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Sample records for high-intensity laser generated

  1. ANALYSIS AND MITIGATION OF X-RAY HAZARD GENERATED FROM HIGH INTENSITY LASER-TARGET INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, R.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.A.; Rokni, S.H.; Woods, M.; Xia, Z.; /SLAC

    2011-03-21

    Interaction of a high intensity laser with matter may generate an ionizing radiation hazard. Very limited studies have been made, however, on the laser-induced radiation protection issue. This work reviews available literature on the physics and characteristics of laser-induced X-ray hazards. Important aspects include the laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency, electron angular distribution, electron energy spectrum and effective temperature, and bremsstrahlung production of X-rays in the target. The possible X-ray dose rates for several femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser systems used at SLAC, including the short pulse laser system for the Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument (peak power 4 TW and peak intensity 2.4 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) were analysed. A graded approach to mitigate the laser-induced X-ray hazard with a combination of engineered and administrative controls is also proposed.

  2. Gamma beams generation with high intensity lasers for two photon Breit-Wheeler pair production

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Ribeyre, Xavier; Jansen, Oliver; Esnault, Leo; Jequier, Sophie; Dubois, Jean-Luc; Hulin, Sebastien; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir; Arefiev, Alex; Toncian, Toma; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2017-10-01

    Linear Breit-Wheeler pair creation is the lowest threshold process in photon-photon interaction, controlling the energy release in Gamma Ray Bursts and Active Galactic Nuclei, but it has never been directly observed in the laboratory. Using numerical simulations, we demonstrate the possibility to produce collimated gamma beams with high energy conversion efficiency using high intensity lasers and innovative targets. When two of these beams collide at particular angles, our analytical calculations demonstrate a beaming effect easing the detection of the pairs in the laboratory. This effect has been confirmed in photon collision simulations using a recently developed innovative algorithm. An alternative scheme using Bremsstrahlung radiation produced by next generation high repetition rate laser systems is also being explored and the results of first optimization campaigns in this regime will be presented.

  3. Monoenergetic proton emission from nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser-generated plasmaa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cavallaro, S.; Cutroneo, M.; Giuffrida, L.; Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Kravarik, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Wolowski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Rosinski, M.

    2012-02-01

    A 1016 W/cm2 Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm at the fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD2 targets placed inside a high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deutons and carbon ions emission with energy of up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deutons may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD2 targets can be employed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deutons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  4. Monoenergetic proton emission from nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser-generated plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L; Cavallaro, S; Cutroneo, M; Giuffrida, L; Krasa, J; Margarone, D; Velyhan, A; Kravarik, J; Ullschmied, J; Wolowski, J; Szydlowski, A; Rosinski, M

    2012-02-01

    A 10(16) W∕cm(2) Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm at the fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD(2) targets placed inside a high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deutons and carbon ions emission with energy of up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deutons may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD(2) targets can be employed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deutons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  5. Monoenergetic proton emission from nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser-generated plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L. [INFN-LNS Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dip.to di Fisica, Universita di Messina, V.le F.S. D' Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Cavallaro, S.; Giuffrida, L. [INFN-LNS Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cutroneo, M. [Dip.to di Fisica, Universita di Messina, V.le F.S. D' Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Ullschmied, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Kravarik, J. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Electro-Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Wolowski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Rosinski, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, IPPLM, 23 Hery Str., 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-02-15

    A 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm at the fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD{sub 2} targets placed inside a high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deutons and carbon ions emission with energy of up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deutons may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD{sub 2} targets can be employed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deutons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  6. Prospects of odd and even harmonic generation by an atom in a high-intensity laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatskaya, A. V.; Volkova, E. A.; Popov, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    A new approach for studying the spontaneous emission of an atomic system in the presence of a high-intensity laser field is used to study the process of harmonic generation. The analysis is based on consideration of quantum system interaction, with the quantized field modes being in the vacuum state, while the intense laser field is considered to be classically beyond perturbation theory. The numerical analysis of the emission from the single one-electron 1D atom irradiated by the femtosecond laser pulse of a Ti:Sa laser is discussed. It is demonstrated that not only odd, but also even harmonics can be emitted if the laser field is strong enough. The origin of the appearance of even harmonics is studied. The obtained results are compared with those found in the framework of the semiclassical approach that is widely used to study harmonic generation. It is found that the semiclassical approach is inapplicable in the strong-field limit.

  7. Generation of hard X-ray from solid target irradiated by UV high intensity ultrashort pulse laser

    CERN Document Server

    Tao Ye; Tang Xiu Zhang; Shan Yu Sheng; Wang Nai Yan

    2002-01-01

    Hard X-ray continuum generated from interaction of UV high intensity ultrashort pulse laser with solid target has been investigated by experiment. P-polarized light irradiating 5 mm Cu slab with 45 degree, the hard X-ray with energy of 200 keV has been detected. Fitting the experiment data by Maxwellian distribution, the temperature of hot electron is 67 keV. The experiment data are the results of combination of several absorption mechanisms

  8. Generation of shock waves in dense plasmas by high-intensity laser pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasley John

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When intense short-pulse laser beams (I > 1022 W/m2, τ < 20 ps interact with high density plasmas, strong shock waves are launched. These shock waves may be generated by a range of processes, and the relative significance of the various mechanisms driving the formation of these shock waves is not well understood. It is challenging to obtain experimental data on shock waves near the focus of such intense laser–plasma interactions. The hydrodynamics of such interactions is, however, of great importance to fast ignition based inertial confinement fusion schemes as it places limits upon the time available for depositing energy in the compressed fuel, and thereby directly affects the laser requirements. In this manuscript we present the results of magnetohydrodynamic simulations showing the formation of shock waves under such conditions, driven by the j × B force and the thermal pressure gradient (where j is the current density and B the magnetic field strength. The time it takes for shock waves to form is evaluated over a wide range of material and current densities. It is shown that the formation of intense relativistic electron current driven shock waves and other related hydrodynamic phenomena may be expected over time scales of relevance to intense laser–plasma experiments and the fast ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion. A newly emerging technique for studying such interactions is also discussed. This approach is based upon Doppler spectroscopy and offers promise for investigating early time shock wave hydrodynamics launched by intense laser pulses.

  9. Laser plasma instabilities and hot electron generation from multi-kilojoule shock ignition relevant high-intensity IR and UV lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Li, J.; Beg, F. N.; Krauland, C. M.; Muller, S.; Alexander, N.; Ren, C.; Theobald, W.; Turnbull, D.; Haberberger, D.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Batani, D.; Santos, J.; Nicolai, P.; Wei, M. S.

    2017-10-01

    As an alternative ignition scheme, shock ignition uses a strong convergent shock driven by a high-intensity laser ( 1016 W/cm2) on a pre-compressed fuel to achieve ignition. Moderately energetic hot electrons (laser plasma instabilities (LPI) can strengthen the ignition shock by depositing energy at the compressed outer shell increasing ablation pressure. In our previous experiments on OMEGA-EP, 90 keV collimated hot electrons were observed from a 100 ps, 2.5 kJ IR laser interacting with SI long scale length hot plasmas (Ln 200 -500 µm, Te >1 keV, produced by low-intensity UV beams). To further characterize hot electron generation and investigate the related LPIs, we have extended the experiments with high-intensity, multi-kJ IR and UV lasers (both at normal incidence, up to 2×1016 W/cm2) . Two IR beams in co-propagation extend the pulse duration to 200 ps, closer to required ignition pulse duration. The scattered light is spectrally resolved to identify the LPI. Angular filter refractometer images from 4 ω probe show the details of the laser propagation and interaction. The divergence, energy, and temperature of the hot electrons are diagnosed by measuring the bremsstrahlung and Cu K α emission. Details of the experimental results will be presented. This work is supported by the U. S. DOE under contracts DE-NA0003600 (NLUF) and DE-SC0014666 (HEDLP).

  10. Fundamental Physics Explored with High Intensity Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, T.; Homma, K.

    2012-10-01

    Over the last century the method of particle acceleration to high energies has become the prime approach to explore the fundamental nature of matter in laboratory. It appears that the latest search of the contemporary accelerator based on the colliders shows a sign of saturation (or at least a slow-down) in increasing its energy and other necessary parameters to extend this frontier. We suggest two pronged approach enabled by the recent progress in high intensity lasers. First we envision the laser-driven plasma accelerator may be able to extend the reach of the collider. For this approach to bear fruit, we need to develop the technology of high averaged power laser in addition to the high intensity. For this we mention that the latest research effort of ICAN is an encouraging sign. In addition to this, we now introduce the concept of the noncollider paradigm in exploring fundamental physics with high intensity (and large energy) lasers. One of the examples we mention is the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) far beyond TeV without large luminosity. If we relax or do not require the large luminosity necessary for colliders, but solely in ultrahigh energy frontier, we are still capable of exploring such a fundamental issue. Given such a high energetic particle source and high-intensity laser fields simultaneously, we expect to be able to access new aspects on the matter and the vacuum structure from fundamental physical point of views. LWFA naturally exploits the nonlinear optical effects in the plasma when it becomes of relativistic intensity. Normally nonlinear optical effects are discussed based upon polarization susceptibility of matter to external fields. We suggest application of this concept even to the vacuum structure as a new kind of order parameter to discuss vacuum-originating phenomena at semimacroscopic scales. This viewpoint unifies the following observables with the unprecedented experimental environment we envision; the dispersion relation of

  11. High intensity laser interactions with atomic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditmire, T

    2000-08-07

    The development of ultrashort pulse table top lasers with peak pulse powers in excess of 1 TW has permitted an access to studies of matter subject to unprecedented light intensities. Such interactions have accessed exotic regimes of multiphoton atomic and high energy-density plasma physics. Very recently, the nature of the interactions between these very high intensity laser pulses and atomic clusters of a few hundred to a few thousand atoms has come under study. Such studies have found some rather unexpected results, including the striking finding that these interactions appear to be more energetic than interactions with either single atoms or solid density plasmas. Recent experiments have shown that the explosion of such clusters upon intense irradiation can expel ions from the cluster with energies from a few keV to nearly 1 MeV. This phenomenon has recently been exploited to produce DD fusion neutrons in a gas of exploding deuterium clusters. Under this project, we have undertaken a general study of the intense femtosecond laser cluster interaction. Our goal is to understand the macroscopic and microscopic coupling between the laser and the clusters with the aim of optimizing high flux fusion neutron production from the exploding deuterium clusters or the x-ray yield in the hot plasmas that are produced in this interaction. In particular, we are studying the physics governing the cluster explosions. The interplay between a traditional Coulomb explosion description of the cluster disassembly and a plasma-like hydrodynamic explosion is not entirely understood, particularly for small to medium sized clusters (<1000 atoms) and clusters composed of low-Z atoms. We are focusing on experimental studies of the ion and electron energies resulting from such explosions through various experimental techniques. We are also examining how an intense laser pulse propagates through a dense medium containing these clusters.

  12. Generation of High-Power High-Intensity Short X-Ray Free-Electron-Laser Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guetg, Marc W; Lutman, Alberto A; Ding, Yuantao; Maxwell, Timothy J; Decker, Franz-Josef; Bergmann, Uwe; Huang, Zhirong

    2018-01-05

    X-ray free-electron lasers combine a high pulse power, short pulse length, narrow bandwidth, and high degree of transverse coherence. Any increase in the photon pulse power, while shortening the pulse length, will further push the frontier on several key x-ray free-electron laser applications including single-molecule imaging and novel nonlinear x-ray methods. This Letter shows experimental results at the Linac Coherent Light Source raising its maximum power to more than 300% of the current limit while reducing the photon pulse length to 10 fs. This was achieved by minimizing residual transverse-longitudinal centroid beam offsets and beam yaw and by correcting the dispersion when operating over 6 kA peak current with a longitudinally shaped beam.

  13. High-intensity, high-contrast laser pulses generated from the fully diode-pumped Yb:glass laser system POLARIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Marco; Keppler, Sebastian; Bödefeld, Ragnar; Kessler, Alexander; Liebetrau, Hartmut; Körner, Jörg; Hellwing, Marco; Schorcht, Frank; Jäckel, Oliver; Sävert, Alexander; Polz, Jens; Arunachalam, Ajay Kawshik; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte C

    2013-03-01

    We report on the first generation of high-contrast, 164 fs duration pulses from the laser system POLARIS reaching focused peak intensities in excess of 2×10(20) W/cm2. To our knowledge, this is the highest peak intensity reported so far that has been achieved with a diode-pumped, solid-state laser. Several passive contrast enhancement techniques have been specially developed and implemented, achieving a relative prepulse intensity smaller than 10(-8) at t=-30 ps before the main pulse. Furthermore a closed-loop adaptive-optics system has been installed. Together with angular chirp compensation, this method has led to a significant reduction of the focal spot size and an increase of the peak intensity.

  14. Generation and transport of fast electrons in the interaction of high intensity laser with matter; Generation et transport des electrons rapides dans l'interaction laser-matiere a haut flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, H

    2005-10-15

    The general context of this study is the Inertial Confinement for thermonuclear controlled fusion and, more precisely, the Fast Igniter (FI). In this context the knowledge of the generation and transport of fast electrons is crucial. This thesis is an experimental study of the generation and transport of fast electrons in the interaction of a high intensity laser ({>=} 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) with a solid target. The main diagnostic used here is the transition radiation. This radiation depends on the electrons which produce it and thus it gives important information on the electrons: energy, temperature, propagation geometry, etc. The spectral, temporal and spatial analysis permitted to put in evidence the acceleration of periodic electron bunches which, in this case, emit a Coherent Transition Radiation (CTR). During this thesis we have developed some theoretical models in order to explain the experimental results. We find this way two kinds of electron bunches, emitted either at the laser frequency ({omega}{sub 0}), either at the double of this frequency (2{omega}{sub 0}), involving several acceleration mechanisms: vacuum heating / resonance absorption and Lorentz force, respectively. These bunches are also observed in the PIC (particle-in-cell) simulations. The electron temperature is of about 2 MeV in our experimental conditions. The electrons are emitted starting from a point source (which is the laser focal spot) and then propagate in a ballistic way through the target. In some cases they can be re-injected in the target by the electrostatic field from the target edges. This diagnostic is only sensitive to the coherent relativistic electrons, which explains the weak total energy that they contain (about a few mJ). The CTR signal emitted by those fast electrons is largely dominating the signal emitted by the less energetic electrons, even if they contain the major part of the energy (about 1 J). (author)

  15. Relativistic electron mirrors from high intensity laser nanofoil interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Daniel

    2012-12-21

    The reflection of a laser pulse from a mirror moving close to the speed of light could in principle create an X-ray pulse with unprecedented high brightness owing to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression by a factor of 4γ{sup 2}, where γ is the Lorentz factor of the mirror. While this scheme is theoretically intriguingly simple and was first discussed by A. Einstein more than a century ago, the generation of a relativistic structure which acts as a mirror is demanding in many different aspects. Recently, the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a nanometer thin foil has raised great interest as it promises the creation of a dense, attosecond short, relativistic electron bunch capable of forming a mirror structure that scatters counter-propagating light coherently and shifts its frequency to higher photon energies. However, so far, this novel concept has been discussed only in theoretical studies using highly idealized interaction parameters. This thesis investigates the generation of a relativistic electron mirror from a nanometer foil with current state-of-the-art high intensity laser pulses and demonstrates for the first time the reflection from those structures in an experiment. To achieve this result, the electron acceleration from high intensity laser nanometer foil interactions was studied in a series of experiments using three inherently different high power laser systems and free-standing foils as thin as 3nm. A drastic increase in the electron energies was observed when reducing the target thickness from the micrometer to the nanometer scale. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were measured for the first time from ultrathin (≤5nm) foils, reaching energies up to ∝35MeV. The acceleration process was studied in simulations well-adapted to the experiments, indicating the transition from plasma to free electron dynamics as the target thickness is reduced to the few nanometer range. The experience gained from those

  16. Advanced approaches to high intensity laser-driven ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henig, Andreas

    2010-04-26

    Since the pioneering work that was carried out 10 years ago, the generation of highly energetic ion beams from laser-plasma interactions has been investigated in much detail in the regime of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA). Creation of ion beams with small longitudinal and transverse emittance and energies extending up to tens of MeV fueled visions of compact, laser-driven ion sources for applications such as ion beam therapy of tumors or fast ignition inertial con finement fusion. However, new pathways are of crucial importance to push the current limits of laser-generated ion beams further towards parameters necessary for those applications. The presented PhD work was intended to develop and explore advanced approaches to high intensity laser-driven ion acceleration that reach beyond TNSA. In this spirit, ion acceleration from two novel target systems was investigated, namely mass-limited microspheres and nm-thin, free-standing diamond-like carbon (DLC) foils. Using such ultrathin foils, a new regime of ion acceleration was found where the laser transfers energy to all electrons located within the focal volume. While for TNSA the accelerating electric field is stationary and ion acceleration is spatially separated from laser absorption into electrons, now a localized longitudinal field enhancement is present that co-propagates with the ions as the accompanying laser pulse pushes the electrons forward. Unprecedented maximum ion energies were obtained, reaching beyond 0.5 GeV for carbon C{sup 6+} and thus exceeding previous TNSA results by about one order of magnitude. When changing the laser polarization to circular, electron heating and expansion were shown to be efficiently suppressed, resulting for the first time in a phase-stable acceleration that is dominated by the laser radiation pressure which led to the observation of a peaked C{sup 6+} spectrum. Compared to quasi-monoenergetic ion beam generation within the TNSA regime, a more than 40 times

  17. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-α-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Bakule, Pavel; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Koji; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko

    2011-09-01

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-α (Ly-α) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-α generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-α radiation generation can achieve a value of ˜5×10-4 which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  18. Analysis of induced stress on materials exposed to laser-plasma radiation during high-intensity laser experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scisciò, M.; Barberio, M.; Liberatore, C.; Veltri, S.; Laramée, A.; Palumbo, L.; Legaré, F.; Antici, P.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the damage produced in materials when exposed to a laser-generated plasma. The plasma was generated by interaction of a high-intensity laser with Oxygen. We demonstrate that the stress induced on the target surface of a Tantalum target (typical materials used as Plasma Facing Material) after 10 h of plasma exposure is equivalent to the stress induced during 1 h of conventional laser ablation using a pulsed 0.5 J laser. In both cases we obtain a surface erosion in the tens of μm, and a change in the surface roughness in the tens of nm for the stressed materials. The erosion rate of 1 nm/s, explained in terms of surface fragmentation at thermodynamic equilibrium, generates a slow damage to the materials exposed to the plasma. Our method allows indicating safety parameters for the maintenance of materials used in high-intensity laser experiments.

  19. Multi-energy ion implantation from high-intensity laser

    OpenAIRE

    Cutroneo Mariapompea; Torrisi Lorenzo; Ullschmied Jiri; Dudzak Roman

    2016-01-01

    The laser-matter interaction using nominal laser intensity above 1015 W/cm2 generates in vacuum non-equilibrium plasmas accelerating ions at energies from tens keV up to hundreds MeV. From thin targets, using the TNSA regime, plasma is generated in the forward direction accelerating ions above 1 MeV per charge state and inducing high-ionization states. Generally, the ion energies follow a Boltzmann-like distribution characterized by a cutoff at high energy and by a Coulomb-shift towards high ...

  20. Multifunctional pulse generator for high-intensity focused ultrasound system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamano, Satoshi; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-Ichiro

    2017-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can achieve high spatial resolution for the treatment of diseases. A major technical challenge in implementing a HIFU therapeutic system is to generate high-voltage high-current signals for effectively exciting a multichannel HIFU transducer at high efficiencies. In this paper, we present the development of a multifunctional multichannel generator/driver. The generator can produce a long burst as well as an extremely high-voltage short pulse of pseudosinusoidal waves (trigger HIFU) and second-harmonic superimposed waves for HIFU transmission. The transmission timing, waveform, and frequency can be controlled using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) via a universal serial bus (USB) microcontroller. The hardware is implemented in a compact printed circuit board. The test results of trigger HIFU reveal that the power consumption and the temperature rise of metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors were reduced by 19.9% and 38.2 °C, respectively, from the previous design. The highly flexible performance of the novel generator/driver is demonstrated in the generation of second-harmonic superimposed waves, which is useful for cavitation-enhanced HIFU treatment, although the previous design exhibited difficulty in generating it.

  1. Multi-energy ion implantation from high-intensity laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cutroneo Mariapompea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The laser-matter interaction using nominal laser intensity above 1015 W/cm2 generates in vacuum non-equilibrium plasmas accelerating ions at energies from tens keV up to hundreds MeV. From thin targets, using the TNSA regime, plasma is generated in the forward direction accelerating ions above 1 MeV per charge state and inducing high-ionization states. Generally, the ion energies follow a Boltzmann-like distribution characterized by a cutoff at high energy and by a Coulomb-shift towards high energy increasing the ion charge state. The accelerated ions are emitted with the high directivity, depending on the ion charge state and ion mass, along the normal to the target surface. The ion fluencies depend on the ablated mass by laser, indeed it is low for thin targets. Ions accelerated from plasma can be implanted on different substrates such as Si crystals, glassy-carbon and polymers at different fluences. The ion dose increment of implanted substrates is obtainable with repetitive laser shots and with repetitive plasma emissions. Ion beam analytical methods (IBA, such as Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA and proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE can be employed to analyse the implanted species in the substrates. Such analyses represent ‘off-line’ methods to extrapolate and to character the plasma ion stream emission as well as to investigate the chemical and physical modifications of the implanted surface. The multi-energy and species ion implantation from plasma, at high fluency, changes the physical and chemical properties of the implanted substrates, in fact, many parameters, such as morphology, hardness, optical and mechanical properties, wetting ability and nanostructure generation may be modified through the thermal-assisted implantation by multi-energy ions from laser-generated plasma.

  2. Diffraction Gratings for High-Intensity Laser Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britten, J

    2008-01-23

    The scattering of light into wavelength-dependent discrete directions (orders) by a device exhibiting a periodic modulation of a physical attribute on a spatial scale similar to the wavelength of light has been the subject of study for over 200 years. Such a device is called a diffraction grating. Practical applications of diffraction gratings, mainly for spectroscopy, have been around for over 100 years. The importance of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy for the measurement of myriad properties of matter can hardly be overestimated. Since the advent of coherent light sources (lasers) in the 1960's, applications of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy have further exploded. Lasers have opened a vast application space for gratings, and apace, gratings have enabled entirely new classes of laser systems. Excellent reviews of the history, fundamental properties, applications and manufacturing techniques of diffraction gratings up to the time of their publication can be found in the books by Hutley (1) and more recently Loewen and Popov (2). The limited scope of this chapter can hardly do justice to such a comprehensive subject, so the focus here will be narrowly limited to characteristics required for gratings suitable for high-power laser applications, and methods to fabricate them. A particular area of emphasis will be on maximally-efficient large-aperture gratings for short-pulse laser generation.

  3. Short-pulse high intensity laser thin foil interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    The technology of ultrashort pulse laser generation has progressed to the point that optical pulses larger than 10 J, 300 fs duration or shorter are routinely produced. Such pulses can be focused to intensities exceeding 10^18 W/cm^2. With high contrast pulses, these focused intensities can be used to heat solid matter to high temperatures with minimal hydrodynamic expansion, producing an extremely high energy-density state of matter for a short period of time. This high density, high temperature plasma can be studied by x-ray spectroscopy. We have performed experiments on thin foils of different elements under well controlled conditions at the 100 Terawatt laser at LULI to study the characteristics X-ray emission of laser heated solids. To suppress the ASE effect, the laser was frequency doubled. S-polarized light with a peak intensity of 10^19W/cm^2 was used to minimize resonance absorption. To decrease the effect of longitudinal temperature gradients very thin (800 μ) aluminum foil targets were used. We have also studied the effect of radial gradient by limiting the measured x-ray emission zone using 50μ or 100μ pinhole on target. The spectra, in the range 7-8Å, were recorded using a conical crystal spectrometer coupled to a 800 fs resolution streak camera. A Fourier Domain Interferometry (FDI) of the back of the foil was also performed providing a measurement of the hydrodynamic expansion as function of time for each shot. To simulate the experiment, we used the 1D hydrodynamic code FILM with a given set of plasma parameter (ρ, Te) as initial conditions. The X-ray emission was calculated by post processing hydrodynamic results with a collisional-radiative model which uses super-configuration average atomic data. The simulation reproduces the main features of the experimental time resolved spectrum.

  4. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, M.; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Aurand, B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Kerr, S.; Pak, A.; Propp, A.; Ramakrishna, B.; Ruby, J.; Willi, O.; Williams, G. J.; Rödel, C.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  5. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, M., E-mail: maxence.gauthier@stanford.edu; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Propp, A.; Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Aurand, B.; Willi, O. [Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf (Germany); Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Pak, A.; Ruby, J.; Williams, G. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kerr, S. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1R1 (Canada); Ramakrishna, B. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad (India); Rödel, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  6. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Taiee [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  7. Effects of high intensity laser therapy on pain and function of patients with chronic back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeun-Woo; Lee, Jongmin; Lee, Sangyong; Choi, Jioun; Lee, Kwansub; Kim, Byung-Kon; Kim, Gook-Joo

    2017-06-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of High Intensity Laser Therapy on pain and function of patients with chronic back pain. [Subjects and Methods] This study evenly divided a total of 20 patients with chronic back pain into a conservative physical therapy group that received conservative physical therapy, and a high intensity laser therapy group that received High Intensity Laser Therapy after conservative physical therapy. All patients received the therapy three times a week for four weeks. For the high intensity laser therapy group, treatment was applied to the L1-L5 and S1 regions for 10 minutes by using a high intensity laser device while vertically maintaining the separation distance from handpiece to skin at approximately 1 cm. A visual analog scale was used to measure the pain and Oswestry Disability Index was used for functional evaluation. [Results] In a within-group comparison of the conservative physical therapy and high intensity laser therapy groups, both the visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index significantly decreased. In a between-group comparison after treatment, the high intensity laser therapy group showed a significantly lower visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index than the conservative physical therapy group. [Conclusion] High Intensity Laser Therapy can be an effective nonsurgical intervention method for reducing pain and helping the performance of daily routines of patients who have chronic back pain.

  8. High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) versus TENS and NSAIDs in low back pain: clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zati, Allesandro; Fortuna, Damiano; Valent, A.; Filippi, M. V.; Bilotta, Teresa W.

    2004-09-01

    Low back pain, caused by lumbar disc herniation, is prevalently treated with a conservative approach. In this study we valued the efficacy of High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT), compared with accepted therapies such as TENS and NSAIDs. Laser therapy obtained similar results in the short term, but better clinical effect over time than TENS and NSAIDs. In conclusion high intensity laser therapy appears to be a interesting new treatment, worthy of further research.

  9. High-intensity laser for Ta and Ag implantation into different substrates for plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutroneo, M., E-mail: cutroneo@ujf.cas.cz [Nuclear Physics Institute, AS CR, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic); Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P. [Nuclear Physics Institute, AS CR, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, Ceske mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Matousek, J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, Ceske mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Torrisi, L. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Messina University, V.le F.S. d’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Ullschmied, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity lasers generating non-equilibrium plasma, can be employed to accelerate ions in the keV–MeV region, useful for many applications. In the present work, we performed study of ion implantation into different substrates by using a high-intensity laser at the PALS laboratory in Prague. Multi-energy ions generated by plasma from Ta and Ag targets were implanted into polyethylene and metallic substrates (Al, Ti) at energies of tens of keV per charge state. The ion emission was monitored online using time-of-flight detectors and electromagnetic deflection systems. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to characterise the elemental composition in the implanted substrates by ion plasma emission and to provide the implanted ion depth profiling. These last measurements enable offline plasma characterisation and provide information on the useful potentiality of multi-ion species and multi-energy ion implantation into different substrates. XPS analysis gives information on the chemical bonds and their modifications in the first superficial implanted layers. The depth distributions of implanted Ta and Ag ions were compared with the theoretical ones achieved by using the SRIM-2012 simulation code.

  10. High-intensity laser for Ta and Ag implantation into different substrates for plasma diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, M.; Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P.; Matousek, J.; Torrisi, L.; Ullschmied, J.

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity lasers generating non-equilibrium plasma, can be employed to accelerate ions in the keV-MeV region, useful for many applications. In the present work, we performed study of ion implantation into different substrates by using a high-intensity laser at the PALS laboratory in Prague. Multi-energy ions generated by plasma from Ta and Ag targets were implanted into polyethylene and metallic substrates (Al, Ti) at energies of tens of keV per charge state. The ion emission was monitored online using time-of-flight detectors and electromagnetic deflection systems. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to characterise the elemental composition in the implanted substrates by ion plasma emission and to provide the implanted ion depth profiling. These last measurements enable offline plasma characterisation and provide information on the useful potentiality of multi-ion species and multi-energy ion implantation into different substrates. XPS analysis gives information on the chemical bonds and their modifications in the first superficial implanted layers. The depth distributions of implanted Ta and Ag ions were compared with the theoretical ones achieved by using the SRIM-2012 simulation code.

  11. Optical Frequency Optimization of a High Intensity Laser Power Beaming System Utilizing VMJ Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, Daniel E.; Dinca, Dragos; Nayfeh, Taysir H.

    2012-01-01

    An effective form of wireless power transmission (WPT) has been developed to enable extended mission durations, increased coverage and added capabilities for both space and terrestrial applications that may benefit from optically delivered electrical energy. The high intensity laser power beaming (HILPB) system enables long range optical 'refueling" of electric platforms such as micro unmanned aerial vehicles (MUAV), airships, robotic exploration missions and spacecraft platforms. To further advance the HILPB technology, the focus of this investigation is to determine the optimal laser wavelength to be used with the HILPB receiver, which utilizes vertical multi-junction (VMJ) photovoltaic cells. Frequency optimization of the laser system is necessary in order to maximize the conversion efficiency at continuous high intensities, and thus increase the delivered power density of the HILPB system. Initial spectral characterizations of the device performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) indicate the approximate range of peak optical-to-electrical conversion efficiencies, but these data sets represent transient conditions under lower levels of illumination. Extending these results to high levels of steady state illumination, with attention given to the compatibility of available commercial off-the-shelf semiconductor laser sources and atmospheric transmission constraints is the primary focus of this paper. Experimental hardware results utilizing high power continuous wave (CW) semiconductor lasers at four different operational frequencies near the indicated band gap of the photovoltaic VMJ cells are presented and discussed. In addition, the highest receiver power density achieved to date is demonstrated using a single photovoltaic VMJ cell, which provided an exceptionally high electrical output of 13.6 W/sq cm at an optical-to-electrical conversion efficiency of 24 percent. These results are very promising and scalable, as a potential 1.0 sq m HILPB receiver of

  12. Deuterium–deuterium nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L., E-mail: lorenzo.torrisi@unime.it [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dip.to di Fisica, Università di Messina, V.le F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Cavallaro, S.; Cutroneo, M.; Giuffrida, L. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dip.to di Fisica, Università di Messina, V.le F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Kravarik, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University, Faculty of Electro-Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Ullschmied, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Wolowski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Rosinski, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, IPPLM, 23 Hery Str., 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-05-01

    A 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD{sub 2} targets placed into the high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deuterons and carbon ions emission with energy up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deuterium ions may induce high D–D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD{sub 2} targets can be availed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deuterons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  13. Deuterium-deuterium nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cavallaro, S.; Cutroneo, M.; Giuffrida, L.; Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Kravarik, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Wolowski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Rosinski, M.

    2013-05-01

    A 1016 W/cm2 Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD2 targets placed into the high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deuterons and carbon ions emission with energy up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deuterium ions may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD2 targets can be availed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deuterons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  14. Ultra-High Intensity Magnetic Field Generation in Dense Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2014-01-08

    The main objective of this grant proposal was to explore the efficient generation of intense currents. Whereas the efficient generation of electric current in low-­energy-­density plasma has occupied the attention of the magnetic fusion community for several decades, scant attention has been paid to carrying over to high-­energy-­density plasma the ideas for steady-­state current drive developed for low-­energy-­density plasma, or, for that matter, to inventing new methodologies for generating electric current in high-­energy-­density plasma. What we proposed to do was to identify new mechanisms to accomplish current generation, and to assess the operation, physics, and engineering basis of new forms of current drive in regimes appropriate for new fusion concepts.

  15. Ablation properties of inorganic filler modified benzoxazine composite coating irradiated by high-intensity continuous laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Ma, Zhuang; Li, Hezhang; Gao, Lihong; Wang, Fuchi

    2017-05-01

    Benzoxazine resin with good heat resistance, low combustion heat release and high char yield is a promising thermosetting resin. Meanwhile, research shows that the inorganic filler can effectively improve the thermodynamic property of the resin. It makes that the inorganic filler modified benzoxazine may have a potential application in laser ablation. The benzoxazine coating with and without inorganic filler ammonium polyphosphate, melamine and pentaerythritol (P-BOZ and BOZ) were prepared by brush and thermal curing method. The ablation properties of these coatings irradiated by high-intensity laser were investigated. The scanning electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis were used to characterize the micrographs, carbon layer structure and thermodynamic property of the sample. Results show that the composite coating has excellent thermal protective properties. The back temperature of 20 wt% P-BOZ coating under different parameter laser power (1000W/cm2, 5s; 1000W/cm2, 10s) are 40% lower than these of the BOZ coating and the 20 wt% P-BOZ has higher mass ablation rate. In the surface layer of the irradiated area, dense carbon layer is produced which reduces the absorb of the laser energy of the interior. In the interior of the sample, a large number of closed bell shaped holes are generated which are beneficial to obstruct the heat conduction.

  16. The study towards high intensity high charge state laser ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H Y; Jin, Q Y; Sha, S; Zhang, J J; Li, Z M; Liu, W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-02-01

    As one of the candidate ion sources for a planned project, the High Intensity heavy-ion Accelerator Facility, a laser ion source has been being intensively studied at the Institute of Modern Physics in the past two years. The charge state distributions of ions produced by irradiating a pulsed 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser on solid targets of a wide range of elements (C, Al, Ti, Ni, Ag, Ta, and Pb) were measured with an electrostatic ion analyzer spectrometer, which indicates that highly charged ions could be generated from low-to-medium mass elements with the present laser system, while the charge state distributions for high mass elements were relatively low. The shot-to-shot stability of ion pulses was monitored with a Faraday cup for carbon target. The fluctuations within ±2.5% for the peak current and total charge and ±6% for pulse duration were demonstrated with the present setup of the laser ion source, the suppression of which is still possible.

  17. High intensity direct third harmonic generation in BBO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, P.S., LLNL

    1998-02-23

    The azimuthal dependence of second- and third-order coupling are used to measure the relative contributions of each to direct third harmonic generation with efficiencies up to 6%. The values of {xi}{sub ij}{sup (3)} are measured.

  18. Comparison of Square and Radial Geometries for High Intensity Laser Power Beaming Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, Daniel E.; Fast, Brian R.; Dinca, Dragos; Nayfeh, Taysir H.; Jalics, Andrew K.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to further advance a realizable form of wireless power transmission (WPT), high intensity laser power beaming (HILPB) has been developed for both space and terrestrial applications. Unique optical-to-electrical receivers are employed with near infrared (IR-A) continuous-wave (CW) semiconductor lasers to experimentally investigate the HILPB system. In this paper, parasitic feedback, uneven illumination and the implications of receiver array geometries are considered and experimental hardware results for HILPB are presented. The TEM00 Gaussian energy profile of the laser beam presents a challenge to the effectiveness of the receiver to perform efficient photoelectric conversion, due to the resulting non-uniform illumination of the photovoltaic cell arrays. In this investigation, the geometry of the receiver is considered as a technique to tailor the receiver design to accommodate the Gaussian beam profile, and in doing so it is demonstrated that such a methodology is successful in generating bulk receiver output power levels reaching 25 W from 7.2 sq cm of photovoltaic cells. These results are scalable, and may be realized by implementing receiver arraying and utilizing higher power source lasers to achieve a 1.0 sq m receiver capable of generating over 30 kW of electrical power. This type of system would enable long range optical "refueling" of electric platforms, such as MUAV s, airships, robotic exploration missions and provide power to spacecraft platforms which may utilize it to drive electric means of propulsion. In addition, a smaller HILPB receiver aperture size could be utilized to establish a robust optical communications link within environments containing high levels of background radiance, to achieve high signal to noise ratios.

  19. Development of a laser ion source for production of high-intensity heavy-ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, H.; Yamada, K.; Kurashima, S.

    2017-09-01

    A laser ion source has been developed as a high-intensity source for the ion implanter and the single pulsed beam of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron at TIARA. Highly charged beams of C5+ and C6+ ions and low-charged beams of heavy ions such as C, Al, Ti, Cu, Au, and Pt are required for the single-pulse acceleration in the cyclotron and for the ion implanter, respectively. In the vacuum chamber of the ion source, a target holder on a three-dimensional linear-motion stage provides a fresh surface for each laser shot. A large-sized target with a maximum size of 300 mm × 135 mm is mounted on the holder for long-term operation. The ion current (ion charge flux) in the laser-produced plasma is measured by a Faraday cup and time-of-flight spectra of each charge state are measured using a 90° cylindrical electrostatic analyzer just behind the Faraday cup. Carbon-plasma-generation experiments indicate that the source produces intense high- and low-charged pulsed ion beams. At a laser energy of 483 mJ (2.3 × 1013 W/cm2), average C6+ current of 13 mA and average C5+ current of 23 mA were obtained over the required time duration for single-pulse acceleration in the cyclotron (49 ns for C6+ and 80 ns for C5+). Furthermore, at 45 mJ (2.1 × 1012 W/cm2), an average C2+ current of 1.6 mA over 0.88 μs is obtained.

  20. Feasibility of laser-integrated high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment for bladder tumors: in vitro study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van Phuc; Park, Suhyun; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that photothemal therapy combined with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can provide a promising method to achieve rapid thermal coagulation during surgical procedures. The current study investigated the feasibility of the laser-integrated high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) application to treat bladder tumors by enhancing thermal effects and therapeutic depth in vitro. To generate thermal coagulation, a single element HIFU transducer with a central frequency of 2.0 MHz was used to transmit acoustic energy to 15 fresh porcine bladders injected with an artificial tumor (100 µl gelatin and hemoglobin solution) in vitro. Simultaneously, an 80-W 532-nm laser system was also implemented to induce thermal necrosis in the targeted tissue. The intensity of 570 W/cm2 at the focus of HIFU and laser energy of 0.9 W were applied to all the samples for 40 s. The temperature rise increased up to about 1.6 or 3 folds (i.e., ΔT=32±3.8 K for laser-integrated HIFU, ΔT=20±6.5 K for HIFU only, and ΔT=11±5.6 K for laser only). The estimated lesion depth also increased by 1.3 and 2 folds during the dual-thermal treatment, in comparison with the treatment by either HIFU or laser. The results indicated that the laser-integrated HIFU treatment can be an efficient hyperthermic method for tumor coagulation.

  1. Studies of Ion Acceleration from Thin Solid-Density Targets on High-Intensity Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Christopher R.

    experiment utilized new liquid crystal film targets developed at OSU, which may be formed at variable thicknesses from tens of nanometers to several microns. On this experiment, an optimum ion energy and flux was reached for targets of 600-900 nm, providing a peak proton energy of 24 MeV, and total ion flux of > 109 protons over 3.4 MeV from 5.5 J of laser energy at an intensity of 1 x 1020 W cm -2. The primary ion diagnostics for these two experiments are described in detail, including the analysis techniques needed to extract absolutely calibrated spatial and spectral distributions of the accelerated ions. Additionally, a new technique for target alignment is presented, providing repeatable target alignment on the micron scale. This allows for a repeatable laser intensity on target, allowing improved shot to shot consistency on high intensity experiments. In addition to these two experiments, work on the upgrade and characterization of the 400 TW Scarlet laser is discussed, including several calculations critical to the design and upgrade of the laser system, as well as prepulse characterization needed for experiments on thin targets.

  2. A High Intensity Multi-Purpose D-D Neutron Generator for Nuclear Engineering Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ka-Ngo Leung; Jasmina L. Vujic; Edward C. Morse; Per F. Peterson

    2005-11-29

    This NEER project involves the design, construction and testing of a low-cost high intensity D-D neutron generator for teaching nuclear engineering students in a laboratory environment without radioisotopes or a nuclear reactor. The neutron generator was designed, fabricated and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  3. Postionisation of a spatially nonuniform plasma plume under high-intensity femtosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krestovskikh, D. A.; Ivanov, K. A.; Tsymbalov, I. N.; Shulyapov, S. A.; Bukin, V. V.; Volkov, R. V.; Rupasov, A. A.; Savel'ev, A. B.

    2017-02-01

    The plasma plume formed by a high-power nanosecond laser pulse on the surface of solid targets as well as the plume parameters after its irradiation by a high-intensity femtosecond laser pulse are investigated by optical diagnostic techniques. Two-dimensional patterns of the electron plasma density are reconstructed from experimentally recorded interferograms at different stages of plasma evolution. It is shown that the interaction of the high-intensity femtosecond radiation with the plasma cloud is accompanied by the field ionisation of atoms and ions as well as by a significant increase in the electron density throughout the interaction volume. Presented at ECLIM2016 (Moscow, 18-23 September 2016).

  4. High Intensity Laser Power Beaming Architecture for Space and Terrestrial Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, Taysir; Fast, Brian; Raible, Daniel; Dinca, Dragos; Tollis, Nick; Jalics, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    High Intensity Laser Power Beaming (HILPB) has been developed as a technique to achieve Wireless Power Transmission (WPT) for both space and terrestrial applications. In this paper, the system architecture and hardware results for a terrestrial application of HILPB are presented. These results demonstrate continuous conversion of high intensity optical energy at near-IR wavelengths directly to electrical energy at output power levels as high as 6.24 W from the single cell 0.8 cm2 aperture receiver. These results are scalable, and may be realized by implementing receiver arraying and utilizing higher power source lasers. This type of system would enable long range optical refueling of electric platforms, such as MUAV s, airships, robotic exploration missions and provide power to spacecraft platforms which may utilize it to drive electric means of propulsion.

  5. Pair production by high intensity picosecond laser interacting with thick solid target at XingGuangIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuchi; Dong, Kegong; Yan, Yonghong; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Tiankui; Chen, Jia; Yu, Minghai; Tan, Fang; Wang, Shaoyi; Han, Dan; Lu, Feng; Gu, Yuqiu

    2017-06-01

    An experiment for pair production by high intensity laser irradiating thick solid targets is present. The experiment used picosecond beam of the XingGuangIII laser facility, with intensities up to several 1019 W/cm2, pulse durations about 0.8 ps and laser energies around 120 J. Pairs were generated from 1 mm-thick tantalum disk targets with different diameters from 1 mm to 10 mm. Energy spectra of hot electron from targetrear surface represent a Maxwellian distribution and obey a scaling of ∼(Iλ2)0.5. Large quantity of positrons were observed at the target rear normal direction with a yield up to 2.8 × 109 e+/sr. Owing to the target rear surface sheath field, the positrons behave as a quasi-monoenergetic beam with peak energy of several MeV. Our experiment shows that the peak energy of positron beam is inversely proportional to the target diameter.

  6. Proton radiography of relativistic magnetic reconnection driven by ultra-high intensity lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Paul T.; Raymond, A.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Ma, Y.; Chen, H.; Katzir, Y.; Mileham, C.; Nilson, P. M.; Ridgers, C. P.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Tubman, E. R.; Wei, M. S.; Williams, G. J.; Woolsey, N.; Willingale, L.; Krushelnick, K.

    2017-10-01

    In recent experiments conducted with the OMEGA-EP laser facility at LLE and the Vulcan laser at RAL, proton radiography was used to observe in detail the magnetic field dynamics associated with magnetic reconnection driven by ultra-high intensity, short pulse lasers. Two configurations were investigated: one with two short pulses focused on target in close proximity and another with a short pulse fired near a relatively slowly evolving long pulse produced plasma. The proton radiography results, along with x-ray imaging and angularly resolved electron spectra will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-0002727.

  7. Final Report on Institutional Computing Project s15_hilaserion, “Kinetic Modeling of Next-Generation High-Energy, High-Intensity Laser-Ion Accelerators as an Enabling Capability”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, Brian James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yin, Lin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stark, David James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-06

    This proposal sought of order 1M core-hours of Institutional Computing time intended to enable computing by a new LANL Postdoc (David Stark) working under LDRD ER project 20160472ER (PI: Lin Yin) on laser-ion acceleration. The project was “off-cycle,” initiating in June of 2016 with a postdoc hire.

  8. Sub-picosecond snapshots of fast electrons from high intensity laser-matter interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, R; Anania, M P; Bisesto, F; Botton, M; Castellano, M; Chiadroni, E; Cianchi, A; Curcio, A; Ferrario, M; Galletti, M; Henis, Z; Petrarca, M; Schleifer, E; Zigler, A

    2016-12-26

    The interaction of a high-intensity short-pulse laser with thin solid targets produces electron jets that escape the target and positively charge it, leading to the formation of the electrostatic potential that in turn governs the ion acceleration. The typical timescale of such phenomena is on the sub-picosecond level. Here we show, for the first time, temporally-resolved measurements of the first released electrons that escaped from the target, so-called fast electrons. Their total charge, energy and temporal profile are provided by means of a diagnostics based on Electro-Optical Sampling with temporal resolution below 100 fs.

  9. Photon dose produced by a high-intensity laser on a solid target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.

    2014-08-01

    When a high-intensity laser pulse hits a solid target, its pedestal creates a preplasma. The interaction of the main laser pulse, linearly polarized, with this preplasma produces relativistic electrons. These electrons subsequently penetrate inside the target, with high atomic number, and produce bremsstrahlung emission, which constitutes an x-ray source that may be used in various applications such as radiography of high area density objects, photonuclear studies or positron production. This x-ray source is mainly defined by its photon dose, which depends upon the laser, preplasma and target characteristics. In new facilities the radioprotection layout design can be obtained by numerical simulations, which are somewhat tedious. A simple model giving the photon dose per laser energy unit is obtained by using the mean bremsstrahlung cross section of electrons interacting with the atoms of the conversion target. It is expressed versus the fraction ηel of the laser energy absorbed into the forward hot electrons, their mean kinetic energy E, the photon lobe emission mean angular aperture \\bar{{\\theta}} and the target characteristics, i.e. thickness, element, atomic mass and atomic number. The parameters ηel, E and \\bar{{\\theta}} are analysed by applying the energy and momentum flux conservation laws during the laser-plasma interaction in the relativistic regime in an underdense and overdense plasma, including the hole-boring effect. In addition, these quantities are parametrized versus the normalized laser vector potential a0 and the preplasma scale length Lp by using a full set of numerical simulations, in the laser intensity domain 1018-1021 W cm-2 and preplasma scale length range 0.03-400µm. These simulations are done in two- and three-dimensional geometry with the CALDER particle-in-cell code, which computes the laser-plasma interaction, and with the MCNP Monte Carlo code, which calculates the bremsstrahlung emission. The present model is compared with the

  10. Proposed method for internal electron therapy based on high-intensity laser acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Michal; Barkai, Uri; Gannot, Israel

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main methods to treat cancer. However, due to the propagation pattern of high-energy photons in tissue and their inability to discriminate between healthy and malignant tissues, healthy tissues may also be damaged, causing undesired side effects. A possible method for internal electron therapy, based on laser acceleration of electrons inside the patient's body, is suggested. In this method, an optical waveguide, optimized for high intensities, is used to transmit the laser radiation and accelerate electrons toward the tumor. The radiation profile can be manipulated in order to create a patient-specific radiation treatment profile by changing the laser characteristics. The propagation pattern of electrons in tissues minimizes the side effects caused to healthy tissues. A simulation was developed to demonstrate the use of this method, calculating the trajectories of the accelerated electron as a function of laser properties. The simulation was validated by comparison to theory, showing a good fit for laser intensities of up to 2×1020 (W/cm2), and was then used to calculate suggested treatment profiles for two tumor test cases (with and without penetration to the tumor). The results show that treatment profiles can be designed to cover tumor area with minimal damage to adjacent tissues.

  11. Simulations On Pair Creation In Collision Of γ-Beams Produced With High Intensity Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Oliver; Ribeyre, Xavier; D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Jaquier, Sophie; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    Direct production of electron-positron pairs in two photon collisions, the Breit-Wheeler process, is one of the most basic processes in the universe. However, this process has never been directly observed in the laboratory due to the lack of high intensity γ sources. For a feasibility study and for the optimisation of experimental set-ups we developed a high-performance tree-code. Different possible set-ups with MeV photon sources were discussed and compared using collision detection for huge number of particles in a quantum-electrodynamic regime. For this we implemented bounding volume hierarchies in a tree-like code structure. We applied this code on the question whether the Texas Petawatt laser could produce a significant number of pairs within the framework of the NSF project National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1632777.

  12. Overview of inertial fusion and high-intensity laser plasma research in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassart, J.

    2004-12-01

    Inertial fusion science is driven by 'the quest for ignition'. For many years, a 'conventional' route towards inertial fusion has been investigated using two different approaches: ignition by an inertial central hot spot could be obtained either through the direct or the indirect drive scheme. Both imply the use of a very large facility to operate the driver, which is a powerful laser in the current projects (LMJ in France as well as NIF in the US). The LMJ construction being on the way, a large amount of experimental and computational work is currently being done to deepen the understanding of ignition requirements. On the other hand, the so-called 'fast ignition' approach has led to an increasingly important amount of scientific work since it was proposed at the beginning of the 1990s. During the last several years (from the previous IFSA held in Kyoto in 2001), several PW-class high-intensity laser facilities have been built in Europe. In the meantime, a large number of interesting results related to fast electron and proton production have been obtained with the existing facilities. Observation of laser-irradiated solid targets has provided the first evidence of electron bunches separated by half the period of light. Nevertheless, target heating remains modest. On the other hand, multi-megaelectronvolt highly collimated electron beams have been produced by table-top lasers interacting with the low-density plasmas. They open the feasibility of a lot of applications: x-ray probe beams in plasma physics, biology, chemistry, injector for conventional accelerators, etc). Laser-produced proton beams is also a growing field, with a lot of promising applications: proton therapy, radio-isotope production, diagnostic for transient phenomena in laser-plasma interaction, etc. Inertial fusion research is fostered by a sustained effort of organization and coordination at the national level (the creation of an Institute for Lasers and Plasmas in France) as well as at the

  13. Optical observation of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in high intensity laser-induced shock processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-López, L; Ocaña, R; Porro, J A; Morales, M; Ocaña, J L

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental study of the temporal and spatial dynamics of shock waves, cavitation bubbles, and sound waves generated in water during laser shock processing by single Nd:YAG laser pulses of nanosecond duration. A fast ICCD camera (2 ns gate time) was employed to record false schlieren photographs, schlieren photographs, and Mach-Zehnder interferograms of the zone surrounding the laser spot site on the target, an aluminum alloy sample. We recorded hemispherical shock fronts, cylindrical shock fronts, plane shock fronts, cavitation bubbles, and phase disturbance tracks.

  14. Highly intense monocycle terahertz vortex generation by utilizing a Tsurupica spiral phase plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Won Tae; Sasaki, Yuta; Niinomi, Hiromasa; Suizu, Koji; Rotermund, Fabian; Omatsu, Takashige

    2016-12-14

    Optical vortex, possessing an annular intensity profile and an orbital angular momentum (characterized by an integer termed a topological charge) associated with a helical wavefront, has attracted great attention for diverse applications due to its unique properties. In particular for terahertz (THz) frequency range, several approaches for THz vortex generation, including molded phase plates consisting of metal slit antennas, achromatic polarization elements and binary-diffractive optical elements, have been recently proposed, however, they are typically designed for a specific frequency. Here, we demonstrate highly intense broadband monocycle vortex generation near 0.6 THz by utilizing a polymeric Tsurupica spiral phase plate in combination with tilted-pulse-front optical rectification in a prism-cut LiNbO3 crystal. A maximum peak power of 2.3 MW was obtained for THz vortex output with an expected topological charge of 1.15. Furthermore, we applied the highly intense THz vortex beam for studying unique nonlinear behaviors in bilayer graphene towards the development of nonlinear super-resolution THz microscopy and imaging system.

  15. Study of 2ω and 3/2ω harmonics in ultrashort high-intensity laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is produced by electron plasma wave coupling at the critical density surface of the plasma. The other mechanism of generation of 2ω is when the intense laser field drives a relativistic oscillation of plasma surface, which causes a periodic phase modulation of the reflected light and, hence, the emission of harmonics of the ...

  16. Comparison between Epidural Block vs. High Intensity Laser Therapy for Controlling Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badiozaman Radpay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic low back pain is among a wide spread musculoskeletal conditions that is related to disability with high economy cost. There are several treatment modalities for controlling chronic low back pain (CLBP, among them high intensity laser therapy (HILT and epidural blocks (EB use more commonly. This study aimed to evaluate the benefits and hazards of each of these two methods.Materials and Methods: We designed a randomized controlled double blind study during 24 months.101 patients divided in 2 groups (52 in EB and 49 in HILT group. Pain intensity was assessed by using faces pain scales (FPS and LINKERT questionaries' before procedure and during one, four, 12, and 24 weeks after beginning the procedures.Results: There were no differences between two groups in FPS lumber tenderness, straight leg rising test (SLRT, paresthesia, deep tendon reflex (DTR, and imaging changes. Motor problems seem was less in HILT group comparing EB.Conclusion: This study showed both EB and HILT approaches can control the pain intensity and motor activities in CLBP patients. Future studies will clarify the precise importance of each these methods.

  17. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields generated from a transmitter with a large aperture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Tao; Fan, Tingbo [Institute of Acoustics, Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Province Institute for Medical Equipment Testing, Nanjing 210012 (China); Zhang, Wei [Jiangsu Province Institute for Medical Equipment Testing, Nanjing 210012 (China); Qiu, Yuanyuan [Department of electronic information, Nantong University, Nantong 226019 (China); Tu, Juan, E-mail: juantu@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn; Guo, Xiasheng [Institute of Acoustics, Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Dong, E-mail: juantu@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn [Institute of Acoustics, Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Institute of Acoustics, State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-03-21

    Prediction and measurement of the acoustic field emitted from a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is essential for the accurate ultrasonic treatment. In this study, the acoustic field generated from a strongly focused HIFU transmitter was characterized by a combined experiment and simulation method. The spheroidal beam equation (SBE) was utilized to describe the nonlinear sound propagation. The curve of the source pressure amplitude versus voltage excitation was determined by fitting the measured ratio of the second harmonic to the fundamental component of the focal waveform to the simulation result; finally, the acoustic pressure field generated by the strongly focused HIFU transmitter was predicted by using the SBE model. A commercial fiber optic probe hydrophone was utilized to measure the acoustic pressure field generated from a 1.1 MHz HIFU transmitter with a large half aperture angle of 30°. The maximum measured peak-to-peak pressure was up to 72 MPa. The validity of this combined approach was confirmed by the comparison between the measured results and the calculated ones. The results indicate that the current approach might be useful to describe the HIFU field. The results also suggest that this method is not valid for low excitations owing to low sensitivity of the second harmonic.

  18. Extreme Nonlinear Optics of High Intensity Laser Pulse Filamentation in Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-12

    progress, quarterly, research, special, group study , etc. 3. DATES COVERED. Indicate the time during which the work was performed and the report was...multimode beams after collapse, but we believe they provide a unifying principle for all self-focusing and propagation phenomena. We believe that the study ...based THz generation experiments using two- colour (400nm and 80nm) drive pulses in the atmosphere, the 2 TW 10 Hz laser in Milchberg’s lab was used

  19. Acceleration of Charged Particles by High Intensity Few-Cycle Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, Ulrich; Geissler, Michael; Grüner, Florian; Habs, Dietrich; Karsch, Stefan; Krausz, Ferenc; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J; Schmid, K; Schreiber, J; Tsakiris, George; Veisz, Laszlo; Witte, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Only recently a breakthrough in laser plasma acceleration has been achieved with the observation of intense (nC) mono-energetic (10% relative width) electron beams in the 100MeV energy range.* Above the wave-breaking threshold the electrons are trapped and accelerated in a single wake of the laser pulse, called bubble, according to PIC simulations.** However, pulse energis varied from shot-to-shot in the experiments. At the MPQ Garching we prepare the stable acceleration of electrons by this bubble regime by the use of 10TW few-cycle laser pulse. As the pulse lenght of 5-10fs remains below the plasma period also at higher plama densities, we expect the scheme to be more stable and efficient. The status of the experiment will be reported. Further, we exploit a colliding beam setup existing at the Jena multi TW laser system for the investigation of the positron generation in the electron-electron collision or in the collision of hard X-rays resulting from Thomson backscattering. The presentation of results on h...

  20. Development of High Intensity D-T fusion NEutron Generator (HINEG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yican; Liu, Chao; Song, Gang; Wang, Yongfeng; Li, Taosheng; Jiang, Jieqiong; Song, Yong; Ji, Xiang

    2017-09-01

    A high intensity D-T fusion neutron generator (HINEG) is keenly needed for the research and development (R&D) of nuclear technology and safety of the advanced nuclear energy system, especially for the radiation protection and shielding. The R&D of HINEG includes two phases: HINEG-I and HINEG-II. HINEG-I is designed to have both the steady beam and pulsed beam. The neutron yield of the steady beam is up to 1012 n/s. The width of pulse neutron beam is less than 1.5 ns. HINEG-I is used for the basic neutronics study, such as measurement of nuclear data, validation of neutronics methods and software, validation of radiation protection and so on. HINEG-II aims to generate a high neutron yield of 1013 n/s neutrons by adopting high speed rotating tritium target system integrated with jet/spray array enhanced cooling techniques, and can further upgrade to obtain neutron yield of 1014 1015n/s by using of accelerators-array in a later stage. HINEG-II can be used for fundamentals research of nuclear technology including mechanism of materials radiation damage and neutronics performance of components, radiation shielding as well as other nuclear technology applications.

  1. Development of High Intensity D-T fusion NEutron Generator (HINEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yican

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A high intensity D-T fusion neutron generator (HINEG is keenly needed for the research and development (R&D of nuclear technology and safety of the advanced nuclear energy system, especially for the radiation protection and shielding. The R&D of HINEG includes two phases: HINEG-I and HINEG-II. HINEG-I is designed to have both the steady beam and pulsed beam. The neutron yield of the steady beam is up to 1012 n/s. The width of pulse neutron beam is less than 1.5 ns. HINEG-I is used for the basic neutronics study, such as measurement of nuclear data, validation of neutronics methods and software, validation of radiation protection and so on. HINEG-II aims to generate a high neutron yield of 1013 n/s neutrons by adopting high speed rotating tritium target system integrated with jet/spray array enhanced cooling techniques, and can further upgrade to obtain neutron yield of 1014~1015n/s by using of accelerators-array in a later stage. HINEG-II can be used for fundamentals research of nuclear technology including mechanism of materials radiation damage and neutronics performance of components, radiation shielding as well as other nuclear technology applications.

  2. EVALUATION OF THE THERAPEUTIC EFFICACY OF HIGH-INTENSITY PULSED-PERIODIC LASER RADIATION (CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Sokolov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the experience of clinical observations, we have shown a high therapeutic effectiveness of the medical laser KULON-MED in: cosmetics, non-cancer inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and cancer (cancer of the stomach and colon as at different wavelengths, and with different types of photosensitizers. In the area of anti-tumor photodynamic therapy (PDT, based on experimental studies, we have showed the high antitumor (sarcoma S‑37 effectiveness of the laser (with the inhibition of tumor growth of up to 100% for repetitively pulsed irradiation mode, and for mode fractionation doses laser radiation. In addition, significant differences are shown in the effectiveness of anticancer PDT methods in the application of high-intensity lasers, continuous and pulsed caused fundamental properties of laser radiation characteristics – time structure of the radiation pulses. Thus, for the first time we have shown that the time of high-intensity laser pulses structure significantly affects therapeutic efficacy laser system, and hence on the mechanisms of interaction of laser radiation with biological tissue.

  3. Investigation of Photo Neutralization Efficiency of High Intensity H-Beam with Nd:YAG Laser for J-PARC

    CERN Document Server

    Tomisawa, T; Hasegawa, K; Kondo, Y; Oigawa, H; Sato, S; Ueno, A

    2005-01-01

    The photo neutralization method with Nd:YAG laser for negative hydrogen ions has been considered as an available candidate for beam intensity profile monitor and charge exchange procedure for Accelerator-Driven-System (ADS) in J-PARC. An electron of H-beam can be stripped by fast and intense Nd:YAG (1064nm) laser with non-destructive, and laser system have advantages of maintenance and radiation hardness in high intensity proton accelerators. In this paper, an experimental set-up and preliminary results of photo neutralization method for linac H- beam in KEK DTL1 are described.

  4. Efficacy of pulsed high-intensity laser therapy on pain, functional capacity, and gait in children with haemophilic arthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shamy, Shamekh Mohamed; Abdelaal, Ashraf Abdelaal Mohamed

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of pulsed high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) on pain, functional capacity, and gait in children with haemophilia. Thirty children with haemophilia type A with ages ranging from 9 to 13 years were selected for this study. They were assigned randomly, into two equal treatment groups. The laser group received the traditional physical therapy programme plus active laser (total energy of 1500 J through three phases/3 sessions/week), whereas the placebo group received the same physical therapy programme plus placebo laser over three consecutive months. Baseline and post-treatment assessments used the visual analogue scale (VAS) to evaluate pain, a 6-min walk test (6MWT) to evaluate functional capacity, and the GAITRite(®) system to evaluate gait parameters. Children in the laser group showed significant improvement in pain, functional capacity, and gait parameters compared to those in the placebo group (p capacity for the laser and placebo groups were 316.6 ± 35.27 and 288 ± 43.3 m, respectively. HILT is an effective modality in reducing pain, increasing functional capacity, and improving gait performance in children with haemophilic arthropathy. Implications for Rehabilitation Haemophilic arthropathy due to recurrent joint bleeding leads to physical, psychological, and socioeconomic problems in children with haemophilia and reduces their quality of life. Early physiotherapeutic interventions help to prevent and treat the sequelae of recurrent haemarthrosis. High-intensity laser therapy has been introduced as non-invasive and an effective physiotherapy modality for rapid pain control, with consequent improvement in children's quality of life. High-intensity laser therapy should be used as an adjunct to exercise programme in the rehabilitation of children with haemophilic arthropathy.

  5. Enhancement of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Heating by Short-Pulse Generated Cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Yoshizawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A target tissue can be thermally coagulated in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU treatment noninvasively. HIFU thermal treatments have been clinically applied to various solid tumors. One of the problems in HIFU treatments is a long treatment time. Acoustically driven microbubbles can accelerate the ultrasonic heating, resulting in the significant reduction of the treatment time. In this paper, a method named “trigger HIFU exposure” which employs cavitation microbubbles is introduced and its results are reviewed. A trigger HIFU sequence consists of high-intensity short pulses followed by moderate-intensity long bursts. Cavitation bubbles induced in a multiple focal regions by rapidly scanning the focus of high-intensity pulses enhanced the temperature increase significantly and produced a large coagulation region with high efficiency.

  6. Characterization of high intensity Ni-like X-ray lasers and their application experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, H.J.; Daido, H.; Suzuki, M. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kyoto (Japan). Advanced Photon Research Center; Yamagami, S.; Nagai, K.; Norimatsu, T.; Mima, K.; Yamanaka, T. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Kato, Y.; Sasaki, A.; Hasegawa, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kyoto (Japan). Advanced Photon Research Center; Wang, S.; Gu, Y.; Huang, G. [National Lab. on High Power Laser and Physics, Shanghai, SH (China); Carillon, A.; Ros, D.; Fourcade, P.; Jamelot, G. [Lab. de Spectroscopie Atomique et Ionique, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Joyeux, D.; Phalippou, D. [Lab. Charles Fabry, CNRS, Inst. d' Optique, Orsay (France); Murai, K. [Osaka National Research Inst., Ikeda, Osaka (Japan); Butzbach, R.; Uschmann, I.; Foerster, E. [IOQ, Friedrich-Schiller Univ., Jena (Germany); Namikawa, K.; Tai, R. [Tokyo Gakugei Univ., Koganei (Japan); Koike, F. [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine; Takenaka, H. [NTT Advanced Technology, Musashino (Japan); Zhang, G. [Inst. of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing, BJ (China); Choi, I.W. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-07-01

    At the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, we have obtained Ni-like X-ray lasers of various atomic number elements, including many shorter wavelength Ni-like lasing lines around 5 nm. The saturated amplification of Ni-like Ag lasing line at the wavelength of 13.9 nm have been observed. Using these X-ray lasers, we are preparing the application experiments such as probing a laser-produced plasma with an X-ray laser interferometer. (orig.)

  7. Stochastic behavior of electrons in high intensity laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Chakhmachi, Amir; Yazdanpanah, Jamalaldin

    2017-12-01

    The stochastic behavior of electrons during the interaction of an intense short laser pulse with under-dense plasma is investigated by employing a fully kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The development of chaos in the involved nonlinear regime and in the presence of plasma space charge is examined. Though the electron Lagrangian is extremely complicated in this case, our analyses suggest some potential ways for chaos development. In this regard, our simulation results show that chaotic motion can develop in three different ways. When the space charge field is weak, the scattered fields can provide the necessary condition for chaos to occur. When a strong space charge field is presented, the creation of chaos is initiated by wave breaking. The third procedure for creating chaos originates from the inhomogeneity of the density on the vacuum-plasma surface. In this case, a new electrostatic mode without any phase relation with the space charge electrostatic mode is generated.

  8. Acceleration of electrons by high intensity laser radiation in a magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Melikian, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We consider the acceleration of electrons in vacuum by means of the circularly-polirized electromagnetic wave, propagating along a magnetic field. We show that the electron energy growth, when using ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulses (10 ps, 10^{18} Bm/cm^2, CO_{2} laser) in the presence of a magnetic field, may reach up to the value 2,1 Gev. The growth of the electron energy is shown to increase proportionally with the increase of the laser intensity and the initial energy of the ele...

  9. Near-critical density target experiments for ion acceleration using high-intensity laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordell, Peter; Campbell, Paul; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Willingale, Louise; Krushelnick, Karl

    2017-10-01

    The interaction of a short-duration, relativistic intensity laser pulse with a near-critical density plasma can produce a collisionless electrostatic shock capable of accelerating ions. This effect has already been demonstrated using CO2 laser systems (λ = 10 μm) where the specific plasma density profile enabled the acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic ion beams. We will present our experiments using the T-cubed laser system at the University of Michigan (λ = 1.053 μm , 6J, 400fs). Due to the shorter wavelength, typical of most relativistic intensity laser systems, a higher plasma density and shorter scalelengths are required to achieve the conditions for shock ion acceleration. The target design and characterization as well as preliminary experimental results will be presented. This work was supported by the DOE through Grant Number DE-SC0012327.

  10. Target Surface Area Effects on Hot Electron Dynamics from High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-19

    sheath field confinement on electron dynamics. X-ray emission due to energetic electrons was imaged using a aK imaging crystal. Electronswere observed to...laser conversion efficiency into particle andfield energy. Previous efforts tominimize this effect have primarily focused on small, isolated targets...leading to enhanced fields [12] improved conversion efficiency [13] and enhanced proton energies [14]with laser pulse durations of hundreds of fs

  11. Heating of heat-conducting targets by laser pulses with a high-intensity leading spike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, V. P.; Burdin, S. G.; Konov, V. I.; Uglov, S. A.; Chapliev, N. I.

    1983-04-01

    The results of an analysis of the solution of a one-dimensional heat conduction equation are used to study the specific features of the thermal effects of laser pulses with a leading spike on a target. Simple criteria are obtained for establishing the ability of a pulse to cause a given increase in the target surface temperature during the leading edge of a spike and also during the tail of the laser pulse. A study is made of the influence of the inhomogeneity of the distribution of surface heat sources on the realization of processes characterized by a threshold in respect of the temperature of the irradiated surface. The results obtained are compared with the experimental delay time in the process of initiation of an air breakdown plasma by interaction of CO2 laser pulses with a metal target.

  12. X-ray emission simulation from hollow atoms produced by high intensity laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Zhidkov, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan); Suto, Keiko [Nara Women' s Univ., Graduate School of Human Culture, Nara (Japan); Kagawa, Takashi [Nara Women' s Univ., Department of Physics, Nara (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    We theoretically study the x-ray emission from hollow atoms produced by collisions of multiply charged ions accelerated by a short pulse laser with a solid or foil. By using the multistep-capture-and-loss (MSCL) model a high conversion efficiency to x-rays in an ultrafast atomic process is obtained. It is also proposed to apply this x-ray emission process to the x-ray source. For a few keV x-rays this x-ray source has a clear advantage. The number of x-ray photons increases as the laser energy becomes larger. For a laser energy of 10 J, the number of x-ray photons of 3x10{sup 11} is estimated. (author)

  13. Condensation of ablation plumes in the irradiation of metals by high-intensity nanosecond laser pulses at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozadaev, K V [A.N. Sevchenko Institute of Applied Physical Problems, Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus)

    2016-01-31

    The Anisimov–Luk'yanchuk model is adapted for describing the condensation of vapour-plasma plumes produced in the irradiation of metal targets by high-intensity (10{sup 8} – 10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2}) nanosecond (10 – 100 ns) pulses at atmospheric pressure. The resultant data suggest that the initial stages of the development of metal ablation plumes correspond with a high degree of accuracy to the Zel'dovich–Raizer theory of dynamic condensation; however, at the stage of the ablation plume decay, the liquid-droplet phase is formed primarily by coalescence of 'nuclei'. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  14. Comparison of high-intensity sound and mechanical vibration for cleaning porous titanium cylinders fabricated using selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Gary; Hopkins, Carl; Sutcliffe, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Orthopedic components, such as the acetabular cup in total hip joint replacement, can be fabricated using porous metals, such as titanium, and a number of processes, such as selective laser melting. The issue of how to effectively remove loose powder from the pores (residual powder) of such components has not been addressed in the literature. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of two processes, acoustic cleaning using high-intensity sound inside acoustic horns and mechanical vibration, to remove residual titanium powder from selective laser melting-fabricated cylinders. With acoustic cleaning, the amount of residual powder removed was not influenced by either the fundamental frequency of the horn used (75 vs. 230 Hz) or, for a given horn, the number of soundings (between 1 and 20). With mechanical vibration, the amount of residual powder removed was not influenced by the application time (10 vs. 20 s). Acoustic cleaning was found to be more reliable and effective in removal of residual powder than cleaning with mechanical vibration. It is concluded that acoustic cleaning using high-intensity sound has significant potential for use in the final preparation stages of porous metal orthopedic components. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 117-123, 2017. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Anti-Stokes scattering and Stokes scattering of stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade in high-intensity laser-plasmas interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qingsong; Zheng, Chunyang; Liu, Zhanjun; Xiao, Chengzhuo; Wang, Qing; Cao, Lihua; He, Xiantu

    2017-10-01

    The anti-Stokes scattering and Stokes scattering in stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) cascade have been researched by the Vlasov-Maxwell simulation. In the high-intensity laser-plasmas interaction, the stimulated anti-Stokes Brillouin scattering (SABS) will occur after the second stage SBS rescattering. The mechanism of SABS has been put forward to explain this phenomenon. In the early time of SBS evolution, only the first stage SBS appears, and the total SBS reflectivity comes from the first stage SBS. However, when the high-stage SBS and SABS occur, the SBS reflectivity will appear a burst behavior, and the total reflectivity comes from the SBS cascade and SABS superimposition. The SABS will compete with the SBS rescattering to determine the total SBS reflectivity. Thus, the SBS rescattering including the SABS is an important saturation mechanism of SBS, and should be taken into account in the high-intensity laser-plasmas interaction. This research was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375032, 11575035, 11475030 and 11435011), National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834101) and Science Challenge Project, No. TZ2016005.

  16. Reflectivity of plasmas created by high-intensity, ultra-short laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, David Michael [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Experiments were performed to characterize the creation and evolution of high-temperature (T e~100eV), high-density (ne>1022cm-3) plasmas created with intense (~1012-1016W/cm2), ultra-short (130fs) laser pulses. The principle diagnostic was plasma reflectivity at optical wavelengths (614nm). An array of target materials (Al, Au, Si, SiO2) with widely differing electronic properties tested plasma behavior over a large set of initial states. Time-integrated plasma reflectivity was measured as a function of laser intensity. Space- and time-resolved reflectivity, transmission and scatter were measured with a spatial resolution of ~3μm and a temporal resolution of 130fs. An amplified, mode-locked dye laser system was designed to produce ~3.5mJ, ~130fs laser pulses to create and nonintrusively probe the plasmas. Laser prepulse was carefully controlled to suppress preionization and give unambiguous, high-density plasma results. In metals (Al and Au), it is shown analytically that linear and nonlinear inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption, resonance absorption, and vacuum heating explain time-integrated reflectivity at intensities near 1016W/cm2. In the insulator, SiO2, a non-equilibrium plasma reflectivity model using tunneling ionization, Helmholtz equations, and Drude conductivity agrees with time-integrated reflectivity measurements. Moreover, a comparison of ionization and Saha equilibration rates shows that plasma formed by intense, ultra-short pulses can exist with a transient, non-equilibrium distribution of ionization states. All targets are shown to approach a common reflectivity at intensities ~1016W/cm2, indicating a material-independent state insensitive to atomic or solid-state details.

  17. Surface treatment of screw shaped titanium dental implants by high intensity laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pető, G.; Karacs, A.; Pászti, Z.; Guczi, L.; Divinyi, T.; Joób, A.

    2002-01-01

    Machined and Al 2O 3 blasted surfaces of screw shaped Ti dental implants were irradiated by 30 ns pulses of Nd:glass laser at 1064 nm wavelength with 0.5-3 J pulse energy. The laser treatment increased the temperature of the Ti surface well above the melting temperature. The resulting ablation of some surface layers was followed by a very rapid solidification. These thermal processes strongly modified the original morphology of the surface and removed the contaminations. The new morphology was characterized by features mostly in ten micron and partly in submicron ranges. The surface composition was the same as the bulk titanium without any segregation. Animal experiments demonstrated that this surface treatment seems to be promising for the improvement of the osseointegration of dental implants.

  18. Continuous dual-wavelength, high-intensive Nd:YAG laser in operative urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, Leonid L.; Pupkova, Ludmila S.; Miroshnicov, B. I.; Snezhko, D. A.; Nikitichev, A. A.; Pokrovskiy, Vasiliy P.; Gomberg, Vladimir G.

    1994-05-01

    A ruby laser with a 0.694 mkm wavelength was used as a source of a new model of laser lithotriptor. The optical irradiation parameters selected included 1 mks duration pulse, frequency from 1 to 5 Hz, energy at an output of up to 120 mJ, transmitted via light guide quartz fiber of 400 kmk. The tip of the light guide was directed to the calculus through a catheterized cystoscope. Light guide position control was done by the presence of a specific acoustic signal accompanying plasma formation. Plasma is not formed by laser action on the ureter wall. In doubtful cases we used roentgenological examination. After lithotripsy and direct processing by irradiation, histological investigations of the ureter wall showed only slight submucosal hemorrhage or revealed no changes. Implantation of the calculus and fiber particles into the ureter wall was not observed. Twenty-nine patients were subjected to lithotripsy of calculus (oxalates, urates, phosphates) in the low and mid-ureter. Usually from 1000 to 3000 impulses were used to destroy the calculus. Calculus fragments passed without assistance (13 patients) or were removed by extractors (7 patients). The recovery of passing of urine and removal of renal colic were observed during lithotripsy if obturation had occurred (8 patients). Ureteral perforation, blood loss, and acute pyelonephritis did not occur.

  19. Pair creation in collision of γ-ray beams produced with high-intensity lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeyre, X; d'Humières, E; Jansen, O; Jequier, S; Tikhonchuk, V T; Lobet, M

    2016-01-01

    Direct production of electron-positron pairs in two-photon collisions, the Breit-Wheeler process, is one of the basic processes in the universe. However, it has never been directly observed in the laboratory because of the absence of the intense γ-ray sources. Laser-induced synchrotron sources emission may open a way to observe this process. The feasibility of an experimental setup using a MeV photon source is studied in this paper. We compare several γ-ray sources and estimate the expected number of electron-positron pairs and competing processes by using numerical simulations including quantum electrodynamic effects.

  20. Particle sources with high-intensity lasers: a tool for plasma diagnostics and an innovative source for applications; Sources de particules avec des lasers de haute intensite: un outil pour les diagnostics plasma et une source innovante pour les applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzler, S

    2003-09-15

    This work is an experimental study on particle generation with high-intensity lasers. This document is divided into 4 parts, whereas the first is dedicated to theoretical basics of particle generation and acceleration mechanisms during relativistic laser plasma interactions, the 3 other parts cover experimental studies on neutron, electron as well as proton generation. In the first part basic laser and plasma characteristics will be introduced as well as physical processes of interest during the interaction of a relativistic high-intensity laser with an underdense / overdense plasma. In the second part we introduce methodological basics of neutron generation by D(d,n)He{sup 3} reactions since this can reveal information about ion kinetics and possible ion heating mechanisms in plasmas. Subsequently the set-up for this experiment, pursued in the underdense regime, will be described in detail. The experimental results will be discussed for the gas jet interaction as well as for the beam target model since it was deduced that plasma ions are heated during the interaction to fusion temperatures of about 1 keV. The third part describes the generation of an electron beam with an energy up to 200 MeV in a new regime termed 'forced laser Wakefield'. Here, the presented experimental results were for the first time fully explained and even extended by the numerical modelling of this interaction in terms of energy, yield, angular divergence, emittance as well as bunch length of this electron beam. In the last part we present a 10 MeV proton beam generation using foil targets and a 10 Hz laser. Again the kinematic simulation of this experiment is in agreement with the experimental results by means of yield and angular divergence.

  1. Efficacy of high intensity diode laser as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal treatment: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Micheli, Giorgio; de Andrade, Ana Karina Pinto; Alves, Vanessa Tubero Euzebio; Seto, Marcio; Pannuti, Cláudio Mendes; Cai, Silvana

    2011-01-01

    The high intensity diode laser has been studied in periodontics for the reduction of subgingival bacteria in non-surgical treatment. Our study evaluated the bacterial effect as well as changes in periodontal clinical parameters promoted by root scaling and planing associated with this wavelength. Twenty-seven patients randomly assigned in two groups underwent root scaling and planing on the tested sites, and only the experimental group received the diode laser irradiation. Among the clinical parameters studied, the clinical probing depth (CPD) and the clinical attachment level (CAL) resulted in significant enhancement in the control group when compared with the experimental group (P = 0.014 and P = 0.039, respectively). The results were similar for both groups regarding the plaque index (PI) and bleeding on probing (BP). No significant difference in the microbiological parameters was observed between the control and experimental groups. It was possible to conclude that the high power diode laser adjunct to the non-surgical periodontal treatment did not promote additional effects to the conventional periodontal treatment.

  2. Recent experiments on electron transport in high-intensity laser matter interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baton, S. D.; Batani, D.; Manclossi, M.; Morace, A.; Piazza, D.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Koenig, M.; Guillou, P.; Loupias, B.; Fuchs, J.; Amiranoff, F.; Rabec LeGloahec, M.; Popescu, H.; Rousseaux, C.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C.; Kodama, R.; Norimatsu, T.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Aglitskiy, Y.

    2005-12-01

    We present the results of some recent experiments performed at the LULI laboratory using the 100 TW laser facility concerning the study of the propagation of fast electrons in gas and solid targets. Novel diagnostics have been implemented including chirped shadowgraphy and proton radiography. Proton radiography images did show the presence of very strong fields in the gas probably produced by charge separation. In turn these imply a slowing down of the fast electron cloud as it penetrates in the gas and a strong inhibition of propagation. Indeed chirped shadowgraphy images show a strong reduction in time of the velocity of the electron cloud from the initial value, which is of the order of a fraction of c. We also performed some preliminary experiments with cone targets in order to verify the guiding effect and fast electron propagation in presence of the cone. Finally we compared results obtained by changing the target size. Here we only give a first presentation and preliminary analysis of data, which will be addressed in detail in a following paper.

  3. Extraction of high-intensity ion beams from a laser plasma by a pulsed spherical diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Oguri

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available High-current Cu^{+} ion beams were extracted from a laser-produced plasma using a pulsed high-voltage multiaperture diode driven by an induction cavity. The amplitude and the duration of the extraction voltage were 130 kV and 450 ns, respectively. During the extraction, explosive beam divergence due to the strong space-charge force was suppressed by the focusing action of the gap between concentric hemispheres. Modulation of the extracted beam flux due to the plasma prefill in the gap has been eliminated by using a biased control grid put on the anode holes. By means of this extraction scheme we obtained a rectangular beam pulse with a rise time as short as ≈100  ns. The beam current behind the cathode was limited to ≈0.1   A, owing to space-charge effects, as well as to poor geometrical transmission through the cathode sphere. From the measurement of the extracted beam current density distribution along the beam axis and the beam profile measurement, we found a beam waist slightly downstream of the spherical center of the diode structure. The measured beam behavior was consistent with numerical results obtained via a 3D particle code. No serious degradation of the beam emittance was observed for the grid-controlled extraction scheme.

  4. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound field generated from a transmitter with large aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingbo; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Jimin; Zhang, Yichuan; Zhang, Dong

    2017-03-01

    A combined experiment and simulation method was utilized to characterize the acoustic field generated from a strong focused HIFU transmitter. The nonlinear sound propagation was described by the spheroidal beam equation (SBE). The relationship between the source pressure amplitude and excitation voltage was determined by fitting the measured ratio of the second harmonic to the fundamental component of the focal waveform to the simulation result; then the acoustic pressure field generated by the strong focused transducer was predicted by using the SBE model. A commercial fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) was utilized to measure the acoustic pressure field generated from a 1.1 MHz HIFU transmitter with a half aperture angle of 30°. The validity of this combined approach was confirmed by the comparison between the measured results and the calculated ones. The results show that the current approach might be useful to describe the HIFU field.

  5. Effects of radiation reaction in the interaction between cluster media and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Natsumi; Nagatomo, Hideo; Fukuda, Yuji; Matsui, Ryutaro; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2016-06-01

    Interaction between media composed of clusters and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime, i.e., intensity of 10 22 - 23 W / cm 2 , is studied based on the particle-in-cell simulation that includes the radiation reaction. By introducing target materials that have the same total mass but different internal structures, i.e., uniform plasma and cluster media with different cluster radii, we investigate the effect of the internal structure on the interaction dynamics, high energy radiation emission, and its reaction. Intense radiation emission is found in the cluster media where electrons exhibit non-ballistic motions suffering from strong accelerations by both the penetrated laser field and charge separation field of clusters. As a result, the clustered structure increases the energy conversion into high energy radiations significantly at the expense of the conversion into particles, while the total absorption rate into radiation and particles remains unchanged from the absorption rate into particles in the case without radiation reaction. The maximum ion energy achieved in the interaction with cluster media is found to be decreased through the radiation reaction to electrons into the same level with that achieved in the interaction with the uniform plasma. The clustered structure thus enhances high energy radiation emission rather than the ion acceleration in the considered intensity regime.

  6. High-intensity UV laser ChIP-seq for the study of protein-DNA interactions in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steube, Arndt; Schenk, Tino; Tretyakov, Alexander; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2017-11-03

    Genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding is generally performed by chemical protein-DNA crosslinking, followed by chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq). Here we present the ChIP-seq technique based on photochemical crosslinking of protein-DNA interactions by high-intensity ultraviolet (UV) laser irradiation in living mammalian cells (UV-ChIP-seq). UV laser irradiation induces an efficient and instant formation of covalent "zero-length" crosslinks exclusively between nucleic acids and proteins that are in immediate contact, thus resulting in a "snapshot" of direct protein-DNA interactions in their natural environment. Here we show that UV-ChIP-seq, applied for genome-wide profiling of the sequence-specific transcriptional repressor B-cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells, produces sensitive and precise protein-DNA binding profiles, highly enriched with canonical BCL6 DNA sequence motifs. Using this technique, we also found numerous previously undetectable direct BCL6 binding sites, particularly in condensed, inaccessible areas of chromatin.

  7. Treatment of drug-resistant fibromyalgia symptoms using high-intensity laser therapy: a case-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul F; Zafereo, Jason; Elvir-Lazo, Ofelia Loani; Hernandez, Hector

    2017-10-28

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic musculoskeletal condition characterized by widespread pain in the body and is associated with tender points at the shoulder, back and hip regions. A wide variety of pharmacologic drugs and dietary supplements have been used with limited success in treating the musculoskeletal pain. Early clinical studies with low level laser therapy (LLLT) alone or in combination with drugs commonly used to treat fibromyalgia suggested that LLLT may be effective in reducing musculoskeletal pain and stiffness, as well as the number of tender locations. However, a sham-controlled study reported that LLLT was not significantly better than the sham treatment and kinesiotape. Preliminary studies with high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) suggest that it may be more effective than LLLT for treating chronic pain syndromes. Therefore, we evaluated low (1 W), intermediate (42 W) and high level (75 W) HILT in a woman with long-standing fibromyalgia syndrome which was resistant to both standard pharmacotherapy and treatment in an interdisciplinary pain management program. The patient received a series of treatments with a HILT device (Phoenix Thera-lase) at a wavelength of 1275 nm administered at both the paraspinous region and tender points in the shoulder and hip regions. Although the 1 W treatment produced minimal symptom relief, both the 42 and the 75 W treatments produced a dramatic reduction in her overall pain, improved quality of sleep, and increased her level of physical activity for 4-10 days after these treatment sessions. This case illustrates the potential beneficial effects of using higher power levels of HILT for patients with fibromyalgia syndrome who have failed to respond to conventional interdisciplinary treatment regimens.

  8. Short-term effects of high-intensity laser therapy on frozen shoulder: A prospective randomized control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae Hoon; Kim, Yeon Ho; Lee, Hwa-Ryeong; Choi, Young Eun

    2015-12-01

    Frozen shoulder, which is characterized by shoulder pain and limitation of the range of motion (ROM), is a common disorder. High-intensity laser therapy (HILT) was recently introduced in the musculoskeletal therapeutic field. The objective of this study is to evaluate the clinical efficacy of HILT in patients with frozen shoulder. A prospective randomized controlled study. Patients with frozen shoulder were randomly divided into 2 groups: a HILT group (n = 33) and a placebo group (n = 33). The treatment was administered 3 times per week on alternate days for 3 weeks. For all patients, the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, VAS for satisfaction, and passive ROM were measured at baseline and 3, 8, and 12 weeks after the treatment. The HILT group had a lower pain VAS score at 3 weeks (3.2 ± 1.7 vs. 4.3 ± 2.2, p = 0.033) and 8 weeks (2.2 ± 2.0 vs. 3.4 ± 2.7, p = 0.042), however, no statistically significant difference in the pain VAS was observed between the two groups at the final follow-up (12 weeks). No statistical difference in the ROM and the satisfaction VAS was observed between the 2 groups at serial follow-ups. In management of frozen shoulder, HILT provided significant pain relief at 3 and 8 weeks, but not at the final follow-up time point. HILT is a noninvasive adjuvant treatment that can reduce pain in frozen shoulders. Further study is needed in order to optimize the dose and duration of HILT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Compton scattering at high intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzl, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.heinzl@plymouth.ac.u [University of Plymouth, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-01

    High-intensity Compton scattering takes place when an electron beam is brought into collision with a high power laser. We briefly review the main intensity signatures using the formalism of strong-field quantum electrodynamics.

  10. Endogenous Catalytic Generation of O2 Bubbles for In Situ Ultrasound-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianzhi; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Zhigang; Wu, Meiying; Chen, Yu; Ma, Ming; Chen, Hangrong; Shi, Jianlin

    2017-09-26

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) surgery generally suffers from poor precision and low efficiency in clinical application, especially for cancer therapy. Herein, a multiscale hybrid catalytic nanoreactor (catalase@MONs, abbreviated as C@M) has been developed as a tumor-sensitive contrast and synergistic agent (C&SA) for ultrasound-guided HIFU cancer surgery, by integrating dendritic-structured mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (MONs) and catalase immobilized in the large open pore channels of MONs. Such a hybrid nanoreactor exhibited sensitive catalytic activity toward H2O2, facilitating the continuous O2 gas generation in a relatively mild manner even if incubated with 10 μM H2O2, which finally led to enhanced ablation in the tissue-mimicking PAA gel model after HIFU exposure mainly resulting from intensified cavitation effect. The C@M nanoparticles could be accumulated within the H2O2-enriched tumor region through enhanced permeability and retention effect, enabling durable contrast enhancement of ultrasound imaging, and highly efficient tumor ablation under relatively low power of HIFU exposure in vivo. Very different from the traditional perfluorocarbon-based C&SA, such an on-demand catalytic nanoreactor could realize the accurate positioning of tumor without HIFU prestimulation and efficient HIFU ablation with a much safer power output, which is highly desired in clinical HIFU application.

  11. HILL: The High-Intensity Laser Laboratory Core Team's Reply to Questions from the NNSA Experimental Facilities Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, B J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-02

    Question 1 - The type of physics regimes that HILL can access for weapons studies is quite interesting. The question that arises for the proposal team is what priority does this type of experimental data have versus data that can be obtained with NIF, and Z. How does HILL rank in priority compared to MARIE 1.0 in terms of the experimental data it will provide? We reiterate that isochoric heating experiments to be conducted with HILL are complementary to the high energy density physics experiments at NIF and Z and uniquely access states of matter that neither other facility can access. It is our belief that HILL will enable several important questions, e.g., as related to mix morphology, radiation transfer from corrugated surfaces, and equations of state, to be run to ground through carefully diagnosed, 'unit-physics' experiments. Such experiments will substantially improve confidence in our computer models and provide a rigorous science basis for certification. Question 2 - A secondary question relates to the interests of LLNL and SNL in the physics that HILL can address. This should be spelled out clearly. I would like to see the other labs be part of the discussion regarding how important this capability would be if built. Both sister Labs have a keen interest in the physics enabled by high-intensity, high-energy lasers, as evinced by the Z Petawatt and NIF ARC upgrades to their signature facilities. LANL scientists have teamed with scientists from both Laboratories in high-intensity laser 'first experiments' envisioned for HILL and we fully intend to continue these profitable discussions going forward. In the preparation of the HILL proposal, feedback was solicited from the broader HEDP and weapons science communities. The consensus view was that HILL filled a critical gap and that there was a need for a facility like HILL to address outstanding questions in weapons science. It was recognized that co-location of HILL with a facility such as

  12. Flooded Lung Generates a Suitable Acoustic Pathway for Transthoracic Application of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound in Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Thomas Günther; Boltze, Carsten; Schubert, Harald; Wolfram, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent years, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has gained increasing clinical interest as a non-invasive method for local therapy of liver malignancies. HIFU treatment of tumours and metastases in the liver dome is limited due to the adjacent ultrasound blocking lung. One-lung flooding (OLF) enables complete sonography of lung and adjoining organs including liver. HIFU liver ablation passing through the flooded lung could enable a direct intercostal beam path and thus improve dose deposition in liver. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of an ultrasound guided transthoracic, transpulmonary HIFU ablation of liver using OLF. Methods: After right-side lung flooding, ultrasound guided HIFU was applied transthoracic- transpulmonary into liver to create thermal lesions in three pigs. The HIFU beam was targeted five times into liver, two times at the liver surface and three times deeper into the tissue. During autopsy examinations of lung, diaphragm and liver located in the HIFU path were performed. The focal liver lesions and lung tissue out of the beam path were examined histologically. Results: Fifteen thermal liver lesions were generated by transpulmonary HIFU sonication in all targeted regions. The lesions appeared well-demarcated in grey color with a cigar-shaped configuration. The mean length and width of the superficial and deeper lesions were 15.8 mm (range: 13-18 mm) and 5.8 mm (range: 5-7 mm), and 10.9 mm (range: 9-13 mm) and 3.3 mm (range: 2-5 mm), respectively. Histopathological, all liver lesions revealed a homogeneous thermal necrosis lacking vitality. There were no signs of damage of the overlying diaphragm and lung tissue. Conclusions: Flooded lung is a suitable pathway for applying HIFU to the liver, thus enabling a transthoracic, transpulmonary approach. The enlarged acoustic window could enhance the ablation speed for targets in the hepatic dome.

  13. Long-term effect of pulsed high-intensity laser therapy in the treatment of post-mastectomy pain syndrome: a double blind, placebo-control, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebid, Anwar Abdelgayed; El-Sodany, Ahmed Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    We assess the long-term effect of pulsed high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) in the treatment of the post-mastectomy pain syndrome (PMPS). A total of 61 women participated in this study (30 in the laser group and 31 in the placebo laser group), with a mean age of 53.56 ± 1.11 years. Patients who were randomly assigned to the laser group received HILT three times per week for 4 weeks, plus a routine physical therapy program (RPTP). The placebo laser group received placebo HILT plus RPTP. The outcomes measured were pain level by visual analog scale (VAS), shoulder range of motion (ROM), and quality of life (QOL). Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA with repeated measures to compare the differences between baseline and post-treatment measurements and after 12 weeks of follow-up for both groups. The level of statistical significance was set at P placebo group. VAS results showed a significant decrease post-treatment in the laser group relative to the placebo group, and QOL results showed a significant improvement in the laser group compared with the placebo group and still improved after 12 weeks of follow-up. HILT combined with an RPTP appears to be more effective in patients with PMPS than a placebo laser procedure with RPTP.

  14. Investigation of Generation, Acceleration, Transport and Final Focusing of High-Intensity Heavy Ion Beams from Sources to Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiping Chen

    2006-10-26

    Under the auspices of the research grant, the Intense Beam Theoretical Research Goup at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science and Fusion Center made significant contributions in a number of important areas in the HIF and HEDP research, including: (a) Derivation of rms envelope equations and study of rms envelope dynamics for high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing transport systems; (b) Identification of a new mechanism for chaotic particle motion, halo formation, and beam loss in high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing systems; Development of elliptic beam theory; (d) Study of Physics Issues in the Neutralization Transport Experiment (NTX).

  15. Prostate vaporization in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia by using a 200-w high-intensity diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Po-Hui; Chen, Chien-Hsu

    2010-07-01

    The recent introduction of high-power 200-W diode laser vaporization of the prostate has resulted in new interest in minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Although clinical reports are still limited, experimental ex vivo or in vivo models have demonstrated that this laser device offers improved ablative and hemostatic abilities. Some preliminary clinical results have proven that this laser technique can efficiently improve the symptoms of BPH. However, this still requires long-term evidence to support the use of this laser device. In this article, we review the latest experience with this laser technique and compare other laser systems in the treatment of BPH in recent years.

  16. Ablation Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed La1-xSrxTiO3+δ Coating Irradiated by High-Intensity Continuous Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinpeng; Ma, Zhuang; Gao, Yinjun; Gao, Lihong; Pervak, Vladimir; Wang, Lijun; Wei, Chenghua; Wang, Fuchi

    2017-10-11

    Laser protection for optical components, particularly those in high-power laser systems, has been a major concern. La1-xSrxTiO3+δ with its good optical and thermal properties can be potentially applied as a high-temperature optical protective coating or high-reflectivity material for optical components. However, the high-power laser ablation behavior of plasma-sprayed La1-xSrxTiO3+δ (x = 0.1) coatings has rarely been investigated. Thus, in this study, laser irradiation experiments were performed to study the effect of high-intensity continuous laser on the ablation behavior of the La1-xSrxTiO3+δ coating. The results show that the La1-xSrxTiO3+δ coating undergoes three ablation stages during laser irradiation: coating oxidation, formation and growth of new structures (columnar and dendritic crystals), and mechanical failure. A finite-element simulation was also conducted to explore the mechanism of the ablation damage to the La1-xSrxTiO3+δ coating and provided a good understanding of the ablation behavior. The apparent ablation characteristics are attributed to the different temperature gradients determined by the reflectivity and thermal diffusivity of the La1-xSrxTiO3+δ coating material, which are critical factors for improving the antilaser ablation property. Now, the stainless steel substrate deposited by it can effectively work as a protective shield layer against ablation by laser irradiation.

  17. Comparative evaluation of the effects of high-intensity and low-intensity laser radiation on microcirculation among patients with knee arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulchitskaya, D. B.; Konchugova, T. V.; E Fedorova, N.

    2017-04-01

    Sixty patients with knee arthritis aged from 40 to 75 years old were examined. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: 1st group (30 patients) received high intensity laser radiation; 2nd group (20 patients) received low intensity laser radiation. As a result of the conducted research it was found that high intensity laser radiation is more efficient and leads to more vivid positive changes in the microcirculation of patients with knee arthritis. The changes in microcirculation were based on the normalization of the myogenic and neurogenic tonus of the arterioles, strengthening oscillation of the endothelial range. As a result of local mechanisms activation of tissue blood flow there occurs adequate modulation of the microcirculatory bloodstream, which is aimed at the elimination of congestive phenomena in the capillary and venular level of the microcirculation bloodstream. We should note that in the long-term more significant were the positive changes in the state of the venular level of the microcirculation bloodstream. in constructing both.

  18. ARTICLES: Heating of heat-conducting targets by laser pulses with a high-intensity leading spike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, Vladimir P.; Burdin, S. G.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Uglov, S. A.; Chapliev, N. I.

    1983-04-01

    The results of an analysis of the solution of a one-dimensional heat conduction equation are used to study the specific features of the thermal effects of laser pulses with a leading spike on a target. Simple criteria are obtained for establishing the ability of a pulse to cause a given increase in the target surface temperature during the leading edge of a spike and also during the tail of the laser pulse. A study is made of the influence of the inhomogeneity of the distribution of surface heat sources on the realization of processes characterized by a threshold in respect of the temperature of the irradiated surface. The results obtained are compared with the experimental delay time in the process of initiation of an air breakdown plasma by interaction of CO2 laser pulses with a metal target.

  19. Temperature changes on the root surfaces of mandibular incisors after an 810-nm high-intensity intracanal diode laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca Alvarez, Andrea; Moura-Netto, Cacio; Daliberto Frugoli, Alexandre; Fernando, Casemiro; Correa Aranha, Ana Cecilia; Davidowicz, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Temperature changes caused by laser irradiation can promote damage to the surrounding dental tissues. In this study, we evaluated the temperature changes of recently extracted human mandibular incisors during intracanal irradiation with an 810-nm diode laser at different settings. Fifty mandibular incisors were enlarged up to an apical size of ISO No. 40 file. After the final rinse with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 0.2% lauryl sodium sulfate biologic detergent, and sterile water, samples were irradiated with circular movements from apex to crown through five different settings of output power (1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 W) in continuous mode. The temperature changes were measured on both sides of the apical and middle root thirds using two thermopar devices. A temperature increase of 7 °C was considered acceptable as a safe threshold when applying the diode laser. Results: The results showed that only 3.5-W output power increased the outer surface temperature above the critical value. Conclusion: The recommended output power can be stipulated as equal to or less than 3 W to avoid overheating during diode laser irradiation on thin dentin walls.

  20. Laser-matter interaction at high intensity and high temporal contrast; Interaction laser matiere a haut flux et fort contraste temporel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doumy, G

    2006-01-15

    The continuous progress in the development of laser installations has already lead to ultra-short pulses capable of achieving very high focalized intensities (I > 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}). At these intensities, matter presents new non-linear behaviours, due to the fact that the electrons are accelerated to relativistic speeds. The experimental access to this interaction regime on solid targets has long been forbidden because of the presence, alongside the femtosecond pulse, of a pedestal (mainly due to the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) which occurs in the laser chain) intense enough to modify the state of the target. In this thesis, we first characterized, both experimentally and theoretically, a device which allows an improvement of the temporal contrast of the pulse: the Plasma Mirror. It consists in adjusting the focusing of the pulse on a dielectric target, so that the pedestal is mainly transmitted, while the main pulse is reflected by the overcritical plasma that it forms at the surface. The implementation of such a device on the UHI 10 laser facility (CEA Saclay - 10 TW - 60 fs) then allowed us to study the interaction between ultra-intense, high contrast pulses with solid targets. In a first part, we managed to generate and characterize dense plasmas resulting directly from the interaction between the main pulse and very thin foils (100 nm). This characterization was realized by using an XUV source obtained by high order harmonics generation in a rare gas jet. In a second part, we studied experimentally the phenomenon of high order harmonics generation on solid targets, which is still badly understood, but could potentially lead to a new kind of energetic ultra-short XUV sources. (author)

  1. Commissioning of a compact laser-based proton beam line for high intensity bunches around 10 MeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Busold

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the first results of experiments with a new laser-based proton beam line at the GSI accelerator facility in Darmstadt. It delivers high current bunches at proton energies around 9.6 MeV, containing more than 10^{9} particles in less than 10 ns and with tunable energy spread down to 2.7% (ΔE/E_{0} at FWHM. A target normal sheath acceleration stage serves as a proton source and a pulsed solenoid provides for beam collimation and energy selection. Finally a synchronous radio frequency (rf field is applied via a rf cavity for energy compression at a synchronous phase of -90  deg. The proton bunch is characterized at the end of the very compact beam line, only 3 m behind the laser matter interaction point, which defines the particle source.

  2. Nonlinear threshold effect in the Z-scan method of characterizing limiters for high-intensity laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tereshchenko, S. A., E-mail: tsa@miee.ru; Savelyev, M. S.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Gerasimenko, A. Yu.; Selishchev, S. V. [National Research University of Electronic Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-07

    A threshold model is described which permits one to determine the properties of limiters for high-powered laser light. It takes into account the threshold characteristics of the nonlinear optical interaction between the laser beam and the limiter working material. The traditional non-threshold model is a particular case of the threshold model when the limiting threshold is zero. The nonlinear characteristics of carbon nanotubes in liquid and solid media are obtained from experimental Z-scan data. Specifically, the nonlinear threshold effect was observed for aqueous dispersions of nanotubes, but not for nanotubes in solid polymethylmethacrylate. The threshold model fits the experimental Z-scan data better than the non-threshold model. Output characteristics were obtained that integrally describe the nonlinear properties of the optical limiters.

  3. Ta-ion implantation induced by a high-intensity laser for plasma diagnostics and target preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, M.; Malinsky, P.; Mackova, A.; Matousek, J.; Torrisi, L.; Slepicka, P.; Ullschmied, J.

    2015-12-01

    The present work is focused on the implantation of Ta ions into silicon substrates covered by a silicon dioxide layer 50-300 nm thick. The implantation is achieved using sub-nanosecond pulsed laser ablation (1015 W/cm2) with the objective of accelerating non-equilibrium plasma ions. The accelerated Ta ions are implanted into the exposed silicon substrates at energies of approximately 20 keV per charge state. By changing a few variables in the laser pulse, it is possible to control the kinetic energy, the yield and the angular distribution of the emitted ions. Rutherford Back-Scattering analysis was performed using 2.0 MeV He+ as the probe ions to determine the elemental depth profiles and the chemical composition of the laser-implanted substrates. The depth distributions of the implanted Ta ions were compared to SRIM 2012 simulations. The evaluated results of energy distribution were compared with online techniques, such as Ion Collectors (IC) and an Ion Energy Analyser (IEA), for a detailed identification of the produced ion species and their energy-to-charge ratios (M/z). Moreover, XPS (X-ray Photon Spectroscopy) and AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) analyses were carried out to obtain information on the surface morphology and the chemical composition of the modified implanted layers, as these features are important for further application of such structures.

  4. Ta-ion implantation induced by a high-intensity laser for plasma diagnostics and target preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutroneo, M., E-mail: cutroneo@ujf.cas.cz [Nuclear Physics Institute, ASCR, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Malinsky, P.; Mackova, A. [Nuclear Physics Institute, ASCR, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, Ceske mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Matousek, J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, Ceske mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Torrisi, L. [Department of Physics and Earth Science, Messina University, V.le F.S. d’Alcontres 31, 981 66 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Slepicka, P. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Ullschmied, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    The present work is focused on the implantation of Ta ions into silicon substrates covered by a silicon dioxide layer 50–300 nm thick. The implantation is achieved using sub-nanosecond pulsed laser ablation (10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) with the objective of accelerating non-equilibrium plasma ions. The accelerated Ta ions are implanted into the exposed silicon substrates at energies of approximately 20 keV per charge state. By changing a few variables in the laser pulse, it is possible to control the kinetic energy, the yield and the angular distribution of the emitted ions. Rutherford Back-Scattering analysis was performed using 2.0 MeV He{sup +} as the probe ions to determine the elemental depth profiles and the chemical composition of the laser-implanted substrates. The depth distributions of the implanted Ta ions were compared to SRIM 2012 simulations. The evaluated results of energy distribution were compared with online techniques, such as Ion Collectors (IC) and an Ion Energy Analyser (IEA), for a detailed identification of the produced ion species and their energy-to-charge ratios (M/z). Moreover, XPS (X-ray Photon Spectroscopy) and AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) analyses were carried out to obtain information on the surface morphology and the chemical composition of the modified implanted layers, as these features are important for further application of such structures.

  5. MR thermometry analysis program for laser- or high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced heating at a clinical MR scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ju; Jeong, Ki Young; Oh, Seung Jae; Park, Eun Hae; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Hong [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry is a noninvasive method for monitoring local temperature change during thermal therapy. In this study, a MR temperature analysis program was established for a laser with gold nanorods (GNRs) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced heating MR thermometry. The MR temperature map was reconstructed using the water proton resonance frequency (PRF) method. The temperature-sensitive phase difference was acquired by using complex number subtraction instead of direct phase subtraction in order to avoid another phase unwrapping process. A temperature map-analyzing program was developed and implemented in IDL (Interactive Data Language) for effective temperature monitoring. This one program was applied to two different heating devices at a clinical MR scanner. All images were acquired with the fast spoiled gradient echo (fSPGR) pulse sequence on a 3.0 T GE Discovery MR750 scanner with an 8-channel knee array coil or with a home-built small surface coil. The analyzed temperature values were confirmed by using values simultaneously measured with an optical temperature probe (R{sup 2} = 0.996). The temperature change in small samples induced by a laser or by HIFU was analyzed by using a raw data, that consisted of complex numbers. This study shows that our MR thermometry analysis program can be used for thermal therapy study with a laser or HIFU at a clinical MR scanner. It can also be applied to temperature monitoring for any other thermal therapy based on the PRF method.

  6. Proton beams emission from laser-generated plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available An alternative method employing large dimension ion accelerator systems to generate proton beams can be the production of ions by using a power pulsed laser, operating at high intensity, irradiating in vacuum hydrogenated targets and by extracting the ions of interest from the generated plasma. The choice of the adequate target, of the laser pulse intensity regime and of the ion current obtainable, is strongly dependent of the type of experimental apparatus, as will be discussed in the article. Proton beam emission from experiments conduced at low and high laser intensities are presented, in order to generate protons from about 100 eV, as that prepared at the Physics Department of Messina University, up to about 100 keV, as prepared at INFN-LNS of Catania, and up to about 1 MeV obtained at the international PALS Laboratory of Prague, Czech Republic.

  7. Long-term effects of pulsed high-intensity laser therapy in the treatment of post-burn pruritus: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebid, Anwar Abdelgayed; Ibrahim, Abeer Ramadan; Omar, Mohammed Taher; El Baky, Amal Mohamed Abd

    2017-04-01

    We assessed the long-term effects of pulsed high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) in post-burn pruritus treatment. A total of 49 adult burn patients with mean age of 31.53 ± 10.14 years participated, with 24 patients randomly assigned to the active laser group (ALG) and 25 in the placebo laser group (PLG). The ALG received HILT three times per week for 6 weeks, while the PLG received placebo HILT. Both groups received 10-mg cetirizine tablets twice daily and 10 mg at bedtime. All patients were advised to massage their burn scars with coconut oil for 5 min four times daily. The outcomes measured were the itch severity scale (ISS), impairment of pruritus-related quality of life (QoL), pain level by the visual analog scale (VAS), hand grip strength by handheld dynamometer, and daily cetirizine intake. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used to compare the baseline and post-treatment measurements and after 12 weeks of follow-up. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. ISS decreased significantly in the ALG after 6 weeks of treatment and after 12 weeks of follow-up compared with the PLG. The QoL results showed a significant improvement in the ALG compared with the PLG, which continued after 12 weeks. VAS results significantly decrease, hand grip strength significantly improved, and cetirizine intake significantly decreased post-treatment in the ALG relative to the PLG. HILT combined with cetirizine seems more effective in patients with post-burn pruritus than a placebo laser procedure with cetirizine.

  8. Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Warren, B.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from the grant entitled, Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions. The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

  9. Thomson parabola spectrometry for gold laser-generated plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Ando, L. [Physics Department of Messina University, V.le F. S. D' Alcontres 31, 9816 S. Agata (Italy); Ullschmied, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2013-02-15

    The plasma generated from thin gold films irradiated in high vacuum at high intensity ({approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) laser shot is characterized in terms of ion generation through time-of-flight techniques and Thomson parabola spectrometry. Gold ions and protons, accelerated in forward direction by the electric field developed in non-equilibrium plasma, have been investigated. Measurements, performed at PALS laboratory, give information about the gold charge states distributions, the ion energy distributions and the proton acceleration driven as a function of film thickness, laser parameters, and angular emission. The ion diagnostics of produced plasma in forward direction permits to understand some mechanisms developed during its expansion kinetics. The role of the focal position of a laser beam with respect to the target surface, plasma properties, and the possibility to accelerate protons up to energies above 3 MeV has been presented and discussed.

  10. Thomson parabola spectrometry for gold laser-generated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Andò, L.; Ullschmied, J.

    2013-02-01

    The plasma generated from thin gold films irradiated in high vacuum at high intensity (˜1015 W/cm2) laser shot is characterized in terms of ion generation through time-of-flight techniques and Thomson parabola spectrometry. Gold ions and protons, accelerated in forward direction by the electric field developed in non-equilibrium plasma, have been investigated. Measurements, performed at PALS laboratory, give information about the gold charge states distributions, the ion energy distributions and the proton acceleration driven as a function of film thickness, laser parameters, and angular emission. The ion diagnostics of produced plasma in forward direction permits to understand some mechanisms developed during its expansion kinetics. The role of the focal position of a laser beam with respect to the target surface, plasma properties, and the possibility to accelerate protons up to energies above 3 MeV has been presented and discussed.

  11. Effect of high-intensity laser therapy in the management of myofascial pain syndrome of the trapezius: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Umit; Turkmen, Utku; Toktas, Hasan; Solak, Ozlem; Ulasli, Alper Murat

    2015-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) of the trapezius muscle is one of the main causes of neck pain. In this randomized, double-blind study, we evaluated the effects of high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) in female patients with chronic MPS of the trapezius muscle. The patients were assigned to two groups. The HILT group was treated with HILT and exercise, and the sham therapy group was treated with placebo HILT and exercise. The patients were assessed for pain, cervical active range of motion, disability, and quality of life. Evaluations were performed before treatment (week 0) and after treatment (weeks 4 and 12). Both groups showed significant improvement in all parameters at weeks 4 and 12. However, in a comparison of the percentage changes in the parameters at weeks 4 and 12 relative to pretreatment values, the HILT group showed greater improvement in pain scores, the neck disability index, and several subparts of the short-form 36 health survey (SF-36) (physical functioning, role limitations due to physical functioning, bodily pain, general health perceptions, social functioning, and role limitations due to emotional problems) than did the sham therapy group. We conclude that HILT is an effective therapeutic method in the treatment of patients with chronic MPS of the trapezius muscle.

  12. Short-term effects of high-intensity laser therapy, manual therapy, and Kinesio taping in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekyavas, Nihan Ozunlu; Baltaci, Gul

    2016-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) is a major contributing factor of shoulder pain; and treatment approaches (Kinesio® taping [KT], Exercise [EX], manual therapy [MT], and high-intensity laser therapy [HILT]) have been developed to treat the pain. The key objective of this study was to compare the effects of KT, MT, and HILT on the pain, the range of motion (ROM), and the functioning in patients with SAIS. Seventy patients with SAIS were randomly divided into four groups based on the treatment(s) each group received [EX (n = 15), KT + EX (n = 20), MT + KT + EX (n = 16), and MT + KT + HILT + EX (n = 19)]. All the patients were assessed before and at the end of the treatment (15th day). The main outcome assessments included the evaluation of severity of pain by visual analogue scale (VAS) and shoulder flexion, abduction, and external rotation ROM measurements by a universal goniometry. Shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI) was used to measure pain and disability associated with shoulder pathology. Statistically significant differences were found in the treatment results of all parameters in MT + KT + EX and HILT + MT + KT + EX groups (p effective in minimizing pain and disability and increasing ROM in patients with SAIS. Further studies with follow-up periods are required to determine the advantages of these treatments conclusively.

  13. Characterization of X-ray emission from laser generated plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannavò Antonino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray emission from laser generated plasma was studied at low (1010 W/cm2 and high (1018 W/cm2 intensity using ns and fs laser, respectively. Plasma characteristics were controlled trough the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions and the target properties. The X-ray spectra were acquired using fast detection technique based on SiC diodes with different active regions. The X-ray yield increases with the atomic number of the target, both at low and high intensity, and a similar empirical law has been obtained. The X-ray emission mechanisms from plasma are correlated to the plasma temperature and density and to the Coulomb charge particle acceleration, due to the charge separation effects produced in the non-equilibrium plasma. Functional dependences, theoretical approaches and interpretation of possible mechanism will be presented and discussed.

  14. Characterization of X-ray emission from laser generated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavò, Antonino; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Ceccio, Giovanni; Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Calcagno, Lucia; Sciuto, Antonella; Mazzillo, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    X-ray emission from laser generated plasma was studied at low (1010 W/cm2) and high (1018 W/cm2) intensity using ns and fs laser, respectively. Plasma characteristics were controlled trough the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions and the target properties. The X-ray spectra were acquired using fast detection technique based on SiC diodes with different active regions. The X-ray yield increases with the atomic number of the target, both at low and high intensity, and a similar empirical law has been obtained. The X-ray emission mechanisms from plasma are correlated to the plasma temperature and density and to the Coulomb charge particle acceleration, due to the charge separation effects produced in the non-equilibrium plasma. Functional dependences, theoretical approaches and interpretation of possible mechanism will be presented and discussed.

  15. High-intensity focused ultrasound-triggered nanoscale bubble-generating liposomes for efficient and safe tumor ablation under photoacoustic imaging monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Gang; Hao, Lan; Xu, Chunyan; Ran, Haitao; Zheng, Yuanyi; Li, Pan; Cao, Yang; Wang, Qi; Xia, Jizhu; Wang, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is widely applied to tumors in clinical practice due to its minimally invasive approach. However, several issues lower therapeutic efficiency in some cases. Many synergists such as microbubbles and perfluorocarbon nanoparticles have recently been used to improve HIFU treatment efficiency, but none were determined to be effective and safe in vivo. In this study, nanoscale bubble-generating liposomes (liposomes containing ammonium bicarbonate [Lip-ABC]) were prepared by film hydration followed by sequential extrusion. Their stable nanoscale particle diameter was confirmed, and their bubble-generating capacity after HIFU triggering was demonstrated with ultrasound imaging. Lip-ABC had good stability in vivo and accumulated in the tumor interstitial space based on the enhanced permeability and retention effect evaluated by photoacoustic imaging. When used to synergize HIFU ablation to bovine liver in vitro and implanted breast tumors of BALB/c nude mice, Lip-ABC outperformed the control. Importantly, all mice survived HIFU treatment, suggesting that Lip-ABC is a safe HIFU synergist.

  16. Ion beam enhancement in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation in non-relativistic mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X. P. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Z. C.; Lei, M. K., E-mail: surfeng@dlut.edu.cn [Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Pushkarev, A. I. [Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Laboratory of Beam and Plasma Technology, High Technologies Physics Institute, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Ave, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) with ion current density above Child-Langmuir limit is achieved by extracting ion beam from anode plasma of ion diodes with suppressing electron flow under magnetic field insulation. It was theoretically estimated that with increasing the magnetic field, a maximal value of ion current density may reach nearly 3 times that of Child-Langmuir limit in a non-relativistic mode and close to 6 times in a highly relativistic mode. In this study, the behavior of ion beam enhancement by magnetic insulation is systematically investigated in three types of magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with passive anode, taking into account the anode plasma generation process on the anode surface. A maximal enhancement factor higher than 6 over the Child-Langmuir limit can be obtained in the non-relativistic mode with accelerating voltage of 200–300 kV. The MIDs differ in two anode plasma formation mechanisms, i.e., surface flashover of a dielectric coating on the anode and explosive emission of electrons from the anode, as well as in two insulation modes of external-magnetic field and self-magnetic field with either non-closed or closed drift of electrons in the anode-cathode (A-K) gap, respectively. Combined with ion current density measurement, energy density characterization is employed to resolve the spatial distribution of energy density before focusing for exploring the ion beam generation process. Consistent results are obtained on three types of MIDs concerning control of neutralizing electron flows for the space charge of ions where the high ion beam enhancement is determined by effective electron neutralization in the A-K gap, while the HIPIB composition of different ion species downstream from the diode may be considerably affected by the ion beam neutralization during propagation.

  17. Ion Beam Analysis applied to laser-generated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, M.; Macková, A.; Havranek, V.; Malinsky, P.; Torrisi, L.; Kormunda, M.; Barchuk, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Dudzak, R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the research activity on Ion Beam Analysis methods performed at Tandetron Laboratory (LT) of the Institute of Nuclear Physics AS CR, Rez, Czech Republic. Recently, many groups are paying attention to implantation by laser generated plasma. This process allows to insert a controllable amount of energetic ions into the surface layers of different materials modifying the physical and chemical properties of the surface material. Different substrates are implanted by accelerated ions from plasma through terawatt iodine laser, at nominal intensity of 1015 W/cm2, at the PALS Research Infrastructure AS CR, in the Czech Republic. This regime of the laser matter interaction generates, multi-MeV proton beams, and multi-charged ions that are tightly confined in time (hundreds ps) and space (source radius of a few microns). These ion beams have a much lower transverse temperature, a much shorter duration and a much higher current than those obtainable from conventional accelerators. The implementation of protons and ions acceleration driven by ultra-short high intensity lasers is exhibited by adopting suitable irradiation conditions as well as tailored targets. An overview of implanted targets and their morphological and structural characterizations is presented and discussed.

  18. High Intensity Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, M.; Brodin, G.; Lundin, J.; Ilderton, A.

    2009-11-01

    The capability to produce high field strengths, and thereby obtain a new means for doing fundamental physics, has over the last thirty years taken great leaps forward. Both superconducting cavities as well ultra-intense lasers can now reach field strengths of the order 50 MV/m (stationary) and 1012 V/m (peak value, time-dependent field), respectively. Here we will describe a collection of problems that catches the flavor of the nonlinear quantum vacuum and the possibility to use high field strengths as a low-energy probe of fundamental physics.

  19. High average power, diode pumped petawatt laser systems: a new generation of lasers enabling precision science and commercial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefner, C. L.; Bayramian, A.; Betts, S.; Bopp, R.; Buck, S.; Cupal, J.; Drouin, M.; Erlandson, A.; Horáček, J.; Horner, J.; Jarboe, J.; Kasl, K.; Kim, D.; Koh, E.; Koubíková, L.; Maranville, W.; Marshall, C.; Mason, D.; Menapace, J.; Miller, P.; Mazurek, P.; Naylon, A.; Novák, J.; Peceli, D.; Rosso, P.; Schaffers, K.; Sistrunk, E.; Smith, D.; Spinka, T.; Stanley, J.; Steele, R.; Stolz, C.; Suratwala, T.; Telford, S.; Thoma, J.; VanBlarcom, D.; Weiss, J.; Wegner, P.

    2017-05-01

    Large laser systems that deliver optical pulses with peak powers exceeding one Petawatt (PW) have been constructed at dozens of research facilities worldwide and have fostered research in High-Energy-Density (HED) Science, High-Field and nonlinear physics [1]. Furthermore, the high intensities exceeding 1018W/cm2 allow for efficiently driving secondary sources that inherit some of the properties of the laser pulse, e.g. pulse duration, spatial and/or divergence characteristics. In the intervening decades since that first PW laser, single-shot proof-of-principle experiments have been successful in demonstrating new high-intensity laser-matter interactions and subsequent secondary particle and photon sources. These secondary sources include generation and acceleration of charged-particle (electron, proton, ion) and neutron beams, and x-ray and gamma-ray sources, generation of radioisotopes for positron emission tomography (PET), targeted cancer therapy, medical imaging, and the transmutation of radioactive waste [2, 3]. Each of these promising applications requires lasers with peak power of hundreds of terawatt (TW) to petawatt (PW) and with average power of tens to hundreds of kW to achieve the required secondary source flux.

  20. The generation of amplified spontaneous emission in high-power CPA laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, Sebastian; Sävert, Alexander; Körner, Jörg; Hornung, Marco; Liebetrau, Hartmut; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte Christoph

    2016-03-01

    An analytical model is presented describing the temporal intensity contrast determined by amplified spontaneous emission in high-intensity laser systems which are based on the principle of chirped pulse amplification. The model describes both the generation and the amplification of the amplified spontaneous emission for each type of laser amplifier. This model is applied to different solid state laser materials which can support the amplification of pulse durations ≤350 fs . The results are compared to intensity and fluence thresholds, e.g. determined by damage thresholds of a certain target material to be used in high-intensity applications. This allows determining if additional means for contrast improvement, e.g. plasma mirrors, are required for a certain type of laser system and application. Using this model, the requirements for an optimized high-contrast front-end design are derived regarding the necessary contrast improvement and the amplified "clean" output energy for a desired focussed peak intensity. Finally, the model is compared to measurements at three different high-intensity laser systems based on Ti:Sapphire and Yb:glass. These measurements show an excellent agreement with the model.

  1. Laser generated nanoparticles based photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, C; Savva, K; Kymakis, E; Stratakis, E

    2017-03-01

    The exploitation of nanoparticles (NP), synthesized via laser ablation in liquids, in photovoltaic devices is reviewed. In particular, the impact of NPs' incorporation into various building blocks within the solar cell architecture on the photovoltaic performance and stability is presented and analysed for the current state of the art photovoltaic technologies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The Mercury Laser Advances Laser Technology for Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbers, C A; Caird, J; Moses, E

    2009-01-21

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is on target to demonstrate 'breakeven' - creating as much fusion-energy output as laser-energy input. NIF will compress a tiny sphere of hydrogen isotopes with 1.8 MJ of laser light in a 20-ns pulse, packing the isotopes so tightly that they fuse together, producing helium nuclei and releasing energy in the form of energetic particles. The achievement of breakeven will culminate an enormous effort by thousands of scientists and engineers, not only at Livermore but around the world, during the past several decades. But what about the day after NIF achieves breakeven? NIF is a world-class engineering research facility, but if laser fusion is ever to generate power for civilian consumption, the laser will have to deliver pulses nearly 100,000 times faster than NIF - a rate of perhaps 10 shots per second as opposed to NIF's several shots a day. The Mercury laser (named after the Roman messenger god) is intended to lead the way to a 10-shots-per-second, electrically-efficient, driver laser for commercial laser fusion. While the Mercury laser will generate only a small fraction of the peak power of NIF (1/30,000), Mercury operates at higher average power. The design of Mercury takes full advantage of the technology advances manifest in its behemoth cousin (Table 1). One significant difference is that, unlike the flashlamp-pumped NIF, Mercury is pumped by highly efficient laser diodes. Mercury is a prototype laser capable of scaling in aperture and energy to a NIF-like beamline, with greater electrical efficiency, while still running at a repetition rate 100,000 times greater.

  3. One laser pulse generates two photoacoustic signals

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic sensing and imaging techniques have been studied widely to explore optical absorption contrast based on nanosecond laser illumination. In this paper, we report a long laser pulse induced dual photoacoustic (LDPA) nonlinear effect, which originates from unsatisfied stress and thermal confinements. Being different from conventional short laser pulse illumination, the proposed method utilizes a long square-profile laser pulse to induce dual photoacoustic signals. Without satisfying the stress confinement, the dual photoacoustic signals are generated following the positive and negative edges of the long laser pulse. More interestingly, the first expansion-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits positive waveform due to the initial sharp rising of temperature. On the contrary, the second contraction-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits exactly negative waveform due to the falling of temperature, as well as pulse-width-dependent, signal amplitude which is caused by the concurrent heat accumulation and ...

  4. Direct Measurements of Space-Charge-Potential in High Intensity H- Beam with Laser Based Photo Neutralization Method

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S; Ikegami, M; Toyama, T

    2005-01-01

    Transverse profiles of H- beams can be observed by scanning a laser wire across the ion beam and detect the pulse of photo detached electrons. In addition, laser based photo neutralization method have a capability of direct space-charge-potential measurement by investigate the energy distribution of collected electrons. The kinetic energy of photo detached electron corresponds to the ion velocity and space potential at stripped location. The space-charge-potential in H- beam can be measured by scanning the bias potential of repeller grid in front of Faraday cup. In this paper, an available method to observe the space-charge-potential and preliminary experimental results with Nd:YAG laser in KEK DTL1 (J-PARC) are described.

  5. High Intensity Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Nightime illumination is an important part of round-the-clock pre-launch preparations because NASA uses TV and film cameras to monitor each step of the preliminaries and at times to identify the cause of malfunction during countdown. Generating a one billion candlepower beam visible 50 miles away, the lamps developed by Duro-Test Corporation provide daylight quality light that eliminates color distortion in film and TV coverage. The lighting system was first used at Kennedy Space Center in 1968 for the launch of Apollo 8. Modified versions are available in wide range of applications, such as the battery of spotlights with colored filters that light up Niagara Falls, as well as the lamps used in the projectors for the Smithsonian's IMAX Theatre, indoor theatres with supersized screens and outdoor projection systems.

  6. Gravitational wave generation by interaction of high power lasers with matter. Part II: Ablation and Piston models

    CERN Document Server

    Kadlecová, Hedvika; Weber, Stefan; Korn, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We analyze theoretical models of gravitational waves generation in the interaction of high intensity laser with matter, namely ablation and piston models. We analyse the generated gravitational waves in linear approximation of gravitational theory. We derive the analytical formulas and estimates for the metric perturbations and the radiated power of generated gravitational waves. Furthermore we investigate the characteristics of polarization and the behaviour of test particles in the presence of gravitational wave which will be important for the detection.

  7. Measurement of 2l-nl' x-ray transitions from approximately 1 microm Kr clusters irradiated by high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S B; Fournier, K B; Faenov, A Ya; Magunov, A I; Pikuz, T A; Skobelev, I Yu; Fukuda, Y; Akahane, Y; Aoyama, M; Inoue, N; Ueda, H; Yamakawa, K

    2005-01-01

    X-ray line emission from 2l-nl' transitions in Ne-like Kr and nearby ions has been observed from approximately 1 microm Kr clusters irradiated by fs-scale laser pulses at the JAERI facility in Kyoto, Japan. The incident laser intensity reached 10(19) W/cm2, with pulse energies from 50 to 300 mJ and pulse durations from 30 to 500 fs. The dependence of the x-ray spectral features and intensity on the incident laser intensity is rather weak, indicating that the 1-2 ps cluster lifetimes limit the number of ions beyond Ne-like Kr that can be produced by collisional ionization. Lines from F- to Al-like Kr emitted from the cluster plasmas have been identified using data from the relativistic multiconfiguration flexible atomic code. A collisional-radiative model based on these data has been constructed and used to determine that the cluster plasma has electron densities near 10(22) cm(-3), temperatures of a few hundred eV, and hot electron fractions of a few percent.

  8. Heat generation in laser irradiated tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, A J; Pearce, J A; Diller, K R; Yoon, G; Cheong, W F

    1989-02-01

    Many medical applications involving lasers rely upon the generation of heat within the tissue for the desired therapeutic effect. Determination of the absorbed light energy in tissue is difficult in many cases. Although UV wavelengths of the excimer laser and 10.6 microns wavelength of the CO2 laser are absorbed within the first 20 microns of soft tissue, visible and near infrared wavelengths are scattered as well as absorbed. Typically, multiple scattering is a significant factor in the distribution of light in tissue and the resulting heat source term. An improved model is presented for estimating heat generation due to the absorption of a collimated (axisymmetric) laser beam and scattered light at each point r and z in tissue. Heat generated within tissue is a function of the laser power, the shape and size of the incident beam and the optical properties of the tissue at the irradiation wavelength. Key to the calculation of heat source strength is accurate estimation of the light distribution. Methods for experimentally determining the optical parameters of tissue are discussed in the context of the improved model.

  9. Microring Diode Laser for THz Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariani, S.; Andronico, A.; Favero, I.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the modeling and optical characterization of AlGaAs/InAs quantum-dot microring diode lasers designed for terahertz (THz) difference frequency generation (DFG) between two whispering gallery modes (WGMs) around 1.3 $\\mu$m. In order to investigate the spectral features of this active...

  10. Accelerators for high intensity beams

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    As particle accelerators strive forever increasing performance, high intensity particle beams become one of the critical demands requested across the board by a majority of accelerator users (proton, electron and ion) and for most applications. Much effort has been made by our community to pursue high intensity accelerator performance on a number of fronts. Recognizing its importance, we devote this volume to Accelerators for High Intensity Beams. High intensity accelerators have become a frontier and a network for innovation. They are responsible for many scientific discoveries and technological breakthroughs that have changed our way of life, often taken for granted. A wide range of topics is covered in the fourteen articles in this volume.

  11. [Assessment of rehabilitation progress in patients with cervical radicular pain syndrome after application of high intensity laser therapy - HILT and Saunders traction device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haładaj, Robert; Pingot, Julia; Pingot, Mariusz

    2015-07-01

    Osteoarthritis of the spine is a major global health problem, it is an epidemic of our times. It affects all parts of the spine, but the hardest to treat is its cervical region. The cervical spine is most mobile, delicate and sensitive to any load. It requires special care in conservative treatment. To date the selection of effective therapeutic approaches has been controversial. The aim of the study was to assess the progress of rehabilitation in patients with cervical radicular pain syndrome after using two different methods of treatment: HILT and spinal axial traction with the use of Saunders device. The randomized study included 150 patients (81 women and 69 men, aged 24-67 years, mean age 45.5) divided into two groups of 75 patients each with characteristic symptoms of radicular pain. The measurement of the range of cervical spine movement of the cervical spine, visual analog scale for pain - VAS and a NDI questionnaire (Neck Disability Index - Polish version) - an indicator of functional disorders - were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the two different therapies. The results obtained by Saunders method remained significantly higher than those obtained when HILT laser therapy was used for most of the examined parameters. A thorough analysis of the results showed greater analgesic efficacy, improved global mobility and reduced functional impairment in patients treated with Saunders method. Both therapeutic methods manifest analgesic effect and a positive impact on the improvement of range of cervical spine movement in patients with radicular pain in this spine region. HILT laser therapy and Saunders traction device reduce neck disability index in the treated patients. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  12. Thomson parabola spectrometry as diagnostics of fast ion emission from laser-generated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Cavallaro, S.; Andò, Lucio; Ullschmied, J.

    2013-05-01

    High intensity lasers produce hot plasmas when irradiating solid matter in vacuum. Properties of the generated plasmas depend strongly on the laser and target parameters and on the target irradiation geometry. Physical characterization of such non-equilibrium plasmas can be performed by using different fast diagnostic techniques based on the detection of energetic charge particles and photons. Thomson parabolas recorded in single laser shots, bring a lot of information about the plasma ion emission, such as the charge-to-mass ratio, ion energy and charge state distributions, furnishing the data necessary for understanding physical mechanisms involved in the plasma dynamics. The ion measurements performed at intensities of the order of 1016 W/cm2, at which thin samples were irradiated by using the iodine laser at PALS laboratory in Prague in target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) conditions, are presented and discussed.

  13. Coherent blue emission generated by Rb two-photon excitation using diode and femtosecond lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jesus P.; Moreno, Marco P.; de Miranda, Marcio H. G.; Vianna, Sandra S.

    2017-04-01

    The coherent blue light generated in rubidium vapor due to the combined action of an ultrashort pulse train and a continuous wave diode laser is investigated. Each step of the two-photon transition 5S-5P{}3/2-5D is excited by one of the lasers, and the induced coherence between the 5S and 6P{}3/2 states is responsible for generating the blue beam. Measurements of the excitation spectrum reveal the frequency comb structure and allow us to identify the resonant modes responsible for inducing the nonlinear process. Further, each resonant mode excites a different group of atoms, making the process selective in atomic velocity. The signal dependency on the atomic density is characterized by a sharp growth and a rapid saturation. We also show that for high intensity of the diode laser, the Stark shift at resonance causes the signal suppression observed at low atomic density.

  14. Combined impact features for laser plasma generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktionov, E.; Protasov, Yu; Telekh, V.

    2017-05-01

    Laser-induced plasma has been considered for multiple applications by the moment, and its characteristics strongly depend on laser radiation parameters. Reaching demanded values for the latter might be rather costly, but, in certain cases, similar or even better results could be reached in case of additional impact (optical, electric, magnetic, corpuscular, mechanical etc.). Combined impact effects are mainly based on target properties or interaction mechanism change, and found to decrease plasma generation thresholds by orders of magnitude, improve energy efficiency significantly, and also broaden the range of plasma parameters. Application area, efficiency and optimal regimes for laser plasma generation at such combined impact have been considered. Analysis based on published data and own experiments was performed for both target material and induced plasma flows. Criterial parameters have been suggested to characterize both combined impact and response to it. The data on plasma generation thresholds, controlled parameters, working media supply systems and recovery rate of droplets are very important for technology setups, including those for material modification.

  15. Synergistic effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound and low-fluence Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of the aging neck and décolletage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jae-Hui; Choi, Young-Jun; Lim, Jae Yun; Min, Joon Hong; Kim, Won-Serk

    2017-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is regarded as an effective skin-lifting device; however, literature regarding treatment of the aging neck and décolletage with HIFU is scarce. Our study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of combination with HIFU and low-fluence Q-switched Nd:YAG (LQSNY) laser on the aging neck and décolletage. Nineteen women were assessed. HIFU at two visits and LQSNY laser at six visits were used to irradiate the neck and chest. At week 16, improvements were rated using the Dedo classification, Fabi/Bolton Chest Wrinkle Scale (FBCWS), and Global Aesthetic Improvement Scales (GAIS). Erythema and melanin indices (EMIs) and cervicomental angle were measured. Subject GAIS and satisfaction were evaluated at follow-up visits. At week 16, neck sagging and chest rhytides were improved on Dedo classification and FBCWS, respectively. Pigmentation and rhytides of the neck and chest were rated as improved in 30 % or more of the subjects by physician GAIS and in approximately 80 % of the subjects by subject GAIS. The above differences seemed to be attributable to the initial expectation level and mild severity pertaining to dress custom in Korea. Eighty-four percent of subjects were satisfied with treatment outcomes. EMIs were decreased on the chest. The combination of HIFU and LQSNY is an effective treatment option to mitigate rhytides and pigmentation of the neck and décolletage.

  16. Fiscal 1998 R and D report on femtosecond technology (power generation facility monitoring system using high- intensity X-ray pulse); 1998 nendo femuto byo technology no kenkyu kaihatsu (kokido X senb pulse riyo hatsuden shisetsu monitoring system no kenkyu kaihatsu) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This report reports the fiscal 1998 R and D result of Femtosecond Technology Research Association (FESTA) supported by NEDO. For creation of industrial basic technologies supporting the advanced information society in the 21st century, ultra-high speed electronics technology including new functions beyond the speed limit of conventional electronics technologies is indispensable. From such viewpoint, this R and D aims at establishment of the basic technology controlling conditions of beams and electrons in a femtosecond (10{sup -15}-10{sup -12} seconds) region. In development of the titled system, this R and D aims at generation of high-intensity X-ray pulse by interaction between femtosecond light pulse and high-density electron beam pulse, and development of measurement technology (non- stop inspection) of high-speed moving objects using such X- ray pulse. In fiscal 1998, this project succeeded in time stabilization of laser oscillators at a 100fs level and generation of low-emittance electron beam pulse through development of ultra-short pulse synchronization, laser stabilization and electron beam pulse generation technologies. (NEDO)

  17. Short-pulse, high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Will

    2013-10-01

    Recent experimental results of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of ~GeV electrons driven by the 200TW HERCULES and the 400TW ASTRA-GEMINI laser systems and their subsequent generation of photons, positrons, and neutrons are presented. In LWFA, high-intensity (I >1019 W /cm2), ultra-short (τL counter-propagating, ultra-high intensity (I >1021 W /cm2) laser pulse to undergo inverse Compton scattering and emit a high-peak brightness beam of high-energy photons. Preliminary results and experimental sensitivities of the electron-laser beam overlap are presented. The high-energy photon beams can be spectrally resolved using a forward Compton scattering spectrometer. Moreover, the photon flux can be characterized by a pixelated scintillator array and by nuclear activation and (γ,n) neutron measurements from the photons interacting with a secondary solid target. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed using FLUKA to support the yield estimates. This research was supported by DOE/NSF-PHY 0810979, NSF CAREER 1054164, DARPA AXiS N66001-11-1-4208, SF/DNDO F021166, and the Leverhulme Trust ECF-2011-383.

  18. Generation conditions of CW Diode Laser Sustained Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Koji; Matsui, Makoto; Ono, Takahiro

    2016-09-01

    Laser sustained plasma was generated using 1 kW class continuous wave diode laser. The laser beam was focused on the seed plasma generated by arc discharge in 1 MPa xenon lamp. The diode laser has advantages of high energy conversion efficiency of 80%, ease of maintenance, compact size and availability of conventional quartz based optics. Therefore, it has a prospect of further development compared with conventional CO2 laser. In this study, variation of the plasma shape caused by laser power is observed and also temperature distribution in the direction of plasma radius is measured by optical emission spectroscopy.

  19. Extremely short relativistic-electron-bunch generation in the laser wakefield via novel bunch injection scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Khachatryan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently a new electron-bunch injection scheme for the laser wakefield accelerator has been proposed [JETP Lett. 74, 371 (2001JTPLA20021-364010.1134/1.1427124; Phys. Rev. E 65, 046504 (2002PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.65.046504]. In this scheme, a low energy electron bunch, sent in a plasma channel just before a high-intensity laser pulse, is trapped in the laser wakefield, considerably compressed and accelerated to an ultrarelativistic energy. In this paper we show the possibility of the generation of an extremely short (on the order of 1   μm long or a few femtoseconds in duration relativistic-electron-bunch by this mechanism. The initial electron bunch, which can be generated, for example, by a laser-driven photocathode rf gun, should have an energy of a few hundred keVs to a few MeVs, a duration in the picosecond range or less and a relatively low concentration. The trapping conditions and parameters of an accelerated bunch are investigated. The laser pulse dynamics as well as a possible experimental setup for the demonstration of the injection scheme are also considered.

  20. Extremely short relativistic-electron-bunch generation in the laser wakefield via novel bunch injection scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.; Reitsma, A.J.W.; Jaroszynski, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Recently a new electron-bunch injection scheme for the laser wakefield accelerator has been proposed [JETP Lett. 74, 371 (2001); Phys. Rev. E 65, 046504 (2002)]. In this scheme, a low energy electron bunch, sent in a plasma channel just before a high-intensity laser pulse, is trapped in the laser

  1. High order harmonic generation with femtosecond mid-infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jinpu; Nees, John; Krushelnick, Karl; Dollar, Franklin; Nguyen, Tam

    2017-10-01

    There has been growing interest in high order harmonic generation (HHG) from laser-solid interactions as a compact source of coherent x-rays. The ponderomotive potential in laser-plasma interactions increases with longer laser wavelength, so there may be significant differences in the physics of harmonic generation and other phenomena when experiments are conducted with mid-infrared lasers. Previous experiments, however, have been done almost exclusively with near-infrared lasers. In this work, we report the results of experiments performed with millijoule, 40 fs, 2 µm laser pulses generated by an optical parametric amplifier (OPA) which are focused onto solid targets such as silicon and glass. The HHG efficiency, polarization dependence, and x-ray emission are studied and compared to measurements with near-infrared lasers. Funded by AFOSR MURI.

  2. Studies of harmonic generation in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldammer, K.

    2007-11-12

    Nonlinear harmonic generation is one of the most interesting aspects of Free Electron Lasers under study today. It provides for coherent, high intensity radiation at higher harmonics of the FEL resonant frequency. The sources, numerical simulation and applications of harmonic radiation in cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FELs were the subject of this thesis. Harmonic emission in FELs originates from harmonic microbunching of the particles and the particular electron trajectory during FEL interaction. Numerical FEL simulation codes model these analytical equations and predict the performance of Free Electron Lasers with good accuracy. This thesis has relied heavily upon the FEL simulation code Genesis 1.3 which has been upgraded in the framework of this thesis to compute harmonic generation in a self-consistent manner. Tests against analytical predictions suggest that the harmonic power levels as well as harmonic gain lengths are simulated correctly. A benchmark with the FEL simulation code GINGER yields excellent agreement of the harmonic saturation length and saturation power. The new version of the simulation code Genesis was also tested against measurements from the VUV-FEL FLASH at DESY. The spectral power distributions of fundamental and third harmonic radiation were recorded at 25.9 nm and 8.6 nm, respectively. The relative bandwidths (FWHM) were in the range of 2 % for both the fundamental as well as the third harmonic, which was accurately reproduced by time-dependent simulations with Genesis. The new code was also used to propose and evaluate a new design for the BESSY Soft X-Ray FEL, a cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL proposed by BESSY in Berlin. The original design for the BESSY High Energy FEL line requires four HGHG stages to convert the initial seed laser wavelength of 297.5 nm down to 1.24 nm. A new scheme is proposed that makes use of fifth harmonic radiation from the first stage and reduces the number of HGHG stages to three. It

  3. High-order harmonic generation in laser plasma: Recent achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2012-07-01

    Recent studies of high-order harmonic generation of laser radiation in laser-produced plasma show new attractive developments in this field. Those include generation of extended harmonics in plasma plumes, new approaches in application of two-color pump, generation of extremely broadened harmonics, further developments in harmonic generation in clusters (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, in-situ produced nanoparticles), destructive interference of harmonics from different emitters, resonance-induced enhancement of harmonics, applications of high pulse repetition rate lasers for the enhancement of average power of generating harmonics, observation of quantum path signatures, etc. We review some of these recent developments.

  4. Generating ultrarelativistic attosecond electron bunches with laser wakefield accelerators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhof, M.J.H.; Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond electron bunches with ultrarelativistic energies were recently generated by laser wakefield accelerators. Here we predict that laser wakefield acceleration can generate even attosecond bunches, due to a strong chirp of the betatron frequency. We show how the bunch duration scales with

  5. LHC Report: reaching high intensity

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven

    2015-01-01

    After both beams having been ramped to their full energy of 6.5 TeV, the last two weeks saw the beam commissioning process advancing on many fronts. An important milestone was achieved when operators succeeded in circulating a nominal-intensity bunch. During the operation, some sudden beam losses resulted in beam dumps at top energy, a problem that needed to be understood and resolved.   In 2015 the LHC will be circulating around 2800 bunches in each beam and each bunch will contain just over 1 x 1011 protons. Until a few days ago commissioning was taking place with single bunches of 5 x 109 protons. The first nominal bunch with an intensity of 1 x 1011 protons was injected on Tuesday, 21 April. In order to circulate such a high-intensity bunch safely, the whole protection system must be working correctly: collimators, which protect the aperture, are set at preliminary values known as coarse settings; all kicker magnets for injecting and extracting the beams are commissioned with beam an...

  6. Ion acceleration from intense laser-generated plasma: methods, diagnostics and possible applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi Lorenzo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many parameters of non-equilibrium plasma generated by high intensity and fast lasers depend on the pulse intensity and the laser wavelength. In conditions favourable for the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA regime the ion acceleration from the rear side of the target can be enhanced by increasing the thin foil absorbance through the use of nanoparticles and nanostructures promoting the surface plasmon resonance effect. In conditions favourable for the backward plasma acceleration (BPA regime, when thick targets are used, a special role is played by the laser focal position with respect to the target surface, a proper choice of which may result in induced self-focusing effects and non-linear acceleration enhancement. SiC detectors employed in the time-of-flight (TOF configuration and a Thomson parabola spectrometer permit on-line diagnostics of the ion streams emitted at high kinetic energies. The target composition and geometry, apart from the laser parameters and to the irradiation conditions, allow further control of the plasma characteristics and can be varied by using advanced targets to reach the maximum ion acceleration. Measurements using advanced targets with enhanced the laser absorption effect in thin films are presented. Applications of accelerated ions in the field of ion source, hadrontherapy and nuclear physics are discussed.

  7. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  8. High-order harmonic generation in laser plasma plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2013-01-01

    This book represents the first comprehensive treatment of high-order harmonic generation in laser-produced plumes, covering the principles, past and present experimental status and important applications. It shows how this method of frequency conversion of laser radiation towards the extreme ultraviolet range matured over the course of multiple studies and demonstrated new approaches in the generation of strong coherent short-wavelength radiation for various applications. Significant discoveries and pioneering contributions of researchers in this field carried out in various laser scientific centers worldwide are included in this first attempt to describe the important findings in this area of nonlinear spectroscopy. "High-Order Harmonic Generation in Laser Plasma Plumes" is a self-contained and unified review of the most recent achievements in the field, such as the application of clusters (fullerenes, nanoparticles, nanotubes) for efficient harmonic generation of ultrashort laser pulses in cluster-containin...

  9. High-intensity research infrastructure at ELI Beamlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimo, Ondrej

    2017-10-01

    The L4 laser (10 PW, 150 fs) at ELI Beamlines is expected to provide focused intensities approaching 1023 W /cm2 and thus herald a new era of research in ultra-high intensity laser matter interaction. This talk will describe the progress in enabling the associated technological infrastructure - including the laser system, beam transport, diagnostics and the experimental chamber. Synergistic experimental and theoretical programs are also developing tools for such research. The talk will also briefly describe these research areas like development of dedicated diagnostic equipment, efforts toward obtaining ultra-high intensities using tight-focusing and theoretical modeling toward future experiments where radiation reaction in the classical and quantum regime and pair production start to play an important role. Supported from European Regional Development Funds - projects High Field Initiative (CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_003/0000449) and ELI - phase 2 (CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162).

  10. Producing High Intense Attosecond Pulse Train by Interaction of Three-Color Pulse and Overdense Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, M.; Mirzanejad, S.

    2017-05-01

    Amplifying the attosecond pulse by the chirp pulse amplification method is impossible. Furthermore, the intensity of attosecond pulse is low in the interaction of laser pulse and underdense plasma. This motivates us to propose using a multi-color pulse to produce the high intense attosecond pulse. In the present study, the relativistic interaction of a three-color linearly-polarized laser-pulse with highly overdense plasma is studied. We show that the combination of {{ω }}1, {{ω }}2 and {{ω }}3 frequencies decreases the instance full width at half maximum reflected attosecond pulse train from the overdense plasma surface. Moreover, we show that the three-color pulse increases the intensity of generated harmonics, which is explained by the relativistic oscillating mirror model. The obtained results demonstrate that if the three-color laser pulse interacts with overdense plasma, it will enhance two orders of magnitude of intensity of ultra short attosecond pulses in comparison with monochromatic pulse.

  11. Fiber-laser-pumped CW OPO for red, green, blue laser generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S T; Lin, Y Y; Tu, R Y; Wang, T D; Huang, Y C

    2010-02-01

    We report a CW, watt-level, red, green, and blue (RGB) laser pumped by an economical multimode (1-nm linewidth) Yb-fiber laser at 1.064 mum. A singly resonant optical parametric oscillator at 1.56 mum has two intracavity sum-frequency generators for red and blue laser generation. An extracavity second harmonic generator converts the residual pump power into green laser radiation. At 25-W pump power, the laser generated 3.9, 0.456, and 0.49 W at 633, 532, and 450 nm, respectively. The multimode pump laser offers a large temperature bandwidth for operating the RGB OPO without the need of a precision crystal temperature stabilizer.

  12. Experimental observations of transport of picosecond laser generated electrons in a nail-like target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasley, J.; Wei, M.; Shipton, E.; Chen, S.; Ma, T.; Beg, F. N.; Alexander, N.; Stephens, R.; MacPhee, A. G.; Hey, D.; Le Pape, S.; Patel, P.; Mackinnon, A.; Key, M.; Offermann, D.; Link, A.; Chowdhury, E.; Van-Woerkom, L.; Freeman, R. R.

    2007-12-01

    The transport of relativistic electrons, generated by the interaction of a high intensity (2×1020W/cm2) laser, has been studied in a nail-like target comprised of a 20μm diameter solid copper wire, coated with ˜2μm of titanium, with an 80μm diameter hemispherical termination. A ˜500fs, ˜200J pulse of 1.053μm laser light produced by the Titan Laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was focused to a ˜20μm diameter spot centered on the flat face of the hemisphere. Kα fluorescence from the Cu and Ti regions was imaged together with extreme ultraviolet (XUV) emission at 68 and 256eV. Results showed a quasiexponential decline in Kα emission along the wire over a distance of a few hundred microns from the laser focus, consistent with bulk Ohmic inhibition of the relativistic electron transport. Weaker Kα and XUV emission on a longer scale length showed limb brightening suggesting a transition to enhanced transport at the surface of the wire.

  13. Picosecond lasers: the next generation of short-pulsed lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Joshua R; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrea I; Green, Jeremy B

    2014-12-01

    Selective photothermolysis, first discussed in the context of targeted microsurgery in 1983, proposed that the optimal parameters for specific thermal damage rely critically on the duration over which energy is delivered to the tissue. At that time, nonspecific thermal damage had been an intrinsic limitation of all commercially available lasers, despite efforts to mitigate this by a variety of compensatory cooling mechanisms. Fifteen years later, experimental picosecond lasers were first reported in the dermatological literature to demonstrate greater efficacy over their nanosecond predecessors in the context of targeted destruction of tattoo ink. Within the last 4 years, more than a decade after those experiments, the first commercially available cutaneous picosecond laser unit became available (Cynosure, Westford, Massachusetts), and several pilot studies have demonstrated its utility in tattoo removal. An experimental picosecond infrared laser has also recently demonstrated a nonthermal tissue ablative capability in soft tissue, bone, and dentin. In this article, we review the published data pertaining to dermatology on picosecond lasers from their initial reports to the present as well as discuss forthcoming technology.

  14. Second harmonic generation in Te crystal using free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, T; Minehara, E J

    2002-01-01

    The second harmonic generation signal converted from the fundamental wavelength of 22 mu m of a free electron laser was observed for the first time using a birefringent Te crystal. The experimental conversion efficiency of Te crystal for second harmonic generation is 0.53%, which is equivalent to the theoretical value within a factor of 2. The Te crystal has been incorporated into an autocorrelator system to measure the micro-pulse width of infrared free electron laser successfully. (author)

  15. Photonic bandgap fiber lasers and multicore fiber lasers for next generation high power lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirakawa, A.; Chen, M.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fiber lasers are realizing new laser spectra and nonlinearity mitigation that a conventional fiber laser cannot. Multicore fiber lasers are a promising tool for power scaling by coherent beam combination. © 2014 OSA....

  16. Control of the droplet generation by an infrared laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the control of the droplet generation by a focused infrared (IR laser with a wavelength of 1550 nm was studied, in which the liquid water and the oil with the surfactant of Span 80 were employed as the disperse and continuous phases, respectively. The characteristics of the droplet generation controlled by the laser was explored under various flow rates, laser powers and spot positions and the comparison between the cases with/without the laser was also performed. The results showed that when the laser was focused on the region away from the outlet of the liquid water inflow channel, the droplet shedding was blocked due to the IR laser heating induced thermocapillary flow, leading to the increase of the droplet volume and the cycle time of the droplet generation as compared to the case without the laser. Decreasing the continuous phase flow rate led to the increase of the droplet volume, cycle time of the droplet generation and the volume increase ratio, while increasing the disperse phase flow rate led to the increase of the droplet volume and the decrease of the cycle time and volume increase ratio. For a given flow rate ratio between the continuous and disperse phases, the increase of the flow rates decreased the volume increase ratio. In addition, it is also found that the droplet volume, the cycle time and the volume increase ratio all increased with the laser power. When the laser was focused at the inlet of the downstream channel, the droplet volume, the cycle time and the volume increase ratio were the largest. Moving the laser spot to the downstream or upstream led to the decrease of them. When the laser was focused on the outlet of the liquid water inflow channel, the generated droplet volume and cycle time of the droplet generation were even lower than the case without the laser because of the lowered viscosity. This works provides a comprehensive understanding of the characteristics of the droplet generation controlled

  17. Photonic bandgap fiber lasers and multicore fiber lasers for next generation high power lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirakawa, A.; Chen, M.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fiber lasers are realizing new laser spectra and nonlinearity mitigation that a conventional fiber laser cannot. Multicore fiber lasers are a promising tool for power scaling by coherent beam combination. © 2014 OSA.......Photonic bandgap fiber lasers are realizing new laser spectra and nonlinearity mitigation that a conventional fiber laser cannot. Multicore fiber lasers are a promising tool for power scaling by coherent beam combination. © 2014 OSA....

  18. Extreme laser-driven magnetic fields: from generation to possible detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toncian, Toma; Wang, Tao; Jansen, Oliver; Stark, David; Arefiev, Alexey

    2017-10-01

    A remarkable feature of a solid density target irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse is its ability to sustain an extremely strong electron current that greatly exceeds the classical Alfvén limit. As the target becomes relativistically transparent due to the electron acceleration by the laser pulse, the current becomes volumetrically distributed. This allows for a MT-level quasi-static magnetic field to be generated in an considerable volume inside the solid density material. The MT-level field can be extremely beneficial for particle acceleration and gamma-ray generation. What are the exact conditions for generating a strong magnetic field? How big is the resulting magnetic field filament and for how long does it exist? Finally, how can one detect such a field? In this work, we focus on answering these questions in the context of the experimental capabilities that should soon be available at the European XFEL and explore the feasibility of the magnetic field detection inside a solid-density material using XFEL photons. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1632777. Simulations were performed with the EPOCH code using HPC resources provided by the TACC at the University of Texas.

  19. Hollow laser plasma self-confined microjet generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizyuk, Valeryi; Hassanein, Ahmed; Center for Materials under Extreme Environment Team

    2017-10-01

    Hollow laser beam produced plasma (LPP) devices are being used for the generation of the self-confined cumulative microjet. Most important place by this LPP device construction is achieving of an annular distribution of the laser beam intensity by spot. An integrated model is being developed to detailed simulation of the plasma generation and evolution inside the laser beam channel. The model describes in two temperature approximation hydrodynamic processes in plasma, laser absorption processes, heat conduction, and radiation energy transport. The total variation diminishing scheme in the Lax-Friedrich formulation for the description of plasma hydrodynamic is used. Laser absorption and radiation transport models on the base of Monte Carlo method are being developed. Heat conduction part on the implicit scheme with sparse matrixes using is realized. The developed models are being integrated into HEIGHTS-LPP computer simulation package. The integrated modeling of the hollow beam laser plasma generation showed the self-confinement and acceleration of the plasma microjet inside the laser channel. It was found dependence of the microjet parameters including radiation emission on the hole and beam radiuses ratio. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, PIRE project.

  20. Advanced pulse generator and preamplifier for the HELEN laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Michael J.; Harvey, E. J.; Hopps, N. W.; Nolan, J. R.; Smith, W. F. E.

    1997-12-01

    A replacement for the HELEN laser has been proposed that would involve a considerable increase in performance up to 100 TW from 32 beams. The design for the new laser is to be based on the technology being developed for the US National Ignition Facility. The pulse generation and preamplification stages employ novel technologies and represent a significant departure from previous designs. As part of the laser replacement development program a pulse generator and preamplifier have been built and installed on the HELEN laser at AWE, based on those employed on the Beamlet laser physics demonstration facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. As well as providing experience of the technologies involved, this system represents a significant enhancement of the performance of HELEN. Initial pulses are generated by a diode-pumped Q-switched Neodymium-doped Yttrium Lithium Fluoride ring oscillator. These are then launched into optical fiber and transported to a series of two integrated optics amplitude modulators for pulse shaping. The resulting pulses are then transported by optical fibers to a ring regenerative preamplifier for amplification to a level suitable for input to the HELEN laser. We describe this system, its performance and the enhanced capabilities of the HELEN laser resulting from its installation.

  1. Plasma generated during underwater pulsed laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jacek; Chrzanowska, Justyna; Moscicki, Tomasz; Radziejewska, Joanna; Stobinski, Leszek; Szymanski, Zygmunt

    2017-09-01

    The plasma induced during underwater pulsed laser ablation of graphite is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The results of the experiment show that the maximum plasma temperature of 25000 K is reached 20 ns from the beginning of the laser pulse and decreases to 6500 K after 1000 ns. The observed OH absorption band shows that the plasma plume is surrounded by the thin layer of dissociated water vapour at a temperature around 5500 K. The hydrodynamic model applied shows similar maximum plasma temperature at delay times between 14 ns and 30 ns. The calculations show also that already at 14th ns, the plasma electron density reaches 0.97·1027 m-3, which is the critical density for 1064 nm radiation. At the same time the plasma pressure is 2 GPa, which is consisted with earlier measurements of the peak pressure exerted on a target in similar conditions.

  2. Recent advances in microstructured fibers for laser delivery and generation

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, J. R.; M. N. Petrovich; Poletti, F.; Horak, P.; Broderick, N.G.R.; Feng, Xian; Dasgupta, S; Loh, Wei H.; Ghosh, Debashri; Pal, Mrinmay; Bhadra, Shyamal K.; Chen, K K; Price, J.H.V.; Alam, S U; Richardson, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    We report recent advances in the development of fibers for the delivery and generation of both single-mode and heavily multimode laser beams as well as recent progress in fibers for supercontinuum generation in spectral regimes spanning the visible to mid-IR.

  3. Recent advances in microstructured fibers for laser delivery and generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J. R.; Petrovich, M. N.; Poletti, F.; Horak, P.; Broderick, N. G. R.; Feng, Xian; Dasgupta, S. X.; Loh, Wei; Ghosh, Debashri; Pal, Mrinmay; Bhadra, Shyamal K.; Chen, K. K.; Price, J. H. V.; Alam, S. U.; Richardson, D. J.

    2010-02-01

    We report recent advances in the development of fibers for the delivery and generation of both single-mode and heavily multimode laser beams as well as recent progress in fibers for supercontinuum generation in spectral regimes spanning the visible to mid-IR.

  4. Influence of target structure on laser plasma generation efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktionov, E.; Telekh, V.

    2017-11-01

    Spatial restrictions on heat transfer imposed in foil and sintered powder titanium targets have resulted in sufficient increase of efficiency of laser plasma generation as compared to bulk Ti targets. Especially at low laser fluences, where target material input in plasma is higher than ambient air’s. Also, the pattern of momentum coupling coefficient C m dependency on laser fluence F has changed from convex to concave. Minimum difference in C m values for bulk and foil targets was 1.68 times, maximum – 1.5 orders of magnitude (always higher for foil). At the impact on sintered porous targets momentum coupling coefficient was lower than for foil, but normalised by mass density, the results were about equal. To our mind, obtained results show that suppression of heat dissipation in porous targets can be same efficient as in foils, but with more benefits for feeding systems and energy efficiency of laser plasma generators.

  5. SOIMUMPs micromirror scanner and its application in laser line generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hui; Nia, Farzad Hossein; He, Siyuan

    2017-01-01

    A SOIMUMPs 1-D rotation micromirror is presented. The micromirror is driven by electrostatic vertical comb-drive actuators to work at resonant mode to scan a laser beam. The residual stress in the metal film coated on the SOI device layer is used to generate vertical offset in the comb-drive actuators with the combs located far from the rotation axis to increase the torque. A concave lens is designed to put after the micromirror to amplify the laser beam scanning angle, as well as to compensate for the curvature of the micromirror. A micromirror-based scanning system is used to build a laser line generator with a continuously adjustable fan angle, which solves the limitation of a fixed fan angle in conventional laser line generators. Prototypes of the micromirror and the laser line generator are fabricated and measured. A driving circuit that can generate a high-voltage square wave driving signal with adjustable amplitude and frequency is designed. All the parts are integrated in a 44 mm×88 mm×44 mm box and powered with a single 5-V power supply. The optical scanning angle under 100 V with or without the concave lens is 27 deg and 12 deg, respectively, at a resonant frequency of 900 Hz.

  6. Laser-generated plasma by carbon nanoparticles embedded into polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L., E-mail: lorenzo.torrisi@unime.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche MIFT, Università di Messina, V.le F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Ceccio, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche MIFT, Università di Messina, V.le F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Cutroneo, M. [Nuclear Physics Institute, AS CR, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Advanced targets are prepared using UHMWPE containing CNT at different concentrations. • The composite has different optical, mechanical, electrical and compositional properties with respect to polyethylene. • Higher ion accelerations with respect to the pure polyethylene are obtained from laser generated plasmas at 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. • High carbon ion yields with respect to the pure polyethylene are obtained from laser generated plasmas at 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. • Advanced targets were prepared to be irradiated in TNSA regime using laser at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. - Abstract: Carbon nanoparticles have been embedded into polyethylene at different concentrations by using chemical–physical processes. The synthesized material was characterized in terms of physical modifications concerning the mechanical, compositional and optical properties. Obtained flat targets have been irradiated by Nd:YAG laser at intensities of the order of 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} in order to generate non-equilibrium plasma in vacuum. The laser–matter interaction produces charge separation effects with consequent acceleration of protons and carbon ions. Plasma was characterized using time-of-flight measurements of the accelerated ions. Applications of the produced targets in order to generate carbon ion beams from laser-generated plasma are presented and discussed.

  7. Simultaneous Second Harmonic Generation of Multiple Wavelength Laser Outputs for Medical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Seok Kim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple wavelength light sources in the medical spectral window region are useful for various medical sensing applications in tissue by distinguishing the absorption and scattering coefficients optically. We propose a simultaneous second harmonic generation of multiple wavelength fiber laser output using parallel channels of periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN waveguides. High intensity dual wavelength lasing output is experimentally realized with two tunable fiber Bragg gratings of 1,547.20 nm and 1,554.48 nm for the efficient conversion to the half wavelengths, 773.60 nm and 777.24 nm, by using two parallel PPLN channels. Compared with a conventional dual second harmonic generation (SHG configuration based on two different input wavelengths from each independent light source, this method has a relatively higher efficiency to align the input light beam into the adjacent parallel PPLN channels simultaneously. The use of fiber lasers offers several advantages since they are relatively inexpensive, provide high power in excess of tens of watts, are widely tunable, and can produce pulses from milliseconds to femtoseconds.

  8. Simultaneous Second Harmonic Generation of Multiple Wavelength Laser Outputs for Medical Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seung Nam; Song, Jae-Jin; Kang, Jin U.; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2011-01-01

    Multiple wavelength light sources in the medical spectral window region are useful for various medical sensing applications in tissue by distinguishing the absorption and scattering coefficients optically. We propose a simultaneous second harmonic generation of multiple wavelength fiber laser output using parallel channels of periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguides. High intensity dual wavelength lasing output is experimentally realized with two tunable fiber Bragg gratings of 1,547.20 nm and 1,554.48 nm for the efficient conversion to the half wavelengths, 773.60 nm and 777.24 nm, by using two parallel PPLN channels. Compared with a conventional dual second harmonic generation (SHG) configuration based on two different input wavelengths from each independent light source, this method has a relatively higher efficiency to align the input light beam into the adjacent parallel PPLN channels simultaneously. The use of fiber lasers offers several advantages since they are relatively inexpensive, provide high power in excess of tens of watts, are widely tunable, and can produce pulses from milliseconds to femtoseconds. PMID:22163945

  9. On the Acceleration and Transport of Electrons Generated by Intense Laser-Plasma Interactions at Sharp Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Joshua Joseph

    The continued development of the chirped pulse amplification technique has allowed for the development of lasers with powers of in excess of 10 15W, for pulse lengths with durations of between .01 and 10 picoseconds, and which can be focused to energy densities greater than 100 giga-atmospheres. When such lasers are focused onto material targets, the possibility of creating particle beams with energy fluxes of comparable parameters arises. Such interactions have a number of theorized applications. For instance, in the Fast Ignition concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion [1], a high-intensity laser efficiently transfers its energy into an electron beam with an appropriate spectra which is then transported into a compressed target and initiate a fusion reaction. Another possible use is the so called Radiation Pressure Acceleration mechanism, in which a high-intensity, circularly polarized laser is used to create a mono-energetic ion beam which could then be used for medical imaging and treatment, among other applications. For this latter application, it is important that the laser energy is transferred to the ions and not to the electrons. However the physics of such high energy-density laser-matter interactions is highly kinetic and non-linear, and presently not fully understood. In this dissertation, we use the Particle-in-Cell code OSIRIS [2, 3] to explore the generation and transport of relativistic particle beams created by high intensity lasers focused onto solid density matter at normal incidence. To explore the generation of relativistic electrons by such interactions, we use primarily one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D), and a few three-dimensional simulations (3D). We initially examine the idealized case of normal incidence of relatively short, plane-wave lasers on flat, sharp interfaces. We find that in 1D the results are highly dependent on the initial temperature of the plasma, with significant absorption into relativistic electrons only

  10. Consequences of Femtosecond Laser Filament Generation Conditions in Standoff Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-08-08

    We investigate the role of femtosecond laser focusing conditions on ablation properties and its implications on analytical merits and standoff detection applications. Femtosecond laser pulses can be used for ablation either by tightly focusing or by using filaments generated during its propagation. We evaluated the persistence of atomic, and molecular emission features as well as time evolution of the fundamental properties (temperature and density) of ablation plumes generated using different methods.

  11. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-01-01

    Modular high-intensity plasma melter promises improved performance, reduced energy use, and lower emissions. The glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass for the past 100 years.

  12. High Intensity Exercise in Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wens, Inez; Dalgas, Ulrik; Vandenabeele, Frank

    2015-01-01

    exercise groups that performed 12 weeks of a high intensity interval (HITR, n = 12) or high intensity continuous cardiovascular training (HCTR, n = 11), both in combination with resistance training. M.vastus lateralis fiber cross sectional area (CSA) and proportion, knee-flexor/extensor strength, body......±5%) and lean tissue mass (+1.4±0.5%) only increased in HITR. Finally self-reported physical activity levels increased 73±19% and 86±27% in HCTR and HITR, respectively. Conclusion High intensity cardiovascular exercise combined with resistance training was safe, well tolerated and improved muscle contractile......Introduction Low-to-moderate intensity exercise improves muscle contractile properties and endurance capacity in multiple sclerosis (MS). The impact of high intensity exercise remains unknown. Methods Thirty-four MS patients were randomized into a sedentary control group (SED, n = 11) and 2...

  13. Laser-generated plasma by carbon nanoparticles embedded into polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Ceccio, G.; Cutroneo, M.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanoparticles have been embedded into polyethylene at different concentrations by using chemical-physical processes. The synthesized material was characterized in terms of physical modifications concerning the mechanical, compositional and optical properties. Obtained flat targets have been irradiated by Nd:YAG laser at intensities of the order of 1010 W/cm2 in order to generate non-equilibrium plasma in vacuum. The laser-matter interaction produces charge separation effects with consequent acceleration of protons and carbon ions. Plasma was characterized using time-of-flight measurements of the accelerated ions. Applications of the produced targets in order to generate carbon ion beams from laser-generated plasma are presented and discussed.

  14. Plasma high-order-harmonic generation from ultraintense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Suo; Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2017-05-01

    Plasma high-order-harmonic generation from an extremely intense short-pulse laser is explored by including the effects of ion motion, electron-ion collisions, and radiation reaction force in the plasma dynamics. The laser radiation pressure induces plasma ion motion through the hole-boring effect, resulting in frequency shifting and widening of the harmonic spectra. The classical radiation reaction force slightly mitigates the frequency broadening caused by the ion motion. Based on the results and physical considerations, parameter maps highlighting the optimum regions for generating a single intense attosecond pulse and coherent XUV radiation are presented.

  15. Testing quantum mechanics in non-Minkowski space-time with high power lasers and 4(th) generation light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, B J B; Bingham, R; Evans, R G; Gericke, D O; Landen, O L; Murphy, C D; Norreys, P A; Rose, S J; Tschentscher, Th; Wang, C H-T; Wark, J S; Gregori, G

    2012-01-01

    A common misperception of quantum gravity is that it requires accessing energies up to the Planck scale of 10¹⁹ GeV, which is unattainable from any conceivable particle collider. Thanks to the development of ultra-high intensity optical lasers, very large accelerations can be now the reached at their focal spot, thus mimicking, by virtue of the equivalence principle, a non Minkowski space-time. Here we derive a semiclassical extension of quantum mechanics that applies to different metrics, but under the assumption of weak gravity. We use our results to show that Thomson scattering of photons by uniformly accelerated electrons predicts an observable effect depending upon acceleration and local metric. In the laboratory frame, a broadening of the Thomson scattered x ray light from a fourth generation light source can be used to detect the modification of the metric associated to electrons accelerated in the field of a high power optical laser.

  16. Generation of monoenergetic ion beams with a laser accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfotenhauer, Sebastian M.

    2009-01-29

    A method for the generation of monoenergetic proton and ion beams from a laser-based particle accelerator is presented. This method utilizes the unique space-charge effects occurring during relativistic laser-plasma interactions on solid targets in combination with a dot-like particle source. Due to this unique interaction geometry, MeV proton beams with an intrinsically narrow energy spectrum were obtained, for the first time, from a micrometer-scale laser accelerator. Over the past three years, the acceleration scheme has been consistently improved to enhance both the maximum particle energy and the reliability of the setup. The achieved degree of reliability allowed to derive the first scaling laws specifically for monoenergetic proton beams. Furthermore, the acceleration scheme was expanded on other target materials, enabling the generation of monoenergetic carbon beams. The experimental work was strongly supported by the parallel development of a complex theoretical model, which fully accounts for the observations and is in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The presented results have an extraordinarily broad scope way beyond the current thesis: The availability of monoenergetic ion beams from a compact laser-plasma beam source - in conjunction with the unique properties of laser-produced particle beams - addresses a number of outstanding applications in fundamental research, material science and medical physics, and will help to shape a new generation of accelerators. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic and electric deflector spectrometers for ion emission analysis from laser generated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Lorenzo; Costa, Giuseppe; Ceccio, Giovanni; Cannavò, Antonino; Restuccia, Nancy; Cutroneo, Mariapompea

    2018-01-01

    The pulsed laser-generated plasma in vacuum and at low and high intensities can be characterized using different physical diagnostics. The charge particles emission can be characterized using magnetic, electric and magnet-electrical spectrometers. Such on-line techniques are often based on time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. A 90° electric deflection system is employed as ion energy analyzer (IEA) acting as a filter of the mass-to-charge ratio of emitted ions towards a secondary electron multiplier. It determines the ion energy and charge state distributions. The measure of the ion and electron currents as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio can be also determined by a magnetic deflector spectrometer, using a magnetic field of the order of 0.35 T, orthogonal to the ion incident direction, and an array of little ion collectors (IC) at different angles. A Thomson parabola spectrometer, employing gaf-chromix as detector, permits to be employed for ion mass, energy and charge state recognition. Mass quadrupole spectrometry, based on radiofrequency electric field oscillations, can be employed to characterize the plasma ion emission. Measurements performed on plasma produced by different lasers, irradiation conditions and targets are presented and discussed. Complementary measurements, based on mass and optical spectroscopy, semiconductor detectors, fast CCD camera and Langmuir probes are also employed for the full plasma characterization. Simulation programs, such as SRIM, SREM, and COMSOL are employed for the charge particle recognition.

  18. Magnetic and electric deflector spectrometers for ion emission analysis from laser generated plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The pulsed laser-generated plasma in vacuum and at low and high intensities can be characterized using different physical diagnostics. The charge particles emission can be characterized using magnetic, electric and magnet-electrical spectrometers. Such on-line techniques are often based on time-of-flight (TOF measurements. A 90° electric deflection system is employed as ion energy analyzer (IEA acting as a filter of the mass-to-charge ratio of emitted ions towards a secondary electron multiplier. It determines the ion energy and charge state distributions. The measure of the ion and electron currents as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio can be also determined by a magnetic deflector spectrometer, using a magnetic field of the order of 0.35 T, orthogonal to the ion incident direction, and an array of little ion collectors (IC at different angles. A Thomson parabola spectrometer, employing gaf-chromix as detector, permits to be employed for ion mass, energy and charge state recognition. Mass quadrupole spectrometry, based on radiofrequency electric field oscillations, can be employed to characterize the plasma ion emission. Measurements performed on plasma produced by different lasers, irradiation conditions and targets are presented and discussed. Complementary measurements, based on mass and optical spectroscopy, semiconductor detectors, fast CCD camera and Langmuir probes are also employed for the full plasma characterization. Simulation programs, such as SRIM, SREM, and COMSOL are employed for the charge particle recognition.

  19. Nuclear Fusion Effects Induced in Intense Laser-Generated Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deutered polyethylene (CD2n thin and thick targets were irradiated in high vacuum by infrared laser pulses at 1015W/cm2 intensity. The high laser energy transferred to the polymer generates plasma, expanding in vacuum at supersonic velocity, accelerating hydrogen and carbon ions. Deuterium ions at kinetic energies above 4 MeV have been measured by using ion collectors and SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. At these energies the deuterium–deuterium collisions may induce over threshold fusion effects, in agreement with the high D-D cross-section valuesaround 3 MeV energy. At the first instants of the plasma generation, during which high temperature, density and ionacceleration occur, the D-D fusions occur as confirmed by the detection of mono-energetic protonsand neutrons with a kinetic energy of 3.0 MeV and 2.5 MeV, respectively, produced by the nuclear reaction. The number of fusion events depends strongly on the experimental set-up, i.e. on the laser parameters (intensity, wavelength, focal spot dimension, target conditions (thickness, chemical composition, absorption coefficient, presence of secondary targets and used geometry (incidence angle, laser spot, secondary target positions.A number of D-D fusion events of the order of 106÷7 per laser shot has been measured.

  20. Laser metrology for a next generation gravimetric mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottini, Sergio; Biondetti, Giorgio; Cesare, Stefano; Castorina, Giuseppe; Musso, Fabio; Pisani, Marco; Leone, Bruno

    2017-11-01

    Within the ESA technology research project "Laser Interferometer High Precision tracking for LEO", Thales Alenia Space Italia is developing a laser metrology system for a Next Generation Gravimetric Mission (NGGM) based on satellite-to-satellite tracking. This technique is based on the precise measurement of the displacement between two satellites flying in formation at low altitude for monitoring the variations of Earth's gravity field at high resolution over a long time period. The laser metrology system that has been defined for this mission consists of the following elements: • an heterodyne Michelson interferometer for measuring the distance variation between retroreflectors positioned on the two satellites; • an angle metrology for measuring the orientation of the laser beam in the reference frames of the two satellites; • a lateral displacement metrology for measuring the deviations of the laser beam axis from the target retro-reflector. The laser interferometer makes use of a chopped measurement beam to avoid spurious signals and nonlinearity caused by the unbalance between the strong local beam and the weak return beam. The main results of the design, development and test activities performed on the breadboard of the metrology system are summarized in this paper.

  1. Laser-generated shockwave for clearing medical device biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizhner, Victor; Krespi, Yosef P; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Stoodley, Paul

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a laser method of biofilm interruption from the surface of various common medical devices and from surgically removed sinus tissue with adherent biofilms in a timely manner. Biofilm has emerged as a new threat not amenable to most antibiotic treatments. Biofilms, as opposed to planktonic bacteria, develop an extracellular polymeric slime matrix to facilitate adherence to host tissue or a prosthetic surface and to form a protective shield. A laser-induced biofilms disruption concept was previously described. Biofilms were grown in the laboratory on metallic and plastic medical device surfaces such as stents. Attempts to remove the biofilms with a laser were undertaken three times for each device. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser-generated shockwaves affecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) biofilm coating were applied with biologically safe parameters utilizing a fiber delivery system and a special probe. A confocal microscope was used to identify the biofilm structure prior to, during, and after laser application. The amount of biofilm removed from the medical devices in time was measured by quantifying green fluorescence. The biofilm fluctuated and eventually broke off the surface as shock waves neared the target. The time to remove 97.9 ± 0.4% (mean ± 1SD, n = 3) the biofilm from the surface of a Nitinol (NiTi) stent ranged from 4 to 10 s. The detached biofilm was observed floating in fluid media in various microscopic size particles. A new treatment modality using laser-generated shockwaves in the warfare against biofilms growing on surgical devices was demonstrated. Q-switched laser pulses stripped biofilm from the surface it adhered to, changing the bacteria to their planktonic form, making them amenable to conventional treatment. This therapeutic modality appears to be rapid, effective, and safe on metallic and plastic medical device surfaces.

  2. Laser-generated acoustic wave studies on tattoo pigment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Lorna M.; Dickinson, Mark R.; King, Terence A.

    1996-01-01

    A Q-switched alexandrite laser (180 ns at 755 nm) was used to irradiate samples of agar embedded with red, black and green tattoo dyes. The acoustic waves generated in the samples were detected using a PVDF membrane hydrophone and compared to theoretical expectations. The laser pulses were found to generate acoustic waves in the black and green samples but not in the red pigment. Pressures of up to 1.4 MPa were produced with irradiances of up to 96 MWcm-2 which is comparable to the irradiances used to clear pigment embedded in skin. The pressure gradient generated across pigment particles was approximately 1.09 X 1010 Pam-1 giving a pressure difference of 1.09 +/- 0.17 MPa over a particle with mean diameter 100 micrometers . This is not sufficient to permanently damage skin which has a tensile strength of 7.4 MPa.

  3. Two color laser driven THz generation in clustered plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Rakhee; Uma, R.; Kumar, Pawan

    2017-07-01

    A scheme of terahertz (THz) generation, using nonlinear mixing of two color laser (fundamental ω1 and slightly frequency shifted second harmonic ω2 ) in clustered plasma, is investigated. The lasers exert ponderomotive force on cluster electrons and drive density perturbations at 2 ω1 and ω2-ω1 . The density perturbations beat with the oscillatory velocities to produce nonlinear current at ω2-2 ω1 , generating THz radiation. The radiation is enhanced due to cluster plasmon resonance and by phase matching introduced through a density ripple. The generation involves third order nonlinearity and does not require a magnetic field or inhomogeneity to sustain it. We report THz power conversion efficiency ˜ 10-4 at 1 μm and 0.5 μm wavelengths with intensity ˜ 3 ×1014W/cm 2 .

  4. Nuclear Fusion Effects Induced in Intense Laser-Generated Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo Torrisi; Salvatore Cavallaro; Mariapompea Cutroneo; Josef Krasa

    2013-01-01

    Deutered polyethylene (CD2)n thin and thick targets were irradiated in high vacuum by infrared laser pulses at 1015W/cm2 intensity. The high laser energy transferred to the polymer generates plasma, expanding in vacuum at supersonic velocity, accelerating hydrogen and carbon ions. Deuterium ions at kinetic energies above 4 MeV have been measured by using ion collectors and SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. At these energies the deuterium–deuterium collisions may induce over thres...

  5. Matching-based fresh-slice method for generating two-color x-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilun Qin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-color high intensity x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs provide powerful tools for probing ultrafast dynamic systems. A novel concept of realizing fresh-slice two-color lasing through slice-dependent transverse mismatch has been proposed by one of the authors [Y. Chao, SLAC Report No. SLAC-PUB-16935, 2016]. In this paper we present a feasible example following this concept based on the Linac Coherent Light Source parameters. Time-dependent mismatch along the bunch is generated by a passive dechirper module and controlled by downstream matching sections, enabling FEL lasing at different wavelength with a split undulator configuration. Simulations for soft x-ray FELs show that tens of gigawatts pulses with femtosecond duration can be generated.

  6. Matching-based fresh-slice method for generating two-color x-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weilun; Ding, Yuantao; Lutman, Alberto A.; Chao, Yu-Chiu

    2017-09-01

    Two-color high intensity x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) provide powerful tools for probing ultrafast dynamic systems. A novel concept of realizing fresh-slice two-color lasing through slice-dependent transverse mismatch has been proposed by one of the authors [Y. Chao, SLAC Report No. SLAC-PUB-16935, 2016]. In this paper we present a feasible example following this concept based on the Linac Coherent Light Source parameters. Time-dependent mismatch along the bunch is generated by a passive dechirper module and controlled by downstream matching sections, enabling FEL lasing at different wavelength with a split undulator configuration. Simulations for soft x-ray FELs show that tens of gigawatts pulses with femtosecond duration can be generated.

  7. Advanced nanoparticle generation and excitation by lasers in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcikowski, Stephan; Compagnini, Giuseppe

    2013-03-07

    Today, nanoparticles are widely implemented as functional elements onto surfaces, into volumes and as nano-hybrids, resulting for example in bioactive composites and biomolecule conjugates. However, only limited varieties of materials compatible for integration into advanced functional materials are available: nanoparticles synthesized using conventional gas phase processes are often agglomerated into micro powders that are hard to re-disperse into functional matrices. Chemical synthesis methods often lead to impurities of the nanoparticle colloids caused by additives and precursor reaction products. In the last decade, laser ablation and nanoparticle generation in liquids has proven to be a unique and efficient technique to generate, excite, fragment, and conjugate a large variety of nanostructures in a scalable and clean manner. This editorial briefly highlights selected recent advancements and critical aspects in the field of pulsed laser-based nanoparticle generation and manipulation, including exemplary strategies to harvest the unique properties of the laser-generated nanomaterials in the field of biomedicine and catalysis. The presented critical aspects address future assignments such as size control and scale-up.

  8. High-power laser experiments to study collisionless shock generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakawa Y.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A collisionless Weibel-instability mediated shock in a self-generated magnetic field is studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation [Kato and Takabe, Astophys. J. Lett. 681, L93 (2008]. It is predicted that the generation of the Weibel shock requires to use NIF-class high-power laser system. Collisionless electrostatic shocks are produced in counter-streaming plasmas using Gekko XII laser system [Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011]. A NIF facility time proposal is approved to study the formation of the collisionless Weibel shock. OMEGA and OMEGA EP experiments have been started to study the plasma conditions of counter-streaming plasmas required for the NIF experiment using Thomson scattering and to develop proton radiography diagnostics.

  9. Dynamic light scattering on bioconjugated laser generated gold nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Zimbone

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs conjugated to DNA are widely used for biomedical targeting and sensing applications. DNA functionalization is easily reached on laser generated gold nanoparticles because of their unique surface chemistry, not reproducible by other methods. In this context, we present an extensive investigation concerning the attachment of DNA to the surface of laser generated nanoparticles using Dynamic Light Scattering and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The DNA conjugation is highlighted by the increase of the hydrodynamic radius and by the UV-Vis spectra behavior. Our investigation indicates that Dynamic Light Scattering is a suitable analytical tool to evidence, directly and qualitatively, the binding between a DNA molecule and a gold nanoparticle, therefore it is ideal to monitor changes in the conjugation process when experimental conditions are varied.

  10. Generation and characterization of biological aerosols for laser measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Concerns for proliferation of biological weapons including bacteria, fungi, and viruses have prompted research and development on methods for the rapid detection of biological aerosols in the field. Real-time instruments that can distinguish biological aerosols from background dust would be especially useful. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a laser-based, real-time instrument for rapid detection of biological aerosols, and ITRI is working with SNL scientists and engineers to evaluate this technology for a wide range of biological aerosols. This paper describes methods being used to generate the characterize the biological aerosols for these tests. In summary, a biosafe system has been developed for generating and characterizing biological aerosols and using those aerosols to test the SNL laser-based real-time instrument. Such tests are essential in studying methods for rapid detection of airborne biological materials.

  11. Ideal radiation source for plasma spectroscopy generated by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Jörg; Grojo, David; Axente, Emanuel; Gerhard, Christoph; Burger, Miloš; Craciun, Valentin

    2017-11-01

    Laboratory plasmas inherently exhibit temperature and density gradients leading to complex investigations. We show that plasmas generated by laser ablation can constitute a robust exception to this. Supported by emission features not observed with other sources, we achieve plasmas of various compositions which are both uniform and in local thermodynamic equilibrium. These properties characterize an ideal radiation source opening multiple perspectives in plasma spectroscopy. The finding also constitutes a breakthrough in the analytical field as fast analyses of complex materials become possible.

  12. Singly-resonant sum frequency generation of visible light in a semiconductor disk laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Thalbitzer; Schlosser, P.J.; Hastie, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a generic approach for visible light generation is presented. It is based on sum frequency generation between a semiconductor disk laser and a solid-state laser, where the frequency mixing is achieved within the cavity of the semiconductor disk laser using a singlepass of the solid......-state laser light. This exploits the good beam quality and high intra-cavity power present in the semiconductor disk laser to achieve high conversion efficiency. Combining sum frequency mixing and semiconductor disk lasers in this manner allows in principle for generation of any wavelength within the visible...... spectrum, by appropriate choice of semiconductor material and single-pass laser wavelength....

  13. Random Sequence for Optimal Low-Power Laser Generated Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangi, D.; Virga, A.; Gulino, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    Low-power laser generated ultrasounds are lately gaining importance in the research world, thanks to the possibility of investigating a mechanical component structural integrity through a non-contact and Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) procedure. The ultrasounds are, however, very low in amplitude, making it necessary to use pre-processing and post-processing operations on the signals to detect them. The cross-correlation technique is used in this work, meaning that a random signal must be used as laser input. For this purpose, a highly random and simple-to-create code called T sequence, capable of enhancing the ultrasound detectability, is introduced (not previously available at the state of the art). Several important parameters which characterize the T sequence can influence the process: the number of pulses Npulses , the pulse duration δ and the distance between pulses dpulses . A Finite Element FE model of a 3 mm steel disk has been initially developed to analytically study the longitudinal ultrasound generation mechanism and the obtainable outputs. Later, experimental tests have shown that the T sequence is highly flexible for ultrasound detection purposes, making it optimal to use high Npulses and δ but low dpulses . In the end, apart from describing all phenomena that arise in the low-power laser generation process, the results of this study are also important for setting up an effective NDT procedure using this technology.

  14. Next Generation Driver for Attosecond and Laser-plasma Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, D E; Borot, A; Cardenas, D E; Marcus, G; Gu, X; Herrmann, D; Xu, J; Tan, J; Kormin, D; Ma, G; Dallari, W; Tsakiris, G D; Földes, I B; Chou, S-W; Weidman, M; Bergues, B; Wittmann, T; Schröder, H; Tzallas, P; Charalambidis, D; Razskazovskaya, O; Pervak, V; Krausz, F; Veisz, L

    2017-07-12

    The observation and manipulation of electron dynamics in matter call for attosecond light pulses, routinely available from high-order harmonic generation driven by few-femtosecond lasers. However, the energy limitation of these lasers supports only weak sources and correspondingly linear attosecond studies. Here we report on an optical parametric synthesizer designed for nonlinear attosecond optics and relativistic laser-plasma physics. This synthesizer uniquely combines ultra-relativistic focused intensities of about 1020 W/cm2 with a pulse duration of sub-two carrier-wave cycles. The coherent combination of two sequentially amplified and complementary spectral ranges yields sub-5-fs pulses with multi-TW peak power. The application of this source allows the generation of a broad spectral continuum at 100-eV photon energy in gases as well as high-order harmonics in relativistic plasmas. Unprecedented spatio-temporal confinement of light now permits the investigation of electric-field-driven electron phenomena in the relativistic regime and ultimately the rise of next-generation intense isolated attosecond sources.

  15. Self-generated surface magnetic fields inhibit laser-driven sheath acceleration of high-energy protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsutsumi, M; Sentoku, Y; Korzhimanov, A; Chen, S N; Buffechoux, S; Kon, A; Atherton, B; Audebert, P; Geissel, M; Hurd, L; Kimmel, M; Rambo, P; Schollmeier, M; Schwarz, J; Starodubtsev, M; Gremillet, L; Kodama, R; Fuchs, J

    2018-01-18

    High-intensity lasers interacting with solid foils produce copious numbers of relativistic electrons, which in turn create strong sheath electric fields around the target. The proton beams accelerated in such fields have remarkable properties, enabling ultrafast radiography of plasma phenomena or isochoric heating of dense materials. In view of longer-term multidisciplinary purposes (e.g., spallation neutron sources or cancer therapy), the current challenge is to achieve proton energies well in excess of 100 MeV, which is commonly thought to be possible by raising the on-target laser intensity. Here we present experimental and numerical results demonstrating that magnetostatic fields self-generated on the target surface may pose a fundamental limit to sheath-driven ion acceleration for high enough laser intensities. Those fields can be strong enough (~10 5  T at laser intensities ~10 21  W cm -2 ) to magnetize the sheath electrons and deflect protons off the accelerating region, hence degrading the maximum energy the latter can acquire.

  16. Enhancing Plasma Surface Modification using high Intensity and high Power Ultrasonic Acoustic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) by at least one ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic wave generator (101 ), wherein the ultrasonic acoustic waves are directed to propagate towards said surface (314) of the object (100) so that a laminar boundary layer (313) of a gas...

  17. Generation of intense X-radiation and high-energy-density matter by laser-accelerated electrons; Erzeugung von intensiver Roentgenstrahlung und Materie hoher Energiedichte durch Laserbeschleunigte Elektronen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenlein, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Aim of this thesis was to study the processes of the interaction between highly intense short-pulse laser and matter. The focus lied thereby on the generation of intense X-radiation and warm dense matter. The studies performed for this thesis comprehend thereby the influence of laser parameters like energy, pulse length, focus size, and intensity as well as the influence of the target geometry on the interaction and generation of high-energy-density matter. In this thesis for this two selected experiments are presented. First a silver foil was used as target, in order to study the generation of radiation at 21 keV. Both bremsstrahlung and characteristic X-radiation were used in order to characterize the interaction. For the second experiment freely standing titanium wires were used as target. Hereby the focus lied on the characterization of the heated matter.

  18. Studies of Positron Generation from Ultraintense Laser-Matter Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gerald Jackson

    Laser-produced pair jets possess unique characteristics that offer great potential for their use in laboratory-astrophysics experiments to study energetic phenomenon such as relativistic shock accelerations. High-flux, high-energy positron sources may also be used to study relativistic pair plasmas and useful as novel diagnostic tools for high energy density conditions. Copious amounts of positrons are produced with MeV energies from directly irradiating targets with ultraintense lasers where relativistic electrons, accelerated by the laser field, drive positron-electron pair production. Alternatively, laser wakefield accelerated electrons can produce pairs by the same mechanisms inside a secondary converter target. This dissertation describes a series of novel experiments that investigate the characteristics and scaling of pair production from ultraintense lasers, which are designed to establish a robust platform for laboratory-based relativistic pair plasmas. Results include a simple power-law scaling to estimate the effective positron yield for elemental targets for any Maxwellian electron source, typical of direct laser-target interactions. To facilitate these measurements, a solenoid electromagnetic coil was constructed to focus emitted particles, increasing the effective collection angle of the detector and enabling the investigation of pair production from thin targets and low-Z materials. Laser wakefield electron sources were also explored as a compact, high repetition rate platform for the production of high energy pairs with potential applications to the creation of charge-neutral relativistic pair plasmas. Plasma accelerators can produce low-divergence electron beams with energies approaching a GeV at Hz frequencies. It was found that, even for high-energy positrons, energy loss and scattering mechanisms in the target create a fundamental limit to the divergence and energy spectrum of the emitted positrons. The potential future application of laser-generated

  19. Boundary Layer Instabilities Generated by Freestream Laser Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Amanda; Schneider, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    A controlled, laser-generated, freestream perturbation was created in the freestream of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT). The freestream perturbation convected downstream in the Mach-6 wind tunnel to interact with a flared cone model. The geometry of the flared cone is a body of revolution bounded by a circular arc with a 3-meter radius. Fourteen PCB 132A31 pressure transducers were used to measure a wave packet generated in the cone boundary layer by the freestream perturbation. This wave packet grew large and became nonlinear before experiencing natural transition in quiet flow. Breakdown of this wave packet occurred when the amplitude of the pressure fluctuations was approximately 10% of the surface pressure for a nominally sharp nosetip. The initial amplitude of the second mode instability on the blunt flared cone is estimated to be on the order of 10 -6 times the freestream static pressure. The freestream laser-generated perturbation was positioned upstream of the model in three different configurations: on the centerline, offset from the centerline by 1.5 mm, and offset from the centerline by 3.0 mm. When the perturbation was offset from the centerline of a blunt flared cone, a larger wave packet was generated on the side toward which the perturbation was offset. The offset perturbation did not show as much of an effect on the wave packet on a sharp flared cone as it did on a blunt flared cone.

  20. Simulation of relativistically colliding laser-generated electron flows

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xiaohu; Sarri, Gianluca; Borghesi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The plasma dynamics resulting from the simultaneous impact, of two equal, ultra-intense laser pulses, in two spatially separated spots, onto a dense target is studied via particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The simulations show that electrons accelerated to relativistic speeds, cross the target and exit at its rear surface. Most energetic electrons are bound to the rear surface by the ambipolar electric field and expand along it. Their current is closed by a return current in the target, and this current configuration generates strong surface magnetic fields. The two electron sheaths collide at the midplane between the laser impact points. The magnetic repulsion between the counter-streaming electron beams separates them along the surface normal direction, before they can thermalize through other beam instabilities. This magnetic repulsion is also the driving mechanism for the beam-Weibel (filamentation) instability, which is thought to be responsible for magnetic field growth close to the internal shocks of ...

  1. Thomson parabola spectrometry of laser generated plasma at PALS laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; Cavallaro, S.; Ando', L.; Velyhan, A.

    2014-04-01

    Laser generated Plasma has been obtained at PALS laboratory in Prague irradiating thin films by Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) regime. The irradiated targets were polymers and metals with embedded nanostructures and different thicknesses. In the present work, plasma has been characterized by using Thomson Parabola Spectrometer placed in forward direction. The regime of laser intensity was of the order of 1016W/cm2 at 1.3 μm wavelength. Simulations performed by TOSCA code have been employed to compare theoretical prevision with experimental data. This approach permitted the recognition of parabolas and the evaluations of ion charge, energy and mass-to-charge ratio. Results revealed that the maximum ion acceleration is obtained n metallic foils for optimal thickness of the order of 10 μm and for target containing nanostructures responsible for the increase of the plasma electron density and resonant absorption effect, as will be presented and discussed.

  2. System and Method for Generating a Frequency Modulated Linear Laser Waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrottet, Diego F. (Inventor); Petway, Larry B. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Farzin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Lockard, George E. (Inventor); Hines, Glenn D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A system for generating a frequency modulated linear laser waveform includes a single frequency laser generator to produce a laser output signal. An electro-optical modulator modulates the frequency of the laser output signal to define a linear triangular waveform. An optical circulator passes the linear triangular waveform to a band-pass optical filter to filter out harmonic frequencies created in the waveform during modulation of the laser output signal, to define a pure filtered modulated waveform having a very narrow bandwidth. The optical circulator receives the pure filtered modulated laser waveform and transmits the modulated laser waveform to a target.

  3. Laser-generated focused ultrasound for arbitrary waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Weiwei; Hies, Thomas; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-10-01

    Transducers for laser generated focused ultrasound can achieve photoacoustic waves with several hundred bars positive pressure in water. Previous designs employed concave glass substrates decorated with catalytically grown carbon nanotubes. Here, we show that arbitrarily shaped surfaces made of polymers and printed with 3d printers allow the generation of waveforms with complex temporal and spatial shape. We first present three different polymer materials together with a simplified deposition technique. This is achieved by painting layers of carbon-nanotube powder and polydimethylsiloxane. Together with a clear resin (Formlabs Photopolymer Clear Resin), pressure amplitudes of 300 bar peak positive were obtained. With the flexibility of polymer substrates, complex waveforms can be generated. This is demonstrated with a stepped surface which launches two waves separated by 0.8 μs. Detailed pressure measurements are supported with shadowgraphy images and simulations of the wave.

  4. Semiconductor surface emitting lasers for photon pairs generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbever, Luc R.; Karpov, Evgueni; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2017-10-01

    We study the feasibility of generating photon pairs in a resonant Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) as a result of a third-order non-linear, four wave mixing interaction. We focus on degenerate four wave mixing in the spontaneous regime where two pump photons are annihilated to create a pair of signal and idler photons. Using the methods of quantum optics, we calculate the two-photon production rate, the spectrum of the generated photons, and the signal-idler cross-correlations. We highlight how the dispersion of the medium in the VCSEL cavity (a regular GaAs configuration) significantly diminishes the two-photon production rate. Based on our results, we enumerate the characteristics of a VCSEL that would be suitable for photon pair generation.

  5. Semiconductor surface emitting lasers for photon pairs generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbever, Luc R; Karpov, Evgueni; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2017-10-01

    We study the feasibility of generating photon pairs in a resonant Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) as a result of a third-order non-linear, four wave mixing interaction. We focus on degenerate four wave mixing in the spontaneous regime where two pump photons are annihilated to create a pair of signal and idler photons. Using the methods of quantum optics, we calculate the two-photon production rate, the spectrum of the generated photons, and the signal-idler cross-correlations. We highlight how the dispersion of the medium in the VCSEL cavity (a regular GaAs configuration) significantly diminishes the two-photon production rate. Based on our results, we enumerate the characteristics of a VCSEL that would be suitable for photon pair generation.

  6. Advanced modeling of high intensity accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.; Wangler, T.P.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goals of this project were three-fold: (1) to develop a new capability, based on high performance (parallel) computers, to perform large scale simulations of high intensity accelerators; (2) to apply this capability to modeling high intensity accelerators under design at LANL; and (3) to use this new capability to improve the understanding of the physics of intense charge particle beams, especially in regard to the issue of beam halo formation. All of these goals were met. In particular, the authors introduced split-operator methods as a powerful and efficient means to simulate intense beams in the presence of rapidly varying accelerating and focusing fields. They then applied these methods to develop scaleable, parallel beam dynamics codes for modeling intense beams in linacs, and in the process they implemented a new three-dimensional space charge algorithm. They also used the codes to study a number of beam dynamics issues related to the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, and in the process performed the largest simulations to date for any accelerator design project. Finally, they used the new modeling capability to provide direction and validation to beam physics studies, helping to identify beam mismatch as a major source of halo formation in high intensity accelerators. This LDRD project ultimately benefited not only LANL but also the US accelerator community since, by promoting expertise in high performance computing and advancing the state-of-the-art in accelerator simulation, its accomplishments helped lead to approval of a new DOE Grand Challenge in Computational Accelerator Physics.

  7. Generation and characterisation of warm dense matter with intense lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper I discuss the subject of warm dense matter (WDM), which, apart from being of academic interest and relevant to inertial fusion capsules, is a subject of importance to those who wish to understand the formation and structure of planetary interiors and other astrophysical bodies. I broadly outline some key properties of WDM and go on to discuss various methods of generating samples in the laboratory using large laser facilities and outline some common techniques of diagnosis. It is not intended as a comprehensive review but rather a brief outline for scientists new to the field and those with an interest but not working in the field directly.

  8. Aerospace propulsion using laser-driven plasma generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Daozhi (Beijing Univ. of Aeronautics and Astronautics (People' s Republic of China))

    1989-04-01

    The use of a remote pulsed laser beam for aerospace vehicle propulsion is suggested. The engine will be of variable cycle type using a plasma generator, and the vehicle will be of rotary plate type. It will be launched using an external radiated-heated VTOL thruster, lifted by an MHD fanjet, and accelerated by a rotary rocket pulsejet. It is speculated that, sending the same payload into low earth orbit, the vehicle mass at liftoff will be 1/20th that of the Space Shuttle, and the propellant mass carried by the new vehicle will be only 1/40th that of the Shuttle. 40 refs.

  9. Shock wave interaction with laser-generated single bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankin, G N; Simmons, W N; Zhu, S L; Zhong, P

    2005-07-15

    The interaction of a lithotripter shock wave (LSW) with laser-generated single vapor bubbles in water is investigated using high-speed photography and pressure measurement via a fiber-optic probe hydrophone. The interaction leads to nonspherical collapse of the bubble with secondary shock wave emission and microjet formation along the LSW propagation direction. The maximum pressure amplification is produced during the collapse phase of the bubble oscillation when the compressive pulse duration of the LSW matches with the forced collapse time of the bubble.

  10. An unconventional ion implantation method for producing Au and Si nanostructures using intense laser-generated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Mackova, A.; Lavrentiev, V.; Pfeifer, M.; Krousky, E.

    2016-02-01

    The present paper describes measurements of ion implantation by high-intensity lasers in an innovative configuration. The ion acceleration and implantation were performed using the target normal sheath acceleration regime. Highly ionized charged ions were generated and accelerated by the self-consistent electrostatic accelerating field at the rear side of a directly illuminated foil surface. A sub-nanosecond pulsed laser operating at an intensity of about 1016 W cm-2 was employed to irradiate thin foils containing Au atoms. Multi-energy and multi-species ions with energies of the order of 1 MeV per charge state were implanted on exposed substrates of monocrystalline silicon up to a concentration of about 1% Au atoms in the first superficial layers. The target, laser parameters and irradiation conditions play a decisive role in the dynamic control of the characteristics of the ion beams to be implanted. The ion penetration depth, the depth profile, the integral amount of implanted ions and the concentration-depth profiles were determined by Rutherford back-scattering analysis. Ion implantation produces Si nanocrystals and Au nanoparticles and induces physical and chemical modifications of the implanted surfaces.

  11. Tenfold enhancement of MeV Proton generation by a moderate ultra-short laser interaction with H2O nano-wire targets

    CERN Document Server

    Zigler, A; Bruner, N; Schleifer, E; Eisenmann, S; Henis, Z; Botton, M; Pikuz, S A; Faenov, A Y; Gordon, D; Sprangle, P

    2010-01-01

    Compact sources of high energy protons (50-500MeV) are expected to be key technology in a wide range of scientific applications. Particularly promising is the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme, holding record level of 67MeV protons generated by a peta-Watt laser. In general, laser intensity exceeding 10^18 W/cm2 is required to produce MeV level protons. Enhancing the energy of generated protons using compact laser sources is very attractive task nowadays. Recently, nano-scale targets were used to accelerate ions. Here we report on the first generation of 5.5-7.5MeV protons by modest laser intensities (4.5 x 10^17 W/cm2) interacting with H2O nano-wires (snow) deposited on a Sapphire substrate. In this setup, the plasma near the tip of the nano-wire is subject to locally enhanced laser intensity with high spatial gradients, and confined charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies. Nano-wire engine...

  12. Nonlinear mixing of laser generated narrowband Rayleigh surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakre, Chaitanya; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2017-02-01

    This research presents the nonlinear mixing technique of two co-directionally travelling Rayleigh surface waves generated and detected using laser ultrasonics. The optical generation of Rayleigh waves on the specimen is obtained by shadow mask method. In conventional nonlinear measurements, the inherently small higher harmonics are greatly influenced by the nonlinearities caused by coupling variabilities and surface roughness between the transducer and specimen interface. The proposed technique is completely contactless and it should be possible to eliminate this problem. Moreover, the nonlinear mixing phenomenon yields not only the second harmonics, but also the sum and difference frequency components, which can be used to measure the acoustic nonlinearity of the specimen. In this paper, we will be addressing the experimental configurations for this technique. The proposed technique is validated experimentally on Aluminum 7075 alloy specimen.

  13. Generation And Measurement Of High Contrast Ultrashort Intense Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Konoplev, O A

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis, the generation and measurement of high contrast, intense, ultrashort pulses have been studied. Various factors affecting the contrast and pulse shape of ultrashort light pulses from a chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser system are identified. The level of contrast resulting from influence of these factors is estimated. Methods for improving and controlling the pulse shape and increasing the contrast are discussed. Ultrahigh contrast, 1-ps pulses were generated from a CPA system with no temporal structure up to eleven orders of magnitude. This is eight orders of magnitude higher contrast than the original pulse. This contrast boost was achieved using two techniques. One is the optical pulse cleaning based on the nonlinear birefringence of the chirping fiber and applied to the pulses before amplification. The other is the fast saturable absorber. The fast saturable absorber was placed after amplification and compression of the pulse. The measurements of high-contrast, ultrashort pulse with h...

  14. Diode end pumped laser and harmonic generator using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, Robert L. (Inventor); Dixon, George J. (Inventor); Kane, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A second harmonic, optical generator is disclosed in which a laser diode produces an output pumping beam which is focused by means of a graded, refractive index rod lens into a rod of lasant material, such as Nd:YAG, disposed within an optical resonator to pump the lasant material and to excite the optical resonator at a fundamental wavelength. A non-linear electro-optic material such as MgO:LiNbO.sub.3 is coupled to the excited, fundamental mode of the optical resonator to produce a non-linear interaction with the fundamental wavelength producing a harmonic. In one embodiment, the gain medium and the non-linear material are disposed within an optical resonator defined by a pair of reflectors, one of which is formed on a face of the gain medium and the second of which is formed on a face of the non-linear medium. In another embodiment, the non-linear, electro-optic material is doped with the lasant ion such that the gain medium and the non-linear doubling material are co-extensive in volume. In another embodiment, a non-linear, doubling material is disposed in an optical resonator external of the laser gai medium for improved stability of the second harmonic generation process. In another embodiment, the laser gain medium andthe non-linear material are bonded together by means of an optically transparent cement to form a mechanically stable, monolithic structure. In another embodiment, the non-linear material has reflective faces formed thereon to define a ring resonator to decouple reflections from the non-linear medium back to the gain medium for improved stability.

  15. High-intensity, focused ultrasonic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1988-01-01

    The use of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for disintegration of body stones has increased considerably during recent years. A worldwide activity in this field is reflected in a growing number of international publications and in the development and manufacturing of several ESWL...... machines marketed by companies in Germany and France, in particular. Two main types of ESWL systems are prevailing, the spark gap-based and the piezoelectric disk-based systems. This paper is introduced by a brief reconsideration of the features of pressure waves in water produced by an electrical...... distribution, etc. involving nonlinearity, diffraction, and absorption in the high-intensity focused ultrasonic fields produced by an ellipsoid as well as a spherical cap focusing geometry. Data from the development of an ESWL of the piezoelectric disk type are reported including demands to transducers...

  16. Production of high intensity radioactive beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1990-04-01

    The production of radioactive nuclear beams world-wide is reviewed. The projectile fragmentation and the ISOL approaches are discussed in detail, and the luminosity parameter is used throughout to compare different production methods. In the ISOL approach a thin and a thick target option are distinguished. The role of storage rings in radioactive beam research is evaluated. It is concluded that radioactive beams produced by the projectile fragmentation and the ISOL methods have complementary characteristics and can serve to answer different scientific questions. The decision which kind of facility to build has to depend on the significance and breadth of these questions. Finally a facility for producing a high intensity radioactive beams near the Coulomb barrier is proposed, with an expected luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 39} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}, which would yield radioactive beams in excess of 10{sup 11} s{sup {minus}1}. 9 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. High-efficiency gamma-ray flash generation from multiple-laser scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zheng; Bulanov, S. S.; Arefiev, A.; Yan, X. Q.

    2017-10-01

    Gamma-ray flash generation in a near-critical-density target irradiated by four symmetrical colliding laser pulses is numerically investigated. With peak intensities about 1023 W/cm2, the laser pulses boost electron energy through direct laser acceleration, while pushing them inward with the ponderomotive force. After backscattering with counter-propagating laser, the accelerated electron is trapped in the electromagnetic standing waves of the ponderomotive potential well created by the coherent overlapping of the laser pulses. Electrons emit gamma -ray photons in a multiple-laser-scattering regime, where the electrons act as a medium transferring energy from the laser to gamma-rays in the ponderomotive potential valley.

  18. Performance analysis of next-generation lunar laser retroreflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocci, Emanuele; Martini, Manuele; Contessa, Stefania; Porcelli, Luca; Mastrofini, Marco; Currie, Douglas; Delle Monache, Giovanni; Dell'Agnello, Simone

    2017-09-01

    Starting from 1969, Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) to the Apollo and Lunokhod Cube Corner Retroreflectors (CCRs) provided several tests of General Relativity (GR). When deployed, the Apollo/Lunokhod CCRs design contributed only a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Today the improvement over the years in the laser ground stations makes the lunar libration contribution relevant. So the libration now dominates the error budget limiting the precision of the experimental tests of gravitational theories. The MoonLIGHT-2 project (Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High-accuracy Tests - Phase 2) is a next-generation LLR payload developed by the Satellite/lunar/GNSS laser ranging/altimetry and Cube/microsat Characterization Facilities Laboratory (SCF _ Lab) at the INFN-LNF in collaboration with the University of Maryland. With its unique design consisting of a single large CCR unaffected by librations, MoonLIGHT-2 can significantly reduce error contribution of the reflectors to the measurement of the lunar geodetic precession and other GR tests compared to Apollo/Lunokhod CCRs. This paper treats only this specific next-generation lunar laser retroreflector (MoonLIGHT-2) and it is by no means intended to address other contributions to the global LLR error budget. MoonLIGHT-2 is approved to be launched with the Moon Express 1(MEX-1) mission and will be deployed on the Moon surface in 2018. To validate/optimize MoonLIGHT-2, the SCF _ Lab is carrying out a unique experimental test called SCF-Test: the concurrent measurement of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP) and the temperature distribution of the CCR under thermal conditions produced with a close-match solar simulator and simulated space environment. The focus of this paper is to describe the SCF _ Lab specialized characterization of the performance of our next-generation LLR payload. While this payload will improve the contribution of the error budget of the space segment (MoonLIGHT-2

  19. High-power green light generation by second harmonic generation of single-frequency tapered diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.; Sumpf, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    laser emits in excess of 9 W single-frequency output power with a good beam quality. The output from the tapered diode laser is frequency doubled using periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3. We investigate the modulation potential of the green light and improve the modulation depth from 1:4 to 1:50.......We demonstrate the generation of high power (>1.5W) and single-frequency green light by single-pass second harmonic generation of a high power tapered diode laser. The tapered diode laser consists of a DBR grating for wavelength selectivity, a ridge section and a tapered section. The DBR tapered...

  20. Compact 180-kV Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by femtosecond laser filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantchouk, L.; Point, G.; Brelet, Y.; Larour, J.; Carbonnel, J.; André, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Houard, A.

    2014-03-01

    We developed a compact Marx generator triggered in atmospheric air by a single femtosecond laser beam undergoing filamentation. Voltage pulses of 180 kV could be generated with a subnanosecond jitter. The same laser beam was also used to initiate simultaneously guided discharges up to 21 cm long at the output of the generator.

  1. Two-Color Laser High-Harmonic Generation in Cavitated Plasma Wakefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl; Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2016-10-03

    A method is proposed for producing coherent x-rays via high-harmonic generation using a laser interacting with highly-stripped ions in cavitated plasma wakefields. Two laser pulses of different colors are employed: a long-wavelength pulse for cavitation and a short-wavelength pulse for harmonic generation. This method enables efficient laser harmonic generation in the sub-nm wavelength regime.

  2. Two-color laser high-harmonic generation in cavitated plasma wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-03-01

    A method is proposed for producing coherent x-rays via high-harmonic generation using a laser interacting with highly-stripped ions in cavitated plasma wakefields. Two laser pulses of different colors are employed: a long-wavelength pulse for cavitation and a short-wavelength pulse for harmonic generation. This method enables efficient laser harmonic generation in the sub-nm wavelength regime.

  3. High-Power, High-Intensity Laser Propagation and Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-10

    T.M. Antonsen, O.V. Sinitsyn, J.Rodgers, A.Mohamed, J. Silverman , M.Al-Sheikhly, Y.S. Dimant, G.M. Milikh, M.Yu, Glyavin, A.G. Luchinin, E.A...Phys. of Plasmas, 21, 013103 (2014). 94. E.T. Gerry, Appl. Phys. Lett. 7, 6 (1965). 95. A.W. Ali, A.C. Kolb and A.D. Anderson , Appl. Opt. 6

  4. Probing Gravity with Next Generation Lunar Laser Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Manuele; Dell'Agnello, Simone

    Lunar and satellite laser ranging (LLR/SLR) are consolidated techniques which provide a precise, and at the same time, cost-effective method to determine the orbits of the Moon and of satellites equipped with laser retroreflectors with respect to the International Celestial Reference System. We describe the precision tests of general relativity and of new theories of gravity that can be performed with second-generation LLR payloads on the surface of the Moon (NASA/ASI MoonLIGHT project), and with SLR/LLR payloads deployed on spacecraft in the Earth-Moon system. A new wave of lunar exploration and lunar science started in 2007-2008 with the launch of three missions (Chang'e by China, Kaguya by Japan, Chandrayaan by India), missions in preparation (LCROSS, LRO, GRAIL/LADEE by NASA) and other proposed missions (like MAGIA in Italy). This research activity will be greatly enhanced by the future robotic deployment of a lunar geophysics network (LGN) on the surface of the Moon. A scientific concept of the latter is the International Lunar Network (ILN, see http://iln.arc.nasa.gov/). The LLR retroreflector payload developed by a US-Italy team described here and under space qualification at the National Laboratories of Frascati (LNF) is the optimum candidate for the LGN, which will be populated in the future by any lunar landing mission.

  5. AGS RESONANT EXTRACTION WITH HIGH INTENSITY BEAMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AHRENS,L.; BROWN,K.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; TSOUPAS,N.; VANASSELT,W.

    1999-03-29

    The Brookhaven AGS third integer resonant extraction system allows the AGS to provide high quality, high intensity 25.5 GeV/c proton beams simultaneously to four target stations and as many as 8 experiments. With the increasing intensities (over 7 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) and associated longer spill periods (2.4 to 3 seconds long), we continue to run with low losses and high quality low modulation continuous current beams.[1] Learning to extract and transport these higher intensity beams has required a process of careful modeling and experimentation. We have had to learn how to correct for various instabilities and how to better match extraction and the transport lines to the higher emittance beams being accelerated in the AGS. Techniques employed include ''RF'' methods to smooth out momentum distributions and fine structure. We will present results of detailed multi-particle tracking modeling studies which enabled us to develop a clear understanding of beam loss mechanisms in the transport and extraction process. We will report on our status, experiences, and the present understanding of the intensity limitations imposed by resonant extraction and transport to fixed target stations.

  6. High-Intensity Sweeteners and Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swithers, Susan E.; Martin, Ashley A.; Davidson, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence points to a link between a variety of negative health outcomes (e.g. metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) and the consumption of both calorically sweetened beverages and beverages sweetened with high-intensity, non-caloric sweeteners. Research on the possibility that non-nutritive sweeteners promote food intake, body weight gain, and metabolic disorders has been hindered by the lack of a physiologically-relevant model that describes the mechanistic basis for these outcomes. We have suggested that based on Pavlovian conditioning principles, consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners could result in sweet tastes no longer serving as consistent predictors of nutritive postingestive consequences. This dissociation between the sweet taste cues and the caloric consequences could lead to a decrease in the ability of sweet tastes to evoke physiological responses that serve to regulate energy balance. Using a rodent model, we have found that intake of foods or fluids containing non-nutritive sweeteners was accompanied by increased food intake, body weight gain, accumulation of body fat, and weaker caloric compensation, compared to consumption of foods and fluids containing glucose. Our research also provided evidence consistent with the hypothesis that these effects of consuming saccharin may be associated with a decrement in the ability of sweet taste to evoke thermic responses, and perhaps other physiological, cephalic phase, reflexes that are thought to help maintain energy balance. PMID:20060008

  7. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    Edgecock, T.R.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo-Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chancé, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrzycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T.Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S.K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J.J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernández Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menéndez, J.; Giunti, C.; González García, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; López-Pavón, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L.J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J.J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J.S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-20

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of {\\mu}+ and {\\mu}- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the ph...

  8. Continuous and Pulsed THz generation with molecular gas lasers and photoconductive antennas gated by femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Flavio C.; Nogueira, T.; Costa, Leverson F. L.; Jarschel, Paulo F.; Frateschi, Newton C.; Viscovini, Ronaldo C.; Vieira, Bruno R. B.; Guevara, Victor M. B.; Pereira, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    We report THz generation based on two systems: 1) continuous-wave (cw) laser generation in molecular gas lasers, and 2) short pulse generation in photoconductive antennas, gated by femtosecond near-infrared Ti:sapphire lasers. With the first system, we have generated tens of monochromatic cw laser lines over the last years, extending roughly from 40 microns to several hundred microns. This is done by optical pumping of gas lasers based on polar molecules such as methanol and its isotopes. In the second system, under development, pulsed THz radiation is generated by a photoconductive antenna built in a semi-insulating GaAs substrate excited by femtosecond pulses from a near-infrared (800 nm) Ti:sapphire laser.

  9. Generation of single-frequency tunable green light in a coupled ring tapered diode laser cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report the realization of a tapered diode laser operated in a coupled ring cavity that significantly improves the coherence properties of the tapered laser and efficiently generates tunable light at the second harmonic frequency. The tapered diode laser is tunable with single-frequency output...

  10. Range extension in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using femtosecond-nanosecond dual-beam laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wei; Zeng, Bin; Li, Ziting; Yao, Jinping; Xie, Hongqiang; Li, Guihua; Wang, Zhanshan; Cheng, Ya

    2017-06-01

    We extend the detection range of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy by combining high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses with high-energy nanosecond CO2 laser pulses. The femtosecond laser pulses ionize the molecules and generate filament in air. The free electrons generated in the self-confined plasma channel by the femtosecond laser serve as the seed electrons which cause efficient avalanche ionization in the nanosecond CO2 laser field. We show that the detection distance has been extended by three times with the assistance of femtosecond laser filamentation.

  11. 5.5-7.5 MeV proton generation by a moderate-intensity ultrashort-pulse laser interaction with H2O nanowire targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigler, A; Palchan, T; Bruner, N; Schleifer, E; Eisenmann, S; Botton, M; Henis, Z; Pikuz, S A; Faenov, A Y; Gordon, D; Sprangle, P

    2011-04-01

    We report on the first generation of 5.5-7.5 MeV protons by a moderate-intensity short-pulse laser (∼5×10(17)  W/cm(2), 40 fsec) interacting with frozen H(2)O nanometer-size structure droplets (snow nanowires) deposited on a sapphire substrate. In this setup, the laser intensity is locally enhanced by the snow nanowire, leading to high spatial gradients. Accordingly, the nanoplasma is subject to enhanced ponderomotive potential, and confined charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced over the short scale length, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies. © 2011 American Physical Society

  12. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Edgecock

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ^{+} and μ^{-} beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular ^{6}He and ^{18}Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. However, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  13. Probing ultrafast dynamics of solid-density plasma generated by high-contrast intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Kamalesh; Blackman, David R.; Shaikh, Moniruzzaman; Lad, Amit D.; Sarkar, Deep; Dey, Indranuj; Robinson, Alex P. L.; Pasley, John; Ravindra Kumar, G.

    2018-01-01

    We present ultrafast dynamics of solid-density plasma created by high-contrast (picosecond contrast ˜10-9), high-intensity (˜4 × 1018 W/cm2) laser pulses using time-resolved pump-probe Doppler spectrometry. Experiments show a rapid rise in blue-shift at early time delay (2-4.3 ps) followed by a rapid fall (4.3-8.3 ps) and then a slow rise in blue-shift at later time delays (>8.3 ps). Simulations show that the early-time observations, specifically the absence of any red-shifting of the reflected probe, can only be reproduced if the front surface is unperturbed by the laser pre-pulse at the moment that the high intensity pulse arrives. A flexible diagnostic which is capable of diagnosing the presence of low-levels of pre-plasma formation would be useful for potential applications in laser-produced proton and ion production, such as cancer therapy and security imaging.

  14. LASIK ablation centration: an objective digitized assessment and comparison between two generations of an excimer laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Anastasios John; Asimellis, George

    2015-03-01

    To objectively define the effective centration of myopic femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK ablation pattern, evaluate the difference between achieved versus planned excimer laser ablation centration, and compare these results from two different generations of an excimer laser system. The study retrospectively evaluated 280 eyes subjected to myopic LASIK. Digital image analysis was performed on Scheimpflug sagittal curvature maps (difference of preoperative to postoperative). Centration was assessed via proprietary software digital analysis of the coordinate displacement between the achieved ablation geometric center and the planned ablation center, which was the corneal vertex. Results from two different excimer laser generations (Eye-Q 400 [140 eyes] and EX500 [140 eyes]; Alcon/WaveLight, Fort Worth, TX) were compared. Radial displacement was on average 360 ± 220 µm (range: 0 to 1,030 µm) in the Eye-Q 400 laser group and 120 ± 110 µm (range: 0 to 580 µm) in the EX500 laser group (P laser group and 4% in the EX500 laser group. Displacement of ablation pattern may depend on the laser platform used. The improvement in the efficiency of centration indicates that newer generation excimer lasers with faster eye tracking and active centration control appear to achieve a significantly more accurate centration of myopic ablation patterns. The authors propose this novel, objective technique for laser refractive surgeon evaluation may point out significant outcome measures not currently used in standard metrics of refractive laser efficiency. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Peculiarities of Efficient Plasma Generation in Air and Water by Short Duration Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2017-01-01

    We have conducted experiments to demonstrate an efficient generation of plasma discharges by focused nanosecond pulsed laser beams in air and provided recommendations on the design of optical systems to implement such plasma generation. We have also demonstrated generation of the secondary plasma discharge using the unused energy from the primary one. Focused nanosecond pulsed laser beams have also been utilized to generate plasma in water where we observed self-focusing and filamentation. Furthermore, we applied the laser generated plasma to the decomposition of methylene blue dye diluted in water.

  16. The effect of laser contrast on generation of highly charged Fe ions by ultra-intense femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faenov, Anatoly Ya.; Alkhimova, Maria A.; Pikuz, Tatiana A.; Skobelev, Igor Yu.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Sakaki, Hironao; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Sagisaka, Akito; Dover, Nicholas P.; Kondo, Kotaro; Ogura, Koichi; Fukuda, Yuji; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Andreev, Alexander; Nishitani, Keita; Miyahara, Takumi; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Kando, Masaki; Kodama, Ruosuke; Kondo, Kiminori

    2017-07-01

    Experimental studies on the formation of highly charged ions of medium-Z elements using femtosecond laser pulses with different contrast levels were carried out. Multiply charged Fe ions were generated by laser pulses with 35 fs duration and an intensity exceeding 1021 W/cm2. Using high-resolution X-ray spectroscopic methods, bulk electron temperature of the generated plasma has been identified. It is shown that the presence of a laser pre-pulse at a contrast level of 105-106 with respect to the main pulse drastically decreases the degree of Fe ionization. We conclude that an effective source of energetic, multiply charged moderate and high- Z ions based on femtosecond laser-plasma interactions can be created only using laser pulses of ultra-high contrast.

  17. White light continuum generation in sapphire using two-coloured femtosecond laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Čepėnas, Augustas

    2017-01-01

    A wide spectrum of laser radiation is useful for two reasons: wider spectrum allows generation of shorter laser pulses, meanwhile, in pump-probe spectroscopy it is prefered to cover the largest possible spectral range with the same source. This work explores white light continuum generation using two-colored (wavelength of 1030 nm and 515 nm) femtosecond laser pulses. Combining these two white light continuums should expand radiation spectrum. However, this research shows that white light con...

  18. Generation of Laguerre-Gaussian Beams Using a Diode Pumped Solid-State Digital Laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bell, Teboho

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The solid state digital laser was used in generation of Laguerre-Gaussian modes, LGpl, of different orders. This work demonstrates that we can generate high-order Laguerre-Gaussian modes with high purity using a digital laser....

  19. Generating higher-order radial Laguerre-Gaussian modes using a digital laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bell, Teboho

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the digital laser one can generate various types of modes, like, Laguerre-Gaussian modes. The digital laser was forced to generate high-order radial Laguerre-Gaussian modes, LGp , with zero azimuthal order, by loading a digital hologram...

  20. Analysis of heat generation and thermal lensing in erbium 3-µm lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, Markus

    2003-01-01

    The influence of energy-transfer upconversion (ETU) between neighboring ions in the upper and lower laser levels of erbium 3-um continuous-wave lasers on heat generation and thermal lensing is investigated. It is shown that the multiphonon relaxations following each ETU process generate significant

  1. Femtosecond-laser generation of self-organized bubble patterns in fused silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellouard, Yves; Hongler, Max-Olivier

    2011-03-28

    By continuously scanning a femtosecond laser beam across a fused silica specimen, we demonstrate the formation of self-organized bubbles buried in the material. Rather than using high intensity pulses and high numerical aperture to induce explosions in the material, here bubbles form as a consequence of cumulative energy deposits. We observe a transition between chaotic and self-organized patterns at high scanning rate (above 10 mm/s). Through modeling the energy exchange, we outline the similarities of this phenomenon with other non-linear dynamical systems. Furthermore, we demonstrate with this method the high-speed writing of two- and three- dimensional bubble "crystals" in bulk silica.

  2. Guideline Implementation: Energy-Generating Devices, Part 2-Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, Byron L

    2017-04-01

    Lasers have been used in the OR for many years and are essential tools in many different types of procedures. However, laser beams that come into contact with unintended targets directly or via reflection can cause injury to patients or personnel or pose other hazards, such as fires. The new AORN "Guideline for safe use of energy-generating devices" provides guidance on the use of all energy-generating devices in the OR. This article focuses on key points of the guideline that address the safe use of lasers. These include the components of the laser safety program, the responsibilities of the personnel in roles specific to use of a laser, laser safety measures, and documentation of laser use. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Heat generation during ablation of porcine skin with erbium:YAG laser vs a novel picosecond infrared laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowett, Nathan; Wöllmer, Wolfgang; Mlynarek, Alex M; Wiseman, Paul; Segal, Bernard; Franjic, Kresimir; Krötz, Peter; Böttcher, Arne; Knecht, Rainald; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2013-08-01

    Despite significant advances in surgery, most surgical tools remain basic. Lasers provide a means of precise surgical ablation, but their clinical use has remained limited because of undesired thermal, ionizing, or acoustic stress effects leading to tissue injury. A novel ultrafast, nonionizing, picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) system has recently been developed and is capable, in theory, of ablation with negligible thermal or acoustic stress effects. To measure and compare heat generation by means of thermography during ablation of ex vivo porcine skin by conventional microsecond-pulsed erbium:YAG (Er:YAG) laser and picosecond infrared laser (PIRL). This study was conducted in an optics laboratory and used a pretest-posttest experimental design comparing 2 methods of laser ablation of tissue with each sample acting as its own control. Ex vivo porcine skin was ablated in a 5-mm line pattern with both Er:YAG laser and PIRL at fluence levels marginally above ablation threshold (2 J/cm² and 0.6 J/cm², respectively). Peaks and maxima of skin temperature rises were determined using a thermography camera. Means of peak temperature rises were compared using the paired sample t test. Ablation craters were assessed by means of digital microscopy. RESULTS Mean peak rise in skin surface temperature for the Er:YAG laser and PIRL was 15.0°C and 1.68°C, respectively (P skin surface temperature was 18.85°C for the Er:YAG laser and 2.05°C for the PIRL. Ablation craters were confirmed on digital microscopy. Picosecond infrared laser ablation results in negligible heat generation, considerably less than Er:YAG laser ablation, which confirms the potential of this novel technology in minimizing undesirable thermal injury associated with lasers currently in clinical use.

  4. Detonation along laser generated micropinch for fast ignition

    OpenAIRE

    Winterberg, F.

    2008-01-01

    The proposed fast ignition of highly compressed deuterium-tritium (DT) targets by petawatt lasers requires energy of about 100kJ. To lower the power of the laser, it is proposed to accomplish fast ignition with two lasers, one with lower power in the infrared, and a second one with high power in the visible to ultraviolet region. The infrared laser of lower power shall by its radiation pressure drive a large current in a less than solid density plasma placed inside a capillary, while the seco...

  5. Short-pulse generation in a diode-end-pumped solid-state laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available theoretical PQSML,th of 2.08W. Short-Pulse Generation in a Diode-End-Pumped Solid-State Laser S. Ngcobo1,2, C. Bollig1 and H. Von Bergmann2 1CSIR National Laser Centre, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa 2Laser Research Center, University... in the picosecond region with a maximum average output power of 2.8W. Passive modelocking of the Nd:YVO4 laser has been demonstrated using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM). THEORETICAL ANALYSIS Ultra-fast solid state lasers are a key component...

  6. Pseudo-Random Modulation of a Laser Diode for Generating Ultrasonic Longitudinal Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Anatasi, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound systems have historically been more complicated and expensive than conventional piezoelectric based systems, and this fact has relegated the acceptance of laser based systems to niche applications for which piezoelectric based systems are less suitable. Lowering system costs, while improving throughput, increasing ultrasound signal levels, and improving signal-to-noise are goals which will help increase the general acceptance of laser based ultrasound. One current limitation with conventional laser generated ultrasound is a material s damage threshold limit. Increasing the optical power to generate more signal eventually damages the material being tested due to rapid, high heating. Generation limitations for laser based ultrasound suggests the use of pulse modulation techniques as an alternate generation method. Pulse modulation techniques can spread the laser energy over time or space, thus reducing laser power densities and minimizing damage. Previous experiments by various organizations using spatial or temporal pulse modulation have been shown to generate detectable surface, plate, and bulk ultrasonic waves with narrow frequency bandwidths . Using narrow frequency bandwidths improved signal detectability, but required the use of expensive and powerful lasers and opto-electronic systems. The use of a laser diode to generate ultrasound is attractive because of its low cost, small size, light weight, simple optics and modulation capability. The use of pulse compression techniques should allow certain types of laser diodes to produce usable ultrasonic signals. The method also does not need to be limited to narrow frequency bandwidths. The method demonstrated here uses a low power laser diode (approximately 150 mW) that is modulated by controlling the diode s drive current and the resulting signal is recovered by cross correlation. A potential application for this system which is briefly demonstrated is in detecting signals in thick

  7. Generation of electron beams from a laser-based advanced accelerator at Shanghai Jiao Tong University

    CERN Document Server

    Elsied, Ahmed M M; Li, Song; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Sokollik, Thomas; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    At Shanghai Jiao Tong University, we have established a research laboratory for advanced acceleration research based on high-power lasers and plasma technologies. In a primary experiment based on the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) scheme, multi-hundred MeV electron beams having a reasonable quality are generated using 20-40 TW, 30 femtosecond laser pulses interacting independently with helium, neon, nitrogen and argon gas jet targets. The laser-plasma interaction conditions are optimized for stabilizing the electron beam generation from each type of gas. The electron beam pointing angle stability and divergence angle as well as the energy spectra from each gas jet are measured and compared.

  8. XUV generation from the interaction of pico- and nanosecond laser pulses with nanostructured targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barte, Ellie Floyd; Lokasani, Ragava; Proska, Jan; Stolcova, Lucie; Maguire, Oisin; Kos, Domagoj; Sheridan, Paul; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; McCormack, Tom; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dunne, Padraig; Limpouch, Jiri

    2017-05-01

    Laser-produced plasmas are intense sources of XUV radiation that can be suitable for different applications such as extreme ultraviolet lithography, beyond extreme ultraviolet lithography and water window imaging. In particular, much work has focused on the use of tin plasmas for extreme ultraviolet lithography at 13.5 nm. We have investigated the spectral behavior of the laser produced plasmas formed on closely packed polystyrene microspheres and porous alumina targets covered by a thin tin layer in the spectral region from 2.5 to 16 nm. Nd:YAG lasers delivering pulses of 170 ps (Ekspla SL312P )and 7 ns (Continuum Surelite) duration were focused onto the nanostructured targets coated with tin. The intensity dependence of the recorded spectra was studied; the conversion efficiency (CE) of laser energy into the emission in the 13.5 nm spectral region was estimated. We have observed an increase in CE using high intensity 170 ps Nd:YAG laser pulses as compared with a 7 ns pulse.

  9. Generation of shape-invariant flat-top laser beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ait-Ameur, K

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A great number of laser applications need in place of the usual Gaussian beam a flat-top intensity profile in the focal plane of a focusing lens. In general the transformation of the laser beam from the Gaussian to the flat-top shape is made by a...

  10. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Plasma Characterization Generated by Long-Pulse Laser on Soil Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S.; Duan, W.; Ning, R.; Li, Q.; Jiang, R.

    2017-03-01

    The plasma is generated by focusing a long-pulse (80 μs) Nd:YAG laser on chromium-doped soil samples. The calibration curves are drawn using the intensity ratio of the chromium spectral line at 425.435 nm with the iron spectral line (425.079 nm) as reference. The regression coefficient of the calibration curve is 0.993, and the limit of detection is 16 mg/kg, which is 19% less than that for the case of a Q-switched laser In the method of long-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, the laser-induced plasma had a temperature of 15795.907 K and an electron density of 2.988 × 1017 cm-3, which exceeded the corresponding plasma parameters of the Q-switched laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy by 75% and 24% respectively.

  11. Evidence based exercise: Clinical benefits of high intensity interval training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shiraev, Tim; Barclay, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    ...: This article describes the benefits of exercise for patients with cardiovascular and metabolic disease and details the numerous benefits of high intensity interval training (HIIT) in particular. Discussion...

  12. Review of High-intensity Interval Training in Cardiac Rehabilitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ito, Shigenori; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Saeki, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    .... Although moderate-intensity continuous training has been the main training regimen recommended in cardiac rehabilitation guidelines, high-intensity interval training has been reported to be more...

  13. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, A. E. [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0G4 (Canada); Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2013-04-14

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  14. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, A. E.; Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  15. Terahertz difference frequency generation in quantum cascade lasers on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seungyong; Kim, Jae Hyun; Jiang, Yifan; Vijayraghavan, Karun; Belkin, Mikhail A.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate that an application of a III-V-on-silicon hybrid concept to terahertz (THz) Cherenkov difference frequency generation (DFG) quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources (THz DFG-QCLs) can dramatically improve THz output power and mid-infrared-to-THz conversion efficiency. Completely processed THz DFG-QCLs grown on a 660-μm-thick native InP substrate are transfer-printed onto a 1-mm-thick high-resistive Si substrate using a 100-nm-thick SU-8 as an adhesive layer. Room temperature device performance of the reference InP and hybrid Si THz DFG-QCLs of the same ridge width (22 μm) and cavity length (4.2 mm) have been experimentally compared. The target THz frequency of 3.5 THz is selected for both devices using the dual-period first order surface gratings to select the mid-infrared pump wavelength of 994 cm-1 and 1110 cm-1. At the maximum bias current, the reference InP and hybrid Si devices produced THz power of 50 μW and 270 μW, respectively. The mid-infrared-to-THz conversion efficiency corresponds to 60 μW/W2 and 480 μW/W2, respectively, resulting in 5 times higher THz power and 8 times higher conversion efficiency from the best-performing hybrid devices. A hybrid Si device integrated in a Littrow external-cavity setup showed wavelength tuning from 1.3 THz to 4.3 THz with beam-steering free operation.

  16. Enhanced efficiency of solar-driven thermoelectric generator with femtosecond laser-textured metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taek Yong; Vorobyev, A Y; Guo, Chunlei

    2011-07-04

    Through femtosecond laser irradiation, we produce in this work a unique type of surface nanostructure on Al that have enhanced absorption at UV and visible but a relatively small emissivity in infrared. By integrating this laser-treated Al to a solar-driven thermoelectric generator, we show that the thermoelectric generator integrated with the femtosecond laser-treated Al foil generates a significantly higher power than the ones without. Our study shows that our technique can dramatically enhance the efficiency of solar-driven thermoelectric devices that may lead to a leap forward in solar energy harnessing.

  17. Layout of NALM fiber laser with adjustable peak power of generated pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Sergey; Kobtsev, Sergey; Ivanenko, Alexey; Kokhanovskiy, Alexey; Kemmer, Anna; Gervaziev, Mikhail

    2017-05-01

    The Letter proposes a new layout of a passively mode-locked fiber laser based on a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror (NALM) with two stretches of active fiber and two independently controlled pump modules. In contrast with conventional NALM configurations using a single piece of active fiber that yields virtually constant peak power, the proposed novel laser features larger than a factor of 2 adjustment range of peak power of generated pulses. The proposed layout also provides independent adjustment of duration and peak power of generated pulses as well as power-independent control of generated pulse spectral width impossible in NALM lasers with a single piece of active fiber.

  18. Theory of fast nondeterministic physical random-bit generation with chaotic lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harayama, Takahisa; Sunada, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki; Muramatsu, Jun; Arai, Ken-ichi; Uchida, Atsushi; Davis, Peter

    2012-04-01

    We theoretically show that completely stochastic fast physical random bit generation at a rate of more than one gigabit per second can be realized by using lasers with optical delayed feedback which creates high-dimensional chaos of laser light outputs. The theory is based on the mixing property of chaos, which transduces microscopic quantum noise of spontaneous emission in lasers into random transitions between discrete macroscopic states.

  19. Testing relativity again, laser, laser, laser, laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einstein, A.

    2015-01-01

    laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser,

  20. Laser beam propagation generation and propagation of customized light

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ""The text is easy to read and is accompanied by beautiful illustrations. It is an excellent book for anyone working in laser beam propagation and an asset for any library.""-Optics & Photonics News, July 2014

  1. Heterogeneously Integrated Microwave Signal Generators with Narrow Linewidth Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-20

    widths of Si and III/V waveguides, and by changing the number of quantum wells in the active region. The longitudinal confinement is controlled by...resonators used in tunable lasers. Various couplers have been demonstrated including directional couplers, multimode interference (MMI) couplers and...above 100 GHz (reducing the metal loss) and using quantum -well lasers with higher output powers. Acknowledgements We thank Josh Conway, Robert

  2. Superradiance: the principles of generation and implementation in lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocharovsky, Vl V.; Zheleznyakov, V. V.; Kocharovskaya, E. R.; Kocharovsky, V. V.

    2017-04-01

    The electrodynamics of active continuous media is applied to theoretically examine collective spontaneous emission regimes of dipole oscillator ensembles. Recent experiments in which the superfluorescence phenomenon has been observed are reviewed. The focus is on propagation and interaction effects experienced by the inhomogeneous waves of active center polarization and electromagnetic fields. The superradiant laser dynamics is examined and prospects for the realization of superradiant lasers using low- Q cavities are discussed.

  3. Third harmonic generation of CO2 laser radiation in AgGaSe2 crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    September 2000 physics pp. 405–412. Third harmonic generation of CO2 laser radiation in. AgGaSe2 crystal. GOPAL C BHAR, PATHIK KUMBHAKAR. ½. , D V SATYANARAYANA. ¾. ,. N S N BANERJEE. ¾. , U NUNDY. ¾ and C G CHAO. ¿. Laser Laboratory, Physics Department, Burdwan University, Burdwan 713 104, ...

  4. Erosion resistant anti-ice surfaces generated by ultra short laser pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Cerro, D.A.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in't Veld, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Wetting properties of a wide range of materials can be modified by accurate laser micromachining with ultra short laser pulses. Controlling the surface topography in a micro and sub-micrometer scale allows the generation of water-repellent surfaces, which remain dry and prevent ice accumulation

  5. Generation of ultra-short relativistic-electron-bunch by a laser wakefield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Boller, Klaus J.; van Goor, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of the generation of an ultra-short (about one micron long) relativistic (up to a few GeVs) electron-bunch in a moderately nonlinear laser wakefield excited in an underdense plasma by an intense laser pulse is investigated. The ultra-short bunch is formed by trapping, effective

  6. Laser materials processing of complex components. From reverse engineering via automated beam path generation to short process development cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgl, R.; Brandstätter, E.

    2016-03-01

    The article presents an overview of what is possible nowadays in the field of laser materials processing. The state of the art in the complete process chain is shown, starting with the generation of a specific components CAD data and continuing with the automated motion path generation for the laser head carried by a CNC or robot system. Application examples from laser welding, laser cladding and additive laser manufacturing are given.

  7. Dynamic control of laser driven proton beams by exploiting self-generated, ultrashort electromagnetic pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kar, S., E-mail: s.kar@qub.ac.uk; Ahmed, H.; Nersisyan, G.; Hanton, F.; Naughton, K.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Brauckmann, S.; Giesecke, A. L.; Willi, O. [Institut für Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    As part of the ultrafast charge dynamics initiated by high intensity laser irradiations of solid targets, high amplitude EM pulses propagate away from the interaction point and are transported along any stalks and wires attached to the target. The propagation of these high amplitude pulses along a thin wire connected to a laser irradiated target was diagnosed via the proton radiography technique, measuring a pulse duration of ∼20 ps and a pulse velocity close to the speed of light. The strong electric field associated with the EM pulse can be exploited for controlling dynamically the proton beams produced from a laser-driven source. Chromatic divergence control of broadband laser driven protons (upto 75% reduction in divergence of >5 MeV protons) was obtained by winding the supporting wire around the proton beam axis to create a helical coil structure. In addition to providing focussing and energy selection, the technique has the potential to post-accelerate the transiting protons by the longitudinal component of the curved electric field lines produced by the helical coil lens.

  8. Triple nuclear reactions (d, n) in laser-generated plasma from deuterated targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Lorenzo; Cutroneo, Mariapompea

    2017-06-01

    Measurements performed at Prague Asterix Laser System laboratory have permitted to study nuclear reactions in plasma produced by high intensity laser pulses (1016 W/cm2) accelerating high energetic ions. In particular, the laser irradiation of deuterated polyethylene (CD2) primary target, as thin foils, has produced the ion acceleration of C and D ions, and the presence of a thick LiD secondary target has produced nuclear reaction events due to the deuteron-deuteron, deuterons-lithium, and deuteron-carbon interactions. Fast and slow neutrons have been obtained mainly from the nuclear reactions 7Li(d, n)8Be, 2H(d, n)3He, and 12C(d, n)13N. Plasma monitoring and measurements of kinetic energies of produced particles in different directions were obtained using many detectors. The analyses were based on a semiconductor time-of-flight technique, an electric and magnetic ion deflection in a Thomson spectrometer, and ion track detectors. The maximum yields of neutrons produced in the used experimental conditions were evaluated to be about 4 × 108 and 3 × 108 neutrons/laser shot at energies of 14 MeV and 2.4 MeV, from the D-Li and D-D reactions, respectively, while the production of low energy neutrons from the third D-C reaction was negligible.

  9. Space-charge effects in ultrahigh current electron bunches generated by laser-plasma accelerators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grüner, F. J; Schroeder, C. B; Maier, A. R; Becker, S; Mikhailova, J. M

    2009-01-01

    ...) generated in laser-plasma accelerators. At low electron energies such peak currents are expected to cause space-charge effects such as bunch expansion and induced energy variations along the bunch, potentially hindering the FEL process...

  10. Laser-generated shock wave attenuation aimed at microscale pyrotechnic device design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu, Hyeonju; Yoh, Jack J

    2016-01-01

    ...m, the laser-generated shock wave in water confinement is adopted. The shock properties are obtained from the free surface velocity by making use of a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR...

  11. Gold nanoparticle nucleated cavitation for enhanced high intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlan, J. R.; Cowell, D. M. J.; Freear, S.

    2018-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or focused ultrasound surgery is a non-invasive technique for the treatment of cancerous tissue, which is limited by difficulties in getting real-time feedback on treatment progress and long treatment durations. The formation and activity of acoustic cavitation, specifically inertial cavitation, during HIFU exposures has been demonstrated to enhance heating rates. However, without the introduction of external nuclei its formation an activity can be unpredictable, and potentially counter-productive. In this study, a combination of pulse laser illumination (839 nm), HIFU exposures (3.3 MHz) and plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNR) was demonstrated as a new approach for the guidance and enhancement of HIFU treatments. For imaging, short duration HIFU pulses (10 μs) demonstrated broadband acoustic emissions from AuNR nucleated cavitation with a signal-to-noise ranging from 5–35 dB for peak negative pressures between 1.19–3.19  ±  0.01 MPa. In the absence of either AuNR or laser illumination these emissions were either not present or lower in magnitude (e.g. 5 dB for 3.19 MPa). Continuous wave (CW) HIFU exposures for 15 s, were then used to generate thermal lesions for peak negative pressures from 0.2–2.71  ±  0.01 MPa at a fluence of 3.4 mJ cm-2 . Inertial cavitation dose (ICD) was monitored during all CW exposures, where exposures combined with both laser illumination and AuNRs resulted in the highest level of detectable emissions. This parameter was integrated over the entire exposure to give a metric to compare with measured thermal lesion area, where it was found that a minimum total ICD of 1.5 × 103 a.u. was correlated with the formation of thermal lesions in gel phantoms. Furthermore, lesion area (mm2) was increased for equivalent exposures without either AuNRs or laser illumination. Once combined with cancer targeting AuNRs this approach could allow for the future theranostic use of HIFU

  12. Low emittance electron beam generation from a laser wakefield accelerator using two laser pulses with different wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. L. Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ionization injection triggered by short wavelength laser pulses inside a nonlinear wakefield driven by a longer wavelength laser is examined via multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We find that very bright electron beams can be generated through this two-color scheme in either collinear propagating or transverse colliding geometry. For a fixed laser intensity I, lasers with longer/shorter wavelength λ have larger/smaller ponderomotive potential (∝Iλ^{2}. The two-color scheme utilizes this property to separate the injection process from the wakefield excitation process. Very strong wakes can be generated at relatively low laser intensities by using a longer wavelength laser driver (e.g., a 10  μm CO_{2} laser due to its very large ponderomotive potential. On the other hand, a short wavelength laser can produce electrons with very small residual momenta (p_{⊥}∼a_{0}∼sqrt[I]λ inside the wake, leading to electron beams with very small normalized emittances (tens of nm. Using particle-in-cell simulations we show that a ∼10  fs electron beam with ∼4  pC of charge and a normalized emittance of ∼50  nm can be generated by combining a 10  μm driving laser with a 400 nm injection laser, which is an improvement of more than 1 order of magnitude compared to the typical results obtained when a single wavelength laser is used for both the wake formation and ionization injection. With the transverse colliding geometry, simulations show that similarly low emittance and much lower slice energy spread (∼30  keV, comparing with the typical value of few MeV in the longitudinal injection scheme can be simultaneously obtained for electron beams with a few pC charge. Such low slice energy spread may have significant advantages in applications relevant to future coherent light sources driven by plasma accelerators.

  13. Laser Ion Acceleration from Shock Wave Generated Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Michael; Gordon, Daniel; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Ting, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    Efficient acceleration of ions by means of high power laser radiation requires electron plasma densities at or in excess of the critical density. Traditionally, this has been achieved using solid targets. More recently, laser facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the University of California in Los Angeles have achieved acceleration using Terawatt CO2 interacting with gas jets. Gas targets are advantageous in that they are relatively simple and can be operated at high repetition rates; however, they typically operate at densities far below those required for optical wavelengths, where most of the world's terawatt lasers operate. To get around this and other issues, a new type of target, a ``gas foil,'' has been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. The target is created by igniting an optically driven hydrodynamic shock into the flow of a gas jet in vacuum. Experiments have shown that a laser-ignited shock is capable of producing 4 times ambient. These results have been incorporated into 3D PIC simulations. Results for a relatively compact and inexpensive 20 TW laser yielded protons with energies in excess of 5 MeV. Simulations as well as preliminary experimental results will be discus

  14. Wavelength-tunable laser based on nonlinear dispersive-wave generation in a tapered optical waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a wavelength tunable laser comprising a first laser source configured to emit a first optical pulse having a pump wavelength, the first optical pulse being emitted in a first longitudinal direction. Furthermore, the wavelength tunable laser comprises...... a waveguide extending in the first longitudinal direction, the waveguide having longitudinally varying phase matching conditions, the waveguide being configured to generate a second optical pulse with a centre wavelength upon receiving the first optical pulse, wherein the wavelength tunable laser...

  15. Linewidth Enhancement Factor Measurement of a Fabry Perot Laser Diode through Narrowband Optical FM Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Taraprasad; Bhattacharyya, Prosenjit; Ghosh, Chiranjib

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a simple method of linewidth enhancement factor (LEF) measurement of a semiconductor laser through narrowband optical frequency modulation (FM) generation by direct modulation. The narrowband optical FM is generated by using small-amplitude direct-current modulation, thereby limiting the resultant optical intensity modulation index level typically within 10%. The LEF is found to decrease linearly with the increase in bias current of the laser diode above threshold.

  16. Third harmonic generation of CO2 laser radiation in AgGaSe2 crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... for second harmonic and third harmonic generations are 6.3% and 2.4% respectively with the input fundamental pump power density of 5.9 MW/cm2 only. The wavelength of the fundamental CO2 laser radiation used for the generation of harmonics is 10.6 m, (20) line. A compact TEA CO2 laser source has been built in ...

  17. Efficient energetic proton generation driven by ultrashort ultraintense ti:Sapphire laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, I. W.; Kim, C. M.; Jeong, T. M.; Yu, T. J.; Sung, J. H.; Lee, S. K.; Hafz, N.; Pae, K. H.; Ko, D. K.; Lee, J. [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Nishiuchi, M.; Daido, H.; Yogo, A.; Orimo, S.; Ogura, K.; Ma, J.; Sagisaka, A.; Mori, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kiriyama, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto (Japan); Oishi, Y.; Nemoto, K. [Central Research Institute of Electronic Power Industry, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Significant progress on laser driven proton generation has been made in the past few years. Proton acceleration driven by ultrashort ultraintense laser pulse has been a promising technology for realizing a compact accelerator. Laser driven protons have several unique properties, such as shot pulse duration of ∼ps, high peak current in kA range, low transverse emittance below 10{sup -}2{sup m}m mrad, and good laminarity. For practical applications, the proton beam should be optimized to obtain higher energy, narrower energy spread, larger number and conversion efficiency. Maximum proton energy of 58 MeV has been demonstrated using PW class laser pulse, and quasi monoenergetic protons were produced from microstructured target. We have performed series of experiments to generate energetic proton beam by collaborating with JAEA and CRIEPI groups. Energetic protons were produced by the interaction of ultrashort ultraintense laser pulse with thin solid targets. Laser pulse with maximum energy of 1.7 J and minimum pulse duration of 34 FS, giving maximum peak intensity 3x10{sup 1}9{sup W}/cm{sup 2,} was focused using an off axis parabolic mirror at 45 degree incident angle with p polarization. The target used was one of 5μm thick copper of 7.5, 12.5, 25μm thick polyimide foils. Fresh Surface of target was supplied by moving the target with tape target driver for every laser shot, performing repetitive laser shooting without breaking vacuum. In order to investigate optimal generation conditions, we varied the laser pulse width and changed target position with respect to a tight focus position of laser beam. Main proton diagnostic was proton time of flight spectrometer to facilitate real time optimization of the laser and target conditions. Energetic protons with maximum energy of up to 4 MeV are generated by the interaction of laser pulse with a 7.5μm thick Polyimide target. The conversion efficiency from the laser energy into the proton kinetic energies is achieved to

  18. Parametric and Nonparametric Empirical Regression Models: Case Study of Copper Bromide Laser Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Gocheva-Ilieva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to model the output laser power of a copper bromide laser with wavelengths of 510.6 and 578.2 nm we have applied two regression techniques—multiple linear regression and multivariate adaptive regression splines. The models have been constructed on the basis of PCA factors for historical data. The influence of first- and second-order interactions between predictors has been taken into account. The models are easily interpreted and have good prediction power, which is established from the results of their validation. The comparison of the derived models shows that these based on multivariate adaptive regression splines have an advantage over the others. The obtained results allow for the clarification of relationships between laser generation and the observed laser input variables, for better determining their influence on laser generation, in order to improve the experimental setup and laser production technology. They can be useful for evaluation of known experiments as well as for prediction of future experiments. The developed modeling methodology is also applicable for a wide range of similar laser devices—metal vapor lasers and gas lasers.

  19. Efficient generation of 509 nm light by sum-frequency mixing between two tapered diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tawfieq, Mahmoud; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hansen, Anders Kragh

    2015-01-01

    a 1063 nm tapered diode laser, inside a periodically poled MgO doped lithium niobate crystal. This corresponds to an optical to optical conversion ef fi ciency of 12.1%. As an example of potential applica- tions, the generated nearly diffraction-limited green light is used for pumping a Ti:sapphire laser......We demonstrate a concept for visible laser sources based on sum-frequency generation of beam com- bined tapered diode lasers. In this specific case, a 1.7 W sum-frequency generated green laser at 509 nm is obtained, by frequency adding of 6.17 W from a 978 nm tapered diode laser with 8.06 W from......, thus demonstrating good beam quality and power stability. The maximum output powers achieved when pumping the Ti:sapphire laser are 226 mW (CW) and 185 mW (mode-locked) at 1.7 W green pump power. The optical spectrum emitted by the mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser shows a spectral width of about 54 nm...

  20. Generation and expansion of laser-induced plasma as a spectroscopic emission source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jin; Ma, Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Lei, Wenqi; Wang, Xiaochun; Bai, Xueshi

    2012-12-01

    Laser-induced plasma represents today a widespread spectroscopic emission source. It can be easily generated using compact and reliable nanosecond pulsed laser on a large variety of materials. Its application for spectrochemical analysis for example with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has become so popular that one tends to forget the complex physical and chemical processes leading to its generation and governing its evolution. The purpose of this review article is to summarize the backgrounds necessary to understand and describe the laser-induced plasma from its generation to its expansion into the ambient gas. The objective is not to go into the details of each process; there are numerous specialized papers and books for that in the literature. The goal here is to gather in a same paper the essential understanding elements needed to describe laser-induced plasma as results from a complex process. These elements can be dispersed in several related but independent fields such as laser-matter interaction, laser ablation of material, optical and thermodynamic properties of hot and ionized gas, or plasma propagation in a background gas. We believe that presenting the ensemble of understanding elements of laser-induced plasma in a comprehensive way and in limited pages of this paper will be helpful for further development and optimized use of the LIBS technique. Experimental results obtained in our laboratory are used to illustrate the studied physical processes each time such illustration becomes possible and helpful.

  1. Self Generated Magnetic Fields in Laser-Produced Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    oscillator and a :.Lngle amplifier stage. The laser was Q-switched with a Pockels cell . The laser system was operated at a power level of 230 MW, which...0 a 0) N -W 4- hon’ 0ý0E I ril 11 Ni SI~ O rT4 * o. 93- ~ - 004 N4 N ’f 4 4 .4 0 0P-4 .. P-44 -11 4 𔃺 tf4-4 *4J 0f N* fj N . 1 N - P4 H 11 0 N d-1 k

  2. Residual stress analysis of laser cladding repair for nuclear steam generator damaged tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Won Jin; Lee, Sang Cheol; Lee, Seon Ho [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Laser cladding technology was studied as a method for upgrading the present repair procedures of damaged tubes in a nuclear steam generator and Doosan subsequently developed and designed a new Laser Cladding Repair System. One of the important features of this newly developed Laser Cladding Repair System is that molten metal can be deposited on damaged tube surfaces using a laser beam and filler wire without the need to install sleeves inside the tube. Laser cladding qualification tests on the steam generator tube material, Alloy 600, were performed according to ASME Section IX. Residual stress analyses were performed for weld metal and heat affected zone of as-welded and PWHT with SYSWELD software.

  3. Graphene based widely-tunable and singly-polarized pulse generation with random fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, B. C.; Rao, Y. J.; Wang, Z. N.; Wu, Y.; Zhou, J. H.; Wu, H.; Fan, M. Q.; Cao, X. L.; Zhang, W. L.; Chen, Y. F.; Li, Y. R.; Churkin, D.; Turitsyn, S.; Wong, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Pulse generation often requires a stabilized cavity and its corresponding mode structure for initial phase-locking. Contrastingly, modeless cavity-free random lasers provide new possibilities for high quantum efficiency lasing that could potentially be widely tunable spectrally and temporally. Pulse generation in random lasers, however, has remained elusive since the discovery of modeless gain lasing. Here we report coherent pulse generation with modeless random lasers based on the unique polarization selectivity and broadband saturable absorption of monolayer graphene. Simultaneous temporal compression of cavity-free pulses are observed with such a polarization modulation, along with a broadly-tunable pulsewidth across two orders of magnitude down to 900 ps, a broadly-tunable repetition rate across three orders of magnitude up to 3 MHz, and a singly-polarized pulse train at 41 dB extinction ratio, about an order of magnitude larger than conventional pulsed fiber lasers. Moreover, our graphene-based pulse formation also demonstrates robust pulse-to-pulse stability and wide-wavelength operation due to the cavity-less feature. Such a graphene-based architecture not only provides a tunable pulsed random laser for fiber-optic sensing, speckle-free imaging, and laser-material processing, but also a new way for the non-random CW fiber lasers to generate widely tunable and singly-polarized pulses.

  4. High energy electron and ion generation from thin target using ultra short table top laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, K.; Oishi, Y.; Fujii, T.; Nayuki, T.; Takizawa, Y. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Sekiya, T; Okano, Y.; Hironaka, Y.; Nakamura, K. G.; Horioka, K.; Kondo, K. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Toyko Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    The influence of laser pulse duration on energetic electrons and protons generation was investigated using a Ti:sapphire laser. Energetic electrons with the temperature of 350 keV were produced by the irradiation of 90 mJ and 50 fs pulse onto a 30 {mu} m copper tape target. For ions, when laser pulse was changed by varying grating distance in the pulse compressor with keeping laser energy at constant value, the maximum proton energy was not changed so much in the region where laser pulse duration was between 55 fs and 400 fs and laser intensity was order of 10{sup 18} W/ cm{sup 2}. The maximum proton energy seems to more depend on the laser energy density on the target than laser intensity. When we evaluate the performance of ion acceleration using the value of E{sub p-max}/U{sub p} (the maximum proton energy normalized by the ponderomotive potential of the laser field), it increasing along with increasing of laser pulse duration.

  5. Dynamics of cavitation clouds within a high-intensity focused ultrasonic beam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Yuan; Katz, Joseph; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In this experimental study, we generate a 500 kHz high-intensity focused ultrasonic beam, with pressure amplitude in the focal zone of up to 1.9 MPa, in initially quiescent water. The resulting pressure field and behavior of the cavitation bubbles are measured using high-speed digital in-line

  6. Production of High-Intensity, Highly Charged Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Gammino, S.

    2013-12-16

    In the past three decades, the development of nuclear physics facilities for fundamental and applied science purposes has required an increasing current of multicharged ion beams. Multiple ionization implies the formation of dense and energetic plasmas, which, in turn, requires specific plasma trapping configurations. Two types of ion source have been able to produce very high charge states in a reliable and reproducible way: electron beam ion sources (EBIS) and electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS). Multiple ionization is also obtained in laser-generated plasmas (laser ion sources (LIS)), where the high-energy electrons and the extremely high electron density allow step-by-step ionization, but the reproducibility is poor. This chapter discusses the atomic physics background at the basis of the production of highly charged ions and describes the scientific and technological features of the most advanced ion sources. Particular attention is paid to ECRIS and the latest developments, since they now r...

  7. Short electron bunches generated by perpendicularly crossing laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horný, Vojtěch; Petržílka, Václav; Klimo, Ondřej; Krůs, Miroslav

    2017-10-01

    Optical injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator by a low intensity orthogonally colliding laser pulse is investigated using 2D particle-in-cell simulations. The collision of the main laser pulse driving the plasma wave in the cavitated regime and the low intensity injection pulse affects the trajectories of electrons in the crossing region. As a consequence, some electrons are ejected into the front part of the bubble, and these electrons are subsequently trapped in the rear part of the bubble. The injected and accelerated electron bunch reaches a peak energy of 630 MeV after 8 ps of acceleration being as short as 7.0 fs and is quasimonoenergetic with a low energy spread of 20 MeV (3.8%), having a charge of several dozens of pC and a relatively large emittance of 2.27 π . mm . mrad. Two main injection mechanisms—crossing beatwave injection and injection by laser field preacceleration—were identified.

  8. Laser weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsipis, K.

    1981-12-01

    The potential for deploying lasers as an effective antimissile system is assessed. High intensity and precise collimation are noted as essential for lasers as weapons, although size and material properties determine the actual performance. Gas-dynamic, electron, and chemical lasers are reviewed as prime weapons candidates. Space-, ground-, and ship-based uses are considered; each demands precision pointing, involving movable mirrors, target tracking and condition sensors, and central processing for target choice, along with large capacity power generation and storage. Laser propagation in the atmosphere is degraded by absorption, scattering, thermal blooming, turbulence (causes diffraction), and plasma formation ahead of the beam. Different modes of damaging missiles are reviewed, and it is found that mirrored surfaces, ablative coatings, and fluid layers have significant abilities to protect a missile in-flight. Destroying an ICBM in the boost phase is calculated to require a one million MW generator, far beyond current power engineering capabilities. Conventional weapons are viewed as more effective than lasers, although high energy laser research may have definite applications in areas such as chemical engineering

  9. Colliding laser-produced plasmas as targets for laser-generated extreme ultraviolet sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, T.; O' Gorman, C.; Dunne, P.; Sokell, E.; O' Sullivan, G. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Hayden, P., E-mail: patrick.hayden@physics.org [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); School of Physical Sciences and National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2014-07-28

    Colliding plasmas produced by neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser illumination of tin wedge targets form stagnation layers, the physical parameters of which can be controlled to optimise coupling with a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) heating laser pulse and subsequent extreme ultraviolet (EUV) production. The conversion efficiency (CE) of total laser energy into EUV emission at 13.5 nm ± 1% was 3.6%. Neglecting both the energy required to form the stagnation layer and the EUV light produced before the CO{sub 2} laser pulse is incident results in a CE of 5.1% of the CO{sub 2} laser energy into EUV light.

  10. Single-frequency blue light generation by single-pass sum-frequency generation in a coupled ring cavity tapered laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    A generic approach for generation of tunable single frequency light is presented. 340 mW of near diffraction limited, single-frequency, and tunable blue light around 459 nm is generated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) between two tunable tapered diode lasers. One diode laser is operated in a ring...

  11. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao, E-mail: haohe@tju.edu.cn; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

    2014-02-24

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca{sup 2+} release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  12. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca2+ release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  13. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Microwave generation in an optical breakdown plasma created by modulated laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, A. A.; Grasyuk, Arkadii Z.; Losev, Leonid L.; Soskov, V. I.

    1990-06-01

    It was established that when laser radiation, intensity modulated at a frequency of 2.2 GHz, interacted with an optical breakdown plasma which it had created, a microwave component appeared in the thermal emf of the plasma. The amplitude of the microwave thermal emf reached 0.7 V for a laser radiation intensity of 6 GW/cm2. Laser radiation with λL = 1.06 μm was converted to the microwave range with λmω = 13 cm in the optical breakdown plasma. A microwave signal power of ~ 0.5 W was obtained from a laser power of ~ 5 MW.

  14. Construction and Characterization of a Nanosecond Nd:YAG Laser Pumped Distributed Feedback Dye Laser Generating Picosecond Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Timothy; Weckerly, Chris; Ujj, Laszlo

    2013-03-01

    We have constructed a Distributed Feedback Dye Laser (DFDL) using interferometric pumping. DFDL works according to the dynamic modulation of the gain medium creating short pulses. Shortening of the pulses, stability, and dynamic range of the DFDL were investigated. Pulses were measured with the help of a photodiode with a 30 picosecond response time. Traces were recorded with a Tektronics DSA73304D (33GHz) digital serial analyser. The gain medium contains an ethanol solution of Rhodamine 590 dye and DODCI saturable absorber. Increasing the concentration of DODCI saturable absorber resulted in significant pulse shortening (150 to 54 picoseconds). Single pulse generation was achieved when the power of the pump laser was adjusted 10 percent above the laser threshold. The central wavelength of the laser pulses was 587 nm. The mathematical modeling, optical layout of the DFDL, and the results of the temporal and spectral characterization of the laser are presented on the poster. The development of the DFDL will lead to an extensive investigation of short pulse dye lasers for educational purposes and for applications in nonlinear spectroscopy. Financial support from University of West Florida is acknowledged.

  15. Concept for a new high resolution high intensity diffractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhr, U. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    A concept of a new time-of-flight powder-diffractometer for a thermal neutral beam tube at SINQ is presented. The design of the instrument optimises the contradictory conditions of high intensity and high resolution. The high intensity is achieved by using many neutron pulses simultaneously. By analysing the time-angle-pattern of the detected neutrons an assignment of the neutrons to a single pulse is possible. (author) 3 figs., tab., refs.

  16. Road Orthophoto/dtm Generation from Mobile Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, B.; Papelard, J.-P.

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a pipeline to produce road orthophoto and DTM from Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS). For the ortho, modern laser scanners provide a reflectance information allowing for high quality grayscale images, at a much finer resolution than aerial photography can offer. For DTM, MLS offers a much higher accuracy and density than aerial products. This increased precision and resolution leverages new applications for both ortho and DEM. The first task is to filter ground vs non ground, then an interpolation is conducted to build image tiles from the filtered points. Finally, multiple layers are registered and blended to allow for seamless fusion. Our proposed approach achieves high quality products and scaling up is demonstrated.

  17. Generation of High Quality Laser Accelerated Ion Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.; Nishihara, K.; Tajima, T.; Pegoraro, F.; Khoroshkov, V. S.; Mima, K.; Daido, H.; Kato, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Nagai, K.; Sakabe, S.

    2002-01-01

    In order to achieve a high quality, i. e. monoergetic, intense ion beam, we propose the use of a double layer target. The first layer, at the target front, consists of high-Z atoms, while the second (rear) layer is a thin coating of low-Z atoms. The high quality proton beams from the double layer target, irradiated by an ultra-intense laser pulse, are demonstrated with three dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations.

  18. Neutron Generation by Laser-Driven Spherically Convergent Plasma Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, G.; Yan, J.; Liu, J.; Lan, K.; Chen, Y. H.; Huo, W. Y.; Fan, Z.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, J.; Chen, Z.; Jiang, W.; Chen, L.; Tang, Q.; Yuan, Z.; Wang, F.; Jiang, S.; Ding, Y.; Zhang, W.; He, X. T.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate a new laser-driven spherically convergent plasma fusion scheme (SCPF) that can produce thermonuclear neutrons stably and efficiently. In the SCPF scheme, laser beams of nanosecond pulse duration and 1 014- 1 015 W /cm2 intensity uniformly irradiate the fuel layer lined inside a spherical hohlraum. The fuel layer is ablated and heated to expand inwards. Eventually, the hot fuel plasmas converge, collide, merge, and stagnate at the central region, converting most of their kinetic energy to internal energy, forming a thermonuclear fusion fireball. With the assumptions of steady ablation and adiabatic expansion, we theoretically predict the neutron yield Yn to be related to the laser energy EL, the hohlraum radius Rh, and the pulse duration τ through a scaling law of Yn∝(EL/Rh1.2τ0.2 )2.5. We have done experiments at the ShengGuangIII-prototype facility to demonstrate the principle of the SCPF scheme. Some important implications are discussed.

  19. Numerical simulation of damage detection using laser-generated ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peipei; Nazirah, Ab Wahab; Sohn, Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Laser ultrasonic techniques have been widely investigated due to its high spatial resolution and capacity for remote and noncontact measurement. In this study, the laser induced ultrasonic wave on an aluminum plate is simulated, and a nonlinear feature is used to detect a micro crack introduced in the plate model. A multi-physics simulation is conducted and optimized considering the effect of thermal diffusion. A nonlinear feature, called Bhattacharyya Distance (BD), is calculated to show the crack-induced geometric difference among the state space attractors obtained from closely spaced measurement points near the crack. First, a 3D model is built, and its simulation result is compared with an experiment performed using a noncontact laser ultrasonic measurement system. Then, by creating a micro crack in the model, BD is extracted and the crack is successfully detected and visualized. Finally, the effects of BD parameters, such as embedding dimension and frequency band, on damage visualization are investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Stimulated Raman backscattering at high laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoric, M.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Tajima, Toshiki; Sasaki, Akira; Maluckov, A.; Jovanovic, M.

    1998-03-01

    Signatures of Stimulated Raman backscattering of a short-pulse high-intensity laser interacting with an underdense plasma are discussed. We introduce a nonlinear three-wave interaction model that accounts for laser pump depletion and relativistic detuning. A mechanism is revealed based on a generic route to chaos, that predicts a progressive increase of the backscatter complexity with a growing laser intensity. Importance of kinetic effects is outlined and demonstrated in fluid-hybrid and particle simulations. As an application, we show that spectral anomalies of the backscatter, predicted by the above model, are consistent with recent sub-picosecond, high-intensity laser gas-target measurements at Livermore and elsewhere. Finally, a recently proposed scheme for generation of ultra-short, low-prepulse laser pulses by Raman backscattering in a thin foil target, is shown. (author)

  1. The effect of near-infrared MLS laser radiation on cell membrane structure and radical generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawa, Jolanta; Pasternak, Kamila; Zavodnik, Ilya; Irzmański, Robert; Wróbel, Dominika; Bryszewska, Maria

    2014-09-01

    The therapeutic effects of low-power laser radiation of different wavelengths and light doses are well known, but the biochemical mechanism of the interaction of laser light with living cells is not fully understood. We have investigated the effect of MLS (Multiwave Locked System) laser near-infrared irradiation on cell membrane structure, functional properties, and free radical generation using human red blood cells and breast cancer MCF-4 cells. The cells were irradiated with low-intensity MLS near-infrared (simultaneously 808 nm, continuous emission and 905 nm, pulse emission, pulse-wave frequency, 1,000 or 2,000 Hz) laser light at light doses from 0 to 15 J (average power density 212.5 mW/cm(2), spot size was 3.18 cm(2)) at 22 °C, the activity membrane bound acetylcholinesterase, cell stability, anti-oxidative activity, and free radical generation were the parameters used in characterizing the structural and functional changes of the cell. Near-infrared low-intensity laser radiation changed the acetylcholinesterase activity of the red blood cell membrane in a dose-dependent manner: There was a considerable increase of maximal enzymatic rate and Michaelis constant due to changes in the membrane structure. Integral parameters such as erythrocyte stability, membrane lipid peroxidation, or methemoglobin levels remained unchanged. Anti-oxidative capacity of the red blood cells increased after MLS laser irradiation. This irradiation induced a time-dependent increase in free radical generation in MCF-4 cells. Low-intensity near-infrared MLS laser radiation induces free radical generation and changes enzymatic and anti-oxidative activities of cellular components. Free radical generation may be the mechanism of the biomodulative effect of laser radiation.

  2. Laser materials processing of complex components: from reverse engineering via automated beam path generation to short process development cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgl, Richard; Brandstätter, Elmar

    2017-01-01

    The article presents an overview of what is possible nowadays in the field of laser materials processing. The state of the art in the complete process chain is shown, starting with the generation of a specific components CAD data and continuing with the automated motion path generation for the laser head carried by a CNC or robot system. Application examples from laser cladding and laser-based additive manufacturing are given.

  3. All-solid-state 360 nm ultraviolet laser generated by intracavity frequency-doubling of diode-pumped Pr3+:YLiF4 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. M.; Yu, W. X.; Zhang, C. G.; Yao, Y.; Zhu, P. F.; Song, P.; Bai, L.

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate an efficient and compact ultraviolet laser at 360 nm generated by intracavity frequency doubling of a continuous wave (CW) laser diode-pumped Pr3+:YLiF4 laser at 721 nm. A lithium triborate crystal, cut for critical type I phase matching at room temperature, is used for second-harmonic generation of the fundamental laser. By using an InGaN laser diode emitting at 444.3 nm with a maximum incident power of 5 W, as high as 460 mW of CW output power at 360 nm is achieved. The optical-to-optical conversion efficiency is as high as 9.2%, and the output power stability in 4 h is better than 3.86%. To the best of our knowledge, this is high efficient UV laser generated by frequency doubling of an InGaN diode-pumped Pr3+:YLiF4 laser.

  4. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-06-10

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10(-18) s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum.

  5. BESTIA - The next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Skaritka, John; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.

    2016-09-01

    Over the last two decades, BNL's ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. Our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particle acceleration of ions and electrons.

  6. Random laser action with coherent feedback via second-harmonic generation

    CERN Document Server

    Qiao, Yanqi; Cai, Zengyan; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-01-01

    The random laser action with coherent feedback by second-harmonic generation (SHG) was experimentally demonstrated in this paper. Compared with the conventional random laser action based on photoluminescence effect, which needs strong photoresponse in the active medium and has a fixed response waveband due to the inherent energy level structure of the material, this random SHG laser action indicates a possible confinement of the nonlinear signal with ring cavities and widens the response waveband due to the flexible frequency conversion in nonlinear process. The combination of coherent random laser and nonlinear optics will provide us another possible way to break phase-matching limitations, with fiber or feedback-based wavefront shaping method to transmit the emission signal directionally. This work suggests potential applications in band-tunable random laser, phase-matching-free nonlinear optics and even brings in new consideration about random nonlinear optics (RNO).

  7. High quality electron bunch generation with CO2-laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingang; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Jiancai; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhao, Xueyan; Yi, Longqing; Yu, Yahong; Shi, Yin; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-02-01

    CO2 laser-driven electron acceleration in low-density plasma is demonstrated using particle-in-cell simulation. An intense CO2 laser pulse of long wavelength excites a wake bubble that has a large elongated volume for accelerating a large number of electrons before reaching the charge saturation limit. A transversely injected laser pulse is used to induce and control the electron injection. It is found that an electron bunch with total charge up to 10 nC and absolute energy spread less than 16 MeV can be obtained. As a result, the charge per energy interval of the bunch reaches up to 0.6 nC/MeV. Intense CO2-laser based electron acceleration can provide a new direction for generating highly charged electron bunches with low energy spread, which is of much current interest, especially for table-top X-ray generation.

  8. Influence of the ion mass on quantum electrodynamics processes with the next generation high power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdessus, Remi; McKenna, Paul; Strathclyde Intense Laser Interactions Studies Group Team

    2017-10-01

    The construction of a number of new multi-petawatt laser facilities in Europe, USA and China has generated intense interest in the exploration of new physical regimes involving ultra-strong electromagnetic fields in which a significant amount of the laser energy is converted into high energy synchrotron radiation and in which electron-positron pairs can be produced. These new laser facilities will enable experimental exploration of this science for the first time. From an ultra-intense laser pulse (I > 1023 W/cm2) interacting with a plasma, we bring out the impact of the ion collective dynamics on the basic quantum electrodynamics processes such as high energy synchrotron radiation generation and the production of electron-positron pairs in the non-linear Breit-Wheeler process. Relevant cases are qualitatively discussed as well as potential future experiments. This work is supported by EPSRC (Grant No. EP/P007082/1).

  9. Repeated high-intensity exercise in professional rugby union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Damien; Gabbett, Tim; Jenkins, David

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the frequency, duration, and nature of repeated high-intensity exercise in Super 14 rugby union. Time-motion analysis was used during seven competition matches over the 2008 and 2009 Super 14 seasons; five players from each of four positional groups (front row forwards, back row forwards, inside backs, and outside backs) were assessed (20 players in total). A repeated high-intensity exercise bout was considered to involve three or more sprints, and/or tackles and/or scrum/ruck/maul activities within 21 s during the same passage of play. The range of repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each group in a match was as follows: 11-18 for front row forwards, 11-21 for back row forwards, 13-18 for inside backs, and 2-11 for outside backs. The durations of the most intense repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each position ranged from 53 s to 165 s and the minimum recovery periods between repeated high-intensity exercise bouts ranged from 25 s for the back row forwards to 64 s for the front row forwards. The present results show that repeated high-intensity exercise bouts vary in duration and activities relative to position but all players in a game will average at least 10 changes in activity in the most demanding bouts and complete at least one tackle and two sprints. The most intense periods of activity are likely to last as long as 120 s and as little as 25 s recovery may separate consecutive repeated high-intensity exercise bouts. The present findings can be used by coaches to prepare their players for the most demanding passages of play likely to be experienced in elite rugby union.

  10. Attenuation of laser-generated shock waves in Plexiglas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui; Xu, Rong-Qing; Yang, Bo; Shen, Zhong-Hua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2006-01-10

    A simple analytic model is derived for describing the attenuation of a shock wave in a Plexiglas plate. At the same time, experimental measurements are presented with a well-designed optical-fiber sensor based on detection-beam deflection. The amplitude of the shock-wave pressure is measured experimentally and calculated numerically for analytic expressions at different distances from the region of the surface breakdown by the radiation of a single-pulse Nd:YAG laser. Good agreement between the experimental and the calculated values of the shock-wave pressure is established.

  11. Radio Frequency and Terahertz Signals Generated by Passively Mode-Locked Semiconductor Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Latkowski, Sylwester

    2010-01-01

    There are several different approaches to generating periodic signals using semiconductor lasers, for example: Q-switching, gain switching or mode-locking schemes. In general the active or passive mode-locking techniques require the use of a modulator or a saturable absorber in order to achieve the phase synchronisation. The laser diodes studied in this thesis, are demonstrated to operate in the mode-locked regime, while not requiring any direct or external modulation, nor the saturable absor...

  12. Temperature variation induced by the pulsed-periodic laser pumping under terahertz wave generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaeva, G. Kh; Moiseenko, E. V.; Shepelev, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    During nonlinear-optical parametric frequency conversion the heat-related effects occur, considerably influencing the conversion process. We develop versatile methods for analytic and numerical calculations of thermo-optical parameters and the temperature distribution inside a non-linear crystal pumped by periodic laser pulses. As an example, numerical results are presented for a number of laser-based schemes actual for the non-linear optical terahertz wave generation and parametric frequency conversion processes.

  13. Use of extended laser plasma for generation of high-order harmonics of picosecond duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganeev, R A; Boltaev, G S; Reyimbaev, Sh; Sherniyozov, Kh; Usmanov, T [Institute of Ion-Plasma and Laser Technologies, Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, Akademgorodok, Tashkent 100125 (Uzbekistan)

    2015-07-31

    We report the results of experimental investigations on the generation of picosecond radiation harmonics in extended laser plasma produced on the surface of different metal targets. The effect of plasma length, heating pulse duration and delay between the heating and transformable pulses on the efficiency of conversion to higher harmonics is studied. The λ = 1064 nm radiation conversion to a short-wavelength (down to 50 nm, 21st harmonic) range in extended plasma of several metals is demonstrated. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  14. Heat generation above break-even from laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium

    OpenAIRE

    Leif Holmlid

    2015-01-01

    Previous results from laser-induced processes in ultra-dense deuterium D(0) give conclusive evidence for ejection of neutral massive particles with energy >10 MeV u−1. Such particles can only be formed from nuclear processes like nuclear fusion at the low laser intensity used. Heat generation is of interest for future fusion energy applications and has now been measured by a small copper (Cu) cylinder surrounding the laser target. The temperature rise of the Cu cylinder is measured with an NT...

  15. Effect of photon energy in collagen generation by interstitial low level laser stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Eunkwon; Ha, Myungjin; Lee, Sangyeob; Radfar, Edalat; Park, Jihoon; Jung, Byungjo

    2015-03-01

    Although the mechanism of low level laser therapy (LLLT) is unclear, many studies demonstrated the positive clinical performance of LLLT for skin rejuvenation. An increase in dermal collagen plays an important role in skin rejuvenation and wound healing. This study aimed to investigate collagen generation after interstitial low level laser stimulation (ILLS). Rabbits were divided into two groups: surfacing irradiation and minimally invasive irradiation. 660nm diode laser of 20mW with 10J, 13J and 15J was applied to the backside of rabbits. Collagen formation was evaluated with ultrasound skin scanner every 12 hours. Results shows that ILLS groups have denser collagen density than surfacing groups.

  16. Study of Nonlinear Propagation of Ultrashort Laser Pulses and Its Application to Harmonic Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerawarne, Darshana L.

    Laser filamentation, which is one of the exotic nonlinear optical phenomena, is self-guidance of high-power laser beams due to the dynamic balance between the optical Kerr effect (self-focusing) and other nonlinear effects such as plasma defocusing. It has many applications including supercontinuum generation (SCG), high-order harmonic generation (HHG), lightning guiding, stand-off sensing, and rain making. The main focus of this work is on studying odd-order harmonic generation (HG) (i.e., 3o, 5o, 7o, etc., where o is the angular frequency) in centrosymmetric media while a high-power, ultrashort harmonic-driving pulse undergoes nonlinear propagation such as laser filamentation. The investigation of highly-controversial nonlinear indices of refraction by measuring low-order HG in air is carried out. Furthermore, time-resolved (i.e., pump-probe) experiments and significant harmonic enhancements are presented and a novel HG mechanism based on higher-order nonlinearities is proposed to explain the experimental results. C/C++ numerical simulations are used to solve the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE) which supports the experimental findings. Another project which I have performed is selective sintering using lasers. Short-pulse lasers provide a fascinating tool for material processing, especially when the conventional oven-based techniques fail to process flexible materials for smart energy/electronics applications. I present experimental and theoretical studies on laser processing of nanoparticle-coated flexible materials, aiming to fabricate flexible electronic devices.

  17. Generation of C6+ in a spark-discharge coupled laser plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balki, Oguzhan; Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Xiao, Shu; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2017-11-01

    By coupling a spark discharge into a laser-generated carbon plasma, fully-stripped carbon ions with a relatively low laser pulse energy are observed. When spark-discharge energy of ∼ 750 mJ is coupled to the carbon plasma generated by ∼ 50 mJ laser pulse (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse width 8 ns, intensity 5 × 109 W /cm2), enhancement in the total ion charge by a factor of ∼ 6 is observed, along with the increase of maximum charge state from C4+ to C6+. Spark coupling to the laser plasma significantly reduces the laser pulse energy required to generate highly-charged ions. Compared to the laser carbon plasma alone, the spark discharge increases the intensity of the spectral emission of carbon lines, the electron density ne, and the electron temperature Te. The effective ion plasma temperature associated with translational motion along the plume axis Tieff is calculated from the ion time-of-flight signal.

  18. High-order-harmonic generation in gas with a flat-top laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutu, W.; Auguste, T.; Binazon, L.; Gobert, O.; Carre, B. [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molecules, CEA-Saclay, FR-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Boyko, O.; Valentin, C. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, UMR 7639 ENSTA/CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, FR-91761 Palaiseau (France); Sola, I.; Constant, E.; Mevel, E. [Universite de Bordeaux, CEA, CNRS UMR 5107, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), FR-33400 Talence (France); Balcou, Ph. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, UMR 7639 ENSTA/CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, FR-91761 Palaiseau (France); Universite de Bordeaux, CEA, CNRS UMR 5107, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), FR-33400 Talence (France); Merdji, H. [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molecules, CEA-Saclay, FR-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); PULSE Institute for Ultrafast Energy Science, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We present experimental and numerical results on high-order-harmonic generation with a flat-top laser beam. We show that a simple binary tunable phase plate, made of two concentric glass plates, can produce a flat-top profile at the focus of a Gaussian infrared beam. Both experiments and numerical calculations show that there is a scaling law between the harmonic generation efficiency and the increase of the generation volume.

  19. Laser ablation impulse generated by irradiating aluminum target with nanosecond laser pulses at normal and oblique incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Impulse generation by irradiating aluminum targets with repetitive laser pulses at normal and oblique incidence was investigated using impulse measurements with a torsion pendulum at various incidence angles under different laser beam fluence conditions. The fluence varied from 5.8-20.0 J/cm2 for normal incidence. For oblique incidence, momentum coupling is sensitive to the incident angle at fluences of 6.3 J/cm2 and 9.2 J/cm2 because of target surface reflectivity changes and plume shielding effects. At fluence of 19.3 J/cm2, the fluence on the target surface becomes dominant for impulse generation compared with the angle of incidence effect in a large angular range. Beam fluence optimization for momentum coupling at oblique incidence is discussed based on the impulse characteristics obtained.

  20. Microwave generation with an inner-modulated laser and parallel Mach-Zehnder interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhaojin; Zeng, Xiaodong; Cao, Changqing; Feng, Zhejun; Lai, Zhi; Cheng, Yinghong; Chen, Xuanqi; Wang, Xiang; Pan, Zewei; Luo, Long; Liu, Yutao

    2017-11-01

    Using an inner-frequency-modulated semiconductor laser, two parallel Mach-Zehnder delay-line interferometers and feedback control loop technique, we generate microwaves. The frequency of the Littrow-structure semiconductor laser is modified by a lead zirconate titanate actuator that covers a wideband modulating range. One long delay-line interferometer generates microwaves; the second short delay-line interferometer controls the linearity of the modulate laser and assures microwave stability by a feedback loop. Thus, this method, in theory, should produce more than one hundred GHz microwave. We experimentally generated 1.743 GHz to 5.134 GHz microwaves. This technology opens a new path for developments in microwave photonics.

  1. Coherence properties of the harmonic generation in intense laser field; Proprietes de coherence de la generation harmonique en champ laser intense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salieres, P.

    1995-07-03

    In this thesis is presented an experimental and theoretical study of the harmonic generation in intense field and coherence properties of this radiation. The first part reminds the main harmonic specter characteristics. Follow then experimental studies of the tray extension with the laser lighting, the harmonic generation by ions, and the influence of the laser field on the efficiency of generation. The second part presents the quantum model of the harmonic generation in tunnel regime that we have used for the calculation of the dipoles. We compare dependence in lighting of some harmonic, by insisting on the characteristic behavior of the atomic phase. The theory of the propagation is presented in third part. After the reminder of the case of a perturbative polarization, we develop the case of the polarization in tunnel regime. With the help of numerical simulations, we show the influence of the atomic phase on the agreement of phase, and therefore on the efficiency of conversion and profiles of generation in the medium. The importance of the geometry of the interaction is underlined. The part IV presents the study of the spatial coherence of the harmonic radiation. We develop first consequences of the theory of the agreement of phase for profiles of emission. Then the comparison with experimental profiles is detailed in function of the different parameters( order of non linearity, laser lighting, position of the focus by report in the gaseous medium). The study of the spectral and temporal coherence of the part V begins with the experimental effect investigation of the ionization on specters of the harmonic of weak order. We present then theoretical predictions of the preceding model for spectral and temporal profiles of the harmonic of highest order, generated in tunnel regime. The part VI is devoted to the UVX source aspect of the harmonic radiation. (Abstract Truncated)

  2. Photoactivation of neurons by laser-generated local heating

    CERN Document Server

    Migliori, Benjamin; Kristan, William

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for achieving temporally and spatially precise photoactivation of neurons without the need for genetic expression of photosensitive proteins. Our method depends upon conduction of thermal energy via absorption by a dye or carbon particles and does not require the presence of voltage-gated channels to create transmembrane currents. We demonstrate photothermal initiation of action potentials in Hirudo verbana neurons and of transmembrane currents in Xenopus oocytes. Thermal energy is delivered by focused 50 ms, 650 nm laser pulses with total pulse energies between 250 and 3500 \\muJ. We document an optical delivery system for targeting specific neurons that can be expanded for multiple target sites. Our method achieves photoactivation reliably (70 - 90% of attempts) and can issue multiple pulses (6-9) with minimal changes to cellular properties as measured by intracellular recording. Direct photoactivation presents a significant step towards all-optical analysis of neural circuits in animals ...

  3. Studies of extreme ultraviolet emission from laser produced plasmas, as sources for next generation lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Thomas

    The work presented in this thesis is primarily concerned with the optimisation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photoemission around 13.5 nm, from laser produced tin (Sn) plasmas. EUV lithography has been identified as the leading next generation technology to take over from the current optical lithography systems, due to its potential of printing smaller feature sizes on integrated circuits. Many of the problems hindering the implementation of EUV lithography for high volume manufacturing have been overcome during the past 20 years of development. However, the lack of source power is a major concern for realising EUV lithography and remains a major roadblock that must be overcome. Therefore in order to optimise and improve the EUV emission from Sn laser plasma sources, many parameters contributing to the make-up of an EUV source are investigated. Chapter 3 presents the results of varying several different experimental parameters on the EUV emission from Sn laser plasmas. Several of the laser parameters including the energy, gas mixture, focusing lens position and angle of incidence are changed, while their effect on the EUV emission is studied. Double laser pulse experiments are also carried out by creating plasma targets for the main laser pulse to interact with. The resulting emission is compared to that of a single laser pulse on solid Sn. Chapter 4 investigates tailoring the CO2 laser pulse duration to improve the efficiency of an EUV source set-up. In doing so a new technique for shortening the time duration of the pulse is described. The direct effects of shortening the CO2 laser pulse duration on the EUV emission from Sn are then studied and shown to improve the efficiency of the source. In Chapter 5 a new plasma target type is studied and compared to the previous dual laser experiments. Laser produced colliding plasma jet targets form a new plasma layer, with densities that can be optimised for re-heating with the main CO2 laser pulse. Chapter 6 will present

  4. Comparison of Monolithic Optical Frequency Comb Generators Based on Passively Mode-Locked Lasers for Continuous Wave mm-Wave and Sub-THz Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Criado, A. R.; de Dios, C.; Acedo, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, two different Passive Mode-Locked Laser Diodes (PMLLD) structures, a Fabry–Perot cavity and a ring cavity laser are characterized and evaluated as monolithic Optical Frequency Comb Generators (OFCG) for CW sub-THz generation. An extensive characterization of the devices under study...

  5. High-intensity aerobic interval exercise in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Philippe; Gayda, Mathieu; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil

    2013-06-01

    Aerobic exercise training is strongly recommended in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) to improve symptoms and quality of life. Moderate-intensity aerobic continuous exercise (MICE) is the best established training modality in HF patients. For about a decade, however, another training modality, high-intensity aerobic interval exercise (HIIE), has aroused considerable interest in cardiac rehabilitation. Originally used by athletes, HIIE consists of repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise interspersed with recovery periods. The rationale for its use is to increase exercise time spent in high-intensity zones, thereby increasing the training stimulus. Several studies have demonstrated that HIIE is more effective than MICE, notably for improving exercise capacity in patients with HF. The aim of the present review is to describe the general principles of HIIE prescription, the acute physiological effects, the longer-term training effects, and finally the future perspectives of HIIE in patients with HF.

  6. Scanning high-power continuous wave laser-generated bulk acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Yan, Shiling; Xie, Qingnan; Ni, Chenyin; Shen, Zhonghua

    2017-05-20

    The ultrasonic bulk waves generated by a high-power continuous laser scanning along the surface of aluminum material were theoretically investigated. Although the temperature rise generated by this scanning laser irradiation was small, it provided a large temperature gradient, which was able to generate measurable ultrasonic waves. Detailed discussions were given to the influence of scanning speed on the generation propagation direction and the amplitude of the wavefront. The longitudinal and transverse waves would be generated in the material only when the scanning speeds reached a certain range. What's more, the amplitude of the wavefronts were significantly enhanced if the wavefront angle controlled by the scanning speed matched with the propagation direction of the ultrasound. In summary, it expounded a method to obtain the ultrasonic signal of direction, controlled from the perspective of numerical simulation, as long as the scanning speed met the requirements.

  7. Phase-matched generation of coherent soft and hard X-rays using IR lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popmintchev, Tenio V.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Bahabad, Alon; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2013-06-11

    Phase-matched high-order harmonic generation of soft and hard X-rays is accomplished using infrared driving lasers in a high-pressure non-linear medium. The pressure of the non-linear medium is increased to multi-atmospheres and a mid-IR (or higher) laser device provides the driving pulse. Based on this scaling, also a general method for global optimization of the flux of phase-matched high-order harmonic generation at a desired wavelength is designed.

  8. Random bit generation using an optically injected semiconductor laser in chaos with oversampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Zhou; Chan, Sze-Chun

    2012-06-01

    Random bit generation is experimentally demonstrated using a semiconductor laser driven into chaos by optical injection. The laser is not subject to any feedback so that the chaotic waveform possesses very little autocorrelation. Random bit generation is achieved at a sampling rate of 10 GHz even when only a fractional bandwidth of 1.5 GHz within a much broader chaotic bandwidth is digitized. By retaining only 3 least significant bits per sample, an output bit rate of 30 Gbps is attained. The approach requires no complicated postprocessing and has no stringent requirement on the electronics bandwidth.

  9. Fourth-harmonic generation of picosecond glass laser pulses with cesium lithium borate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, L.B.; Daido, H.; Kato, Y.; Nakai, S. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6, Yamada-Oka, Suita 565 (Japan); Zhang, T. [Yamanashi University, Faculty of Engineering, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400 (Japan); Mori, Y.; Sasaki, T. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    We report the fourth-harmonic generation of 1.5 ps, 1.053 {mu}m glass laser pulses, where group velocity mismatch plays a significant role, at intensities up to 100 GW/cm{sup 2} using newly developed crystal, cesium lithium borate (CsLiB{sub 6}O{sub 10}). Type-I doubler and type-I quadrupler were used in the fourth harmonic generation experimental scheme. Energy conversion efficiencies of 24{percent} and 53{percent} have been achieved for frequency quadrupling and doubling of the fundamental glass laser pulses, respectively. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. En Route: next-generation laser-plasma-based electron accelerators; En Route: Elektronenbeschleuniger der naechsten Generation auf Laser-Plasma-Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidding, Bernhard

    2008-05-15

    Accelerating electrons to relativistic energies is of fundamental interest, especially in particle physics. Today's accelerator technology, however, is limited by the maximum electric fields which can be created. This thesis presents results on various mechanisms aiming at exploiting the fields in focussed laser pulses and plasma waves for electron acceleration, which can be orders of magnitude higher than with conventional accelerators. With relativistic, underdense laser-plasma-interaction, quasimonoenergetic electron bunches with energies up to {approx}50 MeV and normalized emittances of the order of 5mmmrad have been generated. This was achieved by focussing the {approx}80 fs, 1 J pulses of the JETI-laser at the FSU Jena to intensities of several 10{sup 19}W=cm{sup 2} into gas jets. The experimental observations could be explained via 'bubble acceleration', which is based on self-injection and acceleration of electrons in a highly nonlinear breaking plasma wave. For the rst time, this bubble acceleration was achieved explicitly in the self-modulated laser wakefield regime (SMLWFA). This quasimonoenergetic SMLWFA-regime stands out by relaxing dramatically the requirements on the driving laser pulse necessary to trigger bubble acceleration. This is due to self-modulation of the laser pulse in high-density gas jets, leading to ultrashort laser pulse fragments capable of initiating bubble acceleration. Electron bunches with durations laser pulse fragment can be powerful enough to drive a bubble. Distinct double peaks have been observed in the electron spectra, indicating that two quasimonoenergetic electron bunches separated by only few tens of fs have formed. This is backed up by PIC-Simulations (Particle-in-Cell). These results underline the feasibility of the construction of small table

  11. Surface-generated ultrasonic waves in solids by a Nd-YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmony, David C.; Ward, Barry

    1993-01-01

    A Q switched Nd-YAG laser has been used to generate ultrasonic waves at air-solid boundaries. The high energy and power density at the laser focus leads to the formation of a plasma on the surface of the solid. The solid surface is heated to the vaporization point and the combined effects of the laser plasma and surface ablation lead to shock waves in the air and a high pressure transient acoustic wave in the solid. This laser generated ultrasound is being used to study material properties and is used in non-destructive testing. Laser ultrasound has been studied using a range of transducers to confirm the thermoelastic and ablation regimes. But in general these techniques do not give the spatial as well as temporal behavior of the waves. Schlieren photography using a dye laser has been used to study the propagation of the various wave types at an air-solid boundary and Mach Zehnder interferometry has been used to determine the absolute pressure in transparent solids. The pressure has been measured as a function of time and the radial dependence is in excellent agreement with the direct pressure transducer measurements of other workers in the ablation regime.

  12. Laser excitation dynamics of argon metastables generated in atmospheric pressure flows by microwave frequency microplasma arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, W. T.; Galbally-Kinney, K. L.; Davis, S. J.; Hoskinson, A. R.; Hopwood, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    The optically pumped rare-gas metastable laser is a chemically inert analogue to diode-pumped alkali (DPAL) and alkali-exciplex (XPAL) laser systems. Scaling of these devices requires efficient generation of electronically excited metastable atoms in a continuous-wave electric discharge in flowing gas mixtures at atmospheric pressure. This paper describes initial investigations of the use of linear microwave micro-discharge arrays to generate metastable rare-gas atoms at atmospheric pressure in optical pump-and-probe experiments for laser development. Power requirements to ignite and sustain the plasma at 1 atm are low, 2p9 transition at 811.5 nm and the corresponding laser-induced fluorescence on the 2p10-->1s5 transition at 912.3 nm; the 2p10 state is efficiently populated by collisional energy transfer from 2p9. Using tunable diode laser absorption/gain spectroscopy, we observe small-signal gains of ~1 cm-1 over a 1.9 cm path. We also observe stable, continuous-wave laser oscillation at 912.3 nm, with preliminary optical efficiency ~55%. These results are consistent with efficient collisional coupling within the Ar(4s) manifold.

  13. Frequency-doubled DBR-tapered diode laser for direct pumping of Ti:sapphire lasers generating sub-20 fs pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Unterhuber, Angelika; Le, Tuan; Stingl, Andreas; Hasler, Karl-Heinz; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Andersen, Peter E; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2011-06-20

    For the first time a single-pass frequency doubled DBR-tapered diode laser suitable for pumping Ti:sapphire lasers generating ultrashort pulses is demonstrated. The maximum output powers achieved when pumping the Ti:sapphire laser are 110 mW (CW) and 82 mW (mode-locked) respectively at 1.2 W of pump power. This corresponds to a reduction in optical conversion efficiencies to 75% of the values achieved with a commercial diode pumped solid-state laser. However, the superior electro-optical efficiency of the diode laser improves the overall efficiency of the Ti:sapphire laser by a factor > 2. The optical spectrum emitted by the Ti:sapphire laser when pumped with our diode laser shows a spectral width of 112 nm (FWHM). Based on autocorrelation measurements, pulse widths of less than 20 fs can therefore be expected.

  14. Static and Hypersonic Experimental Analysis of Impulse Generation in Air-Breathing Laser-Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Israel Irone

    The present research campaign centered on static and hypersonic experiments performed with a two-dimensional, repetitively-pulsed (RP) laser Lightcraft model. The future application of interest for this basic research endeavor is the laser launch of nano- and micro-satellites (i.e., 1-100 kg payloads) into Low Earth Orbit (LEO), at low-cost and "on-demand". This research began with an international collaboration on Beamed Energy Propulsion between the United States Air Force and Brazilian Air Force to conduct experiments at the Henry T. Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics (HTN-LAH). The laser propulsion (LP) experiments employed the T3 Hypersonic Shock Tunnel (HST), integrated with twin gigawatt pulsed Lumonics 620-TEA CO2 lasers to produce the required test conditions. Following an introduction of the pulsed laser thermal propulsion concept and a state-of-the-art review of the topic, the principal physical processes are outlined starting from the onset of the laser pulse and subsequent laser-induced air-breakdown, to the expansion and exhaust of the resulting blast wave. After installation of the 254 mm wide, 2D Lightcraft model into the T3 tunnel, static LP tests were performed under quiescent (no-flow) conditions at ambient pressures of 0.06, 0.15, 0.3 and 1 bar, using the T3 test-section/dump-tank as a vacuum chamber. Time-dependent surface pressure distributions were measured over the engine thrust-generating surfaces following laser energy deposition; the delivered impulse and momentum coupling coefficients (Cm) were calculated from that pressure data. A Schlieren visualization system (using a high-speed Cordin digital camera) captured the laser breakdown and blast wave expansion process. The 2D model's Cm performance of 600 to 3000 N/MW was 2.5-5x higher than theoretical projections available in the literature, but indeed in the realm of feasibility for static conditions. Also, these Cm values exceed that for smaller Lightcraft models

  15. Relativistic Electron Acceleration by Surface Plasma Waves in the High Intensity Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Aurand, Bastian; Prasad, Rajendra; Andreev, Alexander; Willi, Oswald

    2017-10-01

    High field plasmonics is one of the new research fields which has synergetically benefited from the advances in laser technology. The availability of radiation fields of intensities exceeding 1018 W/cm2 brought plasmonics into a new regime where relativistic and nonlinear effects start to dominate the dynamics of the surface plasma waves (SPWs). Moreover, surface plasma waves are a very efficient route to transfer the laser energy to the secondary sources including laser driven particle and radiation beams and to control and optimize the physical properties of these sources. We present here experimental evidence of a novel regime of the SPWs excitation by ultra-high intensity laser field (I>1020 W/cm2) on grating targets and its effect on high energy surface electron acceleration. The peak of the electron emission was detected at a laser incidence angle of 45°. The results indicate new conditions for resonant excitation of SPWs since in the limit of the linear regime (moderate intensities of 1019 W/cm2 and step preplasma profile), the resonance angle is predicted at 30°. 2D PIC simulations and a novel analytical model confirm the experimental data and reveal that, at laser intensities above 1020W/cm2, nonlinearities induced by the preplasma condition and relativistic effects change the SPWs resonance.

  16. Proton probing of ultra-thin foil dynamics in high intensity regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Aktan, Esin; Aurand, Bastian; Cerchez, Mirela; Willi, Oswald

    2017-10-01

    The field of laser driven ion acceleration has been enriched significantly over the past decade, thanks to the advanced laser technologies. Already, from 100s TW class systems, laser driven sources of particles and radiations are being considered in number of potential applications in science and medicine due to their unique properties. New physical effects unearthed at these systems may help understand and conduct successful experiments at several PW class multi-beam facilities with high rep rate systems, e.g. ELI. Here we present the first experimental results on ultra-thin foil dynamics irradiated by an ultra-high intensity (1020 W/cm2) , ultra-high contrast (10-12) laser pulse at ARCTURUS laser facility at HHU Duesseldorf. By employing the elegant proton probing technique it is observed that for the circular polarization of laser light, a 100nm thin target is pushed forward as a compressed layer due to the radiation pressure of light. Whereas, the linear polarization seems to decompress the target drastically. 2D particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the experimental findings. Our results confirm the previous simulation studies investigating the fundamental role played by light polarization, finite focus spot size effect and eventually electron heating including the oblique incidence at the target edges.

  17. Laser generated ultrasound sources using polymer nanocomposites for high frequency metrology

    KAUST Repository

    Rajagopal, Srinath

    2017-11-22

    Accurate characterization of ultrasound fields generated by diagnostic and therapeutic transducers is critical for patient safety. This requires hydrophones calibrated to a traceable standard and currently the upper calibration frequency range available to the user community is limited to a frequency of 40 MHz. However, the increasing use of high frequencies for both imaging and therapy necessitates calibrations to frequencies well beyond this range. For this to be possible, a source of high amplitude, broadband, quasi-planar and stable ultrasound fields is required. This is difficult to achieve using conventional piezoelectric sources, but laser generated ultrasound is a promising technique in this regard. In this study, various polymer-carbon nanotube nanocomposites (PNC) were fabricated and tested for their suitability for such an application by varying the polymer type, carbon nanotubes weight content in the polymer, and PNC thickness. A broadband hydrophone was used to measure the peak pressure and bandwidth of the laser generated ultrasound pulse. Peak-positive pressures of up to 8 MPa and −6dB bandwidths of up to 40 MHz were recorded. There is a nonlinear dependence of the peak pressure on the laser fluence and the bandwidth scales inversely proportionally to the peak pressure. The high-pressure plane waves generated from this preliminary investigation has demonstrated that laser generated ultrasound sources are a promising technique for high frequency calibration of hydrophones.

  18. Ablation of steel under surface irradiation by high-intensity tandem pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononenko, V. V.; Konov, V. I.

    2018-01-01

    Specific features of interaction of high-intensity (1015 W cm-2) femtosecond laser pulses with ablated vapour are experimentally studied under a tandem (double pulse) regime of irradiation with a short (Δt = 1–11 ns) delay between the pulses. Using interference and shadow photography at a time scale of below 10 ns, data on dynamics of vapour expansion are obtained and the electron density in vapour is estimated. Reasons for observed strong screening of the radiation of the second pulse in a tandem are discussed.

  19. Soft x-ray generation in gases with an ultrashort pulse laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditmire, Todd Raymond [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1996-01-08

    An experimental investigation of soft x-ray production resulting from the interaction of intense near infra-red laser radiation with gases is presented in this thesis. Specifically, soft x-ray generation through high order harmonic generation or exploiting intense inverse bremsstrahlung heating is examined. Most of these studies are conducted with femtosecond, terawatt class Cr:LiSrAlF6 (LiSAF) laser, though results derived from studies with other laser systems are presented as well. The majority of this work is devoted to experimental investigations, however, theoretical and computational models are developed to interpret the data. These studies are motivated by the possibility of utilizing the physics of intense laser/matter interactions as a potential compact source of bright x-rays. Consequently, the thrust of many of the experiments conducted is aimed at characterizing the x-rays produced for possible use in applications. In general, the studies of this manuscript fall into three categories. First, a unique 130 fs, 8 TW laser that is based on chirped pulse amplification, is described, and its performance is evaluated. The generation of x-rays through high order harmonics is then discussed with emphasis on characterizing and optimizing harmonic generation. Finally, the generation of strong, incoherent x-ray radiation by the intense irradiation of large (>1,000 atom) clusters in gas jets, is explored. The physics of laser energy absorption by clusters illuminated with intensities of 1015 to 1017 W/cm2 is considered in detail. X-ray spectroscopy of the hot plasmas that result from the irradiation of the clusters is conducted, and energy transport and kinetics issues in these plasmas are discussed.

  20. Attosecond light pulses generation along the target surface driven by obliquely-incident lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. X.; Qiao, B.; Xu, X. R.; Chang, H. X.; Zhang, H.; Lu, H. Y.; Yu, M. Y.; Zhou, C. T.; Zhu, S. P.; He, X. T.

    2017-12-01

    A practical approach to achieve strong coherent synchrotron emissions (CSE) in relativistic laser-plasma interaction is proposed, where a plane target with its electron density satisfying the self-similar parameter S ≃ n e 0 / a 0 n c = 1 is obliquely irradiated by a P-polarized laser pulse. In this case, electrons at the target surface are periodically dragged out into the vacuum by the laser field component perpendicular to the target surface, resulting in the formation of a series of dense electron bunches propagating along the target surface. Intense CSE is generated by these electron bunches under acceleration by the laser field component parallel to the target surface. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that an intense attosecond light pulse at intensity 9.1 × 1020 W/cm2 (electric field strength ˜41% as that of the drive laser) can be obtained through such CSE. In the high-order harmonics with 15 ω 0 < ω n < 500 ω 0 (ω0 is the laser frequency), the power spectrum of the emission scales as I ( n ) ˜ n - 1.8 and the conversion efficiency from laser to emission reaches ˜10-2.

  1. Generation of nanoclusters by ultrafast laser ablation of Al: Molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Phillips, Mark C.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Dressman, Phillip; Miloshevsky, Gennady

    2017-11-01

    The laser ablation of materials induced by an ultrashort femtosecond pulse is a complex phenomenon, which depends on both the material properties and the properties of the laser pulse. A combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and momentum scaling model (MSM) methods is applied to a large atomic system to study the process of ultrafast laser-material interactions, behavior of matter in a highly nonequilibrium state, material disintegration, and formation of nanoclusters (NCs). Laser pulses with several fluences in the range from 500 J / m2 to 5000 J / m2 interacting with a large system of aluminum atoms are simulated. The response of Al to laser energy deposition is investigated within the finite-size laser spot. It is found that the shape of the plasma plume is dynamically changing during expansion. At several tens of picoseconds it can be characterized as a long hollow ellipsoid surrounded by Al atoms and NCs. The time evolution of NCs in the plume is investigated. The collisions between single Al atoms and generated NCs and fragmentation of large NCs determine the fractions of different-size NCs in the plume. The MD-MSM simulations show that laser fluence greatly affects the size distribution of NCs, their polar angles, and magnitude and direction vectors of NC velocities. These results and predictions are consistent, in many aspects, with the experimental data and previous MD simulations.

  2. RESPONSE OF DOSEMETERS IN FIELDS GENERATED BY LASER-ACCELERATED PROTONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olšovcová, V; Versaci, R; Ambrožová, I; Zelenka, Z; Kaufman, J; Margarone, D; Kim, I J; Jeong, T M

    2016-09-01

    In laser-driven acceleration, ultra-short and intense laser pulses are focussed on targets to generate beams of ionising radiation. One of the most important issues to be addressed is personal monitoring. While traditional dosemeters were designed primarily for measurements in continuous fields, dosemeters for laser laboratories must be capable of working in pulsed fields of pulse length below 1 ps, in a single-shot regime up to the repetition rate of 1 kHz. Responses of conventional dosemeters (films, polyallyldiglycol carbonate, electronic personal dosemeter) to proton bunches of up to 30 MeV energy produced by South Korean PW laser system at the Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology were studied, both by means of Monte Carlo simulations and experimentally. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Terahertz generation from laser-driven ultrafast current propagation along a wire target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, H. B.; Zhang, S. J.; Li, X. H.; Zhou, H. Y.; Li, X. Z.; Zou, D. B.; Yu, M. Y.; Wu, H. C.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhou, C. T.

    2017-01-01

    Generation of intense coherent THz radiation by obliquely incidenting an intense laser pulse on a wire target is studied using particle-in-cell simulation. The laser-accelerated fast electrons are confined and guided along the surface of the wire, which then acts like a current-carrying line antenna and under appropriate conditions can emit electromagnetic radiation in the THz regime. For a driving laser intensity ˜3 ×1018W /cm2 and pulse duration ˜10 fs, a transient current above 10 KA is produced on the wire surface. The emission-cone angle of the resulting ˜0.15 mJ (˜58 GV/m peak electric field) THz radiation is ˜30∘ . The conversion efficiency of laser-to-THz energy is ˜0.75 % . A simple analytical model that well reproduces the simulated result is presented.

  4. High fluence laser irradiation induces reactive oxygen species generation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Xing, Da; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2006-09-01

    Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) has been used for therapies such as curing spinal cord injury, healing wound et al. Yet, the mechanism of LPLI remains unclear. Our previous study showed that low fluences laser irradiation induces human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) proliferation, but high fluences induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation. In order to study the mechanism of apoptosis induced by high fluences LPLI further, we have measured the dynamics of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) using H IIDCFDA fluorescence probes during this process. ASTC-a-1 cells apoptosis was induced by He-Ne laser irradiation at high fluence of 120J/cm2. A confocal laser scanning microscope was used to perform fluorescence imaging. The results demonstrated that high fluence LPLI induced the increase of mitochondria ROS. Our studies contribute to clarify the biological mechanism of high fluence LPLI-induced cell apoptosis.

  5. High Intensity Pressure Noise Transmission in Human Ear: A Three Dimensional Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawa, Takumi; Gan, Rong; Leckness, Kegan

    2015-03-01

    High intensity pressure noise generated by explosions and jet engines causes auditory damage and hearing loss of the military service personals, which are the most common disabilities in the veterans. Authors have investigated the high intensity pressure noise transmission from the ear canal to middle ear cavity. A fluid-structure interaction with a viscoelastic model for the tympanic membrane (TM) as well as the ossicular chain has been considered in the study. For the high intensity pressure simulation the geometry of the ear was based on a 3D finite element (FE) model of the human ear reported by Gan et al. (Ann Biomed Eng 2004). The model consists of the ear canal, TM, ossicular chain, and the middle ear cavity. The numerical approach includes two steps: 1) FE based finite-volume method simulation to compute pressure distributions in the ear canal and the middle ear cavity using CFX; and 2) FE modeling of TM and middle ear ossicles in response to high intensity sound using multi-physics analysis in ANSYS. The simulations provide the displacement of the TM/ossicular chain and the pressure fields in the ear canal and the middle ear cavity. These results are compared with human temporal bone experimental data obtained in our group. This work was supported by DOD W81XWH-14-1-0228.

  6. Time-Frequency Analysis of Boundary-Layer Instabilites Generated by Freestream Laser Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Amanda; Schneider, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    A controlled disturbance is generated in the freestream of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT) by focusing a high-powered Nd:YAG laser to create a laser-induced breakdown plasma. The plasma then cools, creating a freestream thermal disturbance that can be used to study receptivity. The freestream disturbance convects down-stream in the Mach-6 wind tunnel to interact with a flared cone model. The adverse pressure gradient created by the flare of the model is capable of generating second-mode instability waves that grow large and become nonlinear before experiencing natural transition in quiet flow. The freestream laser perturbation generates a wave packet in the boundary layer at the same frequency as the natural second mode, complicating time-independent analyses of the effect of the laser perturbation. The data show that the laser perturbation creates an instability wave packet that is larger than the natural waves on the sharp flared cone. The wave packet is still difficult to distinguish from the natural instabilities on the blunt flared cone.

  7. A predictive thermal dynamic model for parameter generation in the laser assisted direct write process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Shuo; Fearon, Eamonn; Wellburn, Dan; Sato, Taku; Edwardson, Stuart; Dearden, G.; Watkins, K. G.

    2011-11-01

    The laser assisted direct write (LADW) method can be used to generate electrical circuitry on a substrate by depositing metallic ink and curing the ink thermally by a laser. Laser curing has emerged over recent years as a novel yet efficient alternative to oven curing. This method can be used in situ, over complicated 3D contours of large parts (e.g. aircraft wings) and selectively cure over heat sensitive substrates, with little or no thermal damage. In previous studies, empirical methods have been used to generate processing windows for this technique, relating to the several interdependent processing parameters on which the curing quality and efficiency strongly depend. Incorrect parameters can result in a track that is cured in some areas and uncured in others, or in damaged substrates. This paper addresses the strong need for a quantitative model which can systematically output the processing conditions for a given combination of ink, substrate and laser source; transforming the LADW technique from a purely empirical approach, to a simple, repeatable, mathematically sound, efficient and predictable process. The method comprises a novel and generic finite element model (FEM) that for the first time predicts the evolution of the thermal profile of the ink track during laser curing and thus generates a parametric map which indicates the most suitable combination of parameters for process optimization. Experimental data are compared with simulation results to verify the accuracy of the model.

  8. Laser-induced generation of singlet oxygen and its role in the cerebrovascular physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Sokolovski, S. G.; Goltsov, A.; Gekaluyk, A. S.; Saranceva, E. I.; Bragina, O. A.; Tuchin, V. V.; Rafailov, E. U.

    2017-09-01

    For over 55 years, laser technology has expanded from laboratory research to widespread fields, for example telecommunication and data storage amongst others. Recently application of lasers in biology and medicine presents itself as one of the emerging areas. In this review, we will outline the recent advances in using lasers for the generation of singlet oxygen, traditionally used to kill tumour cells or induce thrombotic stroke model due to damage vascular effects. Over the last two decade, completely new results on cerebrovascular effects of singlet oxygen generated during photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been shown alongside promising applications for delivery of drugs and nanoparticles into the brain for therapy of brain cancer. Furthermore, a ;gold key; has been found to overcome the limitations of PDT, such as low light penetration and high toxicity of photosensitizers, by direct generation of singlet oxygen using quantum-dot laser diodes emitting in the near infrared (NIR) spectral range. It is our motivation to highlight these pioneering results in this review, to improve understanding of the biological role of singlet oxygen and to provide new perspectives for improving clinical application of laser based therapy in further research.

  9. Annotated bibliography on high-intensity linear accelerators. [240 citations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.; Roybal, E.U.

    1978-01-01

    A technical bibliography covering subjects important to the design of high-intensity beam transport systems and linear accelerators is presented. Space charge and emittance growth are stressed. Subject and author concordances provide cross-reference to detailed citations, which include an abstract and notes on the material. The bibliography resides in a computer database that can be searched for key words and phrases.

  10. Reuse Recycler: High Intensity Proton Stacking at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, P. [Fermilab

    2016-07-17

    After a successful career as an antiproton storage and cooling ring, Recycler has been converted to a high intensity proton stacker for the Main Injector. We discuss the commissioning and operation of the Recycler in this new role, and the progress towards the 700 kW design goal.

  11. High-Intensity Interval Training for Improving Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Jonathan P.; Francois, Monique E.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has garnered attention in recent years as a time-efficient exercise option for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. New research demonstrates that HIIT may be particularly effective for improving postprandial hyperglycemia in individuals with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). These findings…

  12. Clinical applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, W H; Cheung, T T; Jenkins, C R; Irwin, M G

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound has been developed for therapeutic use in addition to its diagnostic ability. The use of focused ultrasound energy can offer a non-invasive method for tissue ablation, and can therefore be used to treat various solid tumours. High-intensity focused ultrasound is being increasingly used in the treatment of both primary and metastatic tumours as these can be precisely located for ablation. It has been shown to be particularly useful in the treatment of uterine fibroids, and various solid tumours including those of the pancreas and liver. High-intensity focused ultrasound is a valid treatment option for liver tumours in patients with significant medical co-morbidity who are at high risk for surgery or who have relatively poor liver function that may preclude hepatectomy. It has also been used as a form of bridging therapy while patients awaiting cadaveric donor liver transplantation. In this article, we outline the principles of high-intensity focused ultrasound and its clinical applications, including the management protocol development in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in Hong Kong by performing a search on MEDLINE (OVID), EMBASE, and PubMed. The search of these databases ranged from the date of their establishment until December 2015. The search terms used were: high-intensity focused ultrasound, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, liver tumour, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreas, renal cell carcinoma, prostate cancer, breast cancer, fibroids, bone tumour, atrial fibrillation, glaucoma, Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and neuropathic pain.

  13. Influence of high intensity ultrasound with different probe diameter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main goal of this research is to analyze the influence of ultrasonic probe diameters (7 and 10 mm) of high-intensity ultrasound with constant frequency (30 kHz) on the degree of homogenization (variance) of cow milk. Influence of different probe diameters on the physical properties of cow milk was also tested. Changes ...

  14. Pedalling rate affects endurance performance during high-intensity cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Steen; Hansen, Ernst Albin; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study into high-intensity cycling was to: (1) test the hypothesis that endurance time is longest at a freely chosen pedalling rate (FCPR), compared to pedalling rates 25% lower (FCPR-25) and higher (FCPR+25) than FCPR, and (2) investigate how physiological variables, such as m...

  15. High-intensity acoustics for military nonlethal applications: a lack of useful systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauchem, James R; Cook, Michael C

    2007-02-01

    There have been many previous claims of nonlethal acoustic weapon effects, mostly in the popular rather than the scientific literature. Anecdotal reports of extraordinary effects can make meaningful assessment and review of this area very difficult. Acoustics research has shown that the nonlethal weapon capabilities of audible sound generators have been grossly overstated. Although high-intensity infrasound significantly disrupted animal behavior in some experiments, the generation of such energy in a volume large enough to be of practical use is unlikely because of basic physical principles. On the basis of experimentation completed to date at a number of institutions, it seems unlikely that high-intensity acoustic energy in the audible, infrasonic, or low-frequency range can provide a device suitable for use as a nonlethal weapon.

  16. Generation of a dynamic polarized laser beam for applications in laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräf, Stephan; Staupendahl, Gisbert; Seiser, Carlo; Meyer, Bernd-Jürgen; Müller, Frank A.

    2010-02-01

    The temporal control and optimization of laser beam parameters, e.g., the beam power, can be employed to enhance the quality and reliability of the welding process. Until now, the influence of a time-dependent beam polarization has been less investigated in welding. The publication describes a new experimental arrangement allowing the fast variation of the polarization of CO2 laser radiation ["dynamic polarization" (DP)]. The key element of the setup is a high power interference laser beam modulator for cw laser power rating of up to 4 kW. Weld seams were produced with different process parameters in the technically relevant steels St37 and Ck45 and in the precoated steel 22MnB5 (USIBOR 1500P). The welds were subsequently characterized by roughness measurements of the top bead surfaces and by the preparation of cross sections and their macroscopic analysis. The experiments on welding with DP showed a significant influence on the keyhole and melt pool dynamics, especially a reduction in the top bead roughness at certain DP frequencies up to a factor of about 3. In addition, a threshold behavior for this effect was observed. It was shown that the cross sectional shape and thus the degree of energy coupling to the material was unaffected by the DP. Finally, during welding USIBOR 1500P with DP an enhanced melt pool stirring was achieved. The results show that the temporal modulation of energy coupling to the material caused by DP is suitable to enhance the quality and reliability of the welding process.

  17. High gain harmonic generation free electron lasers enhanced by pseudoenergy bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tanaka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new scheme for high gain harmonic generation free electron lasers (HGHG FELs, which is seeded by a pair of intersecting laser beams to interact with an electron beam in a modulator undulator located in a dispersive section. The interference of the laser beams gives rise to a two-dimensional modulation in the energy-time phase space because of a strong correlation between the electron energy and the position in the direction of dispersion. This eventually forms pseudoenergy bands in the electron beam, which result in efficient harmonic generation in HGHG FELs in a similar manner to the well-known scheme using the echo effects. The advantage of the proposed scheme is that the beam quality is less deteriorated than in other existing schemes.

  18. Generation of 25-TW Femtosecond Laser Pulses at 515 nm with Extremely High Temporal Contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Hornung

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on the frequency doubling of femtosecond laser pulses at 1030 nm center wavelength generated from the fully diode-pumped laser system POLARIS. The newly generated pulses at a center wavelength of 515 nm have a pulse energy of 3 J with a pulse duration of 120 fs. On the basis of initially ultra-high contrast seed pulses we expect a temporal intensity contrast better 10 17 200 ps before the peak of the main pulse. We analyzed the temporal intensity contrast from milliseconds to femtoseconds with a dynamic range covering more than 20 orders of magnitude. The pulses were focussed with a f/2-focussing parabola resulting in a peak intensity exceeding 10 20 W / cm 2 . The peak power and intensity are to the best of our knowledge the highest values for 515 nm-laser-pulses achieved so far.

  19. High quality electron bunch generation with CO2-laser plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, L G; Xu, J C; Ji, L L; Zhang, X M; Wang, W P; Zhao, X Y; Yi, L Q; Yu, Y H; Shi, Y; Xu, T J; Xu, Z Z

    2014-01-01

    CO2 laser-driven electron acceleration is demonstrated with particle-in-cell simulation in low-density plasma. An intense CO2 laser pulse with long wavelength excites wakefield. The bubble behind it has a broad space to sustain a large amount of electrons before reaching its charge saturation limit. A transversely propagating inject pulse is used to induce and control the ambient electron injection. The accelerated electron bunch with total charge up to 10 nC and the average charge per energy interval of more than 0.6 nC/MeV are obtained. Plasma-based electron acceleration driven by intense CO2 laser provides a new potential way to generate high-charge electron bunch with low energy spread, which has broad applications, especially for X-ray generation by table-top FEL and bremsstrahlung.

  20. A Simplified Approach for Predicting Pulsed-Laser-Induced Carrier Generation in Semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Joel M.; Khachatrian, Ani; Buchner, Stephen; Roche, Nicolas J.-H.; Warner, Jeffrey; McMorrow, Dale

    2017-03-01

    Simplified analytic expressions are presented for calculating pulsed-laser induced charge generation in devices with collection volumes of any size. The expressions for charge generation by single-photon absorption for various limiting cases are applied to charge-collection measurements for a bulk Si photodiode, and single-event upsets in a 90-nm CMOS, silicon on insulator (SOI), static random-access memory (SRAM). Strong quantitative agreement between the simplified expressions, the full numerical calculations, and the experimental data serves to validate the analytical expressions. Furthermore, despite the complexity of determining charge deposited via two-photon absorption, the analytic expressions exhibit excellent agreement with full charge-generation simulations utilizing nonlinear-optical beam propagation software. These expressions therefore, represent a convenient and accurate method for estimating pulsed-laser induced charge generation in specified volumes, and are particularly relevant for two-photon absorption, which previously has required the use of complex numerical approaches.

  1. Specular Reflectivity and Hot-Electron Generation in High-Contrast Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, Gregory Elijah [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-intense laser (> 1018 W/cm2) interactions with matter are capable of producing relativistic electrons which have a variety of applications in state-of-the-art scientific and medical research conducted at universities and national laboratories across the world. Control of various aspects of these hot-electron distributions is highly desired to optimize a particular outcome. Hot-electron generation in low-contrast interactions, where significant amounts of under-dense pre-plasma are present, can be plagued by highly non-linear relativistic laser-plasma instabilities and quasi-static magnetic field generation, often resulting in less than desirable and predictable electron source characteristics. High-contrast interactions offer more controlled interactions but often at the cost of overall lower coupling and increased sensitivity to initial target conditions. An experiment studying the differences in hot-electron generation between high and low-contrast pulse interactions with solid density targets was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA. To date, these hot-electrons generated in the laboratory are not directly observable at the source of the interaction. Instead, indirect studies are performed using state-of-the-art simulations, constrained by the various experimental measurements. These measurements, more-often-than-not, rely on secondary processes generated by the transport of these electrons through the solid density materials which can susceptible to a variety instabilities and target material/geometry effects. Although often neglected in these types of studies, the specularly reflected light can provide invaluable insight as it is directly influenced by the interaction. In this thesis, I address the use of (personally obtained) experimental specular reflectivity measurements to indirectly study hot-electron generation in the context of high-contrast, relativistic

  2. 1.5 W green light generation by single-pass second harmonic generation of a single-frequency tapered diode laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.; Sumpf, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    More than 1.5 W of green light at 531 nm is generated by singlepass second harmonic generation in periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3. The pump laser is a high power tapered laser with a distributed Bragg reflector etched in the ridge section of the laser to provide wavelength selectivity. The output...... power of the single-frequency tapered laser is 9.3 W in continuous wave operation. A conversion efficiency of 18.5 % was achieved in the experiments....

  3. Gain-switched all-fiber lasers and quasi-continuous wave supercontinuum generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper

    are reviewed to understand the mechanisms involved in gain-switching. A detailed numerical model is provided to give deep insight into the different stages of pulse generation. A simplied model is also developed to derive an analytic expression for the pulse duration. Extensive experiments with gain....... The physics of SC generation are reviewed with focus on the quasicontinuous wave pumping regime. Experiments with a gain-switched ber laser as a pump for SC generation in photonic crystal fibers are carried out. Requirements for effcient SC generation are analyzed. Finally, an optimization of photonic crystal...

  4. SPES: A new cyclotron-based facility for research and applications with high-intensity beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, M.; Campo, D.; Antonini, P.; Lombardi, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Esposito, J.; Silvestrin, L.

    2017-06-01

    In 2016, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy) started the commissioning of a new accelerator facility based on a high-power cyclotron able to deliver proton beams up to 70 MeV of energy and 700 μA current. Such a machine is the core of the Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) project whose main goal is to provide exotics beam for nuclear and astrophysics research and to deliver high-intensity proton beams for medical applications and neutrons generator.

  5. High-Intensity Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Field effects on Early Physiological Development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Wisuwat Songnuan; Phumin Kirawanich

    2011-01-01

    The influences of pulsed electric fields on early physiological development in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. Inside a 4-mm electroporation cuvette, pre-germination seeds were subjected to high-intensity, nanosecond electrical pulses generated using laboratory-assembled pulsed electric field system. The field strength was varied from 5 to 20 kV.cm-1 and the pulse width and the pulse number were maintained at 10 ns and 100, respectively, corresponding to the specific t...

  6. Harmonic generation by atomic and nanoparticle precursors in a ZnS laser ablation plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oujja, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Nalda, R. de; Castillejo, M., E-mail: marta.castillejo@iqfr.csic.es

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Plume species in infrared ns laser ablation of ZnS studied by low-order harmonic generation. • Different spatiotemporal properties of harmonics from atoms and nanoparticles. • Results compared with calculations of optical frequency up-conversion in perturbative regime. - Abstract: Harmonic generation of a driving laser propagating across a laser ablation plasma serves for the diagnosis of multicomponent plumes. Here we study the contribution of atomic and nanoparticle precursors to the generation of coherent ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet light as low-order harmonics of the fundamental emission (1064 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in a nanosecond infrared ZnS laser ablation plasma. Odd harmonics from the 3rd up to the 9th order (118.2 nm) have been observed with distinct temporal and spatial characteristics which were determined by varying the delay between the ablation and driving nanosecond pulses and by spatially scanning the plasma with the focused driving beam propagating parallel to the target. At short distances from the target surface (≤1 mm), the harmonic intensity displays two temporal components peaked at around 250 ns and 10 μs. While the early component dies off quickly with increasing harmonic order and vanishes for the 9th order, the late component is notably intense for the 7th harmonic and is still clearly visible for the 9th. Spectral analysis of spontaneous plume emissions help to assign the origin of the two components. While the early plasma component is mainly constituted by neutral Zn atoms, the late component is mostly due to nanoparticles, which upon interaction with the driving laser are subject to breakup and ionization. With the aid of calculations of the phase matching integrals within the perturbative model of optical harmonic generation, these results illustrate how atom and nanoparticle populations, with differing temporal and spatial distributions within the ablation plasma, contribute to the nonlinear

  7. Automatic verification of SSD and generation of respiratory signal with lasers in radiotherapy: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Ramachandran

    2012-01-01

    Source to surface distance (SSD) plays a very important role in external beam radiotherapy treatment verification. In this study, a simple technique has been developed to verify the SSD automatically with lasers. The study also suggests a methodology for determining the respiratory signal with lasers. Two lasers, red and green are mounted on the collimator head of a Clinac 2300 C/D linac along with a camera to determine the SSD. A software (SSDLas) was developed to estimate the SSD automatically from the images captured by a 12-megapixel camera. To determine the SSD to a patient surface, the external body contour of the central axis transverse computed tomography (CT) cut is imported into the software. Another important aspect in radiotherapy is the generation of respiratory signal. The changes in the lasers separation as the patient breathes are converted to produce a respiratory signal. Multiple frames of laser images were acquired from the camera mounted on the collimator head and each frame was analyzed with SSDLas to generate the respiratory signal. The SSD as observed with the ODI on the machine and SSD measured by the SSDlas software was found to be within the tolerance limit. The methodology described for generating the respiratory signals will be useful for the treatment of mobile tumors such as lung, liver, breast, pancreas etc. The technique described for determining the SSD and the generation of respiratory signals using lasers is cost effective and simple to implement. Copyright © 2011 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Frequency-doubled DBR-tapered diode laser for direct pumping of Ti:sapphire lasers generating sub-20 fs pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Unterhuber, Angelika

    2011-01-01

    For the first time a single-pass frequency doubled DBR-tapered diode laser suitable for pumping Ti:sapphire lasers generating ultrashort pulses is demonstrated. The maximum output powers achieved when pumping the Ti:sapphire laser are 110 mW (CW) and 82 mW (mode-locked) respectively at 1.2 W of p....... The optical spectrum emitted by the Ti:sapphire laser when pumped with our diode laser shows a spectral width of 112 nm (FWHM). Based on autocorrelation measurements, pulse widths of less than 20 fs can therefore be expected.......For the first time a single-pass frequency doubled DBR-tapered diode laser suitable for pumping Ti:sapphire lasers generating ultrashort pulses is demonstrated. The maximum output powers achieved when pumping the Ti:sapphire laser are 110 mW (CW) and 82 mW (mode-locked) respectively at 1.2 W...... of pump power. This corresponds to a reduction in optical conversion efficiencies to 75% of the values achieved with a commercial diode pumped solid-state laser. However, the superior electro-optical efficiency of the diode laser improves the overall efficiency of the Ti:sapphire laser by a factor > 2...

  9. Gravitational wave generation by interaction of high power lasers with matter. Part I: Shock wave model

    CERN Document Server

    Kadlecová, Hedvika; Weber, Stefan; Korn, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We analyze theoretical models of gravitational wave generation in the interaction of high power lasers with matter in linear approximation of gravitational theory. We derive the analytical formulas and estimates for the metric perturbations and the radiated power of the generated gravitational waves. Furthermore we investigate the characteristics of polarization and the behavior of test particles in the presence of gravitational wave which will be important for the detection.

  10. Second harmonic generation of spectrally broadened femtosecond ytterbium laser radiation in a gas-filled capillary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didenko, N V; Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V; Kostryukov, P V; Losev, Leonid L; Tenyakov, S Yu

    2011-09-30

    A 300-fs radiation pulse of an ytterbium laser with a wavelength of 1030 nm and energy of 150 {mu}J were converted to a 15-fs pulse with a wavelength of 515 nm by broadening the emission spectrum in a capillary filled with xenon and by generating the second harmonic in a KDP crystal. The energy efficiency of the conversion was 30 %.

  11. TUMOR-GROWTH DELAY BY LASER-GENERATED SHOCK-WAVES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Reijke, T. M.; Schamhart, D. H.; Kurth, K. H.; Löwik, C. W.; Donkers, L. H.; Sterenborg, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    The antiproliferative effect of laser-generated shock waves (L-SW) was investigated on a human renal cell carcinoma, RC-8, grown subcutaneously in the nu/nu mouse. The RC-8 is characterized by the syndrome of humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM) associated with profound cachexia, increase of

  12. Hologravure as a computer-generated and laser engraved scratch hologram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augier, Ángel G.; Sánchez, Raúl B.

    2011-01-01

    We presented "hologravure" as the generalization of a scratch hologram, generated by computer from a three-dimensional (3D) model by using an appropriate software, and laser-drawing with a conventional engraver-laser system. For making this type of computer-generated hologram, neither diffractive optics, nor mask pattern or photo-reduction of a transparency onto a high resolution film plate is needed. The shape of a 3D virtual object is encoded in a two-dimensional (2D) multiple circular-scratch drawing. A computer program was created for generating the holograms. Hologravures representing several 3D models are engraved on different materials, and the quality of the lines traced by the CO 2 laser is considered. Sheets of acrylic, polycarbonate, glass and thermo-resistant pieces of acetate were tested. Reconstructed images of all this computer-generated and laser engraved holograms and also of computer assisted and hand-drawn scratch holograms, synthesized by means of the same software are shown.

  13. International, private-public, multi-mission, next-generation Lunar/Martian laser retroreflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellagnello, S.

    2017-09-01

    We describe an international, private-public, multi-mission effort to deploy on the Moon next-generation lunar laser retroreflectors to extend (also to the far side) the existing passive Lunar Geophysical Network (LNG) consisting of the three Apollo and the two Lunokhod payloads. We also describe important applications and extension of this program to Mars Geophysical Network (MGN).

  14. Generation of a passively Q-switched mode-locked pulse from a laser diode pumped Nd:YAG laser

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, T M; Kim, C J; Nam, C H

    1999-01-01

    A passively Q-switched, mode-locked pulse was generated from a laser diode pumped Nd:YAG laser. The passive Q-switching was performed by using a Cr sup 4 sup + :YAG saturable absorber. The mode-locked pulse inside the Q-switched pulse was obtained by using a nonlinear mirror mode-locking without any tight focusing geometry. With a Cr sup 4 sup + :YAG saturable absorber and a nonlinear mirror mode locking method, a mode-locked pulse with a pulse width of less than 600 ps and a repetition rate of 714 MHz was obtained inside a Q-switched pulse envelope with a temporal duration of 80 ns and a repetition rate of about 2 kHz.

  15. Generating Periodic Terahertz Structures in a Relativistic Electron Beam through Frequency Down-Conversion of Optical Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, Michael

    2012-07-19

    We report generation of density modulation at terahertz (THz) frequencies in a relativistic electron beam through laser modulation of the beam longitudinal phase space. We show that by modulating the energy distribution of the beam with two lasers, density modulation at the difference frequency of the two lasers can be generated after the beam passes through a chicane. In this experiment, density modulation around 10 THz was generated by down-converting the frequencies of an 800 nm laser and a 1550 nm laser. The central frequency of the density modulation can be tuned by varying the laser wavelengths, beam energy chirp, or momentum compaction of the chicane. This technique can be applied to accelerator-based light sources for generation of coherent THz radiation and marks a significant advance toward tunable narrow-band THz sources.

  16. Third Harmonic Generation of a Short Pulse Laser in a Tunnel Ionizing Plasma: Effect of Self-Defocusing

    OpenAIRE

    Niti Kant

    2013-01-01

    Third harmonic generation of a Gaussian short pulse laser in a tunnel ionizing plasma is investigated. A Gaussian short pulse laser propagating through a tunnel ionizing plasma generates third harmonic wave. Inhomogeneity of the electric field along the wavefront of the fundamental laser pulse causes more ionization along the axis of propagation while less ionization off axis, leading to strong density gradient with its maximum on the axis of propagation. The medium acts like a diverging lens...

  17. Transverse Dynamics and Energy Tuning of Fast Electrons Generated in Sub-Relativistic Intensity Laser Pulse Interaction with Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, M.; Kando, M.; Daito, I.; Kotaki, H.; Hayashi, Y.; Yamazaki, A.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Koga, J.; Nakajima, K.; Daido, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kimura, T.

    2006-01-01

    The regimes of quasi-mono-energetic electron beam generation were experimentally studied in the sub-relativistic intensity laser plasma interaction. The observed electron acceleration regime is unfolded with two-dimensional-particle-in-cell simulations of laser-wakefield generation in the self-modulation regime.

  18. Transverse dynamics and energy tuning of fast electrons generated in sub-relativistic intensity laser pulse interaction with plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, M. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)]. E-mail: mori.michiaki@jaea.go.jp; Kando, M. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Daito, I. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kotaki, H. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Hayashi, Y. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Yamazaki, A. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Ogura, K. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Sagisaka, A. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Koga, J. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Nakajima, K. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Daido, H. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Bulanov, S.V.; Kimura, T. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2006-07-31

    The regimes of quasi-monoenergetic electron beam generation were experimentally studied in the sub-relativistic intensity laser plasma interaction. The observed electron acceleration regime is unfolded with two-dimensional-particle-in-cell simulations of laser-wakefield generation in the self-modulation regime.

  19. Ultrasonic characterization of delamination in aeronautical composites using noncontact laser generation and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guangkai; Zhou, Zhenggan; Chen, Xiucheng; Wang, Jie

    2013-09-10

    The characterization of delamination in composite plates with ultrasonic waves generated and detected by lasers is presented. Composite materials have become one of the most important structural materials in the aviation industry because of their excellent mechanical properties, such as high specific stiffness and antifatigue. This paper reports a new application of the laser ultrasonic technique to perform nondestructive detection of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) and continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CFCCs) containing artificial internal defects, based on propagation characteristic of ultrasonic waves generated by pulse laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm and pulse duration of 10 ns. A laser interferometer based on two-wave mixing is used to measure ultrasonic wave signals. The main advantage of this technique over conventional ultrasonic testing techniques is the ability to carry out detection without using coupling agents. The research results prove that the laser ultrasonic technique is effective for the detection of internal defects in both CFRP and CFCC composite components, which should promote and expand the application of the technique in the aviation industry.

  20. Space-charge effects in ultrahigh current electron bunches generated by laser-plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Grüner

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in laser-plasma accelerators, including the generation of GeV-scale electron bunches, enable applications such as driving a compact free-electron laser (FEL. Significant reduction in size of the FEL is facilitated by the expected ultrahigh peak beam currents (10–100 kA generated in laser-plasma accelerators. At low electron energies such peak currents are expected to cause space-charge effects such as bunch expansion and induced energy variations along the bunch, potentially hindering the FEL process. In this paper we discuss a self-consistent approach to modeling space-charge effects for the regime of laser-plasma-accelerated ultracompact electron bunches at low or moderate energies. Analytical treatments are considered as well as point-to-point particle simulations, including the beam transport from the laser-plasma accelerator through focusing devices and the undulator. In contradiction to non-self-consistent analyses (i.e., neglecting bunch evolution, which predict a linearly growing energy chirp, we have found the energy chirp reaches a maximum and decreases thereafter. The impact of the space-charge induced chirp on FEL performance is discussed and possible solutions are presented.

  1. Temporal characterization of ultrashort linearly chirped electron bunches generated from a laser wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new method for diagnosing the temporal characteristics of ultrashort electron bunches with linear energy chirp generated from a laser wakefield accelerator is described. When the ionization-injected bunch interacts with the back of the drive laser, it is deflected and stretched along the direction of the electric field of the laser. Upon exiting the plasma, if the bunch goes through a narrow slit in front of the dipole magnet that disperses the electrons in the plane of the laser polarization, it can form a series of bunchlets that have different energies but are separated by half a laser wavelength. Since only the electrons that are undeflected by the laser go through the slit, the energy spectrum of the bunch is modulated. By analyzing the modulated energy spectrum, the shots where the bunch has a linear energy chirp can be recognized. Consequently, the energy chirp and beam current profile of those bunches can be reconstructed. This method is demonstrated through particle-in-cell simulations and experiment.

  2. New generation high-power rare-earth-doped phosphate glass fiber and fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruikun; Myers, John D.; Myers, Michael J.

    2001-04-01

    High power, high brightness fiber lasers have numerous potential commercial and military applications. Fiber lasers with cladding pump designs represent a new generation of diode pumped configurations that are extremely efficient, have single mode output and may be operated with or without active cooling. Kigre has invented a new family of Er/Yb/Nd phosphate laser glass materials (designated QX) that promise to facilitate a quantum leap in fiber laser technology of this field. The new phosphate glass Rare-Earth doped fiber exhibit many advantages than Silica or Fluoride base fiber, see table.1. Instead of 30 to 50 meters of fused silica with a 50 mm bend radii; Kigre's phosphate glass fiber amplifiers may be designed to be less than 4 meters long .Laser performance and various design parameters, such as the fiber core diameter, NA, inner cladding shape and doping concentration are evaluated. Laser performances was demonstrated for an experimental QX/Er doubled clading fiber commissioned by MIT having 8 micron core, a 240 X 300 micron rectangle shaped inner cladding with 0.4 NA and 500 micron outer clading.. Kigre obtained approximately 2 dB/cm gain from 15cm long fiber under 940nm pumping The same fiber was evaluated by researcher at MIT. They used 975nm pump source. Maximum 270mW output was demonstrated by 30 cm long fiber with Fresnel reflection resonator mirrors. The slope efficiency of absorbed pump power s 47%.

  3. Generation of attosecond electron bunches in a laser-plasma accelerator using a plasma density upramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weikum, M.K., E-mail: maria.weikum@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Li, F.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Assmann, R.W. [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Sheng, Z.M. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Laser Plasmas and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jaroszynski, D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Attosecond electron bunches and attosecond radiation pulses enable the study of ultrafast dynamics of matter in an unprecedented regime. In this paper, the suitability for the experimental realization of a novel scheme producing sub-femtosecond duration electron bunches from laser-wakefield acceleration in plasma with self-injection in a plasma upramp profile has been investigated. While it has previously been predicted that this requires laser power above a few hundred terawatts typically, here we show that the scheme can be extended with reduced driving laser powers down to tens of terawatts, generating accelerated electron pulses with minimum length of around 166 attoseconds and picocoulombs charge. Using particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical models, the evolution of the accelerated electron bunch within the plasma as well as simple scalings of the bunch properties with initial laser and plasma parameters are presented. - Highlights: • LWFA with an upramp density profile can trap and accelerate sub-fs electron beams. • A reduction of the necessary threshold laser intensity by a factor 4 is presented. • Electron properties are tuned by varying initial laser and plasma parameters. • Simulations predict electron bunch lengths below 200 attoseconds with pC charge. • Strong bunch evolution effects and a large energy spread still need to be improved.

  4. Field-programmable gate array-controlled sweep velocity-locked laser pulse generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Hefferman, Gerald; Wei, Tao

    2017-05-01

    A field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-controlled sweep velocity-locked laser pulse generator (SV-LLPG) design based on an all-digital phase-locked loop (ADPLL) is proposed. A distributed feedback laser with modulated injection current was used as a swept-frequency laser source. An open-loop predistortion modulation waveform was calibrated using a feedback iteration method to initially improve frequency sweep linearity. An ADPLL control system was then implemented using an FPGA to lock the output of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer that was directly proportional to laser sweep velocity to an on-board system clock. Using this system, linearly chirped laser pulses with a sweep bandwidth of 111.16 GHz were demonstrated. Further testing evaluating the sensing utility of the system was conducted. In this test, the SV-LLPG served as the swept laser source of an optical frequency-domain reflectometry system used to interrogate a subterahertz range fiber structure (sub-THz-FS) array. A static strain test was then conducted and linear sensor results were observed.

  5. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Lanza, Mario, E-mail: mlanza@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nanoscience and Technology, Soochow University, 199 Ren-Ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Iglesias, Vanessa [International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal); Lewis, David [Nanonics Imaging, Har Hotzvim, Jerusalem 91487 (Israel); Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming [Laboratory of Nanofabrication and Novel Device Integration, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther [Deggendorf Institute of Technology, Edlmairstr. 6+8, 94469 Deggendorf (Germany); Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem.

  6. Investigation and in situ removal of spatter generated during laser ablation of aluminium composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, A.C., E-mail: andrei.popescu@inflpr.ro [Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, EMPA, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Delval, C.; Shadman, S.; Leparoux, M. [Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, EMPA, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Study of spatter generated during laser irradiation of an aluminium nanocomposite. • Number of droplets was 1.5–3 times higher for laser in depth vs surface focused beams. • High speed imaging revealed particles exploding in flight similar to a fireworks effect. • Three methods were selected for droplets removal in situ and the results are analyzed. - Abstract: Spatter generated during laser irradiation of an aluminium alloy nanocomposite (AlMg5 reinforced with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles) was monitored by high speed imaging. Droplets trajectory and speed were assessed by computerized image analysis. The effects of laser peak power and laser focusing on the plume expansion and expulsed droplet speeds were studied in air or under argon flow. It was found that the velocity of visible droplets expulsed laterally or at the end of the plume emission from the metal surface was not dependent on the plasma plume speed. The neighbouring area of irradiation sites was studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Droplets deposited on the surface were classified according to their size and counted using a digital image processing software. It was observed that the number of droplets on surface was 1.5–3 times higher when the laser beam was focused in depth as compared to focused beams, even though the populations average diameter were comparable. Three methods were selected for removing droplets in situ, during plume expansion: an argon gas jet crossing the plasma plume, a fused silica plate collector transparent to the laser wavelength placed parallel to the irradiated surface and a mask placed onto the aluminium composite surface. The argon gas jet was efficient only for low power irradiation conditions, the fused silica plate failed in all tested conditions and the mask was successful for all irradiation regimes.

  7. Mechanism of single-pulse ablative generation of laser-induced periodic surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugaev, Maxim V.; Gnilitskyi, Iaroslav; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2017-11-01

    One of the remarkable capabilities of ultrashort polarized laser pulses is the generation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS). The origin of this phenomenon is largely attributed to the interference of the incident laser wave and surface electromagnetic wave that creates a periodic absorption pattern. Although, commonly, LIPSS are produced by repetitive irradiation of the same area by multiple laser pulses in the regime of surface melting and resolidification, recent reports demonstrate the formation of LIPSS in the single-pulse irradiation regime at laser fluences well above the ablation threshold. In this paper, we report results of a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation aimed at providing insights into the mechanisms of single-pulse ablative LIPSS formation. The simulation performed for a Cr target reveals an interplay of material removal and redistribution in the course of spatially modulated ablation, leading to the transient formation of an elongated liquid wall extending up to ˜600 nm above the surface of the target at the locations of the minima of the laser energy deposition. The upper part of the liquid wall disintegrates into droplets while the base of the wall solidifies on the time scale of ˜2 ns, producing a ˜100 -nm-tall frozen surface feature extending above the level of the initial surface of the target. The properties of the surface region of the target are modified by the presence of high densities of dislocations and vacancies generated due to the rapid and highly nonequilibrium nature of the melting and resolidification processes. The insights into the LIPSS formation mechanisms may help in designing approaches for increasing the processing speed and improving the quality of the laser-patterned periodic surface structures.

  8. Time-resolved observations of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by femtosecond laser pulses in corneal tissue and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, T; Kastis, G A; Suárez, C; Bor, Z; Bron, W E

    1996-01-01

    Photodisruption in ocular media with high power pulsed lasers working at non-absorbing frequencies have become a well established surgical tool since the late seventies. Shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by the optical breakdown may strongly influence the surgical effect of photodisruptive lasers. We have investigated the shock wave and cavitation bubble effects of femtosecond laser pulses generated during photodisruption in corneal tissue and water. The results are compared to those obtained with longer laser pulses. Laser pulses with 150 fs duration at approximately 620 nm wavelength have been focused into corneal tissue and water to create optical breakdown. Time-resolved flash photography has been used to investigate the dynamics of the generated shock waves and cavitation bubbles. A rapid decay of the shock waves is observed in both materials with similar temporal characteristics and with a spatial range considerably smaller than that of shock waves induced by picosecond (or nanosecond) optical breakdown. Cavitation bubbles are observed to develop more rapidly and to reach smaller maximum diameter than those generated by longer pulses. In corneal tissue, single intrastromal cavitation bubbles generated by femtosecond pulses disappear within a few tens of seconds, notably faster than cavitation bubbles generated by picosecond pulses. The reduced shock wave and cavitation bubble effects of the femtosecond laser result in more localized tissue damage. Therefore, a more confined surgical effect should be expected from a femtosecond laser than that from picosecond (or nanosecond) lasers. This indicates a potential benefit from the applications of femtosecond laser technology to intraocular microsurgery.

  9. High aspect ratio nanoholes in glass generated by femtosecond laser pulses with picosecond intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sanghoon; Choi, Jiyeon; Noh, Jiwhan; Cho, Sung-Hak

    2018-02-01

    Because of its potential uses, high aspect ratio nanostructures have been interested for last few decades. In order to generate nanostructures, various techniques have been attempted. Femtosecond laser ablation is one of techniques for generating nanostructures inside a transparent material. For generating nanostructures by femtosecond laser ablation, previous studies have been attempted beam shaping such as Bessel beam and temporal tailored beam. Both methods suppress electron excitation at near surface and initiate interference of photons at certain depth. Recent researches indicate that shape of nanostructures is related with temporal change of electron density and number of self-trapped excitons. In this study, we try to use the temporal change of electron density induced by femtosecond laser pulse for generating high aspect ratio nanoholes. In order to reveal the effect of temporal change of electron density, secondary pulses are irradiated from 100 to 1000 ps after the irradiation of first pulse. Our result shows that diameter of nanoholes is increasing and depth of nanoholes is decreasing as pulse to pulse interval is getting longer. With manipulating of pulse to pulse interval, we could generate high aspect ratio nanoholes with diameter of 250-350 nm and depth of 4∼6 μm inside a glass.

  10. Laser controlled singlet oxygen generation in mitochondria to promote mitochondrial DNA replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Wang, Yupei; Si, Jing; Zhou, Rong; Gan, Lu; Di, Cuixia; Xie, Yi; Zhang, Hong

    2015-11-18

    Reports have shown that a certain level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. However, it is unclear whether it is the mitochondrial ROS that stimulate mtDNA replication and this requires further investigation. Here we employed a photodynamic system to achieve controlled mitochondrial singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generation. HeLa cells incubated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) were exposed to laser irradiation to induce (1)O2 generation within mitochondria. Increased mtDNA copy number was detected after low doses of 630 nm laser light in ALA-treated cells. The stimulated mtDNA replication was directly linked to mitochondrial (1)O2 generation, as verified using specific ROS scavengers. The stimulated mtDNA replication was regulated by mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mtDNA polymerase γ. MtDNA control region modifications were induced by (1)O2 generation in mitochondria. A marked increase in 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) level was detected in ALA-treated cells after irradiation. HeLa cell growth stimulation and G1-S cell cycle transition were also observed after laser irradiation in ALA-treated cells. These cellular responses could be due to a second wave of ROS generation detected in mitochondria. In summary, we describe a controllable method of inducing mtDNA replication in vitro.

  11. Synchronization of random bit generators based on coupled chaotic lasers and application to cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Ido; Butkovski, Maria; Peleg, Yitzhak; Zigzag, Meital; Aviad, Yaara; Reidler, Igor; Rosenbluh, Michael; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2010-08-16

    Random bit generators (RBGs) constitute an important tool in cryptography, stochastic simulations and secure communications. The later in particular has some difficult requirements: high generation rate of unpredictable bit strings and secure key-exchange protocols over public channels. Deterministic algorithms generate pseudo-random number sequences at high rates, however, their unpredictability is limited by the very nature of their deterministic origin. Recently, physical RBGs based on chaotic semiconductor lasers were shown to exceed Gbit/s rates. Whether secure synchronization of two high rate physical RBGs is possible remains an open question. Here we propose a method, whereby two fast RBGs based on mutually coupled chaotic lasers, are synchronized. Using information theoretic analysis we demonstrate security against a powerful computational eavesdropper, capable of noiseless amplification, where all parameters are publicly known. The method is also extended to secure synchronization of a small network of three RBGs.

  12. Resonance enhanced high-order harmonic generation in H2+ by two sequential laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoning; He, Lixin; Wang, Feng; Yuan, Hua; Zhu, Xiaosong; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-07-24

    We investigate high-order harmonic generation in H2+ by using two sequential laser pulses, which consist of a 800-nm pump pulse and a time-delayed 1600-nm probe pulse. Based on the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we demonstrate that the harmonic cutoff in our two-pulse scheme is significantly extended compared to that in the 1600-nm probe pulse alone. Meanwhile, the harmonic efficiency is enhanced by 2-3 orders of magnitude due to charge-resonance-enhanced ionization steered by the 800-nm pump pulse. By using a probe pulse with longer wavelength, our scheme can be used for efficient high harmonic generation in the water window region. In addition, the influence of the intensity of the pump pulse and the relative time delay of the two laser pulses on the harmonic generation are also investigated.

  13. Generation of isolated attosecond pulses by spatial shaping of a femtosecond laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strelkov, V V; Mevel, E; Constant, E [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), Domaine du Haut-Carre, Universite Bordeaux 1, 43 Rue Pierre Noailles, 33405 Talence (France)], E-mail: v-strelkov@fpl.gpi.ru

    2008-08-15

    We present a new method for generating isolated attosecond pulses via high-order harmonic generation in gases. It relies on using collective effects to achieve transient phase-matching which provides both a high efficiency and a strong temporal confinement under specific conditions. By controlling the spatial shape of the fundamental beam and the geometry of the laser-gas interaction, this transient phase matching leads to the generation of isolated broadband attosecond pulses with long driving pulses (10-20 fs) even without controlling their carrier envelope phase. Such laser pulses are becoming available at high energy levels and our approach offers a route to increase the energy of isolated attosecond pulses by orders of magnitude as compared to existing sources.

  14. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy: an Overview for Radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Sun; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Lim, Hyo Keun; Choi, Dong Il [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Min Joo [College of Medicine, Cheju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy is a novel, emerging, therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves, propagated through tissue media, as carriers of energy. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation as well as hemostasis, thrombolysis and targeted drug/gene delivery. However, the application of this technology still has many drawbacks. It is expected that current obstacles to implementation will be resolved in the near future. In this review, we provide an overview of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy from the basic physics to recent clinical studies with an interventional radiologist's perspective for the purpose of improving the general understanding of this cutting-edge technology as well as speculating on future developments

  15. Review of High-intensity Interval Training in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shigenori; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Saeki, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    For the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is required. This involves optimal medical therapy, education on nutrition and exercise therapy, and smoking cessation. Of these, efficient exercise therapy is a key factor. A highly effective training protocol is therefore warranted, which requires a high rate of compliance. Although moderate-intensity continuous training has been the main training regimen recommended in cardiac rehabilitation guidelines, high-intensity interval training has been reported to be more effective in the clinical and experimental setting from the standpoint of peak oxygen uptake and central and peripheral adaptations. In this review, we illustrate the scientific evidence for high-intensity interval training. We then verify this evidence and discuss its significance and the remaining issues.

  16. Engineering Food Ingredients with High-Intensity Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jochen; Kristbergsson, Kristberg; Kjartansson, Gunnar Thor

    The use of ultrasound in the food industry has increased in the last decades. Ultrasound has been used both to analyze food structure and composition at low ultrasonic intensities and high frequencies and to modify ingredients at high ultrasonic intensities and low frequencies. Application of the latter is referred to as high-intensity (power) ultrasonication and is generally carried out at frequencies of =0.1 MHz and ultrasonic intensities of 10-100 W cm-2. In the food industry, power ultrasonication has proved to be a highly effective food processing and preservation technology, and use of high-intensity ultrasound with or without heat may be used, for example, to denature enzymes, aid in the extraction of valuable compounds from plants and seeds, tenderize meat, and homogenize or disperse two-phase systems such as emulsions or suspensions (Mason et al., 1996).

  17. Laser-induced generation of surface periodic structures in media with nonlinear diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, V. M.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Korobko, D. A.; Morozov, V. M.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Yavtushenko, I. O.; Yavtushenko, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    A model of fast formation of high-contrast periodic structure appearing on a semiconductor surface under action of laser radiation is proposed. The process of growing a surface structure due to the interaction surface plasmon- polaritons excited on nonequilibrium electrons with incident laser radiation are considered in the framework of a medium with nonlinear diffusion of nonequilibrium carriers (defects). A resonance effect of superfast pico- and subpicosecond amplification of the plasmon-polariton structure generated on the surface, the realization of which can result in a high-contrast defect lattice.

  18. Effect of the Refilling Processes on the Thrust Generation of a Laser Pulsejet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, K.; Hirooka, Y.; Katsurayama, H.; Komurasaki, K.; Arakawa, Y.

    2004-03-01

    Thrust generation of a laser pulsejet with a conical nozzle has been studied. An impulse imparted by a laser-induced blast wave to the conical nozzle was measured experimentally, and the computational analyses were performed to clarify the relationship between the nozzle configuration and the fluid motion. As a result, it was found that the optimum nozzle length was predictable for given blast wave energy conversion efficiency. The impulse was quite sensitive to the divergence angle of the nozzle. This sharp decrease is mainly due to the fluid motion during the refilling stage of the engine cycle.

  19. Generation of hard x rays by femtosecond laser pulse interaction with solid targets in atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, Alexey G; Pikuz, Sergey A; Faenov, Anatoly Ya; Chefonov, Oleg V; Ovchinnikov, Andrey V; Agranat, Mikhail B; Zigler, Arie

    2012-03-01

    X ray radiation as high as 50 keV, including K(α) of Ba and Mo, have been observed from a solid target during the interaction of low energy ~0.65 mJ, 1 kHz 40 femtosecond laser pulses focused in air at atmospheric pressure. Energetic electrons generating such x rays are possibly produced when the field strength in laser pulse wake exceeds the runaway threshold in air. Two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that include optical field ionization of air and elastic collisions support this mechanism. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  20. Diode-pumped Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb: GSO laser generating 72 fs pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wenlong; Wang, Zhaohua; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Zheng, Lihe; Xu, Xiaodong; Xu, Jun; Wei, Zhiyi

    2016-05-01

    The generation of 72 fs hyperbolic secant pulses centered at 1050 nm with 17.8 nm bandwidth from a diode pumped Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb: GSO laser is demonstrated. With the help of a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror, stable mode-locking with an average output power of 85 mW at a repetition rate of 113 MHz is realized. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of Kerr-lens mode-locking in Yb: GSO laser.

  1. Fabrication of computer-generated holograms using femtosecond laser direct writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlich, René; Richter, Daniel; Richardson, Martin; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-04-15

    We demonstrate a single-step fabrication method for computer-generated holograms based on femtosecond laser direct writing. Therefore, a tightly arranged longitudinal waveguide array is directly inscribed into a transparent material. By tailoring the individual waveguide length, the phase profile of an incident laser beam can be arbitrarily adapted. The approach is verified in common borosilicate glass by inscribing a designed phase hologram, which forms the desired intensity pattern in its far field. The resulting performance is analyzed, and the potential as well as limitations of the method are discussed.

  2. Subpicosecond Nd:glass CPA laser system for kilovolt x-ray generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, T.; Sharma, L.B.; Daido, H.; Uematsu, H.; Ninomiya, S.; Murai, K.; Kato, Y.; Nakatsuka, M.; Izawa, Y.; Nakai, S. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan); Kitada, T. [The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., 3-11-20 Naoji, Amagasaki 661 (Japan); Yamanaka, C. [Institute for Laser Technology, 1-8-4 Utsubohonmachi, Nishiku Osaka 550 (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    We describe an experiment on second-harmonic generation of a picosecond Nd:glass laser pulse with time predelay at intensities of up to 200 GW/cm{sup 2} and a wavelength of 1.053 {mu}m. Duration of the second-harmonic pulse was reduced to 0.6 ps from 1.5 ps width of the fundamental pulse at an optimum intensity of 50 GW/cm{sup 2}. The spatial profile of the laser beam is not degraded by self-focusing at an input intensity of {approximately}50 GW/cm{sup 2}. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. D-D nuclear fusion processes induced in polyethylene foams by TW Laser-generated plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Torrisi L.; Cutroneo M.; Cavallaro S.; Ullschmied J.

    2015-01-01

    Deuterium-Deuterium fusion processes were generated by focusing the 3 TW PALS Laser on solid deuterated polyethylene targets placed in vacuum. Deuterium ion acceleration of the order of 4 MeV was obtained using laser irradiance Iλ2 ∼ 5 × 1016 W μm2/cm2 on the target. Thin and thick targets, at low and high density, were irradiated and plasma properties were monitored “on line” and “off line”. The ion emission from plasma was monitored with Thomson Parabola Spectrometer, track detectors and io...

  4. Energy analysis of protons emitted from Nd:YAg laser-generated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.

    2012-06-01

    Hydrogenated targets have been irradiated in vacuum with the pulsed Nd:YAg laser at intensities of the order of 1010 W/cm2. The laser-generated plasma, produced by the interaction with the solid, emits protons and other ions along the normal to the target surface. Ion collectors and ion energy analyzer were used to measure the current, the angular emission and the energy distributions of the emitted protons. Time-of-flight measurements, Coulomb-Boltzmann-distributions and the fits of experimental data were also used in order to evaluate the equivalent ion plasma temperature and the ion acceleration developed in the non-equilibrium-pulsed plasma.

  5. Ripening kinetics of laser-generated plasmonic nanoparticles in different solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökce, Bilal; van't Zand, Danielle D.; Menéndez-Manjón, Ana; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Pulsed laser ablation in liquid is considered to be a fast nanoparticle-synthesis method taking place on ps to μs timescale. Here, we report the comparably slow ripening kinetics of laser-generated plasmonic nanoparticles (copper, silver, and gold) immediately after ablation. The growth dynamics is studied in situ by following the surface plasmon resonance and correlated to known models. We thereby identify a two-step diffusion-controlled coalescence and growth mechanism, quantify their kinetic constants and show the effect of different solvents (water, acetone, ethanol, and ethyl acetate).

  6. Photonic methods of millimeter-wave generation based on Brillouin fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dabbagh, R. K.; Al-Raweshidy, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    In optical communication link, generation and delivering millimeter-wave (mm-waves) in radio over fiber (RoF) systems has limitation due to fiber non-linearity effects. To solve this problem, photonic methods of mm-wave generation based on characterizations of Brillouin fiber laser are proposed in this work for the first time. Three novel photonic approaches for mm-wave generation methods based on Brillouin fiber laser and phase modulator are proposed and demonstrated by simulation. According to our theoretical analysis and simulation, mm-waves with frequency up to 80 GHz and good signal to noise ratio (SNR) up to 90 dB are generated by new and cost effective methods of generation that make them suitable for applications of the fifth generation (5G) networks. The proposed configurations increase the stability and the quality of the mm-wave generation system by using a single laser source as a pump wave and the fiber non-linearity effects are reduced. A key advantage of this research is that proposed a number of very simple generation methods and cost effective which only use standard components of optical telecommunications. Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) effect that exists in the optical fiber is studied with the characterization of phase modulator. An all optically stable mm-wave carriers are achieved successfully in the three different methods with different frequencies from 20 GHz up to 80 GHz. Simulation results show that all these carriers have low phase noise, good SNR ranging between 60 and 90 dB and tuning capability in comparison with previous methods reported. This makes them suitable for mm-wave transmission in RoF systems to transmit data in the next generation networks.

  7. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR THE SIMULATION OF HIGH INTENSITY HADRON SYNCHROTRONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LUCCIO, A.; D' IMPERIO, N.; MALITSKY, N.

    2005-09-12

    Numerical algorithms for PIC simulation of beam dynamics in a high intensity synchrotron on a parallel computer are presented. We introduce numerical solvers of the Laplace-Poisson equation in the presence of walls, and algorithms to compute tunes and twiss functions in the presence of space charge forces. The working code for the simulation here presented is SIMBAD, that can be run as stand alone or as part of the UAL (Unified Accelerator Libraries) package.

  8. Spallation neutron source and other high intensity froton sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiren Chou

    2003-02-06

    This lecture is an introduction to the design of a spallation neutron source and other high intensity proton sources. It discusses two different approaches: linac-based and synchrotron-based. The requirements and design concepts of each approach are presented. The advantages and disadvantages are compared. A brief review of existing machines and those under construction and proposed is also given. An R&D program is included in an appendix.

  9. Light and Light Sources High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    CERN Document Server

    Flesch, Peter G

    2006-01-01

    Light and Light Sources gives an introduction to the working principles of high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps and points out challenges and problems associated with the development and operation of HID lamps. The state-of-the-art in electrode and plasma diagnostics as well as numerical methods used for the understanding of HID lamps are described. This volume addresses students as well as scientists and researchers at universities and in industry.

  10. Enhancing gas-phase reaction in a plasma using high intensity and high power ultrasonic acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    substantially 100 W. In this way, a high sound intensity and power are obtained that efficiently enhances a gas-phase reaction in the plasma, which enhances the plasma process, e.g. enabling more efficient ozone or hydrogen generation using plasma in relation to reaction speed and/or obtained concentration......This invention relates to enhancing a gas-phase reaction in a plasma comprising: creating plasma (104) by at least one plasma source (106), and wherein that the method further comprises: generating ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) having a predetermined amount...... of acoustic energy by at least one ultrasonic high intensity and high power gas-jet acoustic wave generator (101), where said ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves are directed to propagate towards said plasma (104) so that at least a part of said predetermined amount of acoustic energy...

  11. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, XianLu; Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-01

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H- ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H- ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H- ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H- beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  12. Evidence based exercise - clinical benefits of high intensity interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraev, Tim; Barclay, Gabriella

    2012-12-01

    Aerobic exercise has a marked impact on cardiovascular disease risk. Benefits include improved serum lipid profiles, blood pressure and inflammatory markers as well as reduced risk of stroke, acute coronary syndrome and overall cardiovascular mortality. Most exercise programs prescribed for fat reduction involve continuous, moderate aerobic exercise, as per Australian Heart Foundation clinical guidelines. This article describes the benefits of exercise for patients with cardiovascular and metabolic disease and details the numerous benefits of high intensity interval training (HIIT) in particular. Aerobic exercise has numerous benefits for high-risk populations and such benefits, especially weight loss, are amplified with HIIT. High intensity interval training involves repeatedly exercising at a high intensity for 30 seconds to several minutes, separated by 1-5 minutes of recovery (either no or low intensity exercise). HIT is associated with increased patient compliance and improved cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes and is suitable for implementation in both healthy and 'at risk' populations. Importantly, as some types of exercise are contraindicated in certain patient populations and HIIT is a complex concept for those unfamiliar to exercise, some patients may require specific assessment or instruction before commencing a HIIT program.

  13. Narrowband terahertz generation with chirped-and-delayed laser pulses in periodically poled lithium niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahr, Frederike; Jolly, Spencer W; Matlis, Nicholas H; Carbajo, Sergio; Kroh, Tobias; Ravi, Koustuban; Schimpf, Damian N; Schulte, Jan; Ishizuki, Hideki; Taira, Takunori; Maier, Andreas R; Kärtner, Franz X

    2017-06-01

    We generate narrowband terahertz (THz) radiation in periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystals using two chirped-and-delayed driver pulses from a high-energy Ti:sapphire laser. The generated frequency is determined by the phase-matching condition in the PPLN and influences the temporal delay of the two pulses for efficient terahertz generation. We achieve internal conversion efficiencies up to 0.13% as well as a record multicycle THz energy of 40 μJ at 0.544 THz in a cryogenically cooled PPLN.

  14. Generation of hard X-rays by irradiation of femtosecond terawatt laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kazutaka G.; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Saito, Fumikazu; Kondo, Ken-ichi [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Ultra-short pulsed hard X-rays are generated by focusing femtosecond laser beams onto metal targets with a table-top-terawatt system. Temporal and energy profiles of the generated X-rays are measured with an X-ray streak camera and an X-ray CCD camera, respectively. X-rays with a pulse width of 6 ps and an energy of 8 keV are generated from a copper target with a power density of 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. (author)

  15. Beam Dynamics Studies for High-Intensity Beams in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082016; Benedikt, Michael

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the existence of the last missing piece of the Standard Model of particle physics (SM) was confirmed. However, even though very elegant, this theory is unable to explain, for example, the generation of neutrino masses, nor does it account for dark energy or dark matter. To shed light on some of these open questions, research in fundamental particle physics pursues two complimentary approaches. On the one hand, particle colliders working at the high-energy frontier, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), located in Geneva, Switzerland, are utilized to investigate the fundamental laws of nature. Alternatively, fixed target facilities require high-intensity beams to create a large flux of secondary particles to investigate, for example, rare particle decay processes, or to create neutrino beams. This thesis investigates limitations arising during the acceleration of high-intensity beams at the CERN Proton Synchrotro...

  16. Rotational second harmonic generation endoscopy with 1μm fiber laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gangjun; Xie, Tuqiang; Yu, Lingfeng; Su, Jianping; Tomov, Ivan V.; Wang, Qiang; Rao, Bin; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    2009-02-01

    We present a kind of rotational two photon mciroendoscopy for 1μm fiber femtosecond laser. The fiber laser provide ultrashort femto-second pulses with center wavelength at 1.034μm and repetition rate of 50MH. The rotational probe is based on double cladding photonic crystal fiber (CD PCF) fiber, Grin lens, microprism and rotational MEMS motor. The MEMS motor has diameter of 2.2mm and can provide 360 degree full view rotation. We experimentally show that the DC PCF fiber works for 1μm fiber laser two photon system. Second harmonic generation (SHG) singnal line profile of rat tail tendon and fish scale was taken with the endoscopy system.

  17. Cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting: Generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and processing parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    Selective laser melting is yet to become a standardized industrial manufacturing technique. The process continues to suffer from defects such as distortions, residual stresses, localized deformations and warpage caused primarily due to the localized heating, rapid cooling and high temperature...... gradients that occur during the process. While process monitoring and control of selective laser melting is an active area of research, establishing the reliability and robustness of the process still remains a challenge.In this paper, a methodology for generating reliable, optimized scanning paths...... and process parameters for selective laser melting of a standard sample is introduced. The processing of the sample is simulated by sequentially coupling a calibrated 3D pseudo-analytical thermal model with a 3D finite element mechanical model.The optimized processing parameters are subjected to a Monte Carlo...

  18. Wavelength diversification of high-power external cavity diamond Raman lasers using intracavity harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasbeer, Hadiya; Williams, Robert J; Kitzler, Ondrej; McKay, Aaron; Mildren, Richard P

    2018-01-22

    We report a high power quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) 620 nm laser from an external cavity diamond Raman laser utilizing intracavity frequency doubling in lithium triborate. Output power of 30 W for durations of 0.25 ms at 15% conversion efficiency was achieved with a beam quality factor M2 = 1.1 from a free-running Nd:YAG pump laser of M2 = 1.5. The critical design parameters that affect conversion efficiency and power were analysed with the aid of an analytical model. By adaptation to other pump technologies, the diamond approach provides a novel pathway towards high brightness CW beam generation in the visible and ultraviolet regions.

  19. Simulation of intense laser-dense matter interactions. X-ray production and laser absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueshima, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Tajima, Toshiki

    1998-03-01

    The development of short-pulse ultra high intensity lasers will enable us to generate short-pulse intense soft and hard X-rays. Acceleration of an electron in laser field generates intense illuminated located radiation, Larmor radiation, around KeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with 100 TW and 1 {mu}m wave length laser. The Coulomb interaction between rest ions and relativistic electron generates broad energy radiation, bremsstrahlung emission, over MeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with the same condition. These intense radiations come in short pulses of the same order as that of the irradiated laser. The generated intense X-rays, Larmor and bremsstrahlung radiation, can be applied to sources of short pulse X-ray, excitation source of inner-shell X-ray laser, position production and nuclear excitation, etc. (author)

  20. Compact, diode-pumped, solid-state lasers for next generation defence and security sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, M.; Lee, S. T.; Borthwick, A.; McRae, I.; Jackson, D.; Alexander, W.

    2015-06-01

    Low-cost semiconductor laser diode pump sources have made a dramatic impact in sectors such as advanced manufacturing. They are now disrupting other sectors, such as defence and security (D&S), where Thales UK is a manufacturer of sensor systems for application on land, sea, air and man portable. In this talk, we will first give an overview of the market trends and challenges in the D&S sector. Then we will illustrate how low cost pump diodes are enabling new directions in D&S sensors, by describing two diode pumped, solid- state laser products currently under development at Thales UK. The first is a new generation of Laser Target Designators (LTD) that are used to identify targets for the secure guiding of munitions. Current systems are bulky, expensive and require large battery packs to operate. The advent of low cost diode technology, merged with our novel solid-state laser design, has created a designator that will be the smallest, lowest cost, STANAG compatible laser designator on the market. The LTD delivers greater that 50mJ per pulse up to 20Hz, and has compact dimensions of 125×70×55mm. Secondly, we describe an ultra-compact, eye-safe, solid-state laser rangefinder (LRF) with reduced size, weight and power consumption compared to existing products. The LRF measures 100×55×34mm, weighs 200g, and can range to greater than 10km with a single laser shot and at a reprate of 1Hz. This also leverages off advances in laser pump diodes, but also utilises low cost, high reliability, packaging technology commonly found in the telecoms sector. As is common in the D&S sector, the products are designed to work in extreme environments, such as wide temperature range (-40 to +71°C) and high levels of shock and vibration. These disruptive products enable next- generation laser sensors such as rangefinders, target designators and active illuminated imagers.

  1. Generation of femto second pulses from self mode locked Yb doped fiber laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Won; Hong, Sung Ki; Kim, Min Suk; Ko, Kwanghoon; Lim, Changhwan [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jae Jin; Seo, Young Suk [Technology research laboratory, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    Recently, the fiber lasers have received vast attention as an oscillator of Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA)system due to their excellent output power stability. Especially, all fiber splicing connection type fiber lasers offer several advantages over conventional bulk type fiber lasers, including greater stability, compactness, and ease of management. This type of fiber laser does not need the adjustment of its spatially coupled components because it consists of only optical fibers, whereas the conventional fiber lasers using focus lenses and air gaps need the adjustment of spatially coupled components. In addition, the direct splicing of fiber components is very robust to thermal effects and mechanical disturbances because it does not need much optical alignment. We have been demonstrated the self mode locked Yb doped fiber laser by Nonlinear Polarization Rotation (NRT)which consist of all fiber splicing connection type and only PM Single mode fiber due to their structures are similar. Since no polarization instability or polarization mode beating, a highly polarized cavity can generate highly stable pulses. We have fiber ring resonator without air gap of connection between fibers, the active element as laser amplifier was PM YDF which has two air channels located in parallel to the core in order to maintain linear polarization, and we used a PANDA fiber that high internal birefringence loss maintaining linear polarization against external perturbation as shown Fig. 1. When pump power was weak, unstable noisy pulses were observed. As the Pump power gradually increased, the operation mode change to the mode locked pulse generation from noisy pulse trains. We obtain the detail pulse waveform that measuring spectrum FWHM of 70nm by digital spectrum analyzer, measuring pulse train repetition rate of 25MHz and measuring pulse width of 44 FS by SHG FROG method as shown Fig. 2. The self mode locked Yb doped fiber laser system can be widely tunable from 1020nm to

  2. Efficient generation of 3.9 W of diffraction-limited green light with spectrally combined tapered diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.

    1060 nm tapered diode lasers, we achieve a 2.5-3.2 fold increase of green light with a maximum power of 3.9 Watts in a diffraction-limited beam. At this level, diode lasers have a high application potential, for example, within the biomedical field. In order to enhance the power even further, our......We propose an efficient concept increasing the power of diode laser systems in the visible spectral range. In comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation enhances the available power significantly. Combining two...... concept can be expanded combining multiple diode lasers....

  3. Counter-crossing injection for stable high-quality electron beam generation via laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotaki, H; Daito, I; Hayashi, Y; Ma, J; Chen, L-M; Kando, M; Esirkepov, T Z; Fukuda, Y; Homma, T; Pirozhkov, A; Koga, J K; Nakajima, K; Daido, H; Bulanov, S V [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto (Japan)], E-mail: kotaki.hideyuki@jaea.go.jp

    2008-05-01

    Counter-crossing injection, which is a realistic setup for applications, by two sub-relativistic laser pulses colliding at an angle of 45 degrees is demonstrated. The collision of the two laser pulses generates a high-quality electron beam with high reproducibility. The generated monoenergetic electron beam has a peak energy of 14.4 MeV, an energy spread of 10.6%, a charge of 21.8 pC, a normalized emittance of 1.6 {pi} mm mrad, and a reproducibility of 50%. The electron beam generation is unfolded with two-dimensional-particle-in-cell simulations. The laser pulses in plasma are self-focused to higher intensity when the laser power is above the threshold for relativistic self-focusing. The collision of the self-focused laser pulses generates a high-quality electron beam with high reproducibility.

  4. Self-generated magnetic fields and electron transport in laser driven hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, John; Alley, Ed; Hammer, Jim; Town, Richard; Haines, Malcolm

    2002-11-01

    It is well known that magnetic fields can be generated during the interaction of an intense laser beam with solid targets. The principle source of magnetic field from Ohm's law is the familiar grad(T)xgrad(n) term, which results in Megagauss fields for laser intensities typical of inertial fusion and other high energy density experiments. In a hohlraum the main consequence of this is to increase the electron temperature by x2 near the laser entrance holes because of reduced thermal conduction in the cross-field (axial) direction. Despite the "localizing" effect of the magnetic field on the electrons, it appears that the diffusion approximation for electron heat flow breaks down, with the departure becoming progressively worse as the laser power is increased. The results of Lasnex simulations are used to illustrate these effects for laser powers ranging from 10TW to 500TW which cover conditions from Nova to NIF. Potential knock on consequences for inertial fusion are discussed. -This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  5. Parametric generation of energetic short mid-infrared pulses for dielectric laser acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandel, S.; Xu, G.; Yin, Y.; Jovanovic, I.

    2014-12-01

    Laser-driven high-gradient electron acceleration in dielectric photonic structures is an enabling technology for compact and robust sources of tunable monochromatic x-rays. Such advanced x-ray sources are sought in medical imaging, security, industrial, and scientific applications. The use of long-wavelength pulses can mitigate the problem of laser-induced breakdown in dielectric structures at high optical intensities, relax the structure fabrication requirements, and allow greater pulse energy to be injected into the structure. We report on the design and construction of a simple and robust, short-pulse parametric source operating at a center wavelength 5 μm, to be used as a pump for a dielectric photonic structure for laser-driven acceleration. The source is based on a two-stage parametric downconversion design, consisting of a β-BaB2O4-based 2.05 μm optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and a ZnGeP2-based 5 μm OPA. The 2.05 μm OPA is presently pumped by a standard Ti:sapphire chirped-pulse amplified laser, which will be replaced with direct laser pumping at wavelengths \\gt 2 μ m in the future. The design and performance of the constructed short-pulse mid-infrared source are described. The demonstrated architecture is also of interest for use in other applications, such as high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse production.

  6. Medium- and low-volatile organic compounds generated by laser tissue interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spleiss, Martin; Weber, Lothar W.

    1996-12-01

    Different tissue samples have been irradiated with surgical XeCl- and CO2-lasers. The generated laser plume was sampled and analyzed concerning medium and low volatile organic compounds. Differences in the composition of the pyrolysis products in dependance of tissues and lasers are presented. Quantification of aromatic hydrocarbons was carried out. It is obvious that the ratios between the single aromatic hydrocarbons gave hints at the temperatures of the laser tissue interaction process. Some aromatic hydrocarbons were typical high temperature products like phenylacetylene, whereas toluene could be found at lower temperatures with comparable high concentration. Two special classes of compounds, presumed by Curie point pyrolysis of proteins and not yet verified by synthesis, were identified in the aerosol of the CO2-laser. Probably five different amino acids might be the precursors of these compounds whereas by Curie point pyrolysis only three amino acids were reported as precursors. The particular debris which was sampled separately on glass fiber filters was extracted with different solvents. Several compounds absorbed at the particles could be identified and will be discussed. In the polar acetone extract some of main compounds remained unknown. A special clean-up procedure for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was carried out. Qualitative and quantitative results of the PAH analysis are presented. The results are compared with the results of other working groups.

  7. The generation of high-quality, intense ion beams by ultra-intense lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Roth, M; Audebert, Patrick; Blazevic, A; Brambrink, E; Cowan, T E; Fuchs, J; Gauthier, J C; Geissel, M; Hegelich, M; Karsch, S; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J; Ruhl, H; Schlegel, T; Stephens, R B

    2002-01-01

    Intense beams of protons and heavy ions have been observed in ultra-intense laser-solid interaction experiments. Thereby, a considerable fraction of the laser energy is transferred to collimated beams of energetic ions (e.g. up to 50 MeV protons; 100 MeV fluorine), which makes these beams highly interesting for various applications. Experimental results indicate a very short-pulse duration and an excellent beam quality, leading to beam intensities in the TW range. To characterize the beam quality and its dependence on laser parameters and target conditions we performed experiments using the 100 TW laser system at Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses at the Ecole Polytechnique, France, with focused intensities exceeding 10 sup 1 sup 9 W cm sup - sup 2. We found a strong dependence on the target rear surface conditions allowing to tailor the ion beam by an appropriate target design. We also succeeded in the generation of heavy ion beams by suppressing the proton amount at the target surface. We wi...

  8. NANOSCALE STRUCTURES GENERATION WITHIN THE SURFACE LAYER OF METALS WITH SHORT UV LASER PULSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry S. Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have completed modeling of a laser pulse influence on a gold target. We have applied a hybrid atomistic-continuum model to analyze the physical mechanisms responsible for the process of nanostructuring. The model combines the advantages of Molecular Dynamics and Two Temperature Model. We have carried out a direct comparison of the modeling results and experimental data on nano-modification due to a single ps laser pulse at the energy densities significantly exceeding the melting threshold. The experimental data is obtained due to a laser pulse irradiation at the wavelength of 248 nm and duration of 1.6 ps. The mask projection (diffraction grating creates the sinusoidal intensity distribution on a gold surface with periods of 270 nm, 350 nm, and 500 nm. The experimental data and modeling results have demonstrated a good match subject to complex interrelations between a fast material response to the laser excitation, generation of crystal defects, phase transitions and hydrodynamic motion of matter under condition of strong laser-induced non-equilibrium. The performed work confirms the proposed approach as a powerful tool for revealing the physical mechanisms underlying the process of nanostructuring of metal surfaces. Detailed understanding of the dynamics of these processes gives the possibility for designing the topology of functional surfaces on nano- and micro-scales.

  9. Impact of in situ polymer coating on particle dispersion into solid laser-generated nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Philipp; Brandes, Gudrun; Schwenke, Andreas; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2011-03-21

    The crucial step in the production of solid nanocomposites is the uniform embedding of nanoparticles into the polymer matrix, since the colloidal properties or specific physical properties are very sensitive to particle dispersion within the nanocomposite. Therefore, we studied a laser-based generation method of a nanocomposite which enables us to control the agglomeration of nanoparticles and to increase the single particle dispersion within polyurethane. For this purpose, we ablated targets of silver and copper inside a polymer-doped solution of tetrahydrofuran by a picosecond laser (using a pulse energy of 125 μJ at 33.3 kHz repetition rate) and hardened the resulting colloids into solid polymers. Electron microscopy of these nanocomposites revealed that primary particle size, agglomerate size and particle dispersion strongly depend on concentration of the polyurethane added before laser ablation. 0.3 wt% polyurethane is the optimal polymer concentration to produce nanocomposites with improved particle dispersion and adequate productivity. Lower polyurethane concentration results in agglomeration whereas higher concentration reduces the production rate significantly. The following evaporation step did not change the distribution of the nanocomposite inside the polyurethane matrix. Hence, the in situ coating of nanoparticles with polyurethane during laser ablation enables simple integration into the structural analogue polymer matrix without additives. Furthermore, it was possible to injection mold these in situ-stabilized nanocomposites without affecting particle dispersion. This clarifies that sufficient in situ stabilization during laser ablation in polymer solution is able to prevent agglomeration even in a hot polymer melt.

  10. Diagnostics of Particles emitted from a Laser generated Plasma: Experimental Data and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The charge particle emission form laser-generated plasma was studied experimentally and theoretically using the COMSOL simulation code. The particle acceleration was investigated using two lasers at two different regimes. A Nd:YAG laser, with 3 ns pulse duration and 1010 W/cm2 intensity, when focused on solid target produces a non-equilibrium plasma with average temperature of about 30-50 eV. An Iodine laser with 300 ps pulse duration and 1016 W/cm2 intensity produces plasmas with average temperatures of the order of tens keV. In both cases charge separation occurs and ions and electrons are accelerated at energies of the order of 200 eV and 1 MeV per charge state in the two cases, respectively. The simulation program permits to plot the charge particle trajectories from plasma source in vacuum indicating how they can be deflected by magnetic and electrical fields. The simulation code can be employed to realize suitable permanent magnets and solenoids to deflect ions toward a secondary target or detectors, to focalize ions and electrons, to realize electron traps able to provide significant ion acceleration and to realize efficient spectrometers. In particular it was applied to the study two Thomson parabola spectrometers able to detect ions at low and at high laser intensities. The comparisons between measurements and simulation is presented and discussed.

  11. Isolated atto-second pulse generated by spatial shaping of femtosecond laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strelkov, V.; Mevel, E.; Constant, E. [Univ Bordeaux 1, CELIA, F-33405 Talence (France); Strelkov, V. [Russian Acad Sci, Inst Gen Phys, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2009-08-15

    We study numerically the time-dependent HHG phase-matching in the laser beam having a flat-top radial intensity profile. A flat-top profile is the key to produce similar ionization degree at the axis and at the periphery and thus to achieve simultaneous phase-matched generation. Such a profile can be obtained experimentally by using two concentric phase plates that introduce a specific phase shift between the central and the outer part of a focused Gaussian beam. We find realistic laser field parameters and medium density that allow obtaining (after spectral filtering) single atto-second pulse using 10 fs driving laser pulse. Our technique provides isolated atto-second pulse emission almost insensitive on the CEP of the laser pulse. Moreover, the technique is effective both for the mid-plateau and the cut-off spectral range. In particular, the XUV from Ar target in the cut-off spectral range (compatible with the Zr filter) provides isolated atto-second pulse with 185 as duration at a central energy of 92 eV. Using achievable multi mJ 10 fs laser pulses this technique could provide atto-second pulses approaching the {mu}J energy range. (authors)

  12. Generation of nano-voids inside polylactide using femtosecond laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viertel, Tina; Pabst, Linda; Olbrich, Markus; Ebert, Robby; Horn, Alexander; Exner, Horst

    2017-12-01

    The arrangement of nanometer-sized voids, induced by focusing intense laser radiation within transparent material can allow the generation of transparent components with dimensions in the micrometer to nanometre range due to internal contour cut and thus satisfy the progressive miniaturization of products in micro-optics and medical technologies. For further improvements in the precision of those components, a deep understanding of the involved processes during the interaction of laser radiation within the material is necessary. In this work, voids inside bulk polylactide (PLA), a bioabsorbable polymer, were generated using a femtosecond laser ( λ = 1030 nm, τH = 180 fs) with single and multiple pulse irradiation. The dependence of the spot size was examined by the use of four microscope objectives with focus radii of 4.9, 3.3, 2 and 1.2 µm. For the experiments, the pulse energy and focusing depth into the material were varied. The dimensions of the voids were experimentally determined as function of the intensity. Differences in the lateral and axial extents of the voids were obtained for different focus radii and focusing depths at same intensities. Furthermore, the intensity distribution of the laser radiation inside the material for the different focus radii and focusing depths, and their dependence on the lateral and axial sizes of the voids was simulated and compared with the experimental results.

  13. Burst train generator of high energy femtosecond laser pulses for driving heat accumulation effect during micromachining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Saeid; Li, Jianzhao; Herman, Peter R

    2015-05-01

    A new method for generating high-repetition-rate (12.7-38.2 MHz) burst trains of femtosecond laser pulses has been demonstrated for the purpose of tailoring ultrashort laser interactions in material processing that can harness the heat accumulation effect among pulses separated by a short interval (i.e., 26 ns). Computer-controlled time delays were applied to synchronously trigger the high frequency switching of a high voltage Pockels cell to specify distinctive values of polarization rotation for each round-trip of a laser pulse cycling within a passive resonator. Polarization dependent output coupling facilitated the flexible shaping of the burst envelope profile to provide burst trains of up to ∼1  mJ of burst energy divided over a selectable number (1 to 25) of pulses. Individual pulses of variable energy up to 150 μJ and with pulse duration tunable over 70 fs to 2 ps, were applied in burst trains to generate deep and high aspect ratio holes that could not form with low-repetition-rate laser pulses.

  14. Fiber-based 1150-nm femtosecond laser source for the minimally invasive harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing-Yu; Guo, Lun-Zhang; Wang, Jing-Zun; Li, Tse-Chung; Lee, Hsin-Jung; Chiu, Po-Kai; Peng, Lung-Han; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2017-03-01

    Harmonic generation microscopy (HGM) has become one unique tool of optical virtual biopsy for the diagnosis of cancer and the in vivo cytometry of leukocytes. Without labeling, HGM can reveal the submicron features of tissues and cells in vivo. For deep imaging depth and minimal invasiveness, people commonly adopt 1100- to 1300-nm femtosecond laser sources. However, those lasers are typically based on bulky oscillators whose performances are sensitive to environmental conditions. We demonstrate a fiber-based 1150-nm femtosecond laser source, with 6.5-nJ pulse energy, 86-fs pulse width, and 11.25-MHz pulse repetition rate. It was obtained by a bismuth borate or magnesium-doped periodically poled lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN) mediated frequency doubling of the 2300-nm solitons, generated from an excitation of 1550-nm femtosecond pulses on a large mode area photonic crystal fiber. Combined with a home-built laser scanned microscope and a tailor-made frame grabber, we achieve a pulse-per-pixel HGM imaging in vivo at a 30-Hz frame rate. This integrated solution has the potential to be developed as a stable HGM system for routine clinical use.

  15. UV by the fourth harmonic generation of compact side-pumped Yb:YAG laser emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Brian; McIntosh, Chris; Hays, Alan; Dilazaro, Tom; Goldberg, Lew

    2016-03-01

    We present a compact, side pumped passively Q-switched Yb:YAG laser that was operated in a burst mode with pump durations of 2-4 ms at low duty cycles. Intra-pump pulse Q-switched pulse repetition frequencies varied from 5-20 kHz depending on the transmission of the Cr:YAG saturable absorber, which was varied from 70% to 94%. Pump duration, pulse repetition frequency and output coupler reflectivity were optimized to yield maximum Yb:YAG laser average power and laser efficiency, while providing sufficient peak intensity, typically 0.3-1 MW, to enable efficient forth harmonic generation (FHG). Pulse energies and durations were in ranges of 0.3-1.8 mJ and 1.5-7ns, respectively, dependent on the unbleached transmission of the Cr:YAG saturable absorber. We achieved an optical efficiency of greater than 15% for the Yb:YAG laser. Extra-cavity 515 nm second harmonic generation (SHG) was achieved using a 5mm long KTP crystal. The 515 nm light was then frequency doubled by focusing it into a 7mm long BBO crystal, resulting in a 15% conversion efficiency from 1030nm to 257.5 nm, with an average UV power greater than 100 mW.

  16. Wall interactions with plasma generated by vacuum arcs and targets irradiated by intense laser beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beilis, Isak I [Electrical Discharge and Plasma Laboratory, School of Electrical Engineering, Fleischman Faculty of Engineering Tel Aviv University, PO Box 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2009-02-01

    The theory of plasma-wall interactions in vacuum arc spots and in laser irradiated spots is reviewed in light of Langmuir's fundamental contributions to the theory of plasmas, sheaths, evaporation and electron emission. The mechanisms of plasma generation in the electrode and laser-target vapors are described. Models of sheath structures at surfaces which emit vapor and electrons are presented and the influence of the relation between the rates of electron and vapor emission on the electrical current continuity at the plasma-electrode boundary is discussed. The mechanisms of current continuity in the vacuum arc anode region, in the short vacuum arc, and in transient cathode spots are described. The important role of the near-target sheath in laser generated plasma is shown, indicating the effect of converting laser radiation absorbed in plasma into kinetic and potential energy of charged particles that impinge on the target. The description is summarized showing that understanding these phenomena relies on Langmuir's pioneering work.

  17. Analysis of laser-generated plasma ionizing radiation by synthetic single crystal diamond detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinelli, M.; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G. [Dip. di Ing. Meccanica, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Roma 00133 (Italy); Verona, C., E-mail: claudio.verona@uniroma2.it [Dip. di Ing. Meccanica, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Roma 00133 (Italy); Verona-Rinati, G. [Dip. di Ing. Meccanica, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Roma 00133 (Italy); Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L. [Dip. di Fisica, Università di Messina, S. Agata 98166 (Italy); Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Krousky, E. [Institute of Physics of ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-05-01

    Diamond based detectors have been used in order to analyze the ionizing radiation emitted from the laser-generated plasma. High energy proton/ion beams were generated at Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) Centre by the sub-nanosecond kJ-class laser at intensities above 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. The tested detectors consisted of a photoconductive device based on high quality chemical vapor deposition (CVD) single crystal diamond, produced at Rome “Tor Vergata” University. They have been operated in planar configuration, having inter-digitized electrodes. The proposed diamond detectors were able to measure UV, X-rays, electrons and ions. They have been employed in time-of-flight (TOF) configuration and their reliability was checked by comparison with standard ion collectors (mostly used at PALS). Both the forward and backward expanding plasma was characterized in the experiment. The results indicate that diamond detectors are very promising for the characterization of fast proton and ion beams produced by high power laser systems.

  18. Analysis of laser-generated plasma ionizing radiation by synthetic single crystal diamond detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, M.; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Krousky, E.

    2013-05-01

    Diamond based detectors have been used in order to analyze the ionizing radiation emitted from the laser-generated plasma. High energy proton/ion beams were generated at Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) Centre by the sub-nanosecond kJ-class laser at intensities above 1016 W/cm2. The tested detectors consisted of a photoconductive device based on high quality chemical vapor deposition (CVD) single crystal diamond, produced at Rome "Tor Vergata" University. They have been operated in planar configuration, having inter-digitized electrodes. The proposed diamond detectors were able to measure UV, X-rays, electrons and ions. They have been employed in time-of-flight (TOF) configuration and their reliability was checked by comparison with standard ion collectors (mostly used at PALS). Both the forward and backward expanding plasma was characterized in the experiment. The results indicate that diamond detectors are very promising for the characterization of fast proton and ion beams produced by high power laser systems.

  19. The effect of progressive high-intensity inspiratory muscle training and fixed high-intensity inspiratory muscle training on the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Kim, Nan-soo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training on the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-one stroke patients were assigned to one of three groups: progressive load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (n = 8), fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (n = 6), and controls (n = 7). [Methods] The progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle tra...

  20. Design study of Thomson Laser-Electron X-ray Generator (LEX) for Millisecond Angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyukov, I. A.; Bessonov, E. G.; Feshchenko, R. M.; Gorbunkov, M. V.; Maslova, Yu Ya; Popov, N. L.; Dyachkov, N. V.; Postnov, A. A.; Vinogradov, S. L.; Vinogradov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    In this concept study a laser-electron X-ray generator (LEX) is considered for the medical imaging of the inner vessel structure. It is demonstrated that the modern lasers and linear electron accelerators are suitable for the design of the new generation of angiography medical equipment combining higher spatial and time resolution with the reduced patient dose. Angiography setup based on LEXG can make use of different contrast media (iodine, gadolinium) working on absorption edge due to the narrow tuneable spectrum which is not possible with conventional X-ray tubes. In the present study all estimations are made for iodine-based contrast agents. The conclusion is that modern technologies allow practical implementation of LEX for angiography based on multibunch linear accelerator and photon storage device.

  1. Laser controllable generation and manipulation of micro-bubbles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelsky, O. V.; Bekshaev, A. Ya.; Maksimyak, P. P.; Maksimyak, A. P.; Hanson, S. G.; Kontush, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    Micrometer-sized vapor bubbles are formed due to local heating of the water suspension containing absorptive pigment particles of 100 nm diameter. The heating is performed by the CW near-infrared laser radiation. By changing the laser power, four regimes are realized: (1) bubble generation, (2) stable growth of the existing bubbles; (3) stationary existence of the bubbles and (4) bubbles' shrinkage and collapse. The generation and evolution of single bubbles and ensembles of bubbles with controllable sizes and numbers is demonstrated. The bubbles are grouped within the laserilluminated region. They can be easily moved and transported together with the focal spot. The results can be useful for applications associated with the precise manipulation and the species delivery in nano- and micro-engineering problems.

  2. Ambient formaldehyde detection with a laser spectrometer based on difference-frequency generation in PPLN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehle, D; Leleux, D; Erdelyi, M; Tittel, F; Fraser, M; Friedfeld, S

    2001-01-01

    A laser spectrometer based on difference-frequency generation in periodically poled LiNbO3 (PPLN) has been used to quantify atmospheric formaldehyde with a detection limit of 0.32 parts per billion in a given volume (ppbV) using specifically developed data-processing techniques. With state-of-the-art fiber-coupled diode-laser pump sources at 1083 nm and 1561 nm, difference-frequency radiation has been generated in the 3.53-micrometers (2832-cm-1) spectral region. Formaldehyde in ambient air in the 1- to 10-ppb V range has been detected continuously for nine and five days at two separate field sites in the Greater Houston area operated by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) and the Houston Regional Monitoring Corporation (HRM). The acquired spectroscopic data are compared with results obtained by a well-established wet-chemical o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA) technique.

  3. Synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers principles of coherent X-ray generation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Lindberg, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Learn about the latest advances in high-brightness X-ray physics and technology with this authoritative text. Drawing upon the most recent theoretical developments, pre-eminent leaders in the field guide readers through the fundamental principles and techniques of high-brightness X-ray generation from both synchrotron and free-electron laser sources. A wide range of topics is covered, including high-brightness synchrotron radiation from undulators, self-amplified spontaneous emission, seeded high-gain amplifiers with harmonic generation, ultra-short pulses, tapering for higher power, free-electron laser oscillators, and X-ray oscillator and amplifier configuration. Novel mathematical approaches and numerous figures accompanied by intuitive explanations enable easy understanding of key concepts, whilst practical considerations of performance-improving techniques and discussion of recent experimental results provide the tools and knowledge needed to address current research problems in the field. This is a comp...

  4. Generation of air lasing at extended distances by coaxial dual-color femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Helong; Zang, Hongwei; Su, Yue; Fu, Yao; Xu, Huailiang

    2017-12-01

    We present an approach for generation of air lasing at extended distances by coaxial dual-color femtosecond laser pulses. A strong 800 nm pulse prepares the population inversion in {{{N}}}2+ during the filamentation in air, and a weak 400 nm pulse produced coaxially with the 800 nm light by frequency doubling in a BBO crystal seeds the {{{N}}}2+ gain medium, producing strong narrow-band lasing emission at ∼391 nm. We demonstrate that this scheme can overcome the difficulty in spatially overlapping two beams at a far distance, and the lasing emissions at a designed position can be manipulated by dispersion components inserted in the propagation path of the coaxial two-color beam. Our results provide a way for remote generation of air laser for standoff spectroscopy and detection.

  5. Delay line length selection in generating fast random numbers with a chaotic laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Yuncai; Xue, Lugang; Hou, Jiayin; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, Anbang; Zhang, Mingjiang

    2012-04-10

    The chaotic light signals generated by an external cavity semiconductor laser have been experimentally demonstrated to extract fast random numbers. However, the photon round-trip time in the external cavity can cause the occurrence of the periodicity in random sequences. To overcome it, the exclusive-or operation on corresponding random bits in samples of the chaotic signal and its time-delay signal from a chaotic laser is required. In this scheme, the proper selection of delay length is a key issue. By doing a large number of experiments and theoretically analyzing the interplay between the Runs test and the threshold value of the autocorrelation function, we find when the corresponding delay time of autocorrelation trace with the correlation coefficient of less than 0.007 is considered as the delay time between the chaotic signal and its time-delay signal, streams of random numbers can be generated with verified randomness.

  6. Femtosecond pulse generation from a Topological Insulator mode-locked fiber laser

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hao; Liu, Meng; Zhao, Nian; Luo, Ai-Ping; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Xu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Han; Zhao, Chu-Jun; Wen, Shuang-Chun

    2014-01-01

    We reported on the generation of femtosecond pulse in an anomalous-dispersion fiber ring laser by using a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based Topological Insulator (TI), Bi2Se3 saturable absorber (SA). The PVA-TI composite has a low saturable optical intensity of 12 MW/cm2 and a modulation depth of ~3.9%. By incorporating the fabricated PVA-TISA into a fiber laser, mode-locking operation could be achieved at a low pump threshold of 25 mW. After an optimization of the cavity parameters, optical pulse with ~660 fs centered at 1557.5 nm wavelength had been generated. The experimental results demonstrate that the PVA could be an excellent host material for fabricating high-performance TISA, and also indicate that the filmy PVA-TISA is indeed a good candidate for ultrafast saturable absorption device.

  7. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2000-01-01

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  8. Alpine Skiing as Winter-Time High-Intensity Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, Thomas Leonhard; Schwarzl, Christoph; Müller, Edith E; Nagasaki, Masaru; Stöggl, Julia; Schönfelder, Martin; Niebauer, Josef

    2017-09-01

    To counteract the winter activity deficit, we set out to analyze cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses of two high-intensity training (HIT) protocols during alpine skiing (AS), cross-country skiing (XCS), and indoor cycling (IC) and the effects of sex, age, and fitness level in this comparison. Nineteen healthy subjects (two age and fitness groups, both sexes) performed AS, XCS, and IC with measurements of oxygen uptake (V˙O2), energy expenditure (EE), HR, lactate, blood glucose and rate of perceived exertion, determined during 4 min of continuous HIT (HITc: 90% HRmax for XCS and IC or short turn skiing during AS) or 10-min intermittent HIT [HITint: 5 × 1 min high intensity (>90% HRmax or short turn skiing), 1 min active recovery]. During all three exercise modes and irrespective of HIT protocols, sex, age, and fitness, participants were able to reach exercise intensities >90% HRmax and >84% V˙O2max. In all exercise modes 10-min of HITint with a 10-min postexercise O2 consumption phase resulted in greater mean EE per minute compared to 4-min HITc with 10 min postexercise O2 consumption. When applying the same HIT loading and recovery pattern to all three exercise modes, EE during approximately 1:15 h of AS was equivalent to about 1:00 h of either XCS or IC. Across all exercise modes and HIT protocols, high cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses were achieved regardless of age, sex, or fitness. EE during AS can be maximized by choosing the skiing mode "short turn skiing" in combination with an HITint to prolong the duration of continuous high-intensity loading during each descent. Therefore, all exercise modes and both HIT protocols are applicable and feasible in a broad spectrum of healthy subjects.

  9. Beam halo in high-intensity hadron linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerigk, F.

    2006-12-21

    This document aims to cover the most relevant mechanisms for the development of beam halo in high-intensity hadron linacs. The introduction outlines the various applications of high-intensity linacs and it will explain why, in the case of the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) study a linac was chosen to provide a high-power beam, rather than a different kind of accelerator. The basic equations, needed for the understanding of halo development are derived and employed to study the effects of initial and distributed mismatch on high-current beams. The basic concepts of the particle-core model, envelope modes, parametric resonances, the free-energy approach, and the idea of core-core resonances are introduced and extended to study beams in realistic linac lattices. The approach taken is to study the behavior of beams not only in simplified theoretical focusing structures but to highlight the beam dynamics in realistic accelerators. All effects which are described and derived with simplified analytic models, are tested in realistic lattices and are thus related to observable effects in linear accelerators. This approach involves the use of high-performance particle tracking codes, which are needed to simulate the behavior of the outermost particles in distributions of up to 100 million macro particles. In the end a set of design rules are established and their impact on the design of a typical high-intensity machine, the CERN SPL, is shown. The examples given in this document refer to two different design evolutions of the SPL study: the first conceptual design report (SPL I) and the second conceptual design report (SPL II). (orig.)

  10. Investigation of white light continuum generated using two-wavelength femtosecond laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Nemuraitė, Indrė

    2016-01-01

    White light continuum generation is a process which occurs when an intense ultrashort laser pulse is focused into a nonlinear medium. Because of the light matter interaction pump pulse undergoes significant spectral broadening. Main mechanisms causing this is self focusing and self phase modulation. Supercontinuum spectrum has both spatial and temporal coherence, because of these properties it has a wide variety of applications in microscopy, spectroscopy and metrology. Broad supercontinuum s...

  11. Formation of high intensity ion beams with ballistic focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, T. V.; Ryabchikov, A. I.; Shevelev, A. E.; Kim, An Tran My; Tarakanov, V. P.

    2017-11-01

    This investigation presents the results of experimental investigation and theoretical simulations of the influence of plasma and negative bias parameters on formation, transportation and focusing of high intensity ion beams of titanium and nitrogen (with an ion current density up to 1 A/cm2 and pulsed power density up to 2.6 kW/cm2). It was shown that the conditions of space charge neutralization of the focusing beam have a significant influence on the distribution and magnitude of the ion current at the collector.

  12. Lead paint removal with high-intensity light pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapperhaus, Michael J; Schaefer, Raymond B

    2006-12-15

    This paper presents the results of an initial investigation into using high-intensity incoherent light pulses to strip paint. Measurements of light pulse characteristics, the reflectivity of different paints and initial experiments on the threshold for paint removal, and paint removal are presented, along with an approximate model consistent with experimental results. Paint removal tests include lead paint, the reduction of lead levels to below levels required for lead abatement, as well as air and light emissions measurements that are within regulatory guidelines.

  13. Hunting for new, weakly coupled particles with high intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebrich, Babette [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    A number of smaller and diverse experiments complements the high-energy explorations for new physics at the LHC. Many of these experiments are searching for new physics hiding at comparably low mass but very weak coupling. Examples of such particles are axion-like particles and dark gauge bosons, which could also explain Dark Matter. The technology to directly search for such particles are often high-intensity and precision set-ups. In my talk I give a brief overview of the motivation and search for axion-like particles and then focus on the possibility to find them in a proton-dump experiment at CERN.

  14. Investigation on Beam Dynamics Design of High-Intensity RFQs

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C

    2004-01-01

    Recently various potential uses of high-intensity beams bring new opportunities as well as challenges to RFQ accelerator research because of the new problems arising from the strong space-charge effects. Unconventional concepts of beam dynamics design, which surround the choice of basic parameters and the optimization of main dynamics parameters’ variation along the machine, are illustrated by the designing Peking University (PKU) Deuteron RFQ. An efficient tool of LANL RFQ Design Codes for beam dynamics simulation and analysis, RFQBAT, is introduced. Some quality criterions are also presented for evaluating design results.

  15. Proton and Ion Sources for High Intensity Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    Scrivens, R

    2004-01-01

    Future high intensity ion accelerators, including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the European Spallation Source (ESS), the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) etc, will require high current and high duty factor sources for protons and negative hydrogen ions. In order to achieve these goals, a comparison of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance, radio-frequency and Penning ion sources, among others, will be made. For each of these source types, the present operational sources will be compared to the state-of-the-art research devices with special attention given to reliability and availability. Finally, the future research and development aims will be discussed.

  16. The joint project for high-intensity proton accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) agreed to promote the joint project integrating both the Neutron Science Project (NSP) of JAERI and the Japan Hadron Facility Project (JHF) of KEK for comprehensive studies on basic science and technology using high-intensity proton accelerator. This document describes the joint proposal prepared by the Joint Project Team of JAERI and KEK to construct accelerators and research facilities necessary both for the NSP and the JHF at the site of JAERI Tokai Establishment. (author)

  17. Generation of narrowband elastic waves with a fiber laser and its application to the imaging of defects in a plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Ishihara, Ken

    2017-05-01

    Pulsed laser equipment can be used to generate elastic waves through the instantaneous reaction of thermal expansion or ablation of the material; however, we cannot control the waveform generated by the laser in the same manner that we can when piezoelectric transducers are used as exciters. This study investigates the generation of narrowband tone-burst waves using a fiber laser of the type that is widely used in laser beam machining. Fiber lasers can emit laser pulses with a high repetition rate on the order of MHz, and the laser pulses can be modulated to a burst train by external signals. As a consequence of the burst laser emission, a narrowband tone-burst elastic wave is generated. We experimentally confirmed that the elastic waves agreed well with the modulation signals in time domain waveforms and their frequency spectra, and that waveforms can be controlled by the generation technique. We also apply the generation technique to defect imaging with a scanning laser source. In the experiments, with small laser emission energy, we were not able to obtain defect images from the signal amplitude due to low signal-to-noise ratio, whereas using frequency spectrum peaks of the tone-burst signals gave clear defect images, which indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio is improved in the frequency domain by using this technique for the generation of narrowband elastic waves. Moreover, even for defect imaging at a single receiving point, defect images were enhanced by taking an average of distributions of frequency spectrum peaks at different frequencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Generation, shaping, compression, characterization and application of intense ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Z

    2001-01-01

    Recently, the development of intense ultrashort laser pulses has attracted much interest because of their significant applications in many fields of science and technology. This thesis contributes to the generation, shaping, compression, characterization and application of intense ultrashort laser pulses as follows: 1. Laser pulses of 17.5-fs with a peak power of 0.1-TW at 1-kHz repetition rate have been generated by a compact single-stage ten-pass Ti:sapphire amplifier system with a high-order-dispersion-mirror compensator and a spectral shaping for the first time. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with numerical calculations. 2. The first experimental study on arbitrary shaping of intense ultrashort pulses has been conducted in a kHz amplifier system capable of generating 27 fs pulses by using an acousto-optic programmable dispersive filter (AOPDF). 17-fs transform-limited pulses have been achieved and arbitrary shaping of these 17-fs pulses has been demonstrated both in the temporal and ...

  19. Simple open-cavity pulsed Brillouin fiber laser with broadband supercontinuum generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xing; Xu, Zhongwei; Peng, Jinggang; Yang, Luyun; Dai, Nengli; Li, Haiqing; Li, Jinyan

    2017-10-01

    A simple open-cavity laser is proposed for supercontinuum generation. Broadband supercontinuum covering the wavelength from 630 to 1700 nm with low multimode LD pump power ( 1.7 W) is demonstrated. Giant nanosecond pulse generation can be realized by pumping a piece of Yb-doped double cladding fiber combined with two pieces of long passive fibers. There are no reflectors or modulators included in this laser. It is confirmed that the process of the passive self-Q-switch is mainly based on the stimulated Brillouin scattering effect. The peak power of the giant nanosecond pulses is high enough to generate supercontinuum with over 1000 nm bandwidth even in standard single-mode fiber, which makes this supercontinuum laser source low-cost and compact. Replacing the standard single-mode fiber with a piece of high nonlinear photonic crystal fiber, broader and flatter supercontinuum can be obtained because of the high nonlinear coefficient and the blue-shift of the zero-dispersion wavelength.

  20. Echo-enabled tunable terahertz radiation generation with a laser-modulated relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme to generate narrow-band tunable terahertz (THz radiation using a variant of the echo-enabled harmonic generation is analyzed. We show that by using an energy chirped beam, THz density modulation in the beam phase space can be produced with two lasers having the same wavelength. This removes the need for an optical parametric amplifier system to provide a wavelength-tunable laser to vary the central frequency of the THz radiation. The practical feasibility and applications of this scheme are demonstrated numerically with a start-to-end simulation using the beam parameters at the Shanghai Deep Ultraviolet Free-Electron Laser facility (SDUV. The central frequency of the density modulation can be continuously tuned by either varying the chirp of the beam or the momentum compactions of the chicanes. The influence of nonlinear rf chirp and longitudinal space charge effect have also been studied in our article. The methods to generate the THz radiation in SDUV with the new scheme and the estimation of the radiation power are also discussed briefly.

  1. Short optical pulse generated by integrated MQW DBR laser/EA-modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.K.; Tanbun-Ek, T.; Logan, R.A. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The authors report on the generation of short optical pulses by utilizing the non-linear absorption characteristics of a multiple quantum well (MQW) electro-absorption modulator, which is monolithically integrated with a MQW wavelength-tunable distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser on a single chip. Optical pulses as short as 39 ps and 15 ps have been generated at a repetition rate of 3 GHz and 10 GHz, respectively, with a broad tuning range of 5.4 nm near 1554 nm lasing wavelength.

  2. Absorption and generation of femtosecond laser-pulse excited spin currents in noncollinear magnetic bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalieu, M. L. M.; Helgers, P. L. J.; Koopmans, B.

    2017-07-01

    Spin currents can be generated on an ultrafast time scale by excitation of a ferromagnetic (FM) thin film with a femtosecond laser pulse. Recently, it has been demonstrated that these ultrafast spin currents can transport angular momentum to neighboring FM layers, being able to change both the magnitude and orientation of the magnetization in the adjacent layer. In this paper, both the generation and absorption of these optically excited spin currents are investigated. This is done using noncollinear magnetic bilayers, i.e., two FM layers separated by a conductive spacer. Spin currents are generated in a Co/Ni multilayer with out-of-plane (OOP) anisotropy, and absorbed by a Co layer with an in-plane (IP) anisotropy. This behavior is confirmed by careful analysis of the laser-pulse induced magnetization dynamics, whereafter it is demonstrated that the transverse spin current is absorbed very locally near the injection interface of the IP layer (90 % within the first ≈2 nm). Moreover, it will also be shown that this local absorption results in the excitation of THz standing spin waves within the IP layer. The dispersion measured for these high-frequency spin waves shows a discrepancy with respect to the theoretical predictions, for which an explanation involving intermixed interface regions is proposed. Lastly, the spin current generation is investigated by using magnetic bilayers with a different number of repeats for the Co/Ni multilayer, which proves to be of great relevance for identifying the optical spin current generation mechanism.

  3. Wavelength tunable dual channel solid state laser for terahertz difference frequency generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Evan; Ryasnyanskiy, Aleksandr; Venus, George; Divliansky, Ivan; Vodopyanov, Konstantin L.; Glebov, Leonid

    2017-02-01

    The generation of tunable narrowband terahertz (THz) radiation has shown much interest in recent years. THz systems are used for rotational-vibrational spectroscopy, nondestructive inspection, security screening and others. Monochromatic THz emission has been generated by means of THz parametric oscillation, nonlinear difference frequency generation, and quantum cascade lasers. Intracavity difference frequency generation (DFG) in the nonlinear crystal gallium arsenide (GaAs) is known as an efficient way to generate a continuous wave THz radiation. A novel high power solid state resonator is presented with the use of volume Bragg grating (VBG) technology to create a dual channel system by spectral beam combination. The system consists of two separate Tm:YLF crystals and two VBGs for narrowband wavelength selection. At the end of the resonator both channels share common spherical mirrors, which provide feedback and focuses the beam for nonlinear purposes. This allows each channel to be independent in power and wavelength, eliminating gain competition and allowing individual wavelength tunability. The VBGs are recorded in photo-thermo-refractive glass, which has a high laser induced damage threshold and can withstand the high intracavity power present in the resonator. Tunability of the system has shown spectral spacing from 5 to 20 nm, 0.4 - 1.7 THz, and intracavity continuous wave power levels from 80 to 100 W. By placing the GaAs crystal near the waist, THz radiation can be extracted from the cavity.

  4. TT40 Damage during 2004 High Intensity SPS Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B; Mertens, V; Uythoven, J; Wenninger, J; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2005-01-01

    During high intensity extraction on 25/10/04 an incident occurred in which the vacuum chamber of the TT40 magnet QTRF4002 was badly damaged. The beam was a 450 GeV full LHC injection batch of 3.4 1013 p+ in 288 bunches, and was extracted from SPS LSS4 with the wrong trajectory. Prior to the fatal extraction, problems had occurred over several hours during the setting-up, with beam-induced noise causing the extraction septum interlock to trip the power convertor, and also with the bumped beam position interlock. Deficiencies in the extraction setting-up process, in the interlocking and in the operational procedures used for the high-intensity test were contributing factors. In this note the incident causes are identified, the details reconstructed from the logged data, and the damage to the vacuum chamber analysed. The remedial measures which have already been taken are explained, and further recommendations made concerning the interlocking system performance and tests, as well as the operational procedures wh...

  5. High-intensity interval training in cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud, Thibaut; Nigam, Anil; Gremeaux, Vincent; Meyer, Philippe; Juneau, Martin; Bosquet, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is frequently used in sports training. The effects on cardiorespiratory and muscle systems have led scientists to consider its application in the field of cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this review is to report the effects and interest of HIIT in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure (HF), as well as in persons with high cardiovascular risk. A non-systematic review of the literature in the MEDLINE database using keywords 'exercise', 'high-intensity interval training', 'interval training', 'coronary artery disease', 'coronary heart disease', 'chronic heart failure' and 'metabolic syndrome' was performed. We selected articles concerning basic science research, physiological research, and randomized or non-randomized interventional clinical trials published in English. To summarize, HIIT appears safe and better tolerated by patients than moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE). HIIT gives rise to many short- and long-term central and peripheral adaptations in these populations. In stable and selected patients, it induces substantial clinical improvements, superior to those achieved by MICE, including beneficial effects on several important prognostic factors (peak oxygen uptake, ventricular function, endothelial function), as well as improving quality of life. HIIT appears to be a safe and effective alternative for the rehabilitation of patients with CAD and HF. It may also assist in improving adherence to exercise training. Larger randomized interventional studies are now necessary to improve the indications for this therapy in different populations.

  6. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01

    High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable

  7. Efficient second harmonics generation of a laser-diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and its applications. Laser diode reiki Nd:YAG laser no kokoritsu daini kochoha hassei to sono oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, S.; Oka, M. (Sony Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-08-10

    Stabilization of the second harmonics in a laser-diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and its application are described. The laser is a quantum noise limiting laser, in which a mode competing noise is generated from an interaction between the laser medium Nd:YAG and the type II nonlinear optical crystal KTiOPO{sub 4} when generating a second harmonics in the resonator. However, the quantum noise limiting second harmonics was obtained by means of inserting (1/4) wave length plate in the resonator to release the bond between two intersecting inherent polarization modes. This stabilized green laser is of a single lateral mode is nearly free of aberration. Therefore, an optical disc prototype having three times as much of the currently used density was made using an objective lens having high number of openings to collect lights, which was verified capable of regeneration at a high signal to noise ratio. In addition, higher output is possible by means of parallelizing the excitation, and high output is realized from edge excitation at a fiber bundle. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Acoustic-wave generation in the process of CO2-TEA-laser-radiation interaction with metal targets in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Ileana; Teodorescu, G.; Serbanescu-Oasa, Anca; Dragulinescu, Dumitru; Chis, Ioan; Stoian, Razvan

    1995-03-01

    Laser radiation interaction with materials is a complex process in which creation of acoustic waves or stress waves is a part of it. As a function of the laser radiation energy and intensity incident on steel target surface ultrasound signals were registered and studied. Thermoelastic, ablation and breakdown mechanisms of generation of acoustic waves were analyzed.

  9. Determination of Plasma Screening Effects for Thermonuclear Reactions in Laser-generated Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuanbin; Pálffy, Adriana, E-mail: yuanbin.wu@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: Palffy@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-03-20

    Due to screening effects, nuclear reactions in astrophysical plasmas may behave differently than in the laboratory. The possibility to determine the magnitude of these screening effects in colliding laser-generated plasmas is investigated theoretically, having as a starting point a proposed experimental setup with two laser beams at the Extreme Light Infrastructure facility. A laser pulse interacting with a solid target produces a plasma through the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration scheme, and this rapidly streaming plasma (ion flow) impacts a secondary plasma created by the interaction of a second laser pulse on a gas jet target. We model this scenario here and calculate the reaction events for the astrophysically relevant reaction {sup 13}C({sup 4}He, n ){sup 16}O. We find that it should be experimentally possible to determine the plasma screening enhancement factor for fusion reactions by detecting the difference in reaction events between two scenarios of ion flow interacting with the plasma target and a simple gas target. This provides a way to evaluate nuclear reaction cross-sections in stellar environments and can significantly advance the field of nuclear astrophysics.

  10. Controlled generation of higher-order Poincare sphere beams from a laser

    CERN Document Server

    Naidoo, Darryl; Dudley, Angela; Litvin, Igor; Piccirillo, Bruno; Marucci, Lorenzo; Forbes, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The angular momentum state of light can be described by positions on a higher-order Poincar\\'e (HOP) sphere, where superpositions of spin and orbital angular momentum states give rise to laser beams that have found many applications, including optical communication, quantum information processing, microscopy, optical trapping and tweezing and materials processing. Many techniques exist to create such beams but none to date allow their creation at the source. Here we report on a new class of laser that is able to generate all states on the HOP sphere. We exploit geometric phase control with a non-homogenous polarization optic and a wave-plate inside a laser cavity to map spin angular momentum (SAM) to orbital angular momentum (OAM). Rotation of these two elements provides the necessary degrees of freedom to traverse the entire HOP sphere. As a result, we are able to demonstrate that the OAM degeneracy of a standard laser cavity may be broken, producing pure OAM modes as the output, and that generalized vector ...

  11. Laser ultrasonic analysis of normal modes generated by a voltage pulse on an AT quartz sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Jozefien; Martinez, Loïc; Glorieux, Christ; Wilkie-Chancellier, Nicolas; Ehssein, Chighali Ould; Serfaty, Stéphane

    2006-12-22

    Laser ultrasonic detection is a versatile and highly sensitive tool for the observation of surface waves. In the following study, laser ultrasonic detection is used for the experimental study of spurious normal vibration modes of a disk quartz sensor excited by a voltage pulse. The AT cut crystal (cut of the crystal relative to the the main crystallographic axis is 35.25 degrees) is optimal for generating mainly thickness-shear vibrations (central frequency 6 MHz) on the quartz surface. However, resulting from shear-to-longitudinal and shear-to-surface mode conversion, and from the weak coupling with the other crystallographic axes, other modes (thickness-compressional and bending modes) are always present in the plate response. Since the laser vibrometer is sensitive to normal displacements, the laser investigation shows waves that can be considered as unwanted for the AT quartz used as a shear sensor. The scanned three dimensional (3D) amplitude-space-time signals are carefully analysed using their representation in three dual Fourier domains (space-time, wave number-frequency). Results on the transient analysis of the waves, the normal bending modes and the dispersion curves are shown.

  12. Heat generation above break-even from laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmlid, Leif

    2015-08-01

    Previous results from laser-induced processes in ultra-dense deuterium D(0) give conclusive evidence for ejection of neutral massive particles with energy >10 MeV u-1. Such particles can only be formed from nuclear processes like nuclear fusion at the low laser intensity used. Heat generation is of interest for future fusion energy applications and has now been measured by a small copper (Cu) cylinder surrounding the laser target. The temperature rise of the Cu cylinder is measured with an NTC resistor during around 5000 laser shots per measured point. No heating in the apparatus or the gas feed is normally used. The fusion process is suboptimal relative to previously published studies by a factor of around 10. The small neutral particles HN(0) of ultra-dense hydrogen (size of a few pm) escape with a substantial fraction of the energy. Heat loss to the D2 gas (at deuterium as fusion fuel. With a slightly different setup, a thermal gain of 2 is reached, thus clearly above break-even for all neutronicity values possible. Also including the large kinetic energy which is directly measured for MeV particles leaving through a small opening gives a gain of 2.3. Taking into account the lower efficiency now due to the suboptimal fusion process, previous studies indicate a gain of at least 20 during long periods.

  13. Polarisation-dependent generation of fs-laser induced periodic surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräf, Stephan; Müller, Frank A.

    2015-03-01

    The formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPPS) was investigated on polished stainless steel surfaces under irradiation with fs-laser pulses characterised by a pulse duration τ = 300 fs, a laser wavelength λ = 1025 nm, a repetition frequency frep = 250 Hz and a laser fluence F = 1 J/cm2. For this purpose line scans with a scanning velocity v = 0.5 mm/s were performed in air environment at normal incidence utilising a well-defined temporal control of the electrical field vector. The generated surface structures were characterised by optical microscopy, by scanning electron microscopy and by atomic force microscopy in combination with Fourier transformation. The results reveal the formation of a homogenous and highly periodic surface pattern of ripples with a period Λexp ≈ 925 nm aligned perpendicular to the incident electric field vector for static linear polarisation states. Utilising a motor-driven rotation device it was demonstrated that a continuously rotating electric field vector allows to transfer the originally well-ordered periodic ripples into tailored disordered surface structures that could be of particular interest for e.g. absorbing surfaces, plasmonic enhanced optoelectronic devices and biomedical applications.

  14. D-D nuclear fusion processes induced in polyethylene foams by TW Laser-generated plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deuterium-Deuterium fusion processes were generated by focusing the 3 TW PALS Laser on solid deuterated polyethylene targets placed in vacuum. Deuterium ion acceleration of the order of 4 MeV was obtained using laser irradiance Iλ2 ∼ 5 × 1016 W μm2/cm2 on the target. Thin and thick targets, at low and high density, were irradiated and plasma properties were monitored “on line” and “off line”. The ion emission from plasma was monitored with Thomson Parabola Spectrometer, track detectors and ion collectors. Fast semiconductor detectors based on SiC and fast plastic scintillators, both employed in time-of-flight configuration, have permitted to detect the characteristic 3.0 MeV protons and 2.45 MeV neutrons emission from the nuclear fusion reactions. From massive absorbent targets we have evaluated the neutron flux by varying from negligible values up to about 5 × 107 neutrons per laser shot in the case of foams targets, indicating a reaction rate of the order of 108 fusion events per laser shot using “advanced targets”.

  15. D-D nuclear fusion processes induced in polyethylene foams by TW Laser-generated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Cavallaro, S.; Ullschmied, J.

    2015-06-01

    Deuterium-Deuterium fusion processes were generated by focusing the 3 TW PALS Laser on solid deuterated polyethylene targets placed in vacuum. Deuterium ion acceleration of the order of 4 MeV was obtained using laser irradiance Iλ2 ˜ 5 × 1016 W μm2/cm2 on the target. Thin and thick targets, at low and high density, were irradiated and plasma properties were monitored "on line" and "off line". The ion emission from plasma was monitored with Thomson Parabola Spectrometer, track detectors and ion collectors. Fast semiconductor detectors based on SiC and fast plastic scintillators, both employed in time-of-flight configuration, have permitted to detect the characteristic 3.0 MeV protons and 2.45 MeV neutrons emission from the nuclear fusion reactions. From massive absorbent targets we have evaluated the neutron flux by varying from negligible values up to about 5 × 107 neutrons per laser shot in the case of foams targets, indicating a reaction rate of the order of 108 fusion events per laser shot using "advanced targets".

  16. MeV ion beams generated by intense pulsed laser monitored by Silicon Carbide detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagno, L.; Musumeci, P.; Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; La Via, F.; Ullschmied, J.

    2014-04-01

    The high energy ions produced with intense pulsed laser were analyzed with Silicon Carbide detectors. In order to realize high performances and radiation resistant detectors, high quality and thick epitaxial layer were grown on a substrate and a Schottky diodes were then realized. These detectors were employed to probe the plasma generated with a 300 ps laser at intensity of 1016 W/cm2 operating at Prague Asterix Laser System Laboratory. They show a fast response and a high sensitivity to high energy ions. Metallic and polymeric thin films were irradiated and the produced plasmas were monitored in forward and backward directions. The analysis of the time-of-flight spectra evidences the emission of protons and ions at different energies. The spectra were deconvolved with a shifted Maxwell Boltzmann distribution. In our experimental conditions we detected protons in the energy range 1.2 - 3.0 MeV and heavy ions between 1.0 MeV up to 40 MeV depending on the target and the laser energy. The results were compared with the ones obtained by Thompson Parabola Spectrometer.

  17. High intensity surface plasma waves, theory and PIC simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, M.; Héron, A.; Adam, J.-C.

    2018-01-01

    With the development of intense (>1019 W cm‑2) short pulses (≤25 fs) laser with very high contrast, surface plasma wave (SPW) can be explored in the relativistic regime. As the SPW propagates with a phase velocity close to the speed of light it may results in a strong acceleration of electron bunches along the surface permitting them to reach relativistic energies. This may be important e.g. for applications in the field of plasma-based accelerators. We investigate in this work the excitation of SPWs on grating preformed over-dense plasmas for laser intensities ranging from 1019 up to 1021 W cm‑2. We discuss the nature of the interaction with respect to the solid case in which surface plasmon can be resonantly excited with weak laser intensity. In particular, we show the importance of the pulse duration and focalization of the laser beam on the amplitude of the SPW.

  18. Inhibition of enteric pathogens and surrogates using integrated, high intensity 405nm led light on the surface of almonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The disinfecting properties of 405 nm light were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and their non-pathogenic surrogate bacteria on the surface of almonds. High intensity monochromatic blue light (MBL) was generated from an array of narrow-band 405 nm light-emitting diodes (LE...

  19. Femtosecond laser ablation of transparent microphotonic devices and computer-generated holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqurashi, Tawfiq; Montelongo, Yunuen; Penchev, Pavel; Yetisen, Ali K; Dimov, Stefan; Butt, Haider

    2017-09-21

    Femtosecond laser ablation allows direct patterning of engineering materials in industrial settings without requiring multistage processes such as photolithography or electron beam lithography. However, femtosecond lasers have not been widely used to construct volumetric microphotonic devices and holograms with high reliability and cost efficiency. Here, a direct femtosecond laser writing process is developed to rapidly produce transmission 1D/2D gratings, Fresnel Zone Plate lenses, and computer-generated holograms. The optical properties including light transmission, angle-dependent resolution, and light polarization effects for the microphotonic devices have been characterized. Varying the depth of the microgratings from 400 nm to 1.5 μm allowed the control over their transmission intensity profile. The optical properties of the 1D/2D gratings were validated through a geometrical theory of diffraction model involving 2D phase modulation. The produced Fresnel lenses had transmission efficiency of ∼60% at normal incidence and they preserved the polarization of incident light. The computer-generated holograms had an average transmission efficiency of 35% over the visible spectrum. These microphotonic devices had wettability resistance of contact angle ranging from 44° to 125°. These devices can be used in a variety of applications including wavelength-selective filters, dynamic displays, fiber optics, and biomedical devices.

  20. Tungsten disulphide for ultrashort pulse generation in all-fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjun; Pang, Lihui; Han, Hainian; Bi, Ke; Lei, Ming; Wei, Zhiyi

    2017-05-11

    Tungsten disulphide (WS2), which exhibits excellent saturable absorption properties, has attracted much attention in the applications of photonic devices. In this paper, WS2 is applied for the preparation of a saturable absorber (SA). Using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method, WS2 is deposited on the side surface of the tapered fiber. In order to obtain larger non-linearity of the SAs with evanescent wave interaction, the tapered fiber had a smaller waist diameter and longer fused zone. Gold film was deposited on the fiber-taper WS2 SAs to improve their reliability and avoid oxidation and corrosion. Employing the balanced twin-detector method, the modulation depth of the fiber-taper WS2 SAs was measured to be 17.2%. With the fiber-taper WS2 SA, a generated pulse with 246 fs duration and a 57 nm bandwidth was obtained at 1561 nm. The electrical signal to noise ratio was better than 92 dB. To our knowledge, the pulse duration was the shortest among the reported all-fiber lasers with transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) SAs. These results indicate that fiber-taper WS2 SAs with smaller waist diameter and longer fused zone are promising photonic devices for ultrashort pulse generation in all-fiber lasers.

  1. Laser-generated shock wave attenuation aimed at microscale pyrotechnic device design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeonju Yu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To meet the rising demand for miniaturizing the pyrotechnic device that consists of donor/acceptor pair separated by a bulkhead or a thin gap, the shock initiation sensitivity in the microscale gap test configuration is investigated. For understanding the shock attenuation within a gap sample (304 stainless steel thickness of 10∼800 μm, the laser-generated shock wave in water confinement is adopted. The shock properties are obtained from the free surface velocity by making use of a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR. Analytical models for plasma generation in a confined geometry and for evolution and decay of shock waves during the propagation are considered. The shape and amplitude of the laser-driven initial pressure load and its attenuation pattern in the gap are effectively controlled for targeting the microscale propagation distance and subsequent triggering pressure for the acceptor charge. The reported results are important in the precise controlling of the shock strength during the laser initiation of microscale pyrotechnic devices.

  2. New initiatives on lepton flavor violation and neutrino oscillation with high intense muon and neutrino sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kuno, Yoshitaka; Pakvasa, Sandip

    2002-01-01

    The area of physics involving muons and neutrinos has become exciting in particle physics. Using their high intensity sources, physicists undertake, in various ways, extensive searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model, such as tests of supersymmetric grand unification (SUSY-GUT) and precision measurements of the muon and neutrino properties, which will in future extend to ambitious studies such as determination of the three-generation neutrino mixing matrix elements and CP violation in the lepton sector. The physics of this field is advancing, with potential improvements of the source

  3. A laser-activated MEMS transducer for efficient generation of narrowband longitudinal ultrasonic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuesheng; Stratoudaki, Theodosia; Sharples, Steve D; Clark, Matt

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate an optically powered microelectromechanical system (MEMS) transducer. It was designed and fabricated using MEMS techniques, and can generate narrowband ultrasonic bulk waves from a broadband laser excitation pulse with high efficiency. The transducer is a two-mask-level MEMS device with a microdisk seated on a microstem. When a laser pulse is incident on the disk center, a resonant flapping motion of the disk is actuated because of the thermomechanical interaction between the absorbing and non-absorbing parts of the disk, coupling a narrowband longitudinal bulk wave propagating along the axis of the stem into the sample. Finite element (FE) methods were used to simulate the generated ultrasound; the results agree well with experimental measurements. Experiments with the fabricated transducers have shown that narrowband ultrasound with a high SNR/amplitude was generated successfully; compared with normal thermoelastic generation, ultrasound with at least 5 times higher amplitude can be achieved by an optimized MEMS transducer. The transducer is inexpensive, compact, and simple to use.

  4. Optimization of multi-color laser waveform for high-order harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cheng; Lin, C. D.

    2016-09-01

    With the development of laser technologies, multi-color light-field synthesis with complete amplitude and phase control would make it possible to generate arbitrary optical waveforms. A practical optimization algorithm is needed to generate such a waveform in order to control strong-field processes. We review some recent theoretical works of the optimization of amplitudes and phases of multi-color lasers to modify the single-atom high-order harmonic generation based on genetic algorithm. By choosing different fitness criteria, we demonstrate that: (i) harmonic yields can be enhanced by 10 to 100 times, (ii) harmonic cutoff energy can be substantially extended, (iii) specific harmonic orders can be selectively enhanced, and (iv) single attosecond pulses can be efficiently generated. The possibility of optimizing macroscopic conditions for the improved phase matching and low divergence of high harmonics is also discussed. The waveform control and optimization are expected to be new drivers for the next wave of breakthrough in the strong-field physics in the coming years. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. 30916011207), Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U. S. Department of Energy (Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13491), and Air Force Office of Scientific Research, USA (Grant No. FA9550-14-1-0255).

  5. High Intensity Beam and X-Ray Converter Target Interactions and Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chem, Y-J; McCarrick, J F; Guethlein, G; Chambers, F; Falabella, S; Lauer, E; Richardson, R; Weir, J

    2002-07-31

    Ions extracted from a solid surface or plasma by impact of an high intensity and high current electron beam can partially neutralize the beam space charge and change the focusing system. We have investigated ion emission computationally and experimentally. By matching PIC simulation results with available experimental data, our finding suggests that if a mix of ion species is available at the emitting surface, protons dominate the backstreaming ion effects, and that, unless there is surface flashover, ion emission is source limited. We have also investigated mitigation, such as e-beam cleaning, laser cleaning and ion trapping with a foil barrier. The temporal behavior of beam spot size with a foil barrier and a focusing scheme to improve foil barrier performance are discussed.

  6. Comprehensive analysis of heat generation and efficient measurement of fractional thermal loading in a solid-state laser medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. T.; Zhang, R. H.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we provide a detailed analysis of heat generation in a solid-state laser medium. The fractional thermal loadings are different for different physical processes in a laser medium, including the fluorescence process, stimulated emission, energy transfer up-conversion and excited-state absorption. Applying this theoretical analysis in a diode-end-pumped Nd:GdVO4 laser at 1342 nm, and using a simple and efficient method to measure the thermal loading of the solid-state laser medium presented, the experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretically calculated results.

  7. Nonlinearity-tailored fiber laser technology for low-noise, ultra-wideband tunable femtosecond light generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Iegorov, Roman

    2017-01-01

    The emission wavelength of a laser is physically predetermined by the gain medium used.Consequently,arbitrary wavelength generation is a fundamental challenge in the science of light. Present solutions include optical parametric generation, requiring complex optical setups and spectrally sliced...... demonstration of this simple and inexpensive technology, we present a femtosecond fiber laser continuously tunable across the entire red–green–blue spectral range....

  8. A space-based combined thermophotovoltaic electric generator and gas laser solar energy conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesil, Oktay

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a spaceborne energy conversion system consisting of a thermophotovoltaic electric generator and a gas laser. As a power source for the converson, the system utilizes an intermediate blackbody cavity heated to a temperature of 2000-2400 K by concentrated solar radiation. A double-layer solar cell of GaAs and Si forms a cylindrical surface concentric to this blackbody cavity, receiving the blackbody radiation and converting it into electricity with cell conversion efficiency of 50 percent or more. If the blackbody cavity encloses a laser medium, the blackbody radiation can also be used to simultaneously pump a lasing gas. The feasibility of blackbody optical pumping at 4.3 microns in a CO2-He gas mixture was experimentally demonstrated.

  9. Opportunities for chiral discrimination using high harmonic generation in tailored laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, Olga; Patchkovskii, Serguei

    2015-01-01

    Chiral discrimination with high harmonic generation (cHHG method) has been introduced in the recent work by R. Cireasa et al ( Nat. Phys. 11, 654 - 658, 2015). In its original implementation, the cHHG method works by detecting high harmonic emission from randomly oriented ensemble of chiral molecules driven by elliptically polarized field, as a function of ellipticity. Here we discuss future perspectives in the development of this novel method, the ways of increasing chiral dichroism using tailored laser pulses, new detection schemes involving high harmonic phase measurements, and concentration-independent approaches. Using the example of the epoxypropane molecule C$_3$H$_6$O (also known as 1,2-propylene oxide), we show theoretically that application of two-color counter-rotating elliptically polarized laser fields yields an order of magnitude enhancement of chiral dichroism compared to single color elliptical fields. We also describe how one can introduce a new functionality to cHHG: concentration-independen...

  10. Generation of broadband noise-like pulse from Yb-doped fiber laser ring cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Ganeev, Rashid A; Yoneya, Shin; Kuroda, Hiroto

    2015-03-01

    We have demonstrated a generation of the noise-like pulse (NLP) with broadband spectrum in a nonlinear polarized evolution-based passive mode-locked Yb-doped fiber (YDF) ring laser. At the cavity dispersion of near zero, the NLP with spectrum bandwidth up to 131 nm (FWHM) was obtained at a central wavelength of 1070 nm with output power of 136 mW and 80 MHz repetition rate. To our best knowledge, this spectrum bandwidth of NLP is the broadest among the reported YDF lasers. The autocorrelation function of pulse contained the short (30 fs) and long (4.6 ps) components. This short coherence light source is well suited for the optical coherent tomography used for ophthalmology at a wavelength of ∼1000  nm.

  11. Astrophysics of magnetically collimated jets generated from laser-produced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardi, A; Vinci, T; Fuchs, J; Albertazzi, B; Riconda, C; Pépin, H; Portugall, O

    2013-01-11

    The generation of astrophysically relevant jets, from magnetically collimated, laser-produced plasmas, is investigated through three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We show that for laser intensities I∼10(12)-10(14) W cm(-2), a magnetic field in excess of ∼0.1  MG, can collimate the plasma plume into a prolate cavity bounded by a shock envelope with a standing conical shock at its tip, which recollimates the flow into a supermagnetosonic jet beam. This mechanism is equivalent to astrophysical models of hydrodynamic inertial collimation, where an isotropic wind is focused into a jet by a confining circumstellar toruslike envelope. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for a large-scale magnetic field to produce jets from wide-angle winds.

  12. Laser generation of shock waves in a water suspension with light-absorbing particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besaga, Vira R; Maksimyak, Andrew P; Maksimyak, Peter P

    2014-04-01

    We report the generation of shock waves in a disperse medium with absorbing particles of black pigment in the water using continuous laser radiation. As a result of the experimental investigation it was found that the illuminating beam diameter growth at the constant laser power results in the decrease of the signals' modulation frequencies, improving their stability and increasing their amplitudes. In turn, the decrease of the signal's modulation frequency is caused by the growth of time, which is needed for heating the medium to the critical temperature of cavitation. Improving the stability and the increase of optical and acoustic signal amplitudes take place, due to the growth of the medium volume and hence the number of pigment particles that participate in cavitation.

  13. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered.

  14. High Intensity Interval Training for Maximizing Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Trine; Aamot, Inger-Lise; Haykowsky, Mark; Rognmo, Øivind

    Regular physical activity and exercise training are important actions to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and maintain health throughout life. There is solid evidence that exercise is an effective preventative strategy against at least 25 medical conditions, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, colon and breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Traditionally, endurance exercise training (ET) to improve health related outcomes has consisted of low- to moderate ET intensity. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that higher exercise intensities may be superior to moderate intensity for maximizing health outcomes. The primary objective of this review is to discuss how aerobic high-intensity interval training (HIIT) as compared to moderate continuous training may maximize outcomes, and to provide practical advices for successful clinical and home-based HIIT. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce C. Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  16. High Intensity Beam Issues in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Aumon, Sandra; Rivkin, Leonid

    This PhD work is about limitations of high intensity proton beams observed in the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) and, in particular, about issues at injection and transition energies. With its 53 years, the CERN PS would have to operate beyond the limit of its performance to match the future requirements. Beam instabilities driven by transverse impedance and aperture restrictions are important issues for the operation and for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade which foresees an intensity increase delivered by the injectors. The main subject of the thesis concerns the study of a fast transverse instability occurring at transition energy. The proton beams crossing this energy range are particularly sensitive to wake forces because of the slow synchrotron motion. This instability can cause a strong vertical emittance blow-up and severe losses in less than a synchrotron period. Experimental observations show that the particles at the peak density of the beam longitudinal distribution oscillate in the vertical plane du...

  17. High-intensity therapeutic ultrasound: metrological requirements versus clinical usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, J.-F.

    2012-10-01

    High-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) is an appealing non-invasive, non-ionizing therapeutic modality with a wide range of tissue interactions ranging from transient permeabilization of cell membranes to thermal ablation. The ability to guide and monitor the treatment with an associated ultrasonic or magnetic resonance imaging device has resulted in a dramatic rise in the clinical use of therapeutic ultrasound in the past two decades. Nevertheless, the range of clinical applications and the number of patients treated has grown at a much higher pace than the definition of standards. In this paper the metrological requirements of the therapeutic beams are reviewed and are compared with the current clinical use of image-guided HITU mostly based on a practical approach. Liver therapy, a particularly challenging clinical application, is discussed to highlight the differences between some complex clinical situations and the experimental conditions of the metrological characterization of ultrasonic transducers.

  18. Adaptive RF Transient Reduction for HIGH Intensity Beams with Gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    When a high-intensity beam with bunch-trains and gaps passes a cavity with a high-gain vector feedback enforcing a constant voltage, large transients appear, stressing the RF high power hardware and increasing the trip rate. By modulating the cavity voltage with a varying periodic waveform (set-function), the RF power can be made constant while still preserving the high feedback gain. The average cavity voltage is conserved but bunches have to settle at slightly shifted positions. A method is derived to obtain this set-function in practice while making no assumptions or measurements of the beam or RF parameters. Adiabatic iterations are made including the whole machine as an analog computing device, using all parameters as they are. A computer simulation shows the success of the method.

  19. Fast damping in mismatched high intensity beam transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Variale

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available A very fast damping of beam envelope oscillation amplitudes was recently observed in simulations of high intensity beam transport, through periodic FODO cells, in mismatched conditions [V. Variale, Nuovo Cimento Soc. Ital. Fis. 112A, 1571–1582 (1999 and T. Clauser et al., in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, 1999 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1999, p. 1779]. A Landau damping mechanism was proposed at the origin of observed effect. In this paper, to further investigate the source of this fast damping, extensive simulations have been carried out. The results presented here support the interpretation of the mechanism at the origin of the fast damping as a Landau damping effect.

  20. The High-Intensity Hyperon Beam at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrov, Yu.A.; Dropmann, F.; Fournier, A.; Grafstrom, P.; Hubbard, E.; Paul, S.; Siebert, H.W.; Trombini, A.; Zavertyaev, M.

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity hyperon beam was constructed at CERN to deliver S- to experiment WA89 at the Omega facility and operated from 1989 to 1994. The setup allowed rapid changeover between hyperon and conventional hadron beam configurations. The beam provided a S- flux of 1.4 x 105 per burst at mean momenta between 330 and 345 GeV/c produced by about 3 x 1010 protons of 450 GeV/c. At the experiment target the beam had a S-/p- ratio close to 0.4 and a size of 1.6 x 3.7 cm2. The beam particle trajectories and their momenta were measured with a scintillating fibre hodoscope in the beam channel and a silicon microstrip detector at the exit of the channel. A fast transition radiation detector was used to identify the pion component of the beam