed differences between the natural and the managed area in the abundance and movements of breeding nightjars, although no effect on body condition was detected. Agricultural landscapes could be moderately

  1. Can Static Habitat Protection Encompass Critical Areas for Highly Mobile Marine Top Predators? Insights from Coastal East Africa.

    Sergi Pérez-Jorge

    Full Text Available Along the East African coast, marine top predators are facing an increasing number of anthropogenic threats which requires the implementation of effective and urgent conservation measures to protect essential habitats. Understanding the role that habitat features play on the marine top predator' distribution and abundance is a crucial step to evaluate the suitability of an existing Marine Protected Area (MPA, originally designated for the protection of coral reefs. We developed species distribution models (SDM on the IUCN data deficient Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus in southern Kenya. We followed a comprehensive ecological modelling approach to study the environmental factors influencing the occurrence and abundance of dolphins while developing SDMs. Through the combination of ensemble prediction maps, we defined recurrent, occasional and unfavourable habitats for the species. Our results showed the influence of dynamic and static predictors on the dolphins' spatial ecology: dolphins may select shallow areas (5-30 m, close to the reefs (< 500 m and oceanic fronts (< 10 km and adjacent to the 100 m isobath (< 5 km. We also predicted a significantly higher occurrence and abundance of dolphins within the MPA. Recurrent and occasional habitats were identified on large percentages on the existing MPA (47% and 57% using presence-absence and abundance models respectively. However, the MPA does not adequately encompass all occasional and recurrent areas and within this context, we propose to extend the MPA to incorporate all of them which are likely key habitats for the highly mobile species. The results from this study provide two key conservation and management tools: (i an integrative habitat modelling approach to predict key marine habitats, and (ii the first study evaluating the effectiveness of an existing MPA for marine mammals in the Western Indian Ocean.

  2. Increased expression of high-mobility group A2: A novel independent indicator of poor prognosis in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Rongna Wei

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: High HMGA2 expression was related to lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in ESCC. Our results indicated that HMGA2 could act as a potential biomarker for prognosis evaluation of ESCC patients.

  3. Cloning the genes and DNA binding properties of high mobility group B1 (HMGB1) proteins from the human blood flukes Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum

    De Oliveira, F.M.B.; Da Silva, I.C.dA.; Rumjanek, F.D.; Dias-Neto, E.; Guimaraes, P.E.M.; Verjovski-Almeida, S.; Štros, Michal; Fantappié, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 377, - (2006), s. 33-45 ISSN 0378-1119 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/05/2031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : HMGB1 * Schistosoma mansoni * Schistosoma japonicum Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2006

  4. A comparison of high-mobility group-box 1 protein, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and procalcitonin in severe community-acquired infections and bacteraemia: a prospective study

    Gaïni, Shahin; Koldkjaer, Ole G; Møller, Holger J

    2008-01-01

    manner. Demographic data, comorbidity, routine biochemistry, microbiological data, infection focus, severity score and mortality on day 28 were recorded. Plasma and serum were sampled within 24 hours after admission. Levels of all studied markers (HMGB1, LBP, PCT, IL-6, C-reactive protein, white blood...... patients compared with nonbacteraemic patients (P white blood cell count and neutrophils (P ... (HMGB1, LBP, PCT, IL-6) and infection markers (C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, neutrophils) were elevated among bacteraemic patients. PCT performed best as a diagnostic test marker for bacteraemia. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-null...

  5. High-mobility group B1 (HMGB1) and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) expression in canine lymphoma.

    Sterenczak, Katharina A; Joetzke, Alexa E; Willenbrock, Saskia; Eberle, Nina; Lange, Sandra; Junghanss, Christian; Nolte, Ingo; Bullerdiek, Jörn; Simon, Daniela; Murua Escobar, Hugo

    2010-12-01

    Canine lymphoma is a commonly occurring, spontaneously developing neoplasia similar to human non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and, thus, is used as a valuable model for human malignancy. HMGB1 and RAGE are strongly associated with tumour progression and vascularisation. Consequently, deregulated RAGE and HMGB1 may play an important role in the mechanisms involved in lymphoma progression. Expression patterns of HMGB1 and RAGE were analysed in 22 canine lymphoma and three canine non-neoplastic control samples via real time PCR and canine beta-glucuronidase gene (GUSB) as endogenous control. HMGB1 was up-regulated in the neoplastic samples, while RAGE expression remained inconspicuous. This study demonstrated similar mechanisms in lymphoma progression in humans and dogs due to overexpression of HMGB1, which was described in human lymphomas. RAGE remained stable in terms of expression indicating that the extracellular HMGB1-induced effects are regulated by HMGB1 itself.

  6. Behaviour of Bichromatic Microwave Induced Magnetoresistance Oscillations in the High Mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron System

    Gunawardana, Binuka; Liu, Han-Chun; Samaraweera, Rasanga L.; Mani, R.G.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W

    2017-01-01

    Microwave radiation-induced magneto-resistance oscillations are examined under bichromatic excitation for various frequency combinations in order to obtain a better understanding of the lineshape observed in the dual excitation experiment of the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system. Here, we examine superposition- or lack thereof- in the lineshape observed in the bichromatic experiment, and report a trend observed between the monochromatic and bichromatic responses of the oscillatory diagonal resistance. (paper)

  7. Thermally Dried Ink-Jet Process for 6,13-Bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-Pentacene for High Mobility and High Uniformity on a Large Area Substrate

    Ryu, Gi Seong; Lee, Myung Won; Jeong, Seung Hyeon; Song, Chung Kun

    2012-05-01

    In this study we developed a simple ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), which is known as a high-mobility soluble organic semiconductor, to achieve relatively high-mobility and high-uniformity performance for large-area applications. We analyzed the behavior of fluorescent particles in droplets and applied the results to determining a method of controlling the behavior of TIPS-pentacene molecules. The grain morphology of TIPS-pentacene varied depending on the temperature applied to the droplets during drying. We were able to obtain large and uniform grains at 46 °C without any “coffee stain”. The process was applied to a large-size organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) backplane for an electrophoretic display panel containing 192×150 pixels on a 6-in.-sized substrate. The average of mobilities of 36 OTFTs, which were taken from different locations of the backplane, was 0.44±0.08 cm2·V-1·s-1, with a small deviation of 20%, over a 6-in.-size area comprising 28,800 OTFTs. This process providing high mobility and high uniformity can be achieved by simply maintaining the whole area of the substrate at a specific temperature (46 °C in this case) during drying of the droplets.

  8. Thermally dried ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene for high mobility and high uniformity on a large area substrate

    Ryu, Gi Seong; Lee, Myung Won; Jeong, Seung Hyeon; Song, Chung Kun

    2012-01-01

    In this study we developed a simple ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), which is known as a high-mobility soluble organic semiconductor, to achieve relatively high-mobility and high-uniformity performance for large-area applications. We analyzed the behavior of fluorescent particles in droplets and applied the results to determining a method of controlling the behavior of TIPS-pentacene molecules. The grain morphology of TIPS-pentacene varied depending on the temperature applied to the droplets during drying. We were able to obtain large and uniform grains at 46 degrees C without any "coffee stain". The process was applied to a large-size organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) backplane for an electrophoretic display panel containing 192 x 150 pixels on a 6-in.-sized substrate. The average of mobilities of 36 OTFTs, which were taken from different locations of the backplane, was 0.44 +/- 0.08 cm2.V-1.s-1, with a small deviation of 20%, over a 6-in.-size area comprising 28,800 OTFTs. This process providing high mobility and high uniformity can be achieved by simply maintaining the whole area of the substrate at a specific temperature (46 degrees C in this case) during drying of the droplets.

  9. The origin and distribution of HAPs elements in relation to maceral composition of the A1 lignite bed (Paleocene, Calvert Bluff Formation, Wilcox Group), Calvert mine area, east-central Texas

    Crowley, Sharon S.; Warwick, Peter D.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Pontolillo, James

    1997-01-01

    The origin and distribution of twelve potentially Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs; As, Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and U) identified in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments were examined in relation to the maceral composition of the A1 bed (Paleocene, Calvert Bluff Formation, Wilcox Group) of the Calvert mine in east-central Texas. The 3.2 m-thick A1 bed was divided into nine incremental channel samples (7 lignite samples and 2 shaley coal samples) on the basis of megascopic characteristics. Results indicate that As, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Sb, and U are strongly correlated with ash yield and are enriched in the shaley coal samples. We infer that these elements are associated with inorganic constituents in the coal bed and may be derived from a penecontemporaneous stream channel located several kilometers southeast of the mining block. Of the HAPs elements studied, Mn and Hg are the most poorly correlated to ash yield. We infer an organic association for Mn; Hg may be associated with pyrite. The rest of the trace elements (Be, Co, and Se) are weakly correlated with ash yield. Further analytical work is necessary to determine the mode of occurrence for these elements. Overall, concentrations of the HAPs elements are generally similar to or less than those reported in previous studies of lignites of the Wilcox Group, east-central region, Texas. Petrographic analysis indicates the following ranges in composition for the seven lignite samples: liptinites (5–8%), huminites (88–95%), and inertinites (trace amounts to 7%). Samples from the middle portion of the A1 bed contain abundant crypto-eugelinite compared to the rest of the samples; this relationship suggests that the degradation of plant material was an important process during the development of the peat mire. With the exception of Hg and Mn, relatively low levels of the HAPs elements studied are found in the samples containing abundant crypto-eugelinite. We infer that the peat-forming environment for this

  10. Dimerization Is Not a Determining Factor for Functional High Affinity Human Plasminogen Binding by the Group A Streptococcal Virulence Factor PAM and Is Mediated by Specific Residues within the PAM a1a2 Domain*

    Bhattacharya, Sarbani; Liang, Zhong; Quek, Adam J.; Ploplis, Victoria A.; Law, Ruby; Castellino, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    A emm53 subclass of Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) interacts tightly with human plasma plasminogen (hPg) and plasmin (hPm) via the kringle 2 (K2hPg) domain of hPg/hPm and the N-terminal a1a2 regions of a GAS coiled-coil M-like protein (PAM). Previous studies have shown that a monomeric PAM fragment, VEK30 (residues 97–125 + Tyr), interacted specifically with isolated K2hPg. However, the binding strength of VEK30 (KD = 56 nm) was ∼60-fold weaker than that of full-length dimeric PAM (KD = 1 nm). To assess whether this attenuated binding was due to the inability of VEK30 to dimerize, we defined the minimal length of PAM required to dimerize using a series of peptides with additional PAM residues placed at the NH2 and COOH termini of VEK30. VEK64 (PAM residues 83–145 + Tyr) was found to be the smallest peptide that adopted an α-helical dimer, and was bound to K2hPg with nearly the same affinity as PAM (KD = 1–2 nm). However, addition of two PAM residues (Arg126-His127) to the COOH terminus of VEK30 (VEK32) maintained a monomeric peptidic structure, but exhibited similar K2hPg binding affinity as full-length dimeric PAM. We identified five residues in a1a2 (Arg113, His114, Glu116, Arg126, His127), mutation of which reduced PAM binding affinity for K2hPg by ∼1000-fold. Replacement of these critical residues by Ala in the GAS genome resulted in reduced virulence, similar to the effects of inactivating the PAM gene entirely. We conclude that rather than dimerization of PAM, the five key residues in the binding domain of PAM are essential to mediate the high affinity interaction with hPg, leading to increased GAS virulence. PMID:24962580

  11. Dimerization is not a determining factor for functional high affinity human plasminogen binding by the group A streptococcal virulence factor PAM and is mediated by specific residues within the PAM a1a2 domain.

    Bhattacharya, Sarbani; Liang, Zhong; Quek, Adam J; Ploplis, Victoria A; Law, Ruby; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-08-01

    A emm53 subclass of Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) interacts tightly with human plasma plasminogen (hPg) and plasmin (hPm) via the kringle 2 (K2hPg) domain of hPg/hPm and the N-terminal a1a2 regions of a GAS coiled-coil M-like protein (PAM). Previous studies have shown that a monomeric PAM fragment, VEK30 (residues 97-125 + Tyr), interacted specifically with isolated K2hPg. However, the binding strength of VEK30 (KD = 56 nm) was ∼60-fold weaker than that of full-length dimeric PAM (KD = 1 nm). To assess whether this attenuated binding was due to the inability of VEK30 to dimerize, we defined the minimal length of PAM required to dimerize using a series of peptides with additional PAM residues placed at the NH2 and COOH termini of VEK30. VEK64 (PAM residues 83-145 + Tyr) was found to be the smallest peptide that adopted an α-helical dimer, and was bound to K2hPg with nearly the same affinity as PAM (KD = 1-2 nm). However, addition of two PAM residues (Arg(126)-His(127)) to the COOH terminus of VEK30 (VEK32) maintained a monomeric peptidic structure, but exhibited similar K2hPg binding affinity as full-length dimeric PAM. We identified five residues in a1a2 (Arg(113), His(114), Glu(116), Arg(126), His(127)), mutation of which reduced PAM binding affinity for K2hPg by ∼ 1000-fold. Replacement of these critical residues by Ala in the GAS genome resulted in reduced virulence, similar to the effects of inactivating the PAM gene entirely. We conclude that rather than dimerization of PAM, the five key residues in the binding domain of PAM are essential to mediate the high affinity interaction with hPg, leading to increased GAS virulence. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Suppressed carrier density for the patterned high mobility two-dimensional electron gas at γ-Al2O3/SrTiO3 heterointerfaces

    Niu, Wei; Gan, Yulin; Christensen, Dennis Valbjørn

    2017-01-01

    The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the non-isostructural interface between spinel γ-Al2O3 and perovskite SrTiO3 is featured by a record electron mobility among complex oxide interfaces in addition to a high carrier density up to the order of 1015 cm-2. Herein, we report on the patterning...... is found to be approximately 3×1013 cm-2, much lower than that of the unpatterned sample (~1015 cm-2). Remarkably, a high electron mobility of approximately 3,600 cm2V-1s-1 was obtained at low temperatures for the patterned 2DEG at a carrier density of ~ 7×1012 cm-2, which exhibits clear Shubnikov-de Hass...... quantum oscillations. The patterned high-mobility 2DEG at the γ-Al2O3/SrTiO3 interface paves the way for the design and application of spinel/perovskite interfaces for high-mobility all-oxide electronic devic...

  13. A possible high-mobility signal in bulk MoTe2: Temperature independent weak phonon decay

    Titao Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs have attracted great attention due to their non-zero bandgap for potential application in high carrier mobility devices. Recent studies demonstrate that the carrier mobility of MoTe2 would decrease by orders of magnitude when used for few-layer transistors. As phonon scattering has a significant influence on carrier mobility of layered material, here, we first reported temperature-dependent Raman spectra of bulk 2H-MoTe2 from 80 to 300 K and discovered that the phonon lifetime of both E12g and A1g vibration modes are independent with temperature. These results were explained by the weak phonon decay in MoTe2. Our results imply the existence of a carrier mobility higher than the theoretical value in intrinsic bulk 2H-MoTe2 and the feasibility to obtain MoTe2-based transistors with sufficiently high carrier mobility.

  14. Quantum corrections to conductivity observed at intermediate magnetic fields in a high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2-dimensional electron gas

    Taboryski, R.; Veje, E.; Lindelof, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetoresistance with the field perpendicular to the 2-dimensional electron gas in a high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure at low temperatures is studied. At the lowest magnetic field we observe the weak localization. At magnetic fields, where the product of the mobility and the magnetic field is of the order of unity, the quantum correction to conductivity due to the electron-electron interaction is as a source of magnetoresistance. A consistent analysis of experiments in this regime is for the first time performed. In addition to the well known electron-electron term with the expected temperature dependence, we find a new type of temperature independent quantum correction, which varies logarithmically with mobility. (orig.)

  15. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive flexible metal substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Dutta, P.; Rathi, M.; Gao, Y.; Yao, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.; Zheng, N.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Martinez, J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate heteroepitaxial growth of single-crystalline-like n and p-type doped GaAs thin films on inexpensive, flexible, and light-weight metal foils by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Single-crystalline-like Ge thin film on biaxially textured templates made by ion beam assisted deposition on metal foil served as the epitaxy enabling substrate for GaAs growth. The GaAs films exhibited strong (004) preferred orientation, sharp in-plane texture, low grain misorientation, strong photoluminescence, and a defect density of ∼10 7  cm −2 . Furthermore, the GaAs films exhibited hole and electron mobilities as high as 66 and 300 cm 2 /V-s, respectively. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive metal substrates can pave the path for roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible III-V solar cells for the mainstream photovoltaics market.

  16. High operational and environmental stability of high-mobility conjugated polymer field-effect transistors through the use of molecular additives

    Nikolka, Mark; Nasrallah, Iyad; Rose, Bradley Daniel; Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Broch, Katharina; Sadhanala, Aditya; Harkin, David; Charmet, Jerome; Hurhangee, Michael; Brown, Adam; Illig, Steffen; Too, Patrick; Jongman, Jan; McCulloch, Iain; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Due to their low-temperature processing properties and inherent mechanical flexibility, conjugated polymer field-effect transistors (FETs) are promising candidates for enabling flexible electronic circuits and displays. Much progress has been made on materials performance; however, there remain significant concerns about operational and environmental stability, particularly in the context of applications that require a very high level of threshold voltage stability, such as active-matrix addressing of organic light-emitting diode displays. Here, we investigate the physical mechanisms behind operational and environmental degradation of high-mobility, p-type polymer FETs and demonstrate an effective route to improve device stability. We show that water incorporated in nanometre-sized voids within the polymer microstructure is the key factor in charge trapping and device degradation. By inserting molecular additives that displace water from these voids, it is possible to increase the stability as well as uniformity to a high level sufficient for demanding industrial applications.

  17. High mobility and low operating voltage ZnGaO and ZnGaLiO transistors with spin-coated Al2O3 as gate dielectric

    Xia, D X; Xu, J B

    2010-01-01

    Spin-coated alumina serving as a gate dielectric in thin film transistors shows interesting dielectric properties for low-voltage applications, despite a moderate capacitance. With Ga singly doped and Ga, Li co-doped ZnO as the active channel layers, typical mobilities of 4.7 cm 2 V -1 s -1 and 2.1 cm 2 V -1 s -1 are achieved, respectively. At a given gate bias, the operation current is much smaller than the previously reported values in low-voltage thin film transistors, primarily relying on the giant-capacitive dielectric. The reported devices combine advantages of high mobility, low power consumption, low cost and ease of fabrication. In addition to the transparent nature of both the dielectric and semiconducting active channels, the superior electrical properties of the devices may provide a new avenue for future transparent electronics. (fast track communication)

  18. High mobility half-metallicity in the (LaMnO3)2/(SrTiO3)8 superlattice

    Cossu, Fabrizio

    2013-01-28

    First principles calculations have been performed to investigate the LaMnO3/SrTiO3 superlattice. Structural relaxation within the generalized gradient approximation results in no significant tiltings or rotations of oxygen octahedra, but in distinct distortions in the SrTiO3 region. Taking into account the onsite Coulomb interaction, we find that the Mn spins order ferromagnetically, in contrast to the antiferromagnetic state of bulk LaMnO3. Most importantly, the interface strain combined with charge transfer across the interface induces half-metallicity within the MnO2 layers. The superlattice is particulary interesting for spintronics applications because the half-metallic states are characterized by an extraordinary high mobility.

  19. High mobility half-metallicity in the (LaMnO3)2/(SrTiO3)8 superlattice

    Cossu, Fabrizio; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Singh, Nirpendra

    2013-01-01

    First principles calculations have been performed to investigate the LaMnO3/SrTiO3 superlattice. Structural relaxation within the generalized gradient approximation results in no significant tiltings or rotations of oxygen octahedra, but in distinct distortions in the SrTiO3 region. Taking into account the onsite Coulomb interaction, we find that the Mn spins order ferromagnetically, in contrast to the antiferromagnetic state of bulk LaMnO3. Most importantly, the interface strain combined with charge transfer across the interface induces half-metallicity within the MnO2 layers. The superlattice is particulary interesting for spintronics applications because the half-metallic states are characterized by an extraordinary high mobility.

  20. High operational and environmental stability of high-mobility conjugated polymer field-effect transistors through the use of molecular additives

    Nikolka, Mark

    2016-12-12

    Due to their low-temperature processing properties and inherent mechanical flexibility, conjugated polymer field-effect transistors (FETs) are promising candidates for enabling flexible electronic circuits and displays. Much progress has been made on materials performance; however, there remain significant concerns about operational and environmental stability, particularly in the context of applications that require a very high level of threshold voltage stability, such as active-matrix addressing of organic light-emitting diode displays. Here, we investigate the physical mechanisms behind operational and environmental degradation of high-mobility, p-type polymer FETs and demonstrate an effective route to improve device stability. We show that water incorporated in nanometre-sized voids within the polymer microstructure is the key factor in charge trapping and device degradation. By inserting molecular additives that displace water from these voids, it is possible to increase the stability as well as uniformity to a high level sufficient for demanding industrial applications.

  1. Terahertz tunable detection in self-switching diodes based on high mobility semiconductors: InGaAs, InAs and InSb

    Iniguez-de-la-Torre, I; Rodilla, H; Mateos, J; Pardo, D; Gonzalez, T; Song, A M

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report on the use of high mobility materials in the channel of self-switching diodes as potential candidates for terahertz operation. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we envisage the feasibility of tuneable-by-geometry detection in the terahertz range. The low effective mass of InAs and InSb in relation to InGaAs enhances ballistic transport inside the diode, thus improving the amplitude and quality factor of the resonance found in the detection spectra of self-switching diodes. The frequency of the resonant peak is also increased with the use of these narrow band gap semiconductors. The analysis of the noise spectra provides useful information about the origin of the resonance. By decreasing temperature below 300 K, a clear improvement in detection sensitivity is also achieved.

  2. Terahertz tunable detection in self-switching diodes based on high mobility semiconductors: InGaAs, InAs and InSb

    Iniguez-de-la-Torre, I; Rodilla, H; Mateos, J; Pardo, D; Gonzalez, T [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Song, A M, E-mail: indy@usal.e [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    In this work we report on the use of high mobility materials in the channel of self-switching diodes as potential candidates for terahertz operation. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we envisage the feasibility of tuneable-by-geometry detection in the terahertz range. The low effective mass of InAs and InSb in relation to InGaAs enhances ballistic transport inside the diode, thus improving the amplitude and quality factor of the resonance found in the detection spectra of self-switching diodes. The frequency of the resonant peak is also increased with the use of these narrow band gap semiconductors. The analysis of the noise spectra provides useful information about the origin of the resonance. By decreasing temperature below 300 K, a clear improvement in detection sensitivity is also achieved.

  3. High mobility AlGaN/GaN heterostructures grown on Si substrates using a large lattice-mismatch induced stress control technology

    Cheng, Jianpeng; Yang, Xuelin; Sang, Ling; Guo, Lei; Hu, Anqi; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    A large lattice-mismatch induced stress control technology with a low Al content AlGaN layer has been used to grow high quality GaN layers on 4-in. Si substrates. The use of this technology allows for high mobility AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with electron mobility of 2040 cm 2 /(V·s) at sheet charge density of 8.4 × 10 12  cm −2 . Strain relaxation and dislocation evolution mechanisms have been investigated. It is demonstrated that the large lattice mismatch between the low Al content AlGaN layer and AlN buffer layer could effectively promote the edge dislocation inclination with relatively large bend angles and therefore significantly reduce the dislocation density in the GaN epilayer. Our results show a great potential for fabrication of low-cost and high performance GaN-on-Si power devices

  4. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of high-mobility AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures on GaN templates and native GaN substrates

    Chen, Jr-Tai, E-mail: jrche@ifm.liu.se; Hsu, Chih-Wei; Forsberg, Urban; Janzén, Erik [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE 581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-02-28

    Severe surface decomposition of semi-insulating (SI) GaN templates occurred in high-temperature H{sub 2} atmosphere prior to epitaxial growth in a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition system. A two-step heating process with a surface stabilization technique was developed to preserve the GaN template surface. Utilizing the optimized heating process, a high two-dimensional electron gas mobility ∼2000 cm{sup 2}/V·s was obtained in a thin AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure with an only 100-nm-thick GaN spacer layer homoepitaxially grown on the GaN template. This technique was also demonstrated viable for native GaN substrates to stabilize the surface facilitating two-dimensional growth of GaN layers. Very high residual silicon and oxygen concentrations were found up to ∼1 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} at the interface between the GaN epilayer and the native GaN substrate. Capacitance-voltage measurements confirmed that the residual carbon doping controlled by growth conditions of the GaN epilayer can be used to successfully compensate the donor-like impurities. State-of-the-art structural properties of a high-mobility AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure was then realized on a 1 × 1 cm{sup 2} SI native GaN substrate; the full width at half maximum of the X-ray rocking curves of the GaN (002) and (102) peaks are only 21 and 14 arc sec, respectively. The surface morphology of the heterostructure shows uniform parallel bilayer steps, and no morphological defects were noticeable over the entire epi-wafer.

  5. Demonstration of high mobility and quantum transport in modulation-doped β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3/Ga2O3 heterostructures

    Zhang, Yuewei; Neal, Adam; Xia, Zhanbo; Joishi, Chandan; Johnson, Jared M.; Zheng, Yuanhua; Bajaj, Sanyam; Brenner, Mark; Dorsey, Donald; Chabak, Kelson; Jessen, Gregg; Hwang, Jinwoo; Mou, Shin; Heremans, Joseph P.; Rajan, Siddharth

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a high mobility two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed at the β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3/Ga2O3 interface through modulation doping. Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations were observed in the modulation-doped β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3/Ga2O3 structure, indicating a high-quality electron channel formed at the heterojunction interface. The formation of the 2DEG channel was further confirmed by the weak temperature dependence of the carrier density, and the peak low temperature mobility was found to be 2790 cm2/Vs, which is significantly higher than that achieved in bulk-doped Beta-phase Gallium Oxide (β-Ga2O3). The observed SdH oscillations allowed for the extraction of the electron effective mass in the (010) plane to be 0.313 ± 0.015 m0 and the quantum scattering time to be 0.33 ps at 3.5 K. The demonstrated modulation-doped β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3/Ga2O3 structure lays the foundation for future exploration of quantum physical phenomena and semiconductor device technologies based on the β-Ga2O3 material system.

  6. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive flexible metal substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Dutta, P., E-mail: pdutta2@central.uh.edu; Rathi, M.; Gao, Y.; Yao, Y.; Selvamanickam, V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Zheng, N.; Ahrenkiel, P. [Department of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, South Dakota 57701 (United States); Martinez, J. [Materials Evaluation Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas 77085 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate heteroepitaxial growth of single-crystalline-like n and p-type doped GaAs thin films on inexpensive, flexible, and light-weight metal foils by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Single-crystalline-like Ge thin film on biaxially textured templates made by ion beam assisted deposition on metal foil served as the epitaxy enabling substrate for GaAs growth. The GaAs films exhibited strong (004) preferred orientation, sharp in-plane texture, low grain misorientation, strong photoluminescence, and a defect density of ∼10{sup 7 }cm{sup −2}. Furthermore, the GaAs films exhibited hole and electron mobilities as high as 66 and 300 cm{sup 2}/V-s, respectively. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive metal substrates can pave the path for roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible III-V solar cells for the mainstream photovoltaics market.

  7. Emergence of high-mobility minority holes in the electrical transport of the Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 iron pnictides

    Urata, T.; Tanabe, Y.; Huynh, K. K.; Heguri, S.; Oguro, H.; Watanabe, K.; Tanigaki, K.

    2015-05-01

    In Fe pnictide (Pn) superconducting materials, neither Mn nor Cr doping to the Fe site induces superconductivity, even though hole carriers are generated. This is in strong contrast with the superconductivity appearing when holes are introduced by alkali-metal substitution on the insulating blocking layers. We investigate in detail the effects of Mn doping on magnetotransport properties in Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 for elucidating the intrinsic reason. The negative Hall coefficient for x =0 estimated in the low magnetic field (B ) regime gradually increases as x increases, and its sign changes to a positive one at x =0.020 . Hall resistivities as well as simultaneous interpretation using the magnetoconductivity tensor including both longitudinal and transverse transport components clarify that minority holes with high mobility are generated by the Mn doping via spin-density wave transition at low temperatures, while original majority electrons and holes residing in the paraboliclike Fermi surfaces of the semimetallic Ba (FeAs )2 are negligibly affected. Present results indicate that the mechanism of hole doping in Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 is greatly different from that of the other superconducting FePn family.

  8. Interaction of microwave radiation with the high mobility two-dimensional electron system in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures

    Ramanayaka, A.N.; Ye, Tianyu; Liu, H.-C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Wegscheider, W. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Mani, R.G., E-mail: rmani@gsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The influence of microwave excitation on the magnetotransport properties of the high mobility two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in the GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure system is investigated by exploring (a) the dependence of the amplitude of the microwave-induced magnetoresistance-oscillations on the polarization direction of the linearly polarized microwaves and (b) the microwave reflection from the 2DES. The polarization study indicates that the amplitude of the magnetoresistance oscillations is remarkably responsive to the relative orientation between the linearly polarized microwaves and the current-axis in the specimen. At low microwave power, P, experiments indicate a strong sinusoidal variation in the diagonal resistance R{sub xx} vs. θ at the oscillatory extrema of the microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations. The reflection study indicates strong correlations between the microwave induced magnetoresistance oscillations and oscillatory features in the microwave reflection in a concurrent measurement of the magnetoresistance and the microwave magnetoreflection from the 2DES. The correlations are followed as a function of the microwave frequency and the microwave power, and the results are reported.

  9. Polymer/metal oxide hybrid dielectrics for low voltage field-effect transistors with solution-processed, high-mobility semiconductors

    Held, Martin; Schießl, Stefan P.; Gannott, Florentina [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen D-91058 (Germany); Institute for Physical Chemistry, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg D-69120 (Germany); Miehler, Dominik [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen D-91058 (Germany); Zaumseil, Jana, E-mail: zaumseil@uni-heidelberg.de [Institute for Physical Chemistry, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg D-69120 (Germany)

    2015-08-24

    Transistors for future flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) display backplanes should operate at low voltages and be able to sustain high currents over long times without degradation. Hence, high capacitance dielectrics with low surface trap densities are required that are compatible with solution-processable high-mobility semiconductors. Here, we combine poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and atomic layer deposition hafnium oxide (HfO{sub x}) into a bilayer hybrid dielectric for field-effect transistors with a donor-acceptor polymer (DPPT-TT) or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the semiconductor and demonstrate substantially improved device performances for both. The ultra-thin PMMA layer ensures a low density of trap states at the semiconductor-dielectric interface while the metal oxide layer provides high capacitance, low gate leakage and superior barrier properties. Transistors with these thin (≤70 nm), high capacitance (100–300 nF/cm{sup 2}) hybrid dielectrics enable low operating voltages (<5 V), balanced charge carrier mobilities and low threshold voltages. Moreover, the hybrid layers substantially improve the bias stress stability of the transistors compared to those with pure PMMA and HfO{sub x} dielectrics.

  10. Interaction of microwave radiation with the high mobility two-dimensional electron system in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures

    Ramanayaka, A.N.; Ye, Tianyu; Liu, H.-C.; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, R.G.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of microwave excitation on the magnetotransport properties of the high mobility two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in the GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure system is investigated by exploring (a) the dependence of the amplitude of the microwave-induced magnetoresistance-oscillations on the polarization direction of the linearly polarized microwaves and (b) the microwave reflection from the 2DES. The polarization study indicates that the amplitude of the magnetoresistance oscillations is remarkably responsive to the relative orientation between the linearly polarized microwaves and the current-axis in the specimen. At low microwave power, P, experiments indicate a strong sinusoidal variation in the diagonal resistance R xx vs. θ at the oscillatory extrema of the microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations. The reflection study indicates strong correlations between the microwave induced magnetoresistance oscillations and oscillatory features in the microwave reflection in a concurrent measurement of the magnetoresistance and the microwave magnetoreflection from the 2DES. The correlations are followed as a function of the microwave frequency and the microwave power, and the results are reported

  11. Spin dynamics in high-mobility two-dimensional electron systems embedded in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    Griesbeck, Michael

    2012-11-22

    Since many years there has been great effort to explore the spin dynamics in low-dimensional electron systems embedded in GaAs/AlGaAs based heterostructures for the purpose of quantum computation and spintronics applications. Advances in technology allow for the design of high quality and well-defined two-dimensional electron systems (2DES), which are perfectly suited for the study of the underlying physics that govern the dynamics of the electron spin system. In this work, spin dynamics in high-mobility 2DES is studied by means of the all-optical time-resolved Kerr/Faraday rotation technique. In (001)-grown 2DES, a strong in-plane spin dephasing anisotropy is studied, resulting from the interference of comparable Rashba and Dresselhaus contributions to the spin-orbit field (SOF). The dependence of this anisotropy on parameters like the confinement length of the 2DES, the sample temperature, as well as the electron density is demonstrated. Furthermore, coherent spin dynamics of an ensemble of ballistically moving electrons is studied without and within an applied weak magnetic field perpendicular to the sample plane, which forces the electrons to move on cyclotron orbits. Finally, strongly anisotropic spin dynamics is investigated in symmetric (110)-grown 2DES, using the resonant spin amplification method. Here, extremely long out-of-plane spin dephasing times can be achieved, in consequence of the special symmetry of the Dresselhaus SOF.

  12. Generation and emplacement of shear-related highly mobile crustal melts: the synkinematic leucogranites from the Variscan Tormes Dome, Western Spain

    López-Moro, Francisco Javier; López-Plaza, Miguel; Romer, Rolf L.

    2012-07-01

    The Tormes dome consists of S-type granites that intruded into Ordovician augen gneisses and Neoproterozoic-Lower Cambrian metapelites/metagreywackes at different extents of migmatization. S-type granites are mainly equigranular two-mica granites, occurring as: (1) enclave-laden subvertical feeder dykes, (2) small external sill-like bodies with size and shape relations indicative for self-similar pluton growth, and (3) as large pluton bodies, emplaced at higher levels than the external ones. These magmas were highly mobile as it is inferred from the high contents of fluxing components, the disintegration and alignment of pelitic xenoliths in feeder dykes and at the bottom of some sill-like bodies. Field relations relate this 311 Ma magmatism (U-Pb monazite) to the regional shearing of the D3 Variscan event. Partial melting modeling and the relatively high estimated liquidus temperatures indicate biotite-dehydration partial melting (800-840°C and 400-650 MPa) rather than water-fluxed melting, implying that there was no partial melting triggered by externally derived fluids in the shear zones. Instead, the subvertical shear zones favored extraction of melts that formed during the regional migmatization event around 320 Ma. Nd isotope variation among the granites might reflect disequilibrium partial melting or different protoliths. Mass-balance and trace element partial melting modeling strongly suggest two kinds of fertile crustal protoliths: augen gneisses and metapelites. Slight compositional variation among the leucogranites does not reflect different extent of protolith melting but is related to a small amount of fractional crystallization (bodies. The lower extent of fractional crystallization and the higher-pressure emplacement conditions of the sill-like bodies support a more restricted movement through the crust than for batholitic leucogranites.

  13. Solid phase epitaxial growth of high mobility La:BaSnO_3 thin films co-doped with interstitial hydrogen

    Niedermeier, Christian A.; Rhode, Sneha; Fearn, Sarah; Moram, Michelle A.; Ide, Keisuke; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the solid phase epitaxial growth of high mobility La:BaSnO_3 thin films on SrTiO_3 single crystal substrates by crystallization through thermal annealing of nanocrystalline thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. The La:BaSnO_3 thin films show high epitaxial quality and Hall mobilities up to 26 ± 1 cm"2/Vs. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy is used to determine the La concentration profile in the La:BaSnO_3 thin films, and a 9%–16% La doping activation efficiency is obtained. An investigation of H doping to BaSnO_3 thin films is presented employing H plasma treatment at room temperature. Carrier concentrations in previously insulating BaSnO_3 thin films were increased to 3 × 10"1"9" cm"−"3 and in La:BaSnO_3 thin films from 6 × 10"1"9" cm"−"3 to 1.5 × 10"2"0" cm"−"3, supporting a theoretical prediction that interstitial H serves as an excellent n-type dopant. An analysis of the free electron absorption by infrared spectroscopy yields a small (H,La):BaSnO_3 electron effective mass of 0.27 ± 0.05 m_0 and an optical mobility of 26 ± 7 cm"2/Vs. As compared to La:BaSnO_3 single crystals, the smaller electron mobility in epitaxial thin films grown on SrTiO_3 substrates is ascribed to threading dislocations as observed in high resolution transmission electron micrographs.

  14. High mobility two-dimensional hole gases in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures; Hochbewegliche zweidimensionale Lochsysteme in GaAs/AlGaAs Heterostrukturen

    Gerl, Christian

    2009-10-14

    This thesis outlines the fabrication of high mobility two-dimensional hole-gases (2DHG) in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and their characterization with magnetotransport measurements at low temperatures between 4 K and 30 mK. Here the optimization of the carrier mobility is focused. This will be achieved by introducing a novel carbon-filament doping source, with which contaminations of the MBE system and therefore in the grown layers can be reduced and by vary the band structure design to minimize scattering processes. With the help of these actions, hole mobilities above 1 E6 cm{sup 2}/Vs are achievable, what reflects an increase of factor 3 in the (001)- and factor 6.5 in the (110)- oriented transport plane compared to common 2DHGs. Furthermore states of the fractional Quantum Hall Effect can be observed in these 2DHGs, only visible in n-doped 2D systems so fare. Magnetotransport measurements on 2DHGs with aluminum gates reveal a hysteretic behavior of the carrier density with respect to the gate potential which can be attributed to the incorporation mechanisms of carbon atoms as acceptor. Temperature dependent magnetotransport measurements allow the evaluation of effective mass and quantum scattering time as well as the dependence of these parameters from the band structure design. In these experiments an aperiodic behavior of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations can be observed in the inverse magnetic field, which is attributed to the position of the fermi energy in the immediate vicinity of crossing regions of the complex Landau fan of 2DHGs. (orig.)

  15. Rock-avalanche dynamics revealed by large-scale field mapping and seismic signals at a highly mobile avalanche in the West Salt Creek valley, western Colorado

    Coe, Jeffrey A.; Baum, Rex L.; Allstadt, Kate E.; Kochevar, Bernard; Schmitt, Robert G.; Morgan, Matthew L.; White, Jonathan L.; Stratton, Benjamin T.; Hayashi, Timothy A.; Kean, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    On 25 May 2014, a rain-on-snow–induced rock avalanche occurred in the West Salt Creek valley on the northern flank of Grand Mesa in western Colorado (United States). The avalanche mobilized from a preexisting rock slide in the Green River Formation and traveled 4.6 km down the confined valley, killing three people. The avalanche was rare for the contiguous United States because of its large size (54.5 Mm3) and high mobility (height/length = 0.14). To understand the avalanche failure sequence, mechanisms, and mobility, we conducted a forensic analysis using large-scale (1:1000) structural mapping and seismic data. We used high-resolution, unmanned aircraft system imagery as a base for field mapping, and analyzed seismic data from 22 broadband stations (distances earth and tracked these forces using curves in the avalanche path. Our results revealed that the rock avalanche was a cascade of landslide events, rather than a single massive failure. The sequence began with an early morning landslide/debris flow that started ∼10 h before the main avalanche. The main avalanche lasted ∼3.5 min and traveled at average velocities ranging from 15 to 36 m/s. For at least two hours after the avalanche ceased movement, a central, hummock-rich core continued to move slowly. Since 25 May 2014, numerous shallow landslides, rock slides, and rock falls have created new structures and modified avalanche topography. Mobility of the main avalanche and central core was likely enhanced by valley floor material that liquefied from undrained loading by the overriding avalanche. Although the base was likely at least partially liquefied, our mapping indicates that the overriding avalanche internally deformed predominantly by sliding along discrete shear surfaces in material that was nearly dry and had substantial frictional strength. These results indicate that the West Salt Creek avalanche, and probably other long-traveled avalanches, could be modeled as two layers: a thin, liquefied

  16. High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle Rollover Accidents and Injuries to U.S. Army Soldiers by Reported Occupant Restraint Use, 1992-2013.

    Lo, Michael C; Giffin, Robert P; Pakulski, Kraig A; Davis, W Sumner; Bernstein, Stephen A; Wise, Daniel V

    2017-05-01

    The high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV) is a light military tactical vehicle. During Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, the U.S. Army modified the HMMWV into a combat vehicle by adding vehicle armor, which made the vehicle more difficult to control and more likely to roll over. Consequently, reports of fatal rollover accidents involving up-armored HMMWVs began to accumulate during the up-armoring period (August 2003 to April 2005). Furthermore, the lack of occupant restraint use prevalent in a predominantly young, male, and enlisted military population compounded the injuries resulting from these accidents. In this retrospective case series analysis, we describe the characteristics of U.S. Army HMMWV rollover accidents, occupants, and injuries reported worldwide from fiscal year 1992 to 2013 based on reported occupant restraint use. We conducted all analyses using Microsoft Excel 2010 and SAS version 9.1. Because this analysis does not constitute human subjects research, no institutional review board review was required. First, we obtained U.S. Army HMMWV accident records from the U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center, and selected those records indicating a HMMWV rollover had occurred. Next, we successively deduplicated the records at the accident, vehicle, occupant, and injury levels for descriptive analysis of characteristics at each level. For each occupant position, we calculated relative, attributable, and population attributable risks of nonfatal and fatal injury based on reported occupant restraint use. Finally, we analyzed body part injured and nature of injury to characterize the injury patterns that HMMWV occupants in each position sustained based on restraint use. We performed a χ 2 test of homogeneity to assess differences in injury patterns between restrained and unrestrained occupants. A total of 819 U.S. Army HMMWV rollover accidents worldwide were reported from October 1991 through May 2013 involving 821 HMMWVs and

  17. Group X

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  18. Group Flow and Group Genius

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  19. Permutation groups

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  20. Study of the role of the overexpression of the high mobility group-AT-hook-1 (HMGA1) protein in adipose tissue and its implications in the development of obesity and insulin resistance

    Arce Cerezo, Altamira

    2013-01-01

    La obesidad es un trastorno metabólico complejo que ha alcanzado proporciones epidémicas en los países desarrollados y en desarrollo. Por otra parte, la obesidad es un factor de riesgo importante que a su vez aumenta el riesgo de desarrollar otras enfermedades tales como la resistencia a la insulina, diabetes tipo 2 y enfermedades cardiovasculares. El conocimiento de las causas y mecanismos que desencadenan el desarrollo de estas enfermedades es de vital importancia para su prevención y trata...

  1. Study of the role of the overexpression of the high mobility group-AT-hook-1 (HMGA1) protein in the adipose tissue and its implications in the development of obesity and insulin resistance

    Arce Cerezo, Altamira

    2013-01-01

    La obesidad es un trastorno metabólico complejo que ha alcanzado proporciones epidémicas en los países desarrollados y en desarrollo. Por otra parte, la obesidad es un factor de riesgo importante que a su vez aumenta el riesgo de desarrollar otras enfermedades tales como la resistencia a la insulina, diabetes tipo 2 y enfermedades cardiovasculares. El conocimiento de las causas y mecanismos que desencadenan el desarrollo de estas enfermedades es de vital importancia para su preven...

  2. Decommissioning of NPP A-1

    Anon

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation the Operation history of A1 NPP, Project 'Decommissioning of A1 NPP' - I stage, Project 'Decommissioning of A1 NPP ' - II stage and Next stages of Project 'Decommissioning of A1 NPP ' are discussed.

  3. Group devaluation and group identification

    Leach, C.W.; Rodriguez Mosquera, P.M.; Vliek, M.L.W.; Hirt, E.

    2010-01-01

    In three studies, we showed that increased in-group identification after (perceived or actual) group devaluation is an assertion of a (preexisting) positive social identity that counters the negative social identity implied in societal devaluation. Two studies with real-world groups used order

  4. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    We give an exposition of certain topics in Lie groups and algebraic groups. This is not a complete ... of a polynomial equation is equivalent to the solva- bility of the equation ..... to a subgroup of the group of roots of unity in k (in particular, it is a ...

  5. Group Work

    Wilson, Kristy J.; Brickman, Peggy; Brame, Cynthia J.

    2018-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics faculty are increasingly incorporating both formal and informal group work in their courses. Implementing group work can be improved by an understanding of the extensive body of educational research studies on this topic. This essay describes an online, evidence-based teaching guide published by…

  6. Reflection groups

    Eggermont, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  7. Group theory

    Scott, W R

    2010-01-01

    Here is a clear, well-organized coverage of the most standard theorems, including isomorphism theorems, transformations and subgroups, direct sums, abelian groups, and more. This undergraduate-level text features more than 500 exercises.

  8. Group Grammar

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  9. Computer group

    Bauer, H.; Black, I.; Heusler, A.; Hoeptner, G.; Krafft, F.; Lang, R.; Moellenkamp, R.; Mueller, W.; Mueller, W.F.; Schati, C.; Schmidt, A.; Schwind, D.; Weber, G.

    1983-01-01

    The computer groups has been reorganized to take charge for the general purpose computers DEC10 and VAX and the computer network (Dataswitch, DECnet, IBM - connections to GSI and IPP, preparation for Datex-P). (orig.)

  10. Group learning

    Pimentel, Ricardo; Noguira, Eloy Eros da Silva; Elkjær, Bente

    The article presents a study that aims at the apprehension of the group learning in a top management team composed by teachers in a Brazilian Waldorf school whose management is collective. After deciding to extend the school, they had problems recruiting teachers who were already trained based...... on the Steiner´s ideas, which created practical problems for conducting management activities. The research seeks to understand how that group of teachers collectively manage the school, facing the lack of resources, a significant heterogeneity in the relationships, and the conflicts and contradictions......, and they are interrelated to the group learning as the construction, maintenance and reconstruction of the intelligibility of practices. From this perspective, it can be said that learning is a practice and not an exceptional phenomenon. Building, maintaining and rebuilding the intelligibility is the group learning...

  11. Group technology

    Rome, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    Group Technology has been conceptually applied to the manufacture of batch-lots of 554 machined electromechanical parts which now require 79 different types of metal-removal tools. The products have been grouped into 7 distinct families which require from 8 to 22 machines in each machine-cell. Throughput time can be significantly reduced and savings can be realized from tooling, direct-labor, and indirect-labor costs

  12. Abelian groups

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  13. Group dynamics.

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  14. Group representations

    Karpilovsky, G

    1994-01-01

    This third volume can be roughly divided into two parts. The first part is devoted to the investigation of various properties of projective characters. Special attention is drawn to spin representations and their character tables and to various correspondences for projective characters. Among other topics, projective Schur index and projective representations of abelian groups are covered. The last topic is investigated by introducing a symplectic geometry on finite abelian groups. The second part is devoted to Clifford theory for graded algebras and its application to the corresponding theory

  15. Lego Group

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2010-01-01

    The last years’ rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence......, the management had, among many initiatives, decided to offshore and outsource a major chunk of its production to Flextronics. In this pursuit of rapid cost-cutting sourcing advantages, the LEGO Group planned to license out as much as 80 per cent of its production besides closing down major parts...

  16. Informal groups

    E. van den Berg; P. van Houwelingen; J. de Hart

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Informele groepen Going out running with a group of friends, rather than joining an official sports club. Individuals who decide to take action themselves rather than giving money to good causes. Maintaining contact with others not as a member of an association, but through an

  17. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  18. Group therapy

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: In his review 'Genesis of Unified Gauge Theories' at the symposium in Honour of Abdus Salam (June, page 23), Tom Kibble of Imperial College, London, looked back to the physics events around Salam from 1959-67. He described how, in the early 1960s, people were pushing to enlarge the symmetry of strong interactions beyond the SU(2) of isospin and incorporate the additional strangeness quantum number. Kibble wrote - 'Salam had students working on every conceivable symmetry group. One of these was Yuval Ne'eman, who had the good fortune and/or prescience to work on SU(3). From that work, and of course from the independent work of Murray Gell- Mann, stemmed the Eightfold Way, with its triumphant vindication in the discovery of the omega-minus in 1964.' Yuval Ne'eman writes - 'I was the Defence Attaché at the Israeli Embassy in London and was admitted by Salam as a part-time graduate student when I arrived in 1958. I started research after resigning from the Embassy in May 1960. Salam suggested a problem: provide vector mesons with mass - the problem which was eventually solved by Higgs, Guralnik, Kibble,.... (as described by Kibble in his article). I explained to Salam that I had become interested in symmetry. Nobody at Imperial College at the time, other than Salam himself, was doing anything in groups, and attention further afield was focused on the rotation - SO(N) - groups. Reacting to my own half-baked schemes, Salam told me to forget about the rotation groups he taught us, and study group theory in depth, directing me to Eugene Dynkin's classification of Lie subalgebras, about which he had heard from Morton Hamermesh. I found Dynkin incomprehensible without first learning about Lie algebras from Henri Cartan's thesis, which luckily had been reproduced by Dynkin in his 1946 thesis, using his diagram method. From a copy of a translation of Dynkin's thesis which I found in the British Museum Library, I

  19. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  20. Group play

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea

    2008-01-01

    Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects of the v......Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects...... of the various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...... of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in multiplayer...

  1. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  2. Asymmetric Conjugated Molecules Based on [1]Benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene for High-Mobility Organic Thin-Film Transistors: Influence of Alkyl Chain Length.

    He, Keqiang; Li, Weili; Tian, Hongkun; Zhang, Jidong; Yan, Donghang; Geng, Yanhou; Wang, Fosong

    2017-10-11

    Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of a series of [1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (BTBT)-based asymmetric conjugated molecules, that is, 2-(5-alkylthiophen-2-yl)[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (BTBT-Tn, in which T and n represent thiophene and the number of carbons in the alkyl group, respectively). All of the molecules with n ≥ 4 show mesomorphism and display smectic A, smectic B (n = 4), or smectic E (n > 4) phases and then crystalline phases in succession upon cooling from the isotropic state. Alkyl chain length has a noticeable influence on the microstructures of vacuum-deposited films and therefore on the performance of the organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs). All molecules except for 2-(thiophen-2-yl)[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene and 2-(5-ethylthiophen-2-yl)[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene showed OTFT mobilities above 5 cm 2 V -1 s -1 . 2-(5-Hexylthiophen-2-yl)[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene and 2-(5-heptylthiophen-2-yl)[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene showed the greatest OTFT performance with reliable hole mobilities (μ) up to 10.5 cm 2 V -1 s -1 because they formed highly ordered and homogeneous films with diminished grain boundaries.

  3. Two-dimensional Haeckelite NbS{sub 2}. A diamagnetic high-mobility semiconductor with Nb{sup 4+} ions

    Ma, Yandong; Kuc, Agnieszka; Jing, Yu; Heine, Thomas [Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Leipzig (Germany); Philipsen, Pier [Scientific Computing and Modelling NV, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-08-14

    In all known Group 5 transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MLs), the metal centers carry a spin, and their ground-state phases are either metallic or semiconducting with indirect band gaps. Here, on grounds of first-principles calculations, we report that the Haeckelite polytypes 1S-NbX{sub 2} (X=S, Se, Te) are diamagnetic direct-band-gap semiconductors even though the Nb atoms are in the 4+ oxidation state. In contrast, 1S-VX{sub 2} MLs are antiferromagnetically coupled indirect-band-gap semiconductors. The 1S phases are thermodynamically and dynamically stable but of slightly higher energy than their 1H and 1T ML counterparts. 1S-NbX{sub 2} MLs are excellent candidates for optoelectronic applications owing to their small band gaps (between 0.5 and 1 eV). Moreover, 1S-NbS{sub 2} shows a particularly high hole mobility of 2.68 x 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, which is significantly higher than that of MoS{sub 2} and comparable to that of WSe{sub 2}. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  5. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  6. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  7. Analytical admittance characterization of high mobility channel

    Mammeri, A. M.; Mahi, F. Z., E-mail: fati-zo-mahi2002@yahoo.fr [Institute of Science and Technology, University of Bechar (Algeria); Varani, L. [Institute of Electronics of the South (IES - CNRS UMR 5214), University of Montpellier (France)

    2015-03-30

    In this contribution, we investigate the small-signal admittance of the high electron mobility transistors field-effect channels under a continuation branching of the current between channel and gate by using an analytical model. The analytical approach takes into account the linearization of the 2D Poisson equation and the drift current along the channel. The analytical equations discuss the frequency dependence of the admittance at source and drain terminals on the geometrical transistor parameters.

  8. High Mobility, High Life Wheels for Mars

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — GRC will build Mars spring tires based on JPL requirements. GRC will evaluate tractive performance. JPL will conduct life cycle testing and load analysis.

  9. Cassette pontoon bridge of high mobility

    Krzysztof KOSIUCZENKO

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Looking through the known and used buoyant systems, it can be remarked that the single buoyant segments are the stiff objects made of steel or plastic with variable dimensions and a complex construction. The ready to use buoyant segments, that assure the proper displacement, must have the factory leak-tightness. They take up a big transportation volume and need the assurance of the suitably abundant means of transport. Usually the heavy wheeled vehicles are needed because of high own mass of buoyant segment and large gauges. The exploitation of such constructions is very expensive. A cassette pontoon bridge, presented in this paper, is the proposition of the increase of the mobility of construction. The decrease of the single buoyant segment dimensions with the assurance of the capacity leads that more segments fit into in the same dimensions of the loading compartment of the vehicle and storage accommodation. The application of standardized joints assures the assembly efficiency with not numerous crew.

  10. An example of auto-anti-A1 agglutinins.

    Wright, J; Lim, F C; Freedman, J

    1980-10-01

    The serum of an elderly man, group A, Le(a+b-), contained an IgM antibody that agglutinated his own cells and the cells of random group A1 donors. Over a period of 5 months, the titre of these auto-anti-A1 agglutinins was 4 at 22 degrees C.

  11. Improvement of the homogeneity of high mobility In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:H films by sputtering through a mesh electrode studied by Monte Carlo simulation and thin film analysis

    Scherg-Kurmes, Harald; Hafez, Ahmad; Szyszka, Bernd [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Einsteinufer 25, 10587, Berlin (Germany); Siemers, Michael; Pflug, Andreas [Fraunhofer IST, Bienroder Weg 54E, 38108, Braunschweig (Germany); Schlatmann, Rutger [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, PVcomB, Schwarzschildstr. 3, 12489, Berlin (Germany); Rech, Bernd [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Institute for Silicon Photovoltaics, Kekulestrasse 5, 12489, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    Hydrogen-doped indium oxide (IOH) is a transparent conductive oxide offering great potential to optoelectronic applications because of its high mobility of over 100 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1}s{sup -1}. In films deposited statically by RF magnetron sputtering, a small area directly opposing the target center with a higher resistivity and lower crystallinity than the rest of the film has been found via hall- and XRD-measurements, which we attribute to plasma damage. In order to investigate the distribution of particle energies during the sputtering process we have simulated the RF-sputtering deposition process of IOH by particle-in-cell Monte Carlo (PICMC) simulation. At the surface of ceramic sputtering targets, negatively charged oxygen ions are created. These ions are accelerated toward the substrate in the plasma sheath with energies up to 150 eV. They damage the growing film and reduce its crystallinity. The influence of a negatively biased mesh inside the sputtering chamber on particle energies and distributions has been simulated and investigated. We found that the mesh decreased the high-energetic oxygen ion density at the substrate, thus enabling a more homogeneous IOH film growth. The theoretical results have been verified by XRD X-ray diffractometry (XRD), 4-point probe, and hall measurements of statically deposited IOH films on glass. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. On the Brauer group

    Tankeev, Sergei G

    2000-01-01

    For an arithmetic model X of a Fermat surface or a hyperkahler variety with Betti number b 2 (V otimes k-bar)>3 over a purely imaginary number field k, we prove the finiteness of the l-components of Br'(X) for all primes l>>0. This yields a variant of a conjecture of M. Artin. If V is a smooth projective irregular surface over a number field k and V(k)≠ nothing, then the l-primary component of Br(V)/Br(k) is an infinite group for every prime l. Let A 1 →M 1 be the universal family of elliptic curves with a Jacobian structure of level N>=3 over a number field k supset of Q(e 2πi/N ). Assume that M 1 (k) ≠ nothing. If V is a smooth projective compactification of the surface A 1 , then the l-primary component of Br(V)/Br(M-bar 1 ) is a finite group for each sufficiently large prime l

  13. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur a...

  14. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  15. Group Work Publication-1991.

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Lists 21 new publications in group work, of which 9 are reviewed. Those discussed include publications on group counseling and psychotherapy, structured groups, support groups, psychodrama, and social group work. (Author/NB)

  16. Quantum isometry groups

    Jyotishman Bhowmick

    2015-11-07

    Nov 7, 2015 ... Classical. Quantum. Background. Compact Hausdorff space. Unital C∗ algebra. Gelfand-Naimark. Compact Group. Compact Quantum Group. Woronowicz. Group Action. Coaction. Woronowicz. Riemannian manifold. Spectral triple. Connes. Isometry group. Quantum Isometry Group. To be discussed.

  17. Group typicality, group loyalty and cognitive development.

    Patterson, Meagan M

    2014-09-01

    Over the course of childhood, children's thinking about social groups changes in a variety of ways. Developmental Subjective Group Dynamics (DSGD) theory emphasizes children's understanding of the importance of conforming to group norms. Abrams et al.'s study, which uses DSGD theory as a framework, demonstrates the social cognitive skills underlying young elementary school children's thinking about group norms. Future research on children's thinking about groups and group norms should explore additional elements of this topic, including aspects of typicality beyond loyalty. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  18. Beyond HbA1c.

    Bloomgarden, Zachary

    2017-12-01

    It can scarcely be denied that the supreme goal of all theory is to make the irreducible basic elements as simple and as few as possible without having to surrender the adequate representation of a single datum of experience. The diaTribe Foundation convened a meeting on the topic of glycemic outcomes beyond HbA1c on 21 July 2017, in Bethesda (MD, USA), focusing on potential uses of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Understanding patterns of glycemia in people with diabetes has long been a focus of approaches to improving treatment, and over the past few years this has become an available modality for clinical practice. Glucose levels are not the only biologic parameters affecting HbA1c levels; HbA1c changes with anemia or, more subtly, with changes in rates of erythrocyte turnover not reflected in hemoglobin levels outside the normal range. Renal disease often is associated with lower HbA1c than would be predicted based on an individual's glycemic levels. Furthermore, HbA1c levels tend to increase with age and are higher in some ethnic groups; for example, people of African ethnicity have higher HbA1c levels than people of Northern European descent. Indeed, we have argued that even as a measure of mean glycemia HbA1c is inherently imprecise. Overall, for some 20% of people with diabetes, HbA1c levels are substantially higher, or substantially lower, than those that would be predicted from mean blood glucose levels. If one recognizes that HbA1c is, at best, a partial measure of mean glycemic exposure, one must surely accept that HbA1c does not reflect variability within a day, from day to day, and from period to period. Many glucose-lowering medicines, particularly the sulfonylureas and insulin, cause hypoglycemia, with consequent negative effects on quality of life and patient-reported outcomes, as well as association with weight gain and adverse macrovascular outcome; hypoglycemia will, of course, not be captured by HbA1c measurement. Based on these

  19. AREVA group overview; Presentation du groupe AREVA

    NONE

    2002-02-08

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  20. Overgroups of root groups in classical groups

    Aschbacher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The author extends results of McLaughlin and Kantor on overgroups of long root subgroups and long root elements in finite classical groups. In particular he determines the maximal subgroups of this form. He also determines the maximal overgroups of short root subgroups in finite classical groups and the maximal overgroups in finite orthogonal groups of c-root subgroups.

  1. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  2. Theory of Lie groups

    Chevalley, Claude

    2018-01-01

    The standard text on the subject for many years, this introductory treatment covers classical linear groups, topological groups, manifolds, analytic groups, differential calculus of Cartan, and compact Lie groups and their representations. 1946 edition.

  3. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    Luis J. Boya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  4. An introduction to A1-homotopy theory

    Morel, F.

    2003-01-01

    This contribution covers simplicial sheaves, Quillen's homotopical algebra, unstable A 1 homotopy theory, connectivity and A 1 -localisation, stable A 1 homotopy theory of S 1 -spectra and P 1 -spectra

  5. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  6. Free Boolean Topological Groups

    Ol’ga Sipacheva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Known and new results on free Boolean topological groups are collected. An account of the properties that these groups share with free or free Abelian topological groups and properties specific to free Boolean groups is given. Special emphasis is placed on the application of set-theoretic methods to the study of Boolean topological groups.

  7. Small Group Research

    McGrath, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizes research on small group processes by giving a comprehensive account of the types of variables primarily studied in the laboratory. These include group structure, group composition, group size, and group relations. Considers effects of power, leadership, conformity to social norms, and role relationships. (Author/AV)

  8. A1C Test and Diabetes

    ... Diagnosis The A1C Test & Diabetes The A1C Test & Diabetes On this page: What is the A1C test? ... the A1C test used to diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? Health care professionals can use the ...

  9. Geometric group theory

    Druţu, Cornelia

    2018-01-01

    The key idea in geometric group theory is to study infinite groups by endowing them with a metric and treating them as geometric spaces. This applies to many groups naturally appearing in topology, geometry, and algebra, such as fundamental groups of manifolds, groups of matrices with integer coefficients, etc. The primary focus of this book is to cover the foundations of geometric group theory, including coarse topology, ultralimits and asymptotic cones, hyperbolic groups, isoperimetric inequalities, growth of groups, amenability, Kazhdan's Property (T) and the Haagerup property, as well as their characterizations in terms of group actions on median spaces and spaces with walls. The book contains proofs of several fundamental results of geometric group theory, such as Gromov's theorem on groups of polynomial growth, Tits's alternative, Stallings's theorem on ends of groups, Dunwoody's accessibility theorem, the Mostow Rigidity Theorem, and quasiisometric rigidity theorems of Tukia and Schwartz. This is the f...

  10. Profinite graphs and groups

    Ribes, Luis

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a detailed introduction to graph theoretic methods in profinite groups and applications to abstract groups. It is the first to provide a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The author begins by carefully developing relevant notions in topology, profinite groups and homology, including free products of profinite groups, cohomological methods in profinite groups, and fixed points of automorphisms of free pro-p groups. The final part of the book is dedicated to applications of the profinite theory to abstract groups, with sections on finitely generated subgroups of free groups, separability conditions in free and amalgamated products, and algorithms in free groups and finite monoids. Profinite Graphs and Groups will appeal to students and researchers interested in profinite groups, geometric group theory, graphs and connections with the theory of formal languages. A complete reference on the subject, the book includes historical and bibliographical notes as well as a discussion of open quest...

  11. Ultraviolet A1 phototherapy: One center's experience

    Sasi Kiran Attili

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultraviolet A1(UVA1 phototherapy is increasingly being used in the treatment of morphea, atopic dermatitis, lupus and some other recalcitrant dermatoses. We present a retrospective review of our experience with this modality. Aim: To evaluate the treatment response rates for various dermatoses and adverse effects of UVA1 phototherapy. Methods: We reviewed phototherapy notes along with electronic and/or paper case records for all patients treated with UVA1 phototherapy from October 1996 to December 2008. Results: A total of 269 patients (outcomes available for 247 had 361 treatment courses (treatment data available for 317 courses over this period. We found phototherapy to be beneficial in 28 (53% of 53 patients with atopic dermatitis and 19 (51% of 37 patients with morphea. A beneficial outcome was recorded in all six (100% cases of urticaria and six (85.7% of seven patients treated for a polymorphic light eruption. Benefit was also recorded in systemic lupus erythematosus (8 (44.4% of 18, lichen sclerosus (6 (42.9% of 14, mastocytosis (2 (33.3% of 6, necrobiosis lipoidica (4 (30.8% of 13, granuloma annulare (2 (25% of 8, scleroderma (2 (22.2% of 9 and keloids (1 (7.7% of 13. Overall, treatment was well tolerated with no patients having to stop treatment due to adverse effects. Limitations: This is a retrospective study with no control group. Subjective/recall bias is quite possible as a number of patients were followed up over the phone. Conclusions: Our data suggest that ultraviolet A1 can be considered for the treatment of selected dermatoses. However, long-term malignancy risk is as yet unknown.

  12. Group purchasing: an overview.

    Wetrich, J G

    1987-07-01

    The various types and operational methods of purchasing groups are described, and evaluation of groups is discussed. Since group purchasing is increasing in popularity as a method of controlling drug costs, community and hospital pharmacy managers may need to evaluate various groups to determine the appropriateness of their services. Groups are categorized as independent, system based, or alliance or association based. Instead of "purchasing," some groups develop contracts for hospitals, which then purchase directly from the vendor. Aside from this basic difference between groups that purchase and groups that contract, comparisons among groups are difficult because of the wide variation in sizes and services. Competition developing from diversification among groups has led to "super groups," formed from local and regional groups. In evaluating groups, advantages and disadvantages germane to accomplishing the member's objectives must be considered. To ensure a group's success, members must be committed and support the group's philosophies; hospital pharmacists must help to establish a strong formulary system. To select vendors, groups should develop formal qualification and selection criteria and should not base a decision solely on price. The method of solicitation (bidding or negotiating), as well as the role of the prime vendor, should be studied. Legal implications of group purchasing, especially in the areas of administrative fees and drug diversion, must also be considered. The most advantageous group for each organization will include members with common missions and will be able to implement strategies for future success.

  13. Ordered groups and infinite permutation groups

    1996-01-01

    The subjects of ordered groups and of infinite permutation groups have long en­ joyed a symbiotic relationship. Although the two subjects come from very different sources, they have in certain ways come together, and each has derived considerable benefit from the other. My own personal contact with this interaction began in 1961. I had done Ph. D. work on sequence convergence in totally ordered groups under the direction of Paul Conrad. In the process, I had encountered "pseudo-convergent" sequences in an ordered group G, which are like Cauchy sequences, except that the differences be­ tween terms of large index approach not 0 but a convex subgroup G of G. If G is normal, then such sequences are conveniently described as Cauchy sequences in the quotient ordered group GIG. If G is not normal, of course GIG has no group structure, though it is still a totally ordered set. The best that can be said is that the elements of G permute GIG in an order-preserving fashion. In independent investigations around that t...

  14. ALIGNMENTS OF GROUP GALAXIES WITH NEIGHBORING GROUPS

    Wang Yougang; Chen Xuelei; Park, Changbom; Yang Xiaohu; Choi, Yun-Young

    2009-01-01

    Using a sample of galaxy groups found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4, we measure the following four types of alignment signals: (1) the alignment between the distributions of the satellites of each group relative to the direction of the nearest neighbor group (NNG); (2) the alignment between the major axis direction of the central galaxy of the host group (HG) and the direction of the NNG; (3) the alignment between the major axes of the central galaxies of the HG and the NNG; and (4) the alignment between the major axes of the satellites of the HG and the direction of the NNG. We find strong signal of alignment between the satellite distribution and the orientation of central galaxy relative to the direction of the NNG, even when the NNG is located beyond 3r vir of the host group. The major axis of the central galaxy of the HG is aligned with the direction of the NNG. The alignment signals are more prominent for groups that are more massive and with early-type central galaxies. We also find that there is a preference for the two major axes of the central galaxies of the HG and NNG to be parallel for the system with both early central galaxies, however, not for the systems with both late-type central galaxies. For the orientation of satellite galaxies, we do not find any significant alignment signals relative to the direction of the NNG. From these four types of alignment measurements, we conclude that the large-scale environment traced by the nearby group affects primarily the shape of the host dark matter halo, and hence also affects the distribution of satellite galaxies and the orientation of central galaxies. In addition, the NNG directly affects the distribution of the satellite galaxies by inducing asymmetric alignment signals, and the NNG at very small separation may also contribute a second-order impact on the orientation of the central galaxy in the HG.

  15. Citizens' action group

    Andritzky, W.

    1978-01-01

    For the first empirical study of citizens' action groups 331 such groups were consulted. Important information was collected on the following aspects of these groups: their self-image, areas and forms of activities, objectives and their extent, how long the group has existed, successes and failures and their forms of organisation. (orig.) [de

  16. Communication in Organizational Groups

    Monica RADU

    2007-01-01

    Organizational group can be defined as some persons between who exist interactive connections (functional, communication, affective, normative type). Classification of these groups can reflect the dimension, type of relationship or type of rules included. Organizational groups and their influence over the individual efficiency and the efficiency of the entire group are interconnected. Spontaneous roles in these groups sustain the structure of the relationship, and the personality of each indi...

  17. [Social crisis, spontaneous groups and group order].

    Edelman, Lucila; Kordon, Diana

    2002-12-01

    Argentina has gone through very difficult times during the last years and, in particularly, new kinds of social practices have emerged in order to cope with the crisis. This situation demands and urges a new type of reflection upon the double role of groups, as tools to transform reality and as a way to elaborate those processes regarding subjectivity. In this paper we analyse some topics regarding the groupal field (considering spontaneous groups as well as groupal devices that allow to elaborate the crisis). We consider social bond to be the condition of possibility for the existence of the psyche and of time continuity, and that it also makes possible personal and social elaboration of trauma, crisis and social catastrophe. We develop some aspects of an specific device (the reflection group), which we have already depicted in another moment, showing it's usefulness to cope with social crisis and to promote the subjective elaboration of crisis.

  18. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/hemoglobina1chba1ctest.html Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test? A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test measures ...

  19. Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1C

    ... Why Are Hemoglobin A1c Tests Done? When a child has diabetes, hemoglobin A1c levels are followed to see how well medicines are working. If a child with diabetes has a high hemoglobin A1c level, it may ...

  20. IEA SHC Task 42/ECES Annex 29 WG A1

    Ristić, Alenka; Furbo, Simon; Moser, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    An overview on the recent results on the engineering and characterization of sorption materials, PCMs and TCMs investigated in the working group WG A1 “Engineering and processing of TES materials” of IEA SHC Task 42 / ECES Annex 29 (Task 4229) entitled “Compact Thermal Energy Storage” is presented....

  1. Complete COL1A1 allele deletions in osteogenesis imperfecta

    van Dijk, Fleur S.; Huizer, Margriet; Kariminejad, Ariana; Marcelis, Carlo L.; Plomp, Astrid S.; Terhal, Paulien A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Weiss, Marjan M.; van Rijn, Rick R.; Cobben, Jan M.; Pals, Gerard

    Purpose: To identify a molecular genetic cause in patients with a clinical diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I/IV. Methods: The authors performed multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis of the COL1A1 gene in a group of 106 index patients. Results: In four families with

  2. Complete COL1A1 allele deletions in osteogenesis imperfecta

    van Dijk, Fleur S.; Huizer, Margriet; Kariminejad, Ariana; Marcelis, Carlo L.; Plomp, Astrid S.; Terhal, Paulien A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Weiss, Marjan M.; van Rijn, Rick R.; Cobben, Jan M.; Pals, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    To identify a molecular genetic cause in patients with a clinical diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I/IV. The authors performed multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis of the COL1A1 gene in a group of 106 index patients. In four families with mild osteogenesis

  3. Introduction to topological groups

    Husain, Taqdir

    2018-01-01

    Concise treatment covers semitopological groups, locally compact groups, Harr measure, and duality theory and some of its applications. The volume concludes with a chapter that introduces Banach algebras. 1966 edition.

  4. MSUD Family Support Group

    ... The Treatment Of MSUD The MSUD Family Support Group has provided funds to Buck Institute for its ... of the membership of the MSUD Family Support Group, research for improved treatments and potential cure was ...

  5. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  6. UPIN Group File

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Group Unique Physician Identifier Number (UPIN) File is the business entity file that contains the group practice UPIN and descriptive information. It does NOT...

  7. Group Decision Process Support

    Gøtze, John; Hijikata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists.......Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists....

  8. Gestalt Interactional Groups

    Harman, Robert L.; Franklin, Richard W.

    1975-01-01

    Gestalt therapy in groups is not limited to individual work in the presence of an audience. Describes several ways to involve gestalt groups interactionally. Interactions described focus on learning by doing and discovering, and are noninterpretive. (Author/EJT)

  9. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000511.htm Group B streptococcus - pregnancy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that some ...

  10. Multicultural group work

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds.......Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds....

  11. The Areva Group; Le groupe Areva

    NONE

    2004-08-01

    This document provides information on the Areva Group, a world nuclear industry leader, offering solutions for nuclear power generation, electricity transmission and distribution and interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets. It presents successively the front end division including the group business lines involved in producing nuclear fuel for electric power generation (uranium mining, concentration, conversion and enrichment and nuclear fuel fabrication); the reactors and services division which designs and builds PWR, BWR and research reactors; the back end division which encompasses the management of the fuel that has been used in nuclear power plants; the transmission and distribution division which provides products, systems and services to the medium and high voltage energy markets; the connectors division which designs and manufactures electrical, electronic and optical connectors, flexible micro circuitry and interconnection systems. Areva is implemented in Europe, north and south america, africa and asia-pacific. (A.L.B.)

  12. Groups, combinatorics and geometry

    Ivanov, A A; Saxl, J

    2003-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the theory of groups in particular simplegroups, finite and algebraic has influenced a number of diverseareas of mathematics. Such areas include topics where groups have beentraditionally applied, such as algebraic combinatorics, finitegeometries, Galois theory and permutation groups, as well as severalmore recent developments.

  13. Working Group 7 Summary

    Nagaitsev S.; Berg J.

    2012-06-10

    The primary subject of working group 7 at the 2012 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop was muon accelerators for a muon collider or neutrino factory. Additionally, this working group included topics that did not fit well into other working groups. Two subjects were discussed by more than one speaker: lattices to create a perfectly integrable nonlinear lattice, and a Penning trap to create antihydrogen.

  14. AREVA group overview

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  15. Led Astray by Hemoglobin A1c

    Jean Chen MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin A1c (A1c is used frequently to diagnose and treat diabetes mellitus. Therefore, it is important be aware of factors that may interfere with the accuracy of A1c measurements. This is a case of a rare hemoglobin variant that falsely elevated a nondiabetic patient’s A1c level and led to a misdiagnosis of diabetes. A 67-year-old male presented to endocrine clinic for further management after he was diagnosed with diabetes based on an elevated A1c of 10.7%, which is approximately equivalent to an average blood glucose of 260 mg/dL. Multiple repeat A1c levels remained >10%, but his home fasting and random glucose monitoring ranged from 92 to 130 mg/dL. Hemoglobin electrophoresis and subsequent genetic analysis diagnosed the patient with hemoglobin Wayne, a rare hemoglobin variant. This variant falsely elevates A1c levels when A1c is measured using cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. When the boronate affinity method was applied instead, the patient’s A1c level was actually 4.7%. Though hemoglobin Wayne is clinically silent, this patient was erroneously diagnosed with diabetes and started on an antiglycemic medication. Due to this misdiagnosis, the patient was at risk of escalation in his “diabetes management” and hypoglycemia. Therefore, it is important that providers are aware of factors that may result in hemoglobin A1c inaccuracy including hemoglobin variants.

  16. Group Psychotherapy in Denmark.

    Jørgensen, Lars Bo; Thygesen, Bente; Aagaard, Søren

    2015-10-01

    This is a short article on the history and training standards in the Institute of Group Analysis in Copenhagen (IGA-CPH). We describe theoretical orientations and influences in the long-term training program and new initiatives, like courses in mentalization-based group treatment and a dynamic short-term group therapy course, as well as research in group psychotherapy in Denmark. Some group analytic initiatives in relation to social issues and social welfare are presented, as well as initiatives concerning the school system and unemployment.

  17. Group theory I essentials

    Milewski, Emil G

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Group Theory I includes sets and mapping, groupoids and semi-groups, groups, isomorphisms and homomorphisms, cyclic groups, the Sylow theorems, and finite p-groups.

  18. Lectures on Chevalley groups

    Steinberg, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Robert Steinberg's Lectures on Chevalley Groups were delivered and written during the author's sabbatical visit to Yale University in the 1967-1968 academic year. The work presents the status of the theory of Chevalley groups as it was in the mid-1960s. Much of this material was instrumental in many areas of mathematics, in particular in the theory of algebraic groups and in the subsequent classification of finite groups. This posthumous edition incorporates additions and corrections prepared by the author during his retirement, including a new introductory chapter. A bibliography and editorial notes have also been added. This is a great unsurpassed introduction to the subject of Chevalley groups that influenced generations of mathematicians. I would recommend it to anybody whose interests include group theory. -Efim Zelmanov, University of California, San Diego Robert Steinberg's lectures on Chevalley groups were given at Yale University in 1967. The notes for the lectures contain a wonderful exposition of ...

  19. E-groups training

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    There will be an e-groups training course on 16 March 2012 which will cover the main e-groups functionalities i.e.: creating and managing e-groups, difference between static and dynamic e-groups, configuring posting restrictions and archives, examples of where e-groups can be used in daily work. Even if you have already worked with e-groups, this may be a good opportunity to learn about the best practices and security related recommendations when using e-groups. You can find more details as well as enrolment form for the training (it’s free) here. The number of places is limited, so enrolling early is recommended.   Technical Training Tel. 72844

  20. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress.

  1. Geometric group theory

    Bestvina, Mladen; Vogtmann, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Geometric group theory refers to the study of discrete groups using tools from topology, geometry, dynamics and analysis. The field is evolving very rapidly and the present volume provides an introduction to and overview of various topics which have played critical roles in this evolution. The book contains lecture notes from courses given at the Park City Math Institute on Geometric Group Theory. The institute consists of a set of intensive short courses offered by leaders in the field, designed to introduce students to exciting, current research in mathematics. These lectures do not duplicate standard courses available elsewhere. The courses begin at an introductory level suitable for graduate students and lead up to currently active topics of research. The articles in this volume include introductions to CAT(0) cube complexes and groups, to modern small cancellation theory, to isometry groups of general CAT(0) spaces, and a discussion of nilpotent genus in the context of mapping class groups and CAT(0) gro...

  2. CLASSIFICATION OF CRIMINAL GROUPS

    Natalia Romanova

    2013-01-01

    New types of criminal groups are emerging in modern society.  These types have their special criminal subculture. The research objective is to develop new parameters of classification of modern criminal groups, create a new typology of criminal groups and identify some features of their subculture. Research methodology is based on the system approach that includes using the method of analysis of documentary sources (materials of a criminal case), method of conversations with themembers of the...

  3. Group therapy for adolescents

    Nada Hribar

    2001-01-01

    The group included adolescents from secondary school and some students. The group had weekly sessions or twice on mounth. The adolescents had varied simptoms: depressive, anxiety, psychosomatic disorders, learning difficulties, cunduct problems. All of adolescents were common on many problems in social interactions. The goal of therapeutic work were: to increase assertiveness skills and to reduce the anxious in social situations. The adolescents in group raised a self-esteem and developed som...

  4. Presentations of groups

    Johnson, D L

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide an introduction to combinatorial group theory. Any reader who has completed first courses in linear algebra, group theory and ring theory will find this book accessible. The emphasis is on computational techniques but rigorous proofs of all theorems are supplied. This new edition has been revised throughout, including new exercises and an additional chapter on proving that certain groups are infinite.

  5. Group-Server Queues

    Li, Quan-Lin; Ma, Jing-Yu; Xie, Mingzhou; Xia, Li

    2017-01-01

    By analyzing energy-efficient management of data centers, this paper proposes and develops a class of interesting {\\it Group-Server Queues}, and establishes two representative group-server queues through loss networks and impatient customers, respectively. Furthermore, such two group-server queues are given model descriptions and necessary interpretation. Also, simple mathematical discussion is provided, and simulations are made to study the expected queue lengths, the expected sojourn times ...

  6. Environmental groups in politics

    Lowe, P.; Goyder, J.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction; (Part I) the environmental movement (environmental groups and the attentive public; the episodic development of the environmental movement; the underlying values of environmentalism; the roots of environmental concern; the social limits to growth; elite manipulation of values); the organisation of environmental groups; environmental groups in national politics; environmental groups in local politics; (Part II) the Henley Society; Friends of the Earth; the National Trust; the Royal Society for Nature Conservation; the European Environmental Bureau. (U.K.)

  7. Complex quantum groups

    Drabant, B.; Schlieker, M.

    1993-01-01

    The complex quantum groups are constructed. They are q-deformations of the real Lie groups which are obtained as the complex groups corresponding to the Lie algebras of type A n-1 , B n , C n . Following the ideas of Faddeev, Reshetikhin and Takhtajan Hopf algebras of regular functionals U R for these complexified quantum groups are constructed. One has thus in particular found a construction scheme for the q-Lorentz algebra to be identified as U(sl q (2,C). (orig.)

  8. Explosive Technology Group

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  9. Study Groups in Denmark

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions.......Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions....

  10. Lie groups for pedestrians

    Lipkin, Harry J

    2002-01-01

    According to the author of this concise, high-level study, physicists often shy away from group theory, perhaps because they are unsure which parts of the subject belong to the physicist and which belong to the mathematician. However, it is possible for physicists to understand and use many techniques which have a group theoretical basis without necessarily understanding all of group theory. This book is designed to familiarize physicists with those techniques. Specifically, the author aims to show how the well-known methods of angular momentum algebra can be extended to treat other Lie group

  11. The normal holonomy group

    Olmos, C.

    1990-05-01

    The restricted holonomy group of a Riemannian manifold is a compact Lie group and its representation on the tangent space is a product of irreducible representations and a trivial one. Each one of the non-trivial factors is either an orthogonal representation of a connected compact Lie group which acts transitively on the unit sphere or it is the isotropy representation of a single Riemannian symmetric space of rank ≥ 2. We prove that, all these properties are also true for the representation on the normal space of the restricted normal holonomy group of any submanifold of a space of constant curvature. 4 refs

  12. NPP A-1 decommissioning - Phase I

    Krstenik, A.; Blazek, J.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power plant A-1 with output 150 MW e , with metallic natural uranium fuelled, CO 2 cooled and heavy water moderated reactor had been prematurely finally shut down in 1977. It is necessary to mention that neither operator nor regulatory and other authorities have been prepared for the solution of such situation. During next two consecutive years after shutdown main effort of operator focused on technical and administrative activities which are described in the previous paper together with approach, condition and constraints for NPP A-1 decommissioning as well as the work and research carried out up to the development and approval of the Project for NPP A-1 decommissioning - I. phase. Subject of this paper is description of: (1) An approach to NPP A -1 decommissioning; (2) An approach to development of the project for NPP A-1 decommissioning; (3) Project - tasks, scope, objectives; (4) Mode of the Project realisation; (5) Progress achieved up to the 1999 year. (authors)

  13. Trajectory grouping structure

    Maike Buchin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The collective motion of a set of moving entities like people, birds, or other animals, is characterized by groups arising, merging, splitting, and ending. Given the trajectories of these entities, we define and model a structure that captures all of such changes using the Reeb graph, a concept from topology. The trajectory grouping structure has three natural parameters that allow more global views of the data in group size, group duration, and entity inter-distance. We prove complexity bounds on the maximum number of maximal groups that can be present, and give algorithms to compute the grouping structure efficiently. We also study how the trajectory grouping structure can be made robust, that is, how brief interruptions of groups can be disregarded in the global structure, adding a notion of persistence to the structure. Furthermore, we showcase the results of experiments using data generated by the NetLogo flocking model and from the Starkey project. The Starkey data describe the movement of elk, deer, and cattle. Although there is no ground truth for the grouping structure in this data, the experiments show that the trajectory grouping structure is plausible and has the desired effects when changing the essential parameters. Our research provides the first complete study of trajectory group evolvement, including combinatorial,algorithmic, and experimental results.

  14. Computational methods working group

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1997-09-01

    During the Cold Moderator Workshop several working groups were established including one to discuss calculational methods. The charge for this working group was to identify problems in theory, data, program execution, etc., and to suggest solutions considering both deterministic and stochastic methods including acceleration procedures.

  15. GroupFinder

    Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden; Skovsgaard, Anders; Jensen, Christian S.

    2013-01-01

    . Such groups are relevant to users who wish to conveniently explore several options before making a decision such as to purchase a specific product. Specifically, we demonstrate a practical proposal for finding top-k PoI groups in response to a query. We show how problem parameter settings can be mapped...

  16. Toleration, Groups, and Multiculturalism

    Lægaard, Sune

    2014-01-01

    have the ability to interfere with the group’s activities, an object of dislike or disapproval, an agent enjoying non-interference or a moral patient. This means that 'toleration of groups' can mean quite different things depending on the exact meaning of 'group' in relation to each component...

  17. Group B Strep Infection

    ... IV) to kill the germs. If you take antibiotics while you’re in labor, the chances are very good that your baby won’t get this infection. What if my baby has group B strep? If your baby gets group B strep, he or she will be treated with IV antibiotics to kill the bacteria. Your baby will stay ...

  18. Group Process as Drama.

    McLeod, John

    1984-01-01

    Suggests that drama, as well as training or therapy, may be employed as a useful research and practice paradigm in working with small groups. The implications of this view for group development as a whole, and for member and leader participation, are explored. (JAC)

  19. Group Work. Research Brief

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    According to Johnson and Johnson, group work helps increase student retention and satisfaction, develops strong oral communication and social skills, as well as higher self-esteem (University of Minnesota, n.d.). Group work, when planned and implemented deliberately and thoughtfully helps students develop cognitive and leadership skills as well as…

  20. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  1. Introduction to quantum groups

    Sudbery, A.

    1996-01-01

    These pedagogical lectures contain some motivation for the study of quantum groups; a definition of ''quasi triangular Hopf algebra'' with explanations of all the concepts required to build it up; descriptions of quantised universal enveloping algebras and the quantum double; and an account of quantised function algebras and the action of quantum groups on quantum spaces. (author)

  2. Beam dynamics group summary

    Peggs, S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities of the beam dynamics working group of the LHC Collective Effects Workshop that was held in Montreux in 1994. It reviews the presentations that were made to the group, the discussions that ensued, and the consensuses that evolved

  3. Our Deming Users' Group.

    Dinklocker, Christina

    1992-01-01

    After training in the Total Quality Management concept, a suburban Ohio school district created a Deming Users' Group to link agencies, individuals, and ideas. The group has facilitated ongoing school/business collaboration, networking among individuals from diverse school systems, mentoring and cooperative learning activities, and resource…

  4. Asymmetry within social groups

    Barker, Jessie; Loope, Kevin J.; Reeve, H. Kern

    2016-01-01

    Social animals vary in their ability to compete with group members over shared resources and also vary in their cooperative efforts to produce these resources. Competition among groups can promote within-group cooperation, but many existing models of intergroup cooperation do not explicitly account...... of two roles, with relative competitive efficiency and the number of individuals varying between roles. Players in each role make simultaneous, coevolving decisions. The model predicts that although intergroup competition increases cooperative contributions to group resources by both roles, contributions...... are predominantly from individuals in the less competitively efficient role, whereas individuals in the more competitively efficient role generally gain the larger share of these resources. When asymmetry in relative competitive efficiency is greater, a group's per capita cooperation (averaged across both roles...

  5. Supervision and group dynamics

    Hansen, Søren; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2004-01-01

     An important aspect of the problem based and project organized study at Aalborg University is the supervision of the project groups. At the basic education (first year) it is stated in the curriculum that part of the supervisors' job is to deal with group dynamics. This is due to the experience...... that many students are having difficulties with practical issues such as collaboration, communication, and project management. Most supervisors either ignore this demand, because they do not find it important or they find it frustrating, because they do not know, how to supervise group dynamics...... as well as at Aalborg University. The first visible result has been participating supervisors telling us that the course has inspired them to try supervising group dynamics in the future. This paper will explore some aspects of supervising group dynamics as well as, how to develop the Aalborg model...

  6. Summary of group discussions

    2009-01-01

    A key aspect of the workshop was the interaction and exchange of ideas and information among the 40 participants. To facilitate this activity the workshop participants were divided into five discussions groups. These groups reviewed selected subjects and reported back to the main body with summaries of their considerations. Over the 3 days the 5 discussion groups were requested to focus on the following subjects: the characteristics and capabilities of 'good' organisations; how to ensure sufficient resources; how to ensure competence within the organisation; how to demonstrate organisational suitability; the regulatory oversight processes - including their strengths and weaknesses. A list of the related questions that were provided to the discussion groups can be found in Appendix 3. Also included in Appendix 3 are copies of the slides the groups prepared that summarised their considerations

  7. Natural analogue working group

    Come, B.; Chapman, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Natural Analogue Working Group was established by the Commission of the European Communities in 1985. The purpose of this group is to bring together modellers with earth scientists and others, so that maximum benefit can be obtained from natural analogue studies with a view to safe geological disposal of radioactive waste. The first meeting of this group was held in Brussels from November 5 to 7, 1985. The discussions mainly concerned the identification of the modellers' needs and of the earth scientists' capacity to provide for them. Following the debates, a written statement was produced by the Group; this document forms the core of the present Report. Notes and outlines of many of the presentations made are grouped in four appendixes. The valuable contribution of all those involved in the meeting is gratefully acknowledged

  8. Ordered groups and topology

    Clay, Adam

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with the connections between topology and ordered groups. It begins with a self-contained introduction to orderable groups and from there explores the interactions between orderability and objects in low-dimensional topology, such as knot theory, braid groups, and 3-manifolds, as well as groups of homeomorphisms and other topological structures. The book also addresses recent applications of orderability in the studies of codimension-one foliations and Heegaard-Floer homology. The use of topological methods in proving algebraic results is another feature of the book. The book was written to serve both as a textbook for graduate students, containing many exercises, and as a reference for researchers in topology, algebra, and dynamical systems. A basic background in group theory and topology is the only prerequisite for the reader.

  9. Group prenatal care.

    Mazzoni, Sara E; Carter, Ebony B

    2017-06-01

    Patients participating in group prenatal care gather together with women of similar gestational ages and 2 providers who cofacilitate an educational session after a brief medical assessment. The model was first described in the 1990s by a midwife for low-risk patients and is now practiced by midwives and physicians for both low-risk patients and some high-risk patients, such as those with diabetes. The majority of literature on group prenatal care uses CenteringPregnancy, the most popular model. The first randomized controlled trial of CenteringPregnancy showed that it reduced the risk of preterm birth in low-risk women. However, recent meta-analyses have shown similar rates of preterm birth, low birthweight, and neonatal intensive care unit admission between women participating in group prenatal care and individual prenatal care. There may be subgroups, such as African Americans, who benefit from this type of prenatal care with significantly lower rates of preterm birth. Group prenatal care seems to result in increased patient satisfaction and knowledge and use of postpartum family planning as well as improved weight gain parameters. The literature is inconclusive regarding breast-feeding, stress, depression, and positive health behaviors, although it is theorized that group prenatal care positively affects these outcomes. It is unclear whether group prenatal care results in cost savings, although it may in large-volume practices if each group consists of approximately 8-10 women. Group prenatal care requires a significant paradigm shift. It can be difficult to implement and sustain. More randomized trials are needed to ascertain the true benefits of the model, best practices for implementation, and subgroups who may benefit most from this innovative way to provide prenatal care. In short, group prenatal care is an innovative and promising model with comparable pregnancy outcomes to individual prenatal care in the general population and improved outcomes in some

  10. Critical groups - basic concepts

    Carter, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    The potential exposure pathways from the land application site to man are presented. It is emphasised that the critical group is not necessary the population group closest to the source. It could be the group impact by the most significant pathways(s). Only by assessing the importance of each of these pathways and then combining them can a proper choice of critical group be made. It would be wrong to select a critical group on the basis that it seems the most probable one, before the pathways have been properly assessed. A calculation in Carter (1983) suggested that for the operating mine site, the annual doses to an Aboriginal person, a service worker and a local housewife, were all about the same and were in the range 0.1 to 0.2 mSv per year. Thus it may be that for the land application area, the critical group turns out to be non-Aboriginal rather than the expected Aboriginal group. 6 refs., 3 figs

  11. 32 CFR 352a.1 - Purpose.

    2010-07-01

    ... DEFENSE FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING SERVICE (DFAS) § 352a.1 Purpose. Pursuant to the authority vested in the... Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) as an Agency of the Department of Defense with responsibilities...

  12. Current Status of HbA1c Biosensors

    Lin, Hua; Yi, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is formed via non-enzymatic glycosylation reactions at the α–amino group of βVal1 residues in the tetrameric Hb, and it can reflect the ambient glycemic level over the past two to three months. A variety of HbA1c detection methods, including chromatography, immunoassay, enzymatic measurement, electrochemical sensor and capillary electrophoresis have been developed and used in research laboratories and in clinics as well. In this review, we summarize the current status of HbA1c biosensors based on the recognition of the sugar moiety on the protein and also their applications in the whole blood sample measurements. PMID:28777351

  13. Groups - Modular Mathematics Series

    Jordan, David

    1994-01-01

    This text provides an introduction to group theory with an emphasis on clear examples. The authors present groups as naturally occurring structures arising from symmetry in geometrical figures and other mathematical objects. Written in a 'user-friendly' style, where new ideas are always motivated before being fully introduced, the text will help readers to gain confidence and skill in handling group theory notation before progressing on to applying it in complex situations. An ideal companion to any first or second year course on the topic.

  14. Introduction to quantum groups

    Chaichian, Masud

    1996-01-01

    In the past decade there has been an extemely rapid growth in the interest and development of quantum group theory.This book provides students and researchers with a practical introduction to the principal ideas of quantum groups theory and its applications to quantum mechanical and modern field theory problems. It begins with a review of, and introduction to, the mathematical aspects of quantum deformation of classical groups, Lie algebras and related objects (algebras of functions on spaces, differential and integral calculi). In the subsequent chapters the richness of mathematical structure

  15. Group key management

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  16. Group therapy for adolescents

    Nada Hribar

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The group included adolescents from secondary school and some students. The group had weekly sessions or twice on mounth. The adolescents had varied simptoms: depressive, anxiety, psychosomatic disorders, learning difficulties, cunduct problems. All of adolescents were common on many problems in social interactions. The goal of therapeutic work were: to increase assertiveness skills and to reduce the anxious in social situations. The adolescents in group raised a self-esteem and developed some assertiveness skills: eye contact" and effective communication skills, persistence, refusing and requesting, giving and receiving critism, etc. The methods of work and techniques were based on principles of cognitive-behaviour therapy.

  17. Matrix groups for undergraduates

    Tapp, Kristopher

    2005-01-01

    Matrix groups touch an enormous spectrum of the mathematical arena. This textbook brings them into the undergraduate curriculum. It makes an excellent one-semester course for students familiar with linear and abstract algebra and prepares them for a graduate course on Lie groups. Matrix Groups for Undergraduates is concrete and example-driven, with geometric motivation and rigorous proofs. The story begins and ends with the rotations of a globe. In between, the author combines rigor and intuition to describe basic objects of Lie theory: Lie algebras, matrix exponentiation, Lie brackets, and maximal tori.

  18. Gambaran Populasi Golongan Darah Subgroup A (A1, A2 di PMI Kulon Progo

    Hieronymus Rayi Prasetya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Subgroup A1 and A2 are the most important in the blood group A. Subgroup A1 has the A antigen more than A2 subgroup, the A2 subgroup can cause misidentification of blood group due to poor A antigen and genetic variation possessed. Misidentification of the blood group will increase the risk of transfusion reactions. This research aims to describe the A1 and A2 subgroup population in Kulon Progo district. This study was conducted with a cross sectional sampling technique. The sample in this study were taken from donors of blood group A in Kulon Progo Red Cross. Identification of A1 and A2 subgroup is done by using lectin (Dolichos biflorus extract. The result of the examination of 53 samples showed that 96,2% was A1 subgroup and 3,8% was A2 subgroup. Key words : Subgroup A1, Subgroup A2, Population, Kulon Progo

  19. Passive smoking, Cyp1A1 gene polymorphism and dysmenorrhea

    Liu, Hong; Yang, Fan; Li, Zhiping; Chen, Changzhong; Fang, Zhian; Wang, Lihua; Hu, Yonghua; Chen, Dafang

    2007-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether the association between passive smoking exposure and dysmenorrhea is modified by two susceptibility genes, CYP1A1MspI and CYP1A1HincII. Methods This report includes 1645 (1124 no dysmenorrhea, 521 dysmenorrhea) nonsmoking and nondrinking newly wed female workers at Anqing, China between June 1997 and June 2000. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations of passive smoking exposure and genetic susceptibility with dysmenorrhea, adjusting for perceived stress. Results When stratified by women genotype, the adjusted OR of dysmenorrhea was 1.6 (95%CI=1.3-2.1) for passive smoking group with Ile/Ile462 genotype, and 1.5 (95%CI=1.1-2.1) with C/C6235 genotype, compared to non passive smoking group, respectively. The data further showed that there was a significant combined effect between passive smoking and the CYP1A1 Msp1 C/C6235 and HincII Ile/Ile462 genotype (OR=2.6, 95%CI=1.3-5.2). Conclusion CYP1A1 MspI and HincII genotypes modified the association between passive smoking and dysmenorrhea. PMID:17566695

  20. UnitedHealth Group

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  1. Homogeneous group, research, institution

    Francesca Natascia Vasta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The work outlines the complex connection among empiric research, therapeutic programs and host institution. It is considered the current research state in Italy. Italian research field is analyzed and critic data are outlined: lack of results regarding both the therapeutic processes and the effectiveness of eating disorders group analytic treatment. The work investigates on an eating disorders homogeneous group, led into an eating disorder outpatient service. First we present the methodological steps the research is based on including the strong connection among theory and clinical tools. Secondly clinical tools are described and the results commented. Finally, our results suggest the necessity of validating some more specifical hypothesis: verifying the relationship between clinical improvement (sense of exclusion and painful emotions reduction and specific group therapeutic processes; verifying the relationship between depressive feelings, relapses and transition trough a more differentiated groupal field.Keywords: Homogeneous group; Eating disorders; Institutional field; Therapeutic outcome

  2. Color transparency study group

    Appel, J.A.; Pordes, S.; Botts, J.; Bunce, G.; Farrar, G.

    1990-01-01

    The group studied the relatively new notion of color transparency, discussed present experimental evidence for the effect, and explored several ideas for future experiments. This write-up summarizes these discussions. 11 refs., 1 fig

  3. Generalized quantum groups

    Leivo, H.P.

    1992-01-01

    The algebraic approach to quantum groups is generalized to include what may be called an anyonic symmetry, reflecting the appearance of phases more general than ±1 under transposition. (author). 6 refs

  4. Groups – Additive Notation

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We translate the articles covering group theory already available in the Mizar Mathematical Library from multiplicative into additive notation. We adapt the works of Wojciech A. Trybulec [41, 42, 43] and Artur Korniłowicz [25].

  5. Groups – Additive Notation

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-01-01

    We translate the articles covering group theory already available in the Mizar Mathematical Library from multiplicative into additive notation. We adapt the works of Wojciech A. Trybulec [41, 42, 43] and Artur Korniłowicz [25].

  6. Creativity and group innovation

    Nijstad, B.A.; de Dreu, C.K.W.

    2002-01-01

    Comments on M. West's article regarding the validity of an integrative model of creativity and innovation implementation in work groups. Variables affecting the level of team innovation; Relationship between predictors and team innovation; Promotion of constructive conflict.

  7. Truck shovel users group

    Thomas, J. [Surface Mining Association for Research and Technology, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The Truck Shovel Users Group (TSUG) was developed as part of the Surface Mining Association for Research and Technology (SMART), an association of companies that meet to coordinate technology developments for the mining industry. The TSUG meet regularly to discuss equipment upgrades, maintenance planning systems, and repair techniques. The group strives to maximize the value of its assets through increased safety, equipment performance and productivity. This presentation provided administrative details about the TSUG including contact details and admission costs. It was concluded that members of the group must be employed by companies that use heavy mining equipment, and must also be willing to host meetings, make presentations, and support the common goals of the group. tabs., figs.

  8. The theory of groups

    Hall, Marshall

    2018-01-01

    This 1959 text offers an unsurpassed resource for learning and reviewing the basics of a fundamental and ever-expanding area. "This remarkable book undoubtedly will become a standard text on group theory." - American Scientist.

  9. Radiation Protection Group

    2006-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Section of the Radiation Protection Group wishes to inform you that the Radioactive Waste Treatment Centre will be closed on the afternoon of Tuesday 19 December 2006. Thank-you for your understanding.

  10. The Military Cooperation Group

    Renzi, Jr, Alfred E

    2006-01-01

    .... This thesis will describe a structure to assist with both those needs. The premise is that an expanded and improved network of US Military Groups is the weapon of choice for the war on terror, and beyond...

  11. Introduction to group theory

    Canals B.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This chapter is a concise mathematical introduction into the algebra of groups. It is build up in the way that definitions are followed by propositions and proofs. The concepts and the terminology introduced here will serve as a basis for the following chapters that deal with group theory in the stricter sense and its application to problems in physics. The mathematical prerequisites are at the bachelor level.1

  12. Groups, rings, modules

    Auslander, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This classic monograph is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The treatment presupposes some familiarity with sets, groups, rings, and vector spaces. The four-part approach begins with examinations of sets and maps, monoids and groups, categories, and rings. The second part explores unique factorization domains, general module theory, semisimple rings and modules, and Artinian rings. Part three's topics include localization and tensor products, principal ideal domains, and applications of fundamental theorem. The fourth and final part covers algebraic field extensions

  13. Focus Group Guide

    2017-07-01

    home for the arrival of school- aged children. TIP: Do not conduct focus groups in a command conference room in the command group area. Doing so...organizational effectiveness and equal opportunity/equal employment opportunity/fair treatment and sexual assault and response factors (which are listed on the... Sexual Harassment (C) Sex Harassment Retaliation (D) Discrimination - Sex (E) Discrimination - Race (F) Discrimination - Disability (G

  14. Choice Shifts in Groups

    Kfir Eliaz; Debraj Ray

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of "choice shifts" in group decision-making is fairly ubiquitous in the social psychology literature. Faced with a choice between a ``safe" and ``risky" decision, group members appear to move to one extreme or the other, relative to the choices each member might have made on her own. Both risky and cautious shifts have been identified in different situations. This paper demonstrates that from an individual decision-making perspective, choice shifts may be viewed as a systematic...

  15. Group Capability Model

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  16. Parton Distributions Working Group

    Barbaro, L. de; Keller, S. A.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schellman, H.; Tung, W.-K.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Parton Distributions Working Group of the QCD and Weak Boson Physics workshop held in preparation for Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. The main focus of this working group was to investigate the different issues associated with the development of quantitative tools to estimate parton distribution functions uncertainties. In the conclusion, the authors introduce a Manifesto that describes an optimal method for reporting data

  17. Renormalization Group Theory

    Stephens, C. R.

    2006-01-01

    In this article I give a brief account of the development of research in the Renormalization Group in Mexico, paying particular attention to novel conceptual and technical developments associated with the tool itself, rather than applications of standard Renormalization Group techniques. Some highlights include the development of new methods for understanding and analysing two extreme regimes of great interest in quantum field theory -- the ''high temperature'' regime and the Regge regime

  18. Independents' group posts loss

    Sanders, V.; Price, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    Low oil gas prices and special charges caused the group of 50 U.S. independent producers Oil and Gas Journal tracks to post a combined loss in first half 1992. The group logged a net loss of $53 million in the first half compared with net earnings of $354 million in first half 1991, when higher oil prices during the Persian Gulf crisis buoyed earnings in spite of crude oil and natural gas production declines. The combined loss in the first half follows a 45% drop in the group's earnings in 1991 and compares with the OGJ group of integrated oil companies whose first half 1992 income fell 47% from the prior year. Special charges, generally related to asset writedowns, accounted for most of the almost $560 million in losses posted by about the third of the group. Nerco Oil and Gas Inc., Vancouver, Wash., alone accounted for almost half that total with charges related to an asset writedown of $238 million in the first quarter. Despite the poor first half performance, the outlook is bright for sharply improved group earnings in the second half, assuming reasonably healthy oil and gas prices and increased production resulting from acquisitions and in response to those prices

  19. Assessment of Group Preferences and Group Uncertainty for Decision Making

    1976-06-01

    the individ- uals. decision making , group judgments should be preferred to individual judgments if obtaining group judgments costs more. -26- -YI IV... decision making group . IV. A. 3. Aggregation using conjugate distribution. Arvther procedure for combining indivi(jai probability judgments into a group...statisticized group group decision making group judgment subjective probability Delphi method expected utility nominal group 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on

  20. Cyclic Soft Groups and Their Applications on Groups

    Hacı Aktaş

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In crisp environment the notions of order of group and cyclic group are well known due to many applications. In this paper, we introduce order of the soft groups, power of the soft sets, power of the soft groups, and cyclic soft group on a group. We also investigate the relationship between cyclic soft groups and classical groups.

  1. Coordinating Group report

    1994-01-01

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup

  2. Linear algebraic groups

    Springer, T A

    1998-01-01

    "[The first] ten chapters...are an efficient, accessible, and self-contained introduction to affine algebraic groups over an algebraically closed field. The author includes exercises and the book is certainly usable by graduate students as a text or for self-study...the author [has a] student-friendly style… [The following] seven chapters... would also be a good introduction to rationality issues for algebraic groups. A number of results from the literature…appear for the first time in a text." –Mathematical Reviews (Review of the Second Edition) "This book is a completely new version of the first edition. The aim of the old book was to present the theory of linear algebraic groups over an algebraically closed field. Reading that book, many people entered the research field of linear algebraic groups. The present book has a wider scope. Its aim is to treat the theory of linear algebraic groups over arbitrary fields. Again, the author keeps the treatment of prerequisites self-contained. The material of t...

  3. Summary report: injection group

    Simpson, J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brown, B.

    1984-01-01

    The injector group attempted to define and address several problem areas related to the SSC injector as defined in the Reference Design Study (RDS). It also considered the topic of machine utilization, particularly the question of test beam requirements. Details of the work are given in individually contributed papers, but the general concerns and consensus of the group are presented within this note. The group recognized that the injector as outlined in the RDS was developed primarily for costing estimates. As such, it was not necessarily well optimized from the standpoint of insuring the required beam properties for the SSC. On the other hand, considering the extraordinary short time in which the RDS was prepared, it is an impressive document and a good basis from which to work. Because the documented SSC performance goals are ambitious, the group sought an injector solution which would more likely guarantee that SSC performance not be limited by its injectors. As will be seen, this leads to a somewhat different solution than that described in the RDS. Furthermore, it is the consensus of the group that the new, conservative approach represents only a modest cost increase of the overall project well worth the confidence gained and the risks avoided

  4. Matrix groups for undergraduates

    Tapp, Kristopher

    2016-01-01

    Matrix groups touch an enormous spectrum of the mathematical arena. This textbook brings them into the undergraduate curriculum. It makes an excellent one-semester course for students familiar with linear and abstract algebra and prepares them for a graduate course on Lie groups. Matrix Groups for Undergraduates is concrete and example-driven, with geometric motivation and rigorous proofs. The story begins and ends with the rotations of a globe. In between, the author combines rigor and intuition to describe the basic objects of Lie theory: Lie algebras, matrix exponentiation, Lie brackets, maximal tori, homogeneous spaces, and roots. This second edition includes two new chapters that allow for an easier transition to the general theory of Lie groups. From reviews of the First Edition: This book could be used as an excellent textbook for a one semester course at university and it will prepare students for a graduate course on Lie groups, Lie algebras, etc. … The book combines an intuitive style of writing w...

  5. Frailty Across Age Groups.

    Pérez-Zepeda, M U; Ávila-Funes, J A; Gutiérrez-Robledo, L M; García-Peña, C

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of an aging biomarker into clinical practice is under debate. The Frailty Index is a model of deficit accumulation and has shown to accurately capture frailty in older adults, thus bridging biological with clinical practice. To describe the association of socio-demographic characteristics and the Frailty Index in different age groups (from 20 to over one hundred years) in a representative sample of Mexican subjects. Cross-sectional analysis. Nationwide and population-representative survey. Adults 20-years and older interviewed during the last Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey (2012). A 30-item Frailty Index following standard construction was developed. Multi-level regression models were performed to test the associations of the Frailty Index with multiple socio-demographic characteristics across age groups. A total of 29,504 subjects was analyzed. The 30-item Frailty Index showed the highest scores in the older age groups, especially in women. No sociodemographic variable was associated with the Frailty Index in all the studied age groups. However, employment, economic income, and smoking status were more consistently found across age groups. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the Frailty Index in a representative large sample of a Latin American country. Increasing age and gender were closely associated with a higher score.

  6. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  7. Focus group discussions

    Hennink, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    The Understanding Research series focuses on the process of writing up social research. The series is broken down into three categories: Understanding Statistics, Understanding Measurement, and Understanding Qualitative Research. The books provide researchers with guides to understanding, writing, and evaluating social research. Each volume demonstrates how research should be represented, including how to write up the methodology as well as the research findings. Each volume also reviews how to appropriately evaluate published research. Focus Group Discussions addresses the challenges associated with conducting and writing focus group research. It provides detailed guidance on the practical and theoretical considerations in conducting focus group discussions including: designing the discussion guide, recruiting participants, training a field team, moderating techniques and ethical considerations. Monique Hennink describes how a methodology section is read and evaluated by others, such as journal reviewers or ...

  8. Bell, group and tangle

    Solomon, A. I.

    2010-01-01

    The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

  9. A Quantum Groups Primer

    Majid, Shahn

    2002-05-01

    Here is a self-contained introduction to quantum groups as algebraic objects. Based on the author's lecture notes for the Part III pure mathematics course at Cambridge University, the book is suitable as a primary text for graduate courses in quantum groups or supplementary reading for modern courses in advanced algebra. The material assumes knowledge of basic and linear algebra. Some familiarity with semisimple Lie algebras would also be helpful. The volume is a primer for mathematicians but it will also be useful for mathematical physicists.

  10. 8 CFR 1274a.1 - Employer requirements.

    2010-01-01

    ... 1274a.1 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... proceedings. The procedures for hearings before an administrative law judge relating to civil penalties sought... administrative law judge and, to the extent relevant, to cases before an immigration judge or the Board of...

  11. Introduction to quantum groups

    Monteiro, Marco A.R.

    1994-01-01

    An elementary introduction to quantum groups is presented. The example of Universal Enveloping Algebra of deformed SU(2) is analysed in detail. It is also discussed systems made up of bosonic q-oscillators at finite temperature within the formalism of Thermo-Field Dynamics. (author). 39 refs

  12. Lectures on Lie groups

    Hsiang, Wu-Yi

    2017-01-01

    This volume consists of nine lectures on selected topics of Lie group theory. We provide the readers a concise introduction as well as a comprehensive 'tour of revisiting' the remarkable achievements of S Lie, W Killing, É Cartan and H Weyl on structural and classification theory of semi-simple Lie groups, Lie algebras and their representations; and also the wonderful duet of Cartans' theory on Lie groups and symmetric spaces.With the benefit of retrospective hindsight, mainly inspired by the outstanding contribution of H Weyl in the special case of compact connected Lie groups, we develop the above theory via a route quite different from the original methods engaged by most other books.We begin our revisiting with the compact theory which is much simpler than that of the general semi-simple Lie theory; mainly due to the well fittings between the Frobenius-Schur character theory and the maximal tori theorem of É Cartan together with Weyl's reduction (cf. Lectures 1-4). It is a wonderful reality of the Lie t...

  13. Gluten Intolerance Group

    ... Intolerance Group (GIG), the industry leader in the certification of gluten-free products and food services, announced today that a wide ... of gluten-free products. One of the top certification programs in the world, GFCO inspects products and manufacturing facilities for gluten, in an effort ...

  14. With the Radiobiology Group

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The Radiobiology Group carries out experiments to study the effect of radiation on living cells. The photo shows the apparatus for growing broad beans which have been irradiated by 250 GeV protons. The roots are immersed in a tank of running water (CERN Weekly Bulletin 26 January 1981 and Annual Report 1980 p. 160). Karen Panman, Marilena Streit-Bianchi, Roger Paris.

  15. Group control of elevators

    Umeda, Yasukazu; Hikita, Shiro; Tuji, Sintaro (Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1988-09-05

    Items to be evaluated in the group control of elevators, and a typical control system are described. A new system in which the fuzzy rule base is employed is introduced together with the configuration. The items to be evaluated are waiting time, riding time, accuracy of forecasting, energy saving, and ease of usage. The everage waiting time of less than 20 seconds with less than 3% waiting rate of more than 60 seconds is accepted as a satisfactory service condition. There are many conflicting matters in group-controlling, and the study for the controlling must deal with the optimization of multi-purpose problems. The standards for group-control evaluation differ according to building structures and the tastes of users, and an important problem is where to give emphasis of the evaluation. The TRAFFIC PATTERN LEARNING METHOD has been applied in the system for careful control to accommodate the traffic. No specific function is provided for the evaluation, but the call allocation is made by fuzzy rule-base. The configuration of a new group-control system is introduced. 7 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  16. Functional Group Analysis.

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  17. Moral motivation within groups

    Lee, Romy van der

    2013-01-01

    Morality is of particular importance to people: People want to be considered moral and want to belong to moral groups. Consequently, morality judgments have the potential to motivate individuals to behave in ways that are considered to be ‘good’. In the current dissertation, I examined the impact of

  18. Smoot Group Cosmology

    the Universe About Cosmology Planck Satellite Launched Cosmology Videos Professor George Smoot's group conducts research on the early universe (cosmology) using the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation (CMB science goals regarding cosmology. George Smoot named Director of Korean Cosmology Institute The GRB

  19. Groups and Symmetry

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 10. Groups and Symmetry: A Guide to Discovering Mathematics. Geetha Venkataraman. Book Review Volume 4 Issue 10 October 1999 pp 91-92. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Public interest group involvement

    Shelley, P.

    1986-01-01

    Including public interest groups in the siting process for nuclear waste disposal facilities is of great importance. Controversial sitings often result in litigation, but involving public interest groups early in the process will lessen the change of this. They act as surrogates for the general public and should be considered as members of the team. It is important to remember though, that all public interest groups are different. In choosing public panels such as public advisory committees, members should not be chosen on the basis of some quota. Opposition groups should not be excluded. Also, it is important to put the right person in charge of the committee. The goal of public involvement is to identify the conflicts. This must be done during the decision process, because conflicts must be known before they can be eliminated. Regarding litigation, it is important to ease through and around legal battles. If the siting process has integrity and a good faith effort has been shown, the court should uphold the effort. In addition, it is important to be negotiable and to eliminate shortcuts

  1. Leukosis/Sarcoma Group

    The leukosis/sarcoma (L/S) group of diseases designates a variety of transmissible benign and malignant neoplasms of chickens caused by members that belong to the family Retroviridae. Because the expansion of the literature on this disease, it is no longer feasible to cite all relevant publications ...

  2. Working Group Report: Neutrinos

    de Gouvea, A.; Pitts, K.; Scholberg, K.; Zeller, G. P. [et al.

    2013-10-16

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos.

  3. Group: radiation dosimetry

    Caldas, L.V.E.

    1990-01-01

    The main activities of the radiation dosimetry group is described, including the calibration of instruments, sources and radioactive solutions and the determination of neutron flux; development, production and market dosimetric materials; development radiation sensor make the control of radiation dose received by IPEN workers; development new techniques for monitoring, etc. (C.G.C.)

  4. Categorization by Groups

    R.W. Hamilton (Rebecca); S. Puntoni (Stefano); N.T. Tavassoli (Nader)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractCategorization is a core psychological process central to consumer and managerial decision-making. While a substantial amount of research has been conducted to examine individual categorization behaviors, relatively little is known about the group categorization process. In two

  5. Gamma gamma technology group

    The purpose of the meeting was to form a group of people who ... able by looking at the energy deposited at the face of the final dipole, 4.5 m from ... A F Zarnecki has made a good start on background studies, V Telnov has proposed.

  6. Group theory in physics

    Cornwell, J F

    1989-01-01

    Recent devopments, particularly in high-energy physics, have projected group theory and symmetry consideration into a central position in theoretical physics. These developments have taken physicists increasingly deeper into the fascinating world of pure mathematics. This work presents important mathematical developments of the last fifteen years in a form that is easy to comprehend and appreciate.

  7. Anaphylaxis vulnerable groups

    Ehab

    Age groups vulnerable to serious attacks of anaphylaxis include infants, teenagers, pregnant women, and the elderly. Concomitant diseases, such as severe or uncontrolled asthma, cardiovascular disease, mastocytosis or clonal mast cell disorders and the concurrent use of some medications such as beta adrenergic ...

  8. Special Interest Groups.

    Degi, Bruce J.

    1999-01-01

    Offers a reflection on the shootings at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, on April 20, 1999. Notes how every special-interest group has used the tragedy to support its own point of view, and concludes that teachers have become bystanders in the education of America's children. (SR)

  9. Ignalina Safety Analysis Group

    Ushpuras, E.

    1995-01-01

    The article describes the fields of activities of Ignalina NPP Safety Analysis Group (ISAG) in the Lithuanian Energy Institute and overview the main achievements gained since the group establishment in 1992. The group is working under the following guidelines: in-depth analysis of the fundamental physical processes of RBMK-1500 reactors; collection, systematization and verification of the design and operational data; simulation and analysis of potential accident consequences; analysis of thermohydraulic and neutronic characteristics of the plant; provision of technical and scientific consultations to VATESI, Governmental authorities, and also international institutions, participating in various projects aiming at Ignalina NPP safety enhancement. The ISAG is performing broad scientific co-operation programs with both Eastern and Western scientific groups, supplying engineering assistance for Ignalina NPP. ISAG is also participating in the joint Lithuanian - Swedish - Russian project - Barselina, the first Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) study of Ignalina NPP. The work is underway together with Maryland University (USA) for assessment of the accident confinement system for a range of breaks in the primary circuit. At present the ISAG personnel is also involved in the project under the grant from the Nuclear Safety Account, administered by the European Bank for reconstruction and development for the preparation and review of an in-depth safety assessment of the Ignalina plant

  10. Gartner Group reports

    Gartner Group. Stamford, CT

    Gartner Group is the one of the leading independent providers of research and analysis material for IT professionals. Their reports provide in-depth analysis of dominant trends, companies and products. CERN has obtained a licence making these reports available online to anyone within CERN. The database contains not only current reports, updated monthly, but also some going back over a year.

  11. Lattices in group manifolds

    Lisboa, P.; Michael, C.

    1982-01-01

    We address the question of designing optimum discrete sets of points to represent numerically a continuous group manifold. We consider subsets which are extensions of the regular discrete subgroups. Applications to Monte Carlo simulation of SU(2) and SU(3) gauge theory are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Teaching Badminton to Groups.

    Nelson, Jonathan E.

    1980-01-01

    Numerous ideas for teaching badminton to large groups are presented. The focus is on drills and techniques for off the court instructional stations. Instead of having students waiting their turn to play, more students can participate actively as they rotate from one station to another. (JN)

  13. Group leaders optimization algorithm

    Daskin, Anmer; Kais, Sabre

    2011-03-01

    We present a new global optimization algorithm in which the influence of the leaders in social groups is used as an inspiration for the evolutionary technique which is designed into a group architecture. To demonstrate the efficiency of the method, a standard suite of single and multi-dimensional optimization functions along with the energies and the geometric structures of Lennard-Jones clusters are given as well as the application of the algorithm on quantum circuit design problems. We show that as an improvement over previous methods, the algorithm scales as N 2.5 for the Lennard-Jones clusters of N-particles. In addition, an efficient circuit design is shown for a two-qubit Grover search algorithm which is a quantum algorithm providing quadratic speedup over the classical counterpart.

  14. Communication from ST Group

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    Please note that owing the preparations for the Open Days, the FM Group will not able to handle specific requests for waste collection from 2nd to 6th of April, nor removal or PC transport requests between the 31 March and 11 April. We kindly ask you to plan the collection of all types of waste and any urgent transport of office furniture or PCs before 31 March. Waste collection requests must be made by contacting FM Support on 77777 or at the e-mail address mailto:Fm.Support@cern.ch; removal of office furniture or PC transport requests must be made using the EDH ‘Transport request’ form (select "Removals" or "PC transport" from the drop-down menu). For any question concerning the sorting of waste, please consult the following web site: http://dechets-waste.web.cern.ch/dechets-waste/ Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. TS/FM Group

  15. Mindfulness for group facilitation

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Krohn, Simon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that mindfulness techniques can be used for enhancing the outcome of group performance. The word mindfulness has different connotations in the academic literature. Broadly speaking there is ‘mindfulness without meditation’ or ‘Western’ mindfulness which involves active...... thinking and ‘Eastern’ mindfulness which refers to an open, accepting state of mind, as intended with Buddhist-inspired techniques such as meditation. In this paper, we are interested in the latter type of mindfulness and demonstrate how Eastern mindfulness techniques can be used as a tool for facilitation....... A brief introduction to the physiology and philosophy of Eastern mindfulness constitutes the basis for the arguments of the effect of mindfulness techniques. The use of mindfulness techniques for group facilitation is novel as it changes the focus from individuals’ mindfulness practice...

  16. Group and representation theory

    Vergados, J D

    2017-01-01

    This volume goes beyond the understanding of symmetries and exploits them in the study of the behavior of both classical and quantum physical systems. Thus it is important to study the symmetries described by continuous (Lie) groups of transformations. We then discuss how we get operators that form a Lie algebra. Of particular interest to physics is the representation of the elements of the algebra and the group in terms of matrices and, in particular, the irreducible representations. These representations can be identified with physical observables. This leads to the study of the classical Lie algebras, associated with unitary, unimodular, orthogonal and symplectic transformations. We also discuss some special algebras in some detail. The discussion proceeds along the lines of the Cartan-Weyl theory via the root vectors and root diagrams and, in particular, the Dynkin representation of the roots. Thus the representations are expressed in terms of weights, which are generated by the application of the elemen...

  17. Working group 4: Terrestrial

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    A working group at a Canada/USA symposium on climate change and the Arctic identified major concerns and issues related to terrestrial resources. The group examined the need for, and the means of, involving resource managers and users at local and territorial levels in the process of identifying and examining the impacts and consequences of climatic change. Climatic change will be important to the Arctic because of the magnitude of the change projected for northern latitudes; the apparent sensitivity of its terrestrial ecosystems, natural resources, and human support systems; and the dependence of the social, cultural, and economic welfare of Arctic communities, businesses, and industries on the health and quality of their environment. Impacts of climatic change on the physical, biological, and associated socio-economic environment are outlined. Gaps in knowledge needed to quantify these impacts are listed along with their relationships with resource management. Finally, potential actions for response and adaptation are presented

  18. Duality and quantum groups

    Alvarez-Gaume, L.; Gomez, C.; Sierra, G.

    1990-01-01

    We show that the duality properties of Rational Conformal Field Theories follow from the defining relations and the representation theory of quantum groups. The fusion and braiding matrices are q-analogues of the 6j-symbols and the modular transformation matrices are obtained from the properties of the co-multiplication. We study in detail the Wess-Zumino-Witten models and the rational gaussian models as examples, but carry out the arguments in general. We point out the connections with the Chern-Simons approach. We give general arguments of why the general solution to the polynomial equations of Moore and Seiberg describing the duality properties of Rational Conformal Field Theories defines a Quantum Group acting on the space of conformal blocks. A direct connection between Rational Theories and knot invariants is also presented along the lines of Jones' original work. (orig.)

  19. The Areva Group

    2004-08-01

    This document provides information on the Areva Group, a world nuclear industry leader, offering solutions for nuclear power generation, electricity transmission and distribution and interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets. It presents successively the front end division including the group business lines involved in producing nuclear fuel for electric power generation (uranium mining, concentration, conversion and enrichment and nuclear fuel fabrication); the reactors and services division which designs and builds PWR, BWR and research reactors; the back end division which encompasses the management of the fuel that has been used in nuclear power plants; the transmission and distribution division which provides products, systems and services to the medium and high voltage energy markets; the connectors division which designs and manufactures electrical, electronic and optical connectors, flexible micro circuitry and interconnection systems. Areva is implemented in Europe, north and south america, africa and asia-pacific. (A.L.B.)

  20. The Ombudperson Initiative Group

    Laura Stewart

    Following many discussions that took place at some of the ATLAS Women's Network lunch gatherings, a few ATLAS women joined forces with similarly concerned CERN staff women to form a small group last Fall to discuss the need for a CERN-wide Ombudsperson. This has since evolved into the Ombudsperson Initiative Group (OIG) currently composed of the following members: Barbro Asman, Stockholm University; Pierre Charrue, CERN AB; Anna Cook, CERN IT; Catherine Delamare, CERN and IT Ombudsperson; Paula Eerola, Lund University; Pauline Gagnon, Indiana University; Eugenia Hatziangeli, CERN AB; Doreen Klem, CERN IT; Bertrand Nicquevert, CERN TS and Laura Stewart, CERN AT. On June 12, members of the OIG met with representatives of Human Resources (HR) and the Equal Opportunity Advisory Panel (EOAP) to discuss the proposal drafted by the OIG. The meeting was very positive. Everybody agreed that the current procedures at CERN applicable in the event of conflict required a thorough review, and that a professionnally trai...

  1. Metrically universal abelian groups

    Doucha, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 369, č. 8 (2017), s. 5981-5998 ISSN 0002-9947 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Abelian group Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.426, year: 2016 http://www.ams.org/journals/tran/2017-369-08/S0002-9947-2017-07059-8/

  2. Storage ring group summary

    King, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    The Storage Ring Group set out to identify and pursue salient problems in accelerator physics for heavy ion fusion, divorced from any particular reference design concept. However, it became apparent that some basic parameter framework was required to correlate the different study topics. As the Workshop progressed, ring parameters were modified and updated. Consequently, the accompanying papers on individual topics will be found to refer to slightly varied parameters, according to the stage at which the different problems were tackled

  3. MAGIC user's group software

    Warren, G.; Ludeking, L.; McDonald, J.; Nguyen, K.; Goplen, B.

    1990-01-01

    The MAGIC User's Group has been established to facilitate the use of electromagnetic particle-in-cell software by universities, government agencies, and industrial firms. The software consists of a series of independent executables that are capable of inter-communication. MAGIC, SOS, μ SOS are used to perform electromagnetic simulations while POSTER is used to provide post-processing capabilities. Each is described in the paper. Use of the codes for Klystrode simulation is discussed

  4. Multibunch working group

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The goal of this working group was to foment discussions about the use and limitations of multi-bunch, representatives from most operating or in-project synchrotron radiation sources (ALS, SPEAR, BESSY-2, SPRING-8, ANKA, DELTA, PEP-2, DIAMOND, ESRF...) have presented their experience. The discussions have been led around 3 topics: 1) resistive wall instabilities and ion instabilities, 2) higher harmonic cavities, and 3) multibunch feedback systems.

  5. Group 4. Containment

    McCauley, V.S.; Keiser, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of the Containment Working Group which met at the Workshop on Radioactive, Hazardous, and/or Mixed Waste Sludge Management. The Containment Working Group (CWG) examined the problems associated with providing adequate containment of waste forms from both short- and long-term storage. By its nature, containment encompasses a wide variety of waste forms, storage conditions, container types, containment schemes, and handling activities. A containment system can be anything from a 55-gal drum to a 100-ft-long underground vault. Because of the diverse nature of containment systems, the CWG chose to focus its limited time on broad issues that are applicable to the design of any containment system, rather than attempting to address problems specific to a particular containment system or waste-form type. Four major issues were identified by the CWG. They relate to: (1) service conditions and required system performance; (2) ultimate disposition; (3) cost and schedule; and (4) acceptance criteria, including quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) concerns. All of the issues raised by the group are similar in that they all help to define containment system requirements

  6. Adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) play a critical role in osteoclast formation and function

    Kara, Firas M.; Chitu, Violeta; Sloane, Jennifer; Axelrod, Matthew; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Stanley, E. Richard; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine regulates a wide variety of physiological processes via interaction with one or more G-protein-coupled receptors (A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R). Because A1R occupancy promotes fusion of human monocytes to form giant cells in vitro, we determined whether A1R occupancy similarly promotes osteoclast function and formation. Bone marrow cells (BMCs) were harvested from C57Bl/6 female mice or A1R-knockout mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates and differentiated into osteoclasts in the presence of colony stimulating factor-1 and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand in the presence or absence of the A1R antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentyl xanthine (DPCPX). Osteoclast morphology was analyzed in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase or F-actin-stained samples, and bone resorption was evaluated by toluidine blue staining of dentin. BMCs from A1R-knockout mice form fewer osteoclasts than BMCs from WT mice, and the A1R antagonist DPCPX inhibits osteoclast formation (IC50=1 nM), with altered morphology and reduced ability to resorb bone. A1R blockade increased ubiquitination and degradation of TRAF6 in RAW264.7 cells induced to differentiate into osteoclasts. These studies suggest a critical role for adenosine in bone homeostasis via interaction with adenosine A1R and further suggest that A1R may be a novel pharmacologic target to prevent the bone loss associated with inflammatory diseases and menopause.—Kara, F. M., Chitu, V., Sloane, J., Axelrod, M., Fredholm, B. B., Stanley, R., Cronstein, B. N. Adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) play a critical role in osteoclast formation and function. PMID:20181934

  7. Adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) play a critical role in osteoclast formation and function

    Kara, Firas M.; Chitu, Violeta; Sloane, Jennifer; Axelrod, Matthew; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Stanley, E. Richard; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine regulates a wide variety of physiological processes via interaction with one or more G-protein-coupled receptors (A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R). Because A1R occupancy promotes fusion of human monocytes to form giant cells in vitro, we determined whether A1R occupancy similarly promotes osteoclast function and formation. Bone marrow cells (BMCs) were harvested from C57Bl/6 female mice or A1R-knockout mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates and differentiated into osteoclasts in the pre...

  8. Technology working group

    Tsujikura, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The workshop of 26-27 june 2000, on nuclear power Plant LIfe Management (PLIM), also included working groups in which major issues facing PLIM activities for nuclear power plants were identified and discussed. The first group was on Technology. Utilities should consider required provisions capacity by properly maintaining and preserving the existing power plants to the extent practicable and taking into account growing demand, limits of energy conservation, and difficulties in finding new power plant sites. Generally, the extension of the life of nuclear power plant (e.g. from 40 years to 60 years) is an attractive option for utilities, as the marginal cost of most existing nuclear power plants is lower than that of almost all other power sources. It is also an attractive option for environmental protection. Consequently, PLIM has become an important issue in the context of the regulatory reform of the electricity markets. Therefore, the three main objectives of the Technology working group are: 1) Documenting how the safety of nuclear power plants being operated for the long-term has been confirmed, and suggesting ways of sharing this information. 2) Addressing development of advanced maintenance technologies necessary over the plant lifetime, and clarifying their technical challenges. 3) Suggesting potential areas of research and development that might, be necessary. Some potential examples of such research include: - improving the effectiveness of maintenance methods to assure detection of incipient faults; - providing cost effective preventive maintenance programmes; - furnishing systematic, cost-effective refurbishment programmes framed to be consistent with efforts to extend the time between re-fuelling; - developing a methodology that moves routine maintenance on-line without compromising safety. (author)

  9. Notes on quantum groups

    Pressley, A.; Chari, V.; Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Bombay

    1990-01-01

    The authors presents an introduction to quantum groups defined as a deformation of the universal enveloping algebra of a Lie algebra. After the description of Hopf algebras with some examples the approach of Drinfel'd and Jimbo is described, where the quantization of a Lie algebra represents a Hopf algebra, defined over the algebra of formal power series in an indetermined h. The authors show that this approach arises from a r-matrix, which satisfies the classical Yang-Baxter equation. As example quantum sl 2 is considered. Furthermore the approaches of Manin and Woroniwicz and the R-matrix approach are described. (HSI)

  10. Unilever Group : equity valuation

    Pires, Susana Sofia Castelo

    2014-01-01

    The following dissertation has the purpose to value the Unilever Group, but more specifically Unilever N.V. being publicly traded in the Amsterdam Exchange Index. Unilever is seen as a global player and one of most successful and competitive fast-moving consumer goods companies. In order to valuate Unilever’s equity, a Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) approach is first carried out, since it is believed to be the most reliable methodology. The value estimated was €36.39, advising one to buy its s...

  11. Statistical Group Comparison

    Liao, Tim Futing

    2011-01-01

    An incomparably useful examination of statistical methods for comparisonThe nature of doing science, be it natural or social, inevitably calls for comparison. Statistical methods are at the heart of such comparison, for they not only help us gain understanding of the world around us but often define how our research is to be carried out. The need to compare between groups is best exemplified by experiments, which have clearly defined statistical methods. However, true experiments are not always possible. What complicates the matter more is a great deal of diversity in factors that are not inde

  12. Renormalization Group Functional Equations

    Curtright, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {\\sigma} functions, and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {\\beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {\\sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale, and zeroes of {\\beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow, but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

  13. Grouping Notes Through Nodes

    Dove, Graham; Abildgaard, Sille Julie Jøhnk; Biskjær, Michael Mose

    , both individually and when grouped, and their role in categorisation in semantic long-term memory. To do this, we adopt a multimodal analytical approach focusing on interaction between humans, and between humans and artefacts, alongside language. We discuss in detail examples of four different...... externalisation functions served by Post-ItTM notes, and show how these functions are present in complex overlapping combinations rather than being discrete. We then show how the temporal development of Post-ItTM note interactions supports categorisation qualities of semantic long-term memory....

  14. Grouping Notes Through Nodes

    Dove, Graham; Abildgaard, Sille Julie; Biskjær, Michael Mose

    2017-01-01

    , both individually and when grouped, and their role in categorisation in semantic long-term memory. To do this, we adopt a multimodal analytical approach focusing on interaction between humans, and between humans and artefacts, alongside language. We discuss in detail examples of four different...... externalisation functions served by Post-ItTM notes, and show how these functions are present in complex overlapping combinations rather than being discrete. We then show how the temporal development of Post-ItTM note interactions supports categorisation qualities of semantic long-term memory....

  15. Groups and symmetry

    Farmer, David W

    1995-01-01

    In most mathematics textbooks, the most exciting part of mathematics-the process of invention and discovery-is completely hidden from the reader. The aim of Groups and Symmetry is to change all that. By means of a series of carefully selected tasks, this book leads readers to discover some real mathematics. There are no formulas to memorize; no procedures to follow. The book is a guide: Its job is to start you in the right direction and to bring you back if you stray too far. Discovery is left to you. Suitable for a one-semester course at the beginning undergraduate level, there are no prerequ

  16. Theory and modeling group

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Theory and Modeling Group meeting was to identify scientists engaged or interested in theoretical work pertinent to the Max '91 program, and to encourage theorists to pursue modeling which is directly relevant to data which can be expected to result from the program. A list of participants and their institutions is presented. Two solar flare paradigms were discussed during the meeting -- the importance of magnetic reconnection in flares and the applicability of numerical simulation results to solar flare studies.

  17. The OMERACT Ultrasound Group

    Terslev, Lene; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Bruyn, George A W

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update from the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound Working Group on the progress for defining ultrasound (US) minimal disease activity threshold at joint level in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and for standardization of US application in juvenile idiopathic......) and power Doppler (PD). Synovial effusion (SE) was scored a binary variable. For JIA, a Delphi approach and subsequent validation in static images and patient-based exercises were used to developed preliminary definitions for synovitis and a scoring system. RESULTS: For minimal disease activity, 7% HC had...

  18. A village group, Trashibiola

    Thomson, John, 1837-1921, photographer

    2003-01-01

    158 x 111 mm. Woodburytype. A view showing a group of villagers seated in a paved courtyard in front of a stonewalled house (the principal house in the village). The village is near the town of Paphos. The photograph appears in Thomson's 'Through Cyprus with the camera, in the autumn of 1878' (vol.2, London: Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, and Rivington, 1879). Thomson states that the purpose of the gathering was twofold: to welcome strangers to the village and to discuss a point of law c...

  19. Bevalac computer support group

    McParland, C.; Bronson, M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past year, a group was created and placed under the leadership of Charles McParland. This is an expansion of previous Bevalac software efforts and has responsibilities in three major hardware and software areas. The first area is the support of the existing data acquisition/analysis VAX 11/780s at the Bevalac. The second area is the continued support of present data acquisition programs. The third principal area of effort is the development of new data acquisition systems to meet the increasing needs of the Bevalac experimental program

  20. Social group utility maximization

    Gong, Xiaowen; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Junshan

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief explains how to leverage mobile users' social relationships to improve the interactions of mobile devices in mobile networks. It develops a social group utility maximization (SGUM) framework that captures diverse social ties of mobile users and diverse physical coupling of mobile devices. Key topics include random access control, power control, spectrum access, and location privacy.This brief also investigates SGUM-based power control game and random access control game, for which it establishes the socially-aware Nash equilibrium (SNE). It then examines the critical SGUM-b

  1. A Model for Dimerization of the SOX Group E Transcription Factor Family.

    Sarah N Ramsook

    Full Text Available Group E members of the SOX transcription factor family include SOX8, SOX9, and SOX10. Preceding the high mobility group (HMG domain in each of these proteins is a thirty-eight amino acid region that supports the formation of dimers on promoters containing tandemly inverted sites. The purpose of this study was to obtain new structural insights into how the dimerization region functions with the HMG domain. From a mutagenic scan of the dimerization region, the most essential amino acids of the dimerization region were clustered on the hydrophobic face of a single, predicted amphipathic helix. Consistent with our hypothesis that the dimerization region directly contacts the HMG domain, a peptide corresponding to the dimerization region bound a preassembled HMG-DNA complex. Sequence conservation among Group E members served as a basis to identify two surface exposed amino acids in the HMG domain of SOX9 that were necessary for dimerization. These data were combined to make a molecular model that places the dimerization region of one SOX9 protein onto the HMG domain of another SOX9 protein situated at the opposing site of a tandem promoter. The model provides a detailed foundation for assessing the impact of mutations on SOX Group E transcription factors.

  2. High mobility and high concentration Type-III heterojunction FET

    Tsu, R.; Fiddy, M. A.; Her, T.

    2018-02-01

    The PN junction was introduced in transistors by doping, resulting in high losses due to Coulomb scattering from the dopants. The MOSFET introduced carriers in the form of electrons and holes with an applied bias to the oxide barrier, resulting in carrier transfer without doping. This avoids high scattering losses and dominates the IC industries. With heterojunctions having valence-band maxima near and even above the conduction-band minimum in the formation of Type-III superlattices, very useful devices, introduced by Tsu, Sai-Halacz, and Esaki, soon followed. If the layer thicknesses are more than the carrier mean-free-path, incoherent scattering results in the formation of carrier transfer via diffusion instead of opening up new energy gaps. The exploitation of carriers without scattering represents a new and significant opportunity in what we call a Broken Gap Heterojunction FET.

  3. ANYmal - A Highly Mobile and Dynamic Quadrupedal Robot

    2016-10-09

    workers like the foothold planner. The localization and mapping tasks are outsourced to the navigation PC that is responsible for the laser-based...is scalability which makes hydraulic legged systems rather large and heavy. 2) Pseudo-direct-drive systems: When using gearing sys- tems of very low

  4. Thermoelectric transport properties of high mobility organic semiconductors

    Venkateshvaran, Deepak; Broch, Katharina; Warwick, Chris N.; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-09-01

    Transport in organic semiconductors has traditionally been investigated using measurements of the temperature and gate voltage dependent mobility of charge carriers within the channel of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). In such measurements, the behavior of charge carrier mobility with temperature and gate voltage, studied together with carrier activation energies, provide a metric to quantify the extent of disorder within these van der Waals bonded materials. In addition to the mobility and activation energy, another potent but often-overlooked transport coefficient useful in understanding disorder is the Seebeck coefficient (also known as thermoelectric power). Fundamentally, the Seebeck coefficient represents the entropy per charge carrier in the solid state, and thus proves powerful in distinguishing materials in which charge carriers move freely from those where a high degree of disorder causes the induced carriers to remain trapped. This paper briefly covers the recent highlights in the field of organic thermoelectrics, showing how significant strides have been made both from an applied standpoint as well as from a viewpoint of fundamental thermoelectric transport physics. It shall be illustrated how thermoelectric transport parameters in organic semiconductors can be tuned over a significant range, and how this tunability facilitates an enhanced performance for heat-to-electricity conversion as well as quantifies energetic disorder and the nature of the density of states (DOS). The work of the authors shall be spotlighted in this context, illustrating how Seebeck coefficient measurements in the polymer indacenodithiophene-co-benzothiadiazole (IDTBT) known for its ultra-low degree of torsion within the polymer backbone, has a trend consistent with low disorder. 1 Finally, using examples of the small molecules C8-BTBT and C10-DNTT, it shall be discussed how the Seebeck coefficient can aid the estimation of the density and distribution of trap states within these materials. 2, 3

  5. Patterning of high mobility electron gases at complex oxide interfaces

    Trier, Felix; Prawiroatmodjo, G. E. D. K.; von Soosten, Merlin

    2015-01-01

    Oxide interfaces provide an opportunity for electronics. However, patterning of electron gases at complex oxide interfaces is challenging. In particular, patterning of complex oxides while preserving a high electron mobility remains underexplored and inhibits the study of quantum mechanical effects...... of amorphous-LSM (a-LSM) thin films, which acts as a hard mask during subsequent depositions. Strikingly, the patterned modulation-doped interface shows electron mobilities up to ∼8 700 cm2/V s at 2 K, which is among the highest reported values for patterned conducting complex oxide interfaces that usually...... where extended electron mean free paths are paramount. This letter presents an effective patterning strategy of both the amorphous-LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (a-LAO/STO) and modulation-doped amorphous-LaAlO3/La7/8Sr1/8MnO3/SrTiO3 (a-LAO/LSM/STO) oxide interfaces. Our patterning is based on selective wet etching...

  6. High mobility ZnO nanowires for terahertz detection applications

    Liu, Huiqiang; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Shijin; Chu, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    An oxide nanowire material was utilized for terahertz detection purpose. High quality ZnO nanowires were synthesized and field-effect transistors were fabricated. Electrical transport measurements demonstrated the nanowire with good transfer characteristics and fairly high electron mobility. It is shown that ZnO nanowires can be used as building blocks for the realization of terahertz detectors based on a one-dimensional plasmon detection configuration. Clear terahertz wave (∼0.3 THz) induced photovoltages were obtained at room temperature with varying incidence intensities. Further analysis showed that the terahertz photoresponse is closely related to the high electron mobility of the ZnO nanowire sample, which suggests that oxide nanoelectronics may find useful terahertz applications.

  7. Biosurveillance in a Highly Mobile Population - Year 3

    2012-07-01

    provides an opportunity- rich tested for the impact upon infectious disease modeling, biosurveillance, and public health. Kulldorf et al (2005) assessed...Secular Circles and Millenial Trends. URSS, Moscow 2006 Kulldorff M, Heffernan R, Hartman J, Assunção RM, Mostashari F. (2005). “Space-Time Permutation

  8. Narrow Gap, High Mobility, and Stable Pi Conjugated Polymers

    2012-09-20

    wide-angle X-ray scattering (2D-WAXS) of P5.1 (extruded at 210oC). This trend is reflected in conventional bulk- heterojunction OPV devices as shown...Additives in Molecular Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Using a bithiophene capped, isoindigo core, DAD molecule as the donor phase, and PCBM as the...PCE values of 3.7% as illustrated in Figure 11. Figure 11. Combining interface control using MoOx as an electron transport material and PDMS

  9. Magnetic shape memory effect and highly mobile twin boundaries

    Heczko, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 13 (2014), s. 1559-1578 ISSN 0267-0836 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/11/0391 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic shape memory effect * ferromagnetic martensite * twinning * magnetically induced reorientation * reviews Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.995, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/1743284714Y.0000000599

  10. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  11. Communication from ST Group

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    In order to prepare the organization of the Open Days, please note that FM Group will not able to take into account either specific requests for waste collection from 2nd to 6th of April, either removal or PC transport requests between the 31st and the 11th of March. We kindly ask you to plan the collection of any type of waste and the urgent transport of office furniture or PC before the 31st of March. Waste collection requests shall be formulated contacting FM Support at 77777 or at the email address mailto:Fm.Support@cern.ch; removal of office furniture or PC transport requests must be made using the EDH ‘Transport request’ form selecting the "Removals" or the "PC transport" category from the drop-down menu. For any question concerning the waste sorting, please consult the following web address: http://dechets-waste.web.cern.ch/dechets-waste/. Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. TS/FM Group

  12. Social group and mobbing

    Baltezarević Vesna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Our reality, having been subject to the numerous social crises during the last decades of the 20th century, is characterized by frequent incidences of powerlessness and alienation. The man is more frequently a subject to loneliness and overcomes the feeling of worthlessness, no matter whether he considers himself an individual or a part of a whole larger social. Such an environment leads to development of aggression in all fields of ones life. This paper has as an objective the pointing out of the mental harassment that is manifested in the working environment. There is a prevalence of mobbing cases, as a mode of pathological communication. The result of this is that a person, subjected to this kind of abuse, is soon faced with social isolation. This research also aspires to initiate the need for social groups self-organization of which victims are part of. The reaction modality of a social group directly conditions the outcome of the deliberate social drama, one is subjected to it as a result of mobbing.

  13. Meningococcal group B vaccines.

    Findlow, Jamie

    2013-06-01

    Meningococcal disease remains a devastating and feared infection with a significant morbidity and mortality profile. The successful impact of meningococcal capsular group C glyconconjugate vaccines introduced into the UK infant immunization schedule in 1999, has resulted in >80% of disease now being attributable to meningococcal capsular group B (MenB). MenB glyconconjugate vaccines are not immunogenic and hence, vaccine design has focused on sub-capsular antigens. Recently, a four component vaccine to combat MenB disease (4CMenB) has progressed through clinical development and was approved by the European Medicines Agency at the end of 2012. This vaccine has proven safe and immunogenic and has been predicted to provide protection against ~73% of the MenB disease from England and Wales. Recommendation/implementation of the vaccine into the UK infant schedule is currently being evaluated. 4CMenB has the potential to provide protection against a significant proportion of MenB disease in the UK which is currently unpreventable.

  14. Business working group

    Doroshuk, B.W.

    2000-01-01

    The workshop of 26-27 june 2000, on nuclear power Plant LIfe Management (PLIM), also included working groups in which major issues facing PLIM activities for nuclear power plants were identified and discussed. The third group was on Business. The discussion concerned the following points: There are concerns about retaining experienced/trained personnel, and maintaining a good working relationship among them, as well as about the closure of research facilities, the reduction in staff numbers under increasing economic pressure and the lack of new nuclear power plant constructions. The marginal cost of producing electricity is lower for most existing nuclear power plants than for almost all other energy sources. Refurbishment costs are usually relatively small compared with new investments. The ongoing regulatory reform of the electricity market will bring increasing competition. Although PLIM has been carried out in many countries with favourable results, there are still uncertainties which affect business decisions regarding financial and market risks in PLIM activities. Recommendations were made. (author)

  15. Group Life Insurance

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration would like to remind you that staff members and fellows have the possibility to take out a life insurance contract on favourable terms through a Group Life Insurance.   This insurance is provided by the company Helvetia and is available to you on a voluntary basis. The premium, which varies depending on the age and gender of the person insured, is calculated on the basis of the amount of the death benefit chosen by the staff member/fellow and can be purchased in slices of 10,000 CHF.    The contract normally ends at the retirement age (65/67 years) or when the staff member/fellow leaves the Organization. The premium is deducted monthly from the payroll.   Upon retirement, the staff member can opt to maintain his membership under certain conditions.   More information about Group Life Insurance can be found at: Regulations (in French) Table of premiums The Pension Fund Benefit Service &...

  16. Biology task group

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The accomplishments of the task group studies over the past year are reviewed. The purposes of biological investigations, in the context of subseabed disposal, are: an evaluation of the dose to man; an estimation of effects on the ecosystem; and an estimation of the influence of organisms on and as barriers to radionuclide migration. To accomplish these ends, the task group adopted the following research goals: (1) acquire more data on biological accumulation of specific radionuclides, such as those of Tc, Np, Ra, and Sr; (2) acquire more data on transfer coefficients from sediment to organism; (3) Calculate mass transfer rates, construct simple models using them, and estimate collective dose commitment; (4) Identify specific pathways or transfer routes, determine the rates of transfer, and make dose limit calculations with simple models; (5) Calculate dose rates to and estimate irradiation effects on the biota as a result of waste emplacement, by reference to background irradiation calculations. (6) Examine the effect of the biota on altering sediment/water radionuclide exchange; (7) Consider the biological data required to address different accident scenarios; (8) Continue to provide the basic biological information for all of the above, and ensure that the system analysis model is based on the most realistic and up-to-date concepts of marine biologists; and (9) Ensure by way of free exchange of information that the data used in any model are the best currently available

  17. Doing focus group research

    Lindegaard, Laura Bang

    2014-01-01

    Scholars of ethnomethodologically informed discourse studies are often sceptical of the use of interview data such as focus group data. Some scholars quite simply reject interview data with reference to a general preference for so-called naturally occurring data. Other scholars acknowledge...... that interview data can be of some use if the distinction between natural and contrived data is given up and replaced with a distinction between interview data as topic or as resource. In greater detail, such scholars argue that interview data are perfectly adequate if the researcher wants to study the topic...... of interview interaction, but inadequate as data for studying phenomena that go beyond the phenomenon of interview interaction. Neither of these more and less sceptical positions are, on the face of it, surprising due to the ethnomethodological commitment to study social order as accomplished in situ...

  18. Group life insurance

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration wishes to inform staff members and fellows having taken out optional life insurance under the group contract signed by CERN that the following changes to the rules and regulations entered into force on 1 January 2013:   The maximum age for an active member has been extended from 65 to 67 years. The beneficiary clause now allows insured persons to designate one or more persons of their choice to be their beneficiary(-ies), either at the time of taking out the insurance or at a later date, in which case the membership/modification form must be updated accordingly. Beneficiaries must be clearly identified (name, first name, date of birth, address).   The membership/modification form is available on the FP website: http://fp.web.cern.ch/helvetia-life-insurance For further information, please contact: Valentina Clavel (Tel. 73904) Peggy Pithioud (Tel. 72736)

  19. End Group Modification

    Jahnsen, Rasmus O; Sandberg-Schaal, Anne; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Increased incidence of infections with multidrug-resistant bacterial strains warrants an intensive search for novel potential antimicrobial agents. Here, an antimicrobial peptide analogue with a cationic/hydrophobic alternating design displaying only moderate activity against Gram-positive pathog......Increased incidence of infections with multidrug-resistant bacterial strains warrants an intensive search for novel potential antimicrobial agents. Here, an antimicrobial peptide analogue with a cationic/hydrophobic alternating design displaying only moderate activity against Gram......, the most favorable hydrophobic activity-inducing moieties were found to be cyclohexylacetyl and pentafluorophenylacetyl groups, while the presence of a short PEG-like chain had no significant effect on activity. Introduction of cationic moieties conferred no effect or merely a moderate activity...

  20. Optimised Renormalisation Group Flows

    Litim, Daniel F

    2001-01-01

    Exact renormalisation group (ERG) flows interpolate between a microscopic or classical theory and the corresponding macroscopic or quantum effective theory. For most problems of physical interest, the efficiency of the ERG is constrained due to unavoidable approximations. Approximate solutions of ERG flows depend spuriously on the regularisation scheme which is determined by a regulator function. This is similar to the spurious dependence on the ultraviolet regularisation known from perturbative QCD. Providing a good control over approximated ERG flows is at the root for reliable physical predictions. We explain why the convergence of approximate solutions towards the physical theory is optimised by appropriate choices of the regulator. We study specific optimised regulators for bosonic and fermionic fields and compare the optimised ERG flows with generic ones. This is done up to second order in the derivative expansion at both vanishing and non-vanishing temperature. An optimised flow for a ``proper-time ren...

  1. Graphs, groups and surfaces

    White, AT

    1985-01-01

    The field of topological graph theory has expanded greatly in the ten years since the first edition of this book appeared. The original nine chapters of this classic work have therefore been revised and updated. Six new chapters have been added, dealing with: voltage graphs, non-orientable imbeddings, block designs associated with graph imbeddings, hypergraph imbeddings, map automorphism groups and change ringing.Thirty-two new problems have been added to this new edition, so that there are now 181 in all; 22 of these have been designated as ``difficult'''' and 9 as ``unsolved''''. Three of the four unsolved problems from the first edition have been solved in the ten years between editions; they are now marked as ``difficult''''.

  2. Quantum Secure Group Communication.

    Li, Zheng-Hong; Zubairy, M Suhail; Al-Amri, M

    2018-03-01

    We propose a quantum secure group communication protocol for the purpose of sharing the same message among multiple authorized users. Our protocol can remove the need for key management that is needed for the quantum network built on quantum key distribution. Comparing with the secure quantum network based on BB84, we show our protocol is more efficient and securer. Particularly, in the security analysis, we introduce a new way of attack, i.e., the counterfactual quantum attack, which can steal information by "invisible" photons. This invisible photon can reveal a single-photon detector in the photon path without triggering the detector. Moreover, the photon can identify phase operations applied to itself, thereby stealing information. To defeat this counterfactual quantum attack, we propose a quantum multi-user authorization system. It allows us to precisely control the communication time so that the attack can not be completed in time.

  3. Working Group Report: Sensors

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  4. Decommissioning of NPP A1 - HWGCR type

    Burclova, J.

    1998-01-01

    Prototype nuclear power plant A-1 located at Jaslovske Bohunice, was a HWGCR with channel type reactor KS 150 (refuelling during operation) and capacity of 143 MWe. Single unit has been constructed with reactor hall building containing reactor vessel, heavy water system and equipment for spent fuel handling. Another compartment of main building contents coolant system piping, six steam generators and six turbo compressors, the turbine hall was equipped by three turbines. Unit also shares liquid radwaste treatment and storage buildings and ventilation systems including chimney. It started operation in 1972 and was shutdown in 1977 after primary coolant system integrity accident. In 1979 a final decision was made to decommission this plant. The absence of waste treatment technologies and repository and not sufficient storage capacity affected the planning and realization of decommissioning for NPP A-1. The decommissioning policy for the first stage is for lack of regulations based on 'case by case' strategy. For these reasons and for not existence of Decommissioning Found until 1995 the preferred decommissioning option is based on differed decommissioning with safe enclosure of confinement. Transfer of undamaged spent fuel cooled in organic coolant to Russia was finished in 1990. It was necessary to develop new technology for the damaged fuel preparation for transport. The barriers check-up and dismantling of secondary circuit and cooling towers was performed during 1989/90. The complex plan for the first phase of A-1 decommissioning - the status with treated operational radwaste, removed contamination and restored treated waste and spent fuel (in case of interruption of transfer to Russia) was developed in 1993-1994. Under this project bituminization of all liquid operational radwaste (concentrates) was performed during 1995/96, vitrification of inorganic spent fuel coolant started at 1996, decontamination of spent fuel pool coolant occurs (under AEA Technology

  5. Cerebral A1 adenosine receptors (A1AR) in liver cirrhosis

    Boy, Christian; Meyer, Philipp T.; Kircheis, Gerald; Haussinger, Dieter; Holschbach, Marcus H.; Coenen, Heinz H.; Herzog, Hans; Elmenhorst, David; Kaiser, Hans J.; Zilles, Karl; Bauer, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The cerebral mechanisms underlying hepatic encephalopathy (HE) are poorly understood. Adenosine, a neuromodulator that pre- and postsynaptically modulates neuronal excitability and release of classical neurotransmitters via A 1 adenosine receptors (A 1 AR), is likely to be involved. The present study investigates changes of cerebral A 1 AR binding in cirrhotic patients by means of positron emission tomography (PET) and [ 18 F]CPFPX, a novel selective A 1 AR antagonist. PET was performed in cirrhotic patients (n = 10) and healthy volunteers (n = 10). Quantification of in vivo receptor density was done by Logan's non-invasive graphical analysis (pons as reference region). The outcome parameter was the apparent binding potential (aBP, proportional to B max /K D ). Cortical and subcortical regions showed lower A 1 AR binding in cirrhotic patients than in controls. The aBP changes reached statistical significance vs healthy controls (p 1 AR binding may further aggravate neurotransmitter imbalance at the synaptic cleft in cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. Different pathomechanisms may account for these alterations including decrease of A 1 AR density or affinity, as well as blockade of the A 1 AR by endogenous adenosine or exogenous xanthines. (orig.)

  6. Hyperparathyroidism complicating CYP 24A1 mutations.

    Loyer, Camille; Leroy, Clara; Molin, Arnaud; Odou, Marie-Françoise; Huglo, Damien; Lion, Georges; Ernst, Olivier; Hoffmann, Maxime; Porchet, Nicole; Carnaille, Bruno; Pattou, François; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2016-10-01

    CYP24A1 gene mutations induce infantile hypercalcemia, with high 1,25(OH) 2 D contrasting with low PTH levels. The adult phenotype is not well known. Two unrelated adult patients were referred for nephrolithiasis, hypertension, hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, normal 25-OHD levels, and inappropriate PTH levels (22 to 92pg/mL;N: 15-68) suggesting primary hyperparathyroidism, leading to surgery. Hypercalciuria improved despite persistent hypercalcemia, treated with cinacalcet. The ratio 25-OHD 3 /24-25-(OH)2D 3 >100 (Nhyperparathyroidism with moderately increased PTH level, adenoma and/or slightly increased parathyroid glands. Surgery decreased calciuria and improved kidney function. Cinacalcet was partially effective on hypercalcemia since PTH was inappropriate. This novel phenotype, a phenocopy of hyperparathyroidism, might evolve in few cases towards hyperparathyroidism despite random association of the 2 diseases cannot be excluded. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. PEALD grown high-k ZrO{sub 2} thin films on SiC group IV compound semiconductor

    Khairnar, A. G., E-mail: agkhairnar@gmail.com; Patil, V. S.; Agrawal, K. S.; Salunke, R. S.; Mahajan, A. M., E-mail: ammahajan@nmu.ac.in [North Maharashtra University, Department of Electronics, School of Physical Sciences (India)

    2017-01-15

    The study of ZrO{sub 2} thin films on SiC group IV compound semiconductor has been studied as a high mobility substrates. The ZrO{sub 2} thin films were deposited using the Plasma Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition System. The thickness of the thin films were measured using ellipsometer and found to be 5.47 nm. The deposited ZrO{sub 2} thin films were post deposition annealed in rapid thermal annealing chamber at temperature of 400°Ð¡. The atomic force microscopy and X-гау photoelectron spectroscopy has been carried out to study the surface topography, roughness and chemical composition of thin film, respectively.

  8. Experimental lysimetric device NPP A-1

    Matusek, I.; Plsko, J.

    2002-01-01

    In the frame of decommissioning of the NPP A-1 in the locality Jaslovske Bohunice the problem of remedial measures in scope of radioactive contaminated soils is also studied. These soils have originated in the area of the NPP A-1 by different mechanisms as the result of leakages from technology and in the present time they represent the secondary source of contamination of underground waters. Contaminated soils represent the particularity, because we can characterize them as voluminous radioactive contaminated residues with low-level or very low-level activity. EKOSUR Company in the frame of active underground water protection suggested more remedial measures. Two basic tasks are solved in the field of the contaminated soils: rehabilitation of contaminated soils or temporary immobilisation of radionuclides in the contaminated volumes, deposition of rehabilitated soils in the storage of landfill type. In the frame of engineering solution of the landfill storage the question of technology of own deposition of contaminated soils into storage area is important from the safety viewpoint. Therefore the Experimental lysimetric device was built for half-operational test of suggested technologies. This device contains 6 pieces of lysimeters with 6 active volumes of approximately 1 cubic meter. The aim of suggested and in the present time realised experiments is the practical modelling of influence of filtering of waters into storage of contaminated soils in configurational and qualitative different conditions of deposition of soils (for example exploitation of sorption materials). Also the structure of un-rehabilitated soils by the influence of natural downfalls activity is modelled in one lysimeter. In this issue the authors deal with the construction of lysimetric device, proposed experiments as like as gained results of observations. (authors)

  9. Representation Theory of Algebraic Groups and Quantum Groups

    Gyoja, A; Shinoda, K-I; Shoji, T; Tanisaki, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Invited articles by top notch expertsFocus is on topics in representation theory of algebraic groups and quantum groupsOf interest to graduate students and researchers in representation theory, group theory, algebraic geometry, quantum theory and math physics

  10. Oklo working group meeting

    Von Maravic, H.

    1993-01-01

    Natural analogue studies have been carried out for several years in the framework of the European Community's R and D programme on radioactive waste; and within its recent fourth five-year programme on 'Management and storage of radioactive waste (1990-94)' the Community is participating in the Oklo study, natural analogue for transfer processes in a geological repository. The Oklo project is coordinated by CEA-IPSN (F) and involves laboratories from several CEA directorates (IPSN, DTA and DCC) which collaborate with other institutions from France: CREGU, Nancy; CNRS, Strasbourg and ENSMD, Fontainebleau. Moreover, institutes from non-EC member States are also taking part in the Oklo study. The second joint CEC-CEA progress meeting of the Oklo Working Group was held in April 1992 in Brussels and gave the possibility of reviewing and discussing progress made since its first meeting in February 1991 at CEA in Fontenay-aux-Roses. About 40 participants from 15 laboratories and organizations coming from France, Canada, Gabon, Japan, Sweden and the USA underline the great interest in the ongoing research activities. The meeting focused on the different tasks within the CEC-CEA Oklo project concerning (i) field survey and sampling, (ii) characterization of the source term, (iii) studies of the petrographical and geochemical system, and (iv) studies of the hydrogeological system and hydrodynamic modelling. (author) 17 papers are presented

  11. The Liabilities Management Group

    Whitehead, A.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Liabilities Management Group (LMG) was initiated by DTI. It is a cooperative forum which was set up in 1995. The current participants are DTI, UKAEA, NLM (for BNFL), MOD and Magnox Electric. The LMG was initiated to produce closer cooperation between public sector liability management organizations, achieve more cost-effective management of UK nuclear liabilities and enhance development of the UK nuclear decommissioning and waste management strategy. The objectives are to compare practices between liabilities management organizations discuss the scope for collaboration identify priority areas for possible collaboration agree action plans for exploring and undertaking such collaboration.Four task forces have been formed to look at specific areas (R and D, safety, contracts, and project management) and each reports separately to the LMG. The LMG has achieved its original aim of bringing together those with public sector liability management responsibilities. All participants feel that the LMG has been useful and that it should continue. Looking to the future, there is a continuing need for the LMG to facilitate removal of barriers to the achievement of best value for money. The LMG might also consider addressing the 'business process' elements that a liability management organization must be good at in order to define best practice in these. (author)

  12. Combining MOD10A1 and MYD10A1 Images For Snow Cover Area Monitoring

    Tekeli, A. E.

    2008-12-01

    MOD10A1 and MYD10A1 daily snow cover maps at 500 m resolution are available from MODIS sensors on Terra and Aqua satellites. Aqua obtains the image of same region approximately three hours after Terra over Turkey region. MODIS is an optic sensor and cloud cover degrades the usability of derived snow cover maps. Moreover, spectral similarity between clouds and snow complicates their separability in visible imagery. Fortunately, dynamic behavior of clouds enables their discrimination from snow stationary on the surface. Combined use of MOD10A1 and MYD10A1 images mostly reduces the cloud cover present in one image alone and provides better representation of surface snow cover. Comparison of merged images with in situ data indicated higher hit ratios. The individual comparison of MOD10A1 and MYD10A1 images with ground data each yielded 31% hit ratio whereas, the merged images provided 38%. One-day shifts in comparisons increased hit ratios to 52 % and 46% whereas and two-day shifts gave 77 % and 79 % for MOD10A1 and MYD10A1 respectively. Merged maps yielded 54% and 83% for one and two day shifts. The improvement provided by the merging technique is found to be 7% for the present day, 7 % for one- day and 5% for two-day shifts for the whole season. Monthly decomposition resulted 25% improvement as the maximum. The snow cover product obtained by merging Terra and Aqua satellites provided higher hit ratios, as expected.

  13. CORRELATION BETWEEN GROUP LOCAL DENSITY AND GROUP LUMINOSITY

    Deng Xinfa [School of Science, Nanchang University, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Yu Guisheng [Department of Natural Science, Nanchang Teachers College, Jiangxi 330103 (China)

    2012-11-10

    In this study, we investigate the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups. In four volume-limited group catalogs, we can conclude that groups with high luminosity exist preferentially in high-density regions, while groups with low luminosity are located preferentially in low-density regions, and that in a volume-limited group sample with absolute magnitude limit M{sub r} = -18, the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups is the weakest. These results basically are consistent with the environmental dependence of galaxy luminosity.

  14. Group Counseling in the Schools

    Perusse, Rachelle; Goodnough, Gary E.; Lee, Vivian V.

    2009-01-01

    Group counseling is an effective intervention when working in a school setting. In this article, the authors discuss the different kinds of groups offered in schools, types of group interventions, strategies to use in forming groups, and how to collaborate with others in the school. Because leading groups in schools is a specialized skill, the…

  15. Naive Theories of Social Groups

    Rhodes, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    Four studies examined children's (ages 3-10, Total N = 235) naive theories of social groups, in particular, their expectations about how group memberships constrain social interactions. After introduction to novel groups of people, preschoolers (ages 3-5) reliably expected agents from one group to harm members of the other group (rather than…

  16. Making Cooperative Learning Groups Work.

    Hawley, James; De Jong, Cherie

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of cooperative-learning groups with middle school students. Describes cooperative-learning techniques, including group roles, peer evaluation, and observation and monitoring. Considers grouping options, including group size and configuration, dyads, the think-pair-share lecture, student teams achievement divisions, jigsaw groups,…

  17. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    Beier, Eugene; /Pennsylvania U.; Butler, Joel; /Fermilab; Dawson, Sally; /Brookhaven; Edwards, Helen; /Fermilab; Himel, Thomas; /SLAC; Holmes, Stephen; /Fermilab; Kim, Young-Kee; /Fermilab /Chicago U.; Lankford, Andrew; /UC, Irvine; McGinnis, David; /Fermilab; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOVA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the

  18. Linear deformations of discrete groups and constructions of multivalued groups

    Yagodovskii, Petr V

    2000-01-01

    We construct deformations of discrete multivalued groups described as special deformations of their group algebras in the class of finite-dimensional associative algebras. We show that the deformations of ordinary groups producing multivalued groups are defined by cocycles with coefficients in the group algebra of the original group and obtain classification theorems on these deformations. We indicate a connection between the linear deformations of discrete groups introduced in this paper and the well-known constructions of multivalued groups. We describe the manifold of three-dimensional associative commutative algebras with identity element, fixed basis, and a constant number of values. The group algebras of n-valued groups of order three (three-dimensional n-group algebras) form a discrete set in this manifold

  19. Is the A1 a resonance

    Morgan, D.

    1975-06-01

    Data on diffractive and charge exchange 3π production in the Jsup(P) = 1 + state are shown to favour a resonance interpretation, although with a somewhat higher mass than the conventional A 1 bump. Data are fitted using a two-component model for the production amplitude. The first component comprises the Deck (Born) contribution and its re-scattering corrections; the second represents the so-called 'direct-production' term. The conventional isobar approximation to unitarity is demanded; this forbids the intrusion of additional phases in the Born term, such as arise from projecting a Reggeized Deck amplitude. As a consequence, the phase of the 1 + S 3π production amplitude is predicted to execute a standard resonant variation with Msup(3π). This carries a striking implication for the interfering 'background' waves, 1 + P, 2 - P, 0 - S, relative to which the 1 + S amplitude fails to register any appreciable phase variation in phenomenological analyses. There is no obvious objection to ascribing resonance status to these three channels, of which only one, the 0 - , demands a new (π ') resonance. A running theme, which recurs whenever the results of phenomenological 3-body phase shift analyses are appealed to, is that dynamical features are best viewed in terms of effective matrix elements rather than partial cross-sections. (author)

  20. Treadmill desks: A 1-year prospective trial.

    Koepp, Gabriel A; Manohar, Chinmay U; McCrady-Spitzer, Shelly K; Ben-Ner, Avner; Hamann, Darla J; Runge, Carlisle F; Levine, James A

    2013-04-01

    Sedentariness is associated with weight gain and obesity. A treadmill desk is the combination of a standing desk and a treadmill that allow employees to work while walking at low speed. The hypothesis was that a 1-year intervention with treadmill desks is associated with an increase in employee daily physical activity (summation of all activity per minute) and a decrease in daily sedentary time (zero activity). Employees (n = 36; 25 women, 11 men) with sedentary jobs (87 ± 27 kg, BMI 29 ± 7 kg/m(2) , n = 10 Lean BMI 30 kg/m(2) ) volunteered to have their traditional desk replaced with a treadmill desk to promote physical activity for 1 year. Daily physical activity (using accelerometers), work performance, body composition, and blood variables were measured at Baseline and 6 and 12 months after the treadmill desk intervention. Subjects who used the treadmill desk increased daily physical activity from baseline 3,353 ± 1,802 activity units (AU)/day to, at 6 months, 4,460 ± 2,376 AU/day (P office workers without affecting work performance. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  1. Group B Streptococcus and Pregnancy

    ... B Strep and Pregnancy • What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? • What does it mean to be colonized ... planned cesarean birth? •Glossary What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? Group B streptococcus is one of the ...

  2. Harmonic Analysis and Group Representation

    Figa-Talamanca, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    This title includes: Lectures - A. Auslander, R. Tolimeri - Nilpotent groups and abelian varieties, M Cowling - Unitary and uniformly bounded representations of some simple Lie groups, M. Duflo - Construction de representations unitaires d'un groupe de Lie, R. Howe - On a notion of rank for unitary representations of the classical groups, V.S. Varadarajan - Eigenfunction expansions of semisimple Lie groups, and R. Zimmer - Ergodic theory, group representations and rigidity; and, Seminars - A. Koranyi - Some applications of Gelfand pairs in classical analysis.

  3. Topological K-Kolmogorov groups

    Abd El-Sattar, A. Dabbour.

    1987-07-01

    The idea of the K-groups was used to define K-Kolmogorov homology and cohomology (over pairs of coefficient groups) which are descriptions of certain modifications of the Kolmogorov groups. The present work is devoted to the study of the topological properties of the K-Kolmogorov groups which lie at the root of the group duality based essentially upon Pontrjagin's concept of group multiplication. 14 refs

  4. Post-Disaster Social Justice Group Work and Group Supervision

    Bemak, Fred; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses post-disaster group counseling and group supervision using a social justice orientation for working with post-disaster survivors from underserved populations. The Disaster Cross-Cultural Counseling model is a culturally responsive group counseling model that infuses social justice into post-disaster group counseling and…

  5. Group Leader Development: Effects of Personal Growth and Psychoeducational Groups

    Ohrt, Jonathan H.; Robinson, E. H., III; Hagedorn, W. Bryce

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to compare the effects of personal growth groups and psychoeducational groups on counselor education students' (n = 74) empathy and group leader self-efficacy. Additionally, we compared the degree to which participants in each group valued: (a) cohesion, (b) catharsis, and (c) insight. There were no…

  6. Feminist Principles in Survivor's Groups: Out-of-Group Contact.

    Rittenhouse, JoAn

    1997-01-01

    Illustrates the value of theoretical concepts from Feminist Therapy in the group treatment of women survivors. Theoretical underpinnings are supported using data taken from clinical experience and by examining group themes and out-of-group contact developed from the case sample. Principles regarding feminist groups are proposed. (RJM)

  7. Platinum-group elements

    Zientek, Michael L.; Loferski, Patricia J.; Parks, Heather L.; Schulte, Ruth F.; Seal, Robert R.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    The platinum-group elements (PGEs)—platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and osmium—are metals that have similar physical and chemical properties and tend to occur together in nature. PGEs are indispensable to many industrial applications but are mined in only a few places. The availability and accessibility of PGEs could be disrupted by economic, environmental, political, and social events. The United States net import reliance as a percentage of apparent consumption is about 90 percent.PGEs have many industrial applications. They are used in catalytic converters to reduce carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and nitrous oxide emissions in automobile exhaust. The chemical industry requires platinum or platinum-rhodium alloys to manufacture nitric oxide, which is the raw material used to manufacture explosives, fertilizers, and nitric acid. In the petrochemical industry, platinum-supported catalysts are needed to refine crude oil and to produce aromatic compounds and high-octane gasoline. Alloys of PGEs are exceptionally hard and durable, making them the best known coating for industrial crucibles used in the manufacture of chemicals and synthetic materials. PGEs are used by the glass manufacturing industry in the production of fiberglass and flat-panel and liquid crystal displays. In the electronics industry, PGEs are used in computer hard disks, hybridized integrated circuits, and multilayer ceramic capacitors.Aside from their industrial applications, PGEs are used in such other fields as health, consumer goods, and finance. Platinum, for example, is used in medical implants, such as pacemakers, and PGEs are used in cancer-fighting drugs. Platinum alloys are an ideal choice for jewelry because of their white color, strength, and resistance to tarnish. Platinum, palladium, and rhodium in the form of coins and bars are also used as investment commodities, and various financial instruments based on the value of these PGEs are traded on major exchanges

  8. Architecture for a 1-GHz Digital RADAR

    Mallik, Udayan

    2011-01-01

    An architecture for a Direct RF-digitization Type Digital Mode RADAR was developed at GSFC in 2008. Two variations of a basic architecture were developed for use on RADAR imaging missions using aircraft and spacecraft. Both systems can operate with a pulse repetition rate up to 10 MHz with 8 received RF samples per pulse repetition interval, or at up to 19 kHz with 4K received RF samples per pulse repetition interval. The first design describes a computer architecture for a Continuous Mode RADAR transceiver with a real-time signal processing and display architecture. The architecture can operate at a high pulse repetition rate without interruption for an infinite amount of time. The second design describes a smaller and less costly burst mode RADAR that can transceive high pulse repetition rate RF signals without interruption for up to 37 seconds. The burst-mode RADAR was designed to operate on an off-line signal processing paradigm. The temporal distribution of RF samples acquired and reported to the RADAR processor remains uniform and free of distortion in both proposed architectures. The majority of the RADAR's electronics is implemented in digital CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor), and analog circuits are restricted to signal amplification operations and analog to digital conversion. An implementation of the proposed systems will create a 1-GHz, Direct RF-digitization Type, L-Band Digital RADAR--the highest band achievable for Nyquist Rate, Direct RF-digitization Systems that do not implement an electronic IF downsample stage (after the receiver signal amplification stage), using commercially available off-the-shelf integrated circuits.

  9. Emotional collectives: How groups shape emotions and emotions shape groups.

    van Kleef, Gerben A; Fischer, Agneta H

    2016-01-01

    Group settings are epicentres of emotional activity. Yet, the role of emotions in groups is poorly understood. How do group-level phenomena shape group members' emotional experience and expression? How are emotional expressions recognised, interpreted and shared in group settings? And how do such expressions influence the emotions, cognitions and behaviours of fellow group members and outside observers? To answer these and other questions, we draw on relevant theoretical perspectives (e.g., intergroup emotions theory, social appraisal theory and emotions as social information theory) and recent empirical findings regarding the role of emotions in groups. We organise our review according to two overarching themes: how groups shape emotions and how emotions shape groups. We show how novel empirical approaches break important new ground in uncovering the role of emotions in groups. Research on emotional collectives is thriving and constitutes a key to understanding the social nature of emotions.

  10. Odontogenic Infections: A 1-year Retrospective Study.

    Mahmoodi, Benjamin; Weusmann, Jens; Azaripour, Adriano; Braun, Benedikt; Walter, Christian; Willershausen, Brita

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence, demographic patterns and management of odontogenic infections in patients undergoing treatment in an outpatient dental emergency service of a university hospital. In a retrospective study of the year 2012, all patients suffering from odontogenic infections were included. Demographic data, diagnosis and the conducted treatment were analyzed. Odontogenic infections were defined as pulpitis, apical and marginal periodontitis, abscesses and pericoronitis. A total of 2,058 out of 4,209 emergency patients suffered from odontogenic infections. The majority (45.0%) had an apical periodontitis, 20.8% abscesses, 17.3% a marginal periodontitis, 16.3% a pulpitis and 5.8% a pericoronitis. Mean age was 37.5 ± 17.0 years standard deviation (SD) (1.2-96.4). Most patients were 20 to 29 years (24.6%), followed by the age group of 30 to 39 year old patients (21.0%). Males were affected more frequently (55.5%) than females (45.5%). Most of the patients (64.5%) of the patients received a dental or surgical treatment. Antibiotics were prescribed in 31.7% of cases. Amoxicillin was the most common prescribed antibiotic (54.5%). Odontogenic infections represent one of the main reasons for consulting the emergency service. Due to the high number of cases and the severe complications, dentists have to be familiar with the surgical management of odontogenic infections as well as the appropriate use of antibiotics. Nearly half of all patients who sought, treatment in the emergency service had an odontogenic infectious disease. This should be considered for the organization and planning of the service.

  11. A 1.375-approximation algorithm for sorting by transpositions.

    Elias, Isaac; Hartman, Tzvika

    2006-01-01

    Sorting permutations by transpositions is an important problem in genome rearrangements. A transposition is a rearrangement operation in which a segment is cut out of the permutation and pasted in a different location. The complexity of this problem is still open and it has been a 10-year-old open problem to improve the best known 1.5-approximation algorithm. In this paper, we provide a 1.375-approximation algorithm for sorting by transpositions. The algorithm is based on a new upper bound on the diameter of 3-permutations. In addition, we present some new results regarding the transposition diameter: we improve the lower bound for the transposition diameter of the symmetric group and determine the exact transposition diameter of simple permutations.

  12. Evaluation of LLTR Series II tests A-1A and A-1B test results

    Shoopak, B.F.; Amos, J.C.; Norvell, T.J.

    1980-03-01

    The standard methodology, with minor modifications provides conservative yet realistic predictions of leaksite and other sodium system pressures in the LLTR Series II vessel and piping. The good agreement between predicted and measured pressures indicates that the TRANSWRAP/RELAP modeling developed from the Series I tests is applicable to larger scale units prototypical of the Clinch River steam generator design. Calculated sodium system pressures are sensitive to several modeling parameters including rupture disc modeling, acoustic velocity in the test vessel, and flow rate from the rupture tube. The acoustic velocity which produced best agreement with leaksite pressures was calculated based on the shroud diameter and shroud wall thickness. The corresponding rupture tube discharge coefficient was that of the standard design methodology developed from Series I testing. As found in Series I testing, the Series II data suggests that the leading edge of the flow in the relief line is two phase for a single, doubled-ended guillotine tube rupture. The steam generator shroud acts as if it is relatively transparent to the transmission of radial pressures to the vessel wall. Slightly lower sodium system maximum pressures measured during Test A-1b compared to Test A-1a are attributed to premature failure (failure at a lower pressure) of the rupture disc in contact with the sodium for test A-1b. The delay in failure of the second disc in Test A-1b, which was successfully modeled with TRANSWRAP, is attributed to the limited energy in the nitrogen injection

  13. Particle physics with kaons, muons and neutrinos. Summary of JHF K-Arena working groups 1a/1b

    Kuno, Yoshitaka [High Energy Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Littenberg, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The areas of rare K and {mu} decays and of neutrino oscillations are very active at the present time, and there is little reason to doubt that this will continue to be the case in the JHF era. The session featured talks describing the present status and projected future activity in these areas.

  14. Particle physics with kaons, muons and neutrinos. Summary of JHF K-Arena working groups 1a/1b

    Kuno, Yoshitaka; Littenberg, L.

    1998-01-01

    The areas of rare K and μ decays and of neutrino oscillations are very active at the present time, and there is little reason to doubt that this will continue to be the case in the JHF era. The session featured talks describing the present status and projected future activity in these areas

  15. Physical interaction between the strawberry allergen Fra a 1 and an associated partner FaAP: Interaction of Fra a 1 proteins and FaAP.

    Franz-Oberdorf, Katrin; Langer, Andreas; Strasser, Ralf; Isono, Erika; Ranftl, Quirin L; Wunschel, Christian; Schwab, Wilfried

    2017-10-01

    The strawberry fruit allergens Fra a 1.01E, Fra a 1.02 and Fra a 1.03 belong to the group of pathogenesis-related 10 (PR-10) proteins and are homologs of the major birch pollen Bet v 1 and apple allergen Mal d 1. Bet v 1 related proteins are the most extensively studied allergens but their physiological function in planta remains elusive. Since Mal d 1-Associated Protein has been previously identified as interaction partner of Mal d 1 we studied the binding of the orthologous Fra a 1-Associated Protein (FaAP) to Fra a 1.01E/1.02/1.03. As the C-terminal sequence of FaAP showed strong auto-activation activity in yeast 2-hybrid analysis a novel time resolved DNA-switching system was successfully applied. Fra a 1.01E, Fra a 1.02, and Fra a 1.03 bind to FaAP with K D of 4.5 ± 1.1, 15 ± 3, and 11 ± 2 nM, respectively. Fra a 1.01E forms a dimer, whereas Fra a 1.02 and Fra a 1.03 bind as monomer. The results imply that PR-10 proteins might be integrated into a protein-interaction network and FaAP binding appears to be essential for the physiological function of the Fra a 1 proteins. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. APOLIPOPROTEIN B/A1 IS INDEPENDENTLY ASSOCIATED WITH CAROTID INTIMAL-MEDIAL THICKNESS IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE PATIENTS.

    Il Young Ki

    2012-06-01

    In conclusion, this study showed serum apo B/A1 ratio was independently associated with CIMT only in CKD group, not in non-CKD group. Because CIMT is a strong predictor of CVD, the result of this study demonstrates serum apo B/A1 ratio could be included in cardiovascular risk stratification in CKD patients

  17. Group performance and group learning at dynamic system control tasks

    Drewes, Sylvana

    2013-01-01

    Proper management of dynamic systems (e.g. cooling systems of nuclear power plants or production and warehousing) is important to ensure public safety and economic success. So far, research has provided broad evidence for systematic shortcomings in individuals' control performance of dynamic systems. This research aims to investigate whether groups manifest synergy (Larson, 2010) and outperform individuals and if so, what processes lead to these performance advantages. In three experiments - including simulations of a nuclear power plant and a business setting - I compare the control performance of three-person-groups to the average individual performance and to nominal groups (N = 105 groups per experiment). The nominal group condition captures the statistical advantage of aggregated group judgements not due to social interaction. First, results show a superior performance of groups compared to individuals. Second, a meta-analysis across all three experiments shows interaction-based process gains in dynamic control tasks: Interacting groups outperform the average individual performance as well as the nominal group performance. Third, group interaction leads to stable individual improvements of group members that exceed practice effects. In sum, these results provide the first unequivocal evidence for interaction-based performance gains of groups in dynamic control tasks and imply that employers should rely on groups to provide opportunities for individual learning and to foster dynamic system control at its best.

  18. Diazo groups endure metabolism and enable chemoselectivity in cellulo.

    Andersen, Kristen A; Aronoff, Matthew R; McGrath, Nicholas A; Raines, Ronald T

    2015-02-25

    We introduce a stabilized diazo group as a reporter for chemical biology. ManDiaz, which is a diazo derivative of N-acetylmannosamine, is found to endure cellular metabolism and label the surface of a mammalian cell. There its diazo group can undergo a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition with a strained alkyne, providing a signal comparable to that from the azido congener, ManNAz. The chemoselectivity of diazo and alkynyl groups enables dual labeling of cells that is not possible with azido and alkynyl groups. Thus, the diazo group, which is approximately half the size of an azido group, provides unique opportunities for orthogonal labeling of cellular components.

  19. Does group efficacy increase group identification? Resolving their paradoxical relationship

    van Zomeren, Martijn; Leach, Colin Wayne; Spears, Russell

    2010-01-01

    Although group identification and group efficacy are both important predictors of collective action against collective disadvantage, there is mixed evidence for their (causal) relationship. Meta-analytic and correlational evidence suggests an overall positive relationship that has been interpreted

  20. Secure Group Communications for Large Dynamic Multicast Group

    Liu Jing; Zhou Mingtian

    2003-01-01

    As the major problem in multicast security, the group key management has been the focus of research But few results are satisfactory. In this paper, the problems of group key management and access control for large dynamic multicast group have been researched and a solution based on SubGroup Secure Controllers (SGSCs) is presented, which solves many problems in IOLUS system and WGL scheme.

  1. How to conduct focus groups: researching group priorities through discussion.

    1992-01-01

    Focus groups serve to uncover priorities and beliefs of a target group, but health project designers do not always take the time to seek this information beforehand. Focus groups also allow various local subgroups to communicate their concerns before the project starts. Focus groups can also breed ideas and dialogue that individual interviews cannot and they provide baseline information so managers can determine if attitudes or priorities have resulted from the project. Diverse people have different beliefs, e.g., women who have young children view oral rehydration therapy differently from women with no children. Project designers can use these basic differences to arrive at some conclusions about general attitudes. Focus group facilitators should have a discussion outline to help keep the group on the topic of concern. They should limit sessions to 60-90 minutes. Each focus groups should include 8-10 people. It is important to have members of various community subgroups in each group. Yet group designers should be careful not to include within the same group, those who may intimidate other people in the group, e.g., in situations where farmers depend on middlemen, farmers may not be open if middlemen are also in the focus group. Facilitators should launch each session with an attempt to encourage the members to be open and to feel comfortable. For example, in Malawi, a facilitator leads her focus group discussions with songs. Stories are another icebreaker. It is important that all focus groups centering around a certain project discuss the same topics. Facilitators need to stress to the group that all discussions are to be kept confidential. The designers should also carefully word the questions so that facilitators will not impart their bias. Facilitators should not direct the group to certain conclusions, but instead keep the discussions focused.

  2. Group covariance and metrical theory

    Halpern, L.

    1983-01-01

    The a priori introduction of a Lie group of transformations into a physical theory has often proved to be useful; it usually serves to describe special simplified conditions before a general theory can be worked out. Newton's assumptions of absolute space and time are examples where the Euclidian group and translation group have been introduced. These groups were extended to the Galilei group and modified in the special theory of relativity to the Poincare group to describe physics under the given conditions covariantly in the simplest way. The criticism of the a priori character leads to the formulation of the general theory of relativity. The general metric theory does not really give preference to a particular invariance group - even the principle of equivalence can be adapted to a whole family of groups. The physical laws covariantly inserted into the metric space are however adapted to the Poincare group. 8 references

  3. Defining and Classifying Interest Groups

    Baroni, Laura; Carroll, Brendan; Chalmers, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The interest group concept is defined in many different ways in the existing literature and a range of different classification schemes are employed. This complicates comparisons between different studies and their findings. One of the important tasks faced by interest group scholars engaged...... in large-N studies is therefore to define the concept of an interest group and to determine which classification scheme to use for different group types. After reviewing the existing literature, this article sets out to compare different approaches to defining and classifying interest groups with a sample...... in the organizational attributes of specific interest group types. As expected, our comparison of coding schemes reveals a closer link between group attributes and group type in narrower classification schemes based on group organizational characteristics than those based on a behavioral definition of lobbying....

  4. What Is a Group? Young Children's Perceptions of Different Types of Groups and Group Entitativity.

    Maria Plötner

    Full Text Available To date, developmental research on groups has focused mainly on in-group biases and intergroup relations. However, little is known about children's general understanding of social groups and their perceptions of different forms of group. In this study, 5- to 6-year-old children were asked to evaluate prototypes of four key types of groups: an intimacy group (friends, a task group (people who are collaborating, a social category (people who look alike, and a loose association (people who coincidently meet at a tram stop. In line with previous work with adults, the vast majority of children perceived the intimacy group, task group, and social category, but not the loose association, to possess entitativity, that is, to be a 'real group.' In addition, children evaluated group member properties, social relations, and social obligations differently in each type of group, demonstrating that young children are able to distinguish between different types of in-group relations. The origins of the general group typology used by adults thus appear early in development. These findings contribute to our knowledge about children's intuitive understanding of groups and group members' behavior.

  5. Effectiveness of Group Supervision versus Combined Group and Individual Supervision.

    Ray, Dee; Altekruse, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of different types of supervision (large group, small group, combined group, individual supervision) with counseling students (N=64). Analyses revealed that all supervision formats resulted in similar progress in counselor effectiveness and counselor development. Participants voiced a preference for individual…

  6. Group Insight Versus Group Desensitization in Treating Speech Anxiety

    Meichenbaum, Donald H.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Results of this study indicated that the insight group was as effective as the desensitization group in significantly reducing speech anxiety over control group levels as assessed by behavioral, cognitive, and self-report measures given immediately after posttreatment and later at a three-month follow-up. (Author)

  7. Re-Examining Group Development in Adventure Therapy Groups.

    DeGraaf, Don; Ashby, Jeff

    1998-01-01

    Small-group development is an important aspect of adventure therapy. Supplementing knowledge of sequential stages of group development with knowledge concerning within-stage nonsequential development yields a richer understanding of groups. Integrating elements of the individual counseling relationship (working alliance, transference, and real…

  8. Saving Face and Group Identity

    Eriksson, Tor; Mao, Lei; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    2015-01-01

    their self- but also other group members' image. This behavior is frequent even in the absence of group identity. When group identity is more salient, individuals help regardless of whether the least performer is an in-group or an out-group. This suggests that saving others' face is a strong social norm.......Are people willing to sacrifice resources to save one's and others' face? In a laboratory experiment, we study whether individuals forego resources to avoid the public exposure of the least performer in their group. We show that a majority of individuals are willing to pay to preserve not only...

  9. Association of Hemoglobin A1c and Wound Healing in Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Fesseha, Betiel K; Abularrage, Christopher J; Hines, Kathryn F; Sherman, Ronald; Frost, Priscilla; Langan, Susan; Canner, Joseph; Likes, Kendall C; Hosseini, Sayed M; Jack, Gwendolyne; Hicks, Caitlin W; Yalamanchi, Swaytha; Mathioudakis, Nestoras

    2018-04-16

    This study evaluated the association between hemoglobin A 1c (A1C) and wound outcomes in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). We conducted a retrospective analysis of an ongoing prospective, clinic-based study of patients with DFUs treated at an academic institution during a 4.7-year period. Data from 270 participants and 584 wounds were included in the analysis. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess the incidence of wound healing at any follow-up time in relation to categories of baseline A1C and the incidence of long-term (≥90 days) wound healing in relation to tertiles of nadir A1C change and mean A1C change from baseline, adjusted for potential confounders. Baseline A1C was not associated with wound healing in univariate or fully adjusted models. Compared with a nadir A1C change from baseline of -0.29 to 0.0 (tertile 2), a nadir A1C change of 0.09 to 2.4 (tertile 3) was positively associated with long-term wound healing in the subset of participants with baseline A1C healing was seen with the mean A1C change from baseline in this group. Neither nadir A1C change nor mean A1C change were associated with long-term wound healing in participants with baseline A1C ≥7.5%. There does not appear to be a clinically meaningful association between baseline or prospective A1C and wound healing in patients with DFUs. The paradoxical finding of accelerated wound healing and increase in A1C in participants with better baseline glycemic control requires confirmation in further studies. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  10. HbA1c levels in individuals heterozygous for hemoglobin variants.

    Tavares, Ricardo Silva; Souza, Fábio Oliveira de; Francescantonio, Isabel Cristina Carvalho Medeiros; Soares, Weslley Carvalho; Mesquita, Mauro Meira

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in patients heterozygous for hemoglobin variants and compare the results of this test with those of a control group. This was an experimental study based on the comparison of HbA1c tests in two different populations, with a test group represented by individuals heterozygous for hemoglobin variants (AS and AC) and a control group consisting of people with electrophoretic profile AA. The two populations were required to meet the following inclusion criteria: Normal levels of fasting glucose, hemoglobin, urea and triglycerides, bilirubin > 20 mg/dL and non-use of acetylsalicylic acid. 50 heterozygous subjects and 50 controls were evaluated between August 2013 and May 2014. The comparison of HbA1c levels between heterozygous individuals and control subjects was performed based on standard deviation, mean and G-Test. The study assessed a test group and a control group, both with 39 adults and 11 children. The mean among heterozygous adults for HbA1c was 5.0%, while the control group showed a rate of 5.74%. Heterozygous children presented mean HbA1c at 5.11%, while the controls were at 5.78%. G-Test yielded p=0.93 for children and p=0.89 for adults. Our study evaluated HbA1c using ion exchange chromatography resins, and the patients heterozygous for hemoglobin variants showed no significant difference from the control group.

  11. Enhancing Social Communication Between Groups

    T. Stevens; P. Hughes (Peter); D. Williams; I. Craigie; I. Kegel; P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); A.J. Jansen (Jack); M.F. Usrsu; M. Frantzis; N. Farber; M. Lutzky; S. Vogel

    2010-01-01

    htmlabstractThis paper describes a prototype software platform that supports advanced communications services, specifically services enabling effective group-to-group communications with a social purpose, between remote homes. The architecture, the individual components, their interfaces, and the

  12. Coordinated Control of Vehicle Groups

    Kumar, Vijay

    2004-01-01

    .... There are three main objectives: (1) to develop a theoretical paradigm for formalizing the concepts of a group, a team, and control of groups, with specified tasks such as exploring, mapping, searching, and transporting objects; (2...

  13. Criminal groups and criminal subculture

    Romanova N.M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a classification of criminal groups, structured by the following parameters: a) operation mode (secret/open), b) law-enforcement and administrative support (presence/absence). We describe four types of criminal groups: a) legitimized criminal organization, b) secret criminal organization engaged in illegal business, c) secret general crime group, and d) general crime group operating openly. The four types differ in the content of criminal subculture. Modern criminal subcult...

  14. Group Cooperation in Outdoor Education

    Matthews, Bruce E.

    1978-01-01

    Utilizing the Beatles' Yellow Submarine fantasy (e.g., the Blue Meanies), this outdoor education program is designed for sixth graders and special education students. Activities developed at the Cortland Resident Outdoor Education Camp include a series of group stress/challenge activities to be accomplished by everyone in the group, as a group.…

  15. Reinterpreting between-group inequality

    Elbers, C.T.M.; Lanjouw, P.F.; Mistiaen, J.; Özler, B

    2008-01-01

    We evaluate observed inequality between population groups against a benchmark of the maximum between-group inequality attainable given the number and relative sizes of those groups under examination. Because our measure is normalized by these parameters, drawing comparisons across different settings

  16. Ability Grouping in Social Studies.

    Social Education, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a position statement of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS). Reports that the NCSS objects to ability grouping in social studies. Argues that ability grouping disadvantages minority, handicapped, and low ability students. Suggests that ability grouping undermines the democratic ideals that should be the basis of the social…

  17. Conceptualizing Group Flow: A Framework

    Duncan, Jana; West, Richard E.

    2018-01-01

    This literature review discusses the similarities in main themes between Csikszentmihályi theory of individual flow and Sawyer theory of group flow, and compares Sawyer's theory with existing concepts in the literature on group work both in education and business. Because much creativity and innovation occurs within groups, understanding group…

  18. Diagram Techniques in Group Theory

    Stedman, Geoffrey E.

    2009-09-01

    Preface; 1. Elementary examples; 2. Angular momentum coupling diagram techniques; 3. Extension to compact simple phase groups; 4. Symmetric and unitary groups; 5. Lie groups and Lie algebras; 6. Polarisation dependence of multiphoton processes; 7. Quantum field theoretic diagram techniques for atomic systems; 8. Applications; Appendix; References; Indexes.

  19. Designing for informed group formation

    Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh; Juel Jacobsen, Alice; Riis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    A new design ―project preparation‖ preparing for the group formation in problem based project work is proposed and investigated. The main problem is to overcome group formation based on existing relations. The hypothesis is that theme development and group formation are somewhat counterproductive...

  20. Working with Difficult Group Members.

    Kottler, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Describes types of group members who are challenging in group settings including entitled, manipulative, and character-disordered clients. Provides suggestions for working with these group members, either as isolated cases or as homogenous populations, emphasizing the protection of other clients' rights. Includes 31 references. (Author/CRR)