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Sample records for high-mobility copper-phthalocyanine field-effect

  1. High-mobility solution-processed copper phthalocyanine-based organic field-effect transistors

    Nandu B Chaure, Andrew N Cammidge, Isabelle Chambrier, Michael J Cook, Markys G Cain, Craig E Murphy, Chandana Pal and Asim K Ray

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed films of 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octakis(hexyl copper phthalocyanine (CuPc6 were utilized as an active semiconducting layer in the fabrication of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs in the bottom-gate configurations using chemical vapour deposited silicon dioxide (SiO2 as gate dielectrics. The surface treatment of the gate dielectric with a self-assembled monolayer of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS resulted in values of 4×10−2 cm2 V−1 s−1 and 106 for saturation mobility and on/off current ratio, respectively. This improvement was accompanied by a shift in the threshold voltage from 3 V for untreated devices to -2 V for OTS treated devices. The trap density at the interface between the gate dielectric and semiconductor decreased by about one order of magnitude after the surface treatment. The transistors with the OTS treated gate dielectrics were more stable over a 30-day period in air than untreated ones.

  2. Fluorinated copper-phthalocyanine-based n-type organic field-effect transistors with a polycarbonate gate insulator

    Sethuraman, Kunjithapatham; Kumar, Palanisamy; Santhakumar, Kannappan; Ochiai, Shizuyasu; Shin, Paikkyun

    2012-01-01

    Fluorinated copper-phthalocyanine (F 16 CuPc) thin films were prepared by using a vacuum evaporation technique and were applied to n-type organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) as active channel layers combined with a spin-coated polycarbonate thin-film gate insulator. The output characteristics of the resulting n-type OFET devices with bottom-gate/bottom-contact structures were investigated to evaluate the performances such as the field effect mobility (μ FE ), the on/off current ratio (I on/off ), and the threshold voltage (V th ). A relatively high field effect mobility of 6.0 x 10 -3 cm 2 /Vs was obtained for the n-type semiconductor under atmospheric conditions with an on/off current ratio of 1 x 10 4 and a threshold voltage of 5 V. The electron mobility of the n-type semiconductor was found to depend strongly on the growth temperature of the F 16 CuPc thin films. X-ray diffraction profiles showed that the crystallinity and the orientation of the F 16 CuPc on a polycarbonate thin film were enhanced with increasing growth temperature. Atomic force microscopy studies revealed various surface morphologies of the active layer. The field effect mobility of the F 16 CuPc-OFET was closely related to the crystallinity and the orientation of the F 16 CuPc thin film.

  3. High mobility polymer gated organic field effect transistor using zinc ...

    Organic thin film transistors were fabricated using evaporated zinc phthalocyanine as the active layer. Parylene film ... At room temperature, these transistors exhibit p-type conductivity with field-effect ... Keywords. Organic semiconductor; field effect transistor; phthalocyanine; high mobility. ... The evaporation rate was kept at ...

  4. Separation of copper-64 from copper phthalocyanine

    Battaglin, R.I.M.

    1979-01-01

    The separation of copper-64 from irradiated copper phthalocyanine by Szilard-Chalmers effect is studied. Two methods of separation are used: one of them is based on the dissolution of the irradiated dry compound in concentrated sulfuric acid following its precipitation in water. In the other one the compound is irradiated with water in paste form following treatment with water and hydrochloric acid. The influence of the crystal form of the copper phthalocyanine on the separation yield of copper-64 is shown. Preliminary tests using the ionic exchange technique for purification and changing of copper-64 sulfate to chloride form are carried out. The specific activity using the spectrophotometric technique, after the determination of the copper concentration in solution of copper-64, is calculated. (Author) [pt

  5. Diketopyrrolopyrrole-diketopyrrolopyrrole-based conjugated copolymer for high-mobility organic field-effect transistors

    Kanimozhi, Catherine K.; Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Chou, Kang Wei; Amassian, Aram; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Patil, Satish P.

    2012-01-01

    In this communication, we report the synthesis of a novel diketopyrrolopyrrole-diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP-DPP)-based conjugated copolymer and its application in high-mobility organic field-effect transistors. Copolymerization of DPP with DPP yields a

  6. Diketopyrrolopyrrole-diketopyrrolopyrrole-based conjugated copolymer for high-mobility organic field-effect transistors

    Kanimozhi, Catherine K.

    2012-10-10

    In this communication, we report the synthesis of a novel diketopyrrolopyrrole-diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP-DPP)-based conjugated copolymer and its application in high-mobility organic field-effect transistors. Copolymerization of DPP with DPP yields a copolymer with exceptional properties such as extended absorption characteristics (up to ∼1100 nm) and field-effect electron mobility values of >1 cm 2 V -1 s -1. The synthesis of this novel DPP-DPP copolymer in combination with the demonstration of transistors with extremely high electron mobility makes this work an important step toward a new family of DPP-DPP copolymers for application in the general area of organic optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. Dithiopheneindenofluorene (TIF) Semiconducting Polymers with Very High Mobility in Field-Effect Transistors

    Chen, Hu

    2017-07-19

    The charge-carrier mobility of organic semiconducting polymers is known to be enhanced when the energetic disorder of the polymer is minimized. Fused, planar aromatic ring structures contribute to reducing the polymer conformational disorder, as demonstrated by polymers containing the indacenodithiophene (IDT) repeat unit, which have both a low Urbach energy and a high mobility in thin-film-transistor (TFT) devices. Expanding on this design motif, copolymers containing the dithiopheneindenofluorene repeat unit are synthesized, which extends the fused aromatic structure with two additional phenyl rings, further rigidifying the polymer backbone. A range of copolymers are prepared and their electrical properties and thin-film morphology evaluated, with the co-benzothiadiazole polymer having a twofold increase in hole mobility when compared to the IDT analog, reaching values of almost 3 cm2 V−1 s−1 in bottom-gate top-contact organic field-effect transistors.

  8. Effect of thickness and temperature of copper phthalocyanine films on their properties

    Alieva Kh. S.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The research has shown that copper phthalocyanine films, having a set of unique properties, can be successfully used as gas-sensitive coating of resistive structures. The thickness of the film, in contrast to its temperature, is not the determining factor for high sensitivity. Low operating temperature of structures with copper phthalocyanine films allows to exploit them in economy mode.

  9. Field effect in the quantum Hall regime of a high mobility graphene wire

    Barraud, C., E-mail: cbarraud@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: clement.barraud@univ-paris-diderot.fr; Choi, T.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Butti, P.; Shorubalko, I. [Swiss Federal Laboratories of Materials Science and Technologies, EMPA Elect. Metrol. Reliabil. Lab., CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-08-21

    In graphene-based electronic devices like in transistors, the field effect applied thanks to a gate electrode allows tuning the charge density in the graphene layer and passing continuously from the electron to the hole doped regime across the Dirac point. Homogeneous doping is crucial to understand electrical measurements and for the operation of future graphene-based electronic devices. However, recently theoretical and experimental studies highlighted the role of the electrostatic edge due to fringing electrostatic field lines at the graphene edges [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008); F. T. Vasko and I. V. Zozoulenko, Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 092115 (2010)]. This effect originates from the particular geometric design of the samples. A direct consequence is a charge accumulation at the graphene edges giving a value for the density, which deviates from the simple picture of a plate capacitor and also varies along the width of the graphene sample. Entering the quantum Hall regime would, in principle, allow probing this accumulation thanks to the extreme sensitivity of this quantum effect to charge density and the charge distribution. Moreover, the presence of an additional and counter-propagating edge channel has been predicted [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008)] giving a fundamental aspect to this technological issue. In this article, we investigate this effect by tuning a high mobility graphene wire into the quantum Hall regime in which charge carriers probe the electrostatic potential at high magnetic field close to the edges. We observe a slight deviation to the linear shift of the quantum Hall plateaus with magnetic field and we study its evolution for different filling factors, which correspond to different probed regions in real space. We discuss the possible origins of this effect including an increase of the charge density towards the edges.

  10. High mobility organic field-effect transistor based on water-soluble deoxyribonucleic acid via spray coating

    Shi, Wei; Han, Shijiao; Huang, Wei; Yu, Junsheng, E-mail: jsyu@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-01-26

    High mobility organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) by inserting water-soluble deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) buffer layer between electrodes and pentacene film through spray coating process were fabricated. Compared with the OFETs incorporated with DNA in the conventional organic solvents of ethanol and methanol: water mixture, the water-soluble DNA based OFET exhibited an over four folds enhancement of field-effect mobility from 0.035 to 0.153 cm{sup 2}/Vs. By characterizing the surface morphology and the crystalline structure of pentacene active layer through atomic force microscope and X-ray diffraction, it was found that the adoption of water solvent in DNA solution, which played a key role in enhancing the field-effect mobility, was ascribed to both the elimination of the irreversible organic solvent-induced bulk-like phase transition of pentacene film and the diminution of a majority of charge trapping at interfaces in OFETs.

  11. Copper phthalocyanine and metal free phthalocyanine bulk heterojunction photodetector

    Farooq, Amjad, E-mail: amjad.farooq1212@hotmail.com [Wah Engineering College, University of Wah, Wah Cantt. 47040 (Pakistan); GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi 23640, Swabi (Pakistan); Karimov, Kh.S. [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi 23640, Swabi (Pakistan); Physical Technical Institute, Aini St. 299/1, Dushanbe 734063 (Tajikistan); Ahmed, Nisar; Ali, Taimoor [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi 23640, Swabi (Pakistan); Khalid Alamgir, M. [National Institute of Vacuum Science and Technology, NCP complex, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Usman, Muhammad [Experimental Physics Laboratories, National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2015-01-15

    In this study we present the dependence of electrical properties of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and metal free phthalocyanine (H{sub 2}Pc) bulk heterojunction structure under different illumination levels. To fabricate the device on ITO coated glass substrate the bulk heterojunction thin film of CuPc and H{sub 2}Pc with thickness varying from 100 nm to 300 nm are deposited by thermal evaporator. Aluminum thin film was deposited by thermal evaporation as a top contact. The optical properties of the fabricated device are investigated using UV–vis spectroscopy. The current-voltage characteristics in dark and under illumination show that the device is sensitive towards visible light. The absorption spectrum describes its photo sensitivity in the range of wavelength from 200 nm to 850 nm. Simulation of current-intensity of light curve is carried out and experimental results are found in good agreement with simulated ones.

  12. Copper phthalocyanine and metal free phthalocyanine bulk heterojunction photodetector

    Farooq, Amjad; Karimov, Kh.S.; Ahmed, Nisar; Ali, Taimoor; Khalid Alamgir, M.; Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    In this study we present the dependence of electrical properties of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and metal free phthalocyanine (H 2 Pc) bulk heterojunction structure under different illumination levels. To fabricate the device on ITO coated glass substrate the bulk heterojunction thin film of CuPc and H 2 Pc with thickness varying from 100 nm to 300 nm are deposited by thermal evaporator. Aluminum thin film was deposited by thermal evaporation as a top contact. The optical properties of the fabricated device are investigated using UV–vis spectroscopy. The current-voltage characteristics in dark and under illumination show that the device is sensitive towards visible light. The absorption spectrum describes its photo sensitivity in the range of wavelength from 200 nm to 850 nm. Simulation of current-intensity of light curve is carried out and experimental results are found in good agreement with simulated ones

  13. Sensing of volatile organic compounds by copper phthalocyanine thin films

    Ridhi, R.; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    Thin films of copper phthalocyanine have been deposited by thermal evaporation technique. We have subsequently exposed these films to the vapours of methanol, ethanol and propanol. Optical absorption, infrared spectra and electrical conductivities of these films before and after exposure to chemical vapours have been recorded in order to study their sensing mechanisms towards organic vapours. These films exhibit maximum sensing response to methanol while low sensitivities of the films towards ethanol and propanol have been observed. The changes in sensitivities have been correlated with presence of carbon groups in the chemical vapours. The effect of different types of electrodes on response-recovery times of the thin film with organic vapours has been studied and compared. The electrodes gap distance affects the sensitivity as well as response-recovery time values of the thin films.

  14. Organic phthalocyanine films with high mobilities for efficient field-effect transistor switches

    Schauer, F.; Zhivkov, I.; Nešpůrek, Stanislav

    266-269, 1-3 (2000), s. 999-1003 ISSN 0022-3093. [International Conference on Amorphous and Microcrystalline Semiconductors /18./. Snowbird, 23.08.1999-27.08.1999] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 518.10; GA AV ČR KSK2050602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : phthalocyanine * charge mobility * field-effect transistor Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.269, year: 2000

  15. Polarization sensitive detection of 100 GHz radiation by high mobility field-effect transistors

    Sakowicz, M.; Lusakowski, J.; Karpierz, K.; Grynberg, M.; Knap, W.; Gwarek, W.

    2008-01-01

    Detection of 100 GHz electromagnetic radiation by a GaAs/AlGaAs high electron mobility field-effect transistor was investigated at 300 K as a function of the angle α between the direction of linear polarization of the radiation and the symmetry axis of the transistor. The angular dependence of the detected signal was found to be A 0 cos 2 (α-α 0 )+C with A 0 , α 0 , and C dependent on the electrical polarization of the transistor gate. This dependence is interpreted as due to excitation of two crossed phase-shifted oscillators. A response of the transistor chip (including bonding wires and the substrate) to 100 GHz radiation was numerically simulated. Results of calculations confirmed experimentally observed dependencies and showed that the two oscillators result from an interplay of 100 GHz currents defined by the transistor impedance together with bonding wires and substrate related modes

  16. Decolorization Treatment of Copper Phthalocyanine Textile Dye Wastewater by Electrochemical Methods

    K. Dermentzis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical decolorization and degradation treatment of aqueous copper phthalocyanine reactive dye solutions was comparatively studied by electrocoagulation, electrooxidation and electro-Fenton processes. In the electrocoagulation process with aluminum electrodes the colored aqueous solutions of initial pH 6.4 containing 50 mg L-1 copper phthalocyanine and 6 g L-1 NaCl were treated at applied current densities of 2.5 and 5 mA cm-2. Fast and 100% decolorization was achieved in 4 and 2 minutes of electroprocessing respectively. The indirect electrooxidation process was conducted in acidic electrolyte solutions containing 50 mg L-1 copper phthalocyanine and 6 g L-1 NaCl with Ti/Pt and graphite plate electrodes at the applied current density of 10 mA cm-2. Even after 90 minutes of electrolysis time the dye remained by 23 and 18.8 % respectively undegradable. By the direct and indirect electrooxidation with the same amount of Na2SO4 electrolyte and added H2O2 respectively and using the same electrodes, the copper phthalocyanine dye was not or was only barely degraded respectively. In the electro-Fenton process with Fe electrodes and added amounts of H2O2 at pH 3 and an applied current density of 5 mA/cm2 complete degradation of copper phthalocyanine occurred in 15 minutes.

  17. Multi-polar resistance switching and memory effect in copper phthalocyanine junctions

    Qiao Shi-Zhu; Kang Shi-Shou; Li Qiang; Zhong Hai; Kang Yun; Yu Shu-Yun; Han Guang-Bing; Yan Shi-Shen; Mei Liang-Mo; Qin Yu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Copper phthalocyanine junctions, fabricated by magnetron sputtering and evaporating methods, show multi-polar (unipolar and bipolar) resistance switching and the memory effect. The multi-polar resistance switching has not been observed simultaneously in one organic material before. With both electrodes being cobalt, the unipolar resistance switching is universal. The high resistance state is switched to the low resistance state when the bias reaches the set voltage. Generally, the set voltage increases with the thickness of copper phthalocyanine and decreases with increasing dwell time of bias. Moreover, the low resistance state could be switched to the high resistance state by absorbing the phonon energy. The stability of the low resistance state could be tuned by different electrodes. In Au/copper phthalocyanine/Co system, the low resistance state is far more stable, and the bipolar resistance switching is found. Temperature dependence of electrical transport measurements demonstrates that there are no obvious differences in the electrical transport mechanism before and after the resistance switching. They fit quite well with Mott variable range hopping theory. The effect of Al 2 O 3 on the resistance switching is excluded by control experiments. The holes trapping and detrapping in copper phthalocyanine layer are responsible for the resistance switching, and the interfacial effect between electrodes and copper phthalocyanine layer affects the memory effect. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  18. Hole Mobility of Molecular β-Copper Phthalocyanine Crystal

    Pengmanayol, S.; Osotchan, T.; Suewattana, M.; Ingadapa, N.; Girdpun, J.

    2011-01-01

    A Monte Carlo approach is used to estimate hole mobilities in molecular β-copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) crystal for different applied electric field directions. Due to the crystal symmetry, the twelve neighboring molecules in the three-dimensional crystal are selected in the hopping rate calculation. Density functional theory is employed to derive the molecular interaction between the central and neighboring molecules for various applied electric fields. The derived molecular hopping rate is applied to 80 × 80 × 80 lattice sites under periodic boundary conditions. In order to achieve accurate statistics, each calculation includes 6561 particles with more than 10000 hopping steps under an applied electric field of 0.5–3.5 MV/cm. The results indicate that the molecular hopping strongly depends on the molecular orientation and neighboring sites related to the applied electric field direction. The estimated carrier mobility can be described by the percentage occupation in each neighboring site and the obtained hole mobility value is in the same range of the measured values of single crystal CuPc. The calculated mobility for applied electric field along the c crystal axis exhibits the highest values while the mobility along the b axis has the smallest value. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  19. Hindered rotation of a copper phthalocyanine molecule on C60 : Experiments and molecular mechanics calculations

    Fendrich, M.; Wagner, Th.; Stöhr, M.; Möller, R.

    2006-01-01

    If copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules are deposited on a Au(111) surface covered with a monolayer of C60, the molecules are found to adsorb individually onto the close-packed layer of C60. As the adsorption site of the CuPc is not symmetric with respect to the underlying C60 layer, the CuPc

  20. Dynamics of copper-phthalocyanine molecules on Au/Ge(001)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Heimbuch, Rene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Spatially resolved current-time scanning tunneling spectroscopy combined with current-distance spectroscopy has been used to characterize the dynamic behavior of copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules adsorbed on a Au-modified Ge(001) surface. The analyzed CuPc molecules are adsorbed in a “molecular

  1. Binary molecular layers of C-60 and copper phthalocyanine on Au(111) : Self-organized nanostructuring

    Stöhr, Meike; Wagner, Thorsten; Gabriel, Markus; Weyers, Bastian; Möller, Rolf

    The binary molecular system of C-60 and copper phthalocyanine(CuPc) molecules has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at room temperature and at 50 K. As substrate Au(111) was chosen. When C-60 and CuPc molecules are sequentially deposited, it is found that well-ordered domains

  2. Electronic properties and orbital-filling mechanism in Rb-intercalated copper phthalocyanine

    Evangelista, F.; Gotter, R.; Mahne, N.; Nannarone, S.; Ruocco, A.; Rudolf, P.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of the electronic properties of a thin film of copper phthalocyanine deposited on Al(100) and progressively intercalated with rubidium atoms was followed by photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. Electron donation from the Rb atoms to the C32H16N8Cu molecules results in the

  3. Electronic structure of copper phthalocyanine : An experimental and theoretical study of occupied and unoccupied levels

    Evangelista, Fabrizio; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Stefani, Giovanni; Jansik, Branislav; Alagia, Michele; Stranges, Stefano; Ruocco, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the electronic structure of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecule is presented. We performed x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and photoabsorption [x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES)] gas phase experiments and we compared the results with

  4. Air-stable π-conjugated amorphous copolymer field-effect transistors with high mobility of 0.3 cm2/Vs

    Georgakopoulos, S.; Gu, Y.; Nielsen, Martin Meedom

    2012-01-01

    We have fabricated organic bottom-contact top-gate field-effect transistors with an indenofluorene-phenanthrene co-polymer semiconductor, exhibiting ON/OFF ratio of 10(7) and uncommonly high mobility for an amorphous conjugated polymer of up to 0.3 cm(2)/Vs. Lack of crystallinity in this material...

  5. Comparison of interaction mechanisms of copper phthalocyanine and nickel phthalocyanine thin films with chemical vapours

    Ridhi, R.; Singh, Sukhdeep; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K.

    2018-04-01

    The present study deals with comparing interaction mechanisms of copper phthalocyanine and nickel phthalocyanine with versatile chemical vapours: reducing, stable aromatic and oxidizing vapours namely; diethylamine, benzene and bromine. The variation in electrical current of phthalocyanines with exposure of chemical vapours is used as the detection parameter for studying interaction behaviour. Nickel phthalocyanine is found to exhibit anomalous behaviour after exposure of reducing vapour diethylamine due to alteration in its spectroscopic transitions and magnetic states. The observed sensitivities of copper phthalocyanine and nickel phthalcyanine films are different in spite of their similar bond numbers, indicating significant role of central metal atom in interaction mechanism. The variations in electronic transition levels after vapours exposure, studied using UV-Visible spectroscopy confirmed our electrical sensing results. Bromine exposure leads to significant changes in vibrational bands of metal phthalocyanines as compared to other vapours.

  6. Sensing response of copper phthalocyanine salt dispersed glass with organic vapours

    Ridhi, R.; Sachdeva, Sheenam; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K., E-mail: surya@pu.ac.in [Department of Physics, Center of Advanced Study in Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160 014 (INDIA) Fax: +91-172-2783336; Tel.:+91-172-2544362 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Copper Phthalocyanine and other Metal Phthalocyanines are very flexible and tuned easily to modify their structural, spectroscopic, optical and electrical properties by either functionalizing them with various substituent groups or by replacing or adding a ligand to the central metal atom in the phthalocyanine ring and accordingly can be made sensitive and selective to various organic species or gaseous vapours. In the present work, we have dispersed Copper Phthalocyanine Salt (CuPcS) in sol-gel glass form using chemical route sol-gel method and studied its sensing mechanism with organic vapours like methanol and benzene and found that current increases onto their exposure with vapours. A variation in the activation energies was also observed with exposure of vapours.

  7. Femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoemission study of organic semiconductor copper phthalocyanine film

    Tanaka, A.; Tohoku University; University of Rochester, NY; Yan, L.; Watkins, N.J.; Gao, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Organic semiconductors are recently attracting much interest from the viewpoints of both device and fundamental physics. These organic semiconductors are considered to be important constituents of the future devices, such as organic light-emitting diode, organic field effect transistor, and organic solid-state injection laser. In order to elucidate their detailed physical properties and to develop the future devices, it is indispensable to understand their excited-state dynamics as well as their electronic structures. The femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PPE) spectroscopy is attracting much interest because of its capability to observe the energy-resolved excited electron dynamics. In this work, we have carried out a TR-2PPE study of the organic semiconductor copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) film. Furthermore, we have investigated the detailed electronic structure of CuPc film using the photoemission (PES) and inverse photoemission (IPES) spectroscopies. From the simultaneous PES and IPES measurements for CuPc film with a thickness of 100 nm, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), highest occupied molecular orbital, and ionization potential of CuPc film have been directly determined. The observed two-photon photoemission (2PPE) spectrum of the present CuPc film, measured with photon energy of about hv=3.3 eV, exhibits a broad feature. From the energy diagram of CuPc film determined by the PES and IPES measurements, the intermediate state observed in the present 2PPE spectrum of CuPc film corresponds to the energy region between about 0.4 and 1.7 eV above the LUMO energy. From the time-resolved pump-probe measurements, it is found that the relaxation lifetimes of excited states in the present CuPc films are very short (all below 50 fs) and monotonously become faster with increasing excitation energy. We attribute this extremely fast relaxation process of photoexcitation to a rapid internal conversion process. From these results

  8. Pinning of fullerene lowest unoccupied molecular orbital edge at the interface with standing up copper phthalocyanine

    Wang, Chenggong; Irfan, Irfan; Turinske, Alexander J.; Gao, Yongli

    2012-01-01

    The electronic structure evolution of interfaces of fullerene (C 60 ) with copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) and on native silicon oxide has been investigated with ultra-violet photoemission spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital edge of C 60 was found to be pinned at the interface with CuPc on SiO 2 . A substantial difference in the electron affinity of CuPc on the two substrates was observed as the orientation of CuPc is lying flat on HOPG and standing up on SiO 2 . The ionization potential and electron affinity of C 60 were not affected by the orientation of CuPc due to the spherical symmetry of C 60 molecules. We observed band bending in C 60 on the standing-up orientation of CuPc molecules, while the energy levels of C 60 on the flat lying orientation of CuPc molecules were observed to be flat. - Highlights: ► Orientation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on ordered graphite and silicon oxide. ► Pinning of lowest unoccupied molecular orbital edge of C60 to the Fermi level on CuPc. ► No C60 pinning or band bending was observed on flat laying CuPc. ► Results are useful for organic photovoltaic and organic light emitting diode research.

  9. Optical and infrared spectroscopic studies of chemical sensing by copper phthalocyanine thin films

    Singh, Sukhwinder; Tripathi, S.K.; Saini, G.S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Thin films of copper phthalocyanine have been deposited on KBr and glass substrates by thermal evaporation method and characterized by the X-ray diffraction and optical absorption techniques. The observed X-ray pattern suggests the presence of α crystalline phase of copper phthalocyanine in the as-deposited thin films. Infrared spectra of thin films on the KBr pallet before and after exposure to the vapours of ammonia and methanol have been recorded in the wavenumber region of 400-1650 cm -1 . The observed infrared bands also confirm the α crystalline phase. On exposure, change in the intensity of some bands is observed. A new band at 1385 cm -1 , forbidden under ideal D 4h point group symmetry, is also observed in the spectra of exposed thin films. These changes in the spectra are interpreted in terms of the lowering of molecular symmetry from D 4h to C 4v . Axial ligation of the vapour molecules on fifth coordination site of the metal ion is responsible for lowering of the molecular symmetry

  10. Nucleation and growth of copper phthalocyanine aggregates deposited from solution on planar surfaces

    Ghani, Fatemeh [Department of Theory & Bio-Systems, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg 1 Golm, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Gojzewski, Hubert, E-mail: hubert.gojzewski@put.poznan.pl [Department of Theory & Bio-Systems, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg 1 Golm, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Physics, Poznan University of Technology, Piotrowo 3, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Riegler, Hans [Department of Theory & Bio-Systems, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg 1 Golm, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Copper phthalocyanine deposited on planar surfaces by 3 solution process methods. • Aggregate morphology examined for coverage extending over 3 orders of magnitude. • Morphologies vary from small individual domains to mesh-like multilayers. • Nucleation and growth model explains the observed deposit morphologies. - Abstract: Copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) dissolved in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is deposited on solid SiO{sub 2} surfaces by solvent evaporation. The deposited CuPc aggregates are investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The CuPc deposits were prepared by spin casting, dip coating, and spray deposition. Depending on the amount of deposited CuPc the aggregate morphology ranges from small individual domains to mesh-like multilayers. Each domain/layer consists of many parallel stacks of CuPc molecules with the square, plate-like molecules piled face-wise within each stack. The parallel stacks are attached sideways (i.e., edgewise attachment molecularly) to the substrate forming “nanoribbons” with uniform thickness of about 1 nm and varying width. The thickness reflects the length of a molecular edge, the width the number of stacks. A nucleation and growth model is presented that explains the observed aggregate and multilayer morphologies as result of the combination of nucleation, transport processes and a consequence of the anisotropic intermolecular interactions due to the shape of the CuPc molecule.

  11. Sodium doping in copper-phthalocyanine/C{sub 60} heterojunction for organic photovoltaic applications

    Chen, Hui-Ju; Wu, Hsuan-Ta; Hung, Kuang-Teng; Fu, Sheng-Wen [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 70101, Taiwan (China); Shih, Chuan-Feng, E-mail: cfshih@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 70101, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-01

    Sodium was incorporating at the copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc)/C{sub 60} interface in CuPc/C{sub 60}-based small-molecular solar cells to enhance their power conversion efficiency. C{sub 60} was deposited on slightly sodium-doped CuPc. Post-annealing improved the cell properties. Post-annealing doubled the conversion efficiency of the least sodium-doped devices (75 °C, 40 min). The electron/hole mobility ratio gradually approached unity as the annealing time increased, indicating that a reduction in the space charge accumulation was the main cause of the increase of the short-circuit current. The mechanism of enhancement of carrier transport by annealing was investigated by making capacitance–voltage measurements and performing corresponding depth-profile analyses. - Highlights: • Incorporate Na at copper-phthalocyanine/C{sub 60} interface • Annealing importantly improved the cell efficiency of Na-doped devices. • Change in the carrier mobility and concentration was investigated.

  12. Sodium doping in copper-phthalocyanine/C60 heterojunction for organic photovoltaic applications

    Chen, Hui-Ju; Wu, Hsuan-Ta; Hung, Kuang-Teng; Fu, Sheng-Wen; Shih, Chuan-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Sodium was incorporating at the copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc)/C 60 interface in CuPc/C 60 -based small-molecular solar cells to enhance their power conversion efficiency. C 60 was deposited on slightly sodium-doped CuPc. Post-annealing improved the cell properties. Post-annealing doubled the conversion efficiency of the least sodium-doped devices (75 °C, 40 min). The electron/hole mobility ratio gradually approached unity as the annealing time increased, indicating that a reduction in the space charge accumulation was the main cause of the increase of the short-circuit current. The mechanism of enhancement of carrier transport by annealing was investigated by making capacitance–voltage measurements and performing corresponding depth-profile analyses. - Highlights: • Incorporate Na at copper-phthalocyanine/C 60 interface • Annealing importantly improved the cell efficiency of Na-doped devices. • Change in the carrier mobility and concentration was investigated

  13. Ab initio electronic structure and correlations in pristine and potassium-doped molecular crystals of copper phthalocyanine

    Giovannetti, G.; Brocks, G.; van den Brink, J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the effect that potassium intercalation has on the electronic structure of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecular crystals by means of ab initio density functional calculations. Pristine CuPc (in its alpha and beta structures) is found to be an insulator containing local magnetic

  14. High operational and environmental stability of high-mobility conjugated polymer field-effect transistors through the use of molecular additives

    Nikolka, Mark; Nasrallah, Iyad; Rose, Bradley Daniel; Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Broch, Katharina; Sadhanala, Aditya; Harkin, David; Charmet, Jerome; Hurhangee, Michael; Brown, Adam; Illig, Steffen; Too, Patrick; Jongman, Jan; McCulloch, Iain; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Due to their low-temperature processing properties and inherent mechanical flexibility, conjugated polymer field-effect transistors (FETs) are promising candidates for enabling flexible electronic circuits and displays. Much progress has been made on materials performance; however, there remain significant concerns about operational and environmental stability, particularly in the context of applications that require a very high level of threshold voltage stability, such as active-matrix addressing of organic light-emitting diode displays. Here, we investigate the physical mechanisms behind operational and environmental degradation of high-mobility, p-type polymer FETs and demonstrate an effective route to improve device stability. We show that water incorporated in nanometre-sized voids within the polymer microstructure is the key factor in charge trapping and device degradation. By inserting molecular additives that displace water from these voids, it is possible to increase the stability as well as uniformity to a high level sufficient for demanding industrial applications.

  15. High operational and environmental stability of high-mobility conjugated polymer field-effect transistors through the use of molecular additives

    Nikolka, Mark

    2016-12-12

    Due to their low-temperature processing properties and inherent mechanical flexibility, conjugated polymer field-effect transistors (FETs) are promising candidates for enabling flexible electronic circuits and displays. Much progress has been made on materials performance; however, there remain significant concerns about operational and environmental stability, particularly in the context of applications that require a very high level of threshold voltage stability, such as active-matrix addressing of organic light-emitting diode displays. Here, we investigate the physical mechanisms behind operational and environmental degradation of high-mobility, p-type polymer FETs and demonstrate an effective route to improve device stability. We show that water incorporated in nanometre-sized voids within the polymer microstructure is the key factor in charge trapping and device degradation. By inserting molecular additives that displace water from these voids, it is possible to increase the stability as well as uniformity to a high level sufficient for demanding industrial applications.

  16. Dry Etching of Copper Phthalocyanine Thin Films: Effects on Morphology and Surface Stoichiometry

    Michael J. Brett

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the evolution of copper phthalocyanine thin films as they are etched with argon plasma. Significant morphological changes occur as a result of the ion bombardment; a planar surface quickly becomes an array of nanopillars which are less than 20 nm in diameter. The changes in morphology are independent of plasma power, which controls the etch rate only. Analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that surface concentrations of copper and oxygen increase with etch time, while carbon and nitrogen are depleted. Despite these changes in surface stoichiometry, we observe no effect on the work function. The absorbance and X-ray diffraction spectra show no changes other than the peaks diminishing with etch time. These findings have important implications for organic photovoltaic devices which seek nanopillar thin films of metal phthalocyanine materials as an optimal structure.

  17. Energy level alignment at the methylammonium lead iodide/copper phthalocyanine interface

    Shi Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The energy level alignment at the CH3NH3PbI3/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc interface is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS. XPS reveal a 0.3 eV downward band bending in the CuPc film. UPS validate this finding and further reveal negligible interfacial dipole formation – verifying the viability of vacuum level alignment. The highest occupied molecular orbital of CuPc is found to be closer to the Fermi level than the valance band maximum of CH3NH3PbI3, facilitating hole transfer from CH3NH3PbI3 to CuPc. However, subsequent hole extraction from CuPc may be impeded by the downward band bending in the CuPc layer.

  18. Marine sponge skeleton photosensitized by copper phthalocyanine: A catalyst for Rhodamine B degradation

    Norman Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a combined approach to photo-assisted degradation processes, in which a catalyst, H2O2 and UV irradiation are used together to enhance the oxidation of Rhodamine B (RB. The heterogeneous photocatalyst was made by the process of adsorption of copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid (CuPC onto purified spongin-based Hippospongia communis marine sponge skeleton (HcS. The product obtained, CuPC-HcS, was investigated by a variety of spectroscopic (carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance 13C NMR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy FTIR, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy EDS and microscopic techniques (scanning electron microscopy SEM, fluorescent and optical microscopy, as well as thermal analysis. The study confirms the stable combination of the adsorbent and adsorbate. For a 10 mg/L RB solution, the percentage degradation reached 95% using CuPC-HcS as a heterocatalyst. The mechanism of RB removal involves adsorption and photodegradation simultaneously.

  19. Nonvolatile organic write-once-read-many-times memory devices based on hexadecafluoro-copper-phthalocyanine

    Wang, Lidan; Su, Zisheng; Wang, Cheng

    2012-05-01

    Nonvolatile organic write-once-read-many-times memory device was demonstrated based on hexadecafluoro-copper-phthalocyanine (F16CuPc) single layer sandwiched between indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and Al cathode. The as fabricated device remains in ON state and it can be tuned to OFF state by applying a reverse bias. The ON/OFF current ratio of the device can reach up to 2.3 × 103. Simultaneously, the device shows long-term storage stability and long retention time in air. The ON/OFF transition is attributed to the formation and destruction of the interfacial dipole layer in the ITO/F16CuPc interface, and such a mechanism is different from previously reported ones.

  20. Corrections to the density-functional theory electronic spectrum: Copper phthalocyanine

    Vazquez, Hector; Jelinek, P.; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    A method for improving the electronic spectrum of standard Density-Functional Theory (DFT) calculations (i.e., LDA or GGA approximations) is presented, and its application is discussed for the case of the copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecule. The method is based on a treatment of exchange...... and correlation in a many-body Hamiltonian, and it leads to easy-to-evaluate corrections to the DFT eigenvalues. Self-interaction is largely corrected, so that the modified energy levels do not suffer from spurious crossings, as often encountered for CuPc in DFT, and they remedy the standard underestimation...... or semiempirical functionals for molecular levels, it can be easily applied to any local-orbital DFT approach, improving on several important limitations of standard DFT methods....

  1. Revisiting the adsorption of copper-phthalocyanine on Au(111) including van der Waals corrections

    Lüder, Johann; Eriksson, Olle; Sanyal, Biplab; Brena, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption of copper-phthalocyanine on Au(111) by means of van der Waals corrected density functional theory using the Tkatchenko-Scheffler method. We have compared the element and site resolved adsorption distances to recent experimental normal-incident X-ray standing wave measurements. The measured adsorption distances could be reproduced within a deviation of 1% for the Cu atom, 1% for the C atoms, and 2% for the N atoms. The molecule was found to have a magnetic moment of 1 μ B distributed over the Cu and the N atoms of the pyrrole ring. Simulated scanning tunnel microscopy images based on the total and on the spin-resolved differential charge densities are provided for bias voltages of −1.45 and 1.45 eV

  2. Effect of annealing on bulk heterojunction organic solar cells based on copper phthalocyanine and perylene derivative

    Kim, Inho

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effects of annealing on device performances of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells based on copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and N,N′-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI-C6). Blended films of CuPc and PTCDI-C6 with annealing at elevated temperature were characterized by measuring optical absorption, photoluminescence, and X-ray diffraction. Enhanced molecular ordering and increments in domain sizes of donor and acceptor for the blended films were observed, and their influences on device performances were discussed. Annealing led to substantial improvements in photocurrent owing to enhanced molecular ordering and formation of percolation pathways. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Polymer/metal oxide hybrid dielectrics for low voltage field-effect transistors with solution-processed, high-mobility semiconductors

    Held, Martin; Schießl, Stefan P.; Gannott, Florentina [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen D-91058 (Germany); Institute for Physical Chemistry, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg D-69120 (Germany); Miehler, Dominik [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen D-91058 (Germany); Zaumseil, Jana, E-mail: zaumseil@uni-heidelberg.de [Institute for Physical Chemistry, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg D-69120 (Germany)

    2015-08-24

    Transistors for future flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) display backplanes should operate at low voltages and be able to sustain high currents over long times without degradation. Hence, high capacitance dielectrics with low surface trap densities are required that are compatible with solution-processable high-mobility semiconductors. Here, we combine poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and atomic layer deposition hafnium oxide (HfO{sub x}) into a bilayer hybrid dielectric for field-effect transistors with a donor-acceptor polymer (DPPT-TT) or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the semiconductor and demonstrate substantially improved device performances for both. The ultra-thin PMMA layer ensures a low density of trap states at the semiconductor-dielectric interface while the metal oxide layer provides high capacitance, low gate leakage and superior barrier properties. Transistors with these thin (≤70 nm), high capacitance (100–300 nF/cm{sup 2}) hybrid dielectrics enable low operating voltages (<5 V), balanced charge carrier mobilities and low threshold voltages. Moreover, the hybrid layers substantially improve the bias stress stability of the transistors compared to those with pure PMMA and HfO{sub x} dielectrics.

  4. Effect of oxide insertion layer on resistance switching properties of copper phthalocyanine

    Joshi, Nikhil G.; Pandya, Nirav C.; Joshi, U. S.

    2013-02-01

    Organic memory device showing resistance switching properties is a next-generation of the electrical memory unit. We have investigated the bistable resistance switching in current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of organic diode based on copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) film sandwiched between aluminum (Al) electrodes. Pronounced hysteresis in the I-V curves revealed a resistance switching with on-off ratio of the order of 85%. In order to control the charge injection in the CuPc, nanoscale indium oxide buffer layer was inserted to form Al/CuPc/In2O3/Al device. Analysis of I-V measurements revealed space charge limited switching conduction at the Al/CuPc interface. The traps in the organic layer and charge blocking by oxide insertion layer have been used to explain the absence of resistance switching in the oxide buffer layered memory device cell. Present study offer potential applications for CuPc organic semiconductor in low power non volatile resistive switching memory and logic circuits.

  5. Hybrid Solar Cell with TiO2 Film: BBOT Polymer and Copper Phthalocyanine as Sensitizer

    Saptadip Saha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An organic-inorganic hybrid solar cell was fabricated using Titanium dioxide (TiO2: 2,5-bis(5-tert-butyl-2-benzoxazolyl thiophene (BBOT film and Copper Phthalocyanine (CuPc as a sensitizer. BBOT was used in photodetector in other reported research works, but as per best of our knowledge, it was not implemented in solar cells till date. The blend of TiO2: BBOT blend was used to fabricate the film on ITO-coated glass and further a thin layer of CuPc was coated on the film. This was acted as photoanode and another ITO coated glass with a platinum coating was used as a counter electrode (cathode. An optimal blend of acetonitrile (solvent (50-100%, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium iodide (10-25%, iodine (2.5-10% and lithium iodide, pyridine derivative and thiocyanate was used as electrolytes in the hybrid solar cell. The different structural, optical and electrical characteristics were measured. The Hybrid solar cell showed a maximum conversion efficiency of 6.51%.

  6. Controllable preparation of copper phthalocyanine single crystal nano column and its chlorine gas sensing properties

    Jianhong Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The unsubstituted copper phthalocyanine (CuPc single crystal nano columns were fabricated for the first time as chlorine (Cl2 gas sensors in this paper. The nano columns of CuPc have been prepared on different substrates via template-free physical vapor deposition (PVD approach. The growth mechanism of CuPc nano column on quartz was explored and the same condition used on other substrates including glass, sapphire (C-plane, M-plane, R-plane, Si and SiO2/Si came to a same conclusion, which confirmed that the aligned growth of CuPc nano column is not substrate-dependent. And then the CuPc nano column with special morphology was integrated as in-situ sensor device which exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity towards Cl2 at room temperature with a minimum detection limit as low as 0.08 ppm. The response of sensor was found to increase linearly (26∼659% with the increase for Cl2 within concentration range (0.08∼4.0ppm. These results clearly demonstrate the great potential of the nano column growth and device integration approach for sensor device.

  7. Thermal Annealing Effect on Poly(3-hexylthiophene: Fullerene:Copper-Phthalocyanine Ternary Photoactive Layer

    H. Derouiche

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have fabricated poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc/fullerene (C60 ternary blend films. This photoactive layer is sandwiched between an indium tin oxide (ITO/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(styrene sulfonate (PEDOT/PSS photoanode and a bathocuproine (BCP/aluminium photocathode. The thin films have been characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM and ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy in order to study the influence of P3HT doping on the morphological and optical properties of the photoactive layer. We have also compared the characteristics of three different organic solar cells: ITO/PEDOT:PSS/CuPc0.5:C600.5/BCP/Al and ITO/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT0.3:CuPc0.3:C600.4/BCP/Al with and without annealing. Both structures show good photovoltaic behaviour. Indeed, the incorporation of P3HT into CuPc:C60 thin film improves all the photovoltaic characteristics. We have also seen that thermal annealing significantly improves the optical absorption ability and stabilizes the organic solar cells making it more robust to chemical degradation.

  8. Change spectroscopic studies and optimization electrical properties of PVP/PEO doped copper phthalocyanines

    Ragab, H.M., E-mail: yara20092009@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Girls Branch, Cairo 11754 (Egypt); Basic Science Department, Faculty of Preparatory Year, Hail University (Saudi Arabia); Ahmad, F.; Radwan, Sh.N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Girls Branch, Cairo 11754 (Egypt)

    2016-12-01

    Composite films of polyvinyl pyrrolidone and Polyethylene oxide (PVP/PEO) blend doped with 1, 4 and 12 wt% of copper Phthalocyanines (CuPc) were prepared by casting method. The samples were studied using different techniques. The X-ray (XRD) revealed average crystallite size and X-ray intensity decrease at 1 CuPc %; this implies to an increase on the degree of amorphousity, then increase at CuPc >1%. The change in both the intensity and position of some absorption peaks of the blend with CuPc content were observed in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggest the complexation of polymer blend. The UV–Vis spectroscopy revealed that the optical band gap decreases as well as band tail width increases with increasing CuPc concentration. It may be reflect the role of CuPc in modifying the electronic structure of the polymeric matrix. The charge carrier concentration is responsible for conductivity improvement in electrolytes rather than the mobility.

  9. Synchrotron-based measurements of the electronic structure of the organic semiconductor copper phthalocyanine

    Downes, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) is a prototypical molecular organic semiconductor that is currently used in the construction of many organic electronic devices such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Although the material is currently being used, and despite many experimental and theoretical studies, it's detailed electronic structure is still not completely understood. This is likely due to two key factors. Firstly, the interaction of the Cu 3d and phthalocyanine ligand 2p electrons leads to the formation of a complex arrangement of localized and delocalized states near the Fermi level. Secondly, thin films of the material are subject to damage by the photon beam used to make measurements of their electronic structure. Using the synchrotron-based techniques of soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), we have measured the detailed electronic structure of in-situ grown thin film samples of CuPc. Beam damage was minimized by continuous translation of the sample during data acquisition. The results obtained differ significantly from previous XES and ultraviolet photoemission measurements, but are in excellent agreement with recent density functional calculations. The reasons for these discrepancies will be explained, and their implications for future measurements on similar materials will be explored

  10. Controlling molecular condensation/diffusion of copper phthalocyanine by local electric field induced with scanning tunneling microscope tip

    Nagaoka, Katsumi; Yaginuma, Shin; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2018-02-01

    We have discovered the condensation/diffusion phenomena of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules controlled with a pulsed electric field induced by the scanning tunneling microscope tip. This behavior is not explained by the conventional induced dipole model. In order to understand the mechanism, we have measured the electronic structure of the molecule by tunneling spectroscopy and also performed theoretical calculations on molecular orbitals. These data clearly indicate that the molecule is positively charged owing to charge transfer to the substrate, and that hydrogen bonding exists between CuPc molecules, which makes the molecular island stable.

  11. The beneficial effects of mixing spiro-OMeTAD with n-butyl-substituted copper phthalocyanine for perovskite solar cells

    Nouri, Esmaiel; Wang, Yu-Long; Chen, Qian; Xu, Jia-Ju; Dracopoulos, Vassilios; Sygellou, Lamprini; Xu, Zong-Xiang; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Soluble n-butyl substituted copper phthalocyanine. • Mixture with spiro-OMeTAD and employment in perovskite solar cells. • Impressive improvement of perovskite solar cell efficiency. • n-Butyl derivative gives better results than tert-butyl derivative - Abstract: Perovskite solar cells have been constructed under ambient conditions by using 2,2',7,7'-Tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD) mixed with a small quantity of soluble tetra-n-butyl substituted copper phthalocyanine as hole transporting material. The introduction of the phthalocyanine derivative resulted in an impressive increase of cell efficiency, which changed from 10.4% in the absence to 15.4% in the presence of phthalocyanine. This effect is related to the creation of deep traps in the hole transporting phase which block back-travelling electrons as well as to the improvement of the structural quality of the spiro-OMeTAD film in the presence of phthalocyanine. Both functionalities decrease shunt paths within the hole transporting phase resulting in increasing the fill factor and the open-circuit voltage of the cell.

  12. All-perovskite transparent high mobility field effect using epitaxial BaSnO3 and LaInO3

    Useong Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate an all-perovskite transparent heterojunction field effect transistor made of two lattice-matched perovskite oxides: BaSnO3 and LaInO3. We have developed epitaxial LaInO3 as the gate oxide on top of BaSnO3, which were recently reported to possess high thermal stability and electron mobility when doped with La. We measured the dielectric properties of the epitaxial LaInO3 films, such as the band gap, dielectric constant, and the dielectric breakdown field. Using the LaInO3 as a gate dielectric and the La-doped BaSnO3 as a channel layer, we fabricated field effect device structure. The field effect mobility of such device was higher than 90 cm2 V−1 s−1, the on/off ratio was larger than 107, and the subthreshold swing was 0.65 V dec−1. We discuss the possible origins for such device performance and the future directions for further improvement.

  13. All-perovskite transparent high mobility field effect using epitaxial BaSnO{sub 3} and LaInO{sub 3}

    Kim, Useong; Park, Chulkwon; Kim, Young Mo; Ju, Chanjong; Park, Jisung; Char, Kookrin, E-mail: kchar@phya.snu.ac.kr [Institute of Applied Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Taewoo; Kim, Jae Hoon [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Namwook; Yu, Jaejun [Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate an all-perovskite transparent heterojunction field effect transistor made of two lattice-matched perovskite oxides: BaSnO{sub 3} and LaInO{sub 3}. We have developed epitaxial LaInO{sub 3} as the gate oxide on top of BaSnO{sub 3}, which were recently reported to possess high thermal stability and electron mobility when doped with La. We measured the dielectric properties of the epitaxial LaInO{sub 3} films, such as the band gap, dielectric constant, and the dielectric breakdown field. Using the LaInO{sub 3} as a gate dielectric and the La-doped BaSnO{sub 3} as a channel layer, we fabricated field effect device structure. The field effect mobility of such device was higher than 90 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, the on/off ratio was larger than 10{sup 7}, and the subthreshold swing was 0.65 V dec{sup −1}. We discuss the possible origins for such device performance and the future directions for further improvement.

  14. Field-effect transistors with high mobility and small hysteresis of transfer characteristics based on CH3NH3PbBr3 films

    Aleshin, A. N.; Shcherbakov, I. P.; Trapeznikova, I. N.; Petrov, V. N.

    2017-12-01

    Field-effect transistor (FET) structures based on soluble organometallic perovskites, CH3NH3PbBr3, were obtained and their electrical properties were studied. FETs made of CH3NH3PbBr3 films possess current- voltage characteristics (IVs) typical for ambipolar FETs with saturation regime. The transfer characteristics of FETs based on CH3NH3PbBr3 have an insignificant hysteresis and slightly depend on voltage at the source-drain. Mobilities of charge carriers (holes) calculated from IVs of FETs based on CH3NH3PbBr3 at 300 K in saturation and weak field regimes were 5 and 2 cm2/V s, respectively, whereas electron mobility is 3 cm2/V s, which exceeds the mobility value 1 cm2/V s obtained earlier for FETs based on CH3NH3PbI3.

  15. A high mobility C60 field-effect transistor with an ultrathin pentacene passivation layer and bathophenanthroline/metal bilayer electrodes

    Zhou Jian-Lin; Yu Jun-Sheng; Yu Xin-Ge; Cai Xin-Yang

    2012-01-01

    C 60 field-effect transistor (OFET) with a mobility as high as 5.17 cm 2 /V·s is fabricated. In our experiment, an ultrathin pentacene passivation layer on poly-(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) insulator and a bathophenanthroline (Bphen)/Ag bilayer electrode are prepared. The OFET shows a significant enhancement of electron mobility compared with the corresponding device with a single PMMA insultor and an Ag electrode. By analysing the C 60 film with atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques, it is shown that the pentacene passivation layer can contribute to C 60 film growth with the large grain size and significantly improve crystallinity. Moreover, the Bphen buffer layer can reduce the electron contact barrier from Ag electrodes to C 60 film efficiently. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  16. Electrodeposition of zinc oxide/tetrasulfonated copper phthalocyanine hybrid thin film for dye-sensitized solar cell application

    Luo Xinze [Key Laboratory of Polyoxometalates Science of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); College of Chemistry and Biological Science, Yili Normal University, Yining 835000, (China); Xu Lin, E-mail: linxu@nenu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Polyoxometalates Science of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Xu Bingbing; Li Fengyan [Key Laboratory of Polyoxometalates Science of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Hybrid film of zinc oxide (ZnO) and tetrasulfonated copper phthalocyanine (TSPcCu) was grown on an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass by one-step cathodic electrodeposition from aqueous mixtures of Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, TSPcCu and KCl. The addition of TSPcCu strongly influences the morphology and crystallographic orientation of the ZnO. The nanosheets stack of ZnO leads to a porous surface structure which is advantageous to further adsorb organic dyes. The photovoltaic properties were investigated by assembling the DSSC device based on both the only ZnO film and the ZnO/TSPcCu hybrid films. Photoelectrochemical analysis revealed that the optimized DSSC device with TSPcCu represented a more than three-fold improvement in power conversion efficiency than the device without TSPcCu. The DSSC based on ZnO/TSPcCu hybrid films demonstrates an open circuit voltage of 0.308 V, a short circuit current of 90 {mu}A cm{sup -2}, a fill factor of 0.26, and a power conversion efficiency of 0.14%.

  17. Electrodeposition of zinc oxide/tetrasulfonated copper phthalocyanine hybrid thin film for dye-sensitized solar cell application

    Luo Xinze; Xu Lin; Xu Bingbing; Li Fengyan

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid film of zinc oxide (ZnO) and tetrasulfonated copper phthalocyanine (TSPcCu) was grown on an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass by one-step cathodic electrodeposition from aqueous mixtures of Zn(NO 3 ) 2 , TSPcCu and KCl. The addition of TSPcCu strongly influences the morphology and crystallographic orientation of the ZnO. The nanosheets stack of ZnO leads to a porous surface structure which is advantageous to further adsorb organic dyes. The photovoltaic properties were investigated by assembling the DSSC device based on both the only ZnO film and the ZnO/TSPcCu hybrid films. Photoelectrochemical analysis revealed that the optimized DSSC device with TSPcCu represented a more than three-fold improvement in power conversion efficiency than the device without TSPcCu. The DSSC based on ZnO/TSPcCu hybrid films demonstrates an open circuit voltage of 0.308 V, a short circuit current of 90 μA cm -2 , a fill factor of 0.26, and a power conversion efficiency of 0.14%.

  18. Phase and Texture of Solution-Processed Copper Phthalocyanine Thin Films Investigated by Two-Dimensional Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction

    Lulu Deng

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The phase and texture of a newly developed solution-processed copper phthalocyanine (CuPc thin film have been investigated by two-dimensional grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. The results show that it has β phase crystalline structure, with crystallinity greater than 80%. The average size of the crystallites is found to be about 24 nm. There are two different arrangements of crystallites, with one dominating the diffraction pattern. Both of them have preferred orientation along the thin film normal. Based on the similarities to the vacuum deposited CuPc thin films, the new solution processing method is verified to offer a good alternative to vacuum process, for the fabrication of low cost small molecule based organic photovoltaics.

  19. Influence of Exchange-Correlation Functional in the Calculations of Vertical Excitation Energies of Halogenated Copper Phthalocyanines using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT)

    Lee, Sang Uck

    2013-01-01

    The accurate prediction of vertical excitation energies is very important for the development of new materials in the dye and pigment industry. A time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) approach coupled with 22 different exchange-correlation functionals was used for the prediction of vertical excitation energies in the halogenated copper phthalocyanine molecules in order to find the most appropriate functional and to determine the accuracy of the prediction of the absorption wavelength and observed spectral shifts. Among the tested functional, B3LYP functional provides much more accurate vertical excitation energies and UV-vis spectra. Our results clearly provide a benchmark calibration of the TD-DFT method for phthalocyanine based dyes and pigments used in industry

  20. Improvement of the photovoltaic parameters of perovskite solar cells using a reduced-graphene-oxide-modified titania layer and soluble copper phthalocyanine as a hole transporter.

    Nouri, Esmaiel; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Xu, Zong-Xiang; Dracopoulos, Vassilios; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2018-01-24

    Functional perovskite solar cells can be made by using a simple, inexpensive and stable soluble tetra-n-butyl-substituted copper phthalocyanine (CuBuPc) as a hole transporter. In the present study, TiO 2 /reduced graphene oxide (T/RGO) hybrids were synthesized via an in situ solvothermal process and used as electron acceptor/transport mediators in mesoscopic perovskite solar cells based on soluble CuBuPc as a hole transporter and on graphene oxide (GO) as a buffer layer. The impact of the RGO content on the optoelectronic properties of T/RGO hybrids and on the solar cell performance was studied, suggesting improved electron transport characteristics and photovoltaic parameters. An enhanced electron lifetime and recombination resistance led to an increase in the short circuit current density, open circuit voltage and fill factor. The device based on a T/RGO mesoporous layer with an optimal RGO content of 0.2 wt% showed 22% higher photoconversion efficiency and higher stability compared with pristine TiO 2 -based devices.

  1. Realization of size controllable graphene micro/nanogap with a micro/nanowire mask method for organic field-effect transistors

    Liao, Zhiyu; Wan, Qing; Liu, Huixuan

    2011-01-01

    with the graphene micro/nanogap bottom electrodes. The ultrathin thickness of the graphene, combined with its good compatibility with organic semiconductors, and high electrical conductivity produced high-performance CuPc film device with mobility at 0.053 cm(2)/Vs and on/off ratio at 10(5), showing promising......A size controllable graphene micro/nanogap fabrication method using micro/nanowire as mask is presented. The gap dimension can be adjusted by the diameter of the mask wire. As a typical application, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) film organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) were fabricated...

  2. Interfacial Engineering of Perovskite Solar Cells by Employing a Hydrophobic Copper Phthalocyanine Derivative as Hole-Transporting Material with Improved Performance and Stability.

    Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Ze; Lai, Jianbo; Zhang, Yuchen; Hu, Maowei; Lei, Ning; Wang, Dongping; Yang, Xichuan; Sun, Licheng

    2017-04-22

    In high-performance perovskite solar cells (PSCs), hole-transporting materials (HTMs) play an important role in extracting and transporting the photo-generated holes from the perovskite absorber to the cathode, thus reducing unwanted recombination losses and enhancing the photovoltaic performance. Herein, solution-processable tetra-4-(bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)amino)phenoxy-substituted copper phthalocyanine (CuPc-OTPAtBu) was synthesized and explored as a HTM in PSCs. The optical, electrochemical, and thermal properties were fully characterized for this organic metal complex. The photovoltaic performance of PSCs employing this CuPc derivative as a HTM was further investigated, in combination with a mixed-ion perovskite as a light absorber and a low-cost vacuum-free carbon as cathode. The optimized devices [doped with 6 % (w/w) tetrafluoro-tetracyano-quinodimethane (F4TCNQ)] showed a decent power conversion efficiency of 15.0 %, with an open-circuit voltage of 1.01 V, a short-circuit current density of 21.9 mA cm -2 , and a fill factor of 0.68. Notably, the PSC devices studied also exhibited excellent long-term durability under ambient condition for 720 h, mainly owing to the introduction of the hydrophobic HTM interlayer, which prevents moisture penetration into the perovskite film. The present work emphasizes that solution-processable CuPc holds a great promise as a class of alternative HTMs that can be further explored for efficient and stable PSCs in the future. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm2 V−1 s−1. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m−2 and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics. PMID:26620323

  4. Improved Performance of Fluorinated Copper Phthalocyanine Thin Film Transistors Using Para-hexaphenyl as the Inducing Layer

    Ma Feng; Wang Shi-Rong; Li Xiang-Gao; Yan Dong-Hang

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate n-type organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) employing copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (CuPcF 16 ) as the active layer and para-hexaphenyl (p-6p) as the inducing layer. Compared with the CuPcF 16 -based OTFTs without the p-6p inducing layer, the performance of the CuPcF 16 /p-6p OTFTs is greatly improved. The charge carrier field-effect mobility μ, on-off current ratio I on /I off and threshold voltage V T of the CuPcF 16 /p-6p OTFTs are 0.07 cm 2 /V·s, 1.61 × 10 5 and 6.28 V, respectively, approaching the level of a single crystal device. The improved performance is attributed to the introduction of p-6p to form a highly oriented and continuous film of CuPcF 16 with the molecular π-π stack direction parallel to the substrate. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  5. Interface-controlled, high-mobility organic transistors

    Jurchescu, Oana D.; Popinciuc, Mihaita; van Wees, Bart J.; Palstra, Thomas T. M.

    2007-01-01

    The achievement of high mobilities in field-effect transistors (FETs) is one of the main challenges for the widespread application of organic conductors in devices. Good device performance of a single-crystal pentacene FET requires both removal of impurity molecules from the bulk and the

  6. The effect of metal-buffer bilayer drain/source electrodes on the operational stability of the organic field effect transistors

    Karimi-Alavijeh, H.R.; Ehsani, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated experimentally the effect of different drain/source (D/S) electrodes and charge injection buffer layers on the electrical properties and operational stability of a stilbene organic field effect transistor (OFET). The results show that the organic buffer layer of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) considerably improves the electrical properties of the transistors, but has a negligible effect on their temporal behavior. On the other hand, inorganic metal-oxide buffer layer of molybdenum oxide (MoO 3 ) drastically changes both the electrical properties and operational stability. The functionalities of this metal-oxide tightly depend on the properties of the D/S metallic electrodes. OFETs with Al/MoO 3 as the bilayer D/S electrodes have the best electrical properties: field effect mobility μ eff = 0.32 cm 2 V −1 s −1 and threshold voltage V TH = − 5 V and the transistors with Ag/MoO 3 have the longest operational stability. It was concluded that the chemical stability of the metal/metal-oxide or metal/organic interfaces of the bilayer D/S electrodes determine the operational stability of the OFETs. - Highlights: • The effect of buffer layers on the performance of the stilbene OFETs has been investigated. • Inorganic buffer layer improved the electrical and temporal behaviors simultaneously. • Organic buffer layer only changes the electrical properties. • Chemical stability of the interfaces determines the operational stability of the transistor

  7. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy of magnetic nanostructures at the example of bcc-Co/Fe(110), Fe/Mo(110), and copper phthalocyanine/Fe(1110); Spinpolarisierte Rastertunnelmikroskopie magnetischer Nanostrukturen am Beispiel von bcc-Co/Fe(110), Fe/Mo(110) und Kupfer-Phthalocyanin/Fe(110)

    Methfessel, Torsten

    2010-12-09

    This thesis provides an introduction into the technique of spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy as an experimental method for the investigation of magnetic nanostructures. Experimental results for the spin polarized electronic structure depending on the crystal structure of ultrathin Co layers, and depending on the direction of the magnetization for ultrathin Fe layers are presented. High-resolution measurements show the position-dependent spin polarization on a single copper-phthalocyanine molecule deposited on a ferromagnetic surface. Co was deposited by molecular beam epitaxy on the (110) surface of the bodycentered cubic metals Cr and Fe. In contrast to previous reports in the literature only two layers of Co can be stabilized in the body-centered cubic (bcc) structure. The bcc-Co films on the Fe(110) surface show no signs of epitaxial distortions. Thicker layers reconstruct into a closed-packed structure (hcp / fcc). The bcc structure increases the spin-polarization of Co to P=62 % in comparison to hcp-Co (P=45 %). The temperature-dependent spin-reorientation of ultrathin Fe/Mo(110) films was investigated by spin-polarized spectroscopy. A reorientation of the magnetic easy axis from the [110] direction along the surface normal to the in-plane [001] axis is observed at T (13.2{+-}0.5) K. This process can be identified as a discontinuous reorientation transition, revealing two simultaneous minima of the free energy in a certain temperature range. The electronic structure of mono- and double-layer Fe/Mo(110) shows a variation with the reorientation of the magnetic easy axis and with the direction of the magnetization. The investigation of the spin-polarized charge transport through a copper-phthalocyanine molecule on the Fe/Mo(110) surface provides an essential contribution to the understanding of spin-transport at the interface between metal and organic molecule. Due to the interaction with the surface of the metal the HOMO-LUMO energy

  8. Analytical admittance characterization of high mobility channel

    Mammeri, A. M.; Mahi, F. Z., E-mail: fati-zo-mahi2002@yahoo.fr [Institute of Science and Technology, University of Bechar (Algeria); Varani, L. [Institute of Electronics of the South (IES - CNRS UMR 5214), University of Montpellier (France)

    2015-03-30

    In this contribution, we investigate the small-signal admittance of the high electron mobility transistors field-effect channels under a continuation branching of the current between channel and gate by using an analytical model. The analytical approach takes into account the linearization of the 2D Poisson equation and the drift current along the channel. The analytical equations discuss the frequency dependence of the admittance at source and drain terminals on the geometrical transistor parameters.

  9. Investigations on Substrate Temperature-Induced Growth Modes of Organic Semiconductors at Dielectric/semiconductor Interface and Their Correlation with Threshold Voltage Stability in Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    Padma, Narayanan; Maheshwari, Priya; Bhattacharya, Debarati; Tokas, Raj B; Sen, Shashwati; Honda, Yoshihide; Basu, Saibal; Pujari, Pradeep Kumar; Rao, T V Chandrasekhar

    2016-02-10

    Influence of substrate temperature on growth modes of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) thin films at the dielectric/semiconductor interface in organic field effect transistors (OFETs) is investigated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging at the interface reveals a change from 'layer+island' to "island" growth mode with increasing substrate temperatures, further confirmed by probing the buried interfaces using X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and positron annihilation spectroscopic (PAS) techniques. PAS depth profiling provides insight into the details of molecular ordering while positron lifetime measurements reveal the difference in packing modes of CuPc molecules at the interface. XRR measurements show systematic increase in interface width and electron density correlating well with the change from layer + island to coalesced huge 3D islands at higher substrate temperatures. Study demonstrates the usefulness of XRR and PAS techniques to study growth modes at buried interfaces and reveals the influence of growth modes of semiconductor at the interface on hole and electron trap concentrations individually, thereby affecting hysteresis and threshold voltage stability. Minimum hole trapping is correlated to near layer by layer formation close to the interface at 100 °C and maximum to the island formation with large voids between the grains at 225 °C.

  10. Accurate on-chip measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high mobility small molecule organic semiconductors

    Warwick, C. N.; Venkateshvaran, D.; Sirringhaus, H.

    2015-09-01

    We present measurements of the Seebeck coefficient in two high mobility organic small molecules, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) and 2,9-didecyl-dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (C10-DNTT). The measurements are performed in a field effect transistor structure with high field effect mobilities of approximately 3 cm2/V s. This allows us to observe both the charge concentration and temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient. We find a strong logarithmic dependence upon charge concentration and a temperature dependence within the measurement uncertainty. Despite performing the measurements on highly polycrystalline evaporated films, we see an agreement in the Seebeck coefficient with modelled values from Shi et al. [Chem. Mater. 26, 2669 (2014)] at high charge concentrations. We attribute deviations from the model at lower charge concentrations to charge trapping.

  11. Accurate on-chip measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high mobility small molecule organic semiconductors

    C. N. Warwick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of the Seebeck coefficient in two high mobility organic small molecules, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT and 2,9-didecyl-dinaphtho[2,3-b:2′,3′-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (C10-DNTT. The measurements are performed in a field effect transistor structure with high field effect mobilities of approximately 3 cm2/V s. This allows us to observe both the charge concentration and temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient. We find a strong logarithmic dependence upon charge concentration and a temperature dependence within the measurement uncertainty. Despite performing the measurements on highly polycrystalline evaporated films, we see an agreement in the Seebeck coefficient with modelled values from Shi et al. [Chem. Mater. 26, 2669 (2014] at high charge concentrations. We attribute deviations from the model at lower charge concentrations to charge trapping.

  12. Understanding noise suppression in heterojunction field-effect transistors

    Green, F.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The enhanced transport properties displayed by quantum-well-confined, two-dimensional, electron systems underpin the success of heterojunction, field-effect transistors. At cryogenic temperatures, these devices exhibit impressive mobilities and, as a result, high signal gain and low noise. Conventional wisdom has it that the same favourable conditions also hold for normal room-temperature operation. In that case, however, high mobilities are precluded by abundant electron-phonon scattering. Our recent study of nonequilibrium current noise shows that quantum confinement, not high mobility, is the principal source of noise in these devices; this opens up new and exciting opportunities in low-noise transistor design. As trends in millimetre-wave technology push frequencies beyond 100 GHz, it is essential to develop a genuine understanding of noise processes in heterojunction devices

  13. Micro-structure-mobility correlation in self-organised, conjugated polymer field-effect transistors

    Sirringhaus, H.; Brown, P.J.; Friend, R.H.; Nielsen, M.M.; Bechgaard, K.; Langeveld-Voss, B.M.W.; Spiering, A.J.H.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Meijer, E.W.

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the correlation between polymer microstructure and charge carrier mobility in high-mobility, self-organised field-effect transistors of poly-3-hexyl-thiophene (P3HT). Two different preferential orientations of the microcrystalline P3HT domains with respect to the substrate have

  14. Novel field-effect schottky barrier transistors based on graphene-MoS 2 heterojunctions

    Tian, He; Tan, Zhen; Wu, Can; Wang, Xiaomu; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Xie, Dan; Yang, Yi; Wang, Jing; Li, Lain-Jong; Xu, Jun; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2014-01-01

    0.5-20 cm2/V.s). Here, we report a novel field-effect Schottky barrier transistors (FESBT) based on graphene-MoS2 heterojunction (GMH), where the characteristics of high mobility from graphene and high on-off ratio from MoS2 are properly balanced

  15. Microstructure-mobility correlation in self-organised, conjugated polymer field-effect transistors

    Sirringhaus, H.; Brown, P.J.; Friend, R.H.

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the correlation between polymer microstructure and charge carrier mobility in high-mobility, self-organised field-effect transistors of poly-3-hexyl-thiophene (P3HT). Two different preferential orientations of the microcrystalline P3HT domains with respect to the substrate have...

  16. The Influence of Morphology on High-Performance Polymer Field-Effect Transistors

    Tsao, Hoi Nok; Cho, Don; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel

    2009-01-01

    The influence of molecular packing on the performance of polymer organic field-effect transistors is illustrated in this work. Both close -stacking distance and long-range order are important for achieving high mobilities. By aligning the polymers from solution, long-range order is induced...

  17. High mobility and quantum well transistors design and TCAD simulation

    Hellings, Geert

    2013-01-01

    For many decades, the semiconductor industry has miniaturized transistors, delivering increased computing power to consumers at decreased cost. However, mere transistor downsizing does no longer provide the same improvements. One interesting option to further improve transistor characteristics is to use high mobility materials such as germanium and III-V materials. However, transistors have to be redesigned in order to fully benefit from these alternative materials. High Mobility and Quantum Well Transistors: Design and TCAD Simulation investigates planar bulk Germanium pFET technology in chapters 2-4, focusing on both the fabrication of such a technology and on the process and electrical TCAD simulation. Furthermore, this book shows that Quantum Well based transistors can leverage the benefits of these alternative materials, since they confine the charge carriers to the high-mobility material using a heterostructure. The design and fabrication of one particular transistor structure - the SiGe Implant-Free Qu...

  18. High mobility transparent conducting oxides for thin film solar cells

    Calnan, S.; Tiwari, A.N.

    2010-01-01

    A special class of transparent conducting oxides (TCO) with high mobility of > 65 cm 2 V -1 s -1 allows film resistivity in the low 10 -4 Ω cm range and a high transparency of > 80% over a wide spectrum, from 300 nm to beyond 1500 nm. This exceptional coincidence of desirable optical and electrical properties provides opportunities to improve the performance of opto-electronic devices and opens possibilities for new applications. Strategies to attain high mobility (HM) TCO materials as well as the current status of such materials based on indium and cadmium containing oxides are presented. Various concepts used to understand the underlying mechanisms for high mobility in HMTCO films are discussed. Examples of HMTCO layers used as transparent electrodes in thin film solar cells are used to illustrate possible improvements in solar cell performance. Finally, challenges and prospects for further development of HMTCO materials are discussed.

  19. Organic semiconductors for organic field-effect transistors

    Yamashita, Yoshiro

    2009-01-01

    The advantages of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), such as low cost, flexibility and large-area fabrication, have recently attracted much attention due to their electronic applications. Practical transistors require high mobility, large on/off ratio, low threshold voltage and high stability. Development of new organic semiconductors is key to achieving these parameters. Recently, organic semiconductors have been synthesized showing comparable mobilities to amorphous-silicon-based FETs. These materials make OFETs more attractive and their applications have been attempted. New organic semiconductors resulting in high-performance FET devices are described here and the relationship between transistor characteristics and chemical structure is discussed. (topical review)

  20. Organic semiconductors for organic field-effect transistors

    Yoshiro Yamashita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs, such as low cost, flexibility and large-area fabrication, have recently attracted much attention due to their electronic applications. Practical transistors require high mobility, large on/off ratio, low threshold voltage and high stability. Development of new organic semiconductors is key to achieving these parameters. Recently, organic semiconductors have been synthesized showing comparable mobilities to amorphous-silicon-based FETs. These materials make OFETs more attractive and their applications have been attempted. New organic semiconductors resulting in high-performance FET devices are described here and the relationship between transistor characteristics and chemical structure is discussed.

  1. High mobility AlGaN/GaN devices for β{sup −}-dosimetry

    Schmid, Martin; Howgate, John; Ruehm, Werner [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Thalhammer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@physik.uni-augsburg.de [Universität Augsburg, Universitätsstraße 1, 86159 Augsburg (Germany)

    2016-05-21

    There is a high demand in modern medical applications for dosimetry sensors with a small footprint allowing for unobtrusive or high spatial resolution detectors. To this end we characterize the sensoric response of radiation resistant high mobility AlGaN/GaN semiconductor devices when exposed to β{sup −}-emitters. The samples were operated as a floating gate transistor, without a field effect gate electrode, thus excluding any spurious effects from β{sup −}-particle interactions with a metallic surface covering. We demonstrate that the source–drain current is modulated in dependence on the kinetic energy of the incident β{sup −}-particles. Here, the signal is shown to have a linear dependence on the absorbed energy calculated from Monte Carlo simulations. Additionally, a stable and reproducible sensor performance as a β{sup −}-dose monitor is shown for individual radioisotopes. Our experimental findings and the characteristics of the AlGaN/GaN high mobility layered devices indicate their potential for future applications where small sensor size is necessary, like for instance brachytherapy.

  2. High mobility AlGaN/GaN devices for β"−-dosimetry

    Schmid, Martin; Howgate, John; Ruehm, Werner; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    There is a high demand in modern medical applications for dosimetry sensors with a small footprint allowing for unobtrusive or high spatial resolution detectors. To this end we characterize the sensoric response of radiation resistant high mobility AlGaN/GaN semiconductor devices when exposed to β"−-emitters. The samples were operated as a floating gate transistor, without a field effect gate electrode, thus excluding any spurious effects from β"−-particle interactions with a metallic surface covering. We demonstrate that the source–drain current is modulated in dependence on the kinetic energy of the incident β"−-particles. Here, the signal is shown to have a linear dependence on the absorbed energy calculated from Monte Carlo simulations. Additionally, a stable and reproducible sensor performance as a β"−-dose monitor is shown for individual radioisotopes. Our experimental findings and the characteristics of the AlGaN/GaN high mobility layered devices indicate their potential for future applications where small sensor size is necessary, like for instance brachytherapy.

  3. High-mobility pyrene-based semiconductor for organic thin-film transistors.

    Cho, Hyunduck; Lee, Sunyoung; Cho, Nam Sung; Jabbour, Ghassan E; Kwak, Jeonghun; Hwang, Do-Hoon; Lee, Changhee

    2013-05-01

    Numerous conjugated oligoacenes and polythiophenes are being heavily studied in the search for high-mobility organic semiconductors. Although many researchers have designed fused aromatic compounds as organic semiconductors for organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs), pyrene-based organic semiconductors with high mobilities and on-off current ratios have not yet been reported. Here, we introduce a new pyrene-based p-type organic semiconductor showing liquid crystal behavior. The thin film characteristics of this material are investigated by varying the substrate temperature during the deposition and the gate dielectric condition using the surface modification with a self-assembled monolayer, and systematically studied in correlation with the performances of transistor devices with this compound. OTFT fabricated under the optimum deposition conditions of this compound, namely, 1,6-bis(5'-octyl-2,2'-bithiophen-5-yl)pyrene (BOBTP) shows a high-performance transistor behavior with a field-effect mobility of 2.1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an on-off current ratio of 7.6 × 10(6) and enhanced long-term stability compared to the pentacene thin-film transistor.

  4. Organic tunnel field effect transistors

    Tietze, Max Lutz; Lussem, Bjorn; Liu, Shiyi

    2017-01-01

    Various examples are provided for organic tunnel field effect transistors (OTFET), and methods thereof. In one example, an OTFET includes a first intrinsic layer (i-layer) of organic semiconductor material disposed over a gate insulating layer

  5. Tunneling field effect transistor technology

    Chan, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to the state-of-the art in tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs). Readers will learn the TFETs physics from advanced atomistic simulations, the TFETs fabrication process and the important roles that TFETs will play in enabling integrated circuit designs for power efficiency. · Provides comprehensive reference to tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs); · Covers all aspects of TFETs, from device process to modeling and applications; · Enables design of power-efficient integrated circuits, with low power consumption TFETs.

  6. Graphene field-effect devices

    Echtermeyer, T. J.; Lemme, M. C.; Bolten, J.; Baus, M.; Ramsteiner, M.; Kurz, H.

    2007-09-01

    In this article, graphene is investigated with respect to its electronic properties when introduced into field effect devices (FED). With the exception of manual graphene deposition, conventional top-down CMOS-compatible processes are applied. Few and monolayer graphene sheets are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The electrical properties of monolayer graphene sandwiched between two silicon dioxide films are studied. Carrier mobilities in graphene pseudo-MOS structures are compared to those obtained from double-gated Graphene-FEDs and silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs).

  7. High mobility solution-processed hybrid light emitting transistors

    Walker, Bright; Kim, Jin Young; Ullah, Mujeeb; Burn, Paul L.; Namdas, Ebinazar B.; Chae, Gil Jo; Cho, Shinuk; Seo, Jung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of high-performance, solution-processed hybrid (inorganic-organic) light emitting transistors (HLETs). The devices employ a high-mobility, solution-processed cadmium sulfide layer as the switching and transport layer, with a conjugated polymer Super Yellow as an emissive material in non-planar source/drain transistor geometry. We demonstrate HLETs with electron mobilities of up to 19.5 cm 2 /V s, current on/off ratios of >10 7 , and external quantum efficiency of 10 −2 % at 2100 cd/m 2 . These combined optical and electrical performance exceed those reported to date for HLETs. Furthermore, we provide full analysis of charge injection, charge transport, and recombination mechanism of the HLETs. The high brightness coupled with a high on/off ratio and low-cost solution processing makes this type of hybrid device attractive from a manufacturing perspective

  8. Electrical spin injection into high mobility 2D systems.

    Oltscher, M; Ciorga, M; Utz, M; Schuh, D; Bougeard, D; Weiss, D

    2014-12-05

    We report on spin injection into a high mobility 2D electron system confined at an (Al,Ga)As/GaAs interface, using (Ga,Mn)As Esaki diode contacts as spin aligners. We measured a clear nonlocal spin valve signal, which varies nonmonotonically with the applied bias voltage. The magnitude of the signal cannot be described by the standard spin drift-diffusion model, because at maximum this would require the spin polarization of the injected current to be much larger than 100%, which is unphysical. A strong correlation of the spin signal with contact width and electron mean free path suggests that ballistic transport in the 2D region below ferromagnetic contacts should be taken into account to fully describe the results.

  9. Graphene-graphite oxide field-effect transistors.

    Standley, Brian; Mendez, Anthony; Schmidgall, Emma; Bockrath, Marc

    2012-03-14

    Graphene's high mobility and two-dimensional nature make it an attractive material for field-effect transistors. Previous efforts in this area have used bulk gate dielectric materials such as SiO(2) or HfO(2). In contrast, we have studied the use of an ultrathin layered material, graphene's insulating analogue, graphite oxide. We have fabricated transistors comprising single or bilayer graphene channels, graphite oxide gate insulators, and metal top-gates. The graphite oxide layers show relatively minimal leakage at room temperature. The breakdown electric field of graphite oxide was found to be comparable to SiO(2), typically ~1-3 × 10(8) V/m, while its dielectric constant is slightly higher, κ ≈ 4.3. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  10. Comprehensive review on the development of high mobility in oxide thin film transistors

    Choi, Jun Young; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2017-11-01

    Oxide materials are one of the most advanced key technology in the thin film transistors (TFTs) for the high-end of device applications. Amorphous oxide semiconductors (AOSs) have leading technique for flat panel display (FPD), active matrix organic light emitting display (AMOLED) and active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) due to their excellent electrical characteristics, such as field effect mobility ( μ FE ), subthreshold swing (S.S) and threshold voltage ( V th ). Covalent semiconductor like amorphous silicon (a-Si) is attributed to the anti-bonding and bonding states of Si hybridized orbitals. However, AOSs have not grain boundary and excellent performances originated from the unique characteristics of AOS which is the direct orbital overlap between s orbitals of neighboring metal cations. High mobility oxide TFTs have gained attractive attention during the last few years and today in display industries. It is progressively developed to increase the mobility either by exploring various oxide semiconductors or by adopting new TFT structures. Mobility of oxide thin film transistor has been rapidly increased from single digit to higher than 100 cm2/V·s in a decade. In this review, we discuss on the comprehensive review on the mobility of oxide TFTs in a decade and propose bandgap engineering and novel structure to enhance the electrical characteristics of oxide TFTs.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of high-mobility solution-based chalcogenide thin-film transistors

    Mejia, Israel I.; Salas Villaseñ or, Ana L.; Cha, Dong Kyu; Alshareef, Husam N.; Gnade, Bruce E.; Quevedo-Ló pez, Manuel Angel Quevedo

    2013-01-01

    We report device and material considerations for the fabrication of high-mobility thin-film transistors (TFTs) compatible with large-area and inexpensive processes. In particular, this paper reports photolithographically defined n-type TFTs (n-TFTs) based on cadmium sulfide (CdS) films deposited using solution-based techniques. The integration process consists of four mask levels with a maximum processing temperature of 100 °C. The TFT performance was analyzed in terms of the CdS semiconductor thickness and as a function of postdeposition annealing in a reducing ambient. The IonI off ratios are ∼107 with field-effect mobilities of ∼5.3 and ∼4.7cm2V̇s for Al and Au source-drain contacts, respectively, using 70 nm of CdS. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were used to analyze the CdS-metal interfaces. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  12. Ambipolar phosphorene field effect transistor.

    Das, Saptarshi; Demarteau, Marcel; Roelofs, Andreas

    2014-11-25

    In this article, we demonstrate enhanced electron and hole transport in few-layer phosphorene field effect transistors (FETs) using titanium as the source/drain contact electrode and 20 nm SiO2 as the back gate dielectric. The field effect mobility values were extracted to be ∼38 cm(2)/Vs for electrons and ∼172 cm(2)/Vs for the holes. On the basis of our experimental data, we also comprehensively discuss how the contact resistances arising due to the Schottky barriers at the source and the drain end effect the different regime of the device characteristics and ultimately limit the ON state performance. We also propose and implement a novel technique for extracting the transport gap as well as the Schottky barrier height at the metal-phosphorene contact interface from the ambipolar transfer characteristics of the phosphorene FETs. This robust technique is applicable to any ultrathin body semiconductor which demonstrates symmetric ambipolar conduction. Finally, we demonstrate a high gain, high noise margin, chemical doping free, and fully complementary logic inverter based on ambipolar phosphorene FETs.

  13. Magnetic field effects in proteins

    Jones, Alex R.

    2016-06-01

    Many animals can sense the geomagnetic field, which appears to aid in behaviours such as migration. The influence of man-made magnetic fields on biology, however, is potentially more sinister, with adverse health effects being claimed from exposure to fields from mobile phones or high voltage power lines. Do these phenomena have a common, biophysical origin, and is it even plausible that such weak fields can profoundly impact noisy biological systems? Radical pair intermediates are widespread in protein reaction mechanisms, and the radical pair mechanism has risen to prominence as perhaps the most plausible means by which even very weak fields might impact biology. In this New Views article, I will discuss the literature over the past 40 years that has investigated the topic of magnetic field effects in proteins. The lack of reproducible results has cast a shadow over the area. However, magnetic field and spin effects have proven to be useful mechanistic tools for radical mechanism in biology. Moreover, if a magnetic effect on a radical pair mechanism in a protein were to influence a biological system, the conditions necessary for it to do so appear increasing unlikely to have come about by chance.

  14. Organic tunnel field effect transistors

    Tietze, Max Lutz

    2017-06-29

    Various examples are provided for organic tunnel field effect transistors (OTFET), and methods thereof. In one example, an OTFET includes a first intrinsic layer (i-layer) of organic semiconductor material disposed over a gate insulating layer; source (or drain) contact stacks disposed on portions of the first i-layer; a second i-layer of organic semiconductor material disposed on the first i-layer surrounding the source (or drain) contact stacks; an n-doped organic semiconductor layer disposed on the second i-layer; and a drain (or source) contact layer disposed on the n-doped organic semiconductor layer. The source (or drain) contact stacks can include a p-doped injection layer, a source (or drain) contact layer, and a contact insulating layer. In another example, a method includes disposing a first i-layer over a gate insulating layer; forming source or drain contact stacks; and disposing a second i-layer, an n-doped organic semiconductor layer, and a drain or source contact.

  15. High mobility ZnO nanowires for terahertz detection applications

    Liu, Huiqiang; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Shijin; Chu, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    An oxide nanowire material was utilized for terahertz detection purpose. High quality ZnO nanowires were synthesized and field-effect transistors were fabricated. Electrical transport measurements demonstrated the nanowire with good transfer characteristics and fairly high electron mobility. It is shown that ZnO nanowires can be used as building blocks for the realization of terahertz detectors based on a one-dimensional plasmon detection configuration. Clear terahertz wave (∼0.3 THz) induced photovoltages were obtained at room temperature with varying incidence intensities. Further analysis showed that the terahertz photoresponse is closely related to the high electron mobility of the ZnO nanowire sample, which suggests that oxide nanoelectronics may find useful terahertz applications.

  16. Novel field-effect schottky barrier transistors based on graphene-MoS 2 heterojunctions

    Tian, He

    2014-08-11

    Recently, two-dimensional materials such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS 2) have been demonstrated to realize field effect transistors (FET) with a large current on-off ratio. However, the carrier mobility in backgate MoS2 FET is rather low (typically 0.5-20 cm2/V.s). Here, we report a novel field-effect Schottky barrier transistors (FESBT) based on graphene-MoS2 heterojunction (GMH), where the characteristics of high mobility from graphene and high on-off ratio from MoS2 are properly balanced in the novel transistors. Large modulation on the device current (on/off ratio of 105) is achieved by adjusting the backgate (through 300 nm SiO2) voltage to modulate the graphene-MoS2 Schottky barrier. Moreover, the field effective mobility of the FESBT is up to 58.7 cm2/V.s. Our theoretical analysis shows that if the thickness of oxide is further reduced, a subthreshold swing (SS) of 40 mV/decade can be maintained within three orders of drain current at room temperature. This provides an opportunity to overcome the limitation of 60 mV/decade for conventional CMOS devices. The FESBT implemented with a high on-off ratio, a relatively high mobility and a low subthreshold promises low-voltage and low-power applications for future electronics.

  17. Novel Field-Effect Schottky Barrier Transistors Based on Graphene-MoS2 Heterojunctions

    Tian, He; Tan, Zhen; Wu, Can; Wang, Xiaomu; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Xie, Dan; Yang, Yi; Wang, Jing; Li, Lain-Jong; Xu, Jun; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Recently, two-dimensional materials such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) have been demonstrated to realize field effect transistors (FET) with a large current on-off ratio. However, the carrier mobility in backgate MoS2 FET is rather low (typically 0.5–20 cm2/V·s). Here, we report a novel field-effect Schottky barrier transistors (FESBT) based on graphene-MoS2 heterojunction (GMH), where the characteristics of high mobility from graphene and high on-off ratio from MoS2 are properly balanced in the novel transistors. Large modulation on the device current (on/off ratio of 105) is achieved by adjusting the backgate (through 300 nm SiO2) voltage to modulate the graphene-MoS2 Schottky barrier. Moreover, the field effective mobility of the FESBT is up to 58.7 cm2/V·s. Our theoretical analysis shows that if the thickness of oxide is further reduced, a subthreshold swing (SS) of 40 mV/decade can be maintained within three orders of drain current at room temperature. This provides an opportunity to overcome the limitation of 60 mV/decade for conventional CMOS devices. The FESBT implemented with a high on-off ratio, a relatively high mobility and a low subthreshold promises low-voltage and low-power applications for future electronics. PMID:25109609

  18. High-mobility ultrathin semiconducting films prepared by spin coating.

    Mitzi, David B; Kosbar, Laura L; Murray, Conal E; Copel, Matthew; Afzali, Ali

    2004-03-18

    The ability to deposit and tailor reliable semiconducting films (with a particular recent emphasis on ultrathin systems) is indispensable for contemporary solid-state electronics. The search for thin-film semiconductors that provide simultaneously high carrier mobility and convenient solution-based deposition is also an important research direction, with the resulting expectations of new technologies (such as flexible or wearable computers, large-area high-resolution displays and electronic paper) and lower-cost device fabrication. Here we demonstrate a technique for spin coating ultrathin (approximately 50 A), crystalline and continuous metal chalcogenide films, based on the low-temperature decomposition of highly soluble hydrazinium precursors. We fabricate thin-film field-effect transistors (TFTs) based on semiconducting SnS(2-x)Se(x) films, which exhibit n-type transport, large current densities (>10(5) A cm(-2)) and mobilities greater than 10 cm2 V(-1) s(-1)--an order of magnitude higher than previously reported values for spin-coated semiconductors. The spin-coating technique is expected to be applicable to a range of metal chalcogenides, particularly those based on main group metals, as well as for the fabrication of a variety of thin-film-based devices (for example, solar cells, thermoelectrics and memory devices).

  19. High-mobility ultrathin semiconducting films prepared by spin coating

    Mitzi, David B.; Kosbar, Laura L.; Murray, Conal E.; Copel, Matthew; Afzali, Ali

    2004-03-01

    The ability to deposit and tailor reliable semiconducting films (with a particular recent emphasis on ultrathin systems) is indispensable for contemporary solid-state electronics. The search for thin-film semiconductors that provide simultaneously high carrier mobility and convenient solution-based deposition is also an important research direction, with the resulting expectations of new technologies (such as flexible or wearable computers, large-area high-resolution displays and electronic paper) and lower-cost device fabrication. Here we demonstrate a technique for spin coating ultrathin (~50Å), crystalline and continuous metal chalcogenide films, based on the low-temperature decomposition of highly soluble hydrazinium precursors. We fabricate thin-film field-effect transistors (TFTs) based on semiconducting SnS2-xSex films, which exhibit n-type transport, large current densities (>105Acm-2) and mobilities greater than 10cm2V-1s-1-an order of magnitude higher than previously reported values for spin-coated semiconductors. The spin-coating technique is expected to be applicable to a range of metal chalcogenides, particularly those based on main group metals, as well as for the fabrication of a variety of thin-film-based devices (for example, solar cells, thermoelectrics and memory devices).

  20. Thermoelectric transport properties of high mobility organic semiconductors

    Venkateshvaran, Deepak; Broch, Katharina; Warwick, Chris N.; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-09-01

    Transport in organic semiconductors has traditionally been investigated using measurements of the temperature and gate voltage dependent mobility of charge carriers within the channel of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). In such measurements, the behavior of charge carrier mobility with temperature and gate voltage, studied together with carrier activation energies, provide a metric to quantify the extent of disorder within these van der Waals bonded materials. In addition to the mobility and activation energy, another potent but often-overlooked transport coefficient useful in understanding disorder is the Seebeck coefficient (also known as thermoelectric power). Fundamentally, the Seebeck coefficient represents the entropy per charge carrier in the solid state, and thus proves powerful in distinguishing materials in which charge carriers move freely from those where a high degree of disorder causes the induced carriers to remain trapped. This paper briefly covers the recent highlights in the field of organic thermoelectrics, showing how significant strides have been made both from an applied standpoint as well as from a viewpoint of fundamental thermoelectric transport physics. It shall be illustrated how thermoelectric transport parameters in organic semiconductors can be tuned over a significant range, and how this tunability facilitates an enhanced performance for heat-to-electricity conversion as well as quantifies energetic disorder and the nature of the density of states (DOS). The work of the authors shall be spotlighted in this context, illustrating how Seebeck coefficient measurements in the polymer indacenodithiophene-co-benzothiadiazole (IDTBT) known for its ultra-low degree of torsion within the polymer backbone, has a trend consistent with low disorder. 1 Finally, using examples of the small molecules C8-BTBT and C10-DNTT, it shall be discussed how the Seebeck coefficient can aid the estimation of the density and distribution of trap states

  1. Intrinsic Charge Transport in Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    Podzorov, Vitaly

    2005-03-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are essential components of modern electronics. Despite the rapid progress of organic electronics, understanding of fundamental aspects of the charge transport in organic devices is still lacking. Recently, the OFETs based on highly ordered organic crystals have been fabricated with innovative techniques that preserve the high quality of single-crystal organic surfaces. This technological progress facilitated the study of transport mechanisms in organic semiconductors [1-4]. It has been demonstrated that the intrinsic polaronic transport, not dominated by disorder, with a remarkably high mobility of ``holes'' μ = 20 cm^2/Vs can be achieved in these devices at room temperature [4]. The signatures of the intrinsic polaronic transport are the anisotropy of the carrier mobility and an increase of μ with cooling. These and other aspects of the charge transport in organic single-crystal FETs will be discussed. Co-authors are Etienne Menard, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign; Valery Kiryukhin, Rutgers University; John Rogers, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign; Michael Gershenson, Rutgers University. [1] V. Podzorov et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 1739 (2003); ibid. 83, 3504 (2003). [2] V. C. Sundar et al., Science 303, 1644 (2004). [3] R. W. I. de Boer et al., Phys. Stat. Sol. (a) 201, 1302 (2004). [4] V. Podzorov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 086602 (2004).

  2. Interaction of a non-histone chromatin protein (high-mobility group protein 2) with DNA

    Goodwin, G.H.; Shooter, K.V.; Johns, E.W.

    1975-01-01

    The interaction with DNA of the calf thymus chromatin non-histone protein termed the high-mobility group protein 2 has been studied by sedimentation analysis in the ultracentrifuge and by measuring the binding of the 125 I-labelled protein to DNA. The results have been compared with those obtained previously by us [Eur. J. Biochem. (1974) 47, 263-270] for the interaction of high-mobility group protein 1 with DNA. Although the binding parameters are similar for these two proteins, high-mobility group protein 2 differs from high-mobility group protein 1 in that the former appears to change the shape of the DNA to a more compact form. The molecular weight of high-mobility group protein 2 has been determined by equilibrium sedimentation and a mean value of 26,000 was obtained. A low level of nuclease activity detected in one preparation of high-mobility group protein 2 has been investigated. (orig.) [de

  3. High-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Raghavan, Santosh; Schumann, Timo; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Jack Y.; Cain, Tyler A.; Stemmer, Susanne, E-mail: stemmer@mrl.ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility perovskite BaSnO{sub 3} films are of significant interest as new wide bandgap semiconductors for power electronics, transparent conductors, and as high mobility channels for epitaxial integration with functional perovskites. Despite promising results for single crystals, high-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} films have been challenging to grow. Here, we demonstrate a modified oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach, which supplies pre-oxidized SnO{sub x}. This technique addresses issues in the MBE of ternary stannates related to volatile SnO formation and enables growth of epitaxial, stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3}. We demonstrate room temperature electron mobilities of 150 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} in films grown on PrScO{sub 3}. The results open up a wide range of opportunities for future electronic devices.

  4. Graphene Field Effect Transistor for Radiation Detection

    Li, Mary J. (Inventor); Chen, Zhihong (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a graphene field effect transistor-based radiation sensor for use in a variety of radiation detection applications, including manned spaceflight missions. The sensing mechanism of the radiation sensor is based on the high sensitivity of graphene in the local change of electric field that can result from the interaction of ionizing radiation with a gated undoped silicon absorber serving as the supporting substrate in the graphene field effect transistor. The radiation sensor has low power and high sensitivity, a flexible structure, and a wide temperature range, and can be used in a variety of applications, particularly in space missions for human exploration.

  5. Followup Audit: DLA Officials Took Appropriate Actions to Address Concerns With Repair Parts for the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle

    2016-04-29

    Followup Audit : DLA Officials Took Appropriate Actions to Address Concerns With Repair Parts for the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle A P R I L...Results in Brief Followup Audit : DLA Officials Took Appropriate Actions to Address Concerns With Repair Parts for the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled...and Maritime Paid Too Much for High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle Repair Parts,” (HMMWV) was issued on April 4, 2014. The audit

  6. Atomic layer deposition of high-mobility hydrogen-doped zinc oxide

    Macco, B.; Knoops, H.C.M.; Verheijen, M.A.; Beyer, W.; Creatore, M.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been employed to prepare high-mobility H-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:H) films. Hydrogen doping was achieved by interleaving the ZnO ALD cycles with H2 plasma treatments. It has been shown that doping with H2 plasma offers key advantages over traditional

  7. High mobility group A1 enhances tumorigenicity of human cholangiocarcinoma and confers resistance to therapy

    Quintavalle, Cristina; Burmeister, Katharina; Piscuoglio, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    High mobility group A1 (HMGA1) protein has been described to play an important role in numerous types of human carcinoma. By the modulation of several target genes HMGA1 promotes proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells. However, its role in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) has...

  8. Considering the Geographic Dispersion of Homeless and Highly Mobile Students and Families

    Miller, Peter M.; Bourgeois, Alexis K.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses school and community-level issues associated with the expanding crisis of student homelessness in the United States. We note that while an increased geographic dispersion of homeless and highly mobile (HHM) families is largely attributed to the widespread effects of the economic recession, it is also furthered by shifting…

  9. Highly Mobile Students: Educational Problems and Possible Solutions. ERIC/CUE Digest, Number 73.

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, New York, NY.

    The following two types of student mobility stand out as causing educational problems: (1) inner-city mobility, which is prompted largely by fluctuations in the job market; and (2) intra-city mobility, which is caused by upward mobility or by poverty and homelessness. Most research indicates that high mobility negatively affects student…

  10. Fringing-field effects in acceleration columns

    Yavor, M.I.; Weick, H.; Wollnik, H.

    1999-01-01

    Fringing-field effects in acceleration columns are investigated, based on the fringing-field integral method. Transfer matrices at the effective boundaries of the acceleration column are obtained, as well as the general transfer matrix of the region separating two homogeneous electrostatic fields with different field strengths. The accuracy of the fringing-field integral method is investigated

  11. "Liquid-liquid-solid"-type superoleophobic surfaces to pattern polymeric semiconductors towards high-quality organic field-effect transistors.

    Wu, Yuchen; Su, Bin; Jiang, Lei; Heeger, Alan J

    2013-12-03

    Precisely aligned organic-liquid-soluble semiconductor microwire arrays have been fabricated by "liquid-liquid-solid" type superoleophobic surfaces directed fluid drying. Aligned organic 1D micro-architectures can be built as high-quality organic field-effect transistors with high mobilities of >10 cm(2) ·V(-1) ·s(-1) and current on/off ratio of more than 10(6) . All these studies will boost the development of 1D microstructures of organic semiconductor materials for potential application in organic electronics. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Nanowire field effect transistors principles and applications

    Jeong, Yoon-Ha

    2014-01-01

    “Nanowire Field Effect Transistor: Basic Principles and Applications” places an emphasis on the application aspects of nanowire field effect transistors (NWFET). Device physics and electronics are discussed in a compact manner, together with the p-n junction diode and MOSFET, the former as an essential element in NWFET and the latter as a general background of the FET. During this discussion, the photo-diode, solar cell, LED, LD, DRAM, flash EEPROM and sensors are highlighted to pave the way for similar applications of NWFET. Modeling is discussed in close analogy and comparison with MOSFETs. Contributors focus on processing, electrostatic discharge (ESD) and application of NWFET. This includes coverage of solar and memory cells, biological and chemical sensors, displays and atomic scale light emitting diodes. Appropriate for scientists and engineers interested in acquiring a working knowledge of NWFET as well as graduate students specializing in this subject.

  13. Enhanced stability of black phosphorus field-effect transistors with SiO₂ passivation.

    Wan, Bensong; Yang, Bingchao; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Junying; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2015-10-30

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) has attracted much attention due to its high mobility and suitable band gap for potential applic5ations in optoelectronics and flexible devices. However, its instability under ambient conditions limits its practical applications. Our investigations indicate that by passivation of the mechanically exfoliated BP flakes with a SiO2 layer, the fabricated BP field-effect transistors (FETs) exhibit greatly enhanced environmental stability. Compared to the unpassivated BP devices, which show a fast drop of on/off current ratio by a factor of 10 after one week of ambient exposure, the SiO2-passivated BP devices display a high retained on/off current ratio of over 600 after one week of exposure, just a little lower than the initial value of 810. Our investigations provide an effective route to passivate the few-layer BPs for enhancement of their environmental stability.

  14. Method for extracting relevant electrical parameters from graphene field-effect transistors using a physical model

    Boscá, A.; Pedrós, J.; Martínez, J.; Calle, F.

    2015-01-01

    Due to its intrinsic high mobility, graphene has proved to be a suitable material for high-speed electronics, where graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has shown excellent properties. In this work, we present a method for extracting relevant electrical parameters from GFET devices using a simple electrical characterization and a model fitting. With experimental data from the device output characteristics, the method allows to calculate parameters such as the mobility, the contact resistance, and the fixed charge. Differentiated electron and hole mobilities and direct connection with intrinsic material properties are some of the key aspects of this method. Moreover, the method output values can be correlated with several issues during key fabrication steps such as the graphene growth and transfer, the lithographic steps, or the metalization processes, providing a flexible tool for quality control in GFET fabrication, as well as a valuable feedback for improving the material-growth process

  15. Improved performance of InSe field-effect transistors by channel encapsulation

    Liang, Guangda; Wang, Yiming; Han, Lin; Yang, Zai-Xing; Xin, Qian; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R.; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D.; Patanè, Amalia; Song, Aimin

    2018-06-01

    Due to the high electron mobility and photo-responsivity, InSe is considered as an excellent candidate for next generation electronics and optoelectronics. In particular, in contrast to many high-mobility two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as phosphorene, InSe is more resilient to oxidation in air. Nevertheless, its implementation in future applications requires encapsulation techniques to prevent the adsorption of gas molecules on its surface. In this work, we use a common lithography resist, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to encapsulate InSe-based field-effect transistors (FETs). The encapsulation of InSe by PMMA improves the electrical stability of the FETs under a gate bias stress, and increases both the drain current and electron mobility. These findings indicate the effectiveness of the PMMA encapsulation method, which could be applied to other 2D materials.

  16. Method for extracting relevant electrical parameters from graphene field-effect transistors using a physical model

    Boscá, A., E-mail: alberto.bosca@upm.es [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectrónicos y Microtecnología, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Dpto. de Ingeniería Electrónica, E.T.S.I. de Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Pedrós, J. [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectrónicos y Microtecnología, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Campus de Excelencia Internacional, Campus Moncloa UCM-UPM, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Martínez, J. [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectrónicos y Microtecnología, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Dpto. de Ciencia de Materiales, E.T.S.I de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Calle, F. [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectrónicos y Microtecnología, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Dpto. de Ingeniería Electrónica, E.T.S.I. de Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Campus de Excelencia Internacional, Campus Moncloa UCM-UPM, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2015-01-28

    Due to its intrinsic high mobility, graphene has proved to be a suitable material for high-speed electronics, where graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has shown excellent properties. In this work, we present a method for extracting relevant electrical parameters from GFET devices using a simple electrical characterization and a model fitting. With experimental data from the device output characteristics, the method allows to calculate parameters such as the mobility, the contact resistance, and the fixed charge. Differentiated electron and hole mobilities and direct connection with intrinsic material properties are some of the key aspects of this method. Moreover, the method output values can be correlated with several issues during key fabrication steps such as the graphene growth and transfer, the lithographic steps, or the metalization processes, providing a flexible tool for quality control in GFET fabrication, as well as a valuable feedback for improving the material-growth process.

  17. Imaging using long range dipolar field effects

    Gutteridge, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the author, except where indicated in reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre, at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to March 2001. This thesis details the different characteristics of the long range dipolar field and its application to magnetic resonance imaging. The long range dipolar field is usually neglected in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, as molecular tumbling decouples its effect at short distances. However, in highly polarised samples residual long range components have a significant effect on the evolution of the magnetisation, giving rise to multiple spin echoes and unexpected quantum coherences. Three applications utilising these dipolar field effects are documented in this thesis. The first demonstrates the spatial sensitivity of the signal generated via dipolar field effects in structured liquid state samples. The second utilises the signal produced by the dipolar field to create proton spin density maps. These maps directly yield an absolute value for the water content of the sample that is unaffected by relaxation and any RF inhomogeneity or calibration errors in the radio frequency pulses applied. It has also been suggested that the signal generated by dipolar field effects may provide novel contrast in functional magnetic resonance imaging. In the third application, the effects of microscopic susceptibility variation on the signal are studied and the relaxation rate of the signal is compared to that of a conventional spin echo. (author)

  18. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    Pelliccione, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bartel, J.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Sciambi, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called “virtual scanning tunneling microscopy” that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  19. Dietary differentiation and the evolution of population genetic structure in a highly mobile carnivore.

    Małgorzata Pilot

    Full Text Available Recent studies on highly mobile carnivores revealed cryptic population genetic structures correlated to transitions in habitat types and prey species composition. This led to the hypothesis that natal-habitat-biased dispersal may be responsible for generating population genetic structure. However, direct evidence for the concordant ecological and genetic differentiation between populations of highly mobile mammals is rare. To address this we analyzed stable isotope profiles (δ(13C and δ(15N values for Eastern European wolves (Canis lupus as a quantifiable proxy measure of diet for individuals that had been genotyped in an earlier study (showing cryptic genetic structure, to provide a quantitative assessment of the relationship between individual foraging behavior and genotype. We found a significant correlation between genetic distances and dietary differentiation (explaining 46% of the variation in both the marginal test and crucially, when geographic distance was accounted for as a co-variable. These results, interpreted in the context of other possible mechanisms such as allopatry and isolation by distance, reinforce earlier studies suggesting that diet and associated habitat choice are influencing the structuring of populations in highly mobile carnivores.

  20. Interaction of tricyclic drugs with copper phthalocyanine dye immobilized on magnetic carriers

    Šafaříková, Miroslava; Šafařík, Ivo

    3(Suppl.2), - (2002), s. 188-191 ISSN 1473-2262. [International Conference on the Scientific and Clinical Applications of Magnetic Carriers /4./. Tallahassee, 09.05.2002-11.05.2002] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 523.80; GA AV ČR IBS6087204 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : magnetic * tricyclic drugs * phthalocyanine Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  1. Ambipolar carrier transport properties and molecular packing structure of octahexyl-substituted copper phthalocyanine

    Watanabe, Ken; Watanabe, Koichi; Tohnai, Norimitsu; Itani, Hiromichi; Shimizu, Yo; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2018-04-01

    The charge carrier mobility of a solution-processable low-molecular-weight organic semiconductor material, i.e., 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octahexylphthalocyanine copper complex (C6PcCu), was investigated by the time-of-flight technique. The anomalous ambipolar carrier mobility was discussed from the viewpoint of the molecular packing structure, which was clarified by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis. In the comparison between the molecular packing structures of C6PcCu and its metal-free-type homologue, it was found that the difference in carrier mobility originates from the rotation of the molecule, which is caused by the steric hindrance due to the introduction of a center metal and the interpenetration of the nonperipheral alkyl chains.

  2. Photovoltaic conversion efficiency in copper-phthalocyanine/perylenetetracarboxylic acid benzimidazole heterojunction solar cells

    Tsutsui, Tetsuo [Dept. of Materials Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Nakashima, Takuya [Dept. of Materials Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fujita, Yoshimasa [Dept. of Materials Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Saito, Shogo [Dept. of Materials Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    Energy conversion efficiency of organic heterojuction-type solar cells was analyzed based on a simplified model. Energy conversion efficiency was expressed by four terms, a proton collection factor, a voltage output factor, an average quantum efficiency of photo-carrier generation and a fill factor. Meanings of low values of former two terms were discussed. (orig.)

  3. Electronic and magnetic coupling of iron and copper phthalocyanine to ferromagnetic Co(100) surfaces

    Schmidt, Felix; Sauther, Jens; Lach, Stefan; Ziegler, Christiane [Department of Physics, University of Kaiserslautern, Erwin Schroedinger Str. 56, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Ali, Ehesan; Oppeneer, Peter [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Box 530, Uppsala University, S-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Metallo-phthalocyanines are organic semiconductors which show in certain cases promising magnetic properties, advertising them for use in organic spintronics. Here, copper (CuPc) and iron phthalocyanine (FePc) were grown on ultra thin layers of Co(100) substrates with well known highly spin-polarized electron injection capability. Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals different interactions between the pyrolytic nitrogen atoms and the cobalt surface for the two phthalocyanines. The analysis of the different multiplet structures appearing for the nitrogen core levels in the submonolayer regime and UPS investigations of the valence band electronic structure of the Co dominated region near the Fermi level indicates a particularly electronic coupling and a rehybridisation of the molecular orbitals with the cobalt orbitals. In order to clarify the influence of the two different central atoms on the electronic- and subsequently the magnetic coupling to the Co substrate, theoretical calculations using the GGA and GGA+U methodologies on a structure of Fe/Cu-phthalocyanine adsorbed on a 3-layered cobalt surface were performed indicating a ferromagnetic coupling between FePc and Co.

  4. Towards accurate simulation of fringe field effects

    Berz, M.; Erdelyi, B.; Makino, K.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we study various fringe field effects. Previously, we showed the large impact that fringe fields can have on certain lattice scenarios of the proposed Neutrino Factory. Besides the linear design of the lattice, the effects depend strongly on the details of the field fall off. Various scenarios are compared. Furthermore, in the absence of detailed information, we study the effects for the LHC, a case where the fringe fields are known, and try to draw some conclusions for Neutrino Factory lattices

  5. Oxidation and crystal field effects in uranium

    Tobin, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Booth, C. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shuh, D. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); van der Laan, G. [Diamond Light Source, Didcot (United Kingdom); Sokaras, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Weng, T. -C. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Yu, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bagus, P. S. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Tyliszczak, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nordlund, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-07-06

    An extensive investigation of oxidation in uranium has been pursued. This includes the utilization of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, hard x-ray absorption near-edge structure, resonant (hard) x-ray emission spectroscopy, cluster calculations, and a branching ratio analysis founded on atomic theory. The samples utilized were uranium dioxide (UO2), uranium trioxide (UO3), and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4). As a result, a discussion of the role of non-spherical perturbations, i.e., crystal or ligand field effects, will be presented.

  6. Magnetic field effects in hybrid perovskite devices

    Zhang, C.; Sun, D.; Sheng, C.-X.; Zhai, Y. X.; Mielczarek, K.; Zakhidov, A.; Vardeny, Z. V.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic field effects have been a successful tool for studying carrier dynamics in organic semiconductors as the weak spin-orbit coupling in these materials gives rise to long spin relaxation times. As the spin-orbit coupling is strong in organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites, which are promising materials for photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, magnetic field effects are expected to be negligible in these optoelectronic devices. We measured significant magneto-photocurrent, magneto-electroluminescence and magneto-photoluminescence responses in hybrid perovskite devices and thin films, where the amplitude and shape are correlated to each other through the electron-hole lifetime, which depends on the perovskite film morphology. We attribute these responses to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of the photogenerated electron-hole pairs with different g-factors--the Δg model. We validate this model by measuring large Δg (~ 0.65) using field-induced circularly polarized photoluminescence, and electron-hole pair lifetime using picosecond pump-probe spectroscopy.

  7. Deformable Organic Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors.

    Lee, Yeongjun; Oh, Jin Young; Kim, Taeho Roy; Gu, Xiaodan; Kim, Yeongin; Wang, Ging-Ji Nathan; Wu, Hung-Chin; Pfattner, Raphael; To, John W F; Katsumata, Toru; Son, Donghee; Kang, Jiheong; Matthews, James R; Niu, Weijun; He, Mingqian; Sinclair, Robert; Cui, Yi; Tok, Jeffery B-H; Lee, Tae-Woo; Bao, Zhenan

    2018-02-01

    Deformable electronic devices that are impervious to mechanical influence when mounted on surfaces of dynamically changing soft matters have great potential for next-generation implantable bioelectronic devices. Here, deformable field-effect transistors (FETs) composed of single organic nanowires (NWs) as the semiconductor are presented. The NWs are composed of fused thiophene diketopyrrolopyrrole based polymer semiconductor and high-molecular-weight polyethylene oxide as both the molecular binder and deformability enhancer. The obtained transistors show high field-effect mobility >8 cm 2 V -1 s -1 with poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) polymer dielectric and can easily be deformed by applied strains (both 100% tensile and compressive strains). The electrical reliability and mechanical durability of the NWs can be significantly enhanced by forming serpentine-like structures of the NWs. Remarkably, the fully deformable NW FETs withstand 3D volume changes (>1700% and reverting back to original state) of a rubber balloon with constant current output, on the surface of which it is attached. The deformable transistors can robustly operate without noticeable degradation on a mechanically dynamic soft matter surface, e.g., a pulsating balloon (pulse rate: 40 min -1 (0.67 Hz) and 40% volume expansion) that mimics a beating heart, which underscores its potential for future biomedical applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Mobility overestimation due to gated contacts in organic field-effect transistors

    Bittle, Emily G.; Basham, James I.; Jackson, Thomas N.; Jurchescu, Oana D.; Gundlach, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Parameters used to describe the electrical properties of organic field-effect transistors, such as mobility and threshold voltage, are commonly extracted from measured current–voltage characteristics and interpreted by using the classical metal oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor model. However, in recent reports of devices with ultra-high mobility (>40 cm2 V−1 s−1), the device characteristics deviate from this idealized model and show an abrupt turn-on in the drain current when measured as a function of gate voltage. In order to investigate this phenomenon, here we report on single crystal rubrene transistors intentionally fabricated to exhibit an abrupt turn-on. We disentangle the channel properties from the contact resistance by using impedance spectroscopy and show that the current in such devices is governed by a gate bias dependence of the contact resistance. As a result, extracted mobility values from d.c. current–voltage characterization are overestimated by one order of magnitude or more. PMID:26961271

  9. Field-effect P-N junction

    Regan, William; Zettl, Alexander

    2015-05-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to field-effect p-n junctions. In one aspect, a device includes an ohmic contact, a semiconductor layer disposed on the ohmic contact, at least one rectifying contact disposed on the semiconductor layer, a gate including a layer disposed on the at least one rectifying contact and the semiconductor layer and a gate contact disposed on the layer. A lateral width of the rectifying contact is less than a semiconductor depletion width of the semiconductor layer. The gate contact is electrically connected to the ohmic contact to create a self-gating feedback loop that is configured to maintain a gate electric field of the gate.

  10. Field Effect Microparticle Generation for Cell Microencapsulation.

    Hsu, Brend Ray-Sea; Fu, Shin-Huei

    2017-01-01

    The diameter and sphericity of alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate microcapsules, determined by the size and the shape of calcium alginate microspheres, affect their in vivo durability and biocompatibility and the results of transplantation. The commonly used air-jet spray method generates microspheres with a wider variation in diameter, larger sphere morphology, and evenly distributed encapsulated cells. In order to overcome these drawbacks, we designed a field effect microparticle generator to create a stable electric field to prepare microparticles with a smaller diameter and more uniform morphology. Using this electric field microparticle generator the encapsulated cells will be located at the periphery of the microspheres, and thus the supply of oxygen and nutrients for the encapsulated cells will be improved compared with the centrally located encapsulated cells in the air-jet spray method.

  11. Conductance fluctuations in high mobility monolayer graphene: Nonergodicity, lack of determinism and chaotic behavior.

    da Cunha, C R; Mineharu, M; Matsunaga, M; Matsumoto, N; Chuang, C; Ochiai, Y; Kim, G-H; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Ferry, D K; Aoki, N

    2016-09-09

    We have fabricated a high mobility device, composed of a monolayer graphene flake sandwiched between two sheets of hexagonal boron nitride. Conductance fluctuations as functions of a back gate voltage and magnetic field were obtained to check for ergodicity. Non-linear dynamics concepts were used to study the nature of these fluctuations. The distribution of eigenvalues was estimated from the conductance fluctuations with Gaussian kernels and it indicates that the carrier motion is chaotic at low temperatures. We argue that a two-phase dynamical fluid model best describes the transport in this system and can be used to explain the violation of the so-called ergodic hypothesis found in graphene.

  12. Investigation of the High Mobility IGZO Thin Films by Using Co-Sputtering Method

    Hsu, Chao-Ming; Tzou, Wen-Cheng; Yang, Cheng-Fu; Liou, Yu-Jhen

    2015-01-01

    High transmittance ratio in visible range, low resistivity, and high mobility of IGZO thin films were prepared at room temperature for 30 min by co-sputtering of Zn2Ga2O5 (Ga2O3 + 2 ZnO, GZO) ceramic and In2O3 ceramic at the same time. The deposition power of pure In2O3 ceramic target was fixed at 100 W and the deposition power of GZO ceramic target was changed from 80 W to 140 W. We chose to investigate the deposition power of GZO ceramic target on the properties of IGZO thin films. From the...

  13. Data dissemination in the wild: A testbed for high-mobility MANETs

    Vingelmann, Peter; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Heide, Janus

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of efficient data dissemination in Mobile Ad hoc NETworks (MANETs) with high mobility. A testbed is presented; which provides a high degree of mobility in experiments. The testbed consists of 10 autonomous robots with mobile phones mounted on them. The mobile...... information, and the goal is to convey that information to all devices. A strategy is proposed that uses UDP broadcast transmissions and random linear network coding to facilitate the efficient exchange of information in the network. An application is introduced that implements this strategy on Nokia phones...

  14. Random demographic household surveys in highly mobile pastoral communities in Chad.

    Weibel, Daniel; Béchir, Mahamat; Hattendorf, Jan; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Zinsstag, Jakob; Schelling, Esther

    2011-05-01

    Reliable demographic data is a central requirement for health planning and management, and for the implementation of adequate interventions. This study addresses the lack of demographic data on mobile pastoral communities in the Sahel. A total of 1081 Arab, Fulani and Gorane women and 2541 children (1336 boys and 1205 girls) were interviewed and registered by a biometric fingerprint scanner in five repeated random transect demographic and health surveys conducted from March 2007 to January 2008 in the Lake Chad region in Chad. Important determinants for the planning and implementation of household surveys among mobile pastoral communities include: environmental factors; availability of women for interviews; difficulties in defining "own" children; the need for information-education-communication campaigns; and informed consent of husbands in typically patriarchal societies. Due to their high mobility, only 5% (56/1081) of registered women were encountered twice. Therefore, it was not possible to establish a demographic and health cohort. Prospective demographic and health cohorts are the most accurate method to assess child mortality and other demographic indices. However, their feasibility in a highly mobile pastoral setting remains to be shown. Future interdisciplinary scientific efforts need to target innovative methods, tools and approaches to include marginalized communities in operational health and demographic surveillance systems.

  15. Appendicectomies in Albanians in Greece: outcomes in a highly mobile immigrant patient population

    2001-01-01

    Background Albanian immigrants in Greece comprise a highly mobile population with unknown health care profile. We aimed to assess whether these immigrants were more or less likely to undergo laparotomy for suspected appendicitis with negative findings (negative appendicectomy), by performing a controlled study with individual (1:4) matching. We used data from 6 hospitals in the Greek prefecture of Epirus that is bordering Albania. Results Among a total of 2027 non-incidental appendicectomies for suspected appendicitis performed in 1994-1999, 30 patients with Albanian names were matched (for age, sex, time of operation and hospital) to 120 patients with Greek names. The odds for a negative appendicectomy were 3.4-fold higher (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-9.31, p = 0.02) in Albanian immigrants than in matched Greek-name subjects. The difference was most prominent in men (odds ratio 20.0, 95% CI, 1.41-285, p = 0.02) while it was not formally significant in women (odds ratio 1.56, 95% CI, 0.44-5.48). The odds for perforation were 1.25-fold higher in Albanian-name immigrants than in Greek-name patients (95% CI 0.44- 3.57). Conclusions Albanian immigrants in Greece are at high risk for negative appendicectomies. Socioeconomic, cultural and language parameters underlying health care inequalities in highly mobile immigrant populations need better study. PMID:11472640

  16. Determination of the coherence length in high-mobility semiconductor-coupled Josephson weak links

    Kleinsasser, A.W.

    1991-01-01

    A Nb-InAs-Nb superconductor-semiconductor-superconductor weak link based on a high-mobility homoepitaxial n-InAs film was reported recently [Akazaki, Kawakami, and Nittu J. Appl. Phys. 66, 6121 (1989)]. Measurements of the electron concentration, effective mass, and mobility allowed the coherence length in the normal link to be calculated. The mobility was high enough that the dirty limit was not applicable in the temperature range (∼2--7 K) over which the device critical current was measured. The temperature dependence of the critical current could not be fit by the usual theoretical form, even though an expression for the coherence length was used that should be applicable in both the clean and dirty limits. In this paper is demonstrated an excellent fit to the data, obtained by using the magnitude of the coherence length as a fitting parameter and assuming the dirty limit temperature dependence. This implies a coherence length proportional to T -1/2 but far shorter than that calculated from the known material parameters. It is suggested that a different scaling length may apply in high-mobility devices

  17. Random demographic household surveys in highly mobile pastoral communities in Chad

    Béchir, Mahamat; Hattendorf, Jan; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Zinsstag, Jakob; Schelling, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Problem Reliable demographic data is a central requirement for health planning and management, and for the implementation of adequate interventions. This study addresses the lack of demographic data on mobile pastoral communities in the Sahel. Approach A total of 1081 Arab, Fulani and Gorane women and 2541 children (1336 boys and 1205 girls) were interviewed and registered by a biometric fingerprint scanner in five repeated random transect demographic and health surveys conducted from March 2007 to January 2008 in the Lake Chad region in Chad. Local setting Important determinants for the planning and implementation of household surveys among mobile pastoral communities include: environmental factors; availability of women for interviews; difficulties in defining “own” children; the need for information-education-communication campaigns; and informed consent of husbands in typically patriarchal societies. Relevant changes Due to their high mobility, only 5% (56/1081) of registered women were encountered twice. Therefore, it was not possible to establish a demographic and health cohort. Lessons learnt Prospective demographic and health cohorts are the most accurate method to assess child mortality and other demographic indices. However, their feasibility in a highly mobile pastoral setting remains to be shown. Future interdisciplinary scientific efforts need to target innovative methods, tools and approaches to include marginalized communities in operational health and demographic surveillance systems. PMID:21556307

  18. Room Temperature Silicene Field-Effect Transistors

    Akinwande, Deji

    Silicene, a buckled Si analogue of graphene, holds significant promise for future electronics beyond traditional CMOS. In our predefined experiments via encapsulated delamination with native electrodes approach, silicene devices exhibit an ambipolar charge transport behavior, corroborating theories on Dirac band in Ag-free silicene. Monolayer silicene device has extracted field-effect mobility within the theoretical expectation and ON/OFF ratio greater than monolayer graphene, while multilayer silicene devices show decreased mobility and gate modulation. Air-stability of silicene devices depends on the number of layers of silicene and intrinsic material structure determined by growth temperature. Few or multi-layer silicene devices maintain their ambipolar behavior for days in contrast to minutes time scale for monolayer counterparts under similar conditions. Multilayer silicene grown at different temperatures below 300oC possess different intrinsic structures and yield different electrical property and air-stability. This work suggests a practical prospect to enable more air-stable silicene devices with layer and growth condition control, which can be leveraged for other air-sensitive 2D materials. In addition, we describe quantum and classical transistor device concepts based on silicene and related buckled materials that exploit the 2D topological insulating phenomenon. The transistor device physics offer the potential for ballistic transport that is robust against scattering and can be employed for both charge and spin transport. This work was supported by the ARO.

  19. Fringing field effects in negative capacitance field-effect transistors with a ferroelectric gate insulator

    Hattori, Junichi; Fukuda, Koichi; Ikegami, Tsutomu; Ota, Hiroyuki; Migita, Shinji; Asai, Hidehiro; Toriumi, Akira

    2018-04-01

    We study the effects of fringing electric fields on the behavior of negative-capacitance (NC) field-effect transistors (FETs) with a silicon-on-insulator body and a gate stack consisting of an oxide film, an internal metal film, a ferroelectric film, and a gate electrode using our own device simulator that can properly handle the complicated relationship between the polarization and the electric field in ferroelectric materials. The behaviors of such NC FETs and the corresponding metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) FETs are simulated and compared with each other to evaluate the effects of the NC of the ferroelectric film. Then, the fringing field effects are evaluated by comparing the NC effects in NC FETs with and without gate spacers. The fringing field between the gate stack, especially the internal metal film, and the source/drain region induces more charges at the interface of the film with the ferroelectric film. Accordingly, the function of the NC to modulate the gate voltage and the resulting function to improve the subthreshold swing are enhanced. We also investigate the relationships of these fringing field effects to the drain voltage and four design parameters of NC FETs, i.e., gate length, gate spacer permittivity, internal metal film thickness, and oxide film thickness.

  20. Hemoadsorption of high-mobility-group box 1 using a porous polymethylmethacrylate fiber in a swine acute liver failure model.

    Amemiya, Ryusuke; Shinoda, Masahiro; Yamada, Masayuki; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Shimada, Kaoru; Fujieda, Hiroaki; Yagi, Hiroshi; Mizota, Takamasa; Nishiyama, Ryo; Oshima, Go; Yamada, Shingo; Matsubara, Kentaro; Abe, Yuta; Hibi, Taizo; Kitago, Minoru; Obara, Hideaki; Itano, Osamu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2018-04-01

    High-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 has been identified as an important mediator of various kinds of acute and chronic inflammation. In this study, we aimed to develop a column that effectively adsorbs high-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 by altering the pore size of the fiber. First, we produced three types of porous polymethylmethacrylate fiber by altering the concentration of polymethylmethacrylate dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide. We then selected a fiber based on the results of an in vitro incubation test of high-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 adsorption. Using the selected fiber, we constructed a new column and tested its high-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 adsorption capacity during 4-h extracorporeal hemoperfusion in a swine acute liver failure model. Electron microscope observation showed that the three types of fibers had different pore sizes on the surface and in cross section, which were dependent on the concentration of polymethylmethacrylate. In the in vitro incubation test, fiber with moderate-sized pores demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity. In the in vivo hemoperfusion study, the ratio of the high-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 concentration at the outlet versus the inlet of the column was significantly lower with the new column than with the control column during 4-h extracorporeal hemoperfusion. The normalized plasma level of high-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 at 12 h after the completion of hemoperfusion was significantly lower with the new column than with the control column. The newly developed polymethylmethacrylate column adsorbs high-mobility-group box chromosomal protein 1 during hemoperfusion in swine ALF model.

  1. Electric Field Effects in RUS Measurements

    Darling, Timothy W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ten Cate, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allured, Bradley [UNIV NEVADA, RENO; Carpenter, Michael A [CAMBRIDGE UNIV. UK

    2009-09-21

    Much of the power of the Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) technique is the ability to make mechanical resonance measurements while the environment of the sample is changed. Temperature and magnetic field are important examples. Due to the common use of piezoelectric transducers near the sample, applied electric fields introduce complications, but many materials have technologically interesting responses to applied static and RF electric fields. Non-contact optical, buffered, or shielded transducers permit the application of charge and externally applied electric fields while making RUS measurements. For conducting samples, in vacuum, charging produces a small negative pressure in the volume of the material - a state rarely explored. At very high charges we influence the electron density near the surface so the propagation of surface waves and their resonances may give us a handle on the relationship of electron density to bond strength and elasticity. Our preliminary results indicate a charge sign dependent effect, but we are studying a number of possible other effects induced by charging. In dielectric materials, external electric fields influence the strain response, particularly in ferroelectrics. Experiments to study this connection at phase transformations are planned. The fact that many geological samples contain single crystal quartz suggests a possible use of the piezoelectric response to drive vibrations using applied RF fields. In polycrystals, averaging of strains in randomly oriented crystals implies using the 'statistical residual' strain as the drive. The ability to excite vibrations in quartzite polycrystals and arenites is explored. We present results of experimental and theoretical approaches to electric field effects using RUS methods.

  2. Nanowire field-effect transistors for gas sensor applications

    Constantinou, Marios

    Sensing BTEX (Benzene, Ethylbenzene, Toluene, Xylene) pollutants is of utmost importance to reduce health risk and ensure public safety. The lack of sensitivity and selectivity of the current gas sensors and the limited number of available technologies in the field of BTEX-sensing raises the demand for the development of high-performance gas sensors for BTEX applications. The scope of this thesis is the fabrication and characterisation of high-quality field-effect transistors (FETs), with functionalised silicon nanowires (SiNWs), for the selective sensing of benzene vs. other BTEX gases. This research addresses three main challenges in SiNW FET-sensor device development: i) controllable and reproducible assembly of high-quality SiNWs for FET sensor devices using the method of dielectrophoresis (DEP), ii) almost complete elimination of harmful hysteresis effect in the SiNW FET current-voltage characteristics induced by surface states using DMF solvent, iii) selective sensing of benzene with up to ppb range of sensitivity using calix[4]arene-derivatives. It is experimentally demonstrated that frequency-controlled DEP is a powerful tool for the selection and collection of semiconducting SiNWs with advanced electrical and morphological properties, from a poly-disperse as-synthesised NWs. The DEP assembly method also leads to a controllable and reproducible fabrication of high-quality NW-based FETs. The results highlight the superiority of DEP, performed at high signal frequencies (5-20 MHz) to selectively assemble only high-quality NWs which can respond to such high DEP frequencies. The SiNW FETs, with NWs collected at high DEP frequencies, have high mobility (≈50 cm2 V-1 s-1), low sub-threshold-swing (≈1.26 V/decade), high on-current (up to 3 mA) and high on/off ratio (106-107). The DEP NW selection is also demonstrated using an industrially scalable method, to allow establishing of NW response characteristics to different DEP frequencies in a very short time

  3. Photo-Detection on Narrow-Bandgap High-Mobility 2D Semiconductors

    Charnas, Adam; Qiu, Gang; Deng, Yexin; Wang, Yixiu; Du, Yuchen; Yang, Lingming; Wu, Wenzhuo; Ye, Peide

    Photo-detection and energy harvesting device concepts have been demonstrated widely in 2D materials such as graphene, TMDs, and black phosphorus. In this work, we demonstrate anisotropic photo-detection achieved using devices fabricated from hydrothermally grown narrow-bandgap high-mobility 2D semiconductor. Back-gated FETs were fabricated by transferring the 2D flakes onto a Si/SiO2 substrate and depositing various metal contacts across the flakes to optimize the access resistance for optoelectronic devices. Photo-responsivity was measured and mapped by slightly biasing the devices and shining a laser spot at different locations of the device to observe and map the resulting photo-generated current. Optimization of the Schottky barrier height for both n and p at the metal-2D interfaces using asymmetric contact engineering was performed to improve device performance.

  4. Task Phase Recognition for Highly Mobile Workers in Large Building Complexes

    Stisen, Allan; Mathisen, Andreas; Krogh, Søren

    2016-01-01

    requirements on the accuracy of the indoor positioning, and thus come with low deployment and maintenance effort in real-world settings. We evaluated the proposed methods in a large hospital complex, where the highly mobile workers were recruited among the non-clinical workforce. The evaluation is based......-scale indoor work environments, namely from a WiFi infrastructure providing coarse grained indoor positioning, from inertial sensors in the workers’ mobile phones, and from a task management system yielding information about the scheduled tasks’ start and end locations. The methods presented have low...... on manually labelled real-world data collected over 4 days of regular work life of the mobile workforce. The collected data yields 83 tasks in total involving 8 different orderlies from a major university hospital with a building area of 160, 000 m2. The results show that the proposed methods can distinguish...

  5. A southern African origin and cryptic structure in the highly mobile plains zebra

    Pedersen, Casper-Emil T; Albrechtsen, Anders; Etter, Paul D.

    2018-01-01

    insights into the past phylogeography of the species. The results identify a southern African location as the most likely source region from which all extant populations expanded around 370,000 years ago. We show evidence for inclusion of the extinct and phenotypically divergent quagga (Equus quagga quagga......The plains zebra (Equus quagga) is an ecologically important species of the African savannah. It is also one of the most numerous and widely distributed ungulates, and six subspecies have been described based on morphological variation. However, the within-species evolutionary processes have been...... difficult to resolve due to its high mobility and a lack of consensus regarding the population structure. We obtained genome-wide DNA polymorphism data from more than 167,000 loci for 59 plains zebras from across the species range, encompassing all recognized extant subspecies, as well as three mountain...

  6. New Mutation Identified in the SRY Gene High Mobility Group (HMG

    Feride İffet Şahin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the SRY gene prevent the differentiation of the fetal gonads to testes and cause developing female phenotype, and as a result sex reversal and pure gonadal dysgenesis (Swyer syndrome can be developed. Different types of mutations identified in the SRY gene are responsible for 15% of the gonadal dysgenesis. In this study, we report a new mutation (R132P in the High Mobility Group (HMG region of SRY gene was detected in a patient with primary amenorrhea who has 46,XY karyotype. This mutation leads to replacement of the polar and basic arginine with a nonpolar hydrophobic proline residue at aminoacid 132 in the nuclear localization signal region of the protein. With this case report we want to emphasize the genetic approach to the patients with gonadal dysgenesis. If Y chromosome is detected during cytogenetic analysis, revealing the presence of the SRY gene and identification of mutations in this gene by sequencing analysis is become important in.

  7. The role of high mobility group box 1(HMGB1)in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases

    Qingjie Chen; Xiaofeng Guan; Xiaocong Zuo; Jianglin Wang; Wenjun Yin

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1(HMGB1) is a nuclear protein that can bind to DNA and act as a co-factor for gene transcription. When released into extracellular fluid, it plays a proinflammatory role by acting as a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule(DAMP)(also known as an alarmin) to initiate innate immune responses by activating multiple cell surface receptors such as the receptor for advanced glycation end-products(RAGE) and toll-like receptors(TLRs), TLR2, TLR4 or TLR9. This proinflammatory role is now considered to be important in the pathogenesis of a wide range of kidney diseases whether they result from hemodynamic changes, renal tubular epithelial cell apoptosis, kidney tissue fibrosis or inflammation. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of HMGB1 in kidney diseases and how the HMGB1-mediated signaling pathway may constitute a new strategy for the treatment of kidney diseases.

  8. Highly mobile charge-transfer excitons in two-dimensional WS2/tetracene heterostructures

    Zhu, Tong; Yuan, Long; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Mingwei; Wan, Yan; Mei, Jianguo; Huang, Libai

    2018-01-01

    Charge-transfer (CT) excitons at heterointerfaces play a critical role in light to electricity conversion using organic and nanostructured materials. However, how CT excitons migrate at these interfaces is poorly understood. We investigate the formation and transport of CT excitons in two-dimensional WS2/tetracene van der Waals heterostructures. Electron and hole transfer occurs on the time scale of a few picoseconds, and emission of interlayer CT excitons with a binding energy of ~0.3 eV has been observed. Transport of the CT excitons is directly measured by transient absorption microscopy, revealing coexistence of delocalized and localized states. Trapping-detrapping dynamics between the delocalized and localized states leads to stretched-exponential photoluminescence decay with an average lifetime of ~2 ns. The delocalized CT excitons are remarkably mobile with a diffusion constant of ~1 cm2 s−1. These highly mobile CT excitons could have important implications in achieving efficient charge separation. PMID:29340303

  9. High Thermoelectric Power Factor of High-Mobility 2D Electron Gas.

    Ohta, Hiromichi; Kim, Sung Wng; Kaneki, Shota; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2018-01-01

    Thermoelectric conversion is an energy harvesting technology that directly converts waste heat from various sources into electricity by the Seebeck effect of thermoelectric materials with a large thermopower ( S ), high electrical conductivity (σ), and low thermal conductivity (κ). State-of-the-art nanostructuring techniques that significantly reduce κ have realized high-performance thermoelectric materials with a figure of merit ( ZT = S 2 ∙σ∙ T ∙κ -1 ) between 1.5 and 2. Although the power factor (PF = S 2 ∙σ) must also be enhanced to further improve ZT , the maximum PF remains near 1.5-4 mW m -1 K -2 due to the well-known trade-off relationship between S and σ. At a maximized PF, σ is much lower than the ideal value since impurity doping suppresses the carrier mobility. A metal-oxide-semiconductor high electron mobility transistor (MOS-HEMT) structure on an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is prepared. Applying a gate electric field to the MOS-HEMT simultaneously modulates S and σ of the high-mobility electron gas from -490 µV K -1 and ≈10 -1 S cm -1 to -90 µV K -1 and ≈10 4 S cm -1 , while maintaining a high carrier mobility (≈1500 cm 2 V -1 s -1 ). The maximized PF of the high-mobility electron gas is ≈9 mW m -1 K -2 , which is a two- to sixfold increase compared to state-of-the-art practical thermoelectric materials.

  10. A guide to calculating habitat-quality metrics to inform conservation of highly mobile species

    Bieri, Joanna A.; Sample, Christine; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Diffendorfer, James E.; Earl, Julia E.; Erickson, Richard A.; Federico, Paula; Flockhart, D. T. Tyler; Nicol, Sam; Semmens, Darius J.; Skraber, T.; Wiederholt, Ruscena; Mattsson, Brady J.

    2018-01-01

    Many metrics exist for quantifying the relative value of habitats and pathways used by highly mobile species. Properly selecting and applying such metrics requires substantial background in mathematics and understanding the relevant management arena. To address this multidimensional challenge, we demonstrate and compare three measurements of habitat quality: graph-, occupancy-, and demographic-based metrics. Each metric provides insights into system dynamics, at the expense of increasing amounts and complexity of data and models. Our descriptions and comparisons of diverse habitat-quality metrics provide means for practitioners to overcome the modeling challenges associated with management or conservation of such highly mobile species. Whereas previous guidance for applying habitat-quality metrics has been scattered in diversified tracks of literature, we have brought this information together into an approachable format including accessible descriptions and a modeling case study for a typical example that conservation professionals can adapt for their own decision contexts and focal populations.Considerations for Resource ManagersManagement objectives, proposed actions, data availability and quality, and model assumptions are all relevant considerations when applying and interpreting habitat-quality metrics.Graph-based metrics answer questions related to habitat centrality and connectivity, are suitable for populations with any movement pattern, quantify basic spatial and temporal patterns of occupancy and movement, and require the least data.Occupancy-based metrics answer questions about likelihood of persistence or colonization, are suitable for populations that undergo localized extinctions, quantify spatial and temporal patterns of occupancy and movement, and require a moderate amount of data.Demographic-based metrics answer questions about relative or absolute population size, are suitable for populations with any movement pattern, quantify demographic

  11. High-Mobility Aligned Pentacene Films Grown by Zone-Casting

    Duffy, Claudia M.; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel; Breiby, Dag W.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the growth and field-effect transistor performance of aligned pentacene thin films deposited by zone-casting from a solution of unsubstituted pentacene molecules in a chlorinated solvent. Polarized optical microscopy shows that solution processed pentacene films grow as large...

  12. Modeling quantization effects in field effect transistors

    Troger, C.

    2001-06-01

    Numerical simulation in the field of semiconductor device development advanced to a valuable, cost-effective and flexible facility. The most widely used simulators are based on classical models, as they need to satisfy time and memory constraints. To improve the performance of field effect transistors such as MOSFETs and HEMTs these devices are continuously scaled down in their dimensions. Consequently the characteristics of such devices are getting more and more determined by quantum mechanical effects arising from strong transversal fields in the channel. In this work an approach based on a two-dimensional electron gas is used to describe the confinement of the carriers. Quantization is considered in one direction only. For the derivation of a one-dimensional Schroedinger equation in the effective mass framework a non-parabolic correction for the energy dispersion due to Kane is included. For each subband a non-parabolic dispersion relation characterized by subband masses and subband non-parabolicity coefficients is introduced and the parameters are calculated via perturbation theory. The method described in this work has been implemented in a software tool that performs a self-consistent solution of Schroedinger- and Poisson-equation for a one-dimensional cut through a MOS structure or heterostructure. The calculation of the carrier densities is performed assuming Fermi-Dirac statistics. In the case of a MOS structure a metal or a polysilicon gate is considered and an arbitrary gate bulk voltage can be applied. This allows investigating quantum mechanical effects in capacity calculations, to compare the simulated data with measured CV curves and to evaluate the results obtained with a quantum mechanical correction for the classical electron density. The behavior of the defined subband parameters is compared to the value of the mass and the non-parabolicity coefficient from the model due to Kane. Finally the presented characterization of the subbands is applied

  13. Direct coupled amplifiers using field effect transistors

    Fowler, E P [Control and Instrumentation Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-03-15

    The concept of the uni-polar field effect transistor (P.E.T.) was known before the invention of the bi-polar transistor but it is only recently that they have been made commercially. Being produced as yet only in small quantities, their price imposes a restriction on use to circuits where their peculiar properties can be exploited to the full. One such application is described here where the combination of low voltage drift and relatively low input leakage current are necessarily used together. One of the instruments used to control nuclear reactors has a logarithmic response to the mean output current from a polarised ionisation chamber. The logarithmic signal is then differentiated electrically, the result being displayed on a meter calibrated to show the reactor divergence or doubling time. If displayed in doubling time the scale is calibrated reciprocally. Because of the wide range obtained in the logarithmic section and the limited supply voltage, an output of 1 volt per decade change in ionisation current is used. Differentiating this gives a current of 1.5 x 10{sup -8} A for p.s.D. (20 sec. doubling time) in the differentiating amplifier. To overcome some of the problems of noise due to statistical variations in input current, the circuit design necessitates a resistive path to ground at the amplifier input of 20 M.ohms. A schematic diagram is shown. 1. It is evident that a zero drift of 1% can be caused by a leakage current of 1.5 x 10{sup -10} A or an offset voltage of 3 mV at the amplifier input. Although the presently used electrometer valve is satisfactory from the point of view of grid current, there have been sudden changes in grid to grid voltage (the valve is a double triode) of up to 10 m.V. It has been found that a pair of F.E.T's. can be used to replace the electrometer valve so long as care is taken in correct balance of the two devices. An investigation has been made into the characteristics of some fourteen devices to see whether those with

  14. High mobility amorphous InGaZnO{sub 4} thin film transistors formed by CO{sub 2} laser spike annealing

    Chung, Chen-Yang; Zhu, Bin; Ast, Dieter G.; Thompson, Michael O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Greene, Raymond G. [Corning Incorporated, Corning, New York 14831 (United States)

    2015-03-23

    Amorphous InGaZnO{sub 4} (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) hold great potential for large area and flexible electronics with current research focused on improving the mobility and stability. In this work, we report on properties of IGZO TFTs fabricated using laser spike annealing (LSA) with a scanned continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser. For peak annealing temperatures near 430 °C and a 1 ms dwell, TFTs exhibit saturation field-effect mobilities above 70 cm{sup 2}/V-s (V{sub on} ∼ −3 V), a value over 4 times higher than furnace-annealed control samples (∼16 cm{sup 2}/V-s). A model linking oxygen deficient defect structures with limited structural relaxation after the LSA anneal is proposed to explain the observed high mobility. This mobility is also shown to be comparable to the estimated trap-free mobility in oxide semiconductors and suggests that shallow traps can be removed by transient thermal annealing under optimized conditions.

  15. Solution-Processed Donor-Acceptor Polymer Nanowire Network Semiconductors For High-Performance Field-Effect Transistors

    Lei, Yanlian; Deng, Ping; Li, Jun; Lin, Ming; Zhu, Furong; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Lee, Chun-Sing; Ong, Beng S.

    2016-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) represent a low-cost transistor technology for creating next-generation large-area, flexible and ultra-low-cost electronics. Conjugated electron donor-acceptor (D-A) polymers have surfaced as ideal channel semiconductor candidates for OFETs. However, high-molecular weight (MW) D-A polymer semiconductors, which offer high field-effect mobility, generally suffer from processing complications due to limited solubility. Conversely, the readily soluble, low-MW D-A polymers give low mobility. We report herein a facile solution process which transformed a lower-MW, low-mobility diketopyrrolopyrrole-dithienylthieno[3,2-b]thiophene (I) into a high crystalline order and high-mobility semiconductor for OFETs applications. The process involved solution fabrication of a channel semiconductor film from a lower-MW (I) and polystyrene blends. With the help of cooperative shifting motion of polystyrene chain segments, (I) readily self-assembled and crystallized out in the polystyrene matrix as an interpenetrating, nanowire semiconductor network, providing significantly enhanced mobility (over 8 cm2V−1s−1), on/off ratio (107), and other desirable field-effect properties that meet impactful OFET application requirements. PMID:27091315

  16. Low voltage operating OFETs based on solution processed metal phthalocyanines

    Chaidogiannos, G.; Petraki, F.; Glezos, N.; Kennou, S.; Nešpůrek, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 3 (2009), s. 763-767 ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400720701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : field-effect transistors * thin-film transistors * copper phthalocyanine Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.595, year: 2009

  17. Field-effect detection using phospholipid membranes -Topical Review

    Chiho Kataoka-Hamai and Yuji Miyahara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of field-effect devices to biosensors has become an area of intense research interest. An attractive feature of field-effect sensing is that the binding or reaction of biomolecules can be directly detected from a change in electrical signals. The integration of such field-effect devices into cell membrane mimics may lead to the development of biosensors useful in clinical and biotechnological applications. This review summarizes recent studies on the fabrication and characterization of field-effect devices incorporating model membranes. The incorporation of black lipid membranes and supported lipid monolayers and bilayers into semiconductor devices is described.

  18. High-performance PbS quantum dot vertical field-effect phototransistor using graphene as a transparent electrode

    Che, Yongli; Zhang, Yating; Cao, Xiaolong; Song, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Haiting; Cao, Mingxuan; Dai, Haitao; Yang, Junbo; Zhang, Guizhong; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-12-01

    Solution processed photoactive PbS quantum dots (QDs) were used as channel in high-performance near-infrared vertical field-effect phototransistor (VFEpT) where monolayer graphene embedded as transparent electrode. In this vertical architecture, the PbS QD channel was sandwiched and naturally protected between the drain and source electrodes, which made the device ultrashort channel length (110 nm) simply the thickness of the channel layer. The VFEpT exhibited ambipolar operation with high mobilities of μe = 3.5 cm2/V s in n-channel operation and μh = 3.3 cm2/V s in p-channel operation at low operation voltages. By using the photoactive PbS QDs as channel material, the VFEpT exhibited good photoresponse properties with a responsivity of 4.2 × 102 A/W, an external quantum efficiency of 6.4 × 104% and a photodetectivity of 2.1 × 109 Jones at the light irradiance of 36 mW/cm2. Additionally, the VFEpT showed excellent on/off switching with good stability and reproducibility and fast response speed with a short rise time of 12 ms in n-channel operation and 10.6 ms in p-channel operation. These high mobilities, good photoresponse properties and simplistic fabrication of our VFEpTs provided a facile route to the high-performance inorganic photodetectors.

  19. An Ultrathin Single Crystalline Relaxor Ferroelectric Integrated on a High Mobility Semiconductor

    Moghadam, Reza M. [Department; Xiao, Zhiyong [Department; Ahmadi-Majlan, Kamyar [Department; Grimley, Everett D. [Department; Bowden, Mark [Environmental; amp, Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Ong, Phuong-Vu [Physical; amp, Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Chambers, Scott A. [Physical; amp, Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Lebeau, James M. [Department; Hong, Xia [Department; Sushko, Peter V. [Physical; amp, Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Ngai, Joseph H. [Department

    2017-09-13

    The epitaxial growth of multifunctional oxides on semiconductors has opened a pathway to introduce new functionalities to semiconductor device technologies. In particular, ferroelectric materials integrated on semiconductors could lead to low-power field-effect devices that can be used for logic or memory. Essential to realizing such field-effect devices is the development of ferroelectric metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors, in which the polarization of a ferroelectric gate is coupled to the surface potential of a semiconducting channel. Here we demonstrate that ferroelectric MOS capacitors can be realized using single crystalline SrZrxTi1-xO3 (x= 0.7) that has been epitaxially grown on Ge. We find that the ferroelectric properties of SrZrxTi1-xO3 are exceptionally robust, as gate layers as thin as 5 nm give rise to hysteretic capacitance-voltage characteristics that are 2 V in width. The development of ferroelectric MOS capacitors with gate thicknesses that are technologically relevant opens a pathway to realize scalable ferroelectric field-effect devices.

  20. Solution-processed single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors and bootstrapped inverters for disintegratable, transient electronics

    Jin, Sung Hun, E-mail: harin74@gmail.com, E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jrogers@illinois.edu; Shin, Jongmin; Cho, In-Tak; Lee, Jong-Ho, E-mail: harin74@gmail.com, E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jrogers@illinois.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang Youn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Display R and D Center, Samsung Display Co., Yongin-city, Gyeongki-do 446–711 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Joon; Lee, Chi Hwan; Rogers, John A., E-mail: harin74@gmail.com, E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jrogers@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    This paper presents materials, device designs, and physical/electrical characteristics of a form of nanotube electronics that is physically transient, in the sense that all constituent elements dissolve and/or disperse upon immersion into water. Studies of contact effects illustrate the ability to use water soluble metals such as magnesium for source/drain contacts in nanotube based field effect transistors. High mobilities and on/off ratios in transistors that use molybdenum, silicon nitride, and silicon oxide enable full swing characteristics for inverters at low voltages (∼5 V) and with high gains (∼30). Dissolution/disintegration tests of such systems on water soluble sheets of polyvinyl alcohol demonstrate physical transience within 30 min.

  1. Solution-processed single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors and bootstrapped inverters for disintegratable, transient electronics

    Jin, Sung Hun; Shin, Jongmin; Cho, In-Tak; Lee, Jong-Ho; Han, Sang Youn; Lee, Dong Joon; Lee, Chi Hwan; Rogers, John A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents materials, device designs, and physical/electrical characteristics of a form of nanotube electronics that is physically transient, in the sense that all constituent elements dissolve and/or disperse upon immersion into water. Studies of contact effects illustrate the ability to use water soluble metals such as magnesium for source/drain contacts in nanotube based field effect transistors. High mobilities and on/off ratios in transistors that use molybdenum, silicon nitride, and silicon oxide enable full swing characteristics for inverters at low voltages (∼5 V) and with high gains (∼30). Dissolution/disintegration tests of such systems on water soluble sheets of polyvinyl alcohol demonstrate physical transience within 30 min.

  2. Transformational Electronics: Towards Flexible Low-Cost High Mobility Channel Materials

    Nassar, Joanna M.

    2014-05-01

    For the last four decades, Si CMOS technology has been advancing with Moore’s law prediction, working itself down to the sub-20 nm regime. However, fundamental problems and limitations arise with the down-scaling of transistors and thus new innovations needed to be discovered in order to further improve device performance without compromising power consumption and size. Thus, a lot of studies have focused on the development of new CMOS compatible architectures as well as the discovery of new high mobility channel materials that will allow further miniaturization of CMOS transistors and improvement of device performance. Pushing the limits even further, flexible and foldable electronics seem to be the new attractive topic. By being able to make our devices flexible through a CMOS compatible process, one will be able to integrate hundreds of billions of more transistors in a small volumetric space, allowing to increase the performance and speed of our electronics all together with making things thinner, lighter, smaller and even interactive with the human skin. Thus, in this thesis, we introduce for the first time a cost-effective CMOS compatible approach to make high-k/metal gate devices on flexible Germanium (Ge) and Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) platforms. In the first part, we will look at the various approaches in the literature that has been developed to get flexible platforms, as well as we will give a brief overview about epitaxial growth of Si1-xGex films. We will also examine the electrical properties of the Si1-xGex alloys up to Ge (x=1) and discuss how strain affects the band structure diagram, and thus the mobility of the material. We will also review the material growth properties as well as the state-of-the-art results on high mobility metal-oxide semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) using strained SiGe films. Then, we will introduce the flexible process that we have developed, based on a cost-effective “trench-protect-release-reuse” approach, utilizing

  3. Magnetotransport of High Mobility Holes in Monolayer and Bilayer WSe2

    Tutuc, Emanuel

    Transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted significant interest because of their two-dimensional crystal structure, large band-gap, and strong spin-orbit interaction which leads to spin-valley locking. Recent advances in sample fabrication have allowed the experimental study of low temperature magneto-transport of high mobility holes in WSe2. We review here the main results of these studies which reveal clear quantum Hall states in mono- and bilayer WSe2. The data allows the extraction of an effective hole mass of m* = 0.45me (me is the bare electron mass) in both mono and bilayer WSe2. A systematic study of the carrier distribution in bilayer WSe2 determined from a Fourier analysis of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations indicates that the two layers are weakly coupled. The individual layer density dependence on gate bias shows negative compressibility, a signature of strong electron-electron interaction in these materials associated with the large effective mass. We discuss the interplay between cyclotron and Zeeman splitting using the dependence of the quantum Hall state sequence on carrier density, and the angle between the magnetic field and the WSe2 plane. Work done in collaboration with B. Fallahazad, H. C. P. Movva, K. Kim, S. K. Banerjee, T. Taniguchi, and K. Watanabe. This work supported by the Nanoelectronics Research Initiative SWAN center, Intel Corp., and National Science Foundation.

  4. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    Sánchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Malarkey, C. S. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Saperas, N. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Churchill, M. E. A., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Campos, J. L., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an unmodified AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. A new mode of DNA recognition for HMG box proteins is found in which two box A domains bind in an unusual configuration generating a highly kinked DNA structure. High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1–DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA.

  5. Anti-high mobility group box-1 antibody therapy for traumatic brain injury.

    Okuma, Yu; Liu, Keyue; Wake, Hidenori; Zhang, Jiyong; Maruo, Tomoko; Date, Isao; Yoshino, Tadashi; Ohtsuka, Aiji; Otani, Naoki; Tomura, Satoshi; Shima, Katsuji; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hideo K; Mori, Shuji; Nishibori, Masahiro

    2012-09-01

    High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) plays an important role in triggering inflammatory responses in many types of diseases. In this study, we examined the involvement of HMGB1 in traumatic brain injury (TBI) and evaluated the ability of intravenously administered neutralizing anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to attenuate brain injury. Traumatic brain injury was induced in rats or mice by fluid percussion. Anti-HMGB1 mAb or control mAb was administered intravenously after TBI. Anti-HMGB1 mAb remarkably inhibited fluid percussion-induced brain edema in rats, as detected by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging; this was associated with inhibition of HMGB1 translocation, protection of blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, suppression of inflammatory molecule expression, and improvement of motor function. In contrast, intravenous injection of recombinant HMGB1 dose-dependently produced the opposite effects. Experiments using receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE)(-/-) , toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4)(-/-) , and TLR2(-/-) mice suggested the involvement of RAGE as the predominant receptor for HMGB1. Anti-HMGB1 mAb may provide a novel and effective therapy for TBI by protecting against BBB disruption and reducing the inflammatory responses induced by HMGB1. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  6. Increased serum levels of high mobility group box 1 protein in patients with autistic disorder.

    Emanuele, Enzo; Boso, Marianna; Brondino, Natascia; Pietra, Stefania; Barale, Francesco; Ucelli di Nemi, Stefania; Politi, Pierluigi

    2010-05-30

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a highly conserved, ubiquitous protein that functions as an activator for inducing the immune response and can be released from neurons after glutamate excitotoxicity. The objective of the present study was to measure serum levels of HMGB1 in patients with autistic disorder and to study their relationship with clinical characteristics. We enrolled 22 adult patients with autistic disorder (mean age: 28.1+/-7.7 years) and 28 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean age: 28.7+/-8.1 years). Serum levels of HMGB1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared with healthy subjects, serum levels of HMGB1 were significantly higher in patients with autistic disorder (10.8+/-2.6 ng/mL versus 5.6+/-2.5 ng/mL, respectively, Pautistic disorder. Increased HMGB1 may be a biological correlate of the impaired reciprocal social interactions in this neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Expression and Effects of High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Cervical Cancer

    Xiaoao Pang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the significance of high- mobility group box1 (HMGB1 and T-cell-mediated immunity and prognostic value in cervical cancer. HMGB1, forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3 (Foxp3, IL-2, and IL-10 protein expression was analyzed in 100 cervical tissue samples including cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN, and healthy control samples using immunohistochemistry. Serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag was immunoradiometrically measured in 32 serum samples from 37 cases of squamous cervical cancer. HMGB1 and SCC-Ag were then correlated to clinicopathological characteristics. HMGB1 expression tends to increase as cervical cancer progresses and it was found to be significantly correlated to FIGO stage and lymph node metastasis. These findings suggest that HMGB1 may be a useful prognostic indicator of cervical carcinoma. In addition, there were significant positive relationships between HMGB1 and FOXP3 or IL-10 expression (both p < 0.05. In contrast, HMGB1 and IL-2 expression was negatively correlated (p < 0.05. HMGB1 expression may activate Tregs or facilitate Th2 polarization to promote immune evasion of cervical cancer. Elevated HMGB1 protein in cervical carcinoma samples was associated with a high recurrence of HPV infection in univariate analysis (p < 0.05. HMGB1 expression and levels of SCC-Ag were directly correlated in SCC (p < 0.05. Thus, HMGB1 may be a useful biomarker for patient prognosis and cervical cancer prediction and treatment.

  8. Investigation of the High Mobility IGZO Thin Films by Using Co-Sputtering Method

    Hsu, Chao-Ming; Tzou, Wen-Cheng; Yang, Cheng-Fu; Liou, Yu-Jhen

    2015-01-01

    High transmittance ratio in visible range, low resistivity, and high mobility of IGZO thin films were prepared at room temperature for 30 min by co-sputtering of Zn2Ga2O5 (Ga2O3 + 2 ZnO, GZO) ceramic and In2O3 ceramic at the same time. The deposition power of pure In2O3 ceramic target was fixed at 100 W and the deposition power of GZO ceramic target was changed from 80 W to 140 W. We chose to investigate the deposition power of GZO ceramic target on the properties of IGZO thin films. From the SEM observations, all of the deposited IGZO thin films showed a very smooth and featureless surface. From the measurements of XRD patterns, only the amorphous structure was observed. We aimed to show that the deposition power of GZO ceramic target had large effect on the Eg values, Hall mobility, carrier concentration, and resistivity of IGZO thin films. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis in the thicknesses’ profile of IGZO thin films found that In and Ga elements were uniform distribution and Zn element were non-uniform distribution. The SIMS analysis results also showed the concentrations of Ga and Zn elements increased and the concentrations of In element was almost unchanged with increasing deposition power.

  9. Investigation of the High Mobility IGZO Thin Films by Using Co-Sputtering Method

    Chao-Ming Hsu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available High transmittance ratio in visible range, low resistivity, and high mobility of IGZO thin films were prepared at room temperature for 30 min by co-sputtering of Zn2Ga2O5 (Ga2O3 + 2 ZnO, GZO ceramic and In2O3 ceramic at the same time. The deposition power of pure In2O3 ceramic target was fixed at 100 W and the deposition power of GZO ceramic target was changed from 80 W to 140 W. We chose to investigate the deposition power of GZO ceramic target on the properties of IGZO thin films. From the SEM observations, all of the deposited IGZO thin films showed a very smooth and featureless surface. From the measurements of XRD patterns, only the amorphous structure was observed. We aimed to show that the deposition power of GZO ceramic target had large effect on the Eg values, Hall mobility, carrier concentration, and resistivity of IGZO thin films. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS analysis in the thicknesses’ profile of IGZO thin films found that In and Ga elements were uniform distribution and Zn element were non-uniform distribution. The SIMS analysis results also showed the concentrations of Ga and Zn elements increased and the concentrations of In element was almost unchanged with increasing deposition power.

  10. A southern African origin and cryptic structure in the highly mobile plains zebra.

    Pedersen, Casper-Emil T; Albrechtsen, Anders; Etter, Paul D; Johnson, Eric A; Orlando, Ludovic; Chikhi, Lounes; Siegismund, Hans R; Heller, Rasmus

    2018-03-01

    The plains zebra (Equus quagga) is an ecologically important species of the African savannah. It is also one of the most numerous and widely distributed ungulates, and six subspecies have been described based on morphological variation. However, the within-species evolutionary processes have been difficult to resolve due to its high mobility and a lack of consensus regarding the population structure. We obtained genome-wide DNA polymorphism data from more than 167,000 loci for 59 plains zebras from across the species range, encompassing all recognized extant subspecies, as well as three mountain zebras (Equus zebra) and three Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi). Surprisingly, the population genetic structure does not mirror the morphology-based subspecies delineation, underlining the dangers of basing management units exclusively on morphological variation. We use demographic modelling to provide insights into the past phylogeography of the species. The results identify a southern African location as the most likely source region from which all extant populations expanded around 370,000 years ago. We show evidence for inclusion of the extinct and phenotypically divergent quagga (Equus quagga quagga) in the plains zebra variation and reveal that it was less divergent from the other subspecies than the northernmost (Ugandan) extant population.

  11. Expression and mechanism of high mobility group box protein-1 in retinal tissue of diabetic rats

    Shuang Jiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the expression and mechanism of high mobility group box protein-1(HMGB1in the retina of diabetic rats. METHODS:Sixty SD rats were randomly divided into diabetic group and control group. Diabetic rat model was produced by intraperitioneal injection of 1% STZ with 60mg/Kg weight. The rats in control group received intraperitioneal injection of normal saline with same dosage. After injection, the rats were sacrificed and eyeballs were enucleated for HE staining, the retina fluorescence angiography, TUNEL and Western Blot detection at 1, 2 and 4mo for the expressions of HMGB1 and NF-κB. RESULTS:Compared with the control group, the retinal cells disorder, cell densities decreases, microvasculars occlusion were founded with inner and outer nuclear layer thinning and ganglion cell apoptosis. The fluorescence angiography showed that peripheral capillaries became circuitous and vascular occlusion and non-perfusion area could be seen. The expressions of HMGB1 and NF-κB were higher than those of control with time dependence and they had significant positive correlations(PCONCLUSION:The expression of HMGB1 increases in diabetic rat retina, which may involve in the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy through the NF- κB pathway.

  12. High Mobility Group B Proteins, Their Partners, and Other Redox Sensors in Ovarian and Prostate Cancer

    Aida Barreiro-Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells try to avoid the overproduction of reactive oxygen species by metabolic rearrangements. These cells also develop specific strategies to increase ROS resistance and to express the enzymatic activities necessary for ROS detoxification. Oxidative stress produces DNA damage and also induces responses, which could help the cell to restore the initial equilibrium. But if this is not possible, oxidative stress finally activates signals that will lead to cell death. High mobility group B (HMGB proteins have been previously related to the onset and progressions of cancers of different origins. The protein HMGB1 behaves as a redox sensor and its structural changes, which are conditioned by the oxidative environment, are associated with different functions of the protein. This review describes recent advances in the role of human HMGB proteins and other proteins interacting with them, in cancerous processes related to oxidative stress, with special reference to ovarian and prostate cancer. Their participation in the molecular mechanisms of resistance to cisplatin, a drug commonly used in chemotherapy, is also revised.

  13. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    Sánchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J.; Malarkey, C. S.; Saperas, N.; Churchill, M. E. A.; Campos, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an unmodified AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. A new mode of DNA recognition for HMG box proteins is found in which two box A domains bind in an unusual configuration generating a highly kinked DNA structure. High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1–DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of ballistic transport in high-mobility channels

    Sabatini, G; Marinchio, H; Palermo, C; Varani, L; Daoud, T; Teissier, R [Institut d' Electronique du Sud (CNRS UMR 5214) - Universite Montpellier II (France); Rodilla, H; Gonzalez, T; Mateos, J, E-mail: sabatini@ies.univ-montp2.f [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada - Universidad de Salamanca (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    By means of Monte Carlo simulations coupled with a two-dimensional Poisson solver, we evaluate directly the possibility to use high mobility materials in ultra fast devices exploiting ballistic transport. To this purpose, we have calculated specific physical quantities such as the transit time, the transit velocity, the free flight time and the mean free path as functions of applied voltage in InAs channels with different lengths, from 2000 nm down to 50 nm. In this way the transition from diffusive to ballistic transport is carefully described. We remark a high value of the mean transit velocity with a maximum of 14x10{sup 5} m/s for a 50 nm-long channel and a transit time shorter than 0.1 ps, corresponding to a cutoff frequency in the terahertz domain. The percentage of ballistic electrons and the number of scatterings as functions of distance are also reported, showing the strong influence of quasi-ballistic transport in the shorter channels.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of ballistic transport in high-mobility channels

    Sabatini, G; Marinchio, H; Palermo, C; Varani, L; Daoud, T; Teissier, R; Rodilla, H; Gonzalez, T; Mateos, J

    2009-01-01

    By means of Monte Carlo simulations coupled with a two-dimensional Poisson solver, we evaluate directly the possibility to use high mobility materials in ultra fast devices exploiting ballistic transport. To this purpose, we have calculated specific physical quantities such as the transit time, the transit velocity, the free flight time and the mean free path as functions of applied voltage in InAs channels with different lengths, from 2000 nm down to 50 nm. In this way the transition from diffusive to ballistic transport is carefully described. We remark a high value of the mean transit velocity with a maximum of 14x10 5 m/s for a 50 nm-long channel and a transit time shorter than 0.1 ps, corresponding to a cutoff frequency in the terahertz domain. The percentage of ballistic electrons and the number of scatterings as functions of distance are also reported, showing the strong influence of quasi-ballistic transport in the shorter channels.

  16. High Expression of High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Menstrual Blood: Implications for Endometriosis.

    Shimizu, Keiko; Kamada, Yasuhiko; Sakamoto, Ai; Matsuda, Miwa; Nakatsuka, Mikiya; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2017-11-01

    Endometriosis is a benign gynecologic disease characterized by the presence of ectopic endometrium and associated with inflammation and immune abnormalities. However, the molecular basis for endometriosis is not well understood. To address this issue, the present study examined the expression of high-mobility group box (HMGB) 1 in menstrual blood to investigate its role in the ectopic growth of human endometriotic stromal cells (ESCs). A total of 139 patients were enrolled in this study; 84 had endometriosis and 55 were nonendometriotic gynecological patients (control). The HMGB1 levels in various fluids were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in eutopic and ectopic endometrium was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and RAGE and vascular endothelial growth factor ( VEGF) messenger RNA expression in HMGB1- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated ESCs was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The HMGB1 concentration was higher in menstrual blood than in serum or peritoneal fluid ( P endometriosis following retrograde menstruation when complexed with other factors such as LPS by inducing inflammation and angiogenesis.

  17. Evolution of high mobility group nucleosome-binding proteins and its implications for vertebrate chromatin specialization.

    González-Romero, Rodrigo; Eirín-López, José M; Ausió, Juan

    2015-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG)-N proteins are a family of small nonhistone proteins that bind to nucleosomes (N). Despite the amount of information available on their structure and function, there is an almost complete lack of information on the molecular evolutionary mechanisms leading to their exclusive differentiation. In the present work, we provide evidence suggesting that HMGN lineages constitute independent monophyletic groups derived from a common ancestor prior to the diversification of vertebrates. Based on observations of the functional diversification across vertebrate HMGN proteins and on the extensive silent nucleotide divergence, our results suggest that the long-term evolution of HMGNs occurs under strong purifying selection, resulting from the lineage-specific functional constraints of their different protein domains. Selection analyses on independent lineages suggest that their functional specialization was mediated by bursts of adaptive selection at specific evolutionary times, in a small subset of codons with functional relevance-most notably in HMGN1, and in the rapidly evolving HMGN5. This work provides useful information to our understanding of the specialization imparted on chromatin metabolism by HMGNs, especially on the evolutionary mechanisms underlying their functional differentiation in vertebrates. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. High performance printed oxide field-effect transistors processed using photonic curing

    Garlapati, Suresh Kumar; Cadilha Marques, Gabriel; Gebauer, Julia Susanne; Dehm, Simone; Bruns, Michael; Winterer, Markus; Baradaran Tahoori, Mehdi; Aghassi-Hagmann, Jasmin; Hahn, Horst; Dasgupta, Subho

    2018-06-01

    Oxide semiconductors are highly promising candidates for the most awaited, next-generation electronics, namely, printed electronics. As a fabrication route for the solution-processed/printed oxide semiconductors, photonic curing is becoming increasingly popular, as compared to the conventional thermal curing method; the former offers numerous advantages over the latter, such as low process temperatures and short exposure time and thereby, high throughput compatibility. Here, using dissimilar photonic curing concepts (UV–visible light and UV-laser), we demonstrate facile fabrication of high performance In2O3 field-effect transistors (FETs). Beside the processing related issues (temperature, time etc.), the other known limitation of oxide electronics is the lack of high performance p-type semiconductors, which can be bypassed using unipolar logics from high mobility n-type semiconductors alone. Interestingly, here we have found that our chosen distinct photonic curing methods can offer a large variation in threshold voltage, when they are fabricated from the same precursor ink. Consequently, both depletion and enhancement-mode devices have been achieved which can be used as the pull-up and pull-down transistors in unipolar inverters. The present device fabrication recipe demonstrates fast processing of low operation voltage, high performance FETs with large threshold voltage tunability.

  19. 2D negative capacitance field-effect transistor with organic ferroelectrics

    Zhang, Heng; Chen, Yan; Ding, Shijin; Wang, Jianlu; Bao, Wenzhong; Zhang, David Wei; Zhou, Peng

    2018-06-01

    In the past fifty years, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits have undergone significant development, but Moore’s law will soon come to an end. In order to break through the physical limit of Moore’s law, 2D materials have been widely used in many electronic devices because of their high mobility and excellent mechanical flexibility. And the emergence of a negative capacitance field-effect transistor (NCFET) could not only break the thermal limit of conventional devices, but reduce the operating voltage and power consumption. This paper demonstrates a 2D NCFET that treats molybdenum disulfide as a channel material and organic P(VDF-TrFE) as a gate dielectric directly. This represents a new attempt to prepare NCFETs and produce flexible electronic devices. It exhibits a 106 on-/off-current ratio. And the minimum subthreshold swing (SS) of the 21 mV/decade and average SS of the 44 mV/decade in four orders of magnitude of drain current can also be observed at room temperature of 300 K.

  20. Direct-written polymer field-effect transistors operating at 20 MHz.

    Perinot, Andrea; Kshirsagar, Prakash; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Fiammengo, Roberto; Caironi, Mario

    2016-12-12

    Printed polymer electronics has held for long the promise of revolutionizing technology by delivering distributed, flexible, lightweight and cost-effective applications for wearables, healthcare, diagnostic, automation and portable devices. While impressive progresses have been registered in terms of organic semiconductors mobility, field-effect transistors (FETs), the basic building block of any circuit, are still showing limited speed of operation, thus limiting their real applicability. So far, attempts with organic FETs to achieve the tens of MHz regime, a threshold for many applications comprising the driving of high resolution displays, have relied on the adoption of sophisticated lithographic techniques and/or complex architectures, undermining the whole concept. In this work we demonstrate polymer FETs which can operate up to 20 MHz and are fabricated by means only of scalable printing techniques and direct-writing methods with a completely mask-less procedure. This is achieved by combining a fs-laser process for the sintering of high resolution metal electrodes, thus easily achieving micron-scale channels with reduced parasitism down to 0.19 pF mm -1 , and a large area coating technique of a high mobility polymer semiconductor, according to a simple and scalable process flow.

  1. Nanometer size field effect transistors for terahertz detectors

    Knap, W; Rumyantsev, S; Coquillat, D; Dyakonova, N; Teppe, F; Vitiello, M S; Tredicucci, A; Blin, S; Shur, M; Nagatsuma, T

    2013-01-01

    Nanometer size field effect transistors can operate as efficient resonant or broadband terahertz detectors, mixers, phase shifters and frequency multipliers at frequencies far beyond their fundamental cut-off frequency. This work is an overview of some recent results concerning the application of nanometer scale field effect transistors for the detection of terahertz radiation. (paper)

  2. High mobility group box1 (HMGB1) in relation to cutaneous inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    Abdulahad, D.A.; Westra, J.; Reefman, E.; Zuidersma, E.; Bijzet, J.; Limburg, P.C.; Kallenberg, C.G.M.; Bijl, M.

    2013-01-01

    Photosensitivity is characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Upon ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure, patients develop inflammatory skin lesions in the vicinity of sunburn cells (SBCs). High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is released from apoptotic and activated cells and exerts inflammatory

  3. Sequence-specific high mobility group box factors recognize 10-12-base pair minor groove motifs

    van Beest, M; Dooijes, D; van De Wetering, M

    2000-01-01

    Sequence-specific high mobility group (HMG) box factors bind and bend DNA via interactions in the minor groove. Three-dimensional NMR analyses have provided the structural basis for this interaction. The cognate HMG domain DNA motif is generally believed to span 6-8 bases. However, alignment...

  4. Therapeutic potential of an anti-high mobility group box-1 monoclonal antibody in epilepsy.

    Zhao, Junli; Wang, Yi; Xu, Cenglin; Liu, Keyue; Wang, Ying; Chen, Liying; Wu, Xiaohua; Gao, Feng; Guo, Yi; Zhu, Junming; Wang, Shuang; Nishibori, Masahiro; Chen, Zhong

    2017-08-01

    Brain inflammation is a major factor in epilepsy, and the high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein is known to contribute significantly to the generation of seizures. Here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of an anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in epilepsy. anti-HMGB1 mAb attenuated both acute seizure models (maximal electroshock seizure, pentylenetetrazole-induced and kindling-induced), and chronic epilepsy model (kainic acid-induced) in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, the anti-HMGB1 mAb also attenuated seizure activities of human brain slices obtained from surgical resection from drug-resistant epilepsy patients. The mAb showed an anti-seizure effect with a long-term manner and appeared to be minimal side effects at even very high dose (no disrupted physical EEG rhythm and no impaired basic physical functions, such as body growth rate and thermoregulation). This anti-seizure effect of mAb results from its inhibition of translocated HMGB1 from nuclei following seizures, and the anti-seizure effect was absent in toll-like receptor 4 knockout (TLR4 -/- ) mice. Interestingly, the anti-HMGB1 mAb also showed a disease-modifying anti-epileptogenetic effect on epileptogenesis after status epileptics, which is indicated by reducing seizure frequency and improving the impaired cognitive function. These results indicate that the anti-HMGB1 mAb should be viewed as a very promising approach for the development of novel therapies to treat refractory epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. High mobility group A1 protein modulates autophagy in cancer cells.

    Conte, Andrea; Paladino, Simona; Bianco, Gaia; Fasano, Dominga; Gerlini, Raffaele; Tornincasa, Mara; Renna, Maurizio; Fusco, Alfredo; Tramontano, Donatella; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria

    2017-11-01

    High Mobility Group A1 (HMGA1) is an architectural chromatin protein whose overexpression is a feature of malignant neoplasias with a causal role in cancer initiation and progression. HMGA1 promotes tumor growth by several mechanisms, including increase of cell proliferation and survival, impairment of DNA repair and induction of chromosome instability. Autophagy is a self-degradative process that, by providing energy sources and removing damaged organelles and misfolded proteins, allows cell survival under stress conditions. On the other hand, hyper-activated autophagy can lead to non-apoptotic programmed cell death. Autophagy deregulation is a common feature of cancer cells in which has a complex role, showing either an oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity, depending on cellular context and tumor stage. Here, we report that depletion of HMGA1 perturbs autophagy by different mechanisms. HMGA1-knockdown increases autophagosome formation by constraining the activity of the mTOR pathway, a major regulator of autophagy, and transcriptionally upregulating the autophagy-initiating kinase Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1). Consistently, functional experiments demonstrate that HMGA1 binds ULK1 promoter region and negatively regulates its transcription. On the other hand, the increase in autophagosomes is not associated to a proportionate increase in their maturation. Overall, the effects of HMGA1 depletion on autophagy are associated to a decrease in cell proliferation and ultimately impact on cancer cells viability. Importantly, silencing of ULK1 prevents the effects of HMGA1-knockdown on cellular proliferation, viability and autophagic activity, highlighting how these effects are, at least in part, mediated by ULK1. Interestingly, this phenomenon is not restricted to skin cancer cells, as similar results have been observed also in HeLa cells silenced for HMGA1. Taken together, these results clearly indicate HMGA1 as a key regulator of the autophagic pathway in cancer cells

  6. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-dependent cell responses by extracellular high mobility group box 1 protein.

    Marco Pedrazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein can operate in a synergistic fashion with different signal molecules promoting an increase of cell Ca(2+ influx. However, the mechanisms responsible for this effect of HMGB1 are still unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that, at concentrations of agonist per se ineffective, HMGB1 potentiates the activation of the ionotropic glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR in isolated hippocampal nerve terminals and in a neuroblastoma cell line. This effect was abolished by the NMDA channel blocker MK-801. The HMGB1-facilitated NMDAR opening was followed by activation of the Ca(2+-dependent enzymes calpain and nitric oxide synthase in neuroblastoma cells, resulting in an increased production of NO, a consequent enhanced cell motility, and onset of morphological differentiation. We have also identified NMDAR as the mediator of HMGB1-stimulated murine erythroleukemia cell differentiation, induced by hexamethylenebisacetamide. The potentiation of NMDAR activation involved a peptide of HMGB1 located in the B box at the amino acids 130-139. This HMGB1 fragment did not overlap with binding sites for other cell surface receptors of HMGB1, such as the advanced glycation end products or the Toll-like receptor 4. Moreover, in a competition assay, the HMGB1((130-139 peptide displaced the NMDAR/HMGB1 interaction, suggesting that it comprised the molecular and functional site of HMGB1 regulating the NMDA receptor complex. CONCLUSION: We propose that the multifunctional cytokine-like molecule HMGB1 released by activated, stressed, and damaged or necrotic cells can facilitate NMDAR-mediated cell responses, both in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues, independently of other known cell surface receptors for HMGB1.

  7. Cylindrical Field Effect Transistor: A Full Volume Inversion Device

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2010-01-01

    inversion in the body. However, these devices are still limited by lithographic and processing challenges making them unsuitable for commercial production. This thesis explores a unique device structure called the CFET (Cylindrical Field Effect Transistors

  8. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    Li, Jingqi; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Zhihong; Zhang, Xixiang; Abutaha, Anas I.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2012-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) have been developed using pure semiconducting carbon nanotubes. The source and drain were vertically stacked, separated by a dielectric, and the carbon nanotubes were placed

  9. Progresses in organic field-effect transistors and molecular electronics

    Wu Weiping; Xu Wei; Hu Wenping; Liu Yunqi; Zhu Daoben

    2006-01-01

    In the past years,organic semiconductors have been extensively investigated as electronic materials for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs).In this review,we briefly summarize the current status of organic field-effect transistors including materials design,device physics,molecular electronics and the applications of carbon nanotubes in molecular electronics.Future prospects and investigations required to improve the OFET performance are also involved.

  10. Performance improvement for solution-processed high-mobility ZnO thin-film transistors

    Li Chensha; Loutfy, Rafik O [Department of Chemical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Li Yuning; Wu Yiliang; Ong, Beng S [Materials Design and Integration Laboratory, Xerox Research Centre of Canada, 2660 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1 (Canada)], E-mail: lichnsa@163.com

    2008-06-21

    The fabrication technology of stable, non-toxic, transparent, high performance zinc oxide (ZnO) thin-film semiconductors via the solution process was investigated. Two methods, which were, respectively, annealing a spin-coated precursor solution and annealing a drop-coated precursor solution, were compared. The prepared ZnO thin-film semiconductor transistors have well-controlled, preferential crystal orientation and exhibit superior field-effect performance characteristics. But the ZnO thin-film transistor (TFT) fabricated by annealing a drop-coated precursor solution has a distinctly elevated linear mobility, which further approaches the saturated mobility, compared with that fabricated by annealing a spin-coated precursor solution. The performance of the solution-processed ZnO TFT was further improved when substituting the spin-coating process by the drop-coating process.

  11. Performance improvement for solution-processed high-mobility ZnO thin-film transistors

    Li Chensha; Loutfy, Rafik O; Li Yuning; Wu Yiliang; Ong, Beng S

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication technology of stable, non-toxic, transparent, high performance zinc oxide (ZnO) thin-film semiconductors via the solution process was investigated. Two methods, which were, respectively, annealing a spin-coated precursor solution and annealing a drop-coated precursor solution, were compared. The prepared ZnO thin-film semiconductor transistors have well-controlled, preferential crystal orientation and exhibit superior field-effect performance characteristics. But the ZnO thin-film transistor (TFT) fabricated by annealing a drop-coated precursor solution has a distinctly elevated linear mobility, which further approaches the saturated mobility, compared with that fabricated by annealing a spin-coated precursor solution. The performance of the solution-processed ZnO TFT was further improved when substituting the spin-coating process by the drop-coating process

  12. High Mobility Thin Film Transistors Based on Amorphous Indium Zinc Tin Oxide

    Imas Noviyana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Top-contact bottom-gate thin film transistors (TFTs with zinc-rich indium zinc tin oxide (IZTO active layer were prepared at room temperature by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. Sintered ceramic target was prepared and used for deposition from oxide powder mixture having the molar ratio of In2O3:ZnO:SnO2 = 2:5:1. Annealing treatment was carried out for as-deposited films at various temperatures to investigate its effect on TFT performances. It was found that annealing treatment at 350 °C for 30 min in air atmosphere yielded the best result, with the high field effect mobility value of 34 cm2/Vs and the minimum subthreshold swing value of 0.12 V/dec. All IZTO thin films were amorphous, even after annealing treatment of up to 350 °C.

  13. Highly effective field-effect mobility amorphous InGaZnO TFT mediated by directional silver nanowire arrays.

    Liu, Hung-Chuan; Lai, Yi-Chun; Lai, Chih-Chung; Wu, Bing-Shu; Zan, Hsiao-Wen; Yu, Peichen; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Tsai, Chuang-Chuang

    2015-01-14

    In this work, we demonstrate sputtered amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs) with a record high effective field-effect mobility of 174 cm(2)/V s by incorporating silver nanowire (AgNW) arrays to channel electron transport. Compared to the reference counterpart without nanowires, the over 5-fold enhancement in the effective field-effect mobility exhibits clear dependence on the orientation as well as the surface coverage ratio of silver nanowires. Detailed material and device analyses reveal that during the room-temperature IGZO sputtering indium and oxygen diffuse into the nanowire matrix while the nanowire morphology and good contact between IGZO and nanowires are maintained. The unchanged morphology and good interfacial contact lead to high mobility and air-ambient-stable characteristics up to 3 months. Neither hysteresis nor degraded bias stress reliability is observed. The proposed AgNW-mediated a-IGZO TFTs are promising for development of large-scale, flexible, transparent electronics.

  14. Disulfide high mobility group box-1 causes bladder pain through bladder Toll-like receptor 4.

    Ma, Fei; Kouzoukas, Dimitrios E; Meyer-Siegler, Katherine L; Westlund, Karin N; Hunt, David E; Vera, Pedro L

    2017-05-25

    Bladder pain is a prominent symptom in several urological conditions (e.g. infection, painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis, cancer). Understanding the mechanism of bladder pain is important, particularly when the pain is not accompanied by bladder pathology. Stimulation of protease activated receptor 4 (PAR4) in the urothelium results in bladder pain through release of urothelial high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1). HGMB1 has two functionally active redox states (disulfide and all-thiol) and it is not known which form elicits bladder pain. Therefore, we investigated whether intravesical administration of specific HMGB1 redox forms caused abdominal mechanical hypersensitivity, micturition changes, and bladder inflammation in female C57BL/6 mice 24 hours post-administration. Moreover, we determined which of the specific HMGB1 receptors, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) or receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), mediate HMGB1-induced changes. Disulfide HMGB1 elicited abdominal mechanical hypersensitivity 24 hours after intravesical (5, 10, 20 μg/150 μl) instillation. In contrast, all-thiol HMGB1 did not produce abdominal mechanical hypersensitivity in any of the doses tested (1, 2, 5, 10, 20 μg/150 μl). Both HMGB1 redox forms caused micturition changes only at the highest dose tested (20 μg/150 μl) while eliciting mild bladder edema and reactive changes at all doses. We subsequently tested whether the effects of intravesical disulfide HMGB1 (10 μg/150 μl; a dose that did not produce inflammation) were prevented by systemic (i.p.) or local (intravesical) administration of either a TLR4 antagonist (TAK-242) or a RAGE antagonist (FPS-ZM1). Systemic administration of either TAK-242 (3 mg/kg) or FPS-ZM1 (10 mg/kg) prevented HMGB1 induced abdominal mechanical hypersensitivity while only intravesical TLR4 antagonist pretreatment (1.5 mg/ml; not RAGE) had this effect. The disulfide form of HMGB1 mediates bladder pain directly (not

  15. High mobility group protein DSP1 negatively regulates HSP70 transcription in Crassostrea hongkongensis

    Miao, Zongyu; Xu, Delin; Cui, Miao; Zhang, Qizhong, E-mail: zhangqzdr@126.com

    2016-06-10

    HSP70 acts mostly as a molecular chaperone and plays important roles in facilitating the folding of nascent peptides as well as the refolding or degradation of the denatured proteins. Under stressed conditions, the expression level of HSP70 is upregulated significantly and rapidly, as is known to be achieved by various regulatory factors controlling the transcriptional level. In this study, a high mobility group protein DSP1 was identified by DNA-affinity purification from the nuclear extracts of Crassostrea hongkongensis using the ChHSP70 promoter as a bait. The specific interaction between the prokaryotically expressed ChDSP1 and the FITC-labeled ChHSP70 promoter was confirmed by EMSA analysis. ChDSP1 was shown to negatively regulate ChHSP70 promoter expression by Luciferase Reporter Assay in the heterologous HEK293T cells. Both ChHSP70 and ChDSP1 transcriptions were induced by either thermal or CdCl{sub 2} stress, while the accumulated expression peaks of ChDSP1 were always slightly delayed when compared with that of ChHSP70. This indicates that ChDSP1 is involved, very likely to exert its suppressive role, in the recovery of the ChHSP70 expression from the induced level to its original state. This study is the first to report negative regulator of HSP70 gene transcription, and provides novel insights into the mechanisms controlling heat shock protein expression. -- Highlights: •HMG protein ChDSP1 shows affinity to ChHSP70 promoter in Crassostrea hongkongensis. •ChDSP1 negatively regulates ChHSP70 transcription. •ChHSP70 and ChDSP1 transcriptions were coordinately induced by thermal/Cd stress. •ChDSP1 may contribute to the recovery of the induced ChHSP70 to its original state. •This is the first report regarding negative regulator of HSP70 transcription.

  16. Retinol-induced changes in the phosphorylation levels of histones and high mobility group proteins from Sertoli cells

    Moreira J.C.F.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins play a role in the organization and functions of DNA. Covalent modifications of nuclear proteins modulate their interactions with DNA sequences and are probably one of the multiple factors involved in the process of switch on/off transcriptionally active regions of DNA. Histones and high mobility group proteins (HMG are subject to many covalent modifications that may modulate their capacity to bind to DNA. We investigated the changes induced in the phosphorylation pattern of cultured Wistar rat Sertoli cell histones and high mobility group protein subfamilies exposed to 7 µM retinol for up to 48 h. In each experiment, 6 h before the end of the retinol treatment each culture flask received 370 KBq/ml [32P]-phosphate. The histone and HMGs were isolated as previously described [Moreira et al. Medical Science Research (1994 22: 783-784]. The total protein obtained by either method was quantified and electrophoresed as described by Spiker [Analytical Biochemistry (1980 108: 263-265]. The gels were stained with Coomassie brilliant blue R-250 and the stained bands were cut and dissolved in 0.5 ml 30% H2O2 at 60oC for 12 h. The vials were chilled and 5.0 ml scintillation liquid was added. The radioactivity in each vial was determined with a liquid scintillation counter. Retinol treatment significantly changed the pattern of each subfamily of histone and high mobility group proteins.

  17. Clinical Value of High Mobility Group Box 1 and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in Head and Neck Cancer: A Systematic Review

    Nguyen, Austin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction High mobility group box 1 is a versatile protein involved in gene transcription, extracellular signaling, and response to inflammation. Extracellularly, high mobility group box 1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Expression of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products has been described in many cancers. Objectives To systematically review the available literature using PubMed and Web of Science to evaluate the clinical value of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Data synthesis A total of eleven studies were included in this review. High mobility group box 1 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis and many clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients. Additionally, the receptor for advanced glycation end-products demonstrates potential value as a clinical indicator of tumor angiogenesis and advanced staging. In diagnosis, high mobility group box 1 demonstrates low sensitivity. Conclusion High mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products are associated with clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Further investigation of the prognostic and diagnostic value of these molecules is warranted.

  18. Single event burnout sensitivity of embedded field effect transistors

    Koga, R.; Crain, S.H.; Crawford, K.B.; Yu, P.; Gordon, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of single event burnout (SEB) in embedded field effect transistors are reported. Both SEB and other single event effects are presented for several pulse width modulation and high frequency devices. The microscope has been employed to locate and to investigate the damaged areas. A model of the damage mechanism based on the results so obtained is described

  19. Bimolecular recombination in ambipolar organic field effect transistors

    Charrier, D.S.H.; Vries, T. de; Mathijssen, S.G.J.; Geluk, E.-J.; Smits, E.C.P.; Kemerink, M.; Janssen, R.A.J.

    2009-01-01

    In ambipolar organic field effect transistors (OFET) the shape of the channel potential is intimately related to the recombination zone width W, and hence to the electron–hole recombination strength. Experimentally, the recombination profile can be assessed by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy

  20. Durable chemical sensors based on field-effect transistors

    Reinhoudt, David

    1995-01-01

    The design of durable chemical sensors based on field-effect transistors (FETs) is described. After modification of an ion-sensitive FET (ISFET) with a polysiloxane membrane matrix, it is possible to attach all electroactive components covalently. Preliminary results of measurements with a

  1. Bimolecular recombination in ambipolar organic field effect transistors

    Charrier, D. S. H.; de Vries, T.; Mathijssen, S. G. J.; Geluk, E. -J.; Smits, E. C. P.; Kemerink, M.; Janssen, R. A. J.

    In ambipolar organic field effect transistors (OFET) the shape of the channel potential is intimately related to the recombination zone width W, and hence to the electron-hole recombination strength. Experimentally, the recombination profile can be assessed by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy

  2. Relating hysteresis and electrochemistry in graphene field effect transistors

    Veligura, Alina; Zomer, Paul J.; Vera-Marun, Ivan J.; Jozsa, Csaba; Gordiichuk, Pavlo I.; van Wees, Bart J.

    2011-01-01

    Hysteresis and commonly observed p-doping of graphene based field effect transistors (FETs) have been discussed in reports over the last few years. However, the interpretation of experimental works differs; and the mechanism behind the appearance of the hysteresis and the role of charge transfer

  3. Charge transport in disordered organic field-effect transistors

    Tanase, Cristina; Blom, Paul W.M.; Meijer, Eduard J.; Leeuw, Dago M. de; Jabbour, GE; Carter, SA; Kido, J; Lee, ST; Sariciftci, NS

    2002-01-01

    The transport properties of poly(2,5-thienylene vinylene) (PTV) field-effect transistors (FET) have been investigated as a function of temperature under controlled atmosphere. In a disordered semiconductor as PTV the charge carrier mobility, dominated by hopping between localized states, is

  4. Single event burnout sensitivity of embedded field effect transistors

    Koga, R.; Crain, S.H.; Crawford, K.B.; Yu, P.; Gordon, M.J.

    1999-12-01

    Observations of single event burnout (SEB) in embedded field effect transistors are reported. Both SEB and other single event effects are presented for several pulse width modulation and high frequency devices. The microscope has been employed to locate and to investigate the damaged areas. A model of the damage mechanism based on the results so obtained is described.

  5. Nanoscaled biological gated field effect transistors for cytogenetic analysis

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Andersen, Karsten Brandt

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is the study of chromosome structure and function, and is often used in cancer diagnosis, as many chromosome abnormalities are linked to the onset of cancer. A novel label free detection method for chromosomal translocation analysis using nanoscaled field effect transistors...

  6. Ambipolar charge transport in organic field-effect transistors

    Smits, E.C.P.; Anthopoulos, T.D.; Setayesh, S.; Veenendaal, van E.; Coehoorn, R.; Blom, P.W.M.; Boer, de B.; Leeuw, de D.M.

    2006-01-01

    A model describing charge transport in disordered ambipolar organic field-effect transistors is presented. The basis of this model is the variable-range hopping in an exponential density of states developed for disordered unipolar organic transistors. We show that the model can be used to calculate

  7. Field-effect pH Control in Nanochannels

    Veenhuis, R.B.H.; van der Wouden, E.J.; van Nieuwkasteele, Jan William; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Kim, Tae Song; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Chung, Taek-Dong; Jeon, Noo Li; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Suh, Kaph-Yang; Choo, Jaebum; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel capacitive method to change the pH in nanochannels. The device employs metal electrodes outside an insulating channel wall to change the electrical double layer potential by the field effect (‘voltage gating’). We demonstrate that this potential change is accompanied by a

  8. Unconventional Face-On Texture and Exceptional In-Plane Order of a High Mobility n-Type Polymer

    Rivnay, Jonathan; Toney, Michael F.; Zheng, Yan; Kauvar, Isaac V.; Chen, Zhihua; Wagner, Veit; Facchetti, Antonio; Salleo, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Substantial in-plane crystallinity and dominant face-on stacking are observed in thin films of a high-mobility n-type rylene-thiophene copolymer. Spun films of the polymer, previously thought to have little or no order are found to exhibit an ordered microstructure at both interfaces, and in the bulk. The implications of this type of packing and crystalline morphology are discussed as they relate to thin-film transistors. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Unconventional Face-On Texture and Exceptional In-Plane Order of a High Mobility n-Type Polymer

    Rivnay, Jonathan

    2010-07-09

    Substantial in-plane crystallinity and dominant face-on stacking are observed in thin films of a high-mobility n-type rylene-thiophene copolymer. Spun films of the polymer, previously thought to have little or no order are found to exhibit an ordered microstructure at both interfaces, and in the bulk. The implications of this type of packing and crystalline morphology are discussed as they relate to thin-film transistors. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Role of transport band edge variation on delocalized charge transport in high-mobility crystalline organic semiconductors

    Kadashchuk, Andrey; Tong, Fei; Janneck, Robby; Fishchuk, Ivan I.; Mityashin, Alexander; Pavlica, Egon; Köhler, Anna; Heremans, Paul; Rolin, Cedric; Bratina, Gvido; Genoe, Jan

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate that the degree of charge delocalization has a strong impact on polarization energy and thereby on the position of the transport band edge in organic semiconductors. This gives rise to long-range potential fluctuations, which govern the electronic transport through delocalized states in organic crystalline layers. This concept is employed to formulate an analytic model that explains a negative field dependence coupled with a positive temperature dependence of the charge mobility observed by a lateral time-of-flight technique in a high-mobility crystalline organic layer. This has important implications for the further understanding of the charge transport via delocalized states in organic semiconductors.

  11. Impact of Quaternary climatic changes and interspecific competition on the demographic history of a highly mobile generalist carnivore, the coyote.

    Koblmüller, Stephan; Wayne, Robert K; Leonard, Jennifer A

    2012-08-23

    Recurrent cycles of climatic change during the Quaternary period have dramatically affected the population genetic structure of many species. We reconstruct the recent demographic history of the coyote (Canis latrans) through the use of Bayesian techniques to examine the effects of Late Quaternary climatic perturbations on the genetic structure of a highly mobile generalist species. Our analysis reveals a lack of phylogeographic structure throughout the range but past population size changes correlated with climatic changes. We conclude that even generalist carnivorous species are very susceptible to environmental changes associated with climatic perturbations. This effect may be enhanced in coyotes by interspecific competition with larger carnivores.

  12. Hexagonal mesoporous silica modified with copper phthalocyanine as a photocatalyst for pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxiacetic acid degradation.

    DeOliveira, Edimar; Neri, Cláudio R; Ribeiro, Anderson O; Garcia, Vinícius S; Costa, Leonardo L; Moura, Aline O; Prado, Alexandre G S; Serra, Osvaldo A; Iamamoto, Yassuko

    2008-07-01

    A new mesoporous catalyst was prepared by the reaction between 3-aminopropyltrimethoxisylane and Cu(II)-hexadecafluorophthalocyanine, followed by co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate around a micelle formed by n-dodecylamine. The surfactant was removed from the pores by continuous extraction with ethanol, giving the Si-CuF16Pc catalyst. This catalyst was characterized by SEM, FTIR, TGA, 29Si NMR, N2 adsorption and X-ray diffraction. SEM images confirmed that the catalyst material is formed by nanoaggregates with a diameter of 100 nm. N2 adsorption isotherms showed that Si-CuF16Pc has a surface area of approximately 200 m2 g(-1) and a porous diameter of 7.7 nm, characterizing the mesoporosity of this product. This novel material shows an excellent photocatalytic activity, degrading almost 90% of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) up to 30 min, while only approximately 40% of photodegradation was obtained in its absence.

  13. Effects of spin–orbit coupling and many-body correlations in STM transport through copper phthalocyanine

    Benjamin Siegert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The interplay of exchange correlations and spin–orbit interaction (SOI on the many-body spectrum of a copper phtalocyanine (CuPc molecule and their signatures in transport are investigated. We first derive a minimal model Hamiltonian in a basis of frontier orbitals that is able to reproduce experimentally observed singlet–triplet splittings. In a second step SOI effects are included perturbatively. Major consequences of the SOI are the splitting of former degenerate levels and a magnetic anisotropy, which can be captured by an effective low-energy spin Hamiltonian. We show that scanning tunneling microscopy-based magnetoconductance measurements can yield clear signatures of both these SOI-induced effects.

  14. Structure, transport and photoconductance of PbS quantum dot monolayers functionalized with a copper phthalocyanine derivative

    André, A.; Theurer, C.; Lauth, J.D.; Maiti, S.; Hodas, M.; Samadi Khoshkhoo, M.; Kinge, S; Meixner, A. J.; Schreiber, F.; Siebbeles, L.D.A.; Braun, K; Scheele, M.

    2017-01-01

    We simultaneously surface-functionalize PbS nanocrystals with Cu 4,4′,4′′,4′′′-tetraaminophthalocyanine and assemble this hybrid material into macroscopic monolayers. Electron microscopy and X-ray scattering reveal a granular mesocrystalline structure with strong coherence between the atomic

  15. High mobility In0.75Ga0.25As quantum wells in an InAs phonon lattice

    Chen, C.; Holmes, S. N.; Farrer, I.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2018-03-01

    InGaAs based devices are great complements to silicon for CMOS, as they provide an increased carrier saturation velocity, lower operating voltage and reduced power dissipation (International technology roadmap for semiconductors (www.itrs2.net)). In this work we show that In0.75Ga0.25As quantum wells with a high mobility, 15 000 to 20 000 cm2 V-1 s-1 at ambient temperature, show an InAs-like phonon with an energy of 28.8 meV, frequency of 232 cm-1 that dominates the polar-optical mode scattering from  ˜70 K to 300 K. The measured optical phonon frequency is insensitive to the carrier density modulated with a surface gate or LED illumination. We model the electron scattering mechanisms as a function of temperature and identify mechanisms that limit the electron mobility in In0.75Ga0.25As quantum wells. Background impurity scattering starts to dominate for temperatures  <100 K. In the high mobility In0.75Ga0.25As quantum well, GaAs-like phonons do not couple to the electron gas unlike the case of In0.53Ga0.47As quantum wells.

  16. Electric-field effects in optically generated spin transport

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2009-01-01

    Transport of spin-polarized electrons in semiconductors is studied experimentally. Spins are generated by optical excitation because of the selection rules governing optical transitions from heavy-hole and light-hole states to conduction-band states. Experiments designed for the control of spins in semiconductors investigate the bias-dependent spin transport process and detect the spin-polarized electrons during transport. A strong bias dependence is observed. The electric-field effects on the spin-polarized electron transport are also found to be depended on the excitation photon energy and temperature. Based on a field-dependent spin relaxation mechanism, the electric-field effects in the transport process are discussed.

  17. Electric-field effects in optically generated spin transport

    Miah, M. Idrish [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au

    2009-05-25

    Transport of spin-polarized electrons in semiconductors is studied experimentally. Spins are generated by optical excitation because of the selection rules governing optical transitions from heavy-hole and light-hole states to conduction-band states. Experiments designed for the control of spins in semiconductors investigate the bias-dependent spin transport process and detect the spin-polarized electrons during transport. A strong bias dependence is observed. The electric-field effects on the spin-polarized electron transport are also found to be depended on the excitation photon energy and temperature. Based on a field-dependent spin relaxation mechanism, the electric-field effects in the transport process are discussed.

  18. Fringe field effects in small rings of large acceptance

    Martin Berz

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been renewed interest in the influence of fringe fields on particle dynamics, due to studies that revealed their importance in some cases, as, for example, the proposed Neutrino Factory and muon colliders. In this paper, we present a systematic study of generic fringe field effects. Using as an example a lattice of the proposed Neutrino Factory, we show that fringe fields influence the dynamics of particles at all orders, starting with the linear motion. It is found that the widely used sharp cutoff approximation leads to divergences regardless of the specific fall-off shape of the fields. The results suggest that a careful consideration of fringe field effects in the design stage of small machines for large emittances is always recommended.

  19. Field-effect transistor memories based on ferroelectric polymers

    Zhang, Yujia; Wang, Haiyang; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaomeng; Guo, Yu; Sun, Huabin; Li, Yun

    2017-11-01

    Field-effect transistors based on ferroelectrics have attracted intensive interests, because of their non-volatile data retention, rewritability, and non-destructive read-out. In particular, polymeric materials that possess ferroelectric properties are promising for the fabrications of memory devices with high performance, low cost, and large-area manufacturing, by virtue of their good solubility, low-temperature processability, and good chemical stability. In this review, we discuss the material characteristics of ferroelectric polymers, providing an update on the current development of ferroelectric field-effect transistors (Fe-FETs) in non-volatile memory applications. Program supported partially by the NSFC (Nos. 61574074, 61774080), NSFJS (No. BK20170075), and the Open Partnership Joint Projects of NSFC-JSPS Bilateral Joint Research Projects (No. 61511140098).

  20. Diffusion affected magnetic field effect in exciplex fluorescence

    Burshtein, Anatoly I.; Ivanov, Anatoly I.

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescence of the exciplex, 1 [D +δ A −δ ], formed at contact of photoexcited acceptor 1 A * with an electron donor 1 D, is known to be very sensitive to an external magnetic field, reducing the spin conversion efficiency in the resulting geminate radical ion pair, 1,3 [D + …A − ]. The relative increase of the exciplex fluorescence in the highest magnetic field compared to the lowest one, known as the magnetic field effect, crucially depends on the viscosity of the solvent. This phenomenon first studied experimentally is at first reproduced here theoretically. The magnetic field effect is shown to vanish in both limits of high and low solvent diffusivity reaching a maximum in between. It is also very sensitive to the solvent dielectric constant and to the exciplex and radical-ion pair conversion rates

  1. Diffusion affected magnetic field effect in exciplex fluorescence

    Burshtein, Anatoly I. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Ivanov, Anatoly I., E-mail: Anatoly.Ivanov@volsu.ru [Volgograd State University, University Avenue, 100, Volgograd 400062 (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-14

    The fluorescence of the exciplex, {sup 1}[D{sup +δ}A{sup −δ}], formed at contact of photoexcited acceptor {sup 1}A{sup *} with an electron donor {sup 1}D, is known to be very sensitive to an external magnetic field, reducing the spin conversion efficiency in the resulting geminate radical ion pair, {sup 1,3}[D{sup +}…A{sup −}]. The relative increase of the exciplex fluorescence in the highest magnetic field compared to the lowest one, known as the magnetic field effect, crucially depends on the viscosity of the solvent. This phenomenon first studied experimentally is at first reproduced here theoretically. The magnetic field effect is shown to vanish in both limits of high and low solvent diffusivity reaching a maximum in between. It is also very sensitive to the solvent dielectric constant and to the exciplex and radical-ion pair conversion rates.

  2. Diffusion affected magnetic field effect in exciplex fluorescence

    Burshtein, Anatoly I.; Ivanov, Anatoly I.

    2014-07-01

    The fluorescence of the exciplex, 1[D+δA-δ], formed at contact of photoexcited acceptor 1A* with an electron donor 1D, is known to be very sensitive to an external magnetic field, reducing the spin conversion efficiency in the resulting geminate radical ion pair, 1, 3[D+…A-]. The relative increase of the exciplex fluorescence in the highest magnetic field compared to the lowest one, known as the magnetic field effect, crucially depends on the viscosity of the solvent. This phenomenon first studied experimentally is at first reproduced here theoretically. The magnetic field effect is shown to vanish in both limits of high and low solvent diffusivity reaching a maximum in between. It is also very sensitive to the solvent dielectric constant and to the exciplex and radical-ion pair conversion rates.

  3. Magnetic Field Effect in Conjugated Molecules-Based Devices

    2017-10-23

    line shapes of magnetoconductance curves for diodes of pentacene:fullerene charge transfer complexes” Org . Electron. 15, 3076 (2014). (AOARD-14-4012...2. “The origins in the transformation of ambipolar to n-type pentacene-based organic field-effect transistors” Org . Electron. 15, 1759 (2014...shell nanoparticles doped PEDOT:PSS hole-transporter. Org . Electron. : Phys. Mater. Appl. 33, 221-226 (2016). 5. Huang, X., Wang, K. Yi, C., Meng, T

  4. Intrinsic graphene field effect transistor on amorphous carbon films

    Tinchev, Savcho

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of graphene field effect transistor is described which uses an intrinsic graphene on the surface of as deposited hydrogenated amorphous carbon films. Ambipolar characteristic has been demonstrated typical for graphene devices, which changes to unipolar characteristic if the surface graphene was etched in oxygen plasma. Because amorphous carbon films can be growth easily, with unlimited dimensions and no transfer of graphene is necessary, this can open new perspective for graphene ...

  5. Experimental realization of a silicon spin field-effect transistor

    Huang, Biqin; Monsma, Douwe J.; Appelbaum, Ian

    2007-01-01

    A longitudinal electric field is used to control the transit time (through an undoped silicon vertical channel) of spin-polarized electrons precessing in a perpendicular magnetic field. Since an applied voltage determines the final spin direction at the spin detector and hence the output collector current, this comprises a spin field-effect transistor. An improved hot-electron spin injector providing ~115% magnetocurrent, corresponding to at least ~38% electron current spin polarization after...

  6. New Materials for Gas Sensitive Field-Effect Device Studies

    Salomonsson, Anette

    2005-01-01

    Gas sensor control is potentially one of the most important techniques of tomorrow for the environment. All over the world cars are preferred for transportation, and accordingly the number of cars increases, unfortunately, together with pollutants. Boilers and powerplants are other sources of pollutants to the environment. Metal-Insulator-Silicon Carbide (MISiC) Field-effect sensors in car applications and boilers have the potential to reduce the amount of pollutants. These devices are sensit...

  7. Graphene-based field-effect transistor biosensors

    Chen; , Junhong; Mao, Shun; Lu, Ganhua

    2017-06-14

    The disclosure provides a field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensor and uses thereof. In particular, to FET-based biosensors using thermally reduced graphene-based sheets as a conducting channel decorated with nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates. The present disclosure also relates to FET-based biosensors using metal nitride/graphene hybrid sheets. The disclosure provides a method for detecting a target biomolecule in a sample using the FET-based biosensor described herein.

  8. Modulation-doped β-(Al0.2Ga0.8)2O3/Ga2O3 field-effect transistor

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Xia, Zhanbo; Joishi, Chandan; Zhang, Yuewei; McGlone, Joe; Johnson, Jared; Brenner, Mark; Arehart, Aaron R.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Lodha, Saurabh; Rajan, Siddharth

    2017-07-01

    Modulation-doped heterostructures are a key enabler for realizing high mobility and better scaling properties for high performance transistors. We report the realization of a modulation-doped two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the β-(Al0.2Ga0.8)2O3/Ga2O3 heterojunction by silicon delta doping. The formation of a 2DEG was confirmed using capacitance voltage measurements. A modulation-doped 2DEG channel was used to realize a modulation-doped field-effect transistor. The demonstration of modulation doping in the β-(Al0.2Ga0.8)2O3/Ga2O3 material system could enable heterojunction devices for high performance electronics.

  9. Field effects and ictal synchronization: insights from in homine observations.

    Shennan Aibel Weiss

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been well established in animal models that electrical fields generated during inter-ictal and ictal discharges are strong enough in intensity to influence action potential firing threshold and synchronization. We discuss recently published data from microelectrode array recordings of human neocortical seizures and what they imply about the possible role of field effects in neuronal synchronization. We have identified two distinct seizure territories that cannot be easily distinguished by traditional EEG analysis. The ictal core exhibits synchronized neuronal burst firing, while the surrounding ictal penumbra exhibits asynchronous and relatively sparse neuronal activity. In the ictal core large amplitude rhythmic ictal discharges produce large electric fields that correspond with relatively synchronous neuronal firing. In the penumbra rhythmic ictal discharges are smaller in amplitude, but large enough to influence spike timing, yet neuronal synchrony is not observed. These in homine observations are in accord with decades of animal studies supporting a role of field effects in neuronal synchronization during seizures, yet also highlight how field effects may be negated in the presence of strong synaptic inhibition in the penumbra.

  10. Ultrathin regioregular poly(3-hexyl thiophene) field-effect transistors

    Sandberg, H.G.O.; Frey, G.L.; Shkunov, M.N.

    2002-01-01

    Ultrathin films of regioregular poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (RR-P3HT) were deposited through a dip-coating technique and utilized as the semiconducting film in field-effect transistors (FETs). Proper selection of the substrate and solution concentration enabled the growth of a monolayer-thick RR-P3HT...... film. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), U-V-vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray reflectivity, and grazing incidence diffraction were used to study the growth mechanism, thickness and orientation of self-organized monolayer thick RR-P3HT films on SiO2 surfaces. Films were found to adopt a Stranski......-Krastanov-type growth mode with formation of a very stable first monolayer. X-ray measurements show that the direction of pi-stacking in the films (the (010) direction) is parallel to the substrate, which is the preferred orientation for high field-effect carrier mobilities. The field-effect mobilities in all ultrathin...

  11. Organic field-effect transistors using single crystals

    Hasegawa, Tatsuo; Takeya, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors using small-molecule organic single crystals are developed to investigate fundamental aspects of organic thin-film transistors that have been widely studied for possible future markets for 'plastic electronics'. In reviewing the physics and chemistry of single-crystal organic field-effect transistors (SC-OFETs), the nature of intrinsic charge dynamics is elucidated for the carriers induced at the single crystal surfaces of molecular semiconductors. Materials for SC-OFETs are first reviewed with descriptions of the fabrication methods and the field-effect characteristics. In particular, a benchmark carrier mobility of 20-40 cm 2 Vs -1 , achieved with thin platelets of rubrene single crystals, demonstrates the significance of the SC-OFETs and clarifies material limitations for organic devices. In the latter part of this review, we discuss the physics of microscopic charge transport by using SC-OFETs at metal/semiconductor contacts and along semiconductor/insulator interfaces. Most importantly, Hall effect and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements reveal that interface charge transport in molecular semiconductors is properly described in terms of band transport and localization by charge traps. (topical review)

  12. Irradiation of graphene field effect transistors with highly charged ions

    Ernst, P.; Kozubek, R.; Madauß, L.; Sonntag, J.; Lorke, A.; Schleberger, M., E-mail: marika.schleberger@uni-due.de

    2016-09-01

    In this work, graphene field-effect transistors are used to detect defects due to irradiation with slow, highly charged ions. In order to avoid contamination effects, a dedicated ultra-high vacuum set up has been designed and installed for the in situ cleaning and electrical characterization of graphene field-effect transistors during irradiation. To investigate the electrical and structural modifications of irradiated graphene field-effect transistors, their transfer characteristics as well as the corresponding Raman spectra are analyzed as a function of ion fluence for two different charge states. The irradiation experiments show a decreasing mobility with increasing fluences. The mobility reduction scales with the potential energy of the ions. In comparison to Raman spectroscopy, the transport properties of graphene show an extremely high sensitivity with respect to ion irradiation: a significant drop of the mobility is observed already at fluences below 15 ions/μm{sup 2}, which is more than one order of magnitude lower than what is required for Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Organic field-effect transistors using single crystals

    Tatsuo Hasegawa and Jun Takeya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic field-effect transistors using small-molecule organic single crystals are developed to investigate fundamental aspects of organic thin-film transistors that have been widely studied for possible future markets for 'plastic electronics'. In reviewing the physics and chemistry of single-crystal organic field-effect transistors (SC-OFETs, the nature of intrinsic charge dynamics is elucidated for the carriers induced at the single crystal surfaces of molecular semiconductors. Materials for SC-OFETs are first reviewed with descriptions of the fabrication methods and the field-effect characteristics. In particular, a benchmark carrier mobility of 20–40 cm2 Vs−1, achieved with thin platelets of rubrene single crystals, demonstrates the significance of the SC-OFETs and clarifies material limitations for organic devices. In the latter part of this review, we discuss the physics of microscopic charge transport by using SC-OFETs at metal/semiconductor contacts and along semiconductor/insulator interfaces. Most importantly, Hall effect and electron spin resonance (ESR measurements reveal that interface charge transport in molecular semiconductors is properly described in terms of band transport and localization by charge traps.

  14. Molecular-weight dependence of interchain polaron delocalization and exciton bandwidth in high-mobility conjugated polymers

    Chang, J.F.; Clark, J.; Zhao, N.

    2006-01-01

    delocalization with increasing conjugation length and crystalline quality. From comparative studies of field-effect transistor characteristics, film morphology, and optical properties our study provides a microscopic understanding of the factors which limit the charge transport in P3HT to field-effect mobilities......Interchain interactions have a profound effect on the optical as well as charge transport properties of conjugated polymer thin films. In contrast to oligomeric model systems in solution-deposited polymer thin films the study of such effects is complicated by the complex microstructure. We present...

  15. Geminate free radical processes and magnetic field effects

    Eveson, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the study of the dynamics of radical pair recombination reactions in solution by flash photolysis Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and the influence of low static external magnetic fields upon them (MFE). An outline of the concepts of ESR is presented, followed by the theories of Chemically Induced Dynamic Electron Polarisation (CIDEP) of transient radical pairs. This is then followed by a brief review of the flash photolysis ESR apparatus and application of the Bloch equations to solve the equations of time-resolved ESR. Completing the theory section is an overview of the mechanisms by which magnetic fields alter the course of a geminate radical pair reaction in solution. Experimental CIDEP observations of the radical pair produced on photolysis of 1,3-dihydroxypropanone are simulated using polarisation theory and applied to a random-walk diffusion model to find, for the first time, the geminate reaction probability in solutions of varying viscosity. CIDEP spectra of the radical pair formed on photolysis of hydroxypropanone in contrast are not accounted for by current polarisation theory. The discrepancy is due to moderately fast relaxation of the acyl radical, CH 3 CO·, which alters the relative intensities in the ST 0 RPM pattern of the counter radical. Calculations taking into account this now provide an adequate basis for simulation of the spectrum. This method also, in principle, represents a new method for the measurement of phase relaxation times. Concluding the ESR work is a CIDEP study of 2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl diphenylphosphine oxide. Unusual spin polarisation phenomena are found. The time-resolved optical absorption spectroscopy technique used for detecting low magnetic field effects on neutral radical pair reactions is described. Various improvements to the experiment are discussed which result in the observation of the low field effect for a neutral radical pair produced by Norrish type II chemistry. This is followed by an

  16. Black Phosphorus-Zinc Oxide Nanomaterial Heterojunction for p-n Diode and Junction Field-Effect Transistor.

    Jeon, Pyo Jin; Lee, Young Tack; Lim, June Yeong; Kim, Jin Sung; Hwang, Do Kyung; Im, Seongil

    2016-02-10

    Black phosphorus (BP) nanosheet is two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor with distinct band gap and attracting recent attention from researches because it has some similarity to gapless 2D semiconductor graphene in the following two aspects: single element (P) for its composition and quite high mobilities depending on its fabrication conditions. Apart from several electronic applications reported with BP nanosheet, here we report for the first time BP nanosheet-ZnO nanowire 2D-1D heterojunction applications for p-n diodes and BP-gated junction field effect transistors (JFETs) with n-ZnO channel on glass. For these nanodevices, we take advantages of the mechanical flexibility of p-type conducting of BP and van der Waals junction interface between BP and ZnO. As a result, our BP-ZnO nanodimension p-n diode displays a high ON/OFF ratio of ∼10(4) in static rectification and shows kilohertz dynamic rectification as well while ZnO nanowire channel JFET operations are nicely demonstrated by BP gate switching in both electrostatics and kilohertz dynamics.

  17. Wide-bandgap high-mobility ZnO thin-film transistors produced at room temperature

    Fortunato, Elvira M.C.; Barquinha, Pedro M.C.; Pimentel, Ana C.M.B.G.; Goncalves, Alexandra M.F.; Marques, Antonio J.S.; Martins, Rodrigo F.P.; Pereira, Luis M.N.

    2004-01-01

    We report high-performance ZnO thin-film transistor (ZnO-TFT) fabricated by rf magnetron sputtering at room temperature with a bottom gate configuration. The ZnO-TFT operates in the enhancement mode with a threshold voltage of 19 V, a saturation mobility of 27 cm 2 /V s, a gate voltage swing of 1.39 V/decade and an on/off ratio of 3x10 5 . The ZnO-TFT presents an average optical transmission (including the glass substrate) of 80% in the visible part of the spectrum. The combination of transparency, high mobility, and room-temperature processing makes the ZnO-TFT a very promising low-cost optoelectronic device for the next generation of invisible and flexible electronics

  18. Long-lived nanosecond spin coherence in high-mobility 2DEGs confined in double and triple quantum wells

    Ullah, S.; Gusev, G. M.; Hernandez, F. G. G., E-mail: felixggh@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bakarov, A. K. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics and Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-07

    We investigated the spin coherence of high-mobility two-dimensional electron gases confined in multilayer GaAs quantum wells. The dynamics of the spin polarization was optically studied using pump-probe techniques: time-resolved Kerr rotation and resonant spin amplification. For double and triple quantum wells doped beyond the metal-to-insulator transition, the spin-orbit interaction was tailored by the sample parameters of structural symmetry (Rashba constant), width, and electron density (Dresselhaus linear and cubic constants) which allow us to attain long dephasing times in the nanoseconds range. The determination of the scales, namely, transport scattering time, single-electron scattering time, electron-electron scattering time, and spin polarization decay time further supports the possibility of using n-doped multilayer systems for developing spintronic devices.

  19. Optical conductivity and optical effective mass in a high-mobility organic semiconductor: Implications for the nature of charge transport

    Li, Yuan

    2014-12-03

    We present a multiscale modeling of the infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data that point to nonmonotonic features in the optical conductivity spectrum and small optical effective masses. We find that, in the static-disorder approximation, the nonlocal electron-phonon interactions stemming from low-frequency lattice vibrations can decrease the optical effective masses and lead to lighter quasiparticles. On the other hand, the charge-transport and infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal at room temperature are demonstrated to be governed by localized carriers driven by inherent thermal disorders. Our findings underline that the presence of apparently light carriers in high-mobility organic semiconductors does not necessarily imply bandlike transport.

  20. High mobility n-type organic thin-film transistors deposited at room temperature by supersonic molecular beam deposition

    Chiarella, F., E-mail: fabio.chiarella@spin.cnr.it; Barra, M.; Ciccullo, F.; Cassinese, A. [CNR-SPIN and Physics Department, University of Naples, Piazzale Tecchio 80, I-80125 Naples (Italy); Toccoli, T.; Aversa, L.; Tatti, R.; Verucchi, R. [IMEM-CNR-FBK Division of Trento, Via alla Cascata 56/C, I-38123 Povo (Italy); Iannotta, S. [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, I-43124 Parma (Italy)

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication of N,N′-1H,1H-perfluorobutil dicyanoperylenediimide (PDIF-CN{sub 2}) organic thin-film transistors by Supersonic Molecular Beam Deposition. The devices exhibit mobility up to 0.2 cm{sup 2}/V s even if the substrate is kept at room temperature during the organic film growth, exceeding by three orders of magnitude the electrical performance of those grown at the same temperature by conventional Organic Molecular Beam Deposition. The possibility to get high-mobility n-type transistors avoiding thermal treatments during or after the deposition could significantly extend the number of substrates suitable to the fabrication of flexible high-performance complementary circuits by using this compound.

  1. Optical conductivity and optical effective mass in a high-mobility organic semiconductor: Implications for the nature of charge transport

    Li, Yuan; Yi, Yuanping; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    We present a multiscale modeling of the infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data that point to nonmonotonic features in the optical conductivity spectrum and small optical effective masses. We find that, in the static-disorder approximation, the nonlocal electron-phonon interactions stemming from low-frequency lattice vibrations can decrease the optical effective masses and lead to lighter quasiparticles. On the other hand, the charge-transport and infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal at room temperature are demonstrated to be governed by localized carriers driven by inherent thermal disorders. Our findings underline that the presence of apparently light carriers in high-mobility organic semiconductors does not necessarily imply bandlike transport.

  2. Tunable electron heating induced giant magnetoresistance in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system.

    Wang, Zhuo; Samaraweera, R L; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Mani, R G

    2016-12-07

    Electron-heating induced by a tunable, supplementary dc-current (I dc ) helps to vary the observed magnetoresistance in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system. The magnetoresistance at B = 0.3 T is shown to progressively change from positive to negative with increasing I dc , yielding negative giant-magnetoresistance at the lowest temperature and highest I dc . A two-term Drude model successfully fits the data at all I dc and T. The results indicate that carrier heating modifies a conductivity correction σ 1 , which undergoes sign reversal from positive to negative with increasing I dc , and this is responsible for the observed crossover from positive- to negative- magnetoresistance, respectively, at the highest B.

  3. Phenotypic analysis of newly isolated short-lifespan Neurospora crassa mutant deficient in a high mobility group box protein.

    Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Li, ZhengHao; Ishimori, Keisuke; Kuwabara, Kazuki; Hatakeyama, Shin; Tanaka, Shuuitsu

    2017-08-01

    To elucidate genetic mechanisms affecting the lifespan of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, we attempted to identify a gene of which a defect causes a short-lifespan. By screening a Neurospora knockout library, provided by the Fungal Genetics Stock Center at Kansas State University, several KO strains with a short-lifespan were isolated. FGSC#11693 is one of these, which shows similar phenotypes to known Neurospora short-lifespan mutants as follows: 1) hyphal growth ceases after about 2weeks of cultivation, despite that of the wild-type continuing for over 2years, 2) viability of conidia is lower than that of the wild-type, and 3) high sensitivity to mutagens such as methyl methanesulfonate, ultraviolet radiation, and hydroxyl urea is exhibited. The NCU number of the knocked-out gene in the KO strain is NCU02695, and recovery from the short-lifespan and mutagen sensitivity was achieved by the introduction of this gene from the wild-type. The putative amino acid sequence of the knocked-out gene contains two high mobility group box domains and a mitochondrial localization signal is found at the N-terminal of this sequence. Upon analyzing the subcellular localization of the gene product fused with GFP, GFP signals were detected in mitochondria. From these observations, the gene and KO strain were named mitochondrial high mobility group box protein 1 (MHG1) and mhg1 KO strain, respectively. The amount of mtDNA relative to the nuclear amount was lower in the mhg1 KO strain than in the wild-type. mtDNA aberration was also observed in the mhg1 KO strain. These results suggest that the MHG1 protein plays an important role in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA, and mitochondrial abnormality caused by mtDNA aberration is responsible for the short-lifespan of the mhg1 KO strain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Low temperature high-mobility InZnO thin-film transistors fabricated by excimer laser annealing

    Fujii, M.; Ishikawa, Y.; Ishihara, R.; Van der Cingel, J.; Mofrad, M.R.T.; Horita, M.; Uraoka, Y.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we successfully achieved a relatively high field-effect mobility of 37.7?cm2/Vs in an InZnO thin-film transistor (TFT) fabricated by excimer layer annealing (ELA). The ELA process allowed us to fabricate such a high-performance InZnO TFT at the substrate temperature less than 50?°C

  5. Integration of biomolecular logic gates with field-effect transducers

    Poghossian, A., E-mail: a.poghossian@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Nano- and Biotechnologies, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Campus Juelich, Heinrich-Mussmann-Str. 1, D-52428 Juelich (Germany); Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Malzahn, K. [Institute of Nano- and Biotechnologies, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Campus Juelich, Heinrich-Mussmann-Str. 1, D-52428 Juelich (Germany); Abouzar, M.H. [Institute of Nano- and Biotechnologies, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Campus Juelich, Heinrich-Mussmann-Str. 1, D-52428 Juelich (Germany); Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Mehndiratta, P. [Institute of Nano- and Biotechnologies, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Campus Juelich, Heinrich-Mussmann-Str. 1, D-52428 Juelich (Germany); Katz, E. [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Science, NanoBio Laboratory (NABLAB), Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5810 (United States); Schoening, M.J. [Institute of Nano- and Biotechnologies, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Campus Juelich, Heinrich-Mussmann-Str. 1, D-52428 Juelich (Germany); Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: > Enzyme-based AND/OR logic gates are integrated with a capacitive field-effect sensor. > The AND/OR logic gates compose of multi-enzyme system immobilised on sensor surface. > Logic gates were activated by different combinations of chemical inputs (analytes). > The logic output (pH change) produced by the enzymes was read out by the sensor. - Abstract: The integration of biomolecular logic gates with field-effect devices - the basic element of conventional electronic logic gates and computing - is one of the most attractive and promising approaches for the transformation of biomolecular logic principles into macroscopically useable electrical output signals. In this work, capacitive field-effect EIS (electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor) sensors based on a p-Si-SiO{sub 2}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} structure modified with a multi-enzyme membrane have been used for electronic transduction of biochemical signals processed by enzyme-based OR and AND logic gates. The realised OR logic gate composes of two enzymes (glucose oxidase and esterase) and was activated by ethyl butyrate or/and glucose. The AND logic gate composes of three enzymes (invertase, mutarotase and glucose oxidase) and was activated by two chemical input signals: sucrose and dissolved oxygen. The developed integrated enzyme logic gates produce local pH changes at the EIS sensor surface as a result of biochemical reactions activated by different combinations of chemical input signals, while the pH value of the bulk solution remains unchanged. The pH-induced charge changes at the gate-insulator (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) surface of the EIS transducer result in an electronic signal corresponding to the logic output produced by the immobilised enzymes. The logic output signals have been read out by means of a constant-capacitance method.

  6. Integration of biomolecular logic gates with field-effect transducers

    Poghossian, A.; Malzahn, K.; Abouzar, M.H.; Mehndiratta, P.; Katz, E.; Schoening, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Enzyme-based AND/OR logic gates are integrated with a capacitive field-effect sensor. → The AND/OR logic gates compose of multi-enzyme system immobilised on sensor surface. → Logic gates were activated by different combinations of chemical inputs (analytes). → The logic output (pH change) produced by the enzymes was read out by the sensor. - Abstract: The integration of biomolecular logic gates with field-effect devices - the basic element of conventional electronic logic gates and computing - is one of the most attractive and promising approaches for the transformation of biomolecular logic principles into macroscopically useable electrical output signals. In this work, capacitive field-effect EIS (electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor) sensors based on a p-Si-SiO 2 -Ta 2 O 5 structure modified with a multi-enzyme membrane have been used for electronic transduction of biochemical signals processed by enzyme-based OR and AND logic gates. The realised OR logic gate composes of two enzymes (glucose oxidase and esterase) and was activated by ethyl butyrate or/and glucose. The AND logic gate composes of three enzymes (invertase, mutarotase and glucose oxidase) and was activated by two chemical input signals: sucrose and dissolved oxygen. The developed integrated enzyme logic gates produce local pH changes at the EIS sensor surface as a result of biochemical reactions activated by different combinations of chemical input signals, while the pH value of the bulk solution remains unchanged. The pH-induced charge changes at the gate-insulator (Ta 2 O 5 ) surface of the EIS transducer result in an electronic signal corresponding to the logic output produced by the immobilised enzymes. The logic output signals have been read out by means of a constant-capacitance method.

  7. Depth of Field Effects for Interactive Direct Volume Rendering

    Schott, Mathias; Pascal Grosset, A.V.; Martin, Tobias; Pegoraro, Vincent; Smith, Sean T.; Hansen, Charles D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed for computing depth of field effects, which previously were shown to aid observers in depth and size perception of synthetically generated images. The presented technique extends those benefits to volume rendering visualizations of 3D scalar fields from CT/MRI scanners or numerical simulations. It is based on incremental filtering and as such does not depend on any precomputation, thus allowing interactive explorations of volumetric data sets via on-the-fly editing of the shading model parameters or (multi-dimensional) transfer functions. © 2011 The Author(s).

  8. Pauli Spin Blockade and the Ultrasmall Magnetic Field Effect

    Danon, Jeroen

    2013-08-06

    Based on the spin-blockade model for organic magnetoresistance, we present an analytic expression for the polaron-bipolaron transition rate, taking into account the effective nuclear fields on the two sites. We reveal the physics behind the qualitatively different magnetoconductance line shapes observed in experiment, as well as the ultrasmall magnetic field effect (USFE). Since our findings agree in detail with recent experiments, they also indirectly provide support for the spin-blockade interpretation of organic magnetoresistance. In addition, we predict the existence of a similar USFE in semiconductor double quantum dots tuned to the spin-blockade regime.

  9. Uniformity of fully gravure printed organic field-effect transistors

    Hambsch, M.; Reuter, K.; Stanel, M.; Schmidt, G.; Kempa, H.; Fuegmann, U.; Hahn, U.; Huebler, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Fully mass-printed organic field-effect transistors were made completely by means of gravure printing. Therefore a special printing layout was developed in order to avoid register problems in print direction. Upon using this layout, contact pads for source-drain electrodes of the transistors are printed together with the gate electrodes in one and the same printing run. More than 50,000 transistors have been produced and by random tests a yield of approximately 75% has been determined. The principle suitability of the gravure printed transistors for integrated circuits has been shown by the realization of ring oscillators.

  10. Local field effects and metamaterials based on colloidal quantum dots

    Porvatkina, O V; Tishchenko, A A; Strikhanov, M N

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials are composite structures that exhibit interesting and unusual properties, e.g. negative refractive index. In this article we consider metamaterials based on colloidal quantum dots (CQDs). We investigate these structures taking into account the local field effects and theoretically analyze expressions for permittivity and permeability of metamaterials based on CdSe CQDs. We obtain inequality describing the conditions when material with definite concentration of CQDs is metamaterial. Also we investigate how the values of dielectric polarizability and magnetic polarizability of CQDs depend on the dots radius and properties the material the quantum dots are made of. (paper)

  11. Pauli Spin Blockade and the Ultrasmall Magnetic Field Effect

    Danon, Jeroen; Wang, Xuhui; Manchon, Aurelien

    2013-01-01

    Based on the spin-blockade model for organic magnetoresistance, we present an analytic expression for the polaron-bipolaron transition rate, taking into account the effective nuclear fields on the two sites. We reveal the physics behind the qualitatively different magnetoconductance line shapes observed in experiment, as well as the ultrasmall magnetic field effect (USFE). Since our findings agree in detail with recent experiments, they also indirectly provide support for the spin-blockade interpretation of organic magnetoresistance. In addition, we predict the existence of a similar USFE in semiconductor double quantum dots tuned to the spin-blockade regime.

  12. Error correcting circuit design with carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    Liu, Xiaoqiang; Cai, Li; Yang, Xiaokuo; Liu, Baojun; Liu, Zhongyong

    2018-03-01

    In this work, a parallel error correcting circuit based on (7, 4) Hamming code is designed and implemented with carbon nanotube field effect transistors, and its function is validated by simulation in HSpice with the Stanford model. A grouping method which is able to correct multiple bit errors in 16-bit and 32-bit application is proposed, and its error correction capability is analyzed. Performance of circuits implemented with CNTFETs and traditional MOSFETs respectively is also compared, and the former shows a 34.4% decrement of layout area and a 56.9% decrement of power consumption.

  13. Depth of Field Effects for Interactive Direct Volume Rendering

    Schott, Mathias

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed for computing depth of field effects, which previously were shown to aid observers in depth and size perception of synthetically generated images. The presented technique extends those benefits to volume rendering visualizations of 3D scalar fields from CT/MRI scanners or numerical simulations. It is based on incremental filtering and as such does not depend on any precomputation, thus allowing interactive explorations of volumetric data sets via on-the-fly editing of the shading model parameters or (multi-dimensional) transfer functions. © 2011 The Author(s).

  14. Magnetic field effect on indole exciplexes: an anomalous dielectric dependence

    Sengupta, Tamal; Basu, Samita

    2004-01-01

    Individual exciplex formation between various aromatic hydrocarbons, anthracene, pyrene, all-s-trans-1,4-diphenylbuta-1,3-diene and a heteroaromatic amine, 1,2-dimethylindole, was investigated by steady-state fluorescence and magnetic field effect (MFE). A comparative study was carried out with two other exciplex systems 9-cyanophenanthrene-1,2-dimethylindole and 9-cyanophenanthrene-N-methylindole. The extent of charge transfer and dielectric dependence of MFE reveals the potential role of specific interactions related to exciplex geometry

  15. Potential of carbon nanotube field effect transistors for analogue circuits

    Hayat, Khizar

    2013-05-11

    This Letter presents a detailed comparison of carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNFETs) and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) with special focus on carbon nanotube FET\\'s potential for implementing analogue circuits in the mm-wave and sub-terahertz range. The latest CNFET lithographic dimensions place it at-par with complementary metal oxide semiconductor in terms of current handling capability, whereas the forecasted improvement in the lithography enables the CNFETs to handle more than twice the current of MOSFETs. The comparison of RF parameters shows superior performance of CNFETs with a g m , f T and f max of 2.7, 2.6 and 4.5 times higher, respectively. MOSFET- and CNFET-based inverter, three-stage ring oscillator and LC oscillator have been designed and compared as well. The CNFET-based inverters are found to be ten times faster, the ring oscillator demonstrates three times higher oscillation frequency and CNFET-based LC oscillator also shows improved performance than its MOSFET counterpart.

  16. Field-effect enhanced triboelectric colloidal quantum dot flexible sensor

    Meng, Lingju; Xu, Qiwei; Fan, Shicheng; Dick, Carson R.; Wang, Xihua

    2017-10-01

    Flexible electronics, which is of great importance as fundamental sensor and communication technologies for many internet-of-things applications, has established a huge market encroaching into the trillion-dollar market of solid state electronics. For the capability of being processed by printing or spraying, colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) play an increasingly important role in flexible electronics. Although the electrical properties of CQD thin-films are expected to be stable on flexible substrates, their electrical performance could be tuned for applications in flexible touch sensors. Here, we report CQD touch sensors employing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) triboelectric films. The electrical response of touching activity is enhanced by incorporating CQD field-effect transistors into the device architecture. Thanks to the use of the CQD thin film as a current amplifier, the field-effect CQD touch sensor shows a fast response to various touching materials, even being bent to a large curvature. It also shows a much higher output current density compared to a PDMS triboelectric touch sensor.

  17. Graphene field effect transistor without an energy gap.

    Jang, Min Seok; Kim, Hyungjun; Son, Young-Woo; Atwater, Harry A; Goddard, William A

    2013-05-28

    Graphene is a room temperature ballistic electron conductor and also a very good thermal conductor. Thus, it has been regarded as an ideal material for postsilicon electronic applications. A major complication is that the relativistic massless electrons in pristine graphene exhibit unimpeded Klein tunneling penetration through gate potential barriers. Thus, previous efforts to realize a field effect transistor for logic applications have assumed that introduction of a band gap in graphene is a prerequisite. Unfortunately, extrinsic treatments designed to open a band gap seriously degrade device quality, yielding very low mobility and uncontrolled on/off current ratios. To solve this dilemma, we propose a gating mechanism that leads to a hundredfold enhancement in on/off transmittance ratio for normally incident electrons without any band gap engineering. Thus, our saw-shaped geometry gate potential (in place of the conventional bar-shaped geometry) leads to switching to an off state while retaining the ultrahigh electron mobility in the on state. In particular, we report that an on/off transmittance ratio of 130 is achievable for a sawtooth gate with a gate length of 80 nm. Our switching mechanism demonstrates that intrinsic graphene can be used in designing logic devices without serious alteration of the conventional field effect transistor architecture. This suggests a new variable for the optimization of the graphene-based device--geometry of the gate electrode.

  18. Potential of carbon nanotube field effect transistors for analogue circuits

    Hayat, Khizar; Cheema, Hammad; Shamim, Atif

    2013-01-01

    This Letter presents a detailed comparison of carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNFETs) and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) with special focus on carbon nanotube FET's potential for implementing analogue circuits in the mm-wave and sub-terahertz range. The latest CNFET lithographic dimensions place it at-par with complementary metal oxide semiconductor in terms of current handling capability, whereas the forecasted improvement in the lithography enables the CNFETs to handle more than twice the current of MOSFETs. The comparison of RF parameters shows superior performance of CNFETs with a g m , f T and f max of 2.7, 2.6 and 4.5 times higher, respectively. MOSFET- and CNFET-based inverter, three-stage ring oscillator and LC oscillator have been designed and compared as well. The CNFET-based inverters are found to be ten times faster, the ring oscillator demonstrates three times higher oscillation frequency and CNFET-based LC oscillator also shows improved performance than its MOSFET counterpart.

  19. Gas Sensors Based on Semiconducting Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors

    Ping Feng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are unique sensing materials for the fabrication of gas sensors. In this article, gas sensors based on semiconducting nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs are comprehensively reviewed. Individual nanowires or nanowire network films are usually used as the active detecting channels. In these sensors, a third electrode, which serves as the gate, is used to tune the carrier concentration of the nanowires to realize better sensing performance, including sensitivity, selectivity and response time, etc. The FET parameters can be modulated by the presence of the target gases and their change relate closely to the type and concentration of the gas molecules. In addition, extra controls such as metal decoration, local heating and light irradiation can be combined with the gate electrode to tune the nanowire channel and realize more effective gas sensing. With the help of micro-fabrication techniques, these sensors can be integrated into smart systems. Finally, some challenges for the future investigation and application of nanowire field-effect gas sensors are discussed.

  20. Macroscopic local-field effects on photoabsorption processes

    Ma Xiaoguang; Gong Yubing; Wang Meishan; Wang Dehua

    2008-01-01

    The influence of the local-field effect on the photoabsorption cross sections of the atoms which are embedded in the macroscopic medium has been studied by a set of alternative expressions in detail. Some notes on the validity of some different local-field models used to study the photoabsorption cross sections of atoms in condensed matter have been given for the first time. Our results indicate that the local fields can have substantial and different influence on the photoabsorption cross section of atoms in condensed matter for different models. Clausius-Mossotti model and Onsager model have proved to be more reasonable to describe the local field in gas, liquid, or even some simple solid, while Glauber-Lewenstein model probably is wrong in these conditions except for the ideal gas. A procedure which can avoid the errors introduced by Kramers-Kronig transformation has been implemented in this work. This procedure can guarantee that the theoretical studies on the local field effects will not be influenced by the integral instability of the Kramers-Kronig transformation

  1. Recent Advance in Organic Spintronics and Magnetic Field Effect

    Valy Vardeny, Z.

    2013-03-01

    In this talk several important advances in the field of Organic Spintronics and magnetic field effect (MFE) of organic films and optoelectronic devices that have occurred during the past two years from the Utah group will be surveyed and discussed. (i) Organic Spintronics: We demonstrated spin organic light emitting diode (spin-OLED) using two FM injecting electrodes, where the electroluminescence depends on the mutual orientation of the electrode magnetization directions. This development has opened up research studies into organic spin-valves (OSV) in the space-charge limited current regime. (ii) Magnetic field effect: We demonstrated that the photoinduced absorption spectrum in organic films (where current is not involved) show pronounced MFE. This unravels the underlying mechanism of the MFE in organic devices, to be more in agreement with the field of MFE in Biochemistry. (iii) Spin effects in organic optoelectronic devices: We demonstrated that certain spin 1/2 radical additives to donor-acceptor blends substantially enhance the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells. This effect shows that studies of spin response and MFE in OPV devices are promising. In collaboration with T. Nguyen, E. Ehrenfreund, B. Gautam, Y. Zhang and T. Basel. Supported by the DOE grant 04ER46109 ; NSF Grant # DMR-1104495 and MSF-MRSEC program DMR-1121252 [2,3].

  2. Structured-gate organic field-effect transistors

    Aljada, Muhsen; Pandey, Ajay K; Velusamy, Marappan; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul; Namdas, Ebinazar B

    2012-01-01

    We report the fabrication and electrical characteristics of structured-gate organic field-effect transistors consisting of a gate electrode patterned with three-dimensional pillars. The pillar gate electrode was over-coated with a gate dielectric (SiO 2 ) and solution processed organic semiconductors producing both unipolar p-type and bipolar behaviour. We show that this new structured-gate architecture delivers higher source-drain currents, higher gate capacitance per unit equivalent linear channel area, and enhanced charge injection (electrons and/or holes) versus the conventional planar structure in all modes of operation. For the bipolar field-effect transistor (FET) the maximum source-drain current enhancements in p- and n-channel mode were >600% and 28%, respectively, leading to p and n charge mobilities with the same order of magnitude. Thus, we have demonstrated that it is possible to use the FET architecture to manipulate and match carrier mobilities of material combinations where one charge carrier is normally dominant. Mobility matching is advantageous for creating organic logic circuit elements such as inverters and amplifiers. Hence, the method represents a facile and generic strategy for improving the performance of standard organic semiconductors as well as new materials and blends. (paper)

  3. Structured-gate organic field-effect transistors

    Aljada, Muhsen; Pandey, Ajay K.; Velusamy, Marappan; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul; Namdas, Ebinazar B.

    2012-06-01

    We report the fabrication and electrical characteristics of structured-gate organic field-effect transistors consisting of a gate electrode patterned with three-dimensional pillars. The pillar gate electrode was over-coated with a gate dielectric (SiO2) and solution processed organic semiconductors producing both unipolar p-type and bipolar behaviour. We show that this new structured-gate architecture delivers higher source-drain currents, higher gate capacitance per unit equivalent linear channel area, and enhanced charge injection (electrons and/or holes) versus the conventional planar structure in all modes of operation. For the bipolar field-effect transistor (FET) the maximum source-drain current enhancements in p- and n-channel mode were >600% and 28%, respectively, leading to p and n charge mobilities with the same order of magnitude. Thus, we have demonstrated that it is possible to use the FET architecture to manipulate and match carrier mobilities of material combinations where one charge carrier is normally dominant. Mobility matching is advantageous for creating organic logic circuit elements such as inverters and amplifiers. Hence, the method represents a facile and generic strategy for improving the performance of standard organic semiconductors as well as new materials and blends.

  4. Overexpression of high mobility group box 1 contributes to progressive clinicopathological features and poor prognosis of human bladder urothelial carcinoma

    Huang CK

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Changkun Huang,* Zhichao Huang,* Xiaokun Zhao, Yinhuai Wang, Hongqing Zhao, Zhaohui Zhong, Lang Wang Department of Urology, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a versatile protein with intranuclear and extracellular functions, plays an important role in a variety of human cancers. However, the clinical/prognostic significance of HMGB1 expression in human bladder urothelial carcinoma (BUC remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the HMGB1 expression in human BUC with regard to its clinical and prognostic significance.Patients and methods: HMGB1 mRNA and protein expressions in tumor and paired normal bladder tissues were detected in 20 BUC cases by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and Western blot. HMGB1 protein expression in 165 primary BUC tissues was evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC, and its correlations with clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis were also analyzed. Student’s t-test, χ2 test, Kaplan–Meier plots, and Cox proportional hazard regression model were performed to analyze the data. Results: By using qRT-PCR and Western blot, the upregulated expression of HMGB1 mRNA and protein was detected in BUC, compared with paired normal tissue (P<0.05. By using IHC, high HMGB1 expression was examined in 84 of 165 (51.0% BUC cases. High HMGB1 expression was significantly correlated with poorer differentiation and higher T and N classification (all P<0.05. Univariate analysis showed that high HMGB1 expression was significantly associated with a shortened patients’ overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS; both P<0.001. In different subgroups of BUC patients, HMGB1 expression was a prognostic factor in patients with different histological grades or T classification (all P<0.05, pN− (both P<0.001 for OS and DFS, and

  5. A tunable colloidal quantum dot photo field-effect transistor

    Ghosh, Subir; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sukhovatkin, Vlad; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H.

    2011-01-01

    We fabricate and investigate field-effect transistors in which a light-absorbing photogate modulates the flow of current along the channel. The photogate consists of colloidal quantum dots that efficiently transfer photoelectrons to the channel across a charge-separating (type-II) heterointerface, producing a primary and sustained secondary flow that is terminated via electron back-recombination across the interface. We explore colloidal quantum dot sizes corresponding to bandgaps ranging from 730 to 1475 nm and also investigate various stoichiometries of aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) channel materials. We investigate the role of trap state energies in both the colloidal quantum dot energy film and the AZO channel. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Two dimensional analytical model for a reconfigurable field effect transistor

    Ranjith, R.; Jayachandran, Remya; Suja, K. J.; Komaragiri, Rama S.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents two-dimensional potential and current models for a reconfigurable field effect transistor (RFET). Two potential models which describe subthreshold and above-threshold channel potentials are developed by solving two-dimensional (2D) Poisson's equation. In the first potential model, 2D Poisson's equation is solved by considering constant/zero charge density in the channel region of the device to get the subthreshold potential characteristics. In the second model, accumulation charge density is considered to get above-threshold potential characteristics of the device. The proposed models are applicable for the device having lightly doped or intrinsic channel. While obtaining the mathematical model, whole body area is divided into two regions: gated region and un-gated region. The analytical models are compared with technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation results and are in complete agreement for different lengths of the gated regions as well as at various supply voltage levels.

  7. Phosphorus oxide gate dielectric for black phosphorus field effect transistors

    Dickerson, W.; Tayari, V.; Fakih, I.; Korinek, A.; Caporali, M.; Serrano-Ruiz, M.; Peruzzini, M.; Heun, S.; Botton, G. A.; Szkopek, T.

    2018-04-01

    The environmental stability of the layered semiconductor black phosphorus (bP) remains a challenge. Passivation of the bP surface with phosphorus oxide, POx, grown by a reactive ion etch with oxygen plasma is known to improve photoluminescence efficiency of exfoliated bP flakes. We apply phosphorus oxide passivation in the fabrication of bP field effect transistors using a gate stack consisting of a POx layer grown by reactive ion etching followed by atomic layer deposition of Al2O3. We observe room temperature top-gate mobilities of 115 cm2 V-1 s-1 in ambient conditions, which we attribute to the low defect density of the bP/POx interface.

  8. Highly air stable passivation of graphene based field effect devices.

    Sagade, Abhay A; Neumaier, Daniel; Schall, Daniel; Otto, Martin; Pesquera, Amaia; Centeno, Alba; Elorza, Amaia Zurutuza; Kurz, Heinrich

    2015-02-28

    The sensitivity of graphene based devices to surface adsorbates and charge traps at the graphene/dielectric interface requires proper device passivation in order to operate them reproducibly under ambient conditions. Here we report on the use of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide as passivation layer on graphene field effect devices (GFETs). We show that successful passivation produce hysteresis free DC characteristics, low doping level GFETs stable over weeks though operated and stored in ambient atmosphere. This is achieved by selecting proper seed layer prior to deposition of encapsulation layer. The passivated devices are also demonstrated to be robust towards the exposure to chemicals and heat treatments, typically used during device fabrication. Additionally, the passivation of high stability and reproducible characteristics is also shown for functional devices like integrated graphene based inverters.

  9. Bias temperature instability in tunnel field-effect transistors

    Mizubayashi, Wataru; Mori, Takahiro; Fukuda, Koichi; Ishikawa, Yuki; Morita, Yukinori; Migita, Shinji; Ota, Hiroyuki; Liu, Yongxun; O'uchi, Shinichi; Tsukada, Junichi; Yamauchi, Hiromi; Matsukawa, Takashi; Masahara, Meishoku; Endo, Kazuhiko

    2017-04-01

    We systematically investigated the bias temperature instability (BTI) of tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs). The positive BTI and negative BTI mechanisms in TFETs are the same as those in metal-oxide-semiconductor FETs (MOSFETs). In TFETs, although traps are generated in high-k gate dielectrics by the bias stress and/or the interface state is degraded at the interfacial layer/channel interface, the threshold voltage (V th) shift due to BTI degradation is caused by the traps and/or the degradation of the interface state locating the band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) region near the source/gate edge. The BTI lifetime in n- and p-type TFETs is improved by applying a drain bias corresponding to the operation conditions.

  10. Tin - an unlikely ally for silicon field effect transistors?

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2014-01-13

    We explore the effectiveness of tin (Sn), by alloying it with silicon, to use SiSn as a channel material to extend the performance of silicon based complementary metal oxide semiconductors. Our density functional theory based simulation shows that incorporation of tin reduces the band gap of Si(Sn). We fabricated our device with SiSn channel material using a low cost and scalable thermal diffusion process of tin into silicon. Our high-κ/metal gate based multi-gate-field-effect-transistors using SiSn as channel material show performance enhancement, which is in accordance with the theoretical analysis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Intrinsic noise in aggressively scaled field-effect transistors

    Albareda, G; Jiménez, D; Oriols, X

    2009-01-01

    According to roadmap projections, nanoscale field-effect transistors (FETs) with channel lengths below 30 nm and several gates (for improving their gate control over the source–drain conductance) will come to the market in the next few years. However, few studies deal with the noise performance of these aggressively scaled FETs. In this work, a study of the effect of the intrinsic (thermal and shot) noise of such FETs on the performance of an analog amplifier and a digital inverter is carried out by means of numerical simulations with a powerful Monte Carlo (quantum) simulator. The numerical data indicate important drawbacks in the noise performance of aggressively scaled FETs that could invalidate roadmap projections as regards analog and digital applications

  12. Field-effect Flow Control in Polymer Microchannel Networks

    Sniadecki, Nathan; Lee, Cheng S.; Beamesderfer, Mike; DeVoe, Don L.

    2003-01-01

    A new Bio-MEMS electroosmotic flow (EOF) modulator for plastic microchannel networks has been developed. The EOF modulator uses field-effect flow control (FEFC) to adjust the zeta potential at the Parylene C microchannel wall. By setting a differential EOF pumping rate in two of the three microchannels at a T-intersection with EOF modulators, the induced pressure at the intersection generated pumping in the third, field-free microchannel. The EOF modulators are able to change the magnitude and direction of the pressure pumping by inducing either a negative or positive pressure at the intersection. The flow velocity is tracked by neutralized fluorescent microbeads in the microchannels. The proof-of-concept of the EOF modulator described here may be applied to complex plastic ,microchannel networks where individual microchannel flow rates are addressable by localized induced-pressure pumping.

  13. Near-field effects of asteroid impacts in deep water

    Gisler, Galen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weaver, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gittings, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-06-11

    Our previous work has shown that ocean impacts of asteroids below 500 m in diameter do not produce devastating long-distance tsunamis. Nevertheless, a significant portion of the ocean lies close enough to land that near-field effects may prove to be the greatest danger from asteroid impacts in the ocean. Crown splashes and central jets that rise up many kilometres into the atmosphere can produce, upon their collapse, highly non-linear breaking waves that could devastate shorelines within a hundred kilometres of the impact site. We present illustrative calculations, in two and three dimensions, of such impacts for a range of asteroid sizes and impact angles. We find that, as for land impacts, the greatest dangers from oceanic impacts are the short-term near-field, and long-term atmospheric effects.

  14. Field emission current from a junction field-effect transistor

    Monshipouri, Mahta; Abdi, Yaser

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of a titanium dioxide/carbon nanotube (TiO 2 /CNT)-based transistor is reported. The transistor can be considered as a combination of a field emission transistor and a junction field-effect transistor. Using direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC-PECVD) technique, CNTs were grown on a p-typed (100)-oriented silicon substrate. The CNTs were then covered by TiO 2 nanoparticles 2–5 nm in size, using an atmospheric pressure CVD technique. In this device, TiO 2 /CNT junction is responsible for controlling the emission current. High on/off-current ratio and proper gate control are the most important advantages of device. A model based on Fowler–Nordheim equation is utilized for calculation of the emission current and the results are compared with experimental data. The effect of TiO 2 /CNT hetero-structure is also investigated, and well modeled

  15. Deep underground disposal of radioactive wastes: Near field effects

    1985-01-01

    This report reviews the important near-field effects of the disposal of wastes in deep rock formations. The basic characteristics of waste form, container and package, buffer and backfill materials and potential host-rock types are discussed from the perspective of the performance requirements of the total repository system. Effects of waste emplacement on the separate system components and on the system as a whole are discussed. The effects include interactions between groundwater and brines and the other system components, thermal and thermo-mechanical effects, and chemical and geochemical reactions. Special consideration is given to the radiation field that exists in proximity to the waste containers and also to the coupled effects of different phenomena

  16. Simulating realistic implementations of spin field effect transistor

    Gao, Yunfei; Lundstrom, Mark S.; Nikonov, Dmitri E.

    2011-04-01

    The spin field effect transistor (spinFET), consisting of two ferromagnetic source/drain contacts and a Si channel, is predicted to have outstanding device and circuit performance. We carry out a rigorous numerical simulation of the spinFET based on the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism self-consistently coupled with a Poisson solver to produce the device I-V characteristics. Good agreement with the recent experiments in terms of spin injection, spin transport, and the magnetoresistance ratio (MR) is obtained. We include factors crucial for realistic devices: tunneling through a dielectric barrier, and spin relaxation at the interface and in the channel. Using these simulations, we suggest ways of optimizing the device. We propose that by choosing the right contact material and inserting tunnel oxide barriers between the source/drain and channel to filter different spins, the MR can be restored to ˜2000%, which would be beneficial to the reconfigurable logic circuit application.

  17. Molecular materials for organic field-effect transistors

    Mori, T

    2008-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors are important applications of thin films of molecular materials. A variety of materials have been explored for improving the performance of organic transistors. The materials are conventionally classified as p-channel and n-channel, but not only the performance but also even the carrier polarity is greatly dependent on the combinations of organic semiconductors and electrode materials. In this review, particular emphasis is laid on multi-sulfur compounds such as tetrathiafulvalenes and metal dithiolates. These compounds are components of highly conducting materials such as organic superconductors, but are also used in organic transistors. The charge-transfer complexes are used in organic transistors as active layers as well as electrodes. (topical review)

  18. Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors.

    Wakayama, Yutaka; Hayakawa, Ryoma; Seo, Hoon-Seok

    2014-04-01

    Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) is reviewed. Photoactive OFETs are divided into light-emitting (LE) and light-receiving (LR) OFETs. In the first part, LE-OFETs are reviewed from the viewpoint of the evolution of device structures. Device performances have improved in the last decade with the evolution of device structures from single-layer unipolar to multi-layer ambipolar transistors. In the second part, various kinds of LR-OFETs are featured. These are categorized according to their functionalities: phototransistors, non-volatile optical memories, and photochromism-based transistors. For both, various device configurations are introduced: thin-film based transistors for practical applications, single-crystalline transistors to investigate fundamental physics, nanowires, multi-layers, and vertical transistors based on new concepts.

  19. Theoretical study of phosphorene tunneling field effect transistors

    Chang, Jiwon; Hobbs, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In this work, device performances of tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) based on phosphorene are explored via self-consistent atomistic quantum transport simulations. Phosphorene is an ultra-thin two-dimensional (2-D) material with a direct band gap suitable for TFETs applications. Our simulation shows that phosphorene TFETs exhibit subthreshold slope below 60 mV/dec and a wide range of on-current depending on the transport direction due to highly anisotropic band structures of phosphorene. By benchmarking with monolayer MoTe 2 TFETs, we predict that phosphorene TFETs oriented in the small effective mass direction can yield much larger on-current at the same on-current/off-current ratio than monolayer MoTe 2 TFETs. It is also observed that a gate underlap structure is required for scaling down phosphorene TFETs in the small effective mass direction to suppress the source-to-drain direct tunneling leakage current

  20. Theoretical study of phosphorene tunneling field effect transistors

    Chang, Jiwon; Hobbs, Chris [SEMATECH, 257 Fuller Rd #2200, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    In this work, device performances of tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) based on phosphorene are explored via self-consistent atomistic quantum transport simulations. Phosphorene is an ultra-thin two-dimensional (2-D) material with a direct band gap suitable for TFETs applications. Our simulation shows that phosphorene TFETs exhibit subthreshold slope below 60 mV/dec and a wide range of on-current depending on the transport direction due to highly anisotropic band structures of phosphorene. By benchmarking with monolayer MoTe{sub 2} TFETs, we predict that phosphorene TFETs oriented in the small effective mass direction can yield much larger on-current at the same on-current/off-current ratio than monolayer MoTe{sub 2} TFETs. It is also observed that a gate underlap structure is required for scaling down phosphorene TFETs in the small effective mass direction to suppress the source-to-drain direct tunneling leakage current.

  1. Strong crystal field effect in ? - optical absorption study

    Gajek, Z.; Krupa, J. C.

    1998-12-01

    =-1 Results of optical absorption measurements in polarized light on tetravalent neptunium diluted in a 0953-8984/10/50/021/img6 single crystal are reported. The recorded spectra are complex, pointing to the presence of an 0953-8984/10/50/021/img7 impurity. The electronic transitions assigned to the 0953-8984/10/50/021/img8 ion are interpreted in terms of the usual model, following the actual understanding of the neptunium electronic structure and independent theoretical predictions. R.m.s. deviations of the order of 0953-8984/10/50/021/img9 have been obtained for 42 levels fitted with 11 free parameters. The crystal field effect resulting from the fitting is considerably larger than that observed for the uranium ion in the same host.

  2. Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors

    Wakayama, Yutaka; Hayakawa, Ryoma; Seo, Hoon-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) is reviewed. Photoactive OFETs are divided into light-emitting (LE) and light-receiving (LR) OFETs. In the first part, LE-OFETs are reviewed from the viewpoint of the evolution of device structures. Device performances have improved in the last decade with the evolution of device structures from single-layer unipolar to multi-layer ambipolar transistors. In the second part, various kinds of LR-OFETs are featured. These are categorized according to their functionalities: phototransistors, non-volatile optical memories, and photochromism-based transistors. For both, various device configurations are introduced: thin-film based transistors for practical applications, single-crystalline transistors to investigate fundamental physics, nanowires, multi-layers, and vertical transistors based on new concepts. (review)

  3. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    Li, Jingqi

    2012-10-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) have been developed using pure semiconducting carbon nanotubes. The source and drain were vertically stacked, separated by a dielectric, and the carbon nanotubes were placed on the sidewall of the stack to bridge the source and drain. Both the effective gate dielectric and gate electrode were normal to the substrate surface. The channel length is determined by the dielectric thickness between source and drain electrodes, making it easier to fabricate sub-micrometer transistors without using time-consuming electron beam lithography. The transistor area is much smaller than the planar CNTFET due to the vertical arrangement of source and drain and the reduced channel area. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomolecular detection using a metal semiconductor field effect transistor

    Estephan, Elias; Saab, Marie-Belle; Buzatu, Petre; Aulombard, Roger; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.; Gergely, Csilla; Cloitre, Thierry

    2010-04-01

    In this work, our attention was drawn towards developing affinity-based electrical biosensors, using a MESFET (Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor). Semiconductor (SC) surfaces must be prepared before the incubations with biomolecules. The peptides route was adapted to exceed and bypass the limits revealed by other types of surface modification due to the unwanted unspecific interactions. As these peptides reveal specific recognition of materials, then controlled functionalization can be achieved. Peptides were produced by phage display technology using a library of M13 bacteriophage. After several rounds of bio-panning, the phages presenting affinities for GaAs SC were isolated; the DNA of these specific phages were sequenced, and the peptide with the highest affinity was synthesized and biotinylated. To explore the possibility of electrical detection, the MESFET fabricated with the GaAs SC were used to detect the streptavidin via the biotinylated peptide in the presence of the bovine Serum Albumin. After each surface modification step, the IDS (current between the drain and the source) of the transistor was measured and a decrease in the intensity was detected. Furthermore, fluorescent microscopy was used in order to prove the specificity of this peptide and the specific localisation of biomolecules. In conclusion, the feasibility of producing an electrical biosensor using a MESFET has been demonstrated. Controlled placement, specific localization and detection of biomolecules on a MESFET transistor were achieved without covering the drain and the source. This method of functionalization and detection can be of great utility for biosensing application opening a new way for developing bioFETs (Biomolecular Field-Effect Transistor).

  5. Effect of electron-electron interaction on cyclotron resonance in high-mobility InAs/AlSb quantum wells

    Krishtopenko, S. S., E-mail: sergey.krishtopenko@mail.ru; Gavrilenko, V. I. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod, GSP-105 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University, 23 Prospekt Gagarina, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Ikonnikov, A. V. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod, GSP-105 (Russian Federation); Orlita, M. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses (LNCMI-G), CNRS, 25 rue des Martyrs, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble (France); Sadofyev, Yu. G. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991, GSP-1, 53 Leninskiy Prospect (Russian Federation); Goiran, M. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses (LNCMI-T), CNRS, 143 Avenue de Rangueil, 31400 Toulouse (France); Teppe, F.; Knap, W. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb (L2C), UMR CNRS 5221, GIS-TERALAB, Universite Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier (France)

    2015-03-21

    We report observation of electron-electron (e-e) interaction effect on cyclotron resonance (CR) in InAs/AlSb quantum well heterostructures. High mobility values allow us to observe strongly pronounced triple splitting of CR line at noninteger filling factors of Landau levels ν. At magnetic fields, corresponding to ν > 4, experimental values of CR energies are in good agreement with single-electron calculations on the basis of eight-band k ⋅ p Hamiltonian. In the range of filling factors 3 < ν < 4 pronounced, splitting of CR line, exceeding significantly the difference in single-electron CR energies, is discovered. The strength of the splitting increases when occupation of the partially filled Landau level tends to a half, being in qualitative agreement with previous prediction by MacDonald and Kallin [Phys. Rev. B 40, 5795 (1989)]. We demonstrate that such behaviour of CR modes can be quantitatively described if one takes into account both electron correlations and the mixing between conduction and valence bands in the calculations of matrix elements of e-e interaction.

  6. Overexpression of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Human Dental Pulp Inflammation

    Salunya Tancharoen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a nonhistone DNA-binding protein, is released into the extracellular space and promotes inflammation. HMGB1 binds to related cell signaling transduction receptors, including receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, which actively participate in vascular and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the pathogenesis of pulpitis and investigate the effect of Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia lipopolysaccharide (LPS on RAGE and HMGB1 expression in odontoblast-like cells (OLC-1. RAGE and HMGB1 expression levels in clinically inflamed dental pulp were higher than those in healthy dental pulp. Upregulated expression of RAGE was observed in odontoblasts, stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells, and endothelial-like cell lining human pulpitis tissue. Strong cytoplasmic HMGB1 immunoreactivity was noted in odontoblasts, whereas nuclear HMGB1 immunoreactivity was seen in stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells in human pulpitis tissue. LPS stimulated OLC-1 cells produced HMGB1 in a dose-dependent manner through RAGE. HMGB1 translocation towards the cytoplasm and secretion from OLC-1 in response to LPS was inhibited by TPCA-1, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that RAGE and HMGB1 play an important role in the pulpal immune response to oral bacterial infection.

  7. Necrotic enlargement of cone photoreceptor cells and the release of high-mobility group box-1 in retinitis pigmentosa

    Murakami, Y; Ikeda, Y; Nakatake, S; Tachibana, T; Fujiwara, K; Yoshida, N; Notomi, S; Nakao, S; Hisatomi, T; Miller, J W; Vavvas, DG; Sonoda, KH; Ishibashi, T

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal degenerations resulting form rod and cone photoreceptor cell death. The rod cell death due to deleterious genetic mutations has been shown to occur mainly through apoptosis, whereas the mechanisms and features of the secondary cone cell death have not been fully elucidated. Our previous study showed that the cone cell death in rd10 mice, an animal model of RP, involves necrotic features and is partly mediated by the receptor interacting protein kinase. However, the relevancy of necrotic cone cell death in human RP patients remains unknown. In the present study, we showed that dying cone cells in rd10 mice exhibited cellular enlargement, along with necrotic changes such as cellular swelling and mitochondrial rupture. In human eyes, live imaging of cone cells by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy revealed significantly increased percentages of enlarged cone cells in the RP patients compared with the control subjects. The vitreous of the RP patients contained significantly higher levels of high-mobility group box-1, which is released extracellularly associated with necrotic cell death. These findings suggest that necrotic enlargement of cone cells is involved in the process of cone degeneration, and that necrosis may be a novel target to prevent or delay the loss of cone-mediated central vision in RP. PMID:27551484

  8. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells

    Zhang, Xufang; Jiang, Hongwei; Gong, Qimei; Fan, Chen; Huang, Yihua; Ling, Junqi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • HMGB1 translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm during dental pulp inflammation. • HMGB1and its receptor RAGE were up-regulated in hDPCs under LPS stimulation. • HMGB1 enhanced hDPCs migration and induces cytoskeleton reorganization. • HMGB1 may play a critical role in dental pulp repair during inflamed state. - Abstract: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects on proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration

  9. Adsorption of the Inflammatory Mediator High-Mobility Group Box 1 by Polymers with Different Charge and Porosity

    Carla Tripisciano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 is a conserved protein with a variety of biological functions inside as well as outside the cell. When released by activated immune cells, it acts as a proinflammatory cytokine. Its delayed release has sparked the interest in HMGB1 as a potential therapeutic target. Here, we studied the adsorption of HMGB1 to anionic methacrylate-based polymers as well as to neutral polystyrene-divinylbenzene copolymers. Both groups of adsorbents exhibited efficient binding of recombinant HMGB1 and of HMGB1 derived from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The adsorption characteristics depended on particle size, porosity, accessibility of the pores, and charge of the polymers. In addition to these physicochemical parameters of the adsorbents, modifications of the molecule itself (e.g., acetylation, phosphorylation, and oxidation, interaction with other plasma proteins or anticoagulants (e.g., heparin, or association with extracellular microvesicles may influence the binding of HMGB1 to adsorbents and lead to preferential depletion of HMGB1 subsets with different biological activity.

  10. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells

    Zhang, Xufang, E-mail: xufang.zhang@student.qut.edu.au [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059 (Australia); Jiang, Hongwei, E-mail: jianghw@163.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Gong, Qimei, E-mail: gongqmei@gmail.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Fan, Chen, E-mail: c3.fan@student.qut.edu.au [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059 (Australia); Huang, Yihua, E-mail: enu0701@163.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Ling, Junqi, E-mail: lingjq@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • HMGB1 translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm during dental pulp inflammation. • HMGB1and its receptor RAGE were up-regulated in hDPCs under LPS stimulation. • HMGB1 enhanced hDPCs migration and induces cytoskeleton reorganization. • HMGB1 may play a critical role in dental pulp repair during inflamed state. - Abstract: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects on proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration.

  11. Activation of Plant Innate Immunity by Extracellular High Mobility Group Box 3 and Its Inhibition by Salicylic Acid.

    Hyong Woo Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs signal the presence of tissue damage to induce immune responses in plants and animals. Here, we report that High Mobility Group Box 3 (HMGB3 is a novel plant DAMP. Extracellular HMGB3, through receptor-like kinases BAK1 and BKK1, induced hallmark innate immune responses, including i MAPK activation, ii defense-related gene expression, iii callose deposition, and iv enhanced resistance to Botrytis cinerea. Infection by necrotrophic B. cinerea released HMGB3 into the extracellular space (apoplast. Silencing HMGBs enhanced susceptibility to B. cinerea, while HMGB3 injection into apoplast restored resistance. Like its human counterpart, HMGB3 binds salicylic acid (SA, which results in inhibition of its DAMP activity. An SA-binding site mutant of HMGB3 retained its DAMP activity, which was no longer inhibited by SA, consistent with its reduced SA-binding activity. These results provide cross-kingdom evidence that HMGB proteins function as DAMPs and that SA is their conserved inhibitor.

  12. Up-regulation of TLR2 and TLR4 in high mobility group Box1-stimulated macrophages in pulpitis patients

    Mahmoudi, Javad; Sabermarouf, Babak; Baradaran, Behzad; Sadat-Hatamnezhad, Leila; Shotorbani, Siamak Sandoghchian

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): High Mobility Group Box1 (HMGB1) is a nonhistone, DNA-binding protein that serves a crucial role in regulating gene transcription and is involved in a variety of proinflammatory, extracellular activities. The aim of this study was to explore whether HMGB1 stimulation can up-regulate the expression of Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2) and Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) on macrophages from pulpitis and to clarify the subsequent events involving Th17 cells and Th17 cell-associated cytokine changes. Materials and Methods: Having prepared dental pulp tissues of pulpitis and healthy controls, macrophage were isolated and cultured. Macrophages were thereafter stimulated by HMGB1 time course. RT-QPCR, flowcytometer, immunofluorescence, Western blotting, and ELISA techniques were used in the present research. Results: Our results showed that the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 on macrophages stimulated with HMGB1 increased in pulpitis compared with controls (macrophages without HMGB1 stimulation) with a statistical significance (Ppulpitis increased, and NF-kB, the downstream target of TLR2 and TLR4, also showed a marked elevation after macrophages’ stimulation by HMGB1. Conclusion: The evidence from the present study suggests that the enhanced TLR2 and TLR4 pathways and Th17 cell polarization may be due to HMGB1 stimulation in pulpitis. PMID:28293399

  13. Limiting scattering processes in high-mobility InSb quantum wells grown on GaSb buffer systems

    Lehner, Ch. A.; Tschirky, T.; Ihn, T.; Dietsche, W.; Keller, J.; Fält, S.; Wegscheider, W.

    2018-05-01

    We present molecular beam epitaxial grown single- and double-side δ -doped InAlSb/InSb quantum wells with varying distances down to 50 nm to the surface on GaSb metamorphic buffers. We analyze the surface morphology as well as the impact of the crystalline quality on the electron transport. Comparing growth on GaSb and GaAs substrates indicates that the structural integrity of our InSb quantum wells is solely determined by the growth conditions at the GaSb/InAlSb transition and the InAlSb barrier growth. The two-dimensional electron gas samples show high mobilities of up to 349 000 cm2/Vs at cryogenic temperatures and 58 000 cm2/Vs at room temperature. With the calculated Dingle ratio and a transport lifetime model, ionized impurities predominantly remote from the quantum well are identified as the dominant source of scattering events. The analysis of the well-pronounced Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations reveals a high spin-orbit coupling with an effective g -factor of -38.4 in our samples. Along with the smooth surfaces and long mean free paths demonstrated, our InSb quantum wells are increasingly competitive for nanoscale implementations of Majorana mode devices.

  14. Complex quantum transport in a modulation doped strained Ge quantum well heterostructure with a high mobility 2D hole gas

    Morrison, C., E-mail: c.morrison.2@warwick.ac.uk; Casteleiro, C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-05

    The complex quantum transport of a strained Ge quantum well (QW) modulation doped heterostructure with two types of mobile carriers has been observed. The two dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in the Ge QW exhibits an exceptionally high mobility of 780 000 cm{sup 2}/Vs at temperatures below 10 K. Through analysis of Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance of this 2DHG below 2 K, the hole effective mass is found to be 0.065 m{sub 0}. Anomalous conductance peaks are observed at higher fields which deviate from standard Shubnikov de-Haas and quantum Hall effect behaviour due to conduction via multiple carrier types. Despite this complex behaviour, analysis using a transport model with two conductive channels explains this behaviour and allows key physical parameters such as the carrier effective mass, transport, and quantum lifetimes and conductivity of the electrically active layers to be extracted. This finding is important for electronic device applications, since inclusion of highly doped interlayers which are electrically active, for enhancement of, for example, room temperature carrier mobility, does not prevent analysis of quantum transport in a QW.

  15. The role of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1) in the diabetic retinopathy inflammation and apoptosis.

    Yu, Yao; Yang, Lu; Lv, Jinlei; Huang, Xu; Yi, Jinglin; Pei, Chonggang; Shao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common complications of the late phase diabetes, and also a common cause of blindness. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1) is considered to be an inflammatory mediator in the late phase that promotes inflammation and neovascularization in diabetes. Therefore, this paper discussed the role of HMGB-1 in diabetic retinopathy inflammation and neovascularization. 96 adult SD rats were randomly divided into control and diabetes group. The diabetic rat model was established by intraperitoneal injection of streptomycin (0.1 mol/L). Western blot was applied to determine HMGB-1 and its receptor RAGE and TLR2 protein expression in the serum. TUNEL was used to detect retinal apoptosis. Immunofluorescence was performed to test HMGB1 protein expression in retina. HBGM-1 and RAGE expression in diabetic rat retina was significantly higher than the control (P detection showed that diabetic rat retinal cells presented obviously higher apoptosis rate (P diabetic rat retinal cells (P diabetic retinopathy by binding with RAGE receptor to accelerate rat retinal cells apoptosis.

  16. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Disrupts Metabolic Function with Cigarette Smoke Exposure in a Ceramide-Dependent Manner

    Oliver J. Taylor

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously found that cigarette smoke disrupts metabolic function, in part, by increasing muscle ceramide accrual. To further our understanding of this, we sought to determine the role of the cytokine high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, which is increased with smoke exposure, in smoke-induced muscle metabolic perturbations. To test this theory, we determined HMGB1 from lungs of human smokers, as well as from lung cells from mice exposed to cigarette smoke. We also treated cells and mice directly with HMGB1, in the presence or absence of myriocin, an inhibitor of serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in ceramide biosynthesis. Outcomes included assessments of insulin resistance and muscle mitochondrial function. HMGB1 was significantly increased in both human lungs and rodent alveolar macrophages. Further testing revealed that HMGB1 treatment elicited a widespread increase in ceramide species and reduction in myotube mitochondrial respiration, an increase in reactive oxygen species, and reduced insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Inhibition of ceramide biosynthesis with myriocin was protective. In mice, by comparing treatments of HMGB1 injections with or without myriocin, we found that HMGB1 injections resulted in increased muscle ceramides, especially C16 and C24, which were necessary for reduced muscle mitochondrial respiration and compromised insulin and glucose tolerance. In conclusion, HMGB1 may be a necessary intermediate in the ceramide-dependent metabolic consequences of cigarette smoke exposure.

  17. Essential roles of high-mobility group box 1 in the development of murine colitis and colitis-associated cancer

    Maeda, Shin; Hikiba, Yohko; Shibata, Wataru; Ohmae, Tomoya; Yanai, Ayako; Ogura, Keiji; Yamada, Shingo; Omata, Masao

    2007-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear factor released extracellularly as a proinflammatory cytokine. We measured the HMGB1 concentration in the sera of mice with chemically induced colitis (DSS; dextran sulfate sodium salt) and found a marked increase. Inhibition of HMGB1 by neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody resulted in reduced inflammation in DSS-treated colons. In macrophages, HMGB1 induces several proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, which are regulated by NF-κB activation. Two putative sources of HMGB1 were explored: in one, bacterial factors induce HMGB1 secretion from macrophages and in the other, necrotic epithelial cells directly release HMGB1. LPS induced a small amount of HMGB1 in macrophages, but macrophages incubated with supernatant prepared from necrotic cells and containing large amounts of HMGB1 activated NF-κB and induced IL-6. Using the colitis-associated cancer model, we demonstrated that neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody decreases tumor incidence and size. These observations suggest that HMGB1 is a potentially useful target for IBD treatment and the prevention of colitis-associated cancer

  18. Purpurogallin, a Natural Phenol, Attenuates High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Induced Vasospasm in a Rat Model

    Chih-Zen Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 was shown to be an important extracellular mediator involved in vascular inflammation of animals following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. This study is of interest to examine the efficacy of purpurogallin, a natural phenol, on the alternation of cytokines and HMGB1 in a SAH model. A rodent double hemorrhage SAH model was employed. Basilar arteries (BAs were harvested to examine HMGB1 mRNA and protein expression (Western blot. CSF samples were to examine IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α (rt-PCR. Deformed endothelial wall, tortuous elastic lamina, and necrotic smooth muscle were observed in the vessels of SAH groups but were absent in the purpurogallin group. IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the SAH only and SAH plus vehicle groups were significantly elevated (P<0.01. Purpurgallin dose-dependently reduced HMGB1 protein expression. Likewise, high dose purpurogallin reduced TNF-α and HMGB1 mRNA levels. In conclusion, purpurogallin exerts its neuroinflammation effect through the dual effect of inhibiting IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression and reducing HMGB1 protein and mRNA expression. This study supports purpurogallin could attenuate both proinflammatory cytokines and late-onset inflammasome in SAH induced vasospasm.

  19. C-reactive protein and high mobility group box 1 in dogs with gastric dilatation and volvulus.

    Uhrikova, Ivana; Rauserova-Lexmaulova, Leona; Rehakova, Kristina; Scheer, Peter; Doubek, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    To (1) measure C-reactive protein (CRP) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and (2) evaluate their prognostic value and relationship to severity of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, routine hematological and acid-base parameters in dogs with gastric dilatation volvulus (GDV). Prospective observational study from September 2010 to June 2012. Veterinary teaching hospital. Forty-one client-owned dogs with GDV. None. Blood was collected before surgery (baseline), postsurgery, 6-10 hours postsurgery, and 18-22 hours postsurgery. CRP and HMGB1 were measured in all samples, and routine hematological, biochemical, and acid-base analyses were performed. Only baseline and postsurgery samples were used from nonsurvivors (n = 10). CRP increased significantly from postsurgery sampling to 18-22 hours postsurgery, while HMGB1 did not change over time. There was a significant difference in HMGB1 between survivors and nonsurvivors over time. Both proteins correlated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome severity, total leukocyte, segmented neutrophils, and band counts. HMGB1 correlated also with acid-base parameters (pH, bicarbonate, base excess). HMGB1 and CRP behaved differently in regards to their kinetic patterns, with HMGB1 appearing to better reflect the severity of tissue injury in dogs with GDV than CRP. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  20. Complex quantum transport in a modulation doped strained Ge quantum well heterostructure with a high mobility 2D hole gas

    Morrison, C.; Casteleiro, C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.

    2016-09-01

    The complex quantum transport of a strained Ge quantum well (QW) modulation doped heterostructure with two types of mobile carriers has been observed. The two dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in the Ge QW exhibits an exceptionally high mobility of 780 000 cm2/Vs at temperatures below 10 K. Through analysis of Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance of this 2DHG below 2 K, the hole effective mass is found to be 0.065 m0. Anomalous conductance peaks are observed at higher fields which deviate from standard Shubnikov de-Haas and quantum Hall effect behaviour due to conduction via multiple carrier types. Despite this complex behaviour, analysis using a transport model with two conductive channels explains this behaviour and allows key physical parameters such as the carrier effective mass, transport, and quantum lifetimes and conductivity of the electrically active layers to be extracted. This finding is important for electronic device applications, since inclusion of highly doped interlayers which are electrically active, for enhancement of, for example, room temperature carrier mobility, does not prevent analysis of quantum transport in a QW.

  1. Vagal modulation of high mobility group box-1 protein mediates electroacupuncture-induced cardioprotection in ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Zhang, Juan; Yong, Yue; Li, Xing; Hu, Yu; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong-qiang; Song, Wei; Chen, Wen-ting; Xie, Jian; Chen, Xue-mei; Lv, Xin; Hou, Li-li; Wang, Ke; Zhou, Jia; Wang, Xiang-rui; Song, Jian-gang

    2015-10-26

    Excessive release of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein from ischemic cardiomyocytes activates inflammatory cascades and enhances myocardial injury after reperfusion. Here we report evidence that electroacupuncture of mice at Neiguan acupoints can inhibit the up-regulation of cardiac HMGB1 following myocardial ischemia and attenuate the associated inflammatory responses and myocardial injury during reperfusion. These benefits of electroacupuncture were partially reversed by administering recombinant HMGB1 to the mice, and further potentiated by administering anti-HMGB1 antibody. Electroacupuncture-induced inhibition of HMGB1 release was markedly reduced by unilateral vagotomy or administration of nicotinic receptor antagonist, but not by chemical sympathectomy. The cholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine mimicked the effects of electroacupuncture on HMGB1 release and myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Culture experiments with isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes showed that acetylcholine, but not noradrenaline, inhibited hypoxia-induced release of HMGB1 via a α7nAchR-dependent pathway. These results suggest that electroacupuncture acts via the vagal nerve and its nicotinic receptor-mediated signaling to inhibit HMGB1 release from ischemic cardiomyocytes. This helps attenuate pro-inflammatory responses and myocardial injury during reperfusion.

  2. High mobility group box 1 levels are not associated with subclinical carotid atherosclerosis in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis but are reduced by glucocorticoids and statins

    Silva de Souza, Alexandre; De Leeuw, Karina; Westra, Johanna; Smit, Andries J.; Van Der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Nienhuis, Hans L.A.; Bijzet, Johan; Limburg, Pieter C.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Purpose: High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a non-histone DNA binding protein that is passively released by dying cells or actively secreted by immunocompetent cells and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is one of its receptors. Higher levels of HMGB1 have been

  3. High-mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end products contribute to lung injury during Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia

    Achouiti, Ahmed; van der Meer, Anne Jan; Florquin, Sandrine; Yang, Huan; Tracey, Kevin J.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F.; van der Poll, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus has emerged as an important cause of necrotizing pneumonia. Lung injury during S. aureus pneumonia may be enhanced by local release of damage associated molecular patterns such as high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In the current study we sought to determine the functional

  4. SiC Optically Modulated Field-Effect Transistor

    Tabib-Azar, Massood

    2009-01-01

    An optically modulated field-effect transistor (OFET) based on a silicon carbide junction field-effect transistor (JFET) is under study as, potentially, a prototype of devices that could be useful for detecting ultraviolet light. The SiC OFET is an experimental device that is one of several devices, including commercial and experimental photodiodes, that were initially evaluated as detectors of ultraviolet light from combustion and that could be incorporated into SiC integrated circuits to be designed to function as combustion sensors. The ultraviolet-detection sensitivity of the photodiodes was found to be less than desired, such that it would be necessary to process their outputs using high-gain amplification circuitry. On the other hand, in principle, the function of the OFET could be characterized as a combination of detection and amplification. In effect, its sensitivity could be considerably greater than that of a photodiode, such that the need for amplification external to the photodetector could be reduced or eliminated. The experimental SiC OFET was made by processes similar to JFET-fabrication processes developed at Glenn Research Center. The gate of the OFET is very long, wide, and thin, relative to the gates of typical prior SiC JFETs. Unlike in prior SiC FETs, the gate is almost completely transparent to near-ultraviolet and visible light. More specifically: The OFET includes a p+ gate layer less than 1/4 m thick, through which photons can be transported efficiently to the p+/p body interface. The gate is relatively long and wide (about 0.5 by 0.5 mm), such that holes generated at the body interface form a depletion layer that modulates the conductivity of the channel between the drain and the source. The exact physical mechanism of modulation of conductivity is a subject of continuing research. It is known that injection of minority charge carriers (in this case, holes) at the interface exerts a strong effect on the channel, resulting in amplification

  5. Tunnel field-effect transistor with two gated intrinsic regions

    Y. Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose and validate (using simulations a novel design of silicon tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET, based on a reverse-biased p+-p-n-n+ structure. 2D device simulation results show that our devices have significant improvements of switching performance compared with more conventional devices based on p-i-n structure. With independent gate voltages applied to two gated intrinsic regions, band-to-band tunneling (BTBT could take place at the p-n junction, and no abrupt degenerate doping profile is required. We developed single-side-gate (SSG structure and double-side-gate (DSG structure. SSG devices with HfO2 gate dielectric have a point subthreshold swing of 9.58 mV/decade, while DSG devices with polysilicon gate electrode material and HfO2 gate dielectric have a point subthreshold swing of 16.39 mV/decade. These DSG devices have ON-current of 0.255 μA/μm, while that is lower for SSG devices. Having two nano-scale independent gates will be quite challenging to realize with good uniformity across the wafer and the improved behavior of our TFET makes it a promising steep-slope switch candidate for further investigations.

  6. Graphene field-effect transistor application for flow sensing

    Łuszczek Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microflow sensors offer great potential for applications in microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip systems. However, thermal-based sensors, which are commonly used in modern flow sensing technology, are mainly made of materials with positive temperature coefficients (PTC and suffer from a self-heating effect and slow response time. Therefore, the design of novel devices and careful selection of materials are required to improve the overall flow sensor performance. In this work we propose graphene field-effect transistor (GFET to be used as microflow sensor. Temperature distribution in graphene channel was simulated and the analysis of heat convection was performed to establish the relation between the fluidic flow velocity and the temperature gradient. It was shown that the negative temperature coefficient (NTC of graphene could enable the self-protection of the device and should minimize sensing error from currentinduced heating. It was also argued that the planar design of the GFET sensor makes it suitable for the real application due to supposed mechanical stability of such a construction.

  7. Fin field effect transistor directionality impacts printing of implantation shapes

    Wang, Xiren; Granik, Yuri

    2018-01-01

    In modern integrated circuit (IC) fabrication processes, the photoresist receives considerable illumination energy that is reflected by underlying topography during optical lithography of implantation layers. Bottom antireflective coating (BARC) is helpful to mitigate the reflection. Often, however, BARC is not used, because its removal is technically challenging, in addition to its relatively high economic cost. Furthermore, the advanced technology nodes, such as 14/10-nm nodes, have introduced fin field effect transistor (FinFET), which makes reflection from nonuniform silicon substrates exceptionally complicated. Therefore, modeling reflection from topography becomes obligatory to accurately predict printing of implantation shapes. Typically, FinFET is always fixed in one direction in realistic designs. However, the same implantation rectangle may be oriented in either horizontal or vertical direction. Then, there are two types of relations between the critical dimension (CD) and FinFET, namely a parallel-to and a perpendicular-to relation. We examine the fin directionality impact on CD. We found that this impact may be considerable in some cases. We use our in-house rigorous optical topography simulator to reveal underlining physical reasons. One of the major causes of the CD differences is that in the parallel orientation, the solid sidewalls of the fins conduct considerable light reflections unlike for the perpendicular orientation. This finding can aid the compact modeling in optical proximity correction of implantation masks.

  8. Cylindrical Field Effect Transistor: A Full Volume Inversion Device

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2010-12-01

    The increasing demand for high performance as well as low standby power devices has been the main reason for the aggressive scaling of conventional CMOS transistors. Current devices are at the 32nm technology node. However, due to physical limitations as well as increase in short-channel effects, leakage, power dissipation, this scaling trend cannot continue and will eventually hit a barrier. In order to overcome this, alternate device topologies have to be considered altogether. Extensive research on ultra thin body double gate FETs and gate all around nanowire FETs has shown a lot of promise. Under strong inversion, these devices have demonstrated increased performance over their bulk counterparts. This is mainly attributed to full carrier inversion in the body. However, these devices are still limited by lithographic and processing challenges making them unsuitable for commercial production. This thesis explores a unique device structure called the CFET (Cylindrical Field Effect Transistors) which also like the above, relies on complete inversion of carriers in the body/bulk. Using dual gates; an outer and an inner gate, full-volume inversion is possible with benefits such as enhanced drive currents, high Ion/Ioff ratios and reduced short channel effects.

  9. Graphene Channel Liquid Container Field Effect Transistor as ph Sensor

    Li, X.; Shi, J.; Pang, J.; Liu, W.; Wang, X.; Liu, H.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene channel liquid container field effect transistor ph sensor with interdigital micro trench for liquid ion testing is presented. Growth morphology and ph sensing property of continuous few-layer graphene (FLG) and quasi-continuous monolayer graphene (MG) channels are compared. The experiment results show that the source-to-drain current of the graphene channel FET has a significant and fast response after adsorption of the measured molecule and ion at the room temperature; at the same time, the FLG response time is less than 4 s. The resolution of MG (0.01) on ph value is one order of magnitude higher than that of FLG (0.1). The reason is that with fewer defects, the MG is more likely to adsorb measured molecule and ion, and the molecules and ions can make the transport property change. The output sensitivities of MG are from 34.5% to 57.4% when the ph value is between 7 and 8, while sensitivity of FLG is 4.75% when the Ph=6. The sensor fabrication combines traditional silicon technique and flexible electronic technology and provides an easy way to develop graphene-based electrolyte gas sensor or even biological sensors.

  10. Field emission current from a junction field-effect transistor

    Monshipouri, Mahta; Abdi, Yaser, E-mail: y.abdi@ut.ac.ir [University of Tehran, Nano-Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Fabrication of a titanium dioxide/carbon nanotube (TiO{sub 2}/CNT)-based transistor is reported. The transistor can be considered as a combination of a field emission transistor and a junction field-effect transistor. Using direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC-PECVD) technique, CNTs were grown on a p-typed (100)-oriented silicon substrate. The CNTs were then covered by TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles 2–5 nm in size, using an atmospheric pressure CVD technique. In this device, TiO{sub 2}/CNT junction is responsible for controlling the emission current. High on/off-current ratio and proper gate control are the most important advantages of device. A model based on Fowler–Nordheim equation is utilized for calculation of the emission current and the results are compared with experimental data. The effect of TiO{sub 2}/CNT hetero-structure is also investigated, and well modeled.

  11. RNA Detection Based on Graphene Field-Effect Transistor Biosensor

    Meng Tian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene has attracted much attention in biosensing applications due to its unique properties. In this paper, the monolayer graphene was grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD method. Using the graphene as the electric channel, we have fabricated a graphene field-effect transistor (G-FET biosensor that can be used for label-free detection of RNA. Compared with conventional method, the G-FET RNA biosensor can be run in low cost, be time-saving, and be miniaturized for RNA measurement. The sensors show high performance and achieve the RNA detection sensitivity as low as 0.1 fM, which is two orders of magnitude lower than the previously reports. Moreover, the G-FET biosensor can readily distinguish target RNA from noncomplementary RNA, showing high selectivity for RNA detection. The developed G-FET RNA biosensor with high sensitivity, fast analysis speed, and simple operation may provide a new feasible direction for RNA research and biosensing.

  12. Ballistic Spin Field Effect Transistor Based on Silicon Nanowires

    Osintsev, Dmitri; Sverdlov, Viktor; Stanojevic, Zlatan; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the properties of ballistic spin field-effect transistors build on silicon nanowires. An accurate description of the conduction band based on the k . p} model is necessary in thin and narrow silicon nanostructures. The subband effective mass and subband splitting dependence on the nanowire dimensions is analyzed and used in the transport calculations. The spin transistor is formed by sandwiching the nanowire between two ferromagnetic metallic contacts. Delta-function barriers at the interfaces between the contacts and the silicon channel are introduced. The major contribution to the electric field-dependent spin-orbit interaction in confined silicon systems is due to the interface-induced inversion asymmetry which is of the Dresselhaus type. We study the current and conductance through the system for the contacts being in parallel and anti-parallel configurations. Differences between the [100] and [110] orientated structures are investigated in details. This work is supported by the European Research Council through the grant #247056 MOSILSPIN.

  13. Silicon junctionless field effect transistors as room temperature terahertz detectors

    Marczewski, J., E-mail: jmarcz@ite.waw.pl; Tomaszewski, D.; Zaborowski, M. [Institute of Electron Technology, al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Knap, W. [Institute of High Pressure Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); Laboratory Charles Coulomb, Montpellier University & CNRS, Place E. Bataillon, Montpellier 34095 (France); Zagrajek, P. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-09-14

    Terahertz (THz) radiation detection by junctionless metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (JL MOSFETs) was studied and compared with THz detection using conventional MOSFETs. It has been shown that in contrast to the behavior of standard transistors, the junctionless devices have a significant responsivity also in the open channel (low resistance) state. The responsivity for a photolithographically defined JL FET was 70 V/W and the noise equivalent power 460 pW/√Hz. Working in the open channel state may be advantageous for THz wireless and imaging applications because of its low thermal noise and possible high operating speed or large bandwidth. It has been proven that the junctionless MOSFETs can also operate in a zero gate bias mode, which enables simplification of the THz array circuitry. Existing models of THz detection by MOSFETs were considered and it has been demonstrated that the process of detection by these junctionless devices cannot be explained within the framework of the commonly accepted models and therefore requires a new theoretical approach.

  14. Ultrashort Channel Length Black Phosphorus Field-Effect Transistors.

    Miao, Jinshui; Zhang, Suoming; Cai, Le; Scherr, Martin; Wang, Chuan

    2015-09-22

    This paper reports high-performance top-gated black phosphorus (BP) field-effect transistors with channel lengths down to 20 nm fabricated using a facile angle evaporation process. By controlling the evaporation angle, the channel length of the transistors can be reproducibly controlled to be anywhere between 20 and 70 nm. The as-fabricated 20 nm top-gated BP transistors exhibit respectable on-state current (174 μA/μm) and transconductance (70 μS/μm) at a VDS of 0.1 V. Due to the use of two-dimensional BP as the channel material, the transistors exhibit relatively small short channel effects, preserving a decent on-off current ratio of 10(2) even at an extremely small channel length of 20 nm. Additionally, unlike the unencapsulated BP devices, which are known to be chemically unstable in ambient conditions, the top-gated BP transistors passivated by the Al2O3 gate dielectric layer remain stable without noticeable degradation in device performance after being stored in ambient conditions for more than 1 week. This work demonstrates the great promise of atomically thin BP for applications in ultimately scaled transistors.

  15. Balanced Ambipolar Organic Field-Effect Transistors by Polymer Preaggregation.

    Janasz, Lukasz; Luczak, Adam; Marszalek, Tomasz; Dupont, Bertrand G R; Jung, Jaroslaw; Ulanski, Jacek; Pisula, Wojciech

    2017-06-21

    Ambipolar organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on heterojunction active films still suffer from an imbalance in the transport of electrons and holes. This problem is related to an uncontrolled phase separation between the donor and acceptor organic semiconductors in the thin films. In this work, we have developed a concept to improve the phase separation in heterojunction transistors to enhance their ambipolar performance. This concept is based on preaggregation of the donor polymer, in this case poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), before solution mixing with the small-molecular-weight acceptor, phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The resulting heterojunction transistor morphology consists of self-assembled P3HT fibers embedded in a PCBM matrix, ensuring balanced mobilities reaching 0.01 cm 2 /V s for both holes and electrons. These are the highest mobility values reported so far for ambipolar OFETs based on P3HT/PCBM blends. Preaggregation of the conjugated polymer before fabricating binary blends can be regarded as a general concept for a wider range of semiconducting systems applicable in organic electronic devices.

  16. Electromechanical field effect transistors based on multilayer phosphorene nanoribbons

    Jiang, Z.T., E-mail: jiangzhaotan@hotmail.com; Lv, Z.T.; Zhang, X.D.

    2017-06-21

    Based on the tight-binding Hamiltonian approach, we demonstrate that the electromechanical field effect transistors (FETs) can be realized by using the multilayer phosphorene nanoribbons (PNRs). The synergistic combination of the electric field and the external strains can establish the on–off switching since the electric field can shift or split the energy band, and the mechanical strains can widen or narrow the band widths. This kind of multilayer PNR FETs, much solider than the monolayer PNR one and more easily biased by different electric fields, has more transport channels consequently leading to the higher on–off current ratio or the higher sensitivity to the electric fields. Meanwhile, the strain-induced band-flattening will be beneficial for improving the flexibility in designing the electromechanical FETs. In addition, such electromechanical FETs can act as strain-controlled FETs or mechanical detectors for detecting the strains, indicating their potential applications in nano- and micro-electromechanical fields. - Highlights: • Electromechanical transistors are designed with multilayer phosphorene nanoribbons. • Electromechanical synergistic effect can establish the on–off switching more flexibly. • Multilayer transistors, solider and more easily biased, has more transport channels. • Electromechanical transistors can act as strain-controlled transistors or mechanical detectors.

  17. STRONG FIELD EFFECTS ON PULSAR ARRIVAL TIMES: GENERAL ORIENTATIONS

    Wang Yan; Creighton, Teviet; Price, Richard H.; Jenet, Frederick A.

    2009-01-01

    A pulsar beam passing close to a black hole can provide a probe of very strong gravitational fields even if the pulsar itself is not in a strong field region. In the case that the spin of the hole can be ignored, we have previously shown that all strong field effects on the beam can be understood in terms of two 'universal' functions: F(φ in ) and T(φ in ) of the angle of beam emission φ in ; these functions are universal in that they depend only on a single parameter, the pulsar/black hole distance from which the beam is emitted. Here we apply this formalism to general pulsar-hole-observer geometries, with arbitrary alignment of the pulsar spin axis and arbitrary pulsar beam direction and angular width. We show that the analysis of the observational problem has two distinct elements: (1) the computation of the location and trajectory of an observer-dependent 'keyhole' direction of emission in which a signal can be received by the observer; and (2) the determination of an annulus that represents the set of directions containing beam energy. Examples of each are given along with an example of a specific observational scenario.

  18. The Role of Serum High Mobility Group Box 1 and Interleukin-6 Levels in Acute Pancreatitis: A Meta-Analysis.

    Li, Nuo; Wang, Bao-Ming; Cai, Shuang; Liu, Peng-Liang

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to comprehensively investigate the correlation between high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in relation to acute pancreatitis. A highly regulated exploration of various electronic databases, supplemented by manual searching methods, was performed in an attempt to identify pertinent articles of a useful nature. Subsequently, high-quality cohort studies that were deemed to comply with the arduous inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected for our meta-analysis. The extensive data analyses reported in our meta-analysis were conducted in connection with the Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2.0 (CMA 2.0). A total of 395 studies (135 Chinese studies and 260 English studies) were initially retrieved. 27 of those studies were selected for our meta-analysis, comprising of 896 cases of mild acute pancreatitis (MAP), 700 cases of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) as well as 312 healthy controls. Pooled data suggested that serum HMGB1 and IL-6 levels of SAP and MAP patients were higher than in healthy controls. Moreover, serum HMGB1 and IL-6 levels of SAP patients exhibited significantly higher levels than in that of MAP patients. Based on the rigorous investigation of our meta-analysis, it was concluded that serum HMGB1 and IL-6 levels might be used as effective indicators for pancreatic lesions as well as the degree of inflammatory response, owing ultimately to the observations and data analyses, suggesting that serum HMGB1 and IL-6 levels share a close correlation with the severity of pancreatitis. J. Cell. Biochem. 119: 616-624, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. High mobility group box-1 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C zeta and secreted in colon cancer cells

    Lee, Hanna; Park, Minhee; Shin, Nara; Kim, Gamin [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Gi [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jeon-Soo [Department of Microbiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hoguen, E-mail: hkyonsei@yuhs.ac [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemoon-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific enzyme for HMGB1 phosphorylation and its secretion is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of PKC-{zeta} leads to significant reduction of the secreted HMGB1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation of specific site of HMGB1 redirects its secretion in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of PKC-{zeta} in cancers explains the enhanced HMGB1 secretion. -- Abstract: High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, is overexpressed and secreted in cancer cells. Phosphorylation on two different nuclear localization signal regions are known to be important for the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic transport and secretion of HMGB1. However, little is known about the biochemical mechanism of HMGB1 modifications and its subsequent secretion from cancer cells. To identify the specific enzyme and important sites for HMGB1 phosphorylation, we screened the protein kinase C (PKC) family in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116) for HMGB1 binding by pull-down experiments using a 3XFLAG-HMGB1 construct. Strong interactions between atypical PKCs (PKC-{zeta}, {lambda}, and {iota}) and cytoplasmic HMGB1 were observed in HCT116 cells. We further identified the most critical PKC isotype that regulates HMGB1 secretion is PKC-{zeta} by using PKC inhibitors and siRNA experiments. The serine residues at S39, S53 and S181 of HMGB1 were related to enhancing HMGB1 secretion. We also demonstrated overexpression and activation of PKC-{zeta} in colon cancer tissues. Our findings suggest that PKC-{zeta} is involved in the phosphorylation of HMGB1, and the phosphorylation of specific serine residues in the nuclear localization signal regions is related to enhanced HMGB1 secretion in colon cancer cells.

  20. Urinary levels of high mobility group box-1 are associated with disease activity in antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis.

    Tian-Tian Ma

    Full Text Available High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1, a kind of pro-inflammatory mediator, is associated with inflammatory conditions and tissue damage. Our previous study demonstrated that the circulating levels of HMGB1 correlated with disease activity of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV. In the current study, we aimed to measure urinary levels of HMGB1 in AAV patients, correlated them to clinical activity index and analysed the immunohistochemical HMGB1 staining in kidney specimens.50 patients with AAV in active stage and 56 patients with AAV in remission were recruited. The urinary levels of HMGB1 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, renal biopsy specimens from 27 patients with active AAV were randomly collected to evaluate the deposition of HMGB1.Urinary HMGB1 levels in AAV patients in active stage were significantly higher than those in AAV patients in remission and healthy controls (1.46 [0.56-3.43] versus 0.38 [0.10-1.35] mg/μmolCr, P=0.001; 1.46 [0.56-3.43] versus 0.48 [0.40-0.60] mg/μmolCr, P=0.000, respectively. Further analysis found that urinary levels of HMGB1 correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r=0.354, p=0.012, C-reactive protein (r=0.289, p=0.042, and Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (r=0.350, p=0.013. Renal tissue of active AAV patients showed HMGB1 was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm and the extracellular space. The percentage of HMGB1-negative nuclei in renal tissue of patients with active AAV was significantly higher than that in normal controls (60.6±20.2 % versus 2.7±0.6 %, p<0.01.Urinary levels of HMGB1 may be associated with the disease activity in AAV patients.

  1. Role of high mobility group box-1 and protection of growth hormone and somatostatin in severe acute pancreatitis

    Wang, Y.F. [Department of Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Wu, M. [Department of Surgery, Jinshan Pavilion Forest Hospital, Shanghai (China); Ma, B.J.; Cai, D.A.; Yin, B.B. [Department of Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-09-12

    In this study, we investigated the potential role of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the effects of growth hormone (G) and somatostatin (S) in SAP rats. The rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 each: sham-operated, SAP, SAP+saline, SAP+G, SAP+S and SAP+G+S. Ileum and pancreas tissues of rats in each group were evaluated histologically. HMGB1 mRNA expression was measured by reverse transcription-PCR. Levels of circulating TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were also measured. In the SAP group, interstitial congestion and edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and interstitial hemorrhage occurred in ileum and pancreas tissues. The levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and endotoxin were significantly up-regulated in the SAP group compared with those in the sham-operated group, and the 7-day survival rate was 0%. In the SAP+G and SAP+S groups, the inflammatory response of the morphological structures was alleviated, the levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were significantly decreased compared with those in the SAP group, and the survival rate was increased. Moreover, in the SAP+G+S group, all histological scores were significantly improved and the survival rate was significantly higher compared with the SAP group. In conclusion, HMGB1 might participate in pancreas and ileum injury in SAP. Growth hormone and somatostatin might play a therapeutic role in the inflammatory response of SAP.

  2. Role of high mobility group box-1 and protection of growth hormone and somatostatin in severe acute pancreatitis

    Wang, Y.F.; Wu, M.; Ma, B.J.; Cai, D.A.; Yin, B.B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential role of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the effects of growth hormone (G) and somatostatin (S) in SAP rats. The rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 each: sham-operated, SAP, SAP+saline, SAP+G, SAP+S and SAP+G+S. Ileum and pancreas tissues of rats in each group were evaluated histologically. HMGB1 mRNA expression was measured by reverse transcription-PCR. Levels of circulating TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were also measured. In the SAP group, interstitial congestion and edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and interstitial hemorrhage occurred in ileum and pancreas tissues. The levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and endotoxin were significantly up-regulated in the SAP group compared with those in the sham-operated group, and the 7-day survival rate was 0%. In the SAP+G and SAP+S groups, the inflammatory response of the morphological structures was alleviated, the levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were significantly decreased compared with those in the SAP group, and the survival rate was increased. Moreover, in the SAP+G+S group, all histological scores were significantly improved and the survival rate was significantly higher compared with the SAP group. In conclusion, HMGB1 might participate in pancreas and ileum injury in SAP. Growth hormone and somatostatin might play a therapeutic role in the inflammatory response of SAP

  3. Human-induced changes in landscape configuration influence individual movement routines: lessons from a versatile, highly mobile species.

    Carlos Camacho

    Full Text Available Landscape conversion by humans may have detrimental effects on animal populations inhabiting managed ecosystems, but human-altered areas may also provide suitable environments for tolerant species. We investigated the spatial ecology of a highly mobile nocturnal avian species-the red-necked nightjar (Caprimulgus ruficollis-in two contrastingly managed areas in Southwestern Spain to provide management recommendations for species having multiple habitat requirements. Based on habitat use by radiotagged nightjars, we created maps of functional heterogeneity in both areas so that the movements of breeding individuals could be modeled using least-cost path analyses. In both the natural and the managed area, nightjars used remnants of native shrublands as nesting sites, while pinewood patches (either newly planted or natural mature and roads were selected as roosting and foraging habitats, respectively. Although the fraction of functional habitat was held relatively constant (60.9% vs. 74.1% in the natural and the managed area, respectively, landscape configuration changed noticeably. As a result, least-cost routes (summed linear distances from nest locations to the nearest roost and foraging sites were three times larger in the natural than in the managed area (mean ± SE: 1356±76 m vs. 439±32 m. It seems likely that the increased proximity of functional habitats in the managed area relative to the natural one is underlying the significantly higher abundances of nightjars observed therein, where breeders should travel shorter distances to link together essential resources, thus likely reducing their energy expenditure and mortality risks. Our results suggest that landscape configuration, but not habitat availability, is responsible for the observed differences between the natural and the managed area in the abundance and movements of breeding nightjars, although no effect on body condition was detected. Agricultural landscapes could be moderately

  4. [Changing laws of serum high mobility group box 1 protein in septic rats and the intervention effect of xuebijing].

    Zhao, Shi-bing; He, Xian-di; Wang, Hua-xue; Zheng, Sheng-yong; Deng, Xi-ming; Duan, Li-bin

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the changing laws of serum high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) in septic rats and intervention effect of Xuebijing on it. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg/kg BW) was intravenously injected into the tail vein of healthy male Wistar rats to prepare the sepsis rat model. In Experiment 1: 50 Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups, i.e., the normal group (A, n=10); the LPS model group (B, n=10), the LPS +Xuebijing treatment group (C, n=30). Rats in the C group were further divided into three subgroups, i.e., 2 h before LPS injection (group C1), 2 h after LPS injection (group C2), and 8 h after LPS injection (group C3), 10 in each group. Blood samples were collected from the caudal vein to detect serum HMGB1 levels by Western blot at 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after LPS injection. Experiment 2: 30 Wistar rats were equally divided into the LPS model group (D) and the LPS + Xuebijing treatment group (E), 15 in each group. They were treated as rats in the B group and the C1 group respectively. Five rats were sacrificed at 12, 24, and 48 h after LPS injection in the two groups. Blood as well as the tissue samples were harvested to measure such indices as ALT, AST, Cr, and BUN, as well as pathological changes of liver, lung, and kidney. (1) Compared with the A group, serum HMGB1 levels were higher at various time points in the B group (P decrement in the C3 group was less than that in the C1 and C2 groups (P multiple organ dysfunction. Xuebijing could reduce the serum levels of HMGB1, improve biochemical parameters, and attenuate severe inflammatory response of liver, lung, and kidney tissues in septic rats. Besides, the earlier use, the better effect obtained.

  5. Extracellular high-mobility group box 1 mediates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Ying; Yu, Peng; Tong, Rui; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Shuning; Yao, Kang; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation plays a key role in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, but the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which is increased in myocardium under pressure overload, may be involved in pressure overload-induced cardiac injury. The objectives of this study are to determine the role of HMGB1 in cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction under pressure overload. Pressure overload was imposed on the heart of male wild-type mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC), while recombinant HMGB1, HMGB1 box A (a competitive antagonist of HMGB1) or PBS was injected into the LV wall. Moreover, cardiac myocytes were cultured and given sustained mechanical stress. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed after the operation and sections for histological analyses were generated from paraffin-embedded hearts. Relevant proteins and genes were detected. Cardiac HMGB1 expression was increased after TAC, which was accompanied by its translocation from nucleus to both cytoplasm and intercellular space. Exogenous HMGB1 aggravated TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction, as demonstrated by echocardiographic analyses, histological analyses and foetal cardiac genes detection. Nevertheless, the aforementioned pathological change induced by TAC could partially be reversed by HMGB1 inhibition. Consistent with the in vivo observations, mechanical stress evoked the release and synthesis of HMGB1 in cultured cardiac myocytes. This study indicates that the activated and up-regulated HMGB1 in myocardium, which might partially be derived from cardiac myocytes under pressure overload, may be of crucial importance in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  6. Involvement of high mobility group box 1 in the development and maintenance of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Nishida, Takeshi; Tsubota, Maho; Kawaishi, Yudai; Yamanishi, Hiroki; Kamitani, Natsuki; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Liu, Keyue; Nishibori, Masahiro; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-01-01

    Given that high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, once released to the extracellular space, promotes nociception, we asked if inactivation of HMGB1 prevents or reverses chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy in rats and also examined possible involvement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the receptor for advanced glycation endproduct (RAGE), known as targets for HMGB1. Painful neuropathy was produced by repeated i.p. administration of paclitaxel or vincristine in rats. Nociceptive threshold was determined by the paw pressure method and/or von Frey test in the hindpaw. Tissue protein levels were determined by immunoblotting. Repeated i.p. administration of the anti-HMGB1-neutralizing antibody or recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rhsTM), known to inactivate HMGB1, prevented the development of hyperalgesia and/or allodynia induced by paclitaxel or vincristine in rats. A single i.p. or intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of the antibody or rhsTM reversed the chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A single i.pl. administration of a TLR4 antagonist or low molecular weight heparin, known to inhibit RAGE, attenuated the hyperalgesia caused by i.pl. HMGB1 and also the chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy. Paclitaxel or vincristine treatment significantly decreased protein levels of HMGB1 in the dorsal root ganglia, but not sciatic nerves. HMGB1 thus participates in both development and maintenance of chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy, in part through RAGE and TLR4. HMGB1 inactivation is considered useful to prevent and treat the chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy.

  7. Can Static Habitat Protection Encompass Critical Areas for Highly Mobile Marine Top Predators? Insights from Coastal East Africa.

    Sergi Pérez-Jorge

    Full Text Available Along the East African coast, marine top predators are facing an increasing number of anthropogenic threats which requires the implementation of effective and urgent conservation measures to protect essential habitats. Understanding the role that habitat features play on the marine top predator' distribution and abundance is a crucial step to evaluate the suitability of an existing Marine Protected Area (MPA, originally designated for the protection of coral reefs. We developed species distribution models (SDM on the IUCN data deficient Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus in southern Kenya. We followed a comprehensive ecological modelling approach to study the environmental factors influencing the occurrence and abundance of dolphins while developing SDMs. Through the combination of ensemble prediction maps, we defined recurrent, occasional and unfavourable habitats for the species. Our results showed the influence of dynamic and static predictors on the dolphins' spatial ecology: dolphins may select shallow areas (5-30 m, close to the reefs (< 500 m and oceanic fronts (< 10 km and adjacent to the 100 m isobath (< 5 km. We also predicted a significantly higher occurrence and abundance of dolphins within the MPA. Recurrent and occasional habitats were identified on large percentages on the existing MPA (47% and 57% using presence-absence and abundance models respectively. However, the MPA does not adequately encompass all occasional and recurrent areas and within this context, we propose to extend the MPA to incorporate all of them which are likely key habitats for the highly mobile species. The results from this study provide two key conservation and management tools: (i an integrative habitat modelling approach to predict key marine habitats, and (ii the first study evaluating the effectiveness of an existing MPA for marine mammals in the Western Indian Ocean.

  8. High mobility group box-1 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C zeta and secreted in colon cancer cells

    Lee, Hanna; Park, Minhee; Shin, Nara; Kim, Gamin; Kim, Yun Gi; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Kim, Hoguen

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Specific enzyme for HMGB1 phosphorylation and its secretion is proposed. ► Inhibition of PKC-ζ leads to significant reduction of the secreted HMGB1. ► Phosphorylation of specific site of HMGB1 redirects its secretion in cancer cells. ► Activation of PKC-ζ in cancers explains the enhanced HMGB1 secretion. -- Abstract: High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, is overexpressed and secreted in cancer cells. Phosphorylation on two different nuclear localization signal regions are known to be important for the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic transport and secretion of HMGB1. However, little is known about the biochemical mechanism of HMGB1 modifications and its subsequent secretion from cancer cells. To identify the specific enzyme and important sites for HMGB1 phosphorylation, we screened the protein kinase C (PKC) family in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116) for HMGB1 binding by pull-down experiments using a 3XFLAG-HMGB1 construct. Strong interactions between atypical PKCs (PKC-ζ, λ, and ι) and cytoplasmic HMGB1 were observed in HCT116 cells. We further identified the most critical PKC isotype that regulates HMGB1 secretion is PKC-ζ by using PKC inhibitors and siRNA experiments. The serine residues at S39, S53 and S181 of HMGB1 were related to enhancing HMGB1 secretion. We also demonstrated overexpression and activation of PKC-ζ in colon cancer tissues. Our findings suggest that PKC-ζ is involved in the phosphorylation of HMGB1, and the phosphorylation of specific serine residues in the nuclear localization signal regions is related to enhanced HMGB1 secretion in colon cancer cells.

  9. Spinal high-mobility group box 1 contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of bone cancer pain

    Tong, Wei; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Ren, Ning; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Li, Yong-Qi

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying bone cancer-induced pain are largely unknown. Previous studies indicate that neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn is especially involved. Being first reported as a nonhistone chromosomal protein, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is now implicated as a mediator of inflammation. We hypothesized that HMGB1 could trigger the release of cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn and contribute to bone cancer pain. To test this hypothesis, we first built a bone cancer pain model induced by intratibal injection of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells. The structural damage to the tibia was monitored by radiological analysis. The mechanical allodynia was measured and the expression of spinal HMGB1 and IL-1β was evaluated. We observed that inoculation of cancer cells, but not heat-killed cells, induced progressive bone destruction from 9 d to 21 d post inoculation. Behavioral tests demonstrated that the significant nociceptive response in the cancer cells-injected rats emerged on day 9 and this kind of mechanical allodynia lasted at least 21 d following inoculation. Tumor cells inoculation significantly increased HMGB1 expression in the spinal dorsal horn, while intrathecal injecting a neutralizing antibody against HMGB1 showed an effective and reliable anti-allodynia effect with a dose-dependent manner. IL-1β was significantly increased in caner pain rats while intrathecally administration of anti-HMGB1 could decrease IL-1β. Together with previous reports, we predict that bone cancer induces HMGB1 production, enhancing spinal IL-1β expression and thus modulating spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and pain response.

  10. Naphthacenodithiophene Based Polymers-New Members of the Acenodithiophene Family Exhibiting High Mobility and Power Conversion Efficiency

    Knall, Astrid Caroline; Ashraf, Raja Shahid; Nikolka, Mark; Nielsen, Christian B.; Purushothaman, Balaji; Sadhanala, Aditya; Hurhangee, Michael; Broch, Katharina; Harkin, David J.; Nová k, Jiří ; Neophytou, Marios; Hayoz, Pascal; Sirringhaus, Henning; McCulloch, Iain

    2016-01-01

    Wide-bandgap conjugated polymers with a linear naphthacenodithiophene (NDT) donor unit are herein reported along with their performance in both transistor and solar cell devices. The monomer is synthesized starting from 2,6-dihydroxynaphthalene with a double Fries rearrangement as the key step. By copolymerization with 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BT) via a palladium-catalyzed Suzuki coupling reaction, NDT-BT co-polymers with high molecular weights and narrow polydispersities are afforded. These novel wide-bandgap polymers are evaluated as the semiconducting polymer in both organic field effect transistor and organic photovoltaic applications. The synthesized polymers reveal an optical bandgap in the range of 1.8 eV with an electron affinity of 3.6 eV which provides sufficient energy offset for electron transfer to PC70BM acceptors. In organic field effect transistors, the synthesized polymers demonstrate high hole mobilities of around 0.4 cm2 V–1 s–1. By using a blend of NDT-BT with PC70BM as absorber layer in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells, power conversion efficiencies of 7.5% are obtained. This value is among the highest obtained for polymers with a wider bandgap (larger than 1.7 eV), making this polymer also interesting for application in tandem or multijunction solar cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  11. Naphthacenodithiophene Based Polymers-New Members of the Acenodithiophene Family Exhibiting High Mobility and Power Conversion Efficiency

    Knall, Astrid Caroline

    2016-08-18

    Wide-bandgap conjugated polymers with a linear naphthacenodithiophene (NDT) donor unit are herein reported along with their performance in both transistor and solar cell devices. The monomer is synthesized starting from 2,6-dihydroxynaphthalene with a double Fries rearrangement as the key step. By copolymerization with 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BT) via a palladium-catalyzed Suzuki coupling reaction, NDT-BT co-polymers with high molecular weights and narrow polydispersities are afforded. These novel wide-bandgap polymers are evaluated as the semiconducting polymer in both organic field effect transistor and organic photovoltaic applications. The synthesized polymers reveal an optical bandgap in the range of 1.8 eV with an electron affinity of 3.6 eV which provides sufficient energy offset for electron transfer to PC70BM acceptors. In organic field effect transistors, the synthesized polymers demonstrate high hole mobilities of around 0.4 cm2 V–1 s–1. By using a blend of NDT-BT with PC70BM as absorber layer in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells, power conversion efficiencies of 7.5% are obtained. This value is among the highest obtained for polymers with a wider bandgap (larger than 1.7 eV), making this polymer also interesting for application in tandem or multijunction solar cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  12. Crystalline Organic Pigment-Based Field-Effect Transistors.

    Zhang, Haichang; Deng, Ruonan; Wang, Jing; Li, Xiang; Chen, Yu-Ming; Liu, Kewei; Taubert, Clinton J; Cheng, Stephen Z D; Zhu, Yu

    2017-07-05

    Three conjugated pigment molecules with fused hydrogen bonds, 3,7-diphenylpyrrolo[2,3-f]indole-2,6(1H,5H)-dione (BDP), (E)-6,6'-dibromo-[3,3'-biindolinylidene]-2,2'-dione (IIDG), and 3,6-di(thiophen-2-yl)-2,5-dihydropyrrolo-[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4-dione (TDPP), were studied in this work. The insoluble pigment molecules were functionalized with tert-butoxylcarbonyl (t-Boc) groups to form soluble pigment precursors (BDP-Boc, IIDG-Boc, and TDPP-Boc) with latent hydrogen bonding. The single crystals of soluble pigment precursors were obtained. Upon simple thermal annealing, the t-Boc groups were removed and the soluble pigment precursor molecules with latent hydrogen bonding were converted into the original pigment molecules with fused hydrogen bonding. Structural analysis indicated that the highly crystalline soluble precursors were directly converted into highly crystalline insoluble pigments, which are usually only achievable by gas-phase routes like physical vapor transport. The distinct crystal structure after the thermal annealing treatment suggests that fused hydrogen bonding is pivotal for the rearrangement of molecules to form a new crystal in solid state, which leads to over 2 orders of magnitude enhancement in charge mobility in organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. This work demonstrated that crystalline OFET devices with insoluble pigment molecules can be fabricated by their soluble precursors. The results indicated that a variety of commercially available conjugated pigments could be potential active materials for high-performance OFETs.

  13. Demonstration of high current carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors at industrially relevant voltages

    McCarthy, Mitchell

    The display market is presently dominated by the active matrix liquid crystal display (LCD). However, the active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) display is argued to become the successor to the LCD, and is already beginning its way into the market, mainly in small size displays. But, for AMOLED technology to become comparable in market share to LCD, larger size displays must become available at a competitive price with their LCD counterparts. A major issue preventing low-cost large AMOLED displays is the thin-film transistor (TFT) technology. Unlike the voltage driven LCD, the OLEDs in the AMOLED display are current driven. Because of this, the mature amorphous silicon TFT backplane technology used in the LCD must be upgraded to a material possessing a higher mobility. Polycrystalline silicon and transparent oxide TFT technologies are being considered to fill this need. But these technologies bring with them significant manufacturing complexity and cost concerns. Carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors (CN-VFETs) offer a unique solution to this problem (now known as the AMOLED backplane problem). The CN-VFET allows the use of organic semiconductors to be used for the semiconductor layer. Organics are known for their low-cost large area processing compatibility. Although the mobility of the best organics is only comparable to that of amorphous silicon, the CN-VFET makes up for this by orienting the channel vertically, as opposed to horizontally (like in conventional TFTs). This allows the CN-VFET to achieve sub-micron channel lengths without expensive high resolution patterning. Additionally, because the CN-VFET can be easily converted into a light emitting transistor (called the carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic light emitting transistor---CN-VOLET) by essentially stacking an OLED on top of the CN-VFET, more potential benefits can be realized. These potential benefits include, increased aperture ratio, increased OLED

  14. High mobility bottom gate InGaZnO thin film transistors with SiOx etch stopper

    Kim, Minkyu; Jeong, Jong Han; Lee, Hun Jung; Ahn, Tae Kyung; Shin, Hyun Soo; Park, Jin-Seong; Jeong, Jae Kyeong; Mo, Yeon-Gon; Kim, Hye Dong

    2007-05-01

    The authors report on the fabrication of thin film transistors (TFTs), which use an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) channel, by rf sputtering at room temperature and for which the channel length and width are patterned by photolithography and dry etching. To prevent plasma damage to the active channel, a 100-nm-thick SiOx layer deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was adopted as an etch stopper structure. The a-IGZO TFT (W /L=10μm/50μm) fabricated on glass exhibited a high field-effect mobility of 35.8cm2/Vs, a subthreshold gate swing value of 0.59V/decade, a thrseshold voltage of 5.9V, and an Ion/off ratio of 4.9×106, which is acceptable for use as the switching transistor of an active-matrix TFT backplane.

  15. High mobility bottom gate InGaZnO thin film transistors with SiOx etch stopper

    Kim, Minkyu; Jeong, Jong Han; Lee, Hun Jung; Ahn, Tae Kyung; Shin, Hyun Soo; Park, Jin-Seong; Jeong, Jae Kyeong; Mo, Yeon-Gon; Kim, Hye Dong

    2007-01-01

    The authors report on the fabrication of thin film transistors (TFTs), which use an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) channel, by rf sputtering at room temperature and for which the channel length and width are patterned by photolithography and dry etching. To prevent plasma damage to the active channel, a 100-nm-thick SiO x layer deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was adopted as an etch stopper structure. The a-IGZO TFT (W/L=10 μm/50 μm) fabricated on glass exhibited a high field-effect mobility of 35.8 cm 2 /V s, a subthreshold gate swing value of 0.59 V/decade, a thrseshold voltage of 5.9 V, and an I on/off ratio of 4.9x10 6 , which is acceptable for use as the switching transistor of an active-matrix TFT backplane

  16. Identification and characterization of the direct interaction between methotrexate (MTX and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein.

    Yuki Kuroiwa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methotrexate (MTX is an agent used in chemotherapy of tumors and autoimmune disease including rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In addition, MTX has some anti-inflammatory activity. Although dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR is a well-known target for the anti-tumor effect of MTX, the mode of action for the anti-inflammatory activity of MTX is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/RESULT: Here, we performed a screening of MTX-binding proteins using T7 phage display with a synthetic biotinylated MTX derivative. We then characterized the interactions using surface plasmon resonance (SPR analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. Using a T7 phage display screen, we identified T7 phages that displayed part of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein (K86-V175. Binding affinities as well as likely binding sites were characterized using genetically engineered truncated versions of HMGB1 protein (Al G1-K87, Bj: F88-K181, indicating that MTX binds to HMGB1 via two independent sites with a dissociation constants (KD of 0.50±0.03 µM for Al and 0.24 ± 0.01 µM for Bj. Although MTX did not inhibit the binding of HMGB1 to DNA via these domains, HMGB1/RAGE association was impeded in the presence of MTX. These data suggested that binding of MTX to part of the RAGE-binding region (K149-V175 in HMGB1 might be significant for the anti-inflammatory effect of MTX. Indeed, in murine macrophage-like cells (RAW 264.7, TNF-α release and mitogenic activity elicited by specific RAGE stimulation with a truncated monomeric HMGB1 were inhibited in the presence of MTX. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that HMGB1 is a direct binding protein of MTX. Moreover, binding of MTX to RAGE-binding region in HMGB1 inhibited the HMGB1/RAGE interaction at the molecular and cellular levels. These data might explain the molecular basis underlying the mechanism of action for the anti-inflammatory effect of MTX.

  17. Protective effect of Sestrin2 on apoptosis of dendritic cells induced by high mobility group box-1 protein

    Li-xue WANG

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the potential role of Sestrin2 (SESN2 in regulating the apoptosis of dendritic cells (DCs induced by high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1. Methods DCs (the murine DC cell line DC2.4 were cultured with or without HMGB1 stimulation (cultured with 10ng/ml HMGB1 for 8, 24 and 48 hours, or cultured with HMGB1 for 48 hours at different concentrations of 1, 10 and 100ng/ml, respectively, n=4. The protein level of SESN2, cleaved-caspase-3 and Bcl-2 were analyzed with Western blotting. Localization of SESN2 in cells was observed under confocal laser microscope (LSCM. Cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry. In addition, DC2.4 cells were transfected with lentivirus containing SESN2 LV-RNA, SESN2 siRNA sequence expressing plasmids or blank vector (NC, NS, n=4. These cells were then stimulated with HMGB1 (100ng/ml for 48 hours, and the apoptosis was accessed as mentioned above. Results Compared with the control group, the expression of SESN2 was obviously up-regulated after HMGB1 (10ng/ml stimulation for 24 and 48 hours (P<0.05. In a dose-dependent response, the expression of SESN2 was markedly enhanced in treatment with 1, 10, 100ng/ml HMGB1 for 48 hours (P<0.05. Compared with the control group (7.35%±1.33%, the percentage of apoptosis was significantly increased with 10, 100ng/ml HMGB1 for 48 hours [(17.02%±4.85%, 17.48%±4.04%, respectively, P<0.05 or P<0.01]. After transfection, compared with blank vector group, the apoptosis of SESN2 siRNA group obviously elevated [(65.96%±2.50% vs. (50.01%±2.07%, P<0.05], and cleaved-caspase-3 expression significantly increased while Bcl-2 expression obviously decreased. In SESN2 LV-RNA group, the apoptosis significantly decreased [(35.57%±1.69% vs. (49.04%±4.87%, P<0.05], and cleaved-caspase-3 expression decreased and Bcl-2 expression obviously increased compared with blank vector group (P<0.05. Conclusion SESN2 has a protective effect against HMGB1 induced apoptosis of DC2

  18. [Expression of high mobility group box-1 in the lung tissue and serum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Yang, Xiao-min; Yang, Hua

    2013-07-01

    To explore the expression of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in the lung tissue and serum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and to explore its relationship with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin(IL)-1β. Sixty samples of lung tissues were obtained from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who had underwent pneumonectomy in Department of Chest Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical College from June 2010 to December 2011. At the same period, 40 normal lung samples were also obtained from patients with pulmonary contusion and lung cancer by surgical resections as the control group. The mRNA expressions of HMGB1 was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the protein level of HMGB1 was measured by immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays in lung tissue. Blood samples were taken from 89 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (pulmonary tuberculosis group), including hematogenous disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis (type II) in 35 cases and secondary pulmonary tuberculosis (type III) in 54 cases, and 50 healthy volunteers (control group). Furthermore, the 54 patients with secondary pulmonary tuberculosis were divided into different subgroups according to cavity formation and the lung fields involved: patients without lung cavity (35 cases) vs those with lung cavity (19 cases), patients with involvement of pulmonary tuberculosis (69 ± 29) was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (22 ± 12) (t = 2.389, P pulmonary tuberculosis (786 ± 86) was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (202 ± 60) (t = 3.872, P pulmonary tuberculosis group were (5.0 ± 3.2) µg/L, (118 ± 77) ng/L and (33 ± 20) ng/L, respectively, which were significantly higher than those in the control group [(1.7 ± 1.0) µg/L, (40 ± 11) ng/L and (18 ± 12) ng/L, respectively], the respective t values being -0.928, 4.268 and 11.064, all P pulmonary tuberculosis, the serum concentration of HMGB

  19. Behaviour of Bichromatic Microwave Induced Magnetoresistance Oscillations in the High Mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron System

    Gunawardana, Binuka; Liu, Han-Chun; Samaraweera, Rasanga L.; Mani, R.G.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W

    2017-01-01

    Microwave radiation-induced magneto-resistance oscillations are examined under bichromatic excitation for various frequency combinations in order to obtain a better understanding of the lineshape observed in the dual excitation experiment of the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system. Here, we examine superposition- or lack thereof- in the lineshape observed in the bichromatic experiment, and report a trend observed between the monochromatic and bichromatic responses of the oscillatory diagonal resistance. (paper)

  20. Cell-Free DNA, High-Mobility Group Box-1, and Procalcitonin Concentrations in Dogs With Gastric Dilatation–Volvulus Syndrome

    Roberta Troia; Massimo Giunti; Stefano Calipa; Robert Goggs

    2018-01-01

    Canine gastric dilatation–volvulus (GDV) is a life-threatening disease characterized by extensive tissue ischemia, tissue hypoperfusion, and systemic inflammation. Biomarkers that better reflect the severity of gastric necrosis and systemic inflammation would aid clinicians in the management of these patients. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA), high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), and procalcitonin (PCT) in dogs with GDV. Concentrations of cfDN...

  1. Thermally Dried Ink-Jet Process for 6,13-Bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-Pentacene for High Mobility and High Uniformity on a Large Area Substrate

    Ryu, Gi Seong; Lee, Myung Won; Jeong, Seung Hyeon; Song, Chung Kun

    2012-05-01

    In this study we developed a simple ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), which is known as a high-mobility soluble organic semiconductor, to achieve relatively high-mobility and high-uniformity performance for large-area applications. We analyzed the behavior of fluorescent particles in droplets and applied the results to determining a method of controlling the behavior of TIPS-pentacene molecules. The grain morphology of TIPS-pentacene varied depending on the temperature applied to the droplets during drying. We were able to obtain large and uniform grains at 46 °C without any “coffee stain”. The process was applied to a large-size organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) backplane for an electrophoretic display panel containing 192×150 pixels on a 6-in.-sized substrate. The average of mobilities of 36 OTFTs, which were taken from different locations of the backplane, was 0.44±0.08 cm2·V-1·s-1, with a small deviation of 20%, over a 6-in.-size area comprising 28,800 OTFTs. This process providing high mobility and high uniformity can be achieved by simply maintaining the whole area of the substrate at a specific temperature (46 °C in this case) during drying of the droplets.

  2. Thermally dried ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene for high mobility and high uniformity on a large area substrate

    Ryu, Gi Seong; Lee, Myung Won; Jeong, Seung Hyeon; Song, Chung Kun

    2012-01-01

    In this study we developed a simple ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), which is known as a high-mobility soluble organic semiconductor, to achieve relatively high-mobility and high-uniformity performance for large-area applications. We analyzed the behavior of fluorescent particles in droplets and applied the results to determining a method of controlling the behavior of TIPS-pentacene molecules. The grain morphology of TIPS-pentacene varied depending on the temperature applied to the droplets during drying. We were able to obtain large and uniform grains at 46 degrees C without any "coffee stain". The process was applied to a large-size organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) backplane for an electrophoretic display panel containing 192 x 150 pixels on a 6-in.-sized substrate. The average of mobilities of 36 OTFTs, which were taken from different locations of the backplane, was 0.44 +/- 0.08 cm2.V-1.s-1, with a small deviation of 20%, over a 6-in.-size area comprising 28,800 OTFTs. This process providing high mobility and high uniformity can be achieved by simply maintaining the whole area of the substrate at a specific temperature (46 degrees C in this case) during drying of the droplets.

  3. Light Scattering Studies of Organic Field Effect Transistors

    Adil, Danish

    Organic semiconductors hold a great promise of enabling new technology based on low cost and flexible electronic devices. While much work has been done in the field of organic semiconductors, the field is still quite immature when compared to that of traditional inorganic based devices. More work is required before the full potential of organic field effect transistors (OFETs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is realized. Among such work, a further development of diagnostic tools that characterize charge transport and device robustness more efficiently is required. Charge transport in organic semiconductors is limited by the nature of the metal-semiconductor interfaces where charge is injected into the semiconductor film and the semiconductor-dielectric interface where the charge is accumulated and transported. This, combined with that fact that organic semiconductors are especially susceptible to having structural defects induced via oxidation, charge transport induced damage, and metallization results in a situation where a semiconductor film's ability to conduct charge can degrade over time. This degradation manifests itself in the electrical device characteristics of organic based electronic devices. OFETs, for example, may display changes in threshold voltage, lowering of charge carrier mobilities, or a decrease in the On/Off ratio. All these effects sum together to result in degradation in device performance. The work begins with a study where matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition (MAPLE), an alternative organic semiconductor thin film deposition method, is used to fabricate OFETs with improved semiconductor-dielectric interfaces. MAPLE allows for the controlled layer-by-layer growth of the semiconductor film. Devices fabricated using this technique are shown to exhibit desirable characteristics that are otherwise only achievable with additional surface treatments. MAPLE is shown to be viable alternative to other

  4. Research of the voltage and current stabilization processes by using the silicon field-effect transistor

    Karimov, A.V.; Yodgorova, D.M.; Kamanov, B.M.; Giyasova, F.A.; Yakudov, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    The silicon field-effect transistors were investigated to use in circuits for stabilization of current and voltage. As in gallium arsenide field-effect transistors, in silicon field-effect transistors with p-n-junction a new mechanism of saturation of the drain current is experimentally found out due to both transverse and longitudinal compression of channel by additional resistance between the source and the gate of the transistor. The criteria for evaluating the coefficients of stabilization of transient current suppressors and voltage stabilizator based on the field-effect transistor are considered. (authors)

  5. Serum High-Mobility-Group Box 1 as a Biomarker and a Therapeutic Target during Respiratory Virus Infections.

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge C G

    2018-03-13

    Host-derived "danger-associated molecular patterns" (DAMPs) contribute to innate immune responses and serve as markers of disease progression and severity for inflammatory and infectious diseases. There is accumulating evidence that generation of DAMPs such as oxidized phospholipids and high-mobility-group box 1 (HMGB1) during influenza virus infection leads to acute lung injury (ALI). Treatment of influenza virus-infected mice and cotton rats with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist Eritoran blocked DAMP accumulation and ameliorated influenza virus-induced ALI. However, changes in systemic HMGB1 kinetics during the course of influenza virus infection in animal models and humans have yet to establish an association of HMGB1 release with influenza virus infection. To this end, we used the cotton rat model that is permissive to nonadapted strains of influenza A and B viruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and human rhinoviruses (HRVs). Serum HMGB1 levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prior to infection until day 14 or 18 post-infection. Infection with either influenza A or B virus resulted in a robust increase in serum HMGB1 levels that decreased by days 14 to 18. Inoculation with the live attenuated vaccine FluMist resulted in HMGB1 levels that were significantly lower than those with infection with live influenza viruses. RSV and HRVs showed profiles of serum HMGB1 induction that were consistent with their replication and degree of lung pathology in cotton rats. We further showed that therapeutic treatment with Eritoran of cotton rats infected with influenza B virus significantly blunted serum HMGB1 levels and improved lung pathology, without inhibiting virus replication. These findings support the use of drugs that block HMGB1 to combat influenza virus-induced ALI. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus is a common infectious agent causing serious seasonal epidemics, and there is urgent need to develop an alternative treatment

  6. [Effects of exogenous high mobility group protein box 1 on angiogenesis in ischemic zone of early scald wounds of rats].

    Dai, L; Guo, X; Huang, H J; Liao, X M; Luo, X Q; Li, D; Zhou, H; Gao, X C; Tan, M Y

    2018-04-20

    Objective: To observe effects of exogenous high mobility group protein box 1 (HMGB1) on angiogenesis in ischemic zone of early scald wounds of rats. Methods: Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into HMGB1 group and simple scald (SS) group according to the random number table, with 18 rats in each group. Comb-like copper mould was placed on the back of rats for 20 s after being immersed in 100 ℃ hot water for 3 to 5 min to make three ischemic zones of wound. Immediately after scald, rats in HMGB1 group were subcutaneously injected with 0.4 μg HMGB1 and 0.1 mL phosphate buffer solution (PBS), and rats in SS group were subcutaneously injected with 0.1 mL PBS from boarders of ischemic zone of scald wound. At post scald hour (PSH) 24, 48, and 72, 6 rats in each group were collected. Protein expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in ischemic zone of wound at PSH 24, 48, and 72 and protein expressions of CD31 in ischemic zone of wound at PSH 48 and 72 were detected by immunohistochemistry. The number of microvessel in CD31 immunohistochemical sections of ischemic zone of wound at PSH 48 and 72 was calculated after observing by the microscope. The mRNA expressions of VEGF and CD31 in ischemic zone of wound were detected by real-time fluorescence quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction at PSH 24, 48, and 72. Data were processed with analysis of variance of factorial design, t test, and Bonferroni correction. Results: (1) At PSH 24, 48, and 72, protein expressions of VEGF in ischemic zone of wound of rats in HMGB1 group were significantly higher than those of rats in SS group ( t =7.496, 4.437, 5.402, P zone of wound of rats in HMGB1 group were 0.038 8±0.007 9 and 0.057 7±0.001 2 respectively, significantly higher than 0.013 4±0.004 9 and 0.030 3±0.004 0 of rats in SS group ( t =10.257, 15.055, P zone of wound of rats in HMGB1 group was obviously more than that of rats in SS group ( t =3.536, 4.000, P zone of wound of

  7. Investigation of high mobility pseudomorphic SiGe p-channels in Si MOSFETS at low and high electric fields

    Palmer, Martin John

    2001-01-01

    Silicon Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) for high speed, high current applications are rapidly approaching the physical and financial limits of the technology. This opens opportunities for the incorporation of materials with intrinsically better transport characteristics. An alloy of silicon and germanium is one such material that is gaining much recognition as the active component of MOSFETs and as the secondary structures (such as the gate electrode). This work examines a batch of buried channel Si 0.64 Ge 0.36 p-MOSFETs, with a minimum effective length of 0.35 μm, under different bias conditions and at different temperatures. High current and transconductance enhancements are apparent at long gate lengths. The carrier mobility is up to a factor of 2.5 times that of silicon at room temperature and 7.5 times at 4 K. A clear trend of decreasing peak mobility with decreasing silicon cap thickness is evident. Simulations show that scattering caused by the roughness of the SiO 2 /Si interface dominates, rather than alloy scattering or Si/SiGe roughness, even for a buried channel. This scattering increases with the proximity of the carriers to the interface. An increase of interface trap density with decreasing cap thickness, demonstrates that segregated germanium exists some distance into the cap and interferes with the oxidation process. This will increase scattering through increased SiO 2 /Si roughness and increased trapped charge. The short channel, high field results are comparable or slightly worse than those of silicon due to lower saturation drift velocity. However, fitting to a drift-diffusion model shows an apparent increase in saturation velocity for short channels, especially at low temperatures. This effect correlates with the low field mobility and is greater for devices containing SiGe. This is an indication of velocity overshoot, which may enhance the performance of SiGe MOSFETs at deep submicron gate lengths. (author)

  8. Gate-modulated conductance of few-layer WSe2 field-effect transistors in the subgap regime: Schottky barrier transistor and subgap impurity states

    Wang, Junjie; Feng, Simin; Rhodes, Daniel; Balicas, Luis; Nguyen, Minh An T.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Mallouk, Thomas E.; Terrones, Mauricio; Zhu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Two key subjects stand out in the pursuit of semiconductor research: material quality and contact technology. The fledging field of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) faces a number of challenges in both efforts. This work attempts to establish a connection between the two by examining the gate-dependent conductance of few-layer (1-5L) WSe 2 field effect devices. Measurements and modeling of the subgap regime reveal Schottky barrier transistor behavior. We show that transmission through the contact barrier is dominated by thermionic field emission (TFE) at room temperature, despite the lack of intentional doping. The TFE process arises due to a large number of subgap impurity states, the presence of which also leads to high mobility edge carrier densities. The density of states of such impurity states is self-consistently determined to be approximately 1–2 × 10 13 /cm 2 /eV in our devices. We demonstrate that substrate is unlikely to be a major source of the impurity states and suspect that lattice defects within the material itself are primarily responsible. Our experiments provide key information to advance the quality and understanding of TMDC materials and electrical devices

  9. Enhancement of carrier mobility in MoS{sub 2} field effect transistors by a SiO{sub 2} protective layer

    Shao, Peng-Zhi; Zhao, Hai-Ming; Cao, Hui-Wen; Wang, Xue-Feng; Pang, Yu; Li, Yu-Xing; Deng, Ning-Qin; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling, E-mail: RenTL@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: zhangsh@sz.tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics and Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology (TNList), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Jing [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Guang-Yu [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); CollaborativeInnovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Sheng, E-mail: RenTL@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: zhangsh@sz.tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics and Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology (TNList), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); The State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Shanghai 200050 (China); Advanced Sensor and Integrated System Lab, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2016-05-16

    Molybdenum disulfide is a promising channel material for field effect transistors (FETs). In this paper, monolayer MoS{sub 2} grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to fabricate top-gate FETs through standard optical lithography. During the fabrication process, charged impurities and interface states are introduced, and the photoresist is not removed cleanly, which both limit the carrier mobility and the source-drain current. We apply a SiO{sub 2} protective layer, which is deposited on the surface of MoS{sub 2}, in order to avoid the MoS{sub 2} directly contacting with the photoresist and the ambient environment. Therefore, the contact property between the MoS{sub 2} and the electrodes is improved, and the Coulomb scattering caused by the charged impurities and the interface states is reduced. Comparing MoS{sub 2} FETs with and without a SiO{sub 2} protective layer, the SiO{sub 2} protective layer is found to enhance the characteristics of the MoS{sub 2} FETs, including transfer and output characteristics. A high mobility of ∼42.3 cm{sup 2}/V s is achieved, which is very large among the top-gate CVD-grown monolayer MoS{sub 2} FETs.

  10. Gate-modulated conductance of few-layer WSe{sub 2} field-effect transistors in the subgap regime: Schottky barrier transistor and subgap impurity states

    Wang, Junjie; Feng, Simin [Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Rhodes, Daniel; Balicas, Luis [National High Magnetic Field Lab, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Nguyen, Minh An T. [Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Mallouk, Thomas E. [Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Terrones, Mauricio [Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Center for 2-Dimensional and Layered Materials, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Zhu, J., E-mail: jzhu@phys.psu.edu [Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Center for 2-Dimensional and Layered Materials, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2015-04-13

    Two key subjects stand out in the pursuit of semiconductor research: material quality and contact technology. The fledging field of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) faces a number of challenges in both efforts. This work attempts to establish a connection between the two by examining the gate-dependent conductance of few-layer (1-5L) WSe{sub 2} field effect devices. Measurements and modeling of the subgap regime reveal Schottky barrier transistor behavior. We show that transmission through the contact barrier is dominated by thermionic field emission (TFE) at room temperature, despite the lack of intentional doping. The TFE process arises due to a large number of subgap impurity states, the presence of which also leads to high mobility edge carrier densities. The density of states of such impurity states is self-consistently determined to be approximately 1–2 × 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2}/eV in our devices. We demonstrate that substrate is unlikely to be a major source of the impurity states and suspect that lattice defects within the material itself are primarily responsible. Our experiments provide key information to advance the quality and understanding of TMDC materials and electrical devices.

  11. Suppressed carrier density for the patterned high mobility two-dimensional electron gas at γ-Al2O3/SrTiO3 heterointerfaces

    Niu, Wei; Gan, Yulin; Christensen, Dennis Valbjørn

    2017-01-01

    The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the non-isostructural interface between spinel γ-Al2O3 and perovskite SrTiO3 is featured by a record electron mobility among complex oxide interfaces in addition to a high carrier density up to the order of 1015 cm-2. Herein, we report on the patterning...... is found to be approximately 3×1013 cm-2, much lower than that of the unpatterned sample (~1015 cm-2). Remarkably, a high electron mobility of approximately 3,600 cm2V-1s-1 was obtained at low temperatures for the patterned 2DEG at a carrier density of ~ 7×1012 cm-2, which exhibits clear Shubnikov-de Hass...... quantum oscillations. The patterned high-mobility 2DEG at the γ-Al2O3/SrTiO3 interface paves the way for the design and application of spinel/perovskite interfaces for high-mobility all-oxide electronic devic...

  12. Modeling of bias-induced changes of organic field-effect transistor characteristics

    Sharma, A.

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors offer exciting possibilities in developing new types of solar cells, photodetectors, light emitting diodes and field-effect transistors. Important advantages of organic semiconducting materials over their inorganic counterparts are their chemical tunability, their low weight,

  13. Low Temperature Noise and Electrical Characterization of the Company Heterojunction Field-Effect Transistor

    Cunningham, Thomas J.; Gee, Russell C.; Fossum, Eric R.; Baier, Steven M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the electrical properties of the complementary heterojunction field-effect transistor (CHFET) at 4K, including the gate leakage current, the subthreshold transconductance, and the input-referred noise voltage.

  14. Diazaisoindigo bithiophene and terthiophene copolymers for application in field-effect transistors and solar cells

    Yue, Wan; Li, Cheng; Tian, Xuelin; Li, Weiwei; Neophytou, Marios; Chen, Hu; Du, Weiyuan; Jellett, Cameron; Chen, Hung-Yang; Onwubiko, Ada; McCulloch, Iain

    2017-01-01

    Two donor–acceptor conjugated polymers with azaisoindigo as acceptor units and bithiophene and terthiophene as donor units have been synthesized by Stille polymerization. These two polymers have been successfully applied in field-effect transistors

  15. Modeling of pH Dependent Electrochemical Noise in Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors ISFET

    M. P. Das; M. Bhuyan

    2013-01-01

    pH ISFETs are very important sensor for in vivo continuous monitoring application of physiological and environmental system. The accuracy of Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor (ISFET) output measurement is greatly affected by the presences of noise, drift and slow response of the device. Although the noise analysis of ISFET so far performed in different literature relates only to sources originated from Field Effect Transistor (FET) structure which are almost constant for a particular devi...

  16. Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium-Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts

    2015-01-05

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0023 (NII) - Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium -Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts MATTHEW KANAN LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV...Effects on Rhodium -Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts Principal Investigator: Matthew W. Kanan Project Publications: 1. “An Electric Field–Induced Change...Stanford University Grant/Contract Title The full title of the funded effort. (NII)-Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium -Porphyrin and NHC-Gold

  17. Dual field effects in electrolyte-gated spinel ferrite: electrostatic carrier doping and redox reactions.

    Ichimura, Takashi; Fujiwara, Kohei; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-07-24

    Controlling the electronic properties of functional oxide materials via external electric fields has attracted increasing attention as a key technology for next-generation electronics. For transition-metal oxides with metallic carrier densities, the electric-field effect with ionic liquid electrolytes has been widely used because of the enormous carrier doping capabilities. The gate-induced redox reactions revealed by recent investigations have, however, highlighted the complex nature of the electric-field effect. Here, we use the gate-induced conductance modulation of spinel ZnxFe₃₋xO₄ to demonstrate the dual contributions of volatile and non-volatile field effects arising from electronic carrier doping and redox reactions. These two contributions are found to change in opposite senses depending on the Zn content x; virtual electronic and chemical field effects are observed at appropriate Zn compositions. The tuning of field-effect characteristics via composition engineering should be extremely useful for fabricating high-performance oxide field-effect devices.

  18. Electrochemical processes and mechanistic aspects of field-effect sensors for biomolecules

    Huang, Weiguo; Diallo, Abdou Karim; Dailey, Jennifer L.; Besar, Kalpana

    2017-01-01

    Electronic biosensing is a leading technology for determining concentrations of biomolecules. In some cases, the presence of an analyte molecule induces a measured change in current flow, while in other cases, a new potential difference is established. In the particular case of a field effect biosensor, the potential difference is monitored as a change in conductance elsewhere in the device, such as across a film of an underlying semiconductor. Often, the mechanisms that lead to these responses are not specifically determined. Because improved understanding of these mechanisms will lead to improved performance, it is important to highlight those studies where various mechanistic possibilities are investigated. This review explores a range of possible mechanistic contributions to field-effect biosensor signals. First, we define the field-effect biosensor and the chemical interactions that lead to the field effect, followed by a section on theoretical and mechanistic background. We then discuss materials used in field-effect biosensors and approaches to improving signals from field-effect biosensors. We specifically cover the biomolecule interactions that produce local electric fields, structures and processes at interfaces between bioanalyte solutions and electronic materials, semiconductors used in biochemical sensors, dielectric layers used in top-gated sensors, and mechanisms for converting the surface voltage change to higher signal/noise outputs in circuits. PMID:29238595

  19. Probing the localization of charge and the extent of disorder through electronic transport on Au nanoparticle–copper phthalocyanine multijunction networks

    Balliou, A.; Kazim, Samrana; Pfleger, Jiří; Rakušan, J.; Skoulatakis, G.; Kennou, S.; Glezos, N.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 253, č. 5 (2016), s. 1009-1019 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12GR022; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1143 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : Au nanoparticles * carrier localization * electrical transport Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.674, year: 2016

  20. Quantum corrections to conductivity observed at intermediate magnetic fields in a high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2-dimensional electron gas

    Taboryski, R.; Veje, E.; Lindelof, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetoresistance with the field perpendicular to the 2-dimensional electron gas in a high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure at low temperatures is studied. At the lowest magnetic field we observe the weak localization. At magnetic fields, where the product of the mobility and the magnetic field is of the order of unity, the quantum correction to conductivity due to the electron-electron interaction is as a source of magnetoresistance. A consistent analysis of experiments in this regime is for the first time performed. In addition to the well known electron-electron term with the expected temperature dependence, we find a new type of temperature independent quantum correction, which varies logarithmically with mobility. (orig.)

  1. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive flexible metal substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Dutta, P.; Rathi, M.; Gao, Y.; Yao, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.; Zheng, N.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Martinez, J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate heteroepitaxial growth of single-crystalline-like n and p-type doped GaAs thin films on inexpensive, flexible, and light-weight metal foils by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Single-crystalline-like Ge thin film on biaxially textured templates made by ion beam assisted deposition on metal foil served as the epitaxy enabling substrate for GaAs growth. The GaAs films exhibited strong (004) preferred orientation, sharp in-plane texture, low grain misorientation, strong photoluminescence, and a defect density of ∼10 7  cm −2 . Furthermore, the GaAs films exhibited hole and electron mobilities as high as 66 and 300 cm 2 /V-s, respectively. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive metal substrates can pave the path for roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible III-V solar cells for the mainstream photovoltaics market.

  2. High mobility and low operating voltage ZnGaO and ZnGaLiO transistors with spin-coated Al2O3 as gate dielectric

    Xia, D X; Xu, J B

    2010-01-01

    Spin-coated alumina serving as a gate dielectric in thin film transistors shows interesting dielectric properties for low-voltage applications, despite a moderate capacitance. With Ga singly doped and Ga, Li co-doped ZnO as the active channel layers, typical mobilities of 4.7 cm 2 V -1 s -1 and 2.1 cm 2 V -1 s -1 are achieved, respectively. At a given gate bias, the operation current is much smaller than the previously reported values in low-voltage thin film transistors, primarily relying on the giant-capacitive dielectric. The reported devices combine advantages of high mobility, low power consumption, low cost and ease of fabrication. In addition to the transparent nature of both the dielectric and semiconducting active channels, the superior electrical properties of the devices may provide a new avenue for future transparent electronics. (fast track communication)

  3. High mobility half-metallicity in the (LaMnO3)2/(SrTiO3)8 superlattice

    Cossu, Fabrizio

    2013-01-28

    First principles calculations have been performed to investigate the LaMnO3/SrTiO3 superlattice. Structural relaxation within the generalized gradient approximation results in no significant tiltings or rotations of oxygen octahedra, but in distinct distortions in the SrTiO3 region. Taking into account the onsite Coulomb interaction, we find that the Mn spins order ferromagnetically, in contrast to the antiferromagnetic state of bulk LaMnO3. Most importantly, the interface strain combined with charge transfer across the interface induces half-metallicity within the MnO2 layers. The superlattice is particulary interesting for spintronics applications because the half-metallic states are characterized by an extraordinary high mobility.

  4. High mobility half-metallicity in the (LaMnO3)2/(SrTiO3)8 superlattice

    Cossu, Fabrizio; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Singh, Nirpendra

    2013-01-01

    First principles calculations have been performed to investigate the LaMnO3/SrTiO3 superlattice. Structural relaxation within the generalized gradient approximation results in no significant tiltings or rotations of oxygen octahedra, but in distinct distortions in the SrTiO3 region. Taking into account the onsite Coulomb interaction, we find that the Mn spins order ferromagnetically, in contrast to the antiferromagnetic state of bulk LaMnO3. Most importantly, the interface strain combined with charge transfer across the interface induces half-metallicity within the MnO2 layers. The superlattice is particulary interesting for spintronics applications because the half-metallic states are characterized by an extraordinary high mobility.

  5. Terahertz tunable detection in self-switching diodes based on high mobility semiconductors: InGaAs, InAs and InSb

    Iniguez-de-la-Torre, I; Rodilla, H; Mateos, J; Pardo, D; Gonzalez, T; Song, A M

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report on the use of high mobility materials in the channel of self-switching diodes as potential candidates for terahertz operation. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we envisage the feasibility of tuneable-by-geometry detection in the terahertz range. The low effective mass of InAs and InSb in relation to InGaAs enhances ballistic transport inside the diode, thus improving the amplitude and quality factor of the resonance found in the detection spectra of self-switching diodes. The frequency of the resonant peak is also increased with the use of these narrow band gap semiconductors. The analysis of the noise spectra provides useful information about the origin of the resonance. By decreasing temperature below 300 K, a clear improvement in detection sensitivity is also achieved.

  6. Terahertz tunable detection in self-switching diodes based on high mobility semiconductors: InGaAs, InAs and InSb

    Iniguez-de-la-Torre, I; Rodilla, H; Mateos, J; Pardo, D; Gonzalez, T [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Song, A M, E-mail: indy@usal.e [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    In this work we report on the use of high mobility materials in the channel of self-switching diodes as potential candidates for terahertz operation. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we envisage the feasibility of tuneable-by-geometry detection in the terahertz range. The low effective mass of InAs and InSb in relation to InGaAs enhances ballistic transport inside the diode, thus improving the amplitude and quality factor of the resonance found in the detection spectra of self-switching diodes. The frequency of the resonant peak is also increased with the use of these narrow band gap semiconductors. The analysis of the noise spectra provides useful information about the origin of the resonance. By decreasing temperature below 300 K, a clear improvement in detection sensitivity is also achieved.

  7. High mobility AlGaN/GaN heterostructures grown on Si substrates using a large lattice-mismatch induced stress control technology

    Cheng, Jianpeng; Yang, Xuelin; Sang, Ling; Guo, Lei; Hu, Anqi; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    A large lattice-mismatch induced stress control technology with a low Al content AlGaN layer has been used to grow high quality GaN layers on 4-in. Si substrates. The use of this technology allows for high mobility AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with electron mobility of 2040 cm 2 /(V·s) at sheet charge density of 8.4 × 10 12  cm −2 . Strain relaxation and dislocation evolution mechanisms have been investigated. It is demonstrated that the large lattice mismatch between the low Al content AlGaN layer and AlN buffer layer could effectively promote the edge dislocation inclination with relatively large bend angles and therefore significantly reduce the dislocation density in the GaN epilayer. Our results show a great potential for fabrication of low-cost and high performance GaN-on-Si power devices

  8. High mobility, low access thwarts interventions among seasonal workers in the Greater Mekong Sub-region: lessons from the malaria containment project.

    Canavati, Sara E; Quintero, Cesia E; Lawford, Harriet L S; Yok, Sovann; Lek, Dysoley; Richards, Jack S; Whittaker, Maxine Anne

    2016-08-26

    During the process of malaria elimination in the Greater Mekong Sub-region, mobile and migrant populations (MMPs) have been identified as the most at-risk demographic. An important sub-group of MMPs are seasonal workers, and this paper presents an evaluation of the reach and effectiveness of interventions tailored towards this group and was carried out as part of the Containment Project from 2009-11. A mixed-methods study was conducted in Pailin Province in Western Cambodia. Three-hundred-and-four seasonal workers were surveyed using a structured questionnaire. Qualitative data were gathered through a total of eight focus group discussions and 14 in-depth interviews. Data triangulation of the qualitative and quantitative data was used during analysis. High mobility and low access of the target population to the interventions, as well as lack of social and anthropological research that led to implementation oversights, resulted in under-exposure of seasonal workers to interventions. Consequently, their reach and impact were severely limited. Some services, particularly Mobile Malaria Workers, had the ability to significantly impact key factors, such as risky behaviours among those they did reach. Others, like Listening and Viewing Clubs and mass media campaigns, showed little impact. There is potential in two of the interventions assessed, but high mobility and inadequate exposure of seasonal workers to these interventions must be considered in the development and planning of future interventions to avoid investing in low-impact activities and ensure that all interventions perform according to their maximum potential. This will be critical in order for Cambodia to achieve its aim of malaria elimination. The lessons learned from this study can be extrapolated to other areas of health care in Cambodia and other countries in order to reduce the gap between healthcare provided to MMPs, especially seasonal workers, and to the general population.

  9. Nonlinear photoresponse of field effect transistors terahertz detectors at high irradiation intensities

    But, D. B.; Drexler, C.; Ganichev, S. D.; Sakhno, M. V.; Sizov, F. F.; Dyakonova, N.; Drachenko, O.; Gutin, A.; Knap, W.

    2014-01-01

    Terahertz power dependence of the photoresponse of field effect transistors, operating at frequencies from 0.1 to 3 THz for incident radiation power density up to 100 kW/cm 2 was studied for Si metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors and InGaAs high electron mobility transistors. The photoresponse increased linearly with increasing radiation intensity up to the kW/cm 2 range. Nonlinearity followed by saturation of the photoresponse was observed for all investigated field effect transistors for intensities above several kW/cm 2 . The observed photoresponse nonlinearity is explained by nonlinearity and saturation of the transistor channel current. A theoretical model of terahertz field effect transistor photoresponse at high intensity was developed. The model explains quantitative experimental data both in linear and nonlinear regions. Our results show that dynamic range of field effect transistors is very high and can extend over more than six orders of magnitudes of power densities (from ∼0.5 mW/cm 2 to ∼5 kW/cm 2 )

  10. Quantum ballistic analysis of transition metal dichalcogenides based double gate junctionless field effect transistor and its application in nano-biosensor

    Shadman, Abir; Rahman, Ehsanur; Khosru, Quazi D. M.

    2017-11-01

    To reduce the thermal budget and the short channel effects in state of the art CMOS technology, Junctionless field effect transistor (JLFET) has been proposed in the literature. Numerous experimental, modeling, and simulation based works have been done on this new FET with bulk materials for various geometries until now. On the other hand, the two-dimensional layered material is considered as an alternative to current Si technology because of its ultra-thin body and high mobility. Very recently few simulation based works have been done on monolayer molybdenum disulfide based JLFET mainly to show the advantage of JLFET over conventional FET. However, no comprehensive simulation-based work has been done for double gate JLFET keeping in mind the prominent transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) to the authors' best knowledge. In this work, we have studied quantum ballistic drain current-gate voltage characteristics of such FETs within non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) framework. Our simulation results reveal that all these TMDC materials are viable options for implementing state of the art Junctionless MOSFET with emphasis on their performance at short gate lengths. Besides evaluating the prospect of TMDC materials in the digital logic application, the performance of Junctionless Double Gate trilayer TMDC heterostructure FET for the label-free electrical detection of biomolecules in dry environment has been investigated for the first time to the authors' best knowledge. The impact of charge neutral biomolecules on the electrical characteristics of the biosensor has been analyzed under dry environment situation. Our study shows that these materials could provide high sensitivity in the sub-threshold region as a channel material in nano-biosensor, a trend demonstrated by silicon on insulator FET sensor in the literature. Thus, going by the trend of replacing silicon with these novel materials in device level, TMDC heterostructure could be a viable alternative to

  11. Ferroelectric field-effect transistors based on solution-processed electrochemically exfoliated graphene

    Heidler, Jonas; Yang, Sheng; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Asadi, Kamal

    2018-06-01

    Memories based on graphene that could be mass produced using low-cost methods have not yet received much attention. Here we demonstrate graphene ferroelectric (dual-gate) field effect transistors. The graphene has been obtained using electrochemical exfoliation of graphite. Field-effect transistors are realized using a monolayer of graphene flakes deposited by the Langmuir-Blodgett protocol. Ferroelectric field effect transistor memories are realized using a random ferroelectric copolymer poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) in a top gated geometry. The memory transistors reveal ambipolar behaviour with both electron and hole accumulation channels. We show that the non-ferroelectric bottom gate can be advantageously used to tune the on/off ratio.

  12. Effect of grain boundary on the field-effect mobility of microrod single crystal organic transistors.

    Kim, Jaekyun; Kang, Jingu; Cho, Sangho; Yoo, Byungwook; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2014-11-01

    High-performance microrod single crystal organic transistors based on a p-type 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) semiconductor are fabricated and the effects of grain boundaries on the carrier transport have been investigated. The spin-coating of C8-BTBT and subsequent solvent vapor annealing process enabled the formation of organic single crystals with high aspect ratio in the range of 10 - 20. It was found that the organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on these single crystals yield a field-effect mobility and an on/off current ratio of 8.04 cm2/Vs and > 10(5), respectively. However, single crystal OFETs with a kink, in which two single crystals are fused together, exhibited a noticeable drop of field-effect mobility, and we claim that this phenomenon results from the carrier scattering at the grain boundary.

  13. Exploring graphene field effect transistor devices to improve spectral resolution of semiconductor radiation detectors

    Harrison, Richard Karl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen Wayne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Jeffrey B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hamilton, Allister B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Graphene, a planar, atomically thin form of carbon, has unique electrical and material properties that could enable new high performance semiconductor devices. Graphene could be of specific interest in the development of room-temperature, high-resolution semiconductor radiation spectrometers. Incorporating graphene into a field-effect transistor architecture could provide an extremely high sensitivity readout mechanism for sensing charge carriers in a semiconductor detector, thus enabling the fabrication of a sensitive radiation sensor. In addition, the field effect transistor architecture allows us to sense only a single charge carrier type, such as electrons. This is an advantage for room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors, which often suffer from significant hole trapping. Here we report on initial efforts towards device fabrication and proof-of-concept testing. This work investigates the use of graphene transferred onto silicon and silicon carbide, and the response of these fabricated graphene field effect transistor devices to stimuli such as light and alpha radiation.

  14. Comparing Hall Effect and Field Effect Measurements on the Same Single Nanowire.

    Hultin, Olof; Otnes, Gaute; Borgström, Magnus T; Björk, Mikael; Samuelson, Lars; Storm, Kristian

    2016-01-13

    We compare and discuss the two most commonly used electrical characterization techniques for nanowires (NWs). In a novel single-NW device, we combine Hall effect and back-gated and top-gated field effect measurements and quantify the carrier concentrations in a series of sulfur-doped InP NWs. The carrier concentrations from Hall effect and field effect measurements are found to correlate well when using the analysis methods described in this work. This shows that NWs can be accurately characterized with available electrical methods, an important result toward better understanding of semiconductor NW doping.

  15. Electric field effect on exchange interaction in ultrathin Co films with ionic liquids

    Ishibashi, Mio; Yamada, Kihiro T.; Shiota, Yoichi; Ando, Fuyuki; Koyama, Tomohiro; Kakizakai, Haruka; Mizuno, Hayato; Miwa, Kazumoto; Ono, Shimpei; Moriyama, Takahiro; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2018-06-01

    Electric-field modulations of magnetic properties have been extensively studied not only for practical applications but also for fundamental interest. In this study, we investigated the electric field effect on the exchange interaction in ultrathin Co films with ionic liquids. The exchange coupling J was characterized from the direct magnetization measurement as a function of temperature using Pt/ultrathin Co/MgO structures. The trend of the electric field effect on J is in good agreement with that of the theoretical prediction, and a large change in J by applying a gate voltage was observed by forming an electric double layer using ionic liquids.

  16. Theory of Electric-Field Effects on Electron-Spin-Resonance Hyperfine Couplings

    Karna, S.P.

    1997-01-01

    A quantum mechanical theory of the effects of a uniform electric field on electron-spin-resonance hyperfine couplings is presented. The electric-field effects are described in terms of perturbation coefficients which can be used to probe the local symmetry as well as the strength of the electric field at paramagnetic sites in a solid. Results are presented for the first-order perturbation coefficients describing the Bloembergen effect (linear electric-field effect on hyperfine coupling tensor) for the O atom and the OH radical. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  17. Organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories utilizing sputtered C nanoparticles as nano-floating-gate

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Chang-Hai; She, Xiao-Jian; Sun, Qi-Jun; Gao, Xu; Wang, Sui-Dong, E-mail: wangsd@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2014-10-20

    High-performance organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories have been achieved using sputtered C nanoparticles as the nano-floating-gate. The sputtered C nano-floating-gate is prepared with low-cost material and simple process, forming uniform and discrete charge trapping sites covered by a smooth and complete polystyrene layer. The devices show large memory window, excellent retention capability, and programming/reading/erasing/reading endurance. The sputtered C nano-floating-gate can effectively trap both holes and electrons, and it is demonstrated to be suitable for not only p-type but also n-type organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories.

  18. Reconfigurable Complementary Monolayer MoTe2 Field-Effect Transistors for Integrated Circuits.

    Larentis, Stefano; Fallahazad, Babak; Movva, Hema C P; Kim, Kyounghwan; Rai, Amritesh; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Banerjee, Sanjay K; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2017-05-23

    Transition metal dichalcogenides are of interest for next generation switches, but the lack of low resistance electron and hole contacts in the same material has hindered the development of complementary field-effect transistors and circuits. We demonstrate an air-stable, reconfigurable, complementary monolayer MoTe 2 field-effect transistor encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride, using electrostatically doped contacts. The introduction of a multigate design with prepatterned bottom contacts allows us to independently achieve low contact resistance and threshold voltage tuning, while also decoupling the Schottky contacts and channel gating. We illustrate a complementary inverter and a p-i-n diode as potential applications.

  19. Top contact organic field effect transistors fabricated using a photolithographic process

    Wang Hong; Peng Ying-Quan; Ji Zhuo-Yu; Shang Li-Wei; Liu Xing-Hua; Liu Ming

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an effective method of fabricating top contact organic field effect transistors by using a photolithographic process. The semiconductor layer is protected by a passivation layer. Through photolithographic and etching processes, parts of the passivation layer are etched off to form source/drain electrode patterns. Combined with conventional evaporation and lift-off techniques, organic field effect transistors with a top contact are fabricated successfully, whose properties are comparable to those prepared with the shadow mask method and one order of magnitude higher than the bottom contact devices fabricated by using a photolithographic process. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  20. Bisacenaphthopyrazinoquinoxaline derivatives: Synthesis, physical properties and applications as semiconductors for n-channel field effect transistors

    Tong, Chenhua

    2013-01-01

    Several bisacenaphthopyrazinoquinoxaline (BAPQ) based derivatives 1-3 were synthesized by condensation between the acenaphthenequinones and 1,2,4,5-tetraaminobenzene tetrahydrochloride. Their optical, electrochemical and self-assembling properties are tuned by different substituents. Among them, compound 3 possesses a homogeneously distributed low-lying LUMO due to the peripheral substitution with four cyano groups. The corresponding n-channel field effect transistors showed a field effect electron mobility of 5 × 10-3 cm2 V-1 s-1. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories utilizing sputtered C nanoparticles as nano-floating-gate

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Chang-Hai; She, Xiao-Jian; Sun, Qi-Jun; Gao, Xu; Wang, Sui-Dong

    2014-01-01

    High-performance organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories have been achieved using sputtered C nanoparticles as the nano-floating-gate. The sputtered C nano-floating-gate is prepared with low-cost material and simple process, forming uniform and discrete charge trapping sites covered by a smooth and complete polystyrene layer. The devices show large memory window, excellent retention capability, and programming/reading/erasing/reading endurance. The sputtered C nano-floating-gate can effectively trap both holes and electrons, and it is demonstrated to be suitable for not only p-type but also n-type organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories.

  2. Probing organic field effect transistors in situ during operation using SFG.

    Ye, Hongke; Abu-Akeel, Ashraf; Huang, Jia; Katz, Howard E; Gracias, David H

    2006-05-24

    In this communication, we report results obtained using surface-sensitive IR+Visible Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) nonlinear optical spectroscopy on interfaces of organic field effect transistors during operation. We observe remarkable correlations between trends in the surface vibrational spectra and electrical properties of the transistor, with changes in gate voltage (VG). These results suggest that field effects on electronic conduction in thin film organic semiconductor devices are correlated to interfacial nonlinear optical characteristics and point to the possibility of using SFG spectroscopy to monitor electronic properties of OFETs.

  3. Synthesis, characterization of the pentacene and fabrication of pentacene field-effect transistors

    Tao Chunlan; Zhang Xuhui; Dong Maojun; Sun Shuo; Ou Guping; Zhang Fujia; Liu Yiyang; Zhang Haoli

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the organic semiconductor material pentacene is meaningful for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Thin films of pentacene are the most mobile molecular films known to date. This paper reported that the pentacene sample was successfully synthesized. The purity of pentacene is up to 95%. The results of a joint experimental investigation based on a combination of infrared absorption spectra, mass spectra (MS), element analysis, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and atom force microscopy (AFM). The authors fabricated OFET with the synthesized pentacene. Its field effect mobility is about 1.23 cm 2 /(V·s) and on-off ratio is above 10 6

  4. Electric field effect on the critical current of SNS-contact

    Rakhmanov, A.L.; Rozhkov, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    Electric field effect on the SNS-contact critical current is investigated in the Ginzburg-Landau theory approximation. It is shown that the electric field may cause a notable increase of the contact critical current especially if the sample temperature is close to the temperature of a superconducting transition of T sc normal layer. Electric field effect is increased with the reduction of film thickness, but it can strong enough for thick films as well at temperature close to T sc . 11 refs.; 4 figs

  5. Single-step solution processing of small-molecule organic semiconductor field-effect transistors at high yield

    Yu, Liyang; Li, X.; Pavlica, E.; Loth, M.A.; Anthony, J.E.; Bratina, G.; Kjellander, B.K.C.; Gelinck, G.H.; Stutzmann, N.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report a simple, alternative route towards high-mobility structures of the small-molecular semiconductor 5,11-bis(triethyl silylethynyl) anthradithiophene that requires one single processing step without the need for any post-deposition processing. The method relies on careful control of

  6. Use of cermet thin film resistors with nitride passivated metal insulator field effect transistor

    Brown, G. A.; Harrap, V.

    1971-01-01

    Film deposition of cermet resistors on same chip with metal nitride oxide silicon field effect transistors permits protection of contamination sensitive active devices from contaminants produced in cermet deposition and definition processes. Additional advantages include lower cost, greater reliability, and space savings.

  7. High-performance solution-processed polymer ferroelectric field-effect transistors

    Naber, RCG; Tanase, C; Blom, PWM; Gelinck, GH; Marsman, AW; Touwslager, FJ; Setayesh, S; De Leeuw, DM; Naber, Ronald C.G.; Gelinck, Gerwin H.; Marsman, Albert W.; Touwslager, Fred J.

    We demonstrate a rewritable, non-volatile memory device with flexible plastic active layers deposited from solution. The memory device is a ferroelectric field-effect transistor (FeFET) made with a ferroelectric fluoropolymer and a bisalkoxy-substituted poly(p-phenylene vinylene) semiconductor

  8. Electric field confinement effect on charge transport in organic field-effect transistors

    Li, X.; Kadashchuk, A.; Fishchuk, I.I.; Smaal, W.T.T.; Gelinck, G.H.; Broer, D.J.; Genoe, J.; Heremans, P.; Bässler, H.

    2012-01-01

    While it is known that the charge-carrier mobility in organic semiconductors is only weakly dependent on the electric field at low fields, the experimental mobility in organic field-effect transistors using silylethynyl-substituted pentacene is found to be surprisingly field dependent at low

  9. N-Type self-assembled monolayer field-effect transistors for flexible organic electronics

    Ringk, A.; Roelofs, Christian; Smits, E.C.P.; van der Marel, C.; Salzmann, I.; Neuhold, A.; Gelinck, G.H.; Resel, R.; de Leeuw, D.M.; Strohriegl, P.

    Within this work we present n-type self-assembled monolayer field-effect transistors (SAMFETs) based on a novel perylene bisimide. The molecule spontaneously forms a covalently fixed monolayer on top of an aluminium oxide dielectric via a phosphonic acid anchor group. Detailed studies revealed an

  10. Background noise characteristics of field effect transistors for X-ray detection units

    Gostilo, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    Energy equivalent for noise of experimental samples of field-effect transistors for X-ray detection units is investigated. Resolution of 160 eV for lines of 5.9 keV is obtained in detection unit with drain feedback using the Si(Li)-detector of 25 mm 2 by square

  11. Bias stress effect and recovery in organic field effect transistors : proton migration mechanism

    Sharma, A.; Mathijssen, S.G.J.; Kemerink, M.; Leeuw, de D.M.; Bobbert, P.A.; Bao, Z.; McCulloch, I.

    2010-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors exhibit operational instabilities when a gate bias is applied. For a constant gate bias the threshold voltage shifts towards the applied gate bias voltage, an effect known as the bias-stress effect. We have performed a detailed experimental and theoretical study of

  12. New membrane materials for potassium-selective ion-sensitive field-effect transistors

    van der Wal, P.D.; van der Wal, Peter D.; Skowronska-Ptasinska, Maria; van den Berg, Albert; Bergveld, Piet; Sudholter, Ernst; Sudholter, Ernst J.R.; Reinhoudt, David

    1990-01-01

    Several polymeric materials were studied as membrane materials for potassium-selective ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) to overcome the problems related with the use of conventional plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membranes casted on ISFET gate surfaces. Several acrylate materials,

  13. The ion-sensitive field effect transistor in rapid acid-base titrations

    Bos, M.; Bergveld, Piet; van Veen-Blaauw, A.M.W.

    1979-01-01

    Ion-sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) are used as the pH sensor in rapid acid—base titrations. Titration speeds at least five times greater than those with glass electrodes are possible for accuracies better than ±1%.

  14. Shaping the Educational Policy Field: "Cross-Field Effects" in the Chinese Context

    Yu, Hui

    2018-01-01

    This paper theorises how politics, economy and migrant population policies influence educational policy, utilising Bourdieusian theoretical resources to analyse the Chinese context. It develops the work of Lingard and Rawolle on cross-field effects and produces an updated three-step analytical framework. Taking the policy issue of the schooling of…

  15. Field effect control of electro-osmotic flow in microfluidic networks

    van der Wouden, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of a Field Effect Flow Control (FEFC) system for the control of Electro Osmotic Flow (EOF) in microfluidic networks. For this several aspects of FEFC have been reviewed and a process to fabricate microfluidic channels with integrated electrodes has been

  16. High performance low voltage organic field effect transistors on plastic substrate for amplifier circuits

    Houin, G.J.R.; Duez, F.; Garcia, L.; Cantatore, E.; Torricelli, F.; Hirsch, L.; Belot, D.; Pellet, C.; Abbas, M.

    2016-01-01

    The high performance air stable organic semiconductor small molecule dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (DNTT) was chosen as active layer for field effect transistors built to realize flexible amplifier circuits. Initial device on rigid Si/SiO2 substrate showed appreciable performance

  17. Monolithic junction field-effect transistor charge preamplifier for calorimetry at high luminosity hadron colliders

    Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Rehn, L.A.; Manfredi, P.F.; Speziali, V.

    1991-11-01

    The outstanding noise and radiation hardness characteristics of epitaxial-channel junction field-effect transistors (JFET) suggest that a monolithic preamplifier based upon them may be able to meet the strict specifications for calorimetry at high luminosity colliders. Results obtained so far with a buried layer planar technology, among them an entire monolithic charge-sensitive preamplifier, are described

  18. Integrated Materials Design of Organic Semiconductors for Field-Effect Transistors

    Mei, Jianguo; Diao, Ying; Appleton, Anthony L.; Fang, Lei; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-01-01

    The past couple of years have witnessed a remarkable burst in the development of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), with a number of organic semiconductors surpassing the benchmark mobility of 10 cm2/(V s). In this perspective, we highlight

  19. All-(111) surface silicon nanowire field effect transistor devices: Effects of surface preparations

    Masood, M.N.; Carlen, Edwin; van den Berg, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Etching/hydrogen termination of All-(111) surface silicon nanowire field effect (SiNW-FET) devices developed by conventional photolithography and plane dependent wet etchings is studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and

  20. Magnetic field effects on geminate reactions. Study of anthraquinone - hydrogen donors systems

    Vidal, Marie-Helene

    1987-01-01

    This study is devoted to magnetic field effects on chemical reactions which involve a radical pair with correlated spins (radical in a 'cage'). In the first part, the radical pair theory is described: mechanisms of singlet-triplet mixing, the different interactions inside the pair and a quantum mechanical treatment of the radical pair. The details of the experimental method (nanosecond laser flash photolysis) are reported in the second part. In the third part are shown experimental results obtained on Anthraquinone (AQ) - Hydrogen donors systems: - There is no magnetic field effect in homogeneous solution even at a high viscosity. The absorption spectra of the different reaction intermediates are obtained. - However a magnetic field effect is put forward when AQ is introduced in SDS micelles which are hydrogen donors. The absorption spectrum of the AQH · . semi-quinone radical in 'cage' is shown and a mechanism is proposed for its disappearance to generate the AQH-S and AQH 2 species. - The addition of 9, 10 Dihydroanthracene (DH2) inside the micelle near AQ induces an increase of the magnetic field effect by creation of (AQH · . - DH · . ) pairs which diffuse slowly. - Fixed radical pairs in a protein matrix were studied in reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria: in that case, the half effect field is shifted to low fields when compared to the previously described systems. (author) [fr

  1. Ambipolar Cu- and Fe-phthalocyanine single-crystal field-effect transistors

    De Boer, R.W.I.; Stassen, A.F.; Craciun, M.F.; Mulder, C.L.; Molinari, A.; Rogge, S.; Morpurgo, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    We report the observation of ambipolar transport in field-effect transistors fabricated on single crystals of copper- and iron-phthalocyanine, using gold as a high work-function metal for the fabrication of source and drain electrodes. In these devices, the room-temperature mobility of holes reaches

  2. Influence of the semiconductor oxidation potential on the operational stability of organic field-effect transistors

    Sharma, A.; Mathijssen, S.G.J.; Bobbert, P.A.; Leeuw, de D.M.

    2011-01-01

    During prolonged application of a gate bias, organic field-effect transistors show a gradual shift of the threshold voltage towards the applied gate bias voltage. The shift follows a stretched-exponential time dependence governed by a relaxation time. Here, we show that a thermodynamic analysis

  3. Supported lipid bilayer on nanocrystalline diamond: dual optical and field-effect sensor for membrane disruption

    Ang, P.K.; Loh, K.P.; Wohland, T.; Nesládek, Miloš; Van Hove, E.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 1 (2009), s. 109-116 ISSN 1616-301X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond * biocompatibility * supported lipid bilayers * biosensors * solution gate field effect transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 6.990, year: 2009

  4. Functionalization and microfluidic integration of silicon nanowire biologically gated field effect transistors

    Pfreundt, Andrea

    This thesis deals with the development of a novel biosensor for the detection of biomolecules based on a silicon nanowire biologically gated field-effect transistor and its integration into a point-of-care device. The sensor and electrical on-chip integration was developed in a different project...

  5. Functionalization and microfluidic integration of silicon nanowire biologically gated field effect transistors

    Pfreundt, Andrea; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Dimaki, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of a novel biosensor for the detection of biomolecules based on a silicon nanowire biologically gated field-effect transistor and its integration into a point-of-care device. The sensor and electrical on-chip integration was developed in a different project...

  6. Proton migration mechanism for the instability of organic field-effect transistors

    Sharma, A.; Mathijssen, S.G.J.; Kemerink, M.; Leeuw, de D.M.; Bobbert, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    During prolonged application of a gate bias, organic field-effect transistors show an instability involving a gradual shift of the threshold voltage toward the applied gate bias voltage. We propose a model for this instability in p-type transistors with a silicon-dioxide gate dielectric, based on

  7. Intrinsic hydrogen-terminated diamond as ion-sensitive field effect transistor

    Rezek, Bohuslav; Shin, D.; Watanabe, H.; Nebel, C.E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 122, - (2007), s. 596-599 ISSN 0925-4005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : diamond film * surface electronic properties * field effect transistor * pH sensor * semiconductor-electrolyte interface Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.934, year: 2007

  8. Gas sensing with self-assembled monolayer field-effect transistors

    Andringa, Anne-Marije; Spijkman, Mark-Jan; Smits, Edsger C. P.; Mathijssen, Simon G. J.; van Hal, Paul A.; Setayesh, Sepas; Willard, Nico P.; Borshchev, Oleg V.; Ponomarenko, Sergei A.; Blom, Paul W. M.; de Leeuw, Dago M.

    A new sensitive gas sensor based on a self-assembled monolayer field-effect transistor (SAMFET) was used to detect the biomarker nitric oxide. A SAMFET based sensor is highly sensitive because the analyte and the active channel are separated by only one monolayer. SAMFETs were functionalised for

  9. Doping kinetics of organic semiconductors investigated by field-effect transistors

    Maddalena, F.; Meijer, E.J.; Asadi, K.; Leeuw, D.M. de; Blom, P.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of acid doping of the semiconductor regioregular poly-3-hexylthiophene with vaporized chlorosilane have been investigated using field-effect transistors. The dopant density has been derived as a function of temperature and exposure time from the shift in the pinch-off voltage, being the

  10. Ternary logic implemented on a single dopant atom field effect silicon transistor

    Klein, M.; Mol, J.A.; Verduijn, J.; Lansbergen, G.P.; Rogge, S.; Levine, R.D.; Remacle, F.

    2010-01-01

    We provide an experimental proof of principle for a ternary multiplier realized in terms of the charge state of a single dopant atom embedded in a fin field effect transistor (Fin-FET). Robust reading of the logic output is made possible by using two channels to measure the current flowing through

  11. Single-Layer Pentacene Field-Effect Transistors Using Electrodes Modified With Self-assembled Monolayers

    Asadi, Kamal; Wu, Yu; Gholamrezaie, Fatemeh; Rudolf, Petra; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2009-01-01

    Pentacene field-effect transistor performance can be improved by modifying metal electrodes with self-assembled monolayers. The dominant role in performance is played by pentacene morphology rather than the work function of the modified electrodes. With optimized processing conditions,

  12. IC Compatible Wafer Level Fabrication of Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors for Biosensing Applications

    Moh, T.S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    In biosensing, nano-devices such as Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors (SiNW FETs) are promising components/sensors for ultra-high sensitive detection, especially when samples are low in concentration or a limited volume is available. Current processing of SiNW FETs often relies on expensive

  13. Fabrication of a vertical channel field effect transistor and a study of its electrical performances

    Bhuiyan, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    A vertical channel field effect transistor on silicon was fabricated by diffusion technique and its electrical characteristics were studied as a function of voltage and temperature. It was found that this transistor has relatively high breakdown voltage of 65 volts for drain source and of 7.5 volts for gate source terminals. (author)

  14. Direct observation of single-charge-detection capability of nanowire field-effect transistors.

    Salfi, J; Savelyev, I G; Blumin, M; Nair, S V; Ruda, H E

    2010-10-01

    A single localized charge can quench the luminescence of a semiconductor nanowire, but relatively little is known about the effect of single charges on the conductance of the nanowire. In one-dimensional nanostructures embedded in a material with a low dielectric permittivity, the Coulomb interaction and excitonic binding energy are much larger than the corresponding values when embedded in a material with the same dielectric permittivity. The stronger Coulomb interaction is also predicted to limit the carrier mobility in nanowires. Here, we experimentally isolate and study the effect of individual localized electrons on carrier transport in InAs nanowire field-effect transistors, and extract the equivalent charge sensitivity. In the low carrier density regime, the electrostatic potential produced by one electron can create an insulating weak link in an otherwise conducting nanowire field-effect transistor, modulating its conductance by as much as 4,200% at 31 K. The equivalent charge sensitivity, 4 × 10(-5) e Hz(-1/2) at 25 K and 6 × 10(-5) e Hz(-1/2) at 198 K, is orders of magnitude better than conventional field-effect transistors and nanoelectromechanical systems, and is just a factor of 20-30 away from the record sensitivity for state-of-the-art single-electron transistors operating below 4 K (ref. 8). This work demonstrates the feasibility of nanowire-based single-electron memories and illustrates a physical process of potential relevance for high performance chemical sensors. The charge-state-detection capability we demonstrate also makes the nanowire field-effect transistor a promising host system for impurities (which may be introduced intentionally or unintentionally) with potentially long spin lifetimes, because such transistors offer more sensitive spin-to-charge conversion readout than schemes based on conventional field-effect transistors.

  15. Short-channel field-effect transistors with 9-atom and 13-atom wide graphene nanoribbons.

    Llinas, Juan Pablo; Fairbrother, Andrew; Borin Barin, Gabriela; Shi, Wu; Lee, Kyunghoon; Wu, Shuang; Yong Choi, Byung; Braganza, Rohit; Lear, Jordan; Kau, Nicholas; Choi, Wonwoo; Chen, Chen; Pedramrazi, Zahra; Dumslaff, Tim; Narita, Akimitsu; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fischer, Felix; Zettl, Alex; Ruffieux, Pascal; Yablonovitch, Eli; Crommie, Michael; Fasel, Roman; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2017-09-21

    Bottom-up synthesized graphene nanoribbons and graphene nanoribbon heterostructures have promising electronic properties for high-performance field-effect transistors and ultra-low power devices such as tunneling field-effect transistors. However, the short length and wide band gap of these graphene nanoribbons have prevented the fabrication of devices with the desired performance and switching behavior. Here, by fabricating short channel (L ch  ~ 20 nm) devices with a thin, high-κ gate dielectric and a 9-atom wide (0.95 nm) armchair graphene nanoribbon as the channel material, we demonstrate field-effect transistors with high on-current (I on  > 1 μA at V d  = -1 V) and high I on /I off  ~ 10 5 at room temperature. We find that the performance of these devices is limited by tunneling through the Schottky barrier at the contacts and we observe an increase in the transparency of the barrier by increasing the gate field near the contacts. Our results thus demonstrate successful fabrication of high-performance short-channel field-effect transistors with bottom-up synthesized armchair graphene nanoribbons.Graphene nanoribbons show promise for high-performance field-effect transistors, however they often suffer from short lengths and wide band gaps. Here, the authors use a bottom-up synthesis approach to fabricate 9- and 13-atom wide ribbons, enabling short-channel transistors with 10 5 on-off current ratio.

  16. Elevated levels of von Willebrand factor and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) are associated with disease severity and clinical outcome of scrub typhus.

    Chen, Hongliu; Ning, Zong; Qiu, Ying; Liao, Yuanli; Chang, Haihua; Ai, Yuanyuan; Wei, Yinghua; Deng, Yiming; Shen, Ying

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether von Willebrand factor (vWF) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) are associated with the severity and clinical outcome of scrub typhus and to seek novel biomarkers for surveillance and prediction of the prognosis of this infection. Serum concentrations of vWF and HMGB1 were measured twice by ELISA for scrub typhus patients (n=103), once prior to doxycycline therapy and then on day 7 of doxycycline therapy; concentrations were measured once for healthy controls (n=32). Among the total 103 patients enrolled, 38 had disease complicated by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Serum concentrations of vWF and HMGB1 were significantly higher in all the patients than in the healthy controls, both prior to doxycycline treatment and on day 7 of doxycycline treatment (pscrub typhus (area under the curve (AUC)=0.864, p=0.001, and AUC=0.862, p=0.001, respectively). Elevated levels of vWF and HMGB1 are associated with the severity and clinical outcome of scrub typhus. These represent possible new biomarkers for use in the assessment and prognostic prediction of this infection. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Demonstration of high mobility and quantum transport in modulation-doped β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3/Ga2O3 heterostructures

    Zhang, Yuewei; Neal, Adam; Xia, Zhanbo; Joishi, Chandan; Johnson, Jared M.; Zheng, Yuanhua; Bajaj, Sanyam; Brenner, Mark; Dorsey, Donald; Chabak, Kelson; Jessen, Gregg; Hwang, Jinwoo; Mou, Shin; Heremans, Joseph P.; Rajan, Siddharth

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a high mobility two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed at the β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3/Ga2O3 interface through modulation doping. Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations were observed in the modulation-doped β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3/Ga2O3 structure, indicating a high-quality electron channel formed at the heterojunction interface. The formation of the 2DEG channel was further confirmed by the weak temperature dependence of the carrier density, and the peak low temperature mobility was found to be 2790 cm2/Vs, which is significantly higher than that achieved in bulk-doped Beta-phase Gallium Oxide (β-Ga2O3). The observed SdH oscillations allowed for the extraction of the electron effective mass in the (010) plane to be 0.313 ± 0.015 m0 and the quantum scattering time to be 0.33 ps at 3.5 K. The demonstrated modulation-doped β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3/Ga2O3 structure lays the foundation for future exploration of quantum physical phenomena and semiconductor device technologies based on the β-Ga2O3 material system.

  18. Plasma concentration of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) after 100 drop to vertical jumps and after a 1200-km bicycle race.

    Behringer, M; Kilian, Y; Montag, J; Geesmann, B; Mester, J

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has recently been reported to be involved in proinflammation and tissue repair. Therefore, we hypothesized that HMGB1 is released into the bloodstream after eccentric exercises or prolonged endurance activities. Blood samples from 11 participants that performed 100 drop to vertical jumps (DVJ) and from 10 participants that took part in the 1200-km 'Paris-Brest-Paris' bicycle race (PBP) were tested for HMGB1 and creatine kinase (CK) levels. CK increased after both DVJ (pre: 150.6 ± 81.5 U/L; post: 188.8 ± 95.5 U/L 8 h: 790.5 ± 346.4 U/L) and PBP (pre: 81.3 ± 36.4 U/L; post: 725.2 ± 229.5 U/L; 12 h: 535.8 ± 188.6 U/L), indicating membrane damage. However, HMGB1 plasma levels remained below the detection limit (78 pg/mL) of the applied enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit for all blood samples analysed. That is, neither high intensity eccentric exercises (DVJ) nor prolonged endurance events (PBP) seemed to affect HMGB1 levels in blood at selected time points.

  19. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive flexible metal substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Dutta, P., E-mail: pdutta2@central.uh.edu; Rathi, M.; Gao, Y.; Yao, Y.; Selvamanickam, V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Zheng, N.; Ahrenkiel, P. [Department of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, South Dakota 57701 (United States); Martinez, J. [Materials Evaluation Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas 77085 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate heteroepitaxial growth of single-crystalline-like n and p-type doped GaAs thin films on inexpensive, flexible, and light-weight metal foils by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Single-crystalline-like Ge thin film on biaxially textured templates made by ion beam assisted deposition on metal foil served as the epitaxy enabling substrate for GaAs growth. The GaAs films exhibited strong (004) preferred orientation, sharp in-plane texture, low grain misorientation, strong photoluminescence, and a defect density of ∼10{sup 7 }cm{sup −2}. Furthermore, the GaAs films exhibited hole and electron mobilities as high as 66 and 300 cm{sup 2}/V-s, respectively. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive metal substrates can pave the path for roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible III-V solar cells for the mainstream photovoltaics market.

  20. Emergence of high-mobility minority holes in the electrical transport of the Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 iron pnictides

    Urata, T.; Tanabe, Y.; Huynh, K. K.; Heguri, S.; Oguro, H.; Watanabe, K.; Tanigaki, K.

    2015-05-01

    In Fe pnictide (Pn) superconducting materials, neither Mn nor Cr doping to the Fe site induces superconductivity, even though hole carriers are generated. This is in strong contrast with the superconductivity appearing when holes are introduced by alkali-metal substitution on the insulating blocking layers. We investigate in detail the effects of Mn doping on magnetotransport properties in Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 for elucidating the intrinsic reason. The negative Hall coefficient for x =0 estimated in the low magnetic field (B ) regime gradually increases as x increases, and its sign changes to a positive one at x =0.020 . Hall resistivities as well as simultaneous interpretation using the magnetoconductivity tensor including both longitudinal and transverse transport components clarify that minority holes with high mobility are generated by the Mn doping via spin-density wave transition at low temperatures, while original majority electrons and holes residing in the paraboliclike Fermi surfaces of the semimetallic Ba (FeAs )2 are negligibly affected. Present results indicate that the mechanism of hole doping in Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 is greatly different from that of the other superconducting FePn family.

  1. Serum levels of high mobility group box 1 protein and its association with quality of life and psychological and functional status in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Oktayoglu, Pelin; Tahtasiz, Mehmet; Bozkurt, Mehtap; Em, Serda; Ucar, Demet; Yazmalar, Levent; Mete, Nuriye; Nas, Kemal; Gezer, Orhan

    2013-08-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a proinflammatory cytokine. Previous studies have suggested that HMGB1 can play an important role in the pathogenesis of many rheumatic diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum levels of HMGB1 in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and its association with quality of life and psychological and functional status in these patients. Twenty-nine patients who met the 1990 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for the classification of FM and 29 healthy controls (HC) were included in the present study. Serum samples were collected from both the patients and the HC, and HMGB1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) was used to assess the disease severity and functional status in patients with FM. Furthermore, the Nottingham Health Profile was used to assess quality of life in all subjects, as well as the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to assess depression and anxiety. The serum levels of HMGB1 protein were positively correlated with the FIQ scores in patients with FM (P = 0.002). Mean serum levels of HMGB1 were higher in patients with FM than in HC but this difference was not statistically significant. HMGB1 protein might be a good laboratory-sourced candidate for the assessment of functional status and disease severity in patients with FM. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Mediates Fibroblast Activity via RAGE-MAPK and NF-κB Signaling in Keloid Scar Formation

    Jihee Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Emerging studies have revealed the involvement of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 in systemic fibrotic diseases, yet its role in the cutaneous scarring process has not yet been investigated. We hypothesized that HMGB1 may promote fibroblast activity to cause abnormal cutaneous scarring. In vitro wound healing assay with normal and keloid fibroblasts demonstrated that HMGB1 administration promoted the migration of both fibroblasts with increased speed and a greater traveling distance. Treatment of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizic acid (GA showed an opposing effect on both activities. To analyze the downstream mechanism, the protein levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, protein kinase B (AKT, and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB were measured by western blot analysis. HMGB1 increased the expression levels of ERK1/2, AKT, and NF-κB compared to the control, which was suppressed by GA. HMGB1 promoted both normal and keloid fibroblasts migration to a degree equivalent to that achieved with TGF-β. We concluded that HMGB1 activates fibroblasts via the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE—mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK and NF-κB interaction signaling pathways. Further knowledge of the relationship of HMGB1 with skin fibrosis may lead to a promising clinical approach to manage abnormal scarring.

  3. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Mediates Fibroblast Activity via RAGE-MAPK and NF-κB Signaling in Keloid Scar Formation.

    Kim, Jihee; Park, Jong-Chul; Lee, Mi Hee; Yang, Chae Eun; Lee, Ju Hee; Lee, Won Jai

    2017-12-28

    Emerging studies have revealed the involvement of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in systemic fibrotic diseases, yet its role in the cutaneous scarring process has not yet been investigated. We hypothesized that HMGB1 may promote fibroblast activity to cause abnormal cutaneous scarring. In vitro wound healing assay with normal and keloid fibroblasts demonstrated that HMGB1 administration promoted the migration of both fibroblasts with increased speed and a greater traveling distance. Treatment of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizic acid (GA) showed an opposing effect on both activities. To analyze the downstream mechanism, the protein levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, protein kinase B (AKT), and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) were measured by western blot analysis. HMGB1 increased the expression levels of ERK1/2, AKT, and NF-κB compared to the control, which was suppressed by GA. HMGB1 promoted both normal and keloid fibroblasts migration to a degree equivalent to that achieved with TGF-β. We concluded that HMGB1 activates fibroblasts via the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE)-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and NF-κB interaction signaling pathways. Further knowledge of the relationship of HMGB1 with skin fibrosis may lead to a promising clinical approach to manage abnormal scarring.

  4. High mobility group protein number17 cross-links primarily to histone H2A in the reconstituted HMG 17 - nucleosome core particle complex

    Cook, G.R.; Yau, P.; Yasuda, H.; Traut, R.R.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The neighbor relationship of lamb thymus High Mobility Group (HMG) protein 17 to native HeLa nucleosome core particle histones in the reconstituted complex has been studied. 125 I-labeled HMG 17 was cross-linking to core histones using the protein-protein cross-linking reagent 2-iminothiolane. Specific cross-linked products were separated on a two-dimensional Triton-acid-urea/SDS gel system, located by autoradiography, excised and quantified. Disulfide bonds in the cross links were then cleaved and the protein constituents were identified by SDS gel electrophoresis. HMG 17 cross-linked primarily to histone H2A while lower levels of cross-linking occurred between HMG 17 and the other histones. In contrast, cross-linking between two HMG 17 molecules bound on the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that H2A comprises part of the HMG 17 binding site but that HMG 17 is sufficiently elongated and mobile to permit cross-linking to the other histones and to a second HMG 17 molecule. These results are in agreement with the current model for the structure of the nucleosome and the proposed binding sites for HMG 17

  5. Association of high mobility group BOX-1 and receptor for advanced glycation endproducts with clinicopathological features of haematological malignancies: a systematic review

    Austin H. Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 is a versatile protein with nuclear and extracellular functions. In the extracellular milieu, HMGB1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE. The expressions of HMGB1 and RAGE have been described in a variety of cancers. However, the clinical values of HMGB1 and RAGE in haematological malignancies have yet to be evaluated. A systematic search through PubMed and the Web of Science for articles discussing the role of HMGB1 and RAGE in haematological malignancies produced 15 articles. Overexpression of HMGB1 was reported to be associated with malignancy and, in certain studies, poor prognosis and tumour aggressiveness. Only one included study investigated the clinical value of RAGE, in which no significant difference was found between expression of RAGE in CLL neoplastic cells and nonmalignant controls. The discussed associations of HMGB1 and RAGE with clinicopathological characteristics of patients with haematological malignancies warrants further investigation into the prognostic and diagnostic value of both of these molecules.

  6. Interaction of microwave radiation with the high mobility two-dimensional electron system in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures

    Ramanayaka, A.N.; Ye, Tianyu; Liu, H.-C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Wegscheider, W. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Mani, R.G., E-mail: rmani@gsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The influence of microwave excitation on the magnetotransport properties of the high mobility two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in the GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure system is investigated by exploring (a) the dependence of the amplitude of the microwave-induced magnetoresistance-oscillations on the polarization direction of the linearly polarized microwaves and (b) the microwave reflection from the 2DES. The polarization study indicates that the amplitude of the magnetoresistance oscillations is remarkably responsive to the relative orientation between the linearly polarized microwaves and the current-axis in the specimen. At low microwave power, P, experiments indicate a strong sinusoidal variation in the diagonal resistance R{sub xx} vs. θ at the oscillatory extrema of the microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations. The reflection study indicates strong correlations between the microwave induced magnetoresistance oscillations and oscillatory features in the microwave reflection in a concurrent measurement of the magnetoresistance and the microwave magnetoreflection from the 2DES. The correlations are followed as a function of the microwave frequency and the microwave power, and the results are reported.

  7. Intracellular high mobility group B1 protein (HMGB1) represses HIV-1 LTR-directed transcription in a promoter- and cell-specific manner

    Naghavi, Mojgan H.; Nowak, Piotr; Andersson, Jan; Soennerborg, Anders; Yang Huan; Tracey, Kevin J.; Vahlne, Anders

    2003-01-01

    We investigated whether the high mobility group B 1 (HMGB1), an abundant nuclear protein in all mammalian cells, affects HIV-1 transcription. Intracellular expression of human HMGB1 repressed HIV-1 gene expression in epithelial cells. This inhibitory effect of HMGB1 was caused by repression of long terminal repeat (LTR)-mediated transcription. Other viral promoters/enhancers, including simian virus 40 or cytomegalovirus, were not inhibited by HMGB1. In addition, HMGB1 inhibition of HIV-1 subtype C expression was dependent on the number of NFκB sites in the LTR region. The inhibitory effect of HMGB1 on viral gene expression observed in HeLa cells was confirmed by an upregulation of viral replication in the presence of antisense HMGB1 in monocytic cells. In contrast to what was found in HeLa cells and monocytic cells, endogenous HMGB1 expression did not affect HIV-1 replication in unstimulated Jurkat cells. Thus, intracellular HMGB1 affects HIV-1 LTR-directed transcription in a promoter- and cell-specific manner

  8. SOXE transcription factors form selective dimers on non-compact DNA motifs through multifaceted interactions between dimerization and high-mobility group domains.

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Jankowski, Aleksander; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Prabhakar, Shyam; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-05-27

    The SOXE transcription factors SOX8, SOX9 and SOX10 are master regulators of mammalian development directing sex determination, gliogenesis, pancreas specification and neural crest development. We identified a set of palindromic SOX binding sites specifically enriched in regulatory regions of melanoma cells. SOXE proteins homodimerize on these sequences with high cooperativity. In contrast to other transcription factor dimers, which are typically rigidly spaced, SOXE group proteins can bind cooperatively at a wide range of dimer spacings. Using truncated forms of SOXE proteins, we show that a single dimerization (DIM) domain, that precedes the DNA binding high mobility group (HMG) domain, is sufficient for dimer formation, suggesting that DIM : HMG rather than DIM:DIM interactions mediate the dimerization. All SOXE members can also heterodimerize in this fashion, whereas SOXE heterodimers with SOX2, SOX4, SOX6 and SOX18 are not supported. We propose a structural model where SOXE-specific intramolecular DIM:HMG interactions are allosterically communicated to the HMG of juxtaposed molecules. Collectively, SOXE factors evolved a unique mode to combinatorially regulate their target genes that relies on a multifaceted interplay between the HMG and DIM domains. This property potentially extends further the diversity of target genes and cell-specific functions that are regulated by SOXE proteins.

  9. SOXE transcription factors form selective dimers on non-compact DNA motifs through multifaceted interactions between dimerization and high-mobility group domains

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Jankowski, Aleksander; Cheah, Kathryn S. E.; Prabhakar, Shyam; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The SOXE transcription factors SOX8, SOX9 and SOX10 are master regulators of mammalian development directing sex determination, gliogenesis, pancreas specification and neural crest development. We identified a set of palindromic SOX binding sites specifically enriched in regulatory regions of melanoma cells. SOXE proteins homodimerize on these sequences with high cooperativity. In contrast to other transcription factor dimers, which are typically rigidly spaced, SOXE group proteins can bind cooperatively at a wide range of dimer spacings. Using truncated forms of SOXE proteins, we show that a single dimerization (DIM) domain, that precedes the DNA binding high mobility group (HMG) domain, is sufficient for dimer formation, suggesting that DIM : HMG rather than DIM:DIM interactions mediate the dimerization. All SOXE members can also heterodimerize in this fashion, whereas SOXE heterodimers with SOX2, SOX4, SOX6 and SOX18 are not supported. We propose a structural model where SOXE-specific intramolecular DIM:HMG interactions are allosterically communicated to the HMG of juxtaposed molecules. Collectively, SOXE factors evolved a unique mode to combinatorially regulate their target genes that relies on a multifaceted interplay between the HMG and DIM domains. This property potentially extends further the diversity of target genes and cell-specific functions that are regulated by SOXE proteins. PMID:26013289

  10. Interaction of microwave radiation with the high mobility two-dimensional electron system in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures

    Ramanayaka, A.N.; Ye, Tianyu; Liu, H.-C.; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, R.G.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of microwave excitation on the magnetotransport properties of the high mobility two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in the GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure system is investigated by exploring (a) the dependence of the amplitude of the microwave-induced magnetoresistance-oscillations on the polarization direction of the linearly polarized microwaves and (b) the microwave reflection from the 2DES. The polarization study indicates that the amplitude of the magnetoresistance oscillations is remarkably responsive to the relative orientation between the linearly polarized microwaves and the current-axis in the specimen. At low microwave power, P, experiments indicate a strong sinusoidal variation in the diagonal resistance R xx vs. θ at the oscillatory extrema of the microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations. The reflection study indicates strong correlations between the microwave induced magnetoresistance oscillations and oscillatory features in the microwave reflection in a concurrent measurement of the magnetoresistance and the microwave magnetoreflection from the 2DES. The correlations are followed as a function of the microwave frequency and the microwave power, and the results are reported

  11. High mobility group box associated with cell proliferation appears to play an important role in hepatocellular carcinogenesis in rats and humans.

    Suzuki, Shugo; Takeshita, Kentaro; Asamoto, Makoto; Takahashi, Satoru; Kandori, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Kazunari; Saito, Fumiyo; Masuko, Kazuo; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-31

    To identify genes important in hepatocellular carcinogenesis, especially processes involved in malignant transformation, we focused on differences in gene expression between adenomas and carcinomas by DNA microarray. Eighty-one genes for which expression was specific in carcinomas were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software and Gene Ontology, and found to be associated with TP53 and regulators of cell proliferation. In the genes associated with TP53, we selected high mobility group box (HMGB) for detailed analysis. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of HMGBs in carcinomas to be significantly higher than in other lesions among both human and rat liver, and a positive correlation between HMGBs and TP53 was detected in rat carcinomas. Knock-down of HMGB 2 expression in a rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line by RNAi resulted in inhibition of cell growth, although no effects on invasion were evident in vitro. These results suggest that acquisition of malignant potential in the liver requires specific signaling pathways related to high cell proliferation associated with TP53. In particular, HMGBs appear to have an important role for progression and cell proliferation associated with loss of TP53 function in rat and in human hepatocarcinogenesis.

  12. Diabetes-Induced Oxidative Stress in Endothelial Progenitor Cells May Be Sustained by a Positive Feedback Loop Involving High Mobility Group Box-1

    Han Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is considered to be a critical factor in diabetes-induced endothelial progenitor cell (EPC dysfunction, although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the role of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1 in diabetes-induced oxidative stress. HMGB-1 was upregulated in both serum and bone marrow-derived monocytes from diabetic mice compared with control mice. In vitro, advanced glycation end productions (AGEs induced, expression of HMGB-1 in EPCs and in cell culture supernatants in a dose-dependent manner. However, inhibition of oxidative stress with N-acetylcysteine (NAC partially inhibited the induction of HMGB-1 induced by AGEs. Furthermore, p66shc expression in EPCs induced by AGEs was abrogated by incubation with glycyrrhizin (Gly, while increased superoxide dismutase (SOD activity in cell culture supernatants was observed in the Gly treated group. Thus, HMGB-1 may play an important role in diabetes-induced oxidative stress in EPCs via a positive feedback loop involving the AGE/reactive oxygen species/HMGB-1 pathway.

  13. A dimer of the lymphoid protein RAG1 recognizes the recombination signal sequence and the complex stably incorporates the high mobility group protein HMG2.

    Rodgers, K K; Villey, I J; Ptaszek, L; Corbett, E; Schatz, D G; Coleman, J E

    1999-07-15

    RAG1 and RAG2 are the two lymphoid-specific proteins required for the cleavage of DNA sequences known as the recombination signal sequences (RSSs) flanking V, D or J regions of the antigen-binding genes. Previous studies have shown that RAG1 alone is capable of binding to the RSS, whereas RAG2 only binds as a RAG1/RAG2 complex. We have expressed recombinant core RAG1 (amino acids 384-1008) in Escherichia coli and demonstrated catalytic activity when combined with RAG2. This protein was then used to determine its oligomeric forms and the dissociation constant of binding to the RSS. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays show that up to three oligomeric complexes of core RAG1 form with a single RSS. Core RAG1 was found to exist as a dimer both when free in solution and as the minimal species bound to the RSS. Competition assays show that RAG1 recognizes both the conserved nonamer and heptamer sequences of the RSS. Zinc analysis shows the core to contain two zinc ions. The purified RAG1 protein overexpressed in E.coli exhibited the expected cleavage activity when combined with RAG2 purified from transfected 293T cells. The high mobility group protein HMG2 is stably incorporated into the recombinant RAG1/RSS complex and can increase the affinity of RAG1 for the RSS in the absence of RAG2.

  14. Spin dynamics in high-mobility two-dimensional electron systems embedded in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    Griesbeck, Michael

    2012-11-22

    Since many years there has been great effort to explore the spin dynamics in low-dimensional electron systems embedded in GaAs/AlGaAs based heterostructures for the purpose of quantum computation and spintronics applications. Advances in technology allow for the design of high quality and well-defined two-dimensional electron systems (2DES), which are perfectly suited for the study of the underlying physics that govern the dynamics of the electron spin system. In this work, spin dynamics in high-mobility 2DES is studied by means of the all-optical time-resolved Kerr/Faraday rotation technique. In (001)-grown 2DES, a strong in-plane spin dephasing anisotropy is studied, resulting from the interference of comparable Rashba and Dresselhaus contributions to the spin-orbit field (SOF). The dependence of this anisotropy on parameters like the confinement length of the 2DES, the sample temperature, as well as the electron density is demonstrated. Furthermore, coherent spin dynamics of an ensemble of ballistically moving electrons is studied without and within an applied weak magnetic field perpendicular to the sample plane, which forces the electrons to move on cyclotron orbits. Finally, strongly anisotropic spin dynamics is investigated in symmetric (110)-grown 2DES, using the resonant spin amplification method. Here, extremely long out-of-plane spin dephasing times can be achieved, in consequence of the special symmetry of the Dresselhaus SOF.

  15. Unique case of oligoastrocytoma with recurrence and grade progression: Exhibiting differential expression of high mobility group-A1 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase

    Gandhi, Puneet; Khare, Richa; Niraj, Kavita; Garg, Nitin; Sorte, Sandeep K; Gulwani, Hanni

    2016-01-01

    Mixed gliomas, primarily oligoastrocytomas, account for about 5%-10% of all gliomas. Distinguishing oligoastrocytoma based on histological features alone has limitations in predicting the exact biological behavior, necessitating ancillary markers for greater specificity. In this case report, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and high mobility group-A1 (HMGA1); markers of proliferation and stemness, have been quantitatively analyzed in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of a 34 years old patient with oligoastrocytoma. Customized florescence-based immunohistochemistry protocol with enhanced sensitivity and specificity is used in the study. The patient presented with a history of generalized seizures and his magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed infiltrative ill-defined mass lesion with calcified foci within the left frontal white matter, suggestive of glioma. He was surgically treated at our center for four consecutive clinical events. Histopathologically, the tumor was identified as oligoastrocytoma-grade II followed by two recurrence events and final progression to grade III. Overall survival of the patient without adjuvant therapy was more than 9 years. Glial fibrillary acidic protein, p53, Ki-67, nuclear atypia index, pre-operative neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, are the other parameters assessed. Findings suggest that hTERT and HMGA1 are linked to tumor recurrence and progression. Established markers can assist in defining precise histopathological grade in conjuction with conventional markers in clinical setup. PMID:27672647

  16. Relationships between High-mobility Group Protein B1 and Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells Concentrations in Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Chronic Periodontitis.

    Paknejad, Mojgan; Sattari, Mandana; Roozbahani, Zohreh; Ershadi, Morteza; Mehrfard, Ali

    2016-10-01

    One of the inflammatory mediators which is secreted by inflammatory cells is high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1). Interaction of HMGB1 and toll-like receptors (TLRs) leads to increased production of inflammatory cytokines. On the other hand, it was shown that triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM-1) also can be activated by TLRs, and its soluble form (sTREM-1) can be formed by cleaving of membrane-bound form of TREM-1 proteinases. Since there is not enough knowledge about the precise role of HMGB1 and sTREM-1 in periodontal diseases, the aim of this study was to evaluate the concentration of HMGB1 and sTREM-1 in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples of patients with chronic periodontitis. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were obtained from a total of 24 individuals with clinically healthy gingiva and 24 patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis. For collecting GCF samples, periopapers were placed at the entrance of the crevice and left in position for 30 seconds. Then, they were stored at -80°C. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for measuring the concentration of HMGB1 and sTREM-1 in GCF samples. The concentration of HMGB1 (pchronic periodontitis group. In addition, there was a significant positive correlation between HMGB1 and sTREM-1 concentration in chronic periodontitis group (pperiodontal tissues and they can promote inflammatory process, which leads to tissue destruction.

  17. High mobility group box associated with cell proliferation appears to play an important role in hepatocellular carcinogenesis in rats and humans

    Suzuki, Shugo; Takeshita, Kentaro; Asamoto, Makoto; Takahashi, Satoru; Kandori, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Kazunari; Saito, Fumiyo; Masuko, Kazuo; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-01

    To identify genes important in hepatocellular carcinogenesis, especially processes involved in malignant transformation, we focused on differences in gene expression between adenomas and carcinomas by DNA microarray. Eighty-one genes for which expression was specific in carcinomas were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software and Gene Ontology, and found to be associated with TP53 and regulators of cell proliferation. In the genes associated with TP53, we selected high mobility group box (HMGB) for detailed analysis. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of HMGBs in carcinomas to be significantly higher than in other lesions among both human and rat liver, and a positive correlation between HMGBs and TP53 was detected in rat carcinomas. Knock-down of HMGB 2 expression in a rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line by RNAi resulted in inhibition of cell growth, although no effects on invasion were evident in vitro. These results suggest that acquisition of malignant potential in the liver requires specific signaling pathways related to high cell proliferation associated with TP53. In particular, HMGBs appear to have an important role for progression and cell proliferation associated with loss of TP53 function in rat and in human hepatocarcinogenesis

  18. High Performance Polymer Field-Effect Transistors Based on Thermally Crosslinked Poly(3-hexylthiophene)

    Jiang Chun-Xia; Yang Xiao-Yan; Zhao Kai; Wu Xiao-Ming; Yang Li-Ying; Cheng Xiao-Man; Yin Shou-Gen; Wei Jun

    2011-01-01

    The performance of polymer field-effect transistors is improved by thermal crosslinking ofpoly(3-hexylthiophene), using ditert butyl peroxide as the crosslinker. The device performance depends on the crosslinker concentration significantly. We obtain an optimal on/off ratio of 10 5 and the saturate field-effect mobility of 0.34cm 2 V −1 s −1 , by using a suitable ratios of ditert butyl peroxide, 0.5 wt% ofpoly(3-hexylthiophene). The microstructure images show that the crosslinked poly(3-hexylthiophene) active layers simultaneously possess appropriate crystallinity and smooth morphology. Moreover, crosslinking of poly(3-hexylthiophene) prevents the transistors from large threshold voltage shifts under ambient bias-stressing, showing an advantage in encouraging device environmental and operating stability. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  19. A hydrogel capsule as gate dielectric in flexible organic field-effect transistors

    Dumitru, L. M.; Manoli, K.; Magliulo, M.; Torsi, L., E-mail: luisa.torsi@uniba.it [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Via Orabona 4, Bari I-70126 (Italy); Ligonzo, T. [Department of Physics, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Via Orabona 4, Bari I-70126 (Italy); Palazzo, G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Via Orabona 4, Bari I-70126 (Italy); Center of Colloid and Surface Science—CSGI—Bari Unit, Via Orabona 4, Bari I-70126 (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    A jellified alginate based capsule serves as biocompatible and biodegradable electrolyte system to gate an organic field-effect transistor fabricated on a flexible substrate. Such a system allows operating thiophene based polymer transistors below 0.5 V through an electrical double layer formed across an ion-permeable polymeric electrolyte. Moreover, biological macro-molecules such as glucose-oxidase and streptavidin can enter into the gating capsules that serve also as delivery system. An enzymatic bio-reaction is shown to take place in the capsule and preliminary results on the measurement of the electronic responses promise for low-cost, low-power, flexible electronic bio-sensing applications using capsule-gated organic field-effect transistors.

  20. Ion-selective field-effect transitors. A sensor for lithium and calcium

    Kharitonov, A.B.; Petrukhin, O.M.; Nad', V.Yh.; Ypivakov, B.Ya.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Otmakhova, O.A.; Tal'roze, R.V.; Plateh, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    An Li-sensitive sensor based on a field-effect transistor with a tantalum pentoxide gate and a poly(vinyl chloride) membrane based on diethylene glycol bis-o-2-diphenylphosphinylmethyl phenyl ether is developed. THis sensor exhibits analytical characteristics close to those of a lithium-selective electrode analogous in membrane composition; it is insensitive to the concentration of hydrogen ions in the pH range 4.5-8.5. The service life of the sensor is no shorter than four months, which is comparable to the service life of the corresponding ion-selective electrode. A bifunctional sensor for Ca and Li is prepared based on membranes used for preparing the corresponding monofunctional ion-selective field-effect transistors; this sensor exhibits analytical characteristics close to those of ion-selective electrodes and monofunctional sensors. 12 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Organic-inorganic hybrid materials as semiconducting channels in thin-film field-effect transistors

    Kagan; Mitzi; Dimitrakopoulos

    1999-10-29

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials promise both the superior carrier mobility of inorganic semiconductors and the processability of organic materials. A thin-film field-effect transistor having an organic-inorganic hybrid material as the semiconducting channel was demonstrated. Hybrids based on the perovskite structure crystallize from solution to form oriented molecular-scale composites of alternating organic and inorganic sheets. Spin-coated thin films of the semiconducting perovskite (C(6)H(5)C(2)H(4)NH(3))(2)SnI(4) form the conducting channel, with field-effect mobilities of 0.6 square centimeters per volt-second and current modulation greater than 10(4). Molecular engineering of the organic and inorganic components of the hybrids is expected to further improve device performance for low-cost thin-film transistors.

  2. Benzocyclobutene (BCB) Polymer as Amphibious Buffer Layer for Graphene Field-Effect Transistor.

    Wu, Yun; Zou, Jianjun; Huo, Shuai; Lu, Haiyan; Kong, Yuecan; Chen, Tangshen; Wu, Wei; Xu, Jingxia

    2015-08-01

    Owing to the scattering and trapping effects, the interfaces of dielectric/graphene or substrate/graphene can tailor the performance of field-effect transistor (FET). In this letter, the polymer of benzocyclobutene (BCB) was used as an amphibious buffer layer and located at between the layers of substrate and graphene and between the layers of dielectric and graphene. Interestingly, with the help of nonpolar and hydrophobic BCB buffer layer, the large-scale top-gated, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene transistors was prepared on Si/SiO2 substrate, its cutoff frequency (fT) and the maximum cutoff frequency (fmax) of the graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) can be reached at 12 GHz and 11 GHz, respectively.

  3. An innovative large scale integration of silicon nanowire-based field effect transistors

    Legallais, M.; Nguyen, T. T. T.; Mouis, M.; Salem, B.; Robin, E.; Chenevier, P.; Ternon, C.

    2018-05-01

    Since the early 2000s, silicon nanowire field effect transistors are emerging as ultrasensitive biosensors while offering label-free, portable and rapid detection. Nevertheless, their large scale production remains an ongoing challenge due to time consuming, complex and costly technology. In order to bypass these issues, we report here on the first integration of silicon nanowire networks, called nanonet, into long channel field effect transistors using standard microelectronic process. A special attention is paid to the silicidation of the contacts which involved a large number of SiNWs. The electrical characteristics of these FETs constituted by randomly oriented silicon nanowires are also studied. Compatible integration on the back-end of CMOS readout and promising electrical performances open new opportunities for sensing applications.

  4. Predictive simulations and optimization of nanowire field-effect PSA sensors including screening

    Baumgartner, Stefan; Heitzinger, Clemens; Vacic, Aleksandar; Reed, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    We apply our self-consistent PDE model for the electrical response of field-effect sensors to the 3D simulation of nanowire PSA (prostate-specific antigen) sensors. The charge concentration in the biofunctionalized boundary layer at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface is calculated using the propka algorithm, and the screening of the biomolecules by the free ions in the liquid is modeled by a sensitivity factor. This comprehensive approach yields excellent agreement with experimental current-voltage characteristics without any fitting parameters. Having verified the numerical model in this manner, we study the sensitivity of nanowire PSA sensors by changing device parameters, making it possible to optimize the devices and revealing the attributes of the optimal field-effect sensor. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. Extended Gate Field-Effect Transistor Biosensors for Point-Of-Care Testing of Uric Acid.

    Guan, Weihua; Reed, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    An enzyme-free redox potential sensor using off-chip extended-gate field effect transistor (EGFET) with a ferrocenyl-alkanethiol modified gold electrode has been used to quantify uric acid concentration in human serum and urine. Hexacyanoferrate (II) and (III) ions are used as redox reagent. The potentiometric sensor measures the interface potential on the ferrocene immobilized gold electrode, which is modulated by the redox reaction between uric acid and hexacyanoferrate ions. The device shows a near Nernstian response to uric acid and is highly specific to uric acid in human serum and urine. The interference that comes from glucose, bilirubin, ascorbic acid, and hemoglobin is negligible in the normal concentration range of these interferents. The sensor also exhibits excellent long term reliability and is regenerative. This extended gate field effect transistor based sensor is promising for point-of-care detection of uric acid due to the small size, low cost, and low sample volume consumption.

  6. Thienoacene-fused pentalenes: Syntheses, structures, physical properties and applications for organic field-effect transistors

    Dai, Gaole

    2014-11-27

    Three soluble and stable thienoacene-fused pentalene derivatives (1-3) with different π-conjugation lengths were synthesized. X-ray crystallographic analysis and density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed their unique geometric and electronic structures due to the interaction between the aromatic thienoacene units and antiaromatic pentalene moiety. As a result, they all possess a small energy gap and show amphoteric redox behaviour. Time dependent (TD) DFT calculations were used to explain their unique electronic absorption spectra. These new compounds exhibited good thermal stability and ordered packing in solid state and thus their applications in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) were also investigated. The highest field-effect hole mobility of 0.016, 0.036 and 0.001 cm2 V-1 s-1 was achieved for solution-processed thin films of 1-3, respectively.

  7. Dianthraceno[a,e]pentalenes: Synthesis, crystallographic structures and applications in organic field-effect transistors

    Dai, Gaole

    2015-01-01

    Two soluble and stable dianthraceno[a,e]pentalenes with two (DAP1) and six (DAP2) phenyl substituents were synthesized. Both compounds possess a small energy band gap and show amphoteric redox behaviour due to intramolecular donor-accepter interactions. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that DAP2 has a closely packed structure with multi-dimensional [C-H⋯π] interactions although there are no π-π interactions between the dianthraceno[a,e]pentalene cores. As a result, solution-processed field effect transistors based on DAP2 exhibited an average hole mobility of 0.65 cm2 V-1 s-1. Under similar conditions, DAP1 showed an average field effect hole mobility of 0.001 cm2 V-1 s-1. This journal is

  8. Energy minibands degeneration induced by magnetic field effects in graphene superlattices

    Reyes-Villagrana, R. A.; Carrera-Escobedo, V. H.; Suárez-López, J. R.; Madrigal-Melchor, J.; Rodríguez-Vargas, I.

    2017-12-01

    Energy minibands are a basic feature of practically any superlattice. In this regard graphene superlattices are not the exception and recently miniband transport has been reported through magneto-transport measurements. In this work, we compute the energy miniband and transport characteristics for graphene superlattices in which the energy barriers are generated by magnetic and electric fields. The transfer matrix approach and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism have been implemented to calculate the energy minibands and the linear-regime conductance. We find that energy minibands are very sensitive to the magnetic field and become degenerate by rising it. We were also able to correlate the evolution of the energy minibands as a function of the magnetic field with the transport characteristics, finding that miniband transport can be destroyed by magnetic field effects. Here, it is important to remark that although magnetic field effects have been a key element to unveil miniband transport, they can also destroy it.

  9. Germanium field-effect transistor made from a high-purity substrate

    Hansen, W.L.; Goulding, F.S.; Haller, E.E.

    1978-11-01

    Field effect transistors have been fabricated on high-purity germanium substrates using low-temperature technology. The aim of this work is to preserve the low density of trapping centers in high-quality starting material by low-temperature ( 0 C) processing. The use of germanium promises to eliminate some of the traps which cause generation-recombination noise in silicon field-effect transistors (FET's) at low temperatures. Typically, the transconductance (g/sub m/) in the germanium FET's is 10 mA/V and the gate leakage can be less than 10 -12 A. Present devices exhibit a large 1/f noise component and most of this noise must be eliminated if they are to be competitive with silicon FET's commonly used in high-resolution nuclear spectrometers

  10. Dual origin of room temperature sub-terahertz photoresponse in graphene field effect transistors

    Bandurin, D. A.; Gayduchenko, I.; Cao, Y.; Moskotin, M.; Principi, A.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Goltsman, G.; Fedorov, G.; Svintsov, D.

    2018-04-01

    Graphene is considered as a promising platform for detectors of high-frequency radiation up to the terahertz (THz) range due to its superior electron mobility. Previously, it has been shown that graphene field effect transistors (FETs) exhibit room temperature broadband photoresponse to incoming THz radiation, thanks to the thermoelectric and/or plasma wave rectification. Both effects exhibit similar functional dependences on the gate voltage, and therefore, it was difficult to disentangle these contributions in previous studies. In this letter, we report on combined experimental and theoretical studies of sub-THz response in graphene field-effect transistors analyzed at different temperatures. This temperature-dependent study allowed us to reveal the role of the photo-thermoelectric effect, p-n junction rectification, and plasmonic rectification in the sub-THz photoresponse of graphene FETs.

  11. Poloidal field effects on fundamental minority ion cyclotron resonance heating in a tokamak plasma

    Jun, S. C.; Imre, Kaya; Stevens, D. C.; Weitzner, Harold; Chang, C. S.

    2000-01-01

    Minority ion fundamental cyclotron resonance is studied in a large tokamak in which the geometrical optics approximation applies off resonance and the minority average speed is less than the wave phase speeds. Poloidal equilibrium magnetic field effects are included, which lead to nontrivially nonlocal integrodifferential equations for the wave fields. Exact reciprocity relation is given as well as explicit analytic solutions for the transmission coefficients for both the high and low field side incidences. Numerical solutions are needed only for the high field side incident reflection coefficient. Numerical schemes are described and numerical results are presented together with a reliable error bound. Typically, energy absorption increases with poloidal field. The energy absorption increases with minority density at low values of minority density. However, it decreases at high minority density. Poloidal field effects weaken the dependence of energy absorption on the toroidal wave number. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  12. Graphene Field Effect Transistor-Based Detectors for Detection of Ionizing Radiation

    Jovanovic, Igor; Cazalas, Edward; Childres, I.; Patil, A.; Koybasi, O.; Chen, Y-P.

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of our recent efforts to develop novel ionizing radiation sensors based on the nano-material graphene. Graphene used in the field effect transistor architecture could be employed to detect the radiation-induced charge carriers produced in undoped semiconductor absorber substrates, even without the need for charge collection. The detection principle is based on the high sensitivity of graphene to ionization-induced local electric field perturbations in the electrically biased substrate. We experimentally demonstrated promising performance of graphene field effect transistors for detection of visible light, X-rays, gamma-rays, and alpha particles. We propose improved detector architectures which could result in a significant improvement of speed necessary for pulsed mode operation. (authors)

  13. Carbon nanotubes field-effect transistor for rapid detection of DHA

    Nguyen Thi Thuy; Nguyen Duc Chien; Mai Anh Tuan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development of DNA sensor based on a network carbon nanotubes field effect transistor (CNTFETs) for Escherichia coli bacteria detection. The DNA sequences were immobilized on single-walled carbon nanotubes of transistor CNTFETs by using absorption. The hybridization of the DNA probe sequences and complementary DNA strands was detected by electrical conductance change from the electron doping by DNA hybridization directly on the carbon nanotubes leading to the change in the metal-CNTs barrier energy through the modulation of the electrode work function of carbon nanotubes field effect transistor. The results showed that the response time of DNA sensor was approximately 1 min and the sensitivity of DNA sensor was at 0.565 μA/nM; the detection limit of the sensor was about 1 pM of E. coli bacteria sample. (author)

  14. Transport properties of hydrogen passivated silicon nanotubes and silicon nanotube field effect transistors

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2017-01-24

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of silicon nanotubes attached to metallic electrodes from first principles, using density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. The influence of the surface termination is studied as well as the dependence of the transport characteristics on the chirality, diameter, and length. Strong electronic coupling between nanotubes and electrodes is found to be a general feature that results in low contact resistance. The conductance in the tunneling regime is discussed in terms of the complex band structure. Silicon nanotube field effect transistors are simulated by applying a uniform potential gate. Our results demonstrate very high values of transconductance, outperforming the best commercial silicon field effect transistors, combined with low values of sub-threshold swing.

  15. Predictive simulations and optimization of nanowire field-effect PSA sensors including screening

    Baumgartner, Stefan

    2013-05-03

    We apply our self-consistent PDE model for the electrical response of field-effect sensors to the 3D simulation of nanowire PSA (prostate-specific antigen) sensors. The charge concentration in the biofunctionalized boundary layer at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface is calculated using the propka algorithm, and the screening of the biomolecules by the free ions in the liquid is modeled by a sensitivity factor. This comprehensive approach yields excellent agreement with experimental current-voltage characteristics without any fitting parameters. Having verified the numerical model in this manner, we study the sensitivity of nanowire PSA sensors by changing device parameters, making it possible to optimize the devices and revealing the attributes of the optimal field-effect sensor. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. Uniform angular overlap model interpretation of the crystal field effect in U(5+) fluoride compounds

    Gajek, Z.; Mulak, J. (W. Trzebiatowski Inst. of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland))

    1990-11-01

    The uniform interpretation of the crystal field effect in three different U(5+) fluoride compounds: CsUF{sub 6}, {alpha}-UF{sub 5} and {beta}-UF{sub 5} within the angular overlap model (AOM) is given. Some characteristic relations between the AOM parameters and their distance dependencies resulting from ab initio calculations are introduced and examined from a phenomenological point of view. The traditional simplest approach with only one independent parameter, i.e. e{sub {sigma}} with e{sub {pi}}:e{sub {sigma}} = 0.32 and e{sub {delta}} = 0, is shown to provide a consistent interpretation of the crystal field effect of the whole class of the compounds. The parameters obtained for one compound are easily and successfully extrapolated to others. The specificity and importance of the e{sub {delta}} parameter for 5f{sup 1} systems is discussed. (orig.).

  17. Ferroelectric-gate field effect transistor memories device physics and applications

    Ishiwara, Hiroshi; Okuyama, Masanori; Sakai, Shigeki; Yoon, Sung-Min

    2016-01-01

    This book provides comprehensive coverage of the materials characteristics, process technologies, and device operations for memory field-effect transistors employing inorganic or organic ferroelectric thin films. This transistor-type ferroelectric memory has interesting fundamental device physics and potentially large industrial impact. Among the various applications of ferroelectric thin films, the development of nonvolatile ferroelectric random access memory (FeRAM) has progressed most actively since the late 1980s and has achieved modest mass production levels for specific applications since 1995. There are two types of memory cells in ferroelectric nonvolatile memories. One is the capacitor-type FeRAM and the other is the field-effect transistor (FET)-type FeRAM. Although the FET-type FeRAM claims ultimate scalability and nondestructive readout characteristics, the capacitor-type FeRAMs have been the main interest for the major semiconductor memory companies, because the ferroelectric FET has fatal handic...

  18. Synthesis and Field-effect Transistor Behavior of New Oligo-selenophene Derivatives

    Jiwon; Hong; In-Hwan; Jung; Hong-ku; Shim

    2007-01-01

    1 Results In recent years,interests in organic semiconductor have increased due to the applications in optoelectronic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs)[1],field-effect transistors (FETs)[2],and photovoltaic devices[3]. These organic electronics have several advantages over conventional inorganic electronics including facile processability,chemical tunability,compatibility with plastic substrates,and low cost to fabricate. Selenophene-based molecules show good π-conjugating electron o...

  19. Gate-induced carrier delocalization in quantum dot field effect transistors.

    Turk, Michael E; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Oh, Soong Ju; Fafarman, Aaron T; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R; Kikkawa, James M

    2014-10-08

    We study gate-controlled, low-temperature resistance and magnetotransport in indium-doped CdSe quantum dot field effect transistors. We show that using the gate to accumulate electrons in the quantum dot channel increases the "localization product" (localization length times dielectric constant) describing transport at the Fermi level, as expected for Fermi level changes near a mobility edge. Our measurements suggest that the localization length increases to significantly greater than the quantum dot diameter.

  20. Performance of Solution Processed Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors with Graphene Electrodes

    Gangavarapu, P R Yasasvi; Lokesh, Punith Chikkahalli; Bhat, K N; Naik, A K

    2016-01-01

    This work evaluates the performance of carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFET) using few layer graphene as the contact electrode material. We present the experimental results obtained on the barrier height at CNT graphene junction using temperature dependent IV measurements. The estimated barrier height in our devices for both holes and electrons is close to zero or slightly negative indicating the Ohmic contact of graphene with the valence and conduction bands of CNTs. In addition,...

  1. Sensors based on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors and molecular recognition approaches

    Cid Salavert, Cristina Carlota

    2009-01-01

    The general objective of this thesis is to develop chemical sensors whose sensing capacities are based on the principle of molecular recognition and where the transduction is carried out by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT).The sensing device used is the carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET). The new structure of the CNTFET allows nanotubes to be integrated at the surface of the devices, thus exploiting SWCNTs' sensitivity to changes in their environment. The functionalization...

  2. Quantum Transport in Tunnel Field-Effect Transistors for Future Nano-CMOS Applications

    Vandenberghe, William

    2012-01-01

    After decades of scientific and technological development to fabricate ever smaller, faster and more energy efficient MOSFETs, reducing MOSFET power consumption is becoming increasingly difficult. As a possible successor to the MOSFET, the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) has been proposed. The topic of this thesis is to study the working principle of the TFET and to go beyond the semiclassical models towards a fully quantum mechanical modeling of the TFET which has band-to-band tunnelin...

  3. Trap assisted tunneling and its effect on subthreshold swing of tunnel field effect transistors

    Sajjad, Redwan N.; Chern, Winston; Hoyt, Judy L.; Antoniadis, Dimitri A.

    2016-01-01

    We provide a detailed study of the interface Trap Assisted Tunneling (TAT) mechanism in tunnel field effect transistors to show how it contributes a major leakage current path before the Band To Band Tunneling (BTBT) is initiated. With a modified Shockley-Read-Hall formalism, we show that at room temperature, the phonon assisted TAT current always dominates and obscures the steep turn ON of the BTBT current for common densities of traps. Our results are applicable to top gate, double gate and...

  4. Low-voltage self-assembled monolayer field-effect transistors on flexible substrates.

    Schmaltz, Thomas; Amin, Atefeh Y; Khassanov, Artoem; Meyer-Friedrichsen, Timo; Steinrück, Hans-Georg; Magerl, Andreas; Segura, Juan José; Voitchovsky, Kislon; Stellacci, Francesco; Halik, Marcus

    2013-08-27

    Self-assembled monolayer field-effect transistors (SAMFETs) of BTBT functionalized phosphonic acids are fabricated. The molecular design enables device operation with charge carrier mobilities up to 10(-2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and for the first time SAMFETs which operate on rough, flexible PEN substrates even under mechanical substrate bending. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Germanium-Source Tunnel Field Effect Transistors for Ultra-Low Power Digital Logic

    2012-05-10

    CMOS) technology. In this work, Tunnel Field Effect Transistor (TFET) based on Band-to-Band Tunneling ( BTBT ) will be proposed and investigated as an...Band Tunneling ( BTBT ) will be proposed and investigated as an alternative logic switch which can achieve steeper switching characteristics than the...11 2.3.2 Calculation of the Imaginary Dispersion Relation ……………………… 12 2.3.3 Calculation of the BTBT Current and Generation Rate

  6. Diamond-coated field-effect sensor for DNA recognition - influence of material and morphology

    Ižák, Tibor; Sakata, T.; Miyazawa, Y.; Kajisa, T.; Kromka, Alexander; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, Nov (2015), 87-93 ISSN 0925-9635 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101209 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diamond * field effect device * DNA * C-V characteristics * fluorescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.125, year: 2015

  7. Dual field effects in electrolyte-gated spinel ferrite: electrostatic carrier doping and redox reactions

    Takashi Ichimura; Kohei Fujiwara; Hidekazu Tanaka

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the electronic properties of functional oxide materials via external electric fields has attracted increasing attention as a key technology for next-generation electronics. For transition-metal oxides with metallic carrier densities, the electric-field effect with ionic liquid electrolytes has been widely used because of the enormous carrier doping capabilities. The gate-induced redox reactions revealed by recent investigations have, however, highlighted the complex nature of the ...

  8. Modulation of cortical-subcortical networks in Parkinson’s disease by applied field effects

    Hess, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Studies suggest that endogenous field effects may play a role in neuronal oscillations and communication. Non-invasive transcranial electrical stimulation with low-intensity currents can also have direct effects on the underlying cortex as well as distant network effects. While Parkinson’s disease (PD) is amenable to invasive neuromodulation in the basal ganglia by deep brain stimulation (DBS), techniques of non-invasive neuromodulation like transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and ...

  9. Atomic-Monolayer MoS2 Band-to-Band Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor

    Lan, Yann Wen

    2016-09-05

    The experimental observation of band-to-band tunneling in novel tunneling field-effect transistors utilizing a monolayer of MoS2 as the conducting channel is demonstrated. Our results indicate that the strong gate-coupling efficiency enabled by two-dimensional materials, such as monolayer MoS2, results in the direct manifestation of a band-to-band tunneling current and an ambipolar transport.

  10. Field Effect Flow Control in a Polymer T-Intersection Microfluidic Network

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Chang, Richard; Beamesderfer, Mike; Lee, Cheng S.; DeVoe, Don L.

    2003-01-01

    We present a study of induced pressure pumping in a polymer microchannel due to differential electroosmotic flow @OF) rates via field-effect flow control (FEFC). The experimental results demonstrate that the induced pressure pumping is dependent on the distance of the FEFC gate from the cathodic gate. A proposed flow model based on a linearly-decaying zeta potential profile is found to successfully predict experimental trends.

  11. Importance of the Debye screening length on nanowire field effect transistor sensors.

    Stern, Eric; Wagner, Robin; Sigworth, Fred J; Breaker, Ronald; Fahmy, Tarek M; Reed, Mark A

    2007-11-01

    Nanowire field effect transistors (NW-FETs) can serve as ultrasensitive detectors for label-free reagents. The NW-FET sensing mechanism assumes a controlled modification in the local channel electric field created by the binding of charged molecules to the nanowire surface. Careful control of the solution Debye length is critical for unambiguous selective detection of macromolecules. Here we show the appropriate conditions under which the selective binding of macromolecules is accurately sensed with NW-FET sensors.

  12. Detection beyond Debye's length with an electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor.

    Palazzo, Gerardo; De Tullio, Donato; Magliulo, Maria; Mallardi, Antonia; Intranuovo, Francesca; Mulla, Mohammad Yusuf; Favia, Pietro; Vikholm-Lundin, Inger; Torsi, Luisa

    2015-02-04

    Electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors are successfully used as biosensors to detect binding events occurring at distances from the transistor electronic channel that are much larger than the Debye length in highly concentrated solutions. The sensing mechanism is mainly capacitive and is due to the formation of Donnan's equilibria within the protein layer, leading to an extra capacitance (CDON) in series to the gating system. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Plasma wave instability and amplification of terahertz radiation in field-effect-transistor arrays

    Popov, V V; Tsymbalov, G M; Shur, M S

    2008-01-01

    We show that the strong amplification of terahertz radiation takes place in an array of field-effect transistors at small DC drain currents due to hydrodynamic plasmon instability of the collective plasmon mode. Planar designs compatible with standard integrated circuit fabrication processes and strong coupling of terahertz radiation to plasmon modes in FET arrays make such arrays very attractive for potential applications in solid-state terahertz amplifiers and emitters

  14. Numerical study of self-field effects on dynamics of Josephson-junction arrays

    Phillips, J.R.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; White, J.; Orlando, T.P.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the influence of self-induced magnetic fields on dynamic properties of arrays of resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junctions. Self-field effects are modeled by including mutual inductance interactions between every cell in the array. We find that it is important to include all mutual inductance interactions in order to understand the dynamic properties of the array, in particular subharmonic structure arising under AC current bias. (orig.)

  15. Do Prostate Cancer Exosomes Generate a Field Effect Leading to Tumor Multifocality

    2016-04-01

    Undergraduate Research program (to K. Gabriel and E. Frisch), and a generous gift from Melinda and Edward Subia of Orange County CA. Abstract Field effect or...kind gift of Dr. W. Xiao, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China. pLKO.1 control and pLKO.1/EGR-1 shRNA plasmids were from...Pathology and Hospital: Trisha Fleet for procuring prostate tissues through patient consent; Myra Zucker, Cathy Martinez, and Kari Rigg for skillfully

  16. Incorporating TCNQ into thiophene-fused heptacene for n-channel field effect transistor

    Ye, Qun

    2012-06-01

    Incorporation of electron-deficient tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) into electron-rich thiophene-fused heptacene was successfully achieved for the purpose of stabilizing longer acenes and generating new n-type organic semiconductors. The heptacene-TCNQ derivative 1 was found to have good stability and an expected electron transporting property. Electron mobility up to 0.01 cm 2 V -1 s -1 has been obtained for this novel material in solution processed organic field effect transistors. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  17. Magnetic Field Effect on Ultrashort Two-dimensional Optical Pulse Propagation in Silicon Nanotubes

    Konobeeva, N. N.; Evdokimov, R. A.; Belonenko, M. B.

    2018-05-01

    The paper deals with the magnetic field effect which provides a stable propagation of ultrashort pulses in silicon nanotubes from the viewpoint of their waveform. The equation is derived for the electromagnetic field observed in silicon nanotubes with a glance to the magnetic field for two-dimensional optical pulses. The analysis is given to the dependence between the waveform of ultrashort optical pulses and the magnetic flux passing through the cross-sectional area of the nanotube.

  18. Charge-density depinning at metal contacts of graphene field-effect transistors

    Nouchi, Ryo; Tanigaki, Katsumi

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous distortion is often observed in the transfer characteristics of graphene field-effect transistors. We fabricate graphene transistors with ferromagnetic metal electrodes, which reproducibly display distorted transfer characteristics, and show that the distortion is caused by metal-graphene contacts with no charge-density pinning effect. The pinning effect, where the gate voltage cannot tune the charge density of graphene at the metal electrodes, has been experimentally observed; h...

  19. Wafer-Scale Gigahertz Graphene Field Effect Transistors on SiC Substrates

    潘洪亮; 金智; 麻芃; 郭建楠; 刘新宇; 叶甜春; 李佳; 敦少博; 冯志红

    2011-01-01

    Wafer-scale graphene field-effect transistors are fabricated using benzocyclobutene and atomic layer deposition Al2O3 as the top-gate dielectric.The epitaxial-graphene layer is formed by graphitization of a 2-inch-diameter Si-face semi-insulating 6H-SiC substrate.The graphene on the silicon carbide substrate is heavily n-doped and current saturation is not found.For the intrinsic characteristic of this particular channel material,the devices cannot be switched off.The cut-off frequencies of these graphene field-effect transistors,which have a gate length of l μm,are larger than 800 MHz.The largest one can reach 1.24 GHz.There are greater than 95% active devices that can be successfully applied.We thus succeed in fabricating wafer-scale gigahertz graphene field-effect transistors,which paves the way for high-performance graphene devices and circuits.%Wafer-scale graphene Beld-effect transistors are fabricated using benzocyclobutene and atomic layer deposition AI2O3 as the top-gate dielectric. The epitaxial-graphene layer is formed by graphitization of a 2-inch-diameter Si-face semi-insulating 6H-SiC substrate. The graphene on the silicon carbide substrate is heavily n-doped and current saturation is not found. For the intrinsic characteristic of this particular channel material, the devices cannot be switched off. The cut-off frequencies of these graphene field-effect transistors, which have a gate length of l μm, are larger than 800MHz. The largest one can reach 1.24 GHz. There are greater than 95% active devices that can be successfully applied. We thus succeed in fabricating wafer-scale gigahertz graphene Geld-effect transistors, which paves the way for high-performance graphene devices and circuits.

  20. Effect of Disorder on the Conductance of Spin Field Effect Transistors (SPINFET)

    Cahay, M.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2003-01-01

    We show that the conductance of Spin Field Effect Transistors (SPINFET) [Datta and Das, Appl. Phys. Lett., Vol. 56, 665 (1990)] is affected by a single (non-magnetic) impurity in the transistor's channel. The extreme sensitivity of the amplitude and phase of the transistor's conductance oscillations to the location of a single impurity in the channel is reminiscent of the phenomenon of universal conductance fluctuations in mesoscopic samples and is extremely problematic as far as device imple...

  1. Analysis of the two dimensional Datta-Das Spin Field Effect Transistor

    Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    An analytical expression is derived for the conductance modulation of a ballistic two dimensional Datta-Das Spin Field Effect Transistor (SPINFET) as a function of gate voltage. Using this expression, we show that the recently observed conductance modulation in a two-dimensional SPINFET structure does not match the theoretically expected result very well. This calls into question the claimed demonstration of the SPINFET and underscores the need for further careful investigation.

  2. Analysis of the two-dimensional Datta-Das spin field effect transistor

    Agnihotri, P.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2010-03-01

    An analytical expression is derived for the conductance modulation of a ballistic two-dimensional Datta-das spin field effect transistor (SPINFET) as a function of gate voltage. Using this expression, we show that the recently observed conductance modulation in a two-dimensional SPINFET structure does not match the theoretically expected result very well. This calls into question the claimed demonstration of the SPINFET and underscores the need for further careful investigation.

  3. Investigation of Triplet Exciplex Dynamics by Magnetic Field Effects due to the Triplet Mechanism

    Ulrich, T.; Steiner, Ulrich; Föll, Rudolf E.

    1983-01-01

    A reaction scheme is described allowing for magnetic field effects on the chemical kinetics of triplet reactions due to the selective decay of triplet sublevels. The theoretical treatment of this scheme is outlined on the basis of a stochastic Liouville equation, taking into account the rotational diffusion of molecules in liquid solution. Whereas the exact solution of the general case is obtained by a numerical procedure as described by Pedersen and Freed, an approximate analytical expressio...

  4. Subthreshold characteristics of pentacene field-effect transistors influenced by grain boundaries.

    Park, J.; Jeong, Y-S.; Park, K-S.; Do, L-M.; Bae, J-H.; Choi, J.S.; Pearson, C.; Petty, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Grain boundaries in polycrystalline pentacene films significantly affect the electrical characteristics of pentacene field-effect transistors (FETs). Upon reversal of the gate voltage sweep direction, pentacene FETs exhibited hysteretic behaviours in the subthreshold region, which was more pronounced for the FET having smaller pentacene grains. No shift in the flat-band voltage of the metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor elucidates that the observed hysteresis was mainly caused by the infl...

  5. Modeling of pH Dependent Electrochemical Noise in Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors ISFET

    M. P. Das

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available pH ISFETs are very important sensor for in vivo continuous monitoring application of physiological and environmental system. The accuracy of Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor (ISFET output measurement is greatly affected by the presences of noise, drift and slow response of the device. Although the noise analysis of ISFET so far performed in different literature relates only to sources originated from Field Effect Transistor (FET structure which are almost constant for a particular device, the pH dependent electrochemical noise has not been substantially explored and analyzed. In this paper we have investigated the low frequency pH dependent electrochemical noise that originates from the ionic conductance of the electrode-electrolyte-Field Effect Transistor structure of the device and that the noise depends on the concentration of the electrolyte and 1/f in nature. The statistical and frequency analysis of this electrochemical noise of a commercial ISFET sensor, under room temperature has been performed for six different pH values ranging from pH2 to pH9.2. We have also proposed a concentration dependent a/f & b/f2 model of the noise with different values of the coefficients a, b.

  6. Investigations on field-effect transistors based on two-dimensional materials

    Finge, T.; Riederer, F.; Grap, T.; Knoch, J. [Institute of Semiconductor Electronics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Mueller, M.R. [Institute of Semiconductor Electronics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Infineon Technologies, Villach (Austria); Kallis, K. [Intelligent Microsystems Chair, TU Dortmund University (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    In the present article, experimental and theoretical investigations regarding field-effect transistors based on two-dimensional (2D) materials are presented. First, the properties of contacts between a metal and 2D material are discussed. To this end, metal-to-graphene contacts as well to transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) are studied. Whereas metal-graphene contacts can be tuned with an appropriate back-gate, metal-TMD contacts exhibit strong Fermi level pinning showing substantially limited maximum possible drive current. Next, tungsten diselenide (WSe{sub 2}) field-effect transistors are presented. Employing buried-triple-gate substrates allows tuning source, channel and drain by applying appropriate gate voltages so that the device can be reconfigured to work as n-type, p-type and as so-called band-to-band tunnel field-effect transistor on the same WSe{sub 2} flake. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Field Effect Sensors for Nucleic Acid Detection: Recent Advances and Future Perspectives

    Bruno Veigas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade the use of field-effect-based devices has become a basic structural element in a new generation of biosensors that allow label-free DNA analysis. In particular, ion sensitive field effect transistors (FET are the basis for the development of radical new approaches for the specific detection and characterization of DNA due to FETs’ greater signal-to-noise ratio, fast measurement capabilities, and possibility to be included in portable instrumentation. Reliable molecular characterization of DNA and/or RNA is vital for disease diagnostics and to follow up alterations in gene expression profiles. FET biosensors may become a relevant tool for molecular diagnostics and at point-of-care. The development of these devices and strategies should be carefully designed, as biomolecular recognition and detection events must occur within the Debye length. This limitation is sometimes considered to be fundamental for FET devices and considerable efforts have been made to develop better architectures. Herein we review the use of field effect sensors for nucleic acid detection strategies—from production and functionalization to integration in molecular diagnostics platforms, with special focus on those that have made their way into the diagnostics lab.

  8. Tunable SnSe2 /WSe2 Heterostructure Tunneling Field Effect Transistor.

    Yan, Xiao; Liu, Chunsen; Li, Chao; Bao, Wenzhong; Ding, Shijin; Zhang, David Wei; Zhou, Peng

    2017-09-01

    The burgeoning 2D semiconductors can maintain excellent device electrostatics with an ultranarrow channel length and can realize tunneling by electrostatic gating to avoid deprivation of band-edge sharpness resulting from chemical doping, which make them perfect candidates for tunneling field effect transistors. Here this study presents SnSe 2 /WSe 2 van der Waals heterostructures with SnSe 2 as the p-layer and WSe 2 as the n-layer. The energy band alignment changes from a staggered gap band offset (type-II) to a broken gap (type-III) when changing the negative back-gate voltage to positive, resulting in the device operating as a rectifier diode (rectification ratio ~10 4 ) or an n-type tunneling field effect transistor, respectively. A steep average subthreshold swing of 80 mV dec -1 for exceeding two decades of drain current with a minimum of 37 mV dec -1 at room temperature is observed, and an evident trend toward negative differential resistance is also accomplished for the tunneling field effect transistor due to the high gate efficiency of 0.36 for single gate devices. The I ON /I OFF ratio of the transfer characteristics is >10 6 , accompanying a high ON current >10 -5 A. This work presents original phenomena of multilayer 2D van der Waals heterostructures which can be applied to low-power consumption devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. High expression of high-mobility group box 1 in the blood and lungs is associated with the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in smokers.

    Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Hsu, Wen-Hu; Hsieh, Chih-Cheng; Lien, Te-Cheng; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Kou, Yu Ru

    2014-02-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an important mediator in multiple pathological conditions, but the expression of HMGB1 in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has not yet been completely investigated. We aimed to analyze the relationship between HMGB1 expression in blood and lung tissue and the development of COPD. Twenty-eight patients admitted for single pulmonary surgical intervention were enrolled. The expression of HMGB1 in blood and lung tissue was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis and immunohistochemistry stain, respectively. The study patients were divided into smokers with COPD (n = 11), smokers without COPD (n = 8) and non-smoker healthy controls (n = 9). Smokers with COPD compared with smokers without COPD and healthy controls were older in age, with lower post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV1 /FVC) ratio (63.1 ± 5.5 vs 77.6 ± 3.6 and 84.5 ± 5.8, P vs 7.3 ± 4.8 and 17.0 ± 19.6 ng/mL, P = 0.016 and P = 0.021, respectively). In smokers with COPD, the numbers and portion of HMGB1-expressing cells in epithelium and submucosal areas were significantly increased. Notably, plasma HMGB1 levels negatively correlated with post-bronchodilator FEV1 /FVC ratio (r = -0.585, P = 0.008) in smokers, but not in non-smokers. In smokers, high expression of HMGB1 in the blood and lungs is related to the lung function impairment and appears to be associated with the development of COPD. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  10. Effects of subconjunctival administration of anti-high mobility group box 1 on dry eye in a mouse model of Sjӧgren's syndrome.

    Kim, Kyeong Hwan; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Ryu, Jin Suk; Kim, Yu Jeong; Oh, Joo Youn; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) acts as a damage associated molecular pattern molecule through the Toll-like receptor to promote autoreactive B cell activation, which may be involved in the pathogenesis of Sjӧgren's syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of subconjunctival administration of anti-HMGB1 on dry eye in a mouse model of Sjӧgren's syndrome. Ten weeks-old NOD.B10.H2b mice were subconjunctivally injected with 0.02 to 2 μg of anti-HMGB1 antibodies or PBS twice a week for two consecutive weeks. Tear volume and corneal staining scores were measured and compared between before- and after-treatment. Goblet cell density was counted in PAS stained forniceal conjunctiva and inflammatory foci score (>50 cells/focus) was measured in extraorbital glands. Flow cytometry was performed to evaluate the changes in BrdU+ cells, IL-17-, IL-10-, or IFNγ-secreting cells, functional B cells, and IL-22 secreting innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) in cervical lymph nodes. The level of IL-22 in intraorbital glands was measured by ELISA. Injection of 2 μg or 0.02 μg anti-HMGB1 attenuated corneal epithelial erosions and increased tear secretion (pdry eye. The improvement of dry eye may involve an increase of ILC3s, rather than modulation of B or plasma cells, as shown using a mouse model of Sjӧgren's syndrome.

  11. High plasma levels of high mobility group box 1 is associated with the risk of sepsis in severe blunt chest trauma patients: a prospective cohort study.

    Wang, Xiao-Wen; Karki, Avash; Zhao, Xing-Ji; Xiang, Xiao-Yong; Lu, Zhi-Qian

    2014-08-02

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a late mediator of systemic inflammation. Extracellular HMGB1 play a central pathogenic role in critical illness. The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between plasma HMGB1 concentrations and the risk of poor outcomes in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. The plasma concentrations of HMGB1 in patients with severe blunt chest trauma (AIS ≥ 3) were measured by a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at four time points during seven days after admission, and the dynamic release patterns were monitored. The biomarker levels were compared between patients with sepsis and non-sepsis, and between patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and non-MODS. The related factors of prognosis were analyzed by using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The short-form 36 was used to evaluate the quality of life of patients at 12 months after injury. Plasma HMGB1 levels were significantly higher both in sepsis and MODS group on post-trauma day 3, 5, and 7 compared with the non-sepsis and non-MODS groups, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that HMGB1 levels and ISS were independent risk factors for sepsis and MODS in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. Plasma HMGB1 levels were significantly elevated in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. HMGB1 levels were associated with the risk of poor outcome in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. Daily HMGB1 levels measurements is a potential useful tool in the early identification of post-trauma complications. Further studies are needed to determine whether HMGB1 intervention could prevent the development of sepsis and MODS in patients with severe blunt chest trauma.

  12. Generation and emplacement of shear-related highly mobile crustal melts: the synkinematic leucogranites from the Variscan Tormes Dome, Western Spain

    López-Moro, Francisco Javier; López-Plaza, Miguel; Romer, Rolf L.

    2012-07-01

    The Tormes dome consists of S-type granites that intruded into Ordovician augen gneisses and Neoproterozoic-Lower Cambrian metapelites/metagreywackes at different extents of migmatization. S-type granites are mainly equigranular two-mica granites, occurring as: (1) enclave-laden subvertical feeder dykes, (2) small external sill-like bodies with size and shape relations indicative for self-similar pluton growth, and (3) as large pluton bodies, emplaced at higher levels than the external ones. These magmas were highly mobile as it is inferred from the high contents of fluxing components, the disintegration and alignment of pelitic xenoliths in feeder dykes and at the bottom of some sill-like bodies. Field relations relate this 311 Ma magmatism (U-Pb monazite) to the regional shearing of the D3 Variscan event. Partial melting modeling and the relatively high estimated liquidus temperatures indicate biotite-dehydration partial melting (800-840°C and 400-650 MPa) rather than water-fluxed melting, implying that there was no partial melting triggered by externally derived fluids in the shear zones. Instead, the subvertical shear zones favored extraction of melts that formed during the regional migmatization event around 320 Ma. Nd isotope variation among the granites might reflect disequilibrium partial melting or different protoliths. Mass-balance and trace element partial melting modeling strongly suggest two kinds of fertile crustal protoliths: augen gneisses and metapelites. Slight compositional variation among the leucogranites does not reflect different extent of protolith melting but is related to a small amount of fractional crystallization (bodies. The lower extent of fractional crystallization and the higher-pressure emplacement conditions of the sill-like bodies support a more restricted movement through the crust than for batholitic leucogranites.

  13. Solid phase epitaxial growth of high mobility La:BaSnO_3 thin films co-doped with interstitial hydrogen

    Niedermeier, Christian A.; Rhode, Sneha; Fearn, Sarah; Moram, Michelle A.; Ide, Keisuke; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the solid phase epitaxial growth of high mobility La:BaSnO_3 thin films on SrTiO_3 single crystal substrates by crystallization through thermal annealing of nanocrystalline thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. The La:BaSnO_3 thin films show high epitaxial quality and Hall mobilities up to 26 ± 1 cm"2/Vs. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy is used to determine the La concentration profile in the La:BaSnO_3 thin films, and a 9%–16% La doping activation efficiency is obtained. An investigation of H doping to BaSnO_3 thin films is presented employing H plasma treatment at room temperature. Carrier concentrations in previously insulating BaSnO_3 thin films were increased to 3 × 10"1"9" cm"−"3 and in La:BaSnO_3 thin films from 6 × 10"1"9" cm"−"3 to 1.5 × 10"2"0" cm"−"3, supporting a theoretical prediction that interstitial H serves as an excellent n-type dopant. An analysis of the free electron absorption by infrared spectroscopy yields a small (H,La):BaSnO_3 electron effective mass of 0.27 ± 0.05 m_0 and an optical mobility of 26 ± 7 cm"2/Vs. As compared to La:BaSnO_3 single crystals, the smaller electron mobility in epitaxial thin films grown on SrTiO_3 substrates is ascribed to threading dislocations as observed in high resolution transmission electron micrographs.

  14. Receptor for advanced glycation end products and its ligand high-mobility group box-1 mediate allergic airway sensitization and airway inflammation.

    Ullah, Md Ashik; Loh, Zhixuan; Gan, Wan Jun; Zhang, Vivian; Yang, Huan; Li, Jian Hua; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Armour, Carol L; Hughes, J Margaret; Phipps, Simon; Sukkar, Maria B

    2014-08-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) shares common ligands and signaling pathways with TLR4, a key mediator of house dust mite (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) (HDM) sensitization. We hypothesized that RAGE and its ligand high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) cooperate with TLR4 to mediate HDM sensitization. To determine the requirement for HMGB1 and RAGE, and their relationship with TLR4, in airway sensitization. TLR4(-/-), RAGE(-/-), and RAGE-TLR4(-/-) mice were intranasally exposed to HDM or cockroach (Blatella germanica) extracts, and features of allergic inflammation were measured during the sensitization or challenge phase. Anti-HMGB1 antibody and the IL-1 receptor antagonist Anakinra were used to inhibit HMGB1 and the IL-1 receptor, respectively. The magnitude of allergic airway inflammation in response to either HDM or cockroach sensitization and/or challenge was significantly reduced in the absence of RAGE but not further diminished in the absence of both RAGE and TLR4. HDM sensitization induced the release of HMGB1 from the airway epithelium in a biphasic manner, which corresponded to the sequential activation of TLR4 then RAGE. Release of HMGB1 in response to cockroach sensitization also was RAGE dependent. Significantly, HMGB1 release occurred downstream of TLR4-induced IL-1α, and upstream of IL-25 and IL-33 production. Adoptive transfer of HDM-pulsed RAGE(+/+)dendritic cells to RAGE(-/-) mice recapitulated the allergic responses after HDM challenge. Immunoneutralization of HMGB1 attenuated HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. The HMGB1-RAGE axis mediates allergic airway sensitization and airway inflammation. Activation of this axis in response to different allergens acts to amplify the allergic inflammatory response, which exposes it as an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Real-time Kinetics of High-mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) Oxidation in Extracellular Fluids Studied by in Situ Protein NMR Spectroscopy*

    Zandarashvili, Levani; Sahu, Debashish; Lee, Kwanbok; Lee, Yong Sun; Singh, Pomila; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Iwahara, Junji

    2013-01-01

    Some extracellular proteins are initially secreted in reduced forms via a non-canonical pathway bypassing the endoplasmic reticulum and become oxidized in the extracellular space. One such protein is HMGB1 (high-mobility group box 1). Extracellular HMGB1 has different redox states that play distinct roles in inflammation. Using a unique NMR-based approach, we have investigated the kinetics of HMGB1 oxidation and the half-lives of all-thiol and disulfide HMGB1 species in serum, saliva, and cell culture medium. In this approach, salt-free lyophilized 15N-labeled all-thiol HMGB1 was dissolved in actual extracellular fluids, and the oxidation and clearance kinetics were monitored in situ by recording a series of heteronuclear 1H-15N correlation spectra. We found that the half-life depends significantly on the extracellular environment. For example, the half-life of all-thiol HMGB1 ranged from ∼17 min (in human serum and saliva) to 3 h (in prostate cancer cell culture medium). Furthermore, the binding of ligands (glycyrrhizin and heparin) to HMGB1 significantly modulated the oxidation kinetics. Thus, the balance between the roles of all-thiol and disulfide HMGB1 proteins depends significantly on the extracellular environment and can also be artificially modulated by ligands. This is important because extracellular HMGB1 has been suggested as a therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases and cancer. Our work demonstrates that the in situ protein NMR approach is powerful for investigating the behavior of proteins in actual extracellular fluids containing an enormous number of different molecules. PMID:23447529

  16. Cell-Free DNA, High-Mobility Group Box-1, and Procalcitonin Concentrations in Dogs With Gastric Dilatation–Volvulus Syndrome

    Roberta Troia

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Canine gastric dilatation–volvulus (GDV is a life-threatening disease characterized by extensive tissue ischemia, tissue hypoperfusion, and systemic inflammation. Biomarkers that better reflect the severity of gastric necrosis and systemic inflammation would aid clinicians in the management of these patients. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA, high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1, and procalcitonin (PCT in dogs with GDV. Concentrations of cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT were measured in citrated plasma samples collected from 29 dogs with GDV at hospital admission. Additional data collected included baseline lactate concentrations, APPLEfast score, evidence of gastric necrosis, occurrence of postoperative complications, and outcome. Twenty-four healthy dogs were sampled as controls. Continuous variables between groups were compared with the Mann–Whitney U and correlations between continuous variables were assessed by calculation of Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Alpha was set at 0.05. Dogs with GDV had significantly greater concentrations of cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT compared to controls (P = 0.0009, P = 0.004, and P = 0.009, respectively. PCT concentrations were significantly higher in non-survivors compared to survivors (P = 0.008. Dogs with gastric necrosis had significantly greater lactate concentrations compared to dogs without gastric necrosis (P = 0.0005. The APPLEfast score was not prognostic. Lactate and PCT concentrations were moderately, positively correlated (rs 0.51, P = 0.0005. Concentrations of the inflammatory biomarkers cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT are increased in canine GDV. Only lactate and PCT concentrations were prognostic in this population of GDV dogs and were predictive of the presence of gastric necrosis and of non-survival to hospital discharge, respectively.

  17. Cell-Free DNA, High-Mobility Group Box-1, and Procalcitonin Concentrations in Dogs With Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus Syndrome.

    Troia, Roberta; Giunti, Massimo; Calipa, Stefano; Goggs, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Canine gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) is a life-threatening disease characterized by extensive tissue ischemia, tissue hypoperfusion, and systemic inflammation. Biomarkers that better reflect the severity of gastric necrosis and systemic inflammation would aid clinicians in the management of these patients. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA), high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), and procalcitonin (PCT) in dogs with GDV. Concentrations of cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT were measured in citrated plasma samples collected from 29 dogs with GDV at hospital admission. Additional data collected included baseline lactate concentrations, APPLE fast score, evidence of gastric necrosis, occurrence of postoperative complications, and outcome. Twenty-four healthy dogs were sampled as controls. Continuous variables between groups were compared with the Mann-Whitney U and correlations between continuous variables were assessed by calculation of Spearman's correlation coefficient. Alpha was set at 0.05. Dogs with GDV had significantly greater concentrations of cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT compared to controls ( P  = 0.0009, P  = 0.004, and P  = 0.009, respectively). PCT concentrations were significantly higher in non-survivors compared to survivors ( P  = 0.008). Dogs with gastric necrosis had significantly greater lactate concentrations compared to dogs without gastric necrosis ( P  = 0.0005). The APPLE fast score was not prognostic. Lactate and PCT concentrations were moderately, positively correlated ( r s 0.51, P  = 0.0005). Concentrations of the inflammatory biomarkers cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT are increased in canine GDV. Only lactate and PCT concentrations were prognostic in this population of GDV dogs and were predictive of the presence of gastric necrosis and of non-survival to hospital discharge, respectively.

  18. Cell-Free DNA, High-Mobility Group Box-1, and Procalcitonin Concentrations in Dogs With Gastric Dilatation–Volvulus Syndrome

    Troia, Roberta; Giunti, Massimo; Calipa, Stefano; Goggs, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Canine gastric dilatation–volvulus (GDV) is a life-threatening disease characterized by extensive tissue ischemia, tissue hypoperfusion, and systemic inflammation. Biomarkers that better reflect the severity of gastric necrosis and systemic inflammation would aid clinicians in the management of these patients. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA), high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), and procalcitonin (PCT) in dogs with GDV. Concentrations of cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT were measured in citrated plasma samples collected from 29 dogs with GDV at hospital admission. Additional data collected included baseline lactate concentrations, APPLEfast score, evidence of gastric necrosis, occurrence of postoperative complications, and outcome. Twenty-four healthy dogs were sampled as controls. Continuous variables between groups were compared with the Mann–Whitney U and correlations between continuous variables were assessed by calculation of Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Alpha was set at 0.05. Dogs with GDV had significantly greater concentrations of cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT compared to controls (P = 0.0009, P = 0.004, and P = 0.009, respectively). PCT concentrations were significantly higher in non-survivors compared to survivors (P = 0.008). Dogs with gastric necrosis had significantly greater lactate concentrations compared to dogs without gastric necrosis (P = 0.0005). The APPLEfast score was not prognostic. Lactate and PCT concentrations were moderately, positively correlated (rs 0.51, P = 0.0005). Concentrations of the inflammatory biomarkers cfDNA, HMGB1, and PCT are increased in canine GDV. Only lactate and PCT concentrations were prognostic in this population of GDV dogs and were predictive of the presence of gastric necrosis and of non-survival to hospital discharge, respectively. PMID:29686994

  19. High-mobility group box 1 released by autophagic cancer-associated fibroblasts maintains the stemness of luminal breast cancer cells.

    Zhao, Xi-Long; Lin, Yong; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Zhuo; Yang, Shuai; Lu, Lu; Liang, Yan; Liu, Xue; Tan, Jiao; Hu, Xu-Gang; Niu, Qin; Fu, Wen-Juan; Yan, Ze-Xuan; Guo, De-Yu; Ping, Yi-Fang; Wang, Ji Ming; Zhang, Xia; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Yao, Xiao-Hong

    2017-11-01

    Cancer stem cells/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) and their microenvironmental niche play a vital role in malignant tumour recurrence and metastasis. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are major components of the niche of breast cancer-initiating cells (BCICs), and their interactions may profoundly affect breast cancer progression. Autophagy has been considered to be a critical process for CIC maintenance, but whether it is involved in the cross-talk between CAFs and CICs to affect tumourigenesis and pathological significance has not been determined. In this study, we found that the presence of CAFs containing high levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3II), a marker of autophagosomes, was associated with more aggressive luminal human breast cancer. CAFs in human luminal breast cancer tissues with high autophagy activity enriched BCICs with increased tumourigenicity. Mechanistically, autophagic CAFs released high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which activated its receptor, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, expressed by luminal breast cancer cells, to enhance their stemness and tumourigenicity. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry of 180 luminal breast cancers revealed that high LC3II/TLR4 levels predicted an increased relapse rate and a poorer prognosis. Our findings demonstrate that autophagic CAFs play a critical role in promoting the progression of luminal breast cancer through an HMGB1-TLR4 axis, and that both autophagy in CAFs and TLR4 on breast cancer cells constitute potential therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. High-mobility group (HMG) protein HMG-1 and TATA-binding protein-associated factor TAF(II)30 affect estrogen receptor-mediated transcriptional activation.

    Verrier, C S; Roodi, N; Yee, C J; Bailey, L R; Jensen, R A; Bustin, M; Parl, F F

    1997-07-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to a family of ligand-inducible nuclear receptors that exert their effects by binding to cis-acting DNA elements in the regulatory region of target genes. The detailed mechanisms by which ER interacts with the estrogen response element (ERE) and affects transcription still remain to be elucidated. To study the ER-ERE interaction and transcription initiation, we employed purified recombinant ER expressed in both the baculovirus-Sf9 and his-tagged bacterial systems. The effect of high-mobility group (HMG) protein HMG-1 and purified recombinant TATA-binding protein-associated factor TAF(II)30 on ER-ERE binding and transcription initiation were assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and in vitro transcription from an ERE-containing template (pERE2LovTATA), respectively. We find that purified, recombinant ER fails to bind to ERE in spite of high ligand-binding activity and electrophoretic and immunological properties identical to ER in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. HMG-1 interacts with ER and promotes ER-ERE binding in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The effectiveness of HMG-1 to stimulate ER-ERE binding in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay depends on the sequence flanking the ERE consensus as well as the position of the latter in the oligonucleotide. We find that TAF(II)30 has no effect on ER-ERE binding either alone or in combination with ER and HMG-1. Although HMG-1 promotes ER-ERE binding, it fails to stimulate transcription initiation either in the presence or absence of hormone. In contrast, TAF(II)30, while not affecting ER-ERE binding, stimulates transcription initiation 20-fold in the presence of HMG-1. These results indicate that HMG-1 and TAF(II)30 act in sequence, the former acting to promote ER-ERE binding followed by the latter to stimulate transcription initiation.