WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-heat flux electronics

  1. Microgravity experiments on boiling and applications: research activity of advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koichi; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Research and development on advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices has been carried out as the Project of Fundamental Technology Development for Energy Conservation, promoted by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO). Based on the microgravity experiments on boiling heat transfer, the following useful results have obtained for the cooling of electronic devices. In subcooled flow boiling in a small channel, heat flux increases considerably more than the ordinary critical heat flux with microbubble emission in transition boiling, and dry out of the heating surface is disturbed. Successful enhancement of heat transfer is achieved by a capillary effect from grooved surface dual subchannels on the liquid supply. The critical heat flux increases 30-40 percent more than for ordinary subchannels. A self-wetting mechanism has been proposed, following investigation of bubble behavior in pool boiling of binary mixtures under microgravity. Ideas and a new concept have been proposed for the design of future cooling system in power electronics.

  2. Conceptual Design of Vacuum Chamber for testing of high heat flux components using electron beam as a source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. S.; Swamy, Rajamannar; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Divertors Division, Prototype

    2012-11-01

    A conceptual design of vacuum chamber is proposed to study the thermal response of high heat flux components under energy depositions of the magnitude and durations expected in plasma fusion devices. It is equipped with high power electron beam with maximum beam power of 200 KW mounted in a stationary horizontal position from back side of the chamber. The electron beam is used as a heat source to evaluate the heat removal capacity, material performance under thermal loads & stresses, thermal fatigue etc on actively cooled mock - ups which are mounted on a flange system which is the front side door of the chamber. The tests mock - ups are connected to a high pressure high temperature water circulation system (HPHT-WCS) operated over a wide range of conditions. The vacuum chamber consists of different ports at different angles to view the mock -up surface available for mock -up diagnostics. The vacuum chamber is pumped with different pumps mounted on side ports of the chamber. The chamber is shielded from X - rays which are generated inside the chamber when high-energy electrons are incident on the mock-up. The design includes development of a conceptual design with theoretical calculations and CAD modelling of the system using CATIA V5. These CAD models give an outline on the complete geometry of HHF test chamber, fabrication challenges and safety issues. FEA analysis of the system has been performed to check the structural integrity when the system is subjected to structural & thermal loads.

  3. High Heat Flux Testing of B4C/Cu and SiC/Cu Functionally Graded Materials Simulated by Laser and Electron Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘翔; 谌继明; 张斧; 许增裕; 葛昌纯; 李江涛

    2002-01-01

    B4C, SiC and C, Cu functionally graded-materials (FGMs) have been developed by plasma spraying and hot pressing. Their high-heat flux properties have been investigated by high energy laser and electron beam for the simulation of plasma disruption process of the future fusion reactors, And a study on eroded products of B4C/Cu FGM under transient thermal load of electron beam was performed. In the experiment, SEM and EDS analysis indicated that B4C and SiC were decomposed, carbon was preferentially evaporated under high thermal load, and a part of Si and Cu were melted, in addition, the splash of melted metal and the particle emission of brittle destruction were also found. Different erosive behaviors of carbon-based materials (CBMs) caused by laser and electron beam were also discussed.

  4. High heat flux loop heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Mark T.; Sarraf, David B.; Rosenfeld, John H.; Maidanik, Yuri F.; Vershinin, Sergey

    1997-01-01

    Loop Heat Pipes (LHPs) can transport very large thermal power loads, over long distances, through flexible, small diameter tubes and against high gravitational heads. While recent LHPs have transported as much as 1500 W, the peak heat flux through a LHP's evaporator has been limited to about 0.07 MW/m2. This limitation is due to the arrangement of vapor passages next to the heat load which is one of the conditions necessary to ensure self priming of the device. This paper describes work aimed at raising this limit by threefold to tenfold. Two approaches were pursued. One optimized the vapor passage geometry for the high heat flux conditions. The geometry improved the heat flow into the wick and working fluid. This approach also employed a finer pored wick to support higher vapor flow losses. The second approach used a bidisperse wick material within the circumferential vapor passages. The bidisperse material increased the thermal conductivity and the evaporative surface area in the region of highest heat flux, while providing a flow path for the vapor. Proof-of-concept devices were fabricated and tested for each approach. Both devices operated as designed and both demonstrated operation at a heat flux of 0.70 MW/m2. This performance exceeded the known state of the art by a factor of more than six for both conventional heat pipes and for loop heat pipes using ammonia. In addition, the bidisperse-wick device demonstrated boiling heat transfer coefficients up to 100,000 W/m2.K, and the fine pored device demonstrated an orientation independence with its performance essentially unaffected by whether its evaporator was positioned above, below or level with the condenser.

  5. High heat flux transport by microbubble emission boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koichi

    2007-10-01

    In highly subcooled flow boiling, coalescing bubbles on the heating surface collapse to many microbubbles in the beginning of transition boiling and the heat flux increases higher than the ordinary critical heat flux. This phenomenon is called Microbubble Emission Boiling, MEB. It is generated in subcooled flow boiling and the maximum heat flux reaches about 1 kW/cm2(10 MW/m2) at liquid subcooling of 40 K and liquid velocity of 0.5 m/s for a small heating surface of 10 mm×10 mm which is placed at the bottom surface of horizontal rectangular channel. The high pressure in the channel is observed at collapse of the coalescing bubbles and it is closely related the size of coalescing bubbles. Periodic pressure waves are observed in MEB and the heat flux increases linearly in proportion to the pressure frequency. The frequency is considered the frequency of liquid-solid exchange on the heating surface. For the large sized heating surface of 50 mm length×20 mm width, the maximum heat flux obtained is 500 W/cm2 (5 MW/m2) at liquid subcooling of 40 K and liquid velocity of 0.5 m/s. This is considerably higher heat flux than the conventional cooling limit in power electronics. It is difficult to remove the high heat flux by MEB for a longer heating surface than 50 mm by single channel type. A model of advanced cooling device is introduced for power electronics by subcooled flow boiling with impinging jets. Themaxumum cooling heat flux is 500 W/cm2 (5 MW/m2). Microbubble emission boiling is useful for a high heat flux transport technology in future power electronics used in a fuel-cell power plant and a space facility.

  6. High heat flux engineering in solar energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, C.P.

    1993-07-01

    Solar thermal energy systems can produce heat fluxes in excess of 10,000 kW/m{sup 2}. This paper provides an introduction to the solar concentrators that produce high heat flux, the receivers that convert the flux into usable thermal energy, and the instrumentation systems used to measure flux in the solar environment. References are incorporated to direct the reader to detailed technical information.

  7. Baseline high heat flux and plasma facing materials for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Y.; Schmid, K.; Balden, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Loewenhoff, Th.; Ito, A.; Hasegawa, A.; Hardie, C.; Porton, M.; Gilbert, M.

    2017-09-01

    In fusion reactors, surfaces of plasma facing components (PFCs) are exposed to high heat and particle flux. Tungsten and Copper alloys are primary candidates for plasma facing materials (PFMs) and coolant tube materials, respectively, mainly due to high thermal conductivity and, in the case of tungsten, its high melting point. In this paper, recent understandings and future issues on responses of tungsten and Cu alloys to fusion environments (high particle flux (including T and He), high heat flux, and high neutron doses) are reviewed. This review paper includes; Tritium retention in tungsten (K. Schmid and M. Balden), Impact of stationary and transient heat loads on tungsten (J.W. Coenen and Th. Loewenhoff), Helium effects on surface morphology of tungsten (Y. Ueda and A. Ito), Neutron radiation effects in tungsten (A. Hasegawa), and Copper and copper alloys development for high heat flux components (C. Hardie, M. Porton, and M. Gilbert).

  8. Development activities of the high heat flux scraper element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscary, J., E-mail: jean.boscary@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); Lore, J.; Lumsdaine, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Maier, M. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); McGinnis, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peacock, A.; Tretter, J. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The function of the high heat flux scraper element is to reduce the heat loads on the element ends of the actively cooled divertor of Wendelstein 7-X. The scraper element is actively water cooled to remove up to 550 kW steady state power load, with localized heat fluxes as high as 20 MW/m{sup 2}. Its surface area, 0.17 m{sup 2}, is contoured to optimally intercept both upstream and downstream particle fluxes. The plasma facing surface is made of 24 individual scraper fingers based on the monoblock technology. Each scraper finger is 247 mm long and 28 mm wide and has 13 monoblocks made of CFC NB31 bonded by hot isostatic pressing onto a CuCrZr cooling tube equipped with a copper twisted tape. Development activities, described here, include the design and fabrication of prototypes to validate the different technologies selected for the scraper element design to prepare a possible production.

  9. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    -section components has become critical, but at the same time the service conditions have put our best alloy systems to their limits. As a result, implementation of cooling holes and thermal barrier coatings are new advances in hot-section technologies now looked at for modifications to reach higher temperature applications. Current thermal barrier coatings used in today's turbine applications is known as 8%yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and there are no coatings for current thrust chambers. Current research is looking at the applicability of 8%yttria-stabilized hafnia (YSH) for turbine applications and the implementation of 8%YSZ onto thrust chambers. This study intends to determine if the use of thermal barrier coatings are applicable for high heat flux thrust chambers using industrial YSZ will be advantageous for improvements in efficiency, thrust and longer service life by allowing the thrust chambers to be used more than once.

  10. Visualization Study on High Heat Flux Boiling and Critical Heat Flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Satbyoul; Kim, Hyungdae [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, an integrated visible and infrared-based experimental method is introduced to simultaneously measure the details of high-resolution liquid-vapor phase and heat transfer distributions on a heated wall. The dynamics and heat transfer at high heat flux boiling and critical heat flux were observed. The experiment was conducted in pool of saturated water under atmospheric pressure. There have been many studies to examine the physical mechanisms of nucleation boiling and critical heat flux over several decades. Several visible and infrared-based optical techniques for time-resolved high resolution measurements for liquid-vapor phase and heater surface temperature during boiling have been introduced to understand the characteristics and mechanisms of them. Liquid-vapor phase, temperature, and heat flux distributions on the heated surface were measured during pool boiling of water using the integrated total reflection and infrared thermometry technique. Qualitative examination of the data for high heat flux boiling and CHF was performed. The main contributions of this work are summarized below. The existence and behavior of dry patches lead the way toward CHF condition. Therefore, the mechanistic modeling of the CHF phenomenon necessarily needs to include the physical parameters related to dynamics of the large dry patch such as life time and size. In addition to the dynamic behavior of the dry patch, the thermal behavior of the hot patch is also important. Even though the dry area was rewetted, the stored thermal energy in the hot patch can be remained if the rewetting time is short and the subsequent dry patch is regenerated quickly.

  11. COMPARISON OF COOLING SCHEMES FOR HIGH HEAT FLUX COMPONENTS COOLING IN FUSION REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phani Kumar Domalapally

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Some components of the fusion reactor receives high heat fluxes either during the startup and shutdown or during the operation of the machine. This paper analyzes different ways of enhancing heat transfer using helium and water for cooling of these high heat flux components and then conclusions are drawn to decide the best choice of coolant, for usage in near and long term applications.

  12. Development of heat pipe cooling technology in high heat flux electronic components%高热流密度电子元件中热管散热技术的进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝俊娇; 潘日; 周刚; 张亚军; 庄俭

    2015-01-01

    Cooling performance of tradiator is an important factor affecting service life of electronic component and security. Heat pipe is widely used in high heat flux electronic components because of its small size,high cooling capacity and no consumption of power. The overall structure innovations of heat pipe radiator,particularly different arrangements and combinations of heat pipe are summarized,and thermal performance enhancements of heat pipe,including improvement of internal wick structure,complex internal wick structure manufacture are studied. The introduction of nano-fluid for heat transfer improvement is analyzed,and the relevant methods of heat sink thermal performance analysis and parameter optimization are introduced. The development trends and prospects of new structural design concept of heat pipe radiator,nano-fluid model and manufacture of compound liquid-absorbing core are proposed according to analyzing and summarizing research achievements.%散热器的散热性能是影响电子元件使用寿命与安全性的重要因素,热管以其空间尺寸小、冷却能力高、无需消耗动力等优点在高热流密度元件的散热技术领域得到广泛应用。文中总结了热管散热器整体结构设计的创新尤其是热管的不同排布和组合,研究了热管元件性能的提高包括热管内部吸液芯的改进、复杂结构吸液芯的制造,分析了纳米流体工质的引入对换热效果的强化,介绍了散热器热性能分析和参数优化的相关方法。通过分析总结国内外研究成果,提出了新概念热管散热器的结构设计、纳米流体理论模型及复合吸液芯的加工制造等方面的发展趋势与展望。

  13. Plasma–Surface Interactions Under High Heat and Particle Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory De Temmerman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasma-surface interactions expected in the divertor of a future fusion reactor are characterized by extreme heat and particle fluxes interacting with the plasma-facing surfaces. Powerful linear plasma generators are used to reproduce the expected plasma conditions and allow plasma-surface interactions studies under those very harsh conditions. While the ion energies on the divertor surfaces of a fusion device are comparable to those used in various plasma-assited deposition and etching techniques, the ion (and energy fluxes are up to four orders of magnitude higher. This large upscale in particle flux maintains the surface under highly non-equilibrium conditions and bring new effects to light, some of which will be described in this paper.

  14. High heat flux capabilities of the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Temmerman, G., E-mail: g.c.detemmerman@differ.nl; Berg, M.A. van den; Scholten, J.; Lof, A.; Meiden, H.J. van der; Eck, H.J.N. van; Morgan, T.W.; Kruijf, T.M. de; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Zielinski, J.J.

    2013-10-15

    Magnum-PSI is an advanced linear plasma device uniquely capable of producing plasma conditions similar to those expected in the divertor of ITER both steady-state and transients. The machine is designed both for fundamental studies of plasma–surface interactions under high heat and particle fluxes, and as a high-heat flux facility for the tests of plasma-facing components under realistic plasma conditions. To study the effects of transient heat loads on a plasma-facing surface, a novel pulsed plasma source system as well as a high power laser is available. In this article, we will describe the capabilities of Magnum-PSI for high-heat flux tests of plasma-facing materials.

  15. High heat flux testing of EU tungsten monoblock mock-ups for the ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavila, P., E-mail: pierre.gavila@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Riccardi, B. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Pintsuk, G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Ritz, G. [AREVA NP, Centre Technique France, 71205 Le Creusot (France); Kuznetsov, V. [JCS “Efremov Institute”, Doroga na Metallostroy 3, Metallostroy, Saint-Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation); Durocher, A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • All the tested items sustained the ITER Full W divertor qualification program requirements. This confirms that the technology for the manufacturing of the first set of the ITER Divertor is available in Europe. • The surface roughening and local melting of the W surface under high heat flux was proven to be significantly reduced for an armour thickness lower or equal to 6 mm. • However, this campaign highlighted some specific areas of improvement to be implemented ideally before the upcoming ITER Divertor IVT serial production. • The issue of the self-castellation of the W monoblocks, which typically appears after a few tenths of cycles at 20 MW/m{sup 2}, is critical because it generates some uncontrolled defects at the amour to heat sink joints. Besides, they create a gap which exposure is almost perpendicular to the magnetic field lines and which might lead to local W melting in the strike point region. • This campaign also evidenced that the minimum IO requirements on the CuCrZr ductility could be revised to avoid the occurrence of rather early fatigue failures. Although the W material characterization program has been set up by the IO, the strategy on the CuCrZr still needs to be defined. - Abstract: With the aim to assess the option to start the ITER operation with a full tungsten divertor, an R&D program was launched in order to evaluate the performances of tungsten (W) armoured plasma facing components (PFCs) under high heat flux. The F4E program consisted in the manufacturing and high heat flux (HHF) testing of W monoblock mock-ups and medium scale prototypes up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}. During the test campaign, 26 W mock-ups and two medium scale prototypes manufactured by Plansee SE (Austria) and by Ansaldo Nucleare (Italy) have been tested at the FE200 (AREVA, Le Creusot, France) and ITER Divertor Test Facility (IDTF) (Efremov Institute Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation) electron beam test facilities. The high heat flux (HHF) testing

  16. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coating During Interrupted High-Heat Flux Laser Testing Using Upconversion Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Upconversion luminescence imaging of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been shown to successfully monitor TBC delamination progression during interrupted furnace cycling. However, furnace cycling does not adequately model engine conditions where TBC-coated components are subjected to significant heat fluxes that produce through-thickness temperature gradients that may alter both the rate and path of delamination progression. Therefore, new measurements are presented based on luminescence imaging of TBC-coated specimens subjected to interrupted high-heat-flux laser cycling exposures that much better simulate the thermal gradients present in engine conditions. The TBCs tested were deposited by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and were composed of 7wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) with an integrated delamination sensing layer composed of 7YSZ co-doped with erbium and ytterbium (7YSZ:Er,Yb). The high-heat-flux exposures that produce the desired through-thickness thermal gradients were performed using a high power CO2 laser operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns. Upconversion luminescence images revealed the debond progression produced by the cyclic high-heat-flux exposures and these results were compared to that observed for furnace cycling.

  17. Modeling of a heat sink and high heat flux vapor chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadnjal, Aleksander

    An increasing demand for a higher heat flux removal capability within a smaller volume for high power electronics led us to focus on a novel cold plate design. A high heat flux evaporator and micro channel heat sink are the main components of a cold plate which is capable of removing couple of 100 W/cm2. In order to describe performance of such porous media device a proper modeling has to be addressed. A universal approach based on the volume average theory (VAT) to transport phenomena in porous media is shown. An approach on how to treat the closure for momentum and energy equations is addressed and a proper definition for friction factors and heat transfer coefficients are discussed. A numerical scheme using a solution to Navier-Stokes equations over a representative elementary volume (REV) and the use of VAT is developed to show how to compute friction factors and heat transfer coefficients. The calculation show good agreement with the experimental data. For the heat transfer coefficient closure, a proper average for both fluid and solid is investigated. Different types of heating are also investigated in order to determine how it influences the heat transfer coefficient. A higher heat fluxes in small area condensers led us to the micro channels in contrast to the classical heat fin design. A micro channel can have various shapes to enhance heat transfer, but the shape that will lead to a higher heat flux removal with a moderate pumping power needs to be determined. The standard micro-channel terminology is usually used for channels with a simple cross section, e.g. square, round, triangle, etc., but here the micro channel cross section is going to be expanded to describe more complicated and interconnected micro scale channel cross sections. The micro channel geometries explored are pin fins (in-line and staggered) and sintered porous micro channels. The problem solved here is a conjugate problem involving two heat transfer mechanisms; (1) porous media

  18. Prototyping phase of the high heat flux scraper element of Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscary, J., E-mail: jean.boscary@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); Greuner, H. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); Ehrke, G. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald (Germany); Böswirth, B.; Wang, Z. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); Clark, E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States); Lumsdaine, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Tretter, J. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); McGinnis, D.; Lore, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Ekici, K. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Aim of scraper element: reduction of heat loads on high heat flux divertor ends. • Design: actively water-cooled for 20 MW/m{sup 2} local heat loads. • Technology: CFC NB31 monoblocks bonded by HIP to CuCrZr cooling tube. • Successful high heat flux testing up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}. - Abstract: The water-cooled high heat flux scraper element aims to reduce excessive heat loads on the target element ends of the actively cooled divertor of Wendelstein 7-X. Its purpose is to intercept some of the plasma fluxes both upstream and downstream before they reach the divertor surface. The scraper element has 24 identical plasma facing components (PFCs) divided into 6 modules. One module has 4 PFCs hydraulically connected in series by 2 water boxes. A PFC, 247 mm long and 28 mm wide, has 13 monoblocks made of CFC NB31 bonded by hot isostatic pressing onto a CuCrZr cooling tube equipped with a copper twisted tape. 4 full-scale prototypes of PFCs have been successfully tested in the GLADIS facility up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}. The difference observed between measured and calculated surface temperatures is probably due to the inhomogeneity of CFC properties. The design of the water box prototypes has been detailed to allow the junction between the cooling pipe of the PFCs and the water boxes by internal orbital welding. The prototypes are presently under fabrication.

  19. Institute for High Heat Flux Removal (IHHFR). Phases I, II, and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Ronald D. [Prairie View A& M Univ., TX (United States)

    2014-08-31

    The IHHFR focused on interdisciplinary applications as it relates to high heat flux engineering issues and problems which arise due to engineering systems being miniaturized, optimized, or requiring increased high heat flux performance. The work in the IHHFR focused on water as a coolant and includes: (1) the development, design, and construction of the high heat flux flow loop and facility; (2) test section development, design, and fabrication; and, (3) single-side heat flux experiments to produce 2-D boiling curves and 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements for single-side heated test sections. This work provides data for comparisons with previously developed and new single-side heated correlations and approaches that address the single-side heated effect on heat transfer. In addition, this work includes the addition of single-side heated circular TS and a monoblock test section with a helical wire insert. Finally, the present work includes: (1) data base expansion for the monoblock with a helical wire insert (only for the latter geometry), (2) prediction and verification using finite element, (3) monoblock model and methodology development analyses, and (4) an alternate model development for a hypervapotron and related conjugate heat transfer controlling parameters.

  20. GRCop-84: A High Temperature Copper-based Alloy For High Heat Flux Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    While designed for rocket engine main combustion chamber liners, GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) offers potential for high heat flux applications in industrial applications requiring a temperature capability up to approximately 700 C (1292 F). GRCop-84 is a copper-based alloy with excellent elevated temperature strength, good creep resistance, long LCF lives and enhanced oxidation resistance. It also has a lower thermal expansion than copper and many other low alloy copper-based alloys. GRCop-84 can be manufactured into a variety of shapes such as tubing, bar, plate and sheet using standard production techniques and requires no special production techniques. GRCop-84 forms well, so conventional fabrication methods including stamping and bending can be used. GRCop-84 has demonstrated an ability to be friction stir welded, brazed, inertia welded, diffusion bonded and electron beam welded for joining to itself and other materials. Potential applications include plastic injection molds, resistance welding electrodes and holders, permanent metal casting molds, vacuum plasma spray nozzles and high temperature heat exchanger applications.

  1. Behavior of Brazed W/Cu Mockup Under High Heat Flux Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Lian, Youyun; Liu, Xiang

    2014-03-01

    In order to transfer the heat from the armor to the coolant, tungsten has to be connected with a copper heat sink. The joint technology is the most critical issue for manufacturing plasma facing components. Consequently, the reliability of the joints should be verified by a great number of high-heat-flux (HHF) tests to simulate the real load conditions. W/Cu brazed joint technology with sliver free filler metal CuMnNi has been developed at Southwestern Institute of Physics (SWIP). Screening and thermal fatigue tests of one small-scale flat tile W/CuCrZr mockup were performed on a 60 kW electron-beam Material testing scenario (EMS-60) constructed recently at SWIP. The module successfully survived screening test with the absorbed power density (Pabs) of 2 MW/m2 to 10 MW/m2 and the following 1000 cycles at Pabs of 7.2 MW/m2 without hot spots and overheating zones during the whole test campaign. Metallurgy and SEM observations did not find any cracks at both sides and the interface, indicating a good bonding of W and CuCrZr alloy. In addition, finite element simulations by ANSYS 12.0 under experimental load conditions were performed and compared with experimental results.

  2. The Influence of Non-Uniform High Heat Flux on Thermal Stress of Thermoelectric Power Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingzhen Ming

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A thermoelectric generator (TEG device which uses solar energy as heat source would achieve higher efficiency if there is a higher temperature difference between the hot-cold ends. However, higher temperature or higher heat flux being imposed upon the hot end will cause strong thermal stress, which will have a negative influence on the life cycle of the thermoelectric module. Meanwhile, in order to get high heat flux, a Fresnel lens is required to concentrate solar energy, which will cause non-uniformity of heat flux on the hot end of the TEG and further influence the thermal stress of the device. This phenomenon is very common in solar TEG devices but seldom research work has been reported. In this paper, numerical analysis on the heat transfer and thermal stress performance of a TEG module has been performed considering the variation on the power of the heat flux being imposed upon the hot-end; the influence of non-uniform high heat flux on thermal stress has also been analyzed. It is found that non-uniformity of high heat flux being imposed upon the hot end has a significant effect on the thermal stress of TEG and life expectation of the device. Taking the uniformity of 100% as standard, when the heating uniformity is 70%, 50%, 30%, and 10%, respectively, the maximum thermal stress of TEG module increased by 3%, 6%, 12%, and 22% respectively. If we increase the heat flux on the hot end, the influence of non-uniformity on the thermal stress will be more remarkable.

  3. Numerical prediction of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer coefficient under high heat fluxes

    OpenAIRE

    Pezo Milada L.; Stevanović Vladimir D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) approach to prediction of the heat transfer coefficient for nucleate pool boiling under high heat fluxes. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the atmospheric saturated pool boiling are performed. Mathematical modelling of pool boiling requires a treatment of vapor-liquid two-phase mixture on the macro level, as well as on the micro level, such as bubble growth and departure from the heating surfa...

  4. High-Heat-Flux Cyclic Durability of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. For the supersonic vehicles currently envisioned in the NASA fundamental aeronautics program, advanced gas turbine engines will be used to provide high power density thrust during the extended supersonic flight of the aircraft, while meeting stringent low emission requirements. Advanced ceramic coating systems are critical to the performance, life and durability of the hot-section components of the engine systems. In this work, the laser and burner rig based high-heat-flux testing approaches were developed to investigate the coating cyclic response and failure mechanisms under simulated supersonic long-duration cruise mission. The accelerated coating cracking and delamination mechanism under the engine high-heat-flux, and extended supersonic cruise time conditions will be addressed. A coating life prediction framework may be realized by examining the crack initiation and propagation in conjunction with environmental degradation under high-heat-flux test conditions.

  5. Analysis of heat transfer under high heat flux nucleate boiling conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.; Dinh, N. [3145 Burlington Laboratories, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Analysis was performed for a heater infrared thermometric imaging temperature data obtained from high heat flux pool boiling and liquid film boiling experiments BETA. With the OpenFOAM solver, heat flux distribution towards the coolant was obtained by solving transient heat conduction of heater substrate given the heater surface temperature data as boundary condition. The so-obtained heat flux data was used to validate them against the state-of-art wall boiling model developed by D. R. Shaver (2015) with the assumption of micro-layer hydrodynamics. Good agreement was found between the model prediction and data for conditions away from the critical heat flux (CHF). However, the data indicate a different heat transfer pattern under CHF, which is not captured by the current model. Experimental data strengthen the notion of burnout caused by the irreversible hot spot due to failure of rewetting. The observation forms a basis for a detailed modeling of micro-layer hydrodynamics under high heat flux.

  6. Thermal evaluation of uranium silicide miniplates irradiated at high heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post Guillen, Donna, E-mail: Donna.Guillen@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3710 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Best estimate of thermal conditions during irradiation experiment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal evaluation of 25% enriched, high-density U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}/Al dispersion fuel miniplates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Predictions of heat flux and temperature for as-run, high heat flux conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finite-element analysis uses measured values of hydroxide layer thickness. - Abstract: The Gas Test Loop (GTL)-1 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to assess corrosion performance of proposed booster fuel at heat flux levels {approx}30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density (4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}) U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 to 593 W/cm{sup 2}. No adverse impacts to the miniplates were observed at these high heat flux levels. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective ATR south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant-hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average hydroxide thickness on each miniplate measured during post-irradiation examination. The purpose of this study was to obtain a best estimate of the as-run experiment temperatures to aid in establishing acceptable heat flux levels and designing fuel qualification experiments for this fuel type.

  7. Evaluation of The Thermal Performance of Multi-Element Doped Graphite under Steady-State High Heat Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈俊凌; 李建刚; 野田信明; 久保田雄辅; 郭全贵; 裘亮

    2002-01-01

    Multi-element doped graphite, GBST1308 has been developed as a plasma facing material (PFM) for high heat flux components of the HT-7U device. The thermal performance of the material under steady-state (SS) high heat flux was evaluated under actively cooling conditions, the specimens were mechanically joined to copper heat sink with supercarbon sheet as a compliant layer between the interfaces. The experiments have been performed in a facility of ACT (actively cooling test stand) with a 100 kW electron gun in order to test the suitability and the loading limit of such materials. The surface temperature and bulk temperature distribution of the specimens were investigated. The experimental results are very encouraging that when heat flux is not more than 6 MW/m2, the surface temperature of GBST1308 is less than 1000 ℃, which is the lowest, compared with IG-430U and even with CX-2002U (CFC); The primary results indicate that the mechanically-joined material system by such a proper design as thin tile, super compliant layer, GBST as a PFM and copper-alloy heat sink, can be used as divertor plates for HT-7U in the first phase.

  8. Experimental study of thermal crisis in connection with Tokamak reactor high heat flux components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, D.; Giardina, M.; Castiglia, F.; Celata, G. P.; Mariani, A.; Zummo, G.; Cumo, M.

    2000-04-01

    The results of an experimental research on high heat flux thermal crisis in forced convective subcooled water flow, under operative conditions of interest to the thermal-hydraulic design of TOKAMAK fusion reactors, are here reported. These experiments, carried out in the framework of a collaboration between the Nuclear Engineering Department of Palermo University and the National Institute of Thermal - Fluid Dynamics of the ENEA - Casaccia (Rome), were performed on the STAF (Scambio Termico Alti Flussi) water loop and consisted, essentially, in a high speed photographic study which enabled focusing several information on bubble characteristics and flow patterns taking place during the burnout phenomenology.

  9. Electron heat flux instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  10. Potential for improvement in high heat flux HyperVapotron element performance using nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergis, A.; Hardalupas, Y.; Barrett, T. R.

    2013-11-01

    HyperVapotron (HV) elements have been used extensively as high heat flux beam stopping components in nuclear fusion research facilities. These water-cooled heat exchangers use a boiling heat transfer mechanism and so are inherently limited by their critical heat flux (CHF). The use of a nanofluid as the coolant, instead of water, promises to enhance the heat transfer performance of the HV and increase the CHF by a factor of 2 or 3, which would lead to a step-change improvement in the power handling capability. This paper reports on computational and experimental analyses which have indicated mechanisms for the enhanced thermal performance of nanofluids. A molecular dynamics simulation code has been developed which has identified heat transfer augmentation mechanisms that depart from classical thermodynamics associated with the presence of nanoparticles. In addition, an experiment has been conducted which uses particle image velocimetry to measure the flow field in a full-scale HV. Past studies have yielded qualitative experimental results, but the measurements reported here provide quantitative data to aid the understanding of the initial flow field inside the HV (i.e., before a heat flux is applied). Further, the experiment is conducted using both water and Al2O3-water nanofluid as the flow medium. Thus, these velocity measurements offer a first indication for potentially enhanced heat transfer in HV devices when nanofluids are used as the coolant. The improved understanding of the HV flow regime and the cooling advantage of nanofluids could assist the design of advanced high heat flux components for future fusion machines.

  11. Manufacturing and High Heat Flux Testing of Brazed Flat-Type W/CuCrZr Plasma Facing Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Youyun; Liu, Xiang; Feng, Fan; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Zhengkui; Wang, Jin; Chen, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Water-cooled flat-type W/CuCrZr plasma facing components with an interlayer of oxygen-free copper (OFC) have been developed by using vacuum brazing route. The OFC layer for the accommodation of thermal stresses was cast onto the surface of W at a temperature range of 1150 °C-1200 °C in a vacuum furnace. The W/OFC cast tiles were vacuum brazed to a CuCrZr heat sink at 940 °C using the silver-free filler material CuMnSiCr. The microstructure, bonding strength, and high heat flux properties of the brazed W/CuCrZr joint samples were investigated. The W/Cu joint exhibits an average tensile strength of 134 MPa, which is about the same strength as pure annealed copper. High heat flux tests were performed in the electron beam facility EMS-60. Experimental results indicated that the brazed W/CuCrZr mock-up experienced screening tests of up to 15 MW/m2 and cyclic tests of 9 MW/m2 for 1000 cycles without visible damage. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11205049) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2011GB110004)

  12. A low-frequency wave motion mechanism enables efficient energy transport in carbon nanotubes at high heat fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-07-11

    The great majority of investigations of thermal transport in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the open literature focus on low heat fluxes, that is, in the regime of validity of the Fourier heat conduction law. In this paper, by performing nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we investigated thermal transport in a single-walled CNT bridging two Si slabs under constant high heat flux. An anomalous wave-like kinetic energy profile was observed, and a previously unexplored, wave-dominated energy transport mechanism is identified for high heat fluxes in CNTs, originated from excited low frequency transverse acoustic waves. The transported energy, in terms of a one-dimensional low frequency mechanical wave, is quantified as a function of the total heat flux applied and is compared to the energy transported by traditional Fourier heat conduction. The results show that the low frequency wave actually overtakes traditional Fourier heat conduction and efficiently transports the energy at high heat flux. Our findings reveal an important new mechanism for high heat flux energy transport in low-dimensional nanostructures, such as one-dimensional (1-D) nanotubes and nanowires, which could be very relevant to high heat flux dissipation such as in micro/nanoelectronics applications.

  13. Erosion and Modifications of Tungsten-Coated Carbon and Copper Under High Heat Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiang(刘翔); S.Tamura; K.Tokunaga; N.Yoshida; Zhang Fu(张斧); Xu Zeng-yu(许增裕); Ge Chang-chun(葛昌纯); N.Noda

    2003-01-01

    Tungsten-coated carbon and copper was prepared by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS)and inert gas plasma spraying (IPS), respectively. W/CFC (Tungsten /Carbon Fiber-Enhancedmaterial) coating has a diffusion barrier that consists of W and Re multi-layers pre-deposited byphysical vapor deposition on carbon fiber-enhanced materials, while W/Cu coating has a gradedtransition interface. Different grain growth processes of tungsten coatings under stable and tran-sient heat loads were observed, their experimental results indicated that the recrystallizing tem-perature of VPS-W coating was about 1400 ℃ and a recrystallized columnar layer of about 30μmthickness was formed by cyclic heat loads of 4 ms pulse duration. Erosion and modifications ofW/CFC and W/Cu coatings under high heat load, such as microstructure changes of interface,surface plastic deformations and cracks, were investigated, and the erosion mechanism erosionproducts) of these two kinds of tungsten coatings under high heat flux was also studied.

  14. Investigating the use of nanofluids to improve high heat flux cooling systems

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, T R; Flinders, K; Sergis, A; Hardalupas, Y

    2013-01-01

    The thermal performance of high heat flux components in a fusion reactor could be enhanced significantly by the use of nanofluid coolants, suspensions of a liquid with low concentrations of solid nanoparticles. However, before they are considered viable for fusion, the long-term behaviour of nanofluids must be investigated. This paper reports an experiment which is being prepared to provide data on nanofluid stability, settling and erosion in a HyperVapotron device. Procedures are demonstrated for nanofluid synthesis and quality assessment, and the fluid sample analysis methods are described. The end results from this long-running experiment are expected to allow an initial assessment of the suitability of nanofluids as coolants in a fusion reactor.

  15. Calibration of high-heat-flux sensors in a solar furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestrin, J.; Rodriguez-Alonso, M.; Rodriguez, J.; Canadas, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Almeria (Spain); Barbero, F.J. [Almeria Univ., Dept. de Fisica (Spain); Langley, L.W.; Barnes, A. [Vatell Corporation, Christiansburg, VA (United States)

    2006-12-15

    The most common sensors used for the measurement of high solar irradiance are the Gardon gauges, which are usually calibrated using a black body at a certain temperature as the radiant source. This calibration procedure is assumed to produce a systematic error when solar irradiance measurements are taken using these sensors. This paper demonstrates a calorimetric method for calibrating these high-heat-flux gauges in a solar furnace. This procedure has enabled these sensors to be calibrated under concentrated solar radiation at higher irradiances under non-laboratory conditions in the CIEMAT solar furnace at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria. Working at higher irradiances has allowed the uncertainty in the calibration constant of these sensors to be reduced. This work experimentally confirms the predicted systematic errors committed when measuring high solar irradiances using Gardon sensors calibrated with a black body. (authors)

  16. Calibration of high-heat-flux sensors in a solar furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestrín, J.; Rodríguez-Alonso, M.; Rodríguez, J.; Cañadas, I.; Barbero, F. J.; Langley, L. W.; Barnes, A.

    2006-12-01

    The most common sensors used for the measurement of high solar irradiance are the Gardon gauges, which are usually calibrated using a black body at a certain temperature as the radiant source. This calibration procedure is assumed to produce a systematic error when solar irradiance measurements are taken using these sensors. This paper demonstrates a calorimetric method for calibrating these high-heat-flux gauges in a solar furnace. This procedure has enabled these sensors to be calibrated under concentrated solar radiation at higher irradiances under non-laboratory conditions in the CIEMAT solar furnace at the Plataforma Solar de Almería. Working at higher irradiances has allowed the uncertainty in the calibration constant of these sensors to be reduced. This work experimentally confirms the predicted systematic errors committed when measuring high solar irradiances using Gardon sensors calibrated with a black body.

  17. High heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components development, realization and first results in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosman, A. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2004-07-01

    The development, design, manufacture and testing of actively cooled high heat flux plasma facing components (PFC) has been an essential stage towards long powerful tokamak operations for Tore-Supra, it lasted about 10 years. This paper deals with the toroidal pumped limiter (TPL) that is able to sustain up to 10 MW/m{sup 2} of nominal heat flux. This device is based on hardened copper alloy heat sink structures covered by a carbon fiber composite armour, it resulted in the manufacturing of 600 elementary components, called finger elements, to achieve the 7.6 m{sup 2} TPL. This assembly has been operating in Tore-Supra since spring 2002. Some difficulties occurred during the manufacturing phase, the valuable industrial experience is summarized in the section 2. The permanent monitoring of PFC surface temperature all along the discharge is performed by a set of 6 actively cooled infrared endoscopes. The heat flux monitoring and control issue but also the progress made in our understanding of the deuterium retention in long discharges are described in the section 3. (A.C.)

  18. SIRHEX—A new experimental facility for high heat flux testing of plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunze, André, E-mail: andre.kunze@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (Germany); Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (Germany); Bonelli, Flavia [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento Energia (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Commercial infrared heaters have been qualified for future First Wall experiments. • In first tests surface heat flux densities up to 470 kW/m were achieved. • The homogeneity of the heat distribution stayed within ±5% of the nominal value. • With the heaters a typical ITER pulse can be reproduced. • An adequate testing strategy will be required to improve heater lifetime. - Abstract: SIRHEX (“Surface Infrared Radiation Heating Experiment”) is a small-scale experimental facility at KIT, which has been built for testing and qualifying high heat flux radiation heaters for blanket specific conditions using an instrumented water cooled target. This paper describes the SIRHEX facility and the experimental set-up for the heater tests. The results of a series of tests focused on reproducing homogeneous surface heat flux densities up to 500 kW/m{sup 2} will be presented and the impact of the heater performance on the design of the First Wall test rig will be discussed.

  19. Development of Advanced Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings Using a High-Heat-Flux Testing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The development of low conductivity, robust thermal and environmental barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity and cyclic resistance at very high surface temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. In this study, a laser high-heat-flux test approach is established for evaluating advanced low conductivity, high temperature capability thermal and environmental barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program. The test approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity, which initially rises under the steady-state high temperature thermal gradient test due to coating sintering, and later drops under the cyclic thermal gradient test due to coating cracking/delamination. The coating system is then evaluated based on damage accumulation and failure after the combined steady-state and cyclic thermal gradient tests. The lattice and radiation thermal conductivity of advanced ceramic coatings can also be evaluated using laser heat-flux techniques. The external radiation resistance of the coating is assessed based on the measured specimen temperature response under a laser- heated intense radiation-flux source. The coating internal radiation contribution is investigated based on the measured apparent coating conductivity increases with the coating surface test temperature under large thermal gradient test conditions. Since an increased radiation contribution is observed at these very high surface test temperatures, by varying the laser heat-flux and coating average test temperature, the complex relation between the lattice and radiation conductivity as a function of surface and interface test temperature may be derived.

  20. Super-High Heat Flux Removal Using Sintered Metal Porous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuhisa YUKI; Jun ABEI; Hidetoshi HASHIZUME; Saburo TODA

    2005-01-01

    Heat transfer experiments using various porous materials are performed to verify the possibility of extremely highheat flux removal (several dozens of MW/m2). The porous media introduced in this experiment are bronze particle-sintered ones and copper fibers-sintered ones that have high thermal conductivity, each of which can enhance the thermal diffusion in the porous material. From the heat transfer experiments using a non-transferredtype of plasma arcjet as a high heat flux source, the steady heat removal of 66.0 MW/m2 is proved by using the bronze porous medium whose pore size and porosity are 100 μm and 0.38, respectively. Furthermore, as the result of eveluating the heat removal performance for various copper fiber porous media with the porosity from 0.5 to 0.7 and the fiber diameter from 30 to 90 μm, it is clarified that the maximum cooling performance exceeds 70.0MW/m2 at the porosity of 0.7 and the fiber diameter of 90 μm, and that using the lower porosity material is useful for improving an evaporation rate in the porous media.

  1. Thermo-mechanical study of high heat flux component mock-ups for ITER TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonelli, Flavia [Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Dipartimento Energia, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Boccaccini, Lorenzo Virgilio, E-mail: lorenzo.boccaccini@kit.edu [Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Kunze, André; Maione, Ivan Alessio [Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Savoldi, Laura; Zanino, Roberto [Dipartimento Energia, Politecnico di Torino (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Infrared radiation heaters for test of plasma facing component available at KIT. • Numerical model developed and validated to check uniformity of heat flux. • Thermo-mechanical calculations performed on a mock-up of the HCPB TBM FW. • Assessment done of representativity of stress conditions for the ITER TBMs. - Abstract: Commercial infrared heaters have been proposed to be used in the HELOKA facility under construction at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) to test a mock-up of the first wall (FW), called thermo-cycle mock-up (TCM) plate, under stress loading comparable to those experienced by the test blanket modules (TBMs) in ITER. Two related issues are analyzed in this paper, in relation to the ongoing European project aimed at the design of the two EU TBMs: (1) the possibility to reproduce, by means of those heaters, high heat flux loading conditions on the TCM plate similar to those expected on the ITER TBMs, and (2) the thermo-mechanical analysis of the TCM itself, in order to define a suitable choice of experimental parameters and mechanical constraints leading to a relevant stress condition. A suitable heater model is developed and validated against experimental data from an ad-hoc test campaign. A thermo-mechanical study of the TCM plate is presented, showing that the structure is able to withstand high thermal loads, even in the most constrained case, reaching stress levels comparable to the ITER TBM.

  2. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000ÀC showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  3. Manufacturing and thermomechanical testing of actively cooled all beryllium high heat flux test pieces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, N.N.; Sokolov, Yu.A.; Shatalov, G.E. [and others

    1995-09-01

    One of the problems affiliated to ITER high heat flux elements development is a problem of interface of beryllium protection with heat sink routinely made of copper alloys. To get rid of this problem all beryllium elements could be used as heat receivers in places of enhanced thermal loads. In accordance with this objectives four beryllium test pieces of two types have been manufactured in {open_quotes}Institute of Beryllium{close_quotes} for succeeding thermomechanical testing. Two of them were manufactured in accordance with JET team design; they are round {open_quotes}hypervapotron type{close_quotes} test pieces. Another two ones are rectangular test sections with a twisted tape installed inside of the circular channel. Preliminary stress-strain analysis have been performed for both type of the test pieces. Hypervapotrons have been shipped to JET where they were tested on JET test bed. Thermomechanical testing of pieces of the type of {open_quotes}swirl tape inside of tube{close_quotes} have been performed on Kurchatov Institute test bed. Chosen beryllium grade properties, some details of manufacturing, results of preliminary stress-strain analysis and thermomechanical testing of the test pieces {open_quotes}swirl tape inside of tube{close_quotes} type are given in this report.

  4. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  5. Development of advanced high heat flux and plasma-facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Rieth, M.; Aktaa, J.; Chikada, T.; Hoffmann, A.; Hoffmann, J.; Houben, A.; Kurishita, H.; Jin, X.; Li, M.; Litnovsky, A.; Matsuo, S.; von Müller, A.; Nikolic, V.; Palacios, T.; Pippan, R.; Qu, D.; Reiser, J.; Riesch, J.; Shikama, T.; Stieglitz, R.; Weber, T.; Wurster, S.; You, J.-H.; Zhou, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Plasma-facing materials and components in a fusion reactor are the interface between the plasma and the material part. The operational conditions in this environment are probably the most challenging parameters for any material: high power loads and large particle and neutron fluxes are simultaneously impinging at their surfaces. To realize fusion in a tokamak or stellarator reactor, given the proven geometries and technological solutions, requires an improvement of the thermo-mechanical capabilities of currently available materials. In its first part this article describes the requirements and needs for new, advanced materials for the plasma-facing components. Starting points are capabilities and limitations of tungsten-based alloys and structurally stabilized materials. Furthermore, material requirements from the fusion-specific loading scenarios of a divertor in a water-cooled configuration are described, defining directions for the material development. Finally, safety requirements for a fusion reactor with its specific accident scenarios and their potential environmental impact lead to the definition of inherently passive materials, avoiding release of radioactive material through intrinsic material properties. The second part of this article demonstrates current material development lines answering the fusion-specific requirements for high heat flux materials. New composite materials, in particular fiber-reinforced and laminated structures, as well as mechanically alloyed tungsten materials, allow the extension of the thermo-mechanical operation space towards regions of extreme steady-state and transient loads. Self-passivating tungsten alloys, demonstrating favorable tungsten-like plasma-wall interaction behavior under normal operation conditions, are an intrinsic solution to otherwise catastrophic consequences of loss-of-coolant and air ingress events in a fusion reactor. Permeation barrier layers avoid the escape of tritium into structural and cooling

  6. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, R.T. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yamashina, T. [ed.] [Hokkadio Univ. (Japan)

    1994-04-01

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

  7. Numerical prediction of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer coefficient under high heat fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezo Milada L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics approach to prediction of the heat transfer coefficient for nucleate pool boiling under high heat fluxes. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the atmospheric saturated pool boiling are performed. Mathematical modelling of pool boiling requires a treatment of vapor-liquid two-phase mixture on the macro level, as well as on the micro level, such as bubble growth and departure from the heating surface. Two-phase flow is modelled by the two-fluid model, which consists of the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations for each phase. Interface transfer processes are calculated by the closure laws. Micro level phenomena on the heating surface are modelled with the bubble nucleation site density, the bubble resistance time on the heating wall and with the certain level of randomness in the location of bubble nucleation sites. The developed model was used to determine the heat transfer coefficient and results of numerical simulations are compared with available experimental results and several empirical correlations. A considerable scattering of the predictions of the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient by experimental correlations is observed, while the numerically predicted values are within the range of results calculated by well-known Kutateladze, Mostinski, Kruzhilin and Rohsenow correlations. The presented numerical modeling approach is original regarding both the application of the two-fluid two-phase model for the determination of heat transfer coefficient in pool boiling and the defined boundary conditions at the heated wall surface. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 174014

  8. High heat flux components in fusion devices: from nowadays experience in Tore Supra towards the ITER challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosman, A.; Bayetti, P.; Chappuis, P.; Cordier, J.J.; Durocher, A.; Escourbiac, F.; Guilhem, D.; Lipa, M.; Marbach, G.; Mitteau, R.; Schlosser, J

    2003-07-01

    A pioneering activity has been developed by CEA and the European industry in the field of actively cooled high heat flux plasma facing components in Tore Supra operation, which is today culminating with the routine operation of an actively cooled toroidal pumped limiter (TPL) capable to sustain up to 10 MW.m{sup -2} of nominal convected heat flux. This success is the result of a long lead development and industrialization program (about 10 years) marked out with a number of technical and managerial challenges that were taken up and has allowed us to build up an unique experience feedback database. This is illustrated in this paper with the specific example of the development of high heat flux CFC-on-CuCrZr (carbon-carbon fibre composite on hardened copper alloy CuCrZr) component from design phase to tokamak operation. (authors)

  9. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coatings During Interrupted High-Heat-Flux Laser Testing using Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation showed progress made in extending luminescence-base delamination monitoring to TBCs exposed to high heat fluxes, which is an environment that much better simulates actual turbine engine conditions. This was done by performing upconversion luminescence imaging during interruptions in laser testing, where a high-power CO2 laser was employed to create the desired heat flux. Upconverison luminescence refers to luminescence where the emission is at a higher energy (shorter wavelength) than the excitation. Since there will be negligible background emission at higher energies than the excitation, this methods produces superb contrast. Delamination contrast is produced because both the excitation and emission wavelengths are reflected at delamination cracks so that substantially higher luminescence intensity is observed in regions containing delamination cracks. Erbium was selected as the dopant for luminescence specifically because it exhibits upconversion luminescence. The high power CO2 10.6 micron wavelength laser facility at NASA GRC was used to produce the heat flux in combination with forced air backside cooling. Testing was performed at a lower (95 W/sq cm) and higher (125 W/sq cm) heat flux as well as furnace cycling at 1163C for comparison. The lower heat flux showed the same general behavior as furnace cycling, a gradual, "spotty" increase in luminescence associated with debond progression; however, a significant difference was a pronounced incubation period followed by acceleration delamination progression. These results indicate that extrapolating behavior from furnace cycling measurements will grossly overestimate remaining life under high heat flux conditions. The higher heat flux results were not only accelerated, but much different in character. Extreme bond coat rumpling occurred, and delamination propagation extended over much larger areas before precipitating macroscopic TBC failure. This indicates that under the higher heat flux (and

  10. High heat flux testing of divertor plasma facing materials and components using the HHF test facility at IPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Yashashri; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Belsare, Sunil; Swamy, Rajamannar; Tripathi, Sudhir; Bhope, Kedar; Kanpara, Shailesh

    2016-02-01

    The High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) was designed and established recently at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) in India for testing heat removal capability and operational life time of plasma facing materials and components of the ITER-like tokamak. The HHFTF is equipped with various diagnostics such as IR cameras and IR-pyrometers for surface temperature measurements, coolant water calorimetry for absorbed power measurements and thermocouples for bulk temperature measurements. The HHFTF is capable of simulating steady state heat load of several MW m-2 as well as short transient heat loads of MJ m-2. This paper presents the current status of the HHFTF at IPR and high heat flux tests performed on the curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups as well as transient heat flux tests carried out on pure tungsten materials using the HHFTF. Curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups were fabricated using hot radial pressing (HRP) technique. Two curved tungsten monoblock type test mock-ups successfully sustained absorbed heat flux up to 14 MW m-2 with thermal cycles of 30 s ON and 30 s OFF duration. Transient high heat flux tests or thermal shock tests were carried out on pure tungsten hot-rolled plate material (Make:PLANSEE) with incident power density of 0.49 GW m-2 for 20 milliseconds ON and 1000 milliseconds OFF time. A total of 6000 thermal shock cycles were completed on pure tungsten material. Experimental results were compared with mathematical simulations carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics for transient high heat flux tests.

  11. Hybrid Cooling Loop Technology for Robust High Heat Flux Cooling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. proposes to develop a hybrid cooling loop technology for space thermal control. The proposed technology combines the high heat...

  12. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  13. Numerical simulation in a subcooled water flow boiling for one-sided high heat flux in reactor divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, P., E-mail: pinliu@aust.edu.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan 232001 (China); Peng, X.B., E-mail: pengxb@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Song, Y.T. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Fang, X.D. [Institute of Air Conditioning and Refrigeration, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Huang, S.H. [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Mao, X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The Eulerian multiphase models coupled with Non-equilibrium Boiling model can effectively simulate the subcooled water flow boiling. • ONB and FDB appear earlier and earlier with the increase of heat fluxes. • The void fraction increases gradually along the flow direction. • The inner CuCrZr tube deteriorates earlier than the outer tungsten layer and the middle OFHC copper layer. - Abstract: In order to remove high heat fluxes for plasma facing components in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) divertor, a numerical simulation of subcooled water flow boiling heat transfer in a vertically upward smooth tube was conducted in this paper on the condition of one-sided high heat fluxes. The Eulerian multiphase model coupled with Non-equilibrium Boiling model was adopted in numerical simulation of the subcooled boiling two-phase flow. The heat transfer regions, thermodynamic vapor quality (x{sub th}), void fraction and temperatures of three components on the condition of the different heat fluxes were analyzed. Numerical results indicate that the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) and fully developed boiling (FDB) appear earlier and earlier with increasing heat flux. With the increase of heat fluxes, the inner CuCrZr tube will deteriorate earlier than the outer tungsten layer and the middle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper layer. These results provide a valuable reference for the thermal-hydraulic design of a water-cooled W/Cu divertor.

  14. High heat flux testing of ITER ICH&CD antenna beryllium faraday screen bars mock-ups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtois, X., E-mail: xavier.courtois@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Meunier, L. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Kuznetsov, V. [Efremov Institute, FSUE NIIEFA, St. Petersburg, 196641 (Russian Federation); Beaumont, B.; Lamalle, P. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Conchon, D. [ATMOSTAT Co, F-94815 Villejuif (France); Languille, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • ITER ICH&CD antenna beryllium faraday screen bars mock-ups were manufactured. • The mock-ups are submitted to high heat loads to test their heat exhaust capabilities. • The mock-ups withstand without damage the design limit load. • Lifetime is gradually reduced when the heat load is augmented beyond the design limit. • Thermal and mechanical behavior are reproducible, and coherent with the calculation. - Abstract: The Faraday Screen (FS) is the plasma facing component of ITER ion cyclotron heating antennas shielding. The requirement for the high heat exhaust, and the limitation of the temperatures to minimize strain and thus offer sufficient resistance to fatigue, imply the need for high conductivity materials and a high cooling flow rate. The FS bars are constructed by a hipping process involving beryllium tiles, a pure copper layer, a copper chrome zirconium alloy for the cooling channel and a stainless steel backing strip. Two FS bars small scale mock-ups were manufactured and tested under high heat flux. They endured 15,000 heating cycles without degradation under nominal heat flux, and revealed growing flaws when the heat flux was progressively augmented beyond. In this case, the ultrasonic test confirms a strong delamination of the Be tiles.

  15. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K.L. (ed.)

    1985-10-01

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well. (LSP)

  16. Scientific feedback from high heat flux actively cooled PFCs development, realization and first results in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosman, A.; Bayetti, P.; Brosset, C.; Bucalossi, J.; Cordier, J.J.; Durocher, A.; Escourbiac, F.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Guilhem, D.; Gunn, J.; Loarer, T.; Lipa, M.; Mitteau, R.; Pegourie, B.; Reichle, R.; Schlosser, J.; Tsitrone, E.; Vallet, J.C

    2004-07-01

    The implementation of actively cooled high heat flux plasma facing components (PFCs) are one of the major ingredients required for operating the Tore Supra tokamak with very long pulses. A pioneering activity has been developed in this field from the very beginning of the device operation that is today culminating with the routine operation of an actively cooled toroidal pumped limiter (TPL) capable to sustain up to 10 MW.m{sup -2} of nominal convected heat flux. A technical feedback is given from the whole development up to the industrialization and focuses on a number of critical issues, such as bonding technology analysis, manufacture processes, repair processes, destructive and non destructive testing. The actual experience in Tore Supra allows to address the question of D retention on carbon walls. Redeposition on surfaces without plasma flux is suspected to cause the final 'burial' of about the injected gas during long discharges. (authors)

  17. Results of high heat flux tests and structural analysis of the new solid tungsten divertor tile for ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaksic, Nikola, E-mail: nikola.jaksic@ipp.mpg.de; Greuner, Henri; Herrmann, Albrecht; Böswirth, Bernd; Vorbrugg, Stefan

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The main motivation for the HHF investigation of tungsten tiles was an untypical deformation of some specimens under thermal loading, observed during the previous tests in GLADIS test facility. • A nonlinear finite element (FE) model for simulations of the GLADIS tests has been built. • The unexpected plastic deformations are mainly caused by internal stresses due to the manufacturing process. The small discrepancies among the FEA investigated and measured plastic deformations are most likely caused, beside of the practical difficulties by measuring of low items, also by tile internal stresses. • The influences of the residual stresses caused by special production processes have to be taken into account by design of the structural part made of solid tungsten. - Abstract: Tungsten as plasma-facing material for fusion devices is currently the most favorable candidate. In general solid tungsten is used for shielding the plasma chamber interior against the high heat generated from the plasma. For the purposes of implementation at ASDEX Upgrade and as a contribution to ITER the thermal performance of tungsten tiles has been extensively tested in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS during the development phase and beyond. These tests have been performed on full scale tungsten tile prototypes including their clamping and cooling structure. Simulating the adiabatically thermal loading due to plasma operation in ASDEX Upgrade, the tungsten tiles have been subjected to a thermal load with central heat flux of 10–24 MW/m{sup 2} and absorbed energy between 370 and 680 kJ. This loading results in maximum surface temperatures between 1300 °C and 2800 °C. The tests in GLADIS have been accompanied by intensive numerical investigations using FEA methods. For this purpose a multiple nonlinear finite element model has been set up. This paper discusses the main results of the high heat flux final tests and their numerical simulation. Moreover, first

  18. Radiant heat transfer network in the simulated protective clothing ; System under high heat flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fukazawa, T.; Hartog, E.A. den; Daanen, H.A.M.; Penders-van Elk, N.; Tochihara, Y.; Havenith, G.

    2005-01-01

    A radiant network model was developed for design of the protective clothing system against solar and infrared radiative heat flux. A one-dimensional model was employed in the present study, because the aim of this study was to obtain precise temperature distribution through the system with use of a

  19. Explosive disintegration of the vapor film under influence of high heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkevich, O.A.; Glazkov, V.V. [Moscow Power Engineering Institute (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation); Ziegarnik, Yu.A.; Ivochkin, Yu.P. [Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    The problem was formulated and solved on the stability of steady-state interface between a thin vapor film and a layer of liquid in the presence of a heat flux. Boundary conditions were derived for disturbances of the vapor-liquid interface, which generalize the known correlations on the free surface of liquid in the gravity field. These boundary conditions allow for the variation of the saturation pressure, for overheating of a liquid, its transition in the metastable area and explosive boiling, for the variation of the thickness of steady-state vapor film, and for generation of the mass flux on the vapor- liquid interface. the mode of explosive instability may arise in the nonlinear stage of development of instability because of a weak variation of the thickness of steady-state vapor film or due to overheating of a liquid and its transition in the metastable area. Due to nonlinear effects, specific solitons and the specific turbulence may arise on the vapor-liquid interface in the absence of gravity force. In the mode of explosive instability, the initially low wave amplitude rises to infinity during a finite period of time. Conditions were found in which the heat flux through the vapor-liquid interface leads to explosive instability: the initially low plane wave amplitude exhibits an explosive rise. (author)

  20. Pool boiling with high heat flux enabled by a porous artery structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lizhan; Zhang, Lianpei; Lin, Guiping; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-06-01

    A porous artery structure utilizing the concept of "phase separation and modulation" is proposed to enhance the critical heat flux of pool boiling. A series of experiments were conducted on a range of test articles in which multiple rectangular arteries were machined directly into the top surface of a 10.0 mm diameter copper rod. The arteries were then covered by a 2.0 mm thickness microporous copper plate through silver brazing. The pool wall was fabricated from transparent Pyrex glass to allow a visualization study, and water was used as the working fluid. Experimental results confirmed that the porous artery structure provided individual flow paths for the liquid supply and vapor venting, and avoided the detrimental effects of the liquid/vapor counter flow. As a result, a maximum heat flux of 610 W/cm2 over a heating area of 0.78 cm2 was achieved with no indication of dryout, prior to reaching the heater design temperature limit. Following the experimental tests, the mechanisms responsible for the boiling critical heat flux and performance enhancement of the porous artery structure were analyzed.

  1. High heat flux x-ray monochromators: What are the limits?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, C.S.

    1997-06-01

    First optical elements at third-generation, hard x-ray synchrotrons, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), are subjected to immense heat fluxes. The optical elements include crystal monochromators, multilayers and mirrors. This paper presents a mathematical model of the thermal strain of a three-layer (faceplate, heat exchanger, and baseplate), cylindrical optic subjected to narrow beam of uniform heat flux. This model is used to calculate the strain gradient of a liquid-gallium-cooled x-ray monochromator previously tested on an undulator at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). The resulting thermally broadened rocking curves are calculated and compared to experimental data. The calculated rocking curve widths agree to within a few percent of the measured values over the entire current range tested (0 to 60 mA). The thermal strain gradient under the beam footprint varies linearly with the heat flux and the ratio of the thermal expansion coefficient to the thermal conductivity. The strain gradient is insensitive to the heat exchanger properties and the optic geometry. This formulation provides direct insight into the governing parameters, greatly reduces the analysis time, and provides a measure of the ultimate performance of a given monochromator.

  2. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume II. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in high heat flux materials and component development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.A.; Boyd, R.D.; Easor, J.R.; Gauster, W.B.; Gordon, J.D.; Mattas, R.F.; Morgan, G.D.; Ulrickson, M.A,; Watson, R.D.; Wolfer, W.G,

    1984-06-01

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas for high heat flux materials and components (HHFMC) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be of critical importance for the successful operation of near-term fusion experiments and for the feasibility and attractiveness of long-term fusion reactors. A number of subgroups were formed to assess the critical HHFMC issues along the following major lines: (1) source conditions, (2) systems integration, (3) materials and processes, (4) thermal hydraulics, (5) thermomechanical response, (6) electromagnetic response, (7) instrumentation and control, and (8) test facilities. The details of the technical assessment are presented in eight chapters. The primary technical issues and needs for each area are highlighted.

  3. High heat flux Langmuir probe array for the DIII-D divertor platesa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, J. G.; Taussig, D.; Boivin, R. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Nygren, R. E.

    2008-10-01

    Two modular arrays of Langmuir probes designed to handle a heat flux of up to 25 MW/m2 for 10 s exposures have been installed in the lower divertor target plates of the DIII-D tokamak. The 20 pyrolytic graphite probe tips have more than three times higher thermal conductivity and 16 times larger mass than the original DIII-D isotropic graphite probes. The probe tips have a fixed 12.5° surface angle to distribute the heat flux more uniformly than the previous 6 mm diameter domed collectors and a symmetric "rooftop" design to allow operation with reversed toroidal magnetic field. A large spring-loaded contact area improves heat conduction from each probe tip through a ceramic insulator into a cooled graphite divertor floor tile. The probe tips, brazed to molybdenum foil to ensure good electrical contact, are mounted in a ceramic tray for electrical isolation and reliable cable connections. The new probes are located 1.5 cm radially apart in a staggered arrangement near the entrance to the lower divertor pumping baffle and are linearly spaced 3 cm apart on the shelf above the in-vessel cryopump. Typical target plate profiles of Jsat, Te, and Vf with 4 mm spatial resolution are shown.

  4. Initiation and propagation of damage in actively cooled CFC armoured high heat flux components in fusion machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)], E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr; Schlosser, J. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G. [Universite Bordeaux 1, Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux, F-33600 Pessac (France); Escourbiac, F. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2009-06-15

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) in magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines are armoured with carbon fibre composite (CFC) bonded to a copper alloy heat sink. The manufacturing process induces high level of residual stresses due to the thermal expansion mismatch between CFC and copper and PFCs have to withstand strong stress ranges during operation. To study the initiation and propagation of damage in the CFC part, the ONERA damage model is used to describe the behaviour of the N11 material. The finite element simulations show that the damage is located near the interface and develops during the manufacturing of the PFCs as a consequence of the high amplitude of shear stresses. Under high heat flux, stresses decrease and the damage does not evolve. Further studies will take into account the damageable behaviour of the composite/copper interface, which will lead to geometrical optimisations and better knowledge of the link between damage and conductivity.

  5. Growth of a dry spot under a vapor bubble at high heat flux and high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolayev, Vadim; Lagier, G -L; Hegseth, J

    2016-01-01

    We report a 2D modeling of the thermal diffusion-controlled growth of a vapor bubble attached to a heating surface during saturated boiling. The heat conduction problem is solved in a liquid that surrounds a bubble with a free boundary and in a semi-infinite solid heater by the boundary element method. At high system pressure the bubble is assumed to grow slowly, its shape being defined by the surface tension and the vapor recoil force, a force coming from the liquid evaporating into the bubble. It is shown that at some typical time the dry spot under the bubble begins to grow rapidly under the action of the vapor recoil. Such a bubble can eventually spread into a vapor film that can separate the liquid from the heater thus triggering the boiling crisis (critical heat flux).

  6. Hybrid Heat Pipes for Lunar and Martian Surface and High Heat Flux Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababneh, Mohammed T.; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Alvarez-Hernandez, Angel R.

    2016-01-01

    Novel hybrid wick heat pipes are developed to operate against gravity on planetary surfaces, operate in space carrying power over long distances and act as thermosyphons on the planetary surface for Lunar and Martian landers and rovers. These hybrid heat pipes will be capable of operating at the higher heat flux requirements expected in NASA's future spacecraft and on the next generation of polar rovers and equatorial landers. In addition, the sintered evaporator wicks mitigate the start-up problems in vertical gravity aided heat pipes because of large number of nucleation sites in wicks which will allow easy boiling initiation. ACT, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Johnson Space Center, are working together on the Advanced Passive Thermal experiment (APTx) to test and validate the operation of a hybrid wick VCHP with warm reservoir and HiK"TM" plates in microgravity environment on the ISS.

  7. High heat flux testing of first wall mock-ups with and without neutron irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pintsuk

    2016-12-01

    For qualification, all three flat-tile mock-ups were exposed to cyclic steady state heat loads in the electron beam facility JUDITH-1 up to a maximum of 3.0MW/m2. Thereby, each tile was loaded individually as the full loading area exceeds the limits of the facility.

  8. A Photographic study of subcooled flow boiling burnout at high heat flux and velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celata, G.P.; Mariani, A.; Zummo, G. [ENEA, National Institute of Thermal-Fluid Dynamics, Rome (Italy); Cumo, M. [University of Rome (Italy); Gallo, D. [University of Palermo (Italy). Department of Nuclear Engineering

    2007-01-15

    The present paper reports the results of a visualization study of the burnout in subcooled flow boiling of water, with square cross section annular geometry (formed by a central heater rod contained in a duct characterized by a square cross section). The coolant velocity is in the range 3-10m/s. High speed movies of flow pattern in subcooled flow boiling of water from the onset of nucleate boiling up to physical burnout of the heater are recorded. From video images (single frames taken with a stroboscope light and an exposure time of 1{mu}s), the following general behaviour of vapour bubbles was observed: when the rate of bubble generation is increasing, with bubbles growing in the superheated layer close to the heating wall, their coalescence produces a type of elongated bubble called vapour blanket. One of the main features of the vapour blanket is that it is rooted to the nucleation site on the heated surface. Bubble dimensions are given as a function of thermal-hydraulic tested conditions for the whole range of velocity until the burnout region. A qualitative analysis of the behaviour of four stainless steel heater wires with different macroscopic surface finishes is also presented, showing the importance of this parameter on the dynamics of the bubbles and on the critical heat flux. (author)

  9. High heat flux engineering for the upgraded neutral beam injection systems of MAST-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhalla, F., E-mail: Fahim.dhalla@ccfe.ac.uk; Mistry, S.; Turner, I.; Barrett, T.R.; Day, I.; McAdams, R.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A new Residual Ion Dump (RID) and bend magnet system for the upgraded NBI systems have been designed for the 5 s MAST-U pulse requirements. • Design scoping was performed using numerical ion-tracing analysis software (MAGNET and OPERA codes). • A more powerful bending magnet will separate the residual ions into full, half and third energy components. • Three separate CuCrZr dumps spread the power loading resulting in acceptable power footprints. • FE thermo-mechanical analyses using ANSYS to validate the designs against the ITER SDC-IC code. • New bend magnet coils, yoke and CuCrZr water-cooled plates are in the procurement phase. - Abstract: For the initial phase of MAST-U operation the two existing neutral beam injection systems will be used, but must be substantially upgraded to fulfil expected operational requirements. The major elements are the design, manufacture and installation of a bespoke bending magnet and Residual Ion Dump (RID) system. The MAST-design full energy dump is being replaced with new actively-cooled full, half and third energy dumps, designed to receive 2.4 MW of ion power deflected by an iron-cored electromagnet. The main design challenge is limited space available in the vacuum vessel, requiring ion-deflection calculations to ensure acceptable heat flux distribution on the dump panels. This paper presents engineering and physics analysis of the upgraded MAST beamlines and reports the current status of manufacture.

  10. GRCop-84: A High-Temperature Copper Alloy for High-Heat-Flux Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) is a new high-temperature copper-based alloy. It possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance and low-cycle fatigue up to 700 C (1292 F) along with low thermal expansion and good conductivity. GRCop-84 can be processed and joined by a variety of methods such as extrusion, rolling, bending, stamping, brazing, friction stir welding, and electron beam welding. Considerable mechanical property data has been generated for as-produced material and following simulated braze cycles. The data shows that the alloy is extremely stable during thermal exposures. This paper reviews the major GRCop-84 mechanical and thermophysical properties and compares them to literature values for a variety of other high-temperature copper-based alloys.

  11. Numerical investigation of fluid flow and heat transfer under high heat flux using rectangular micro-channels

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad M.

    2012-02-01

    A 3D-conjugate numerical investigation was conducted to predict heat transfer characteristics in a rectangular cross-sectional micro-channel employing simultaneously developing single-phase flows. The numerical code was validated by comparison with previous experimental and numerical results for the same micro-channel dimensions and classical correlations based on conventional sized channels. High heat fluxes up to 130W/cm 2 were applied to investigate micro-channel thermal characteristics. The entire computational domain was discretized using a 120×160×100 grid for the micro-channel with an aspect ratio of (α=4.56) and examined for Reynolds numbers in the laminar range (Re 500-2000) using FLUENT. De-ionized water served as the cooling fluid while the micro-channel substrate used was made of copper. Validation results were found to be in good agreement with previous experimental and numerical data [1] with an average deviation of less than 4.2%. As the applied heat flux increased, an increase in heat transfer coefficient values was observed. Also, the Reynolds number required for transition from single-phase fluid to two-phase was found to increase. A correlation is proposed for the results of average Nusselt numbers for the heat transfer characteristics in micro-channels with simultaneously developing, single-phase flows. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Recrystallization and grain growth behavior of rolled tungsten under VDE-like short pulse high heat flux loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Krieger, K.; Luo, G.-N.; Xu, H. Y.; Fu, B. Q.; Li, M.; Liu, W.

    2013-02-01

    Short pulse heat loads expected for vertical displacement events (VDEs) in ITER were applied in the high heat flux (HHF) test facility GLADIS at IPP-Garching onto samples of rolled W. Pulsed neutral beams with the central heat flux of 23 MW/m2 were applied for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 s, respectively. Rapid recrystallization of the adiabatically loaded 3 mm thick samples was observed when the pulse duration was up to 1.0 s. Grains grew markedly following recrystallization with increasing pulse length. The recrystallization temperature and temperature dependence of the recrystallized grain size were also investigated. The results showed that the recrystallization temperature of the W grade was around 2480 °C under the applied heat loading condition, which was nearly 1150 °C higher than the conventional recrystallization temperature, and the grains were much finer. A linear relationship between the logarithm of average grain size (ln d) and the inverse of maximum surface temperature (1/Tmax) was found and accordingly the activation energy for grain growth in temperature evolution up to Tmax in 1.5 s of the short pulse HHF load was deduced to be 4.1 eV. This provided an effective clue to predict the structure evolution under short pulse HHF loads.

  13. Numerical Study of High Heat Flux Performances of Flat-Tile Divertor Mock-ups with Hypervapotron Cooling Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Liu, Xiang; Lian, Youyun; Cai, Laizhong

    2015-09-01

    The hypervapotron (HV), as an enhanced heat transfer technique, will be used for ITER divertor components in the dome region as well as the enhanced heat flux first wall panels. W-Cu brazing technology has been developed at SWIP (Southwestern Institute of Physics), and one W/CuCrZr/316LN component of 450 mm×52 mm×166 mm with HV cooling channels will be fabricated for high heat flux (HHF) tests. Before that a relevant analysis was carried out to optimize the structure of divertor component elements. ANSYS-CFX was used in CFD analysis and ABAQUS was adopted for thermal-mechanical calculations. Commercial code FE-SAFE was adopted to compute the fatigue life of the component. The tile size, thickness of tungsten tiles and the slit width among tungsten tiles were optimized and its HHF performances under International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) loading conditions were simulated. One brand new tokamak HL-2M with advanced divertor configuration is under construction in SWIP, where ITER-like flat-tile divertor components are adopted. This optimized design is expected to supply valuable data for HL-2M tokamak. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2011GB110001 and 2011GB110004)

  14. Cu-Cr-Nb-Zr Alloy for Rocket Engines and Other High-Heat- Flux Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Rocket-engine main combustion chamber liners are used to contain the burning of fuel and oxidizer and provide a stream of high-velocity gas for propulsion. The liners in engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine are regeneratively cooled by flowing fuel, e.g., cryogenic hydrogen, through cooling channels in the back side of the liner. The heat gained by the liner from the flame and compression of the gas in the throat section is transferred to the fuel by the liner. As a result, the liner must either have a very high thermal conductivity or a very high operating temperature. In addition to the large heat flux (>10 MW/sq m), the liners experience a very large thermal gradient, typically more than 500 C over 1 mm. The gradient produces thermally induced stresses and strains that cause low cycle fatigue (LCF). Typically, a liner will experience a strain differential in excess of 1% between the cooling channel and the hot wall. Each time the engine is fired, the liner undergoes an LCF cycle. The number of cycles can be as few as one for an expendable booster engine, to as many as several thousand for a reusable launch vehicle or reaction control system. Finally, the liners undergo creep and a form of mechanical degradation called thermal ratcheting that results in the bowing out of the cooling channel into the combustion chamber, and eventual failure of the liner. GRCop-84, a Cu-Cr-Nb alloy, is generally recognized as the best liner material available at the time of this reporting. The alloy consists of 14% Cr2Nb precipitates in a pure copper matrix. Through experimental work, it has been established that the Zr will not participate in the formation of Laves phase precipitates with Cr and Nb, but will instead react with Cu to form the desired Cu-Zr compounds. It is believed that significant improvements in the mechanical properties of GRCop-84 will be realized by adding Zr. The innovation is a Cu-Cr-Nb-Zr alloy covering the composition range of 0.8 to 8.1 weight

  15. Experimental study on heat transfer augmentation for high heat flux removal in rib-roughened narrow channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, M.S.; Monde, Masanori [Saga Univ. (Japan); Hino, Ryutaro; Haga, Katsuhiro; Sudo, Yukio

    1997-07-01

    Frictional pressure drop and heat transfer performance in a very narrow rectangular channel having one-sided constant heat flux and repeated-ribs for turbulent flow have been investigated experimentally, and their experimental correlations were obtained using the least square method. The rib pitch-to-height ratios(p/k) were 10 and 20 while holding the rib height constant at 0.2mm, the Reynolds number(Re) from 2,414 to 98,458 under different channel heights of 1.2mm, 2.97mm, and 3.24mm, the rib height-to-channel equivalent diameter(k/De) of 0.03, 0.04, and 0.09 respectively. The results show that the rib-roughened surface augments heat transfer 2-3 times higher than that of the smooth surface with the expense of 2.8-4 times higher frictional pressure drop under Re=5000-10{sup 5}, p/k=10, and H=1.2mm. Experimental results obtained by channel height, H=1.2mm shows a little bit higher heat transfer and friction factor performance than the higher channel height, H=3.24mm. The effect of fin and consequently higher turbulence intensity are responsible for producing higher heat transfer rates. The obtained correlations could be used to design the cooling passages between the target plates to remove high heat flux up to 12MW/m{sup 2} generated at target plates in a high-intensity proton accelerator system. (author). 54 refs.

  16. Recrystallization and grain growth behavior of rolled tungsten under VDE-like short pulse high heat flux loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Y. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Krieger, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Xu, H.Y.; Fu, B.Q.; Li, M. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, W., E-mail: liuw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Recrystallization temperature of a rolled W was ∼2480 °C under applied HHF loads. ► Fine grains were obtained under HHF loads with appropriate short pulse length. ► With increasing pulse length, the recrystallized grains significantly grew larger. ► A linear relationship between ln d and 1/T{sub max} was found. ► Activation energy for grain growth in T evolution up to T{sub max} in 1.5 s was obtained. -- Abstract: Short pulse heat loads expected for vertical displacement events (VDEs) in ITER were applied in the high heat flux (HHF) test facility GLADIS at IPP-Garching onto samples of rolled W. Pulsed neutral beams with the central heat flux of 23 MW/m{sup 2} were applied for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 s, respectively. Rapid recrystallization of the adiabatically loaded 3 mm thick samples was observed when the pulse duration was up to 1.0 s. Grains grew markedly following recrystallization with increasing pulse length. The recrystallization temperature and temperature dependence of the recrystallized grain size were also investigated. The results showed that the recrystallization temperature of the W grade was around 2480 °C under the applied heat loading condition, which was nearly 1150 °C higher than the conventional recrystallization temperature, and the grains were much finer. A linear relationship between the logarithm of average grain size (ln d) and the inverse of maximum surface temperature (1/T{sub max}) was found and accordingly the activation energy for grain growth in temperature evolution up to T{sub max} in 1.5 s of the short pulse HHF load was deduced to be 4.1 eV. This provided an effective clue to predict the structure evolution under short pulse HHF loads.

  17. Manufacturing and high heat-flux testing of brazed actively cooled mock-ups with Ti-doped graphite and CFC as plasma-facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rosales, C; Ordas, N; Lopez-Galilea, I [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Pintsuk, G; Linke, J [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Gualco, C; Grattarola, M; Mataloni, F [Ansaldo Ricerche S.p.A., I-16152 Genoa (Italy); Ramos Fernandez, J M; MartInez Escandell, M [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, University of Alicante, E-03690 Alicante (Spain); Centeno, A; Blanco, C [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (CSIC), Apdo. 73, E-33080 Oviedo (Spain)], E-mail: cgrosales@ceit.es

    2009-12-15

    In the frame of the EU project ExtreMat new Ti-doped isotropic graphites and carbon fibre-reinforced carbons (CFCs) with high thermal conductivity and reduced chemical erosion were brazed to a CuCrZr heat-sink to produce flat-tile actively cooled mock-ups (MUs). Brazing was done using a low CTE interlayer to shift the stresses to the metal-metal interface. These MUs were exposed to high heat-fluxes in the electron beam facility JUDITH. Screening tests were conducted increasing the heat load stepwise up to 15 MW m{sup -2}, followed by 100 cycles at 15 MW m{sup -2}, subsequent screening up to 20 MW m{sup -2} and 100 cycles at 20 MW m{sup -2}. All MUs withstood screening at 15 MW m{sup -2} and most of them survived screening at 20 MW m{sup -2}. Ti-doped CFC MUs showed a significant improvement compared with the undoped reference CFC, surviving several cycles at 20 MW m{sup -2} on all tiles. One of the Ti-doped graphite MUs withstood 100 cycles at 20 MW m{sup -2} on one tile, representing a promising result.

  18. Calculated Electron Fluxes at Airplane Altitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, R K; Stanev, T

    1993-01-01

    A precision measurement of atmospheric electron fluxes has been performed on a Japanese commercial airliner (Enomoto, {\\it et al.}, 1991). We have performed a monte carlo calculation of the cosmic ray secondary electron fluxes expected in this experiment. The monte carlo uses the hadronic portion of our neutrino flux cascade program combined with the electromagnetic cascade portion of the CERN library program GEANT. Our results give good agreement with the data, provided we boost the overall normalization of the primary cosmic ray flux by 12\\% over the normalization used in the neutrino flux calculation.

  19. Interpretation of the deep cracking phenomenon of tungsten monoblock targets observed in high-heat-flux fatigue tests at 20 MW/m{sup 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Muyuan; You, Jeong-Ha, E-mail: you@ipp.mpg.de

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A theoretical interpretation is presented for deep crack of W monoblocks at 20 MW/m{sup 2}. • A consecutive process of crack initiation and growth was modeled in two stages. • The lifetime to crack initiation and the driving force of fracture are assessed. • Numerical predictions in this study agree well with the experimental findings. - Abstract: The HHF qualification tests conducted on the ITER divertor target prototypes showed that the tungsten monoblock armor suffered from deep cracking due to fatigue, when the applied high-heat-flux load approaches 20 MW/m{sup 2}. In spite of the critical implication of the deep cracking of armor on the structural integrity of a whole target component, no rigorous interpretation has been given to date. In this paper, a theoretical interpretation of the observed deep cracking feature is presented. A two-stage modeling approach is employed where deep cracking is thought to be a consecutive process of crack initiation and crack growth, which is assumed to be caused by plastic fatigue and brittle facture, respectively. The fatigue lifetime to crack initiation on the armor surface and the crack tip load of brittle fracture are assessed as a function of crack length and heat flux loads. The potential mechanisms of deep cracking are discussed for a typical slow transient high-heat-flux load cycle. It is shown that the quantitative predictions delivered in this study agree well with the observed findings offering insight into the nature of tungsten armor failure.

  20. The high-heat-flux test facilities in the joint stock company “D.V. Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volodin, A., E-mail: volodin@sintez.niiefa.spb.su [JSC “NIIEFA”, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kuznetcov, V.; Davydov, V.; Kokoulin, A.; Komarov, A.; Mazul, I.; Mudyugin, B.; Ovchinnikov, I.; Stepanov, N.; Rulev, R.; Eremkin, A.; Rogov, A.; Prianikov, V. [JSC “NIIEFA”, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Fedosov, A. [ITER Organization, Building 81/124, TKM, Internal Components Division, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The IDTF was created for the high heat flux tests of the PFUs of the ITER divertor. • At the present on the TSEFEY-M a brazing of fingers a FW semi-prototype is performing. • The IDTF and TSEFEY-M facilities are ready for the HHF testing of the ITER components. - Abstract: The current ITER design involves beryllium and tungsten as plasma facing materials for in-vessel components. Due to a high number of operating cycles and to the expected surface heat loads, thermal fatigue is one of the most damaging mechanisms for the plasma facing components (PFCs) of the ITER machine. Therefore, it is essential to perform an assessment of the behavior of PFCs under cycling heat loads to demonstrate the fitness for purpose of the selected technologies. This article summarizes the features of high heat flux facilities designed and constructed in the Efremov Institute for the performance of high heat flux (HHF) tests under ITER procurements as well as related R&D works. The TSEFEY-M facility was commissioned in 1994. The main purpose of this facility is thermal fatigue testing of mock-ups with various plasma-facing materials (carbon fiber reinforced composite (CFC), tungsten, beryllium, etc.) and with various cooling agents (water or gas). The ITER divertor test facility (IDTF) was created in the framework of ITER project, specifically for the HHF tests of the vertical targets (inner and outer) and domes of the ITER divertor. After commissioning in 2008, the IDTF facility was qualified in 2012–2013 for HHF tests of ITER PFCs.

  1. The WEST project: Testing ITER divertor high heat flux component technology in a steady state tokamak environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucalossi, J., E-mail: jerome.bucalossi@cea.fr; Missirlian, M.; Moreau, P.; Samaille, F.; Tsitrone, E.; Houtte, D. van; Batal, T.; Bourdelle, C.; Chantant, M.; Corre, Y.; Courtois, X.; Delpech, L.; Doceul, L.; Douai, D.; Dougnac, H.; Faïsse, F.; Fenzi, C.; Ferlay, F.; Firdaouss, M.; Gargiulo, L.; and others

    2014-10-15

    The WEST project recently launched at Cadarache consists in transforming Tore Supra in an X-point divertor configuration while extending its long pulse capability, in order to test the ITER divertor technology. The implementation of a full tungsten actively cooled divertor with plasma facing unit representative of ITER divertor targets will allow addressing risks both in terms of industrial-scale manufacturing and operation of such components. Relevant plasma scenarios are foreseen for extensive testing under high heat load in the 10–20 MW/m{sup 2} range and ITER-like fluences (1000 s pulses). Plasma facing unit monitoring and development of protection strategies will be key elements of the WEST program. WEST is scheduled to enter into operation in 2016, and will provide a key facility to prepare and be prepared for ITER.

  2. An augmented Young-Laplace model of an evaporating meniscus in a micro-channel with high heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayner, P. C., Jr.; Plawsky, J.; Schonberg, J. A.; Dasgupta, S.

    1993-01-01

    High flux evaporations from a steady meniscus formed in a 2 micron channel is modeled using the augmented Young-Laplace equation. The heat flux is found to be a function of the long range van der Waals dispersion force which represents interfacial conditions between heptane and various substrates. Heat fluxes of (1.3-1.6) x 10(exp 6) W/m(exp 2) based on the width of the channel are obtained for heptane completely wetting the substrate at 100 C. Small channels are used to obtain these large fluxes. Even though the real contact angle is 0 deg, the apparent contact angle is found to vary between 24.8 deg and 25.6 deg. The apparent contact angle, which represents viscous losses near the contact line, has a large effect on the heat flow rate because of its effect on capillary suction and the area of the meniscus. The interfacial heat flux is modeled using kinetic theory for the evaporation rate. The superheated state depends on the temperature and the pressure of the liquid phase. The liquid pressure differs from the pressure of the vapor phase due to capillarity and long range van der Waals dispersion forces which are relevant in the ultra think film formed at the leading edge of the meniscus. Important pressure gradients in the thin film cause a substantial apparent contact angle for a complete wetting system. The temperature of the liquid is related to the evaporation rate and to the substrate temperature through the steady heat conduction equation. Conduction in the liquid phase is calculated using finite element analysis except in the vicinity of the thin film. A lubrication theory solution for the thin film is combined with the finite element analysis by the method of matched asymptotic expansions.

  3. Melt layer erosion of pure and lanthanum doped tungsten under VDE-like high heat flux loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Luo, G.-N.; Fu, B. Q.; Xu, H. Y.; Liu, W.

    2013-07-01

    Heat loads expected for VDEs in ITER were applied in the neutral beam facility GLADIS at IPP Garching. Several ˜3 mm thick rolled pure W and W-1 wt% La2O3 plates were exposed to pulsed hydrogen beams with a central heat flux of 23 MW/m2 for 1.5-1.8 s. The melting thresholds are determined, and melt layer motion as well as material structure evolutions are shown. The melting thresholds of the two W grades are very close in this experimental setup. Lots of big bubbles with diameters from several μm to several 10 μm in the re-solidified layer of W were observed and they spread deeper with increasing heat flux. However, for W-1 wt% La2O3, no big bubbles were found in the corrugated melt layer. The underlying mechanisms referred to the melt layer motion and bubble issues are tentatively discussed based on comparison of the erosion characteristics between the two W grades.

  4. Melt layer erosion of pure and lanthanum doped tungsten under VDE-like high heat flux loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Y., E-mail: yuanyue08@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Fu, B.Q.; Xu, H.Y. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, W., E-mail: liuw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Heat loads expected for VDEs in ITER were applied in the neutral beam facility GLADIS at IPP Garching. Several ∼3 mm thick rolled pure W and W–1 wt% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} plates were exposed to pulsed hydrogen beams with a central heat flux of 23 MW/m{sup 2} for 1.5–1.8 s. The melting thresholds are determined, and melt layer motion as well as material structure evolutions are shown. The melting thresholds of the two W grades are very close in this experimental setup. Lots of big bubbles with diameters from several μm to several 10 μm in the re-solidified layer of W were observed and they spread deeper with increasing heat flux. However, for W–1 wt% La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, no big bubbles were found in the corrugated melt layer. The underlying mechanisms referred to the melt layer motion and bubble issues are tentatively discussed based on comparison of the erosion characteristics between the two W grades.

  5. Developing Structural, High-heat flux and Plasma Facing Materials for a near-term DEMO Fusion Power Plant: the EU Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Stork, D; Boutard, J-L; Buckthorpe, D; Diegele, E; Dudarev, S L; English, C; Federici, G; Gilbert, M R; Gonzalez, S; Ibarra, A; Linsmeier, Ch; Puma, A Li; Marbach, G; Morris, P F; Packer, L W; Raj, B; Rieth, M; Tran, M Q; Ward, D J; Zinkle, S J

    2014-01-01

    The findings of the EU 'Materials Assessment Group' (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R&D up to a DEMO construction decision. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R&D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials.

  6. High heat flux test with HIP-bonded Ferritic Martensitic Steel mock-up for the first wall of the KO HCML TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Won, E-mail: dwlee@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Young Dug; Kim, Suk Kwon; Shin, Hee Shin; Hong, Bong Guen [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Bang, In Cheol, E-mail: icbang@unist.ac.kr [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-01

    In order for a Korean Helium Cooled Molten Lithium (HCML) Test Blanket Module (TBM) to be tested in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), fabrication method for the TBM FW such as Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP, 1050 deg. C, 100 MPa, 2 h) has been developed including post HIP heat treatment (PHHT, normalizing at 950 deg. C for 2 h and tempering at 750 deg. C for 2 h) with Ferritic Martensitic Steel (FMS). Several mock-ups were fabricated using the developed methods and one of them, three-channel mock-up, was used for performing a High Heat Flux (HHF) test to verify the joint integrity. Test conditions were determined using the commercial code, ANSYS-11, and the test was performed in the Korea Heat Load Test (KoHLT) facility, which was used a radiation heating with a graphite heater. The mock-up survived up to 1000 cycles under 1.0 MW/m{sup 2} heat flux and there is no delamination or failure during the test.

  7. Correlation of Electrical Resistance to CMC Stress-Strain and Fracture Behavior Under High Heat-Flux Thermal and Stress Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew; Morscher, Gregory; Zhu, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    Because SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are under consideration for use as turbine engine hot-section components in extreme environments, it becomes necessary to investigate their performance and damage morphologies under complex loading and environmental conditions. Monitoring of electrical resistance (ER) has been shown as an effective tool for detecting damage accumulation of woven melt-infiltrated SiCSiC CMCs. However, ER change under complicated thermo-mechanical loading is not well understood. In this study a systematic approach is taken to determine the capabilities of ER as a relevant non-destructive evaluation technique for high heat-flux testing, including thermal gradients and localized stress concentrations. Room temperature and high temperature, laser-based tensile tests were conducted in which stress-dependent damage locations were determined using modal acoustic emission (AE) monitoring and compared to full-field strain mapping using digital image correlation (DIC). This information is then compared with the results of in-situ ER monitoring, post-test ER inspection and fractography in order to correlate ER response to convoluted loading conditions and damage evolution.

  8. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  9. Flux profile scanners for scattered high-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, R. S.; Decowski, P.; Arroyo, C.; Breuer, M.; Celli, J.; Chudakov, E.; Kumar, K. S.; Olson, M.; Peterson, G. A.; Pope, K.; Ricci, J.; Savage, J.; Souder, P. A.

    2005-11-01

    The paper describes the design and performance of flux integrating Cherenkov scanners with air-core reflecting light guides used in a high-energy, high-flux electron scattering experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The scanners were highly radiation resistant and provided a good signal to background ratio leading to very good spatial resolution of the scattered electron flux profile scans.

  10. Electron-induced damage to NPN transistors under different fluxes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Radiation damage of NPN transistors under different fluxes with electron energy of 1.5 MeV was investigated in this article. It has been shown that when NPN transistors were irradiated to a given fluence at different electron fluxes, the shift of base current was dependent on flux. With electron flux decreasing, the shift of base current becomes larger, while collector current almost keeps constant. Thus, more degradation of NPN transistors could be caused by low-electron-flux irradiation, similar to enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) of transistors under 60Co γ-irradiation. Finally, the underlying mechanisms were discussed here.

  11. Developing structural, high-heat flux and plasma facing materials for a near-term DEMO fusion power plant: The EU assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stork, D., E-mail: derek.stork@btinternet.com [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Agostini, P. [ENEA, Brasimone Research Centre, 40032 Cumugnano, Bologna (Italy); Boutard, J.L. [CEA, cab HC, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Buckthorpe, D. [AMEC, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 8QZ (United Kingdom); Diegele, E. [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, IMF-I, D-7602 Karlsruhe (Germany); Dudarev, S.L. [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); English, C. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Federici, G. [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Gilbert, M.R. [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Gonzalez, S. [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Ibarra, A. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid (Spain); Linsmeier, Ch. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Li Puma, A. [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Marbach, G. [CEA, cab HC, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Morris, P.F. [Formerly of TATA Steel Europe, Swinden Technology Centre, Moorgate, Rotherham S60 3AR (United Kingdom); Packer, L.W. [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Raj, B. [Indian National Academy of Engineering, Shaheed Jeet Singh Marg, New Delhi 110016 (India); Rieth, M. [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, IMF-I, D-7602 Karlsruhe (Germany); and others

    2014-12-15

    The findings of the EU ‘Materials Assessment Group’ (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R and D up to a DEMO construction decision. A DEMO phase I with a ‘Starter Blanket’ and ‘Starter Divertor’ is foreseen: the blanket being capable of withstanding ⩾2 MW yr m{sup −2} fusion neutron fluence (∼20 dpa in the front-wall steel). A second phase ensues for DEMO with ⩾5 MW yr m{sup −2} first wall neutron fluence. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R and D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials. The DEMO balance of plant constrains the blanket and divertor coolants to remain unchanged between the two phases. The blanket coolant choices (He gas or pressurised water) put technical constraints on the blanket steels, either to have high strength at higher temperatures than current baseline variants (above 650 °C for high thermodynamic efficiency from He-gas coolant), or superior radiation-embrittlement properties at lower temperatures (∼290–320 °C), for construction of water-cooled blankets. Risk mitigation proposed would develop these options in parallel, and computational and modelling techniques to shorten the cycle-time of new steel development will be important to achieve tight R and D timescales. The superior power handling of a water-cooled divertor target suggests a substructure temperature operating window (∼200–350 °C) that could be realised, as a

  12. Developing structural, high-heat flux and plasma facing materials for a near-term DEMO fusion power plant: The EU assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, D.; Agostini, P.; Boutard, J. L.; Buckthorpe, D.; Diegele, E.; Dudarev, S. L.; English, C.; Federici, G.; Gilbert, M. R.; Gonzalez, S.; Ibarra, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Li Puma, A.; Marbach, G.; Morris, P. F.; Packer, L. W.; Raj, B.; Rieth, M.; Tran, M. Q.; Ward, D. J.; Zinkle, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The findings of the EU 'Materials Assessment Group' (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R&D up to a DEMO construction decision. A DEMO phase I with a 'Starter Blanket' and 'Starter Divertor' is foreseen: the blanket being capable of withstanding ⩾2 MW yr m-2 fusion neutron fluence (∼20 dpa in the front-wall steel). A second phase ensues for DEMO with ⩾5 MW yr m-2 first wall neutron fluence. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R&D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials. The DEMO balance of plant constrains the blanket and divertor coolants to remain unchanged between the two phases. The blanket coolant choices (He gas or pressurised water) put technical constraints on the blanket steels, either to have high strength at higher temperatures than current baseline variants (above 650 °C for high thermodynamic efficiency from He-gas coolant), or superior radiation-embrittlement properties at lower temperatures (∼290-320 °C), for construction of water-cooled blankets. Risk mitigation proposed would develop these options in parallel, and computational and modelling techniques to shorten the cycle-time of new steel development will be important to achieve tight R&D timescales. The superior power handling of a water-cooled divertor target suggests a substructure temperature operating window (∼200-350 °C) that could be realised, as a baseline-concept, using tungsten on a copper

  13. Exploring ISEE-3 magnetic cloud polarities with electron heat fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahler, S.W. [Air Force Research Laboratory, 29 Randolph Rd, Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts 01731 (United States); Crooker, N.U. [Center for Space Physics, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Gosling, J.T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS D 466, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1999-06-01

    We have used solar wind electron heat fluxes to determine the magnetic polarities of the interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF) during the ISEE-3 observations in 1978{endash}1982. That period included 14 magnetic clouds (MCs) identified by Zhang and Burlaga. The MCs have been modeled as single magnetic flux ropes, and it is generally assumed that they are magnetically closed structures with each end of the flux rope connected to the Sun. The flux rope model is valid only if the magnetic polarity of each MC does not change during the passage of ISEE-3 through the MC. We test this model with the heat flux data, using the dominant heat flux in bidirectional electron heat fluxes to determine the MC polarities. The polarity changes within at least 2, and possibly 6, of the 14 MCs, meaning that those MCs can not fit the model of a single flux rope. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Exploring ISEE-3 magnetic cloud polarities with electron heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Crooker, N. U.; Gosling, J. T.

    1999-06-01

    We have used solar wind electron heat fluxes to determine the magnetic polarities of the interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF) during the ISEE-3 observations in 1978-1982. That period included 14 magnetic clouds (MCs) identified by Zhang and Burlaga. The MCs have been modeled as single magnetic flux ropes, and it is generally assumed that they are magnetically closed structures with each end of the flux rope connected to the Sun. The flux rope model is valid only if the magnetic polarity of each MC does not change during the passage of ISEE-3 through the MC. We test this model with the heat flux data, using the dominant heat flux in bidirectional electron heat fluxes to determine the MC polarities. The polarity changes within at least 2, and possibly 6, of the 14 MCs, meaning that those MCs can not fit the model of a single flux rope.

  15. Use of a thin liquid film moving under the action of gas flow in a mini-channel for removing high heat fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaitsev Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensively evaporating liquid films shear-driven in a mini- or micro-channel under the action of cocurrent gas flow are promising for the use in modern cooling systems of semiconductor devices. In this work, we investigated the influence of liquid and gas flow rates on the critical heat flux in a locally heated film of water, moving under the action of air flow in a mini-channel. In experiments a record value of critical heat flux of 870 W/cm2 was reached. Heat spreading into the substrate and heat losses to the atmosphere in total do not exceed 25 % at heat fluxes above 400 W/cm2. A comparison with the critical heat flux for water flow boiling in the channel shows that, for shear-driven liquid films the critical heat flux is almost an order of magnitude higher.

  16. Surface modification and deuterium retention in reduced-activation steels under low-energy deuterium plasma exposure. Part II: steels pre-damaged with 20 MeV W ions and high heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Zhou, Z.; Sugiyama, K.; Balden, M.; Pintsuk, G.; Gasparyan, Yu.; Efimov, V.

    2017-03-01

    The reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels including Eurofer (9Cr) and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels by the addition of Y2O3 particles investigated in Part I were pre-damaged either with 20 MeV W ions at room temperature at IPP (Garching) or with high heat flux at FZJ (Juelich) and subsequently exposed to low energy (~20-200 eV per D) deuterium (D) plasma up to a fluence of 2.9  ×  1025 D m-2 in the temperature range from 290 K to 700 K. The pre-irradiation with 20 MeV W ions at room temperature up to 1 displacement per atom (dpa) has no noticeable influence on the steel surface morphology before and after the D plasma exposure. The pre-irradiation with W ions leads to the same concentration of deuterium in all kinds of investigated steels, regardless of the presence of nanoparticles and Cr content. It was found that (i) both kinds of irradiation with W ions and high heat flux increase the D retention in steels compared to undamaged steels and (ii) the D retention in both pre-damaged and undamaged steels decreases with a formation of surface roughness under the irradiation of steels with deuterium ions with incident energy which exceeds the threshold of sputtering. The increase in the D retention in RAFM steels pre-damaged either with W ions (damage up to ~3 µm) or high heat flux (damage up to ~10 µm) diminishes with increasing the temperature. It is important to mention that the near surface modifications caused by either implantation of high energy ions or a high heat flux load, significantly affect the total D retention at low temperatures or low fluences but have a negligible impact on the total D retention at elevated temperatures and high fluences because, in these cases, the D retention is mainly determined by bulk diffusion.

  17. Electronic Flux Density beyond the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Axel; Agostini, Federica; Gross, E K U

    2016-05-19

    In the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the electronic wave function is typically real-valued and hence the electronic flux density (current density) seems to vanish. This is unfortunate for chemistry, because it precludes the possibility to monitor the electronic motion associated with the nuclear motion during chemical rearrangements from a Born-Oppenheimer simulation of the process. We study an electronic flux density obtained from a correction to the electronic wave function. This correction is derived via nuclear velocity perturbation theory applied in the framework of the exact factorization of electrons and nuclei. To compute the correction, only the ground state potential energy surface and the electronic wave function are needed. For a model system, we demonstrate that this electronic flux density approximates the true one very well, for coherent tunneling dynamics as well as for over-the-barrier scattering, and already for mass ratios between electrons and nuclei that are much larger than the true mass ratios.

  18. Electron flux through apo-and holoferritin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axford, Danny N; Davis, Jason J [Chemical Research Laboratory, University of Oxford, Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TA (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-11

    Conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) has been used to investigate electronic transport through the protein ferritin in both its holo and apo forms. The presence of the iron oxide core has a notable effect on both conductance and the molecular response to probe-induced compression. This response can also be contrasted with that of the much smaller metalloprotein cytochrome c, across which electron transport can be simulated by a single non-resonant tunnel barrier model. Tapping mode AFM imaging, in different compressional regimes, reveals both the mineral core of holoferritin and significant collapse of the hollow protein cavity of apoferritin. These topographic findings correlate well with CP-AFM conductance data and facilitate a clearer description of electron transport across these molecules.

  19. Electron flux through apo-and holoferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Danny N.; Davis, Jason J.

    2007-04-01

    Conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) has been used to investigate electronic transport through the protein ferritin in both its holo and apo forms. The presence of the iron oxide core has a notable effect on both conductance and the molecular response to probe-induced compression. This response can also be contrasted with that of the much smaller metalloprotein cytochrome c, across which electron transport can be simulated by a single non-resonant tunnel barrier model. Tapping mode AFM imaging, in different compressional regimes, reveals both the mineral core of holoferritin and significant collapse of the hollow protein cavity of apoferritin. These topographic findings correlate well with CP-AFM conductance data and facilitate a clearer description of electron transport across these molecules.

  20. Forecasting relativistic electron flux using dynamic multiple regression models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-L. Wei

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The forecast of high energy electron fluxes in the radiation belts is important because the exposure of modern spacecraft to high energy particles can result in significant damage to onboard systems. A comprehensive physical model of processes related to electron energisation that can be used for such a forecast has not yet been developed. In the present paper a systems identification approach is exploited to deduce a dynamic multiple regression model that can be used to predict the daily maximum of high energy electron fluxes at geosynchronous orbit from data. It is shown that the model developed provides reliable predictions.

  1. Quantifying electron fluxes in methanogenic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junicke, H.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a widely applied process in which close interactions between different microbial groups result in the formation of renewable energy in the form of biogas. Nevertheless, the regulatory mechanisms of the electron transfer between acetogenic bacteria and methanogenic archaea in t

  2. Resonant enhancement of relativistic electron fluxes during geomagnetically active periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Roth

    Full Text Available The strong increase in the flux of relativistic electrons during the recovery phase of magnetic storms and during other active periods is investigated with the help of Hamiltonian formalism and simulations of test electrons which interact with whistler waves. The intensity of the whistler waves is enhanced significantly due to injection of 10-100 keV electrons during the substorm. Electrons which drift in the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field generate the rising tones of VLF whistler chorus. The seed population of relativistic electrons which bounce along the inhomogeneous magnetic field, interacts resonantly with the whistler waves. Whistler wave propagating obliquely to the magnetic field can interact with energetic electrons through Landau, cyclotron, and higher harmonic resonant interactions when the Doppler-shifted wave frequency equals any (positive or negative integer multiple of the local relativistic gyrofrequency. Because the gyroradius of a relativistic electron may be the order of or greater than the perpendicular wavelength, numerous cyclotron, harmonics can contribute to the resonant interaction which breaks down the adiabatic invariant. A similar process diffuses the pitch angle leading to electron precipitation. The irreversible changes in the adiabatic invariant depend on the relative phase between the wave and the electron, and successive resonant interactions result in electrons undergoing a random walk in energy and pitch angle. This resonant process may contribute to the 10-100 fold increase of the relativistic electron flux in the outer radiation belt, and constitute an interesting relation between substorm-generated waves and enhancements in fluxes of relativistic electrons during geomagnetic storms and other active periods.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles · trapped; plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms

  3. Results of high heat flux testing of W/CuCrZr multilayer composites with percolating microstructure for plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greuner, Henri, E-mail: henri.greuner@ipp.mpg.de; Zivelonghi, Alessandro; Böswirth, Bernd; You, Jeong-Ha

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Improvement of the performance of plasma-facing components made of W and CuCrZr. • Functionally graded composite at the interface of W and CuCrZr to mitigate the CTE. • A three-layer composite system (W volume fraction: 70/50/30%) was developed. • Design of water-cooled divertor components up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} heat load for e.g. DEMO. • HHF tests up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} were successfully performed. - Abstract: Reliable joining of tungsten to copper is a major issue in the design of water-cooled divertor components for future fusion reactors. One of the suggested advanced engineering solutions is to use functionally graded composite interlayers. Recently, the authors have developed a novel processing route for fabricating multi-layer graded W/CuCrZr composites. Previous characterization confirmed that the composite materials possess enhanced strength compared to the matrix alloy and shows reasonable ductility up to 300 °C indicating large potential to extend the operation temperature limit. Furthermore, a three-layer composite system (W volume fraction: 70/50/30%) was developed as a graded interlayer between the W armour and CuCrZr heat sink. In this study, we investigated the structural performance of the graded joint. Three water-cooled mock-ups of a flat tile type component were fabricated using electron beam welding and thermally loaded at the hydrogen neutral beam test facility GLADIS. Cycling tests at 10 MW/m{sup 2} and screening tests up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} were successfully performed and confirmed the expected thermal performance of the compound. The measured temperature values were in good agreement with the prediction of finite element analysis. Microscopic investigation confirmed the structural integrity of the newly developed functionally graded composite after these tests.

  4. Ion and electron velocity distributions within flux transfer events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Stansberry, J. A.; Bame, S. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gosling, J. T.

    1987-01-01

    The detailed nature of the thermal and suprathermal ion and electron distributions within magnetic flux transfer events (FTEs) is examined. Examples of both magnetosheath FTEs and magnetospheric FTEs are discussed. The detailed distributions confirm that FTEs contain a mixture of magnetosheath and magnetospheric plasmas. To lowest order, the distributions are consistent with a simple superposition of the two interpenetrating populations, with no strong interactions between them. To first order, some interesting differences appear, especially in the electron distributions, suggesting that considerable pitch angle scattering and some electron energy diffusion are also occurring. These observations should provide a useful test of analytical and numerical studies of interpenetrating plasmas.

  5. Observation of relativistic electron precipitation during a rapid decrease of trapped relativistic electron flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, R. M.; Lin, R. P.; Smith, D. M.; McCarthy, M. P.

    2007-05-01

    We present the first quantitative comparison of precipitating and geomagnetically trapped electron flux during a relativistic electron depletion event. Intense bremsstrahlung X-ray emission from relativistic electron precipitation was observed on January 19-20, 2000 (21:20-00:45 UT) by the germanium spectrometer on the MAXIS balloon payload (-7.2 to -9.3 E, 74 S corresponding to IGRF L = 4.7, 1920-2240 MLT). A rapid decrease in the geosynchronous >2 MeV electron flux was simultaneously observed at GOES-8 and GOES-10, and between 0.34-3.6 MeV by GPS ns33 at L = 4.7. The observations show that electrons were lost to the atmosphere early in the flux depletion event, during a period of magnetic field stretching in the tail. The observed X-ray spectrum is well modeled by an exponential distribution of precipitating electrons with an e-folding energy of 290 keV and a lower-energy cut-off of 400 keV. The duration of the event implies precipitation extended over at least 3 hours of MLT, assuming a source fixed in local time. Comparison of the precipitation rate with the flux decrease measured at GPS implies that the loss cone flux was only ~1% of the equatorial flux. However, precipitation is sufficient to account for the rate of flux decrease if it extended over 2-3 hours of local time.

  6. Application of a Heat Flux Sensor in Wind Power Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Baygildina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes and investigates the application of the gradient heat flux sensor (GHFS for measuring the local heat flux in power electronics. Thanks to its thinness, the sensor can be placed between the semiconductor module and the heat sink. The GHFS has high sensitivity and yields direct measurements without an interruption to the normal power device operation, which makes it attractive for power electronics applications. The development of systems for monitoring thermal loading and methods for online detection of degradation and failure of power electronic devices is a topical and crucial task. However, online condition monitoring (CM methods, which include heat flux sensors, have received little research attention so far. In the current research, an insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT module-based test setup with the GHFS implemented on the base plate of one of the IGBTs is introduced. The heat flux experiments and the IGBT power losses obtained by simulations show similar results. The findings give clear evidence that the GHFS can provide an attractive condition monitoring method for the thermal loading of power devices.

  7. Electron beam induced oxidation of Ni3Al surfaces : electron flux effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, S.A.; Palasantzas, G.; Agterveld, D.T.L. van; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2002-01-01

    Electron beam irradiation of polycrystalline boron doped Ni3Al (at 300 K and under ultrahigh vacuum conditions) induces fast oxidation. The rate and depth of oxidation initially increase with increasing electron flux as indicated by results from Auger electron spectroscopy. Curves of oxygen developm

  8. A calculation of acetone temperature field under extremely high heat flux within a short time%超急速温升下丙酮液池的温度场计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金仁喜; 华顺芳; 刘登瀛; 张正芳

    2001-01-01

    According to the experiment and numerical simulation, the temperature field and its variation law of acetone and the tiny metal grains are studied under the transient and extremely high heat flux condition, while the platinum film resistance is overlaid with tiny metal grains or nothing. The speed of temperature rise, temperature grads and the thickness of heat layer are calculated numerically. Some stranger phenomena that are different from abnormal boiling are observed. It points out that it is easy to get higher speed of temperature rise while the platinum film is overlaid with nothing than with tiny metal grains despite of its vehemently boiling behavior.%通过实验和数值模拟计算,研究了瞬时、强热流极端条件下铂薄膜表面覆盖和不覆盖细小金属颗粒时丙酮液体和金属颗粒温度场分布及其变化规律.确定了温升速率、温度梯度和温度边界层厚度,发现了常规沸腾难以解释的现象,并指出覆盖金属颗粒后虽然沸腾极为激烈,但难以达到极高的温升速率,而不覆盖金属颗粒却容易产生爆发沸腾.

  9. Thermal and hydrodynamic study of a whirling liquid hydrogen layer under high heat flux; Etude thermique et hydrodynamique d'une couche tourbillonnaire d'hydrogenen liquide sous flux de chaleur eleve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewald, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-03-01

    In order to achieve a cold neutrons source ({lambda} {>=} 4.10{sup -10} m) in a high flux reactor ({approx} 10{sup 15} neutrons/cm{sup 2}.s), a whirling liquid hydrogen layer (145 mm OD, effective thickness 15 mm, height about 180 mm) was formed, out-of-pile, in a cylindrical transparent glass vessel. The whirling motion was obtained by tangential injection of the liquid, near the wall. Thermal and hydrodynamical conditions of formation and laws of similarity of such a layer were studied. The characteristics of this whirling flow were observed as a function of mass flow rate (5 to 27 g/s; 4.3 to 23 l/mn), and of spillway width (18 and 25 mm). Six different nozzles were used : 1.0; 1.5; 1.9; 2.25; 2.65 and 3.0 mm ID. The total heat influx was found between 8.6 and 10.4 kW. The heat flux density was about 9.4 W/cm{sup 2} and the mean layer density around 80 per cent of that of the liquid hydrogen at 20.4 Kelvin. High speed movies were used to analyze the boiling regime. (author) [French] En vue de realiser une source de neutrons froids ({lambda} {>=} 4.10{sup -10} m) dans un reacteur a haut flux ({approx} 10{sup 15} neutrons thermiques/cm{sup 2}.s), on a forme dans un vase cylindrique transparent en verre, hors-pile, une couche tourbillonnaire ('vortex') d'hydrogene liquide (diametre exterieur 145 mm, epaisseur effective 15 mm, hauteur 180 mm environ). Le mouvement giratoire est obtenu par injection tangentielle du liquide pres de la paroi. L'etude porte sur la determination des conditions thermiques et hydrodynamiques de la formation d'une telle couche et sur les regles de similitude de ce phenomene. On a observe les caracteristiques de l'ecoulement giratoire en fonction du debit (de 5 a 27 g/s, soit de 4.3 a 23 1/mn), de la vitesse d'injection (entre 10 et 110 m/s) et de la largeur du deversoir (18 et 25 mm), ceci pour six diametres differents d'injecteur (1.0 ; 1.5; 1.9; 2.25; 2.65 et 3.0 mm). Le flux de chaleur total mesure

  10. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Quasi-classical theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic molecular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J

    2012-11-26

    The standard Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (EFD). A previously proposed "coupled-channels" theory permits the extraction of the EFD from the BO wave function for one-electron diatomic systems, but attempts at generalization to many-electron polyatomic systems are frustrated by technical barriers. An alternative "quasi-classical" approach, which eliminates the explicit quantum dynamics of the electrons within a classical framework, yet retains the quantum character of the nuclear motion, appears capable of yielding EFDs for arbitrarily complex systems. Quasi-classical formulas for the EFD in simple systems agree with corresponding coupled-channels formulas. Results of the application of the new quasi-classical formula for the EFD to a model triatomic system indicate the potential of the quasi-classical scheme to elucidate the dynamical role of electrons in electronically adiabatic processes in more complex multiparticle systems.

  12. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J

    2012-03-22

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (j(e)), =1/2∫dR[Δ(b) (x;R) - Δ(a) (x;R)] even though the electrons certainly move in response to the movement of the nuclei. This article, the first of a pair, proposes a quantum-mechanical "coupled-channels" (CC) theory that allows the approximate extraction of j(e) from the electronically adiabatic BO wave function . The CC theory is detailed for H(2)(+), in which case j(e) can be resolved into components associated with two channels α (=a,b), each of which corresponds to the "collision" of an "internal" atom α (proton a or b plus electron) with the other nucleus β (proton b or a). The dynamical role of the electron, which accommodates itself instantaneously to the motion of the nuclei, is submerged in effective electronic probability (population) densities, Δ(α), associated with each channel (α). The Δ(α) densities are determined by the (time-independent) BO electronic energy eigenfunction, which depends parametrically on the configuration of the nuclei, the motion of which is governed by the usual BO nuclear Schrödinger equation. Intuitively appealing formal expressions for the electronic flux density are derived for H(2)(+).

  13. Observation of relativistic electron precipitation during a rapid decrease of trapped electron flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, R. M.; Lin, R. P.; Smith, D. M.; McCarthy, M. P.; Sample, J. G.; Shprits, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Rapid depletions of the trapped electron flux are often observed, and illustrate the important role played by losses in controlling electron variability in the radiation belts. The observed decrease may be partly due to adiabatic effects, but some of the electrons are lost either through magnetopause shadowing or through precipitation into Earth's atmosphere. On January 19, 2000, duskside precipitation was observed near the start of a rapid flux depletion event, during a period of magnetic field stretching in the tail. The observations were made with the germanium spectrometer on the MAXIS balloon payload and show that real losses were occurring during the initial decrease which has previously been attributed to purely adiabatic effects. A quantitative comparison of the precipitation rate with the change in electron flux measured at GPS implies that only ~1% of the loss cone was filled, however, precipitation alone is sufficient to account for the flux decrease if it extended over 2-3 hours of local time. We present these results and compare the observed loss rate with the theoretical loss rate expected for pitch-angle scattering by EMIC waves.

  14. Counterstreaming electrons in small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, H. Q.; Zhao, G. Q.; Wang, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (SIMFRs) are commonly observed by spacecraft at 1 AU, and their origin still remains disputed. We investigated the counterstreaming suprathermal electron (CSE) signatures of 106 SIMFRs measured by Wind during 1995-2005. We found that 79 (75%) of the 106 flux ropes contain CSEs, and the percentages of counterstreaming vary from 8% to 98%, with a mean value of 51%. CSEs are often observed in magnetic clouds (MCs), and this indicates these MCs are still attached to the Sun at both ends. CSEs are also related to heliospheric current sheets (HCSs) and the Earth's bow shock. We divided the SIMFRs into two categories: The first category is far from HCSs, and the second category is in the vicinity of HCSs. The first category has 57 SIMFRs, and only 7 of 57 ropes have no CSEs. This ratio is similar to that of MCs. The second category has 49 SIMFRs; however, 20 of the 49 events have no CSEs. This ratio is larger than that of MCs. These two categories have different origins. One category originates from the solar corona, and most ropes are still connected to the Sun at both ends. The other category is formed near HCSs in the interplanetary space.

  15. Direct Measurements of the Electron Energy Flux versus Electron Temperature Gradient in Tokamak Discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.W. Gentle; M.E. Austin; P.E. Phillips

    2004-01-01

    Electron thermal transport is one of the most complex processes in fusion plasmas. It is generally described by a simple thermal diffusivity in transport analyses of discharges, but there is evidence of critical gradient effects with moderate stiffness. By analyzing periodic perturbations to an equilibrium, one can measure the variations in electron energy flux and electron temperature gradient over the perturbation cycle, obtaining the flux as a function of gradient over the range of parameters generated by the perturbation. Although time-dependent transport analysis is very sensitive to noise in the input data, averaging over many cycles of a periodic perturbation can provide data of sufficient quality. The analyses presented here are based on the ECE temperature data with high spatial and temporal resolution and full profile coverage on DIII-D for sawteeth and modulated ECH heating.

  16. Relativistic electron flux enhancement at synchronous orbit during SEP event on July 14, 2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵华; 朱光武; 王世金; 高玉芬; 刘振兴

    2002-01-01

    Relativistic (E >1.6 MeV) electron flux enhancements during Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events as observed by the synchronous FY-2 satellite at orbit located at 105°E are investigated. Energetic protons during SEP events heavily contaminate relativistic electron flux measurements. The ratio of the contamination in the original measurement of relativistic electron flux was over 30% during most of the SEP event on July 14, 2000. A method has been developed to eliminate the contamination caused by the energetic protons, and a "corrected" relativistic electron flux has been obtained. The "cleaned-up" relativistic electron flux measurement shows that relativistic electron flux enhancement at synchronous orbit is well correlated with SEP events during which the IMF Bz has some southward periods. The enhancement could arise as the transport of relativistic electrons from the upstream solar wind into synchronous orbit via the magnetotail.

  17. Relative effect of solder flux chemistry on the humidity related failures in electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to investigate the effect of no-clean flux chemistry with various weak organic acids (WOAs) as activators on the corrosion reliability of electronics with emphasis on the hygroscopic nature of the residue. Design/methodology/approach - The hygroscopicity of flux residue...... of printed circuit boards under humid conditions. Originality/value - The classification of solder flux systems according to IPC J-STD-004 standard does not specify the WOAs in the flux; however, ranking of the flux systems based on the hygroscopic property of activators would be useful information when...... selecting no-clean flux systems for electronics with applications in humid conditions....

  18. Input Parameters for Models of Energetic Electrons Fluxes at the Geostationary Orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. I. Degtyarev; G.V. Popov; B. S. Xue; S.E. Chudnenko

    2005-01-01

    The results of cross-correlation analysis between electrons fluxes (with energies of > 0.6 MeV,> 2.0MeV and > 4.0MeV), geomagnetic indices and solar wind parameters are shown in the paper. It is determined that the electron fluxes are controlled not only by the geomagnetic indices, but also by the solar wind parameters, and the solar wind velocity demonstrates the best relation with the electron fluxes.Numerical value of the relation efficiency of external parameters with the highly energetic electrons fluxes shows a periodicity. It is presented here the preliminary results of daily averaged electrons fluxes forecast for a day ahead on the basis of the model of neuron networks.

  19. Prediction of MeV electron fluxes throughout the outer radiation belt using multivariate autoregressive models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Kaori; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen radiation belts surrounding the Earth are filled with MeV-energy electrons. This region poses ionizing radiation risks for spacecraft that operate within it, including those in geostationary orbit (GEO) and medium Earth orbit. To provide alerts of electron flux enhancements, 16 prediction models of the electron log-flux variation throughout the equatorial outer radiation belt as a function of the McIlwain L parameter were developed using the multivariate autoregressive model and Kalman filter. Measurements of omnidirectional 2.3 MeV electron flux from the Van Allen Probes mission as well as >2 MeV electrons from the GOES 15 spacecraft were used as the predictors. Model explanatory parameters were selected from solar wind parameters, the electron log-flux at GEO, and geomagnetic indices. For the innermost region of the outer radiation belt, the electron flux is best predicted by using the Dst index as the sole input parameter. For the central to outermost regions, at L ≧ 4.8 and L ≧ 5.6, the electron flux is predicted most accurately by including also the solar wind velocity and then the dynamic pressure, respectively. The Dst index is the best overall single parameter for predicting at 3 ≦ L ≦ 6, while for the GEO flux prediction, the KP index is better than Dst. A test calculation demonstrates that the model successfully predicts the timing and location of the flux maximum as much as 2 days in advance and that the electron flux decreases faster with time at higher L values, both model features consistent with the actually observed behavior.

  20. Characteristics of heat flux and electromagnetic electron-cyclotron instabilities driven by solar wind electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sundas; Yoon, P. H.; Sarfraz, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-04-01

    In situ observations reveal the existence of electron velocity distribution function in the solar wind, where the net distribution can be modelled by a combination of core, halo and strahl. These components often possess a relative drift and with respective temperature anisotropies. The relative drift between the core and halo components leads to heat flux (HF) instability, while temperature anisotropies drive electromagnetic electron-cyclotron (EMEC) instability. These instabilities have been separately studied in the literature, but for the first time, the present study combines both unstable modes in the presence of two free energy sources, namely, excessive parallel pressure and excessive perpendicular temperature. HF instability (which is a left-hand circularly polarized mode) is effectively similar to electron firehose instability, except that the free energy is provided by net relative drift among two component electrons in the background of protons. The HF instability is discussed here along with (the right-hand polarized) EMEC instability driven by temperature anisotropy. The unstable HF mode is conventionally termed the 'whistler' HF instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. EMEC mode, on the other hand, reduces to the proper whistler wave in the absence of free energy source. The present combined analysis clarifies the polarization characteristics of these two modes in an unambiguous manner.

  1. Searching for Dark Matter Signatures in the GLAST LAT Electron Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseev, Alexander; Profumo, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    We explored several viable scenarios of how LAT might observe DM, when the spectral feature is predicted to be observed in the HE electron flux It has been demonstrated elsewhere that LAT will be capable to detect HE electrons flux in energy range from 20 GeV to - 1 TeV with 520% energy resolution and good statistics If there is a DM-caused feature in the HE electron flux (in the range 20 GeV - 1 TeV), LAT will be the best current instrument to observe it!

  2. Influence of electron flux on the oxidation of Ni3Al surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Agterveld, D.T.L. van; Koch, S.A.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2001-01-01

    Electron beam currents of a few nanoamps, currently used in nanometer scale scanning Auger microscopy scanning electron microscopy, promote oxidation of polycrystalline Ni3Al to a degree that depends on the size of the beam and subsequently on the electron flux φe. In fact, the oxidation of Ni3Al at

  3. Effect of Solder Flux Residues on Corrosion of Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kirsten Stentoft; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Møller, Per

    2009-01-01

    Flux from ‘No Clean’ solder processes can cause reliability problems in the field due to aggressive residues, which may be electrical conducting or corrosive in humid environments. The solder temperature during a wave solder process is of great importance to the amount of residues left on a PCBA[...

  4. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhotin, I P; Drozdov, A Y; Shprits, Y Y; Boynton, R J; Subbotin, D A; Balikhin, M A

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system has been tested for three extended time periods totalling several weeks of observations. The time periods involved periods of quiet, moderate, and strong geomagnetic activity and captured a range of dynamics typical of the radiation belts. The model has successfully simulated energetic electron fluxes for various magnetospheric conditions. Physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the discrepancies between the model results and observations are discussed.

  5. The expected imprint of flux rope geometry on suprathermal electrons in magnetic clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Owens

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic clouds are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections characterized by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction, which is interpreted as a signature of a magnetic flux rope. Suprathermal electron observations indicate that one or both ends of a magnetic cloud typically remain connected to the Sun as it moves out through the heliosphere. With distance from the axis of the flux rope, out toward its edge, the magnetic field winds more tightly about the axis and electrons must traverse longer magnetic field lines to reach the same heliocentric distance. This increased time of flight allows greater pitch-angle scattering to occur, meaning suprathermal electron pitch-angle distributions should be systematically broader at the edges of the flux rope than at the axis. We model this effect with an analytical magnetic flux rope model and a numerical scheme for suprathermal electron pitch-angle scattering and find that the signature of a magnetic flux rope should be observable with the typical pitch-angle resolution of suprathermal electron data provided ACE's SWEPAM instrument. Evidence of this signature in the observations, however, is weak, possibly because reconnection of magnetic fields within the flux rope acts to intermix flux tubes.

  6. Supercomplex assembly determines electron flux in the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapuente-Brun, Esther; Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Latorre-Pellicer, Ana; Colás, Carmen; Balsa, Eduardo; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Quirós, Pedro M; Calvo, Enrique; Rodríguez-Hernández, M A; Navas, Plácido; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Ángel; López-Otín, Carlos; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Enríquez, José Antonio

    2013-06-28

    The textbook description of mitochondrial respiratory complexes (RCs) views them as free-moving entities linked by the mobile carriers coenzyme Q (CoQ) and cytochrome c (cyt c). This model (known as the fluid model) is challenged by the proposal that all RCs except complex II can associate in supercomplexes (SCs). The proposed SCs are the respirasome (complexes I, III, and IV), complexes I and III, and complexes III and IV. The role of SCs is unclear, and their existence is debated. By genetic modulation of interactions between complexes I and III and III and IV, we show that these associations define dedicated CoQ and cyt c pools and that SC assembly is dynamic and organizes electron flux to optimize the use of available substrates.

  7. Energetic electron precipitation into the middle atmosphere -- Constructing the loss cone fluxes from MEPED POES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesse Tyssøy, H.; Sandanger, M. I.; Ødegaard, L.-K. G.; Stadsnes, J.; Aasnes, A.; Zawedde, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) on the chemistry of the middle atmosphere (50-90 km) is still an outstanding question as accurate quantification of EEP is lacking due to instrumental challenges and insufficient pitch angle coverage of current particle detectors. The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detectors (MEPED) instrument on board the NOAA/Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) and MetOp spacecraft has two sets of electron and proton telescopes pointing close to zenith (0°) and in the horizontal plane (90°). Using measurements from either the 0° or 90° telescope will underestimate or overestimate the bounce loss cone flux, respectively, as the energetic electron fluxes are often strongly anisotropic with decreasing fluxes toward the center of the loss cone. By combining the measurements from both telescopes with electron pitch angle distributions from theory of wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, a complete bounce loss cone flux is constructed for each of the electron energy channels >50 keV, >100 keV, and >300 keV. We apply a correction method to remove proton contamination in the electron counts. We also account for the relativistic (>1000 keV) electrons contaminating the proton detector at subauroral latitudes. This gives us full range coverage of electron energies that will be deposited in the middle atmosphere. Finally, we demonstrate the method's applicability on strongly anisotropic pitch angle distributions during a weak geomagnetic storm in February 2008. We compare the electron fluxes and subsequent energy deposition estimates to OH observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura satellite substantiating that the estimated fluxes are representative for the true precipitating fluxes impacting the atmosphere.

  8. The expected imprint of flux rope geometry on suprathermal electrons in magnetic clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, Mathew James; Crooker, N. U.; Horbury, T. S.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic clouds are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections characterized by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction, which is interpreted as a signature of a magnetic flux rope. Suprathermal electron observations indicate that one or both ends of a magnetic cloud typically remain connected to the Sun as it moves out through the heliosphere. With distance from the axis of the flux rope, out toward its edge, the magnetic field winds more tightly about the axis and electrons...

  9. Decomposition studies of no-clean solder flux systems in connection with corrosion reliability of electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Verdingovas, Vadimas

    2013-01-01

    One of the predominant factors for accelerated corrosion in electronics is the intrinsic contamination on Printed Circuit Board Assemblies (PCBAs) originating from the soldering process used for component mounting. However, the amount, distribution, and morphology of flux residue vary considerably...... such as electrochemical migration resulting in intermittent or permanent failures. This paper summarizes the investigations on decomposition of some typical no-clean flux systems (WOA based) which are used today for the electronic manufacturing. The change in flux chemistry was studied as a function of temperature...

  10. Energetic electron precipitation into the middle atmosphere - Constructing the loss cone fluxes from MEPED POES

    CERN Document Server

    Tyssøy, H Nesse; Ødegaard, L -K G; Stadsnes, J; Aasnes, A; Zawedde, A E

    2016-01-01

    The impact of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) on the chemistry of the middle atmosphere (50-90 km) is still an outstanding question as accurate quantification of EEP is lacking due to instrumental challenges and insufficient pitch angle coverage of current particle detectors. The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detectors (MEPED) instrument on board the NOAA/Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites(POES) and MetOp spacecraft has two sets of electron and proton telescopes pointing close to zenith ($0\\,^{\\circ}$) and in the horizontal plane ($90\\,^{\\circ}$). Using measurements from either the $0\\,^{\\circ}$ or $90\\,^{\\circ}$ telescope will underestimate or overestimate the bounce loss cone flux, respectively, as the energetic electron fluxes are often strongly anisotropic with decreasing fluxes toward the center of the loss cone. By combining the measurements from both telescopes with electron pitch angle distributions from theory of wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, a complete bounce loss ...

  11. Artificial neural network prediction model for geosynchronous electron fluxes: Dependence on satellite position and particle energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dae-Kyu; Lee, Dae-Young; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Hwang, Junga; Kim, Jaehun

    2016-04-01

    Geosynchronous satellites are often exposed to energetic electrons, the flux of which varies often to a large extent. Since the electrons can cause irreparable damage to the satellites, efforts to develop electron flux prediction models have long been made until recently. In this study, we adopt a neural network scheme to construct a prediction model for the geosynchronous electron flux in a wide energy range (40 keV to >2 MeV) and at a high time resolution (as based on 5 min resolution data). As the model inputs, we take the solar wind variables, geomagnetic indices, and geosynchronous electron fluxes themselves. We also take into account the magnetic local time (MLT) dependence of the geosynchronous electron fluxes. We use the electron data from two geosynchronous satellites, GOES 13 and 15, and apply the same neural network scheme separately to each of the GOES satellite data. We focus on the dependence of prediction capability on satellite's magnetic latitude and MLT as well as particle energy. Our model prediction works less efficiently for magnetic latitudes more away from the equator (thus for GOES 13 than for GOES 15) and for MLTs nearer to midnight than noon. The magnetic latitude dependence is most significant for an intermediate energy range (a few hundreds of keV), and the MLT dependence is largest for the lowest energy (40 keV). We interpret this based on degree of variance in the electron fluxes, which depends on magnetic latitude and MLT at geosynchronous orbit as well as particle energy. We demonstrate how substorms affect the flux variance.

  12. Rapid increase in relativistic electron flux controlled by nonlinear phase trapping of whistler chorus elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shinji; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Seki, Kanako

    2016-07-01

    Wave-particle interactions with whistler chorus waves are believed to provide a primary acceleration for electrons in the outer radiation belt. Previous models for flux enhancement of the radiation belt have assumed the stochastic process as a diffusion manner of successive random-phase interactions, but physical mechanisms for the acceleration are not fully incorporated in these models because of the lack of a nonlinear scattering process. Here we report rapid increase in relativistic electron flux by using an innovative computer simulation model that incorporates not only diffusive process but also nonlinear scattering processes. The simulations show that three types of scattering simultaneously occur, which are diffusive, phase trapping, and phase bunching. It is found that the phase trapping is the most efficient mechanism to produce the MeV electrons rapidly in the scattering processes. The electrons are accelerated from 400 keV to over 1 MeV in time scale less than 60 s. On the other hand, as the phase trapping is suppressed by the breaking of relative phase angle between waves and gyrating electrons during the interaction, the increase of electron flux at MeV energy is clearly reduced. Our simulations conclude that the phase-trapping process causes a significant effect for the increase in relativistic electron flux and suggest that a quasi-linear diffusion model is not always valid to fully describe the relativistic electron acceleration.

  13. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  14. Wettability Modification of Nanomaterials by Low-Energy Electron Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torchinsky I

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Controllable modification of surface free energy and related properties (wettability, hygroscopicity, agglomeration, etc. of powders allows both understanding of fine physical mechanism acting on nanoparticle surfaces and improvement of their key characteristics in a number of nanotechnology applications. In this work, we report on the method we developed for electron-induced surface energy and modification of basic, related properties of powders of quite different physical origins such as diamond and ZnO. The applied technique has afforded gradual tuning of the surface free energy, resulting in a wide range of wettability modulation. In ZnO nanomaterial, the wettability has been strongly modified, while for the diamond particles identical electron treatment leads to a weak variation of the same property. Detailed investigation into electron-modified wettability properties has been performed by the use of capillary rise method using a few probing liquids. Basic thermodynamic approaches have been applied to calculations of components of solid–liquid interaction energy. We show that defect-free, low-energy electron treatment technique strongly varies elementary interface interactions and may be used for the development of new technology in the field of nanomaterials.

  15. APS high heat load monochromator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.K.; Mills, D.

    1993-02-01

    This document contains the design specifications of the APS high heat load (HHL) monochromator and associated accessories as of February 1993. It should be noted that work is continuing on many parts of the monochromator including the mechanical design, crystal cooling designs, etc. Where appropriate, we have tried to add supporting documentation, references to published papers, and calculations from which we based our decisions. The underlying philosophy behind performance specifications of this monochromator was to fabricate a device that would be useful to as many APS users as possible, that is, the design should be as generic as possible. In other words, we believe that this design will be capable of operating on both bending magnet and ID beamlines (with the appropriate changes to the cooling and crystals) with both flat and inclined crystal geometries and with a variety of coolants. It was strongly felt that this monochromator should have good energy scanning capabilities over the classical energy range of about 4 to 20 keywith Si (111) crystals. For this reason, a design incorporating one rotation stage to drive both the first and second crystals was considered most promising. Separate rotary stages for the first and second crystals can sometimes provide more flexibility in their capacities to carry heavy loads (for heavily cooled first crystals or sagittal benders of second crystals), but their tuning capabilities were considered inferior to the single axis approach.

  16. Analysis of Voyager Observed High-Energy Electron Fluxes in the Heliosheath Using MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washimi, Haruichi; Webber, W. R.; Zank, Gary P.; Hu, Qiang; Florinski, Vladimir; Adams, James; Kubo, Yuki

    2011-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft (V1 and V2) observed electrons of 6-14 MeV in the heliosheath which showed several incidences of flux variation relative to a background of gradually increasing flux with distance from the Sun. The increasing flux of background electrons is thought to result from inward radial diffusion. We compare the temporal electron flux variation with dynamical phenomena in the heliosheath that are obtained from our MHD simulations. Because our simulation is based on V2 observed plasma data before V2 crossed the termination shock, this analysis is effective up to late 2008, i.e., about a year after the V2-crossing, during which disturbances, driven prior to the crossing time, survived in the heliosheath. Several electron flux variations correspond to times directly associated with interplanetary shock events. One noteworthy example corresponds to various times associated with the March 2006 interplanetary shock, these being the collision with the termination shock, the passage past the V1 spacecraft, and the collision with the region near the heliopause, as identified by W.R. Webber et al. for proton/helium of 7-200 MeV. Our simulations indicate that all other electron flux variations, except one, correspond well to the times when a shock-driven magneto-sonic pulse and its reflection in the heliosheath either passed across V1/V2, or collided with the termination shock or with the plasma sheet near the heliopause. This result suggests that variation in the electron flux should be due to either direct or indirect effects of magnetosonic pulses in the heliosheath driven by interplanetary shocks

  17. Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0124 Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product...Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0486 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM... Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Grant #FA9550-12-1-0486 2013 Basic Research Initiative (BRI

  18. Corrosion failure due to flux residues in an electronic add-on device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Minzari, Daniel; Rathinavelu, Umadevi

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion of components and sub-assemblies on an electronic Printed Circuit Board Assembly (PCBA) is a major reliability concern. Both process and user related contamination will influence the corrosion reliability of a PCBA and the electronic device as a whole. An important process related......-electrochemical technique, in situ ECM studies, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Failure of the switches was found to be either due to the flux residue acting as an nsulating layer or as a corrosion accelerator causing ECM....

  19. Relative effect of solder flux chemistry on the humidity related failures in electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    was studied by quartz crystal microbalance, while corrosive effects were studied by leakage current and impedance measurements on standard test boards. The measurements were performed as a function of relative humidity (RH) in the range from 60 to ~99 per cent at 25°C. The corrosiveness of solder flux systems...... of printed circuit boards under humid conditions. Originality/value - The classification of solder flux systems according to IPC J-STD-004 standard does not specify the WOAs in the flux; however, ranking of the flux systems based on the hygroscopic property of activators would be useful information when...... selecting no-clean flux systems for electronics with applications in humid conditions....

  20. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  1. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  2. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  3. Adiabatic electronic flux density: a Born-Oppenheimer Broken Symmetry ansatz

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation leads to the counterintuitive result of a vanishing electronic flux density upon vibrational dynamics in the electronic ground state. To circumvent this long known issue, we propose using pairwise anti-symmetrically translated vibronic densities to generate a symmetric electronic density that can be forced to satisfy the continuity equation approximately. The so-called Born-Oppenheimer broken symmetry ansatz yields all components of the flux density simultaneously while requiring only knowledge about the nuclear quantum dynamics on the electronic adiabatic ground state potential energy surface. The underlying minimization procedure is transparent and computationally inexpensive, and the solution can be computed from the standard output of any quantum chemistry program. Taylor series expansion reveals that the implicit electron dynamics originates from non-adiabatic coupling to the explicit Born-Oppenheimer nuclear dynamics. The new approach is applied to the ${\\rm H}_2^+$ mo...

  4. Geodesic mode instability driven by electron and ion fluxes in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elfimov, A. G., E-mail: elfimov@if.usp.br; Camilo de Souza, F.; Galvão, R. M. O. [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-090 (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    The effect of the parallel electron current and plasma flux on Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAM) in a tokamak is analyzed by kinetic theory taking into the account the ion Landau damping and diamagnetic drifts. It is shown that the electron current and plasma flow, modeled by shifted Maxwell distributions of electrons and ions, may overcome the ion Landau damping generating the GAM instability when the parallel electron current velocity is larger than the effective parallel GAM phase velocity of sidebands, Rqω. The instability is driven by the electron current and the parallel ion flux cross term. Possible applications to tokamak experiments are discussed. The existence of the geodesic ion sound mode due to plasma flow is shown.

  5. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: cluster observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; De Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, UPMC Université Paris 06, Université Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Matteini, L. [Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Santolík, O. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics ASCR, 141 31 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-11-20

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ∼10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor β {sub e∥} is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for β {sub e∥} ≥ 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  6. Neutrino-Electron Scattering in MINERvA for Constraining the NuMI Neutrino Flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaewon [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is used as a reference process to constrain the neutrino flux at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam observed by the MINERvA experiment. Prediction of the neutrino flux at accelerator experiments from other methods has a large uncertainty, and this uncertainty degrades measurements of neutrino oscillations and neutrino cross-sections. Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is a rare process, but its cross-section is precisely known. With a sample corresponding to $3.5\\times10^{20}$ protons on target in the NuMI low-energy neutrino beam, a sample of $120$ $\

  7. A new approach to predict and estimate enhancements of "killer" electron flux at geosynchronous orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, Alexander; Ryzhakova, Larisa; Tsegmed, Battuulai

    2016-09-01

    So-called "killer" electrons are electrons of relativistic energies (more than 1-2 MeV) forming the outer radiation belt. Their fluxes present a serious threat for on-board electronics of spacecraft orbiting in geosynchronous orbit. This provides actuality of the problem of electron flux forecast. The population of energetic electrons grows after immersion of the Earth's magnetosphere into a high-speed stream of the solar wind. One of the main mechanisms of acceleration of magnetospheric electrons to relativistic energies assumed to be their wave-particle interaction with the ultra-low-frequency or very-low-frequency waves. Accordingly, the previously proposed prognostic methods were based on the connection of the outer radiation belt population with the speed of the solar wind and the activity of the low-frequency waves in the magnetosphere. In this paper, we propose to build a forecast based on a new kind of the multiple regressions model with sliding window of predictors. A set of predictors used in the successful multiple regressions model include parameters that reflect processes of replenishment of the outer radiation belt due to the acceleration of seed electrons as well as processes of the devastation of the electron flux in the geosynchronous region due to outward adiabatic transport and outward radial diffusion. To characterize these processes, we use the following set of parameters measured on the ground and in situ: the solar wind speed, density and dynamic pressure of the interplanetary plasma, the intensity of ultra-low-frequency oscillations in front of the magnetosphere and on the ground, the flux of seed electrons (of hundreds eV energy) at geosynchronous orbit, the actual values of the magnetic field at L=6.6, and interplanetary electric field. Coefficients in the model equation are derived from experimental data using the least-squares method. Test calculations using the proposed model have shown promising results.

  8. High Heat Load Properties of Ultra Fine Grain Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Du, J.; Ge, C. [Lab. of Special Ceramic and P/M, University of Science and Technology, 100083 Beijing (China); Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G. [FZJ-Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association Euratom-FZJ, Institut fur Plasmaphysik, Postfach 1913, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Song, S.X. [Research Center on Fusion Materials (RCFM), University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), 100083 Beijing (China)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is increasingly considered as a promising candidate armour materials facing the plasma in tokamaks for medium to high heat flux components (EAST, ASDEX, ITER). Fabrication tungsten with ultra fine grain size is considered as an effective way to ameliorate some disadvantages of tungsten, such as its brittleness at room temperature. But the research data on the performance of ultra fine grain tungsten is still very limit. In this work, high heat load properties of pure ultra-fine grain tungsten have been studied. The ultra fine grain tungsten samples with average grain size of 0.2 {mu}m, 1 {mu}m and 3 {mu}m were fabricated by resistance sintering under ultra high pressure. The annealing experiments for the investigation of the material resistance against grain growth have been done by annealing samples in a vacuum furnace at different temperature holding for 2 hours respectively. It is found that recrystallization and grain growth occur at heating temperature of 1250 deg. c. The finer the initial grain sizes of tungsten, the smaller its grain growth grain. The effects of transient high thermal loads (off normal events like disruptions) on tungsten surface morphology have been performed in electron beam test facility JUDITH. The thermal loads tests have been carried out with 4 ms pulses at different power density of 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, 0.55 and 0.88 GW/m{sup 2} respectively. Horizontal cracks formed for all tungsten samples at 0.44 GW/m{sup 2}. Particle erosions occurred for tungsten with 3 {mu}m size at 0.33 GW/m{sup 2} and for tungsten with 0.2 and 1 {mu}m size at 0.55 GW/m{sup 2}. The weight loss of tungsten with 0.2, 1 and 3 {mu}m size are 2,0.1,0.6 mg respectively at 0.88 GW/m{sup 2}. The effects of a large number of very short transient repetitive thermal loads (ELM-like) on tungsten surface morphology also have been performed by using a fundamental wave of a YAG laser. It is found that tungsten with 0.2 {mu}m size has

  9. Fluxes of energetic protons and electrons measured on board the Oersted satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cabrera

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The Charged Particle Detector (CPD on board the Oersted satellite (649 km perigee, 865 km apogee and 96.48° inclination currently measures energetic protons and electrons. The measured peak fluxes of E>1 MeV electrons are found to confirm the predictions of AE8-MAX, though they occur at a geographical position relatively shifted in the SAA. The fluxes of protons are one order of magnitude higher than the predictions of AP8-MAX in the energy range 20-500 MeV. This huge discrepancy between AP8 and recent measurements in LEO was already noticed and modelled in SAMPEX/PSB97 and TPM-1 models. Nevertheless some other LEO measurements such as PROBA and CORONA-F result in flux values in good agreement with AP8 within a factor 2. The anisotropy of the low-altitude proton flux, combined with measurement performed on board three-axis stabilised satellites, has been suspected to be one possible source of the important discrepancies observed by different missions. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of anisotropy on flux measurements conducted using the CPD instruments. On the basis of the available data, we confirm the inaccuracy of AP8 at LEO and suggest methods to improve the analysis of data in future flux measurements of energetic protons at low altitudes.

  10. Extensive electron transport and energization via multiple, localized dipolarizing flux bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielse, Christine; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Harris, Camilla; Artemyev, Anton; Kepko, Larry; Runov, Andrei

    2017-05-01

    Using an analytical model of multiple dipolarizing flux bundles (DFBs) embedded in earthward traveling bursty bulk flows, we demonstrate how equatorially mirroring electrons can travel long distances and gain hundreds of keV from betatron acceleration. The model parameters are constrained by four Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellite observations, putting limits on the DFBs' speed, location, and magnetic and electric field magnitudes. We find that the sharp, localized peaks in magnetic field have such strong spatial gradients that energetic electrons ∇B drift in closed paths around the peaks as those peaks travel earthward. This is understood in terms of the third adiabatic invariant, which remains constant when the field changes on timescales longer than the electron's drift timescale: An energetic electron encircles a sharp peak in magnetic field in a closed path subtending an area of approximately constant flux. As the flux bundle magnetic field increases the electron's drift path area shrinks and the electron is prevented from escaping to the ambient plasma sheet, while it continues to gain energy via betatron acceleration. When the flux bundles arrive at and merge with the inner magnetosphere, where the background field is strong, the electrons suddenly gain access to previously closed drift paths around the Earth. DFBs are therefore instrumental in transporting and energizing energetic electrons over long distances along the magnetotail, bringing them to the inner magnetosphere and energizing them by hundreds of keV.Plain Language SummaryScientists have wondered how narrow flow channels in space could transport and energize electrons enough before the electrons escape the channel. They also wondered how narrow, localized magnetic field peaks (and their electric fields) contribute to electron energization in comparison to wide, large-scale electromagnetic fields. We show that it is actually because these fields are so

  11. Testing an inversion method for estimating electron energy fluxes from all-sky camera images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available An inversion method for reconstructing the precipitating electron energy flux from a set of multi-wavelength digital all-sky camera (ASC images has recently been developed by tomografia. Preliminary tests suggested that the inversion is able to reconstruct the position and energy characteristics of the aurora with reasonable accuracy. This study carries out a thorough testing of the method and a few improvements for its emission physics equations.

    We compared the precipitating electron energy fluxes as estimated by the inversion method to the energy flux data recorded by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP satellites during four passes over auroral structures. When the aurorae appear very close to the local zenith, the fluxes inverted from the blue (427.8nm filtered ASC images or blue and green line (557.7nm images together give the best agreement with the measured flux values. The fluxes inverted from green line images alone are clearly larger than the measured ones. Closer to the horizon the quality of the inversion results from blue images deteriorate to the level of the ones from green images. In addition to the satellite data, the precipitating electron energy fluxes were estimated from the electron density measurements by the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR. These energy flux values were compared to the ones of the inversion method applied to over 100 ASC images recorded at the nearby ASC station in Longyearbyen. The energy fluxes deduced from these two types of data are in general of the same order of magnitude. In 35% of all of the blue and green image inversions the relative errors were less than 50% and in 90% of the blue and green image inversions less than 100%.

    This kind of systematic testing of the inversion method is the first step toward using all-sky camera images in the way in which global UV images have recently been used to estimate the energy fluxes. The

  12. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  13. Relativistic electron microbursts and variations in trapped MeV electron fluxes during the 8-9 October 2012 storm: SAMPEX and Van Allen Probes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Blake, J. Bernard; Reeves, Geoffery D.; Kletzing, Craig A.

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that whistler mode chorus is responsible for both acceleration of MeV electrons and relativistic electron microbursts through resonant wave-particle interactions. Relativistic electron microbursts have been considered as an important loss mechanism of radiation belt electrons. Here we report on the observations of relativistic electron microbursts and flux variations of trapped MeV electrons during the 8-9 October 2012 storm, using the SAMPEX and Van Allen Probes satellites. Observations by the satellites show that relativistic electron microbursts correlate well with the rapid enhancement of trapped MeV electron fluxes by chorus wave-particle interactions, indicating that acceleration by chorus is much more efficient than losses by microbursts during the storm. It is also revealed that the strong chorus wave activity without relativistic electron microbursts does not lead to significant flux variations of relativistic electrons. Thus, effective acceleration of relativistic electrons is caused by chorus that can cause relativistic electron microbursts.

  14. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: application to the hydrogen molecule ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J; Kenfack, A; Manz, J; Paulus, B

    2012-03-22

    This article presents the results of the first quantum simulations of the electronic flux density (j(e)) by the "coupled-channels" (CC) theory, the fundamentals of which are presented in the previous article [Diestler, D. J. J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, DOI: 10.1021/jp207843z]. The principal advantage of the CC scheme is that it employs exclusively standard methods of quantum chemistry and quantum dynamics within the framework of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA). The CC theory goes beyond the BOA in that it yields a nonzero j(e) for electronically adiabatic processes, in contradistinction to the BOA itself, which always gives j(e) = 0. The CC is applied to oriented H(2)(+) vibrating in the electronic ground state ((2)Σ(g)(+)), for which the nuclear and electronic flux densities evolve on a common time scale of about 22 fs per vibrational period. The system is chosen as a touchstone for the CC theory, because it is the only one for which highly accurate flux densities have been calculated numerically without invoking the BOA [Barth et al, Chem. Phys. Lett. 2009, 481, 118]. Good agreement between CC and accurate results supports the CC approach, another advantage of which is that it allows a transparent interpretation of the temporal and spatial properties of j(e).

  15. Tungsten joining with copper alloy and its high heat load performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Lian, Youyun; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Zengkui; Chen, Jiming; Duan, Xuru; Song, Jioupeng; Yu, Yang

    2014-12-01

    W-CuCrZr joining technology by using low activation Cu-Mn filler metal was developed at Southwestern Institute of Physics (SWIP) for the manufacturing of divertor components of fusion experiment devices. In addition, a fast W coating technology by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was also developed and CVD-W/CuCrZr and CVD-W/C mockups with a W coating thickness of 2 mm were prepared. In order to assess their high heat flux (HHF) performances, a 60 kW Electron-beam Material testing Scenario (EMS-60) equipped with a 150 keV electron beam welding gun was constructed at SWIP. Experimental results indicated that brazed W/CuCrZr mockups can withstand 8 MW/m2 heat flux for 1000 cycles without visible damages and CVD-W/CuCrZr mockups with W-Cu gradient interface can survive 1000 cycles under 11 MW/m2 heat flux. An ultrasonic inspection method for non-destructive tests (NDT) of brazed W/CuCrZr mockups was established and 2 mm defect can be detected. Infinite element analysis and heat load tests indicated that 5 mm defect had less noticeable influence on the heat transfer.

  16. Transport coefficients and heat fluxes in non-equilibrium high-temperature flows with electronic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of electronic excitation on transport processes in non-equilibrium high-temperature ionized mixture flows is studied. Two five-component mixtures, N 2 / N2 + / N / N + / e - and O 2 / O2 + / O / O + / e - , are considered taking into account the electronic degrees of freedom for atomic species as well as the rotational-vibrational-electronic degrees of freedom for molecular species, both neutral and ionized. Using the modified Chapman-Enskog method, the transport coefficients (thermal conductivity, shear viscosity and bulk viscosity, diffusion and thermal diffusion) are calculated in the temperature range 500-50 000 K. Thermal conductivity and bulk viscosity coefficients are strongly affected by electronic states, especially for neutral atomic species. Shear viscosity, diffusion, and thermal diffusion coefficients are not sensible to electronic excitation if the size of excited states is assumed to be constant. The limits of applicability for the Stokes relation are discussed; at high temperatures, this relation is violated not only for molecular species but also for electronically excited atomic gases. Two test cases of strongly non-equilibrium flows behind plane shock waves corresponding to the spacecraft re-entry (Hermes and Fire II) are simulated numerically. Fluid-dynamic variables and heat fluxes are evaluated in gases with electronic excitation. In inviscid flows without chemical-radiative coupling, the flow-field is weakly affected by electronic states; however, in viscous flows, their influence can be more important, in particular, on the convective heat flux. The contribution of different dissipative processes to the heat transfer is evaluated as well as the effect of reaction rate coefficients. The competition of diffusion and heat conduction processes reduces the overall effect of electronic excitation on the convective heating, especially for the Fire II test case. It is shown that reliable models of chemical reaction rates are of great

  17. Quantitative analysis of bidirectional electron fluxes within coronal mass ejections at 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    The solar wind electron heat flux is carried primarily by suprathermal halo'' electrons beamed antisunward along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), indicating magnetic connection to the Sun only in one direction. However, electron observations at 1 AU show that counterstreaming halo beams, suggesting closed magnetic structures, prevail within coronal mass ejections (CMEs). These structures might be magnetic tongues'', tied to the Sun at both ends, magnetically detached plasmoids, or complex flux rope structures. Here we present first results of analysis of ISEE-3 observations within 39 CMEs, including the asymmetry between the counterstreaming beams and its control by the IMF orientation, and the variation of the electron distributions as CMEs convect past the spacecraft. We find that some CMEs contain nearly symmetric electron beams, while others are strongly asymmetric, and that the antisunward beam is generally dominant. The more nearly radial the IMF, the greater is the asymmetry between outward and inward beams. We present an example of a distinctive strahl-on-strahl'' distribution, suggesting continued magnetic connection to the corona, in which a narrow antisunward beam is superimposed on a broader beam. Taken as a whole, our results appear to favor a tongue or flux rope scenario rather than a fully detached plasmoid. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  18. The Mars aurora: UV detections and in situ electron flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, J.-C.; Soret, L.; Lundin, R.; Libert, L.; Stiepen, A.; Radioti, A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Shematovich, V. I.; Bisikalo, D.

    2015-10-01

    A detailed search through the database of the SPICAM instrument on board Mars Express made it possible to identify 16 signatures of the CO Cameron and CO2+ doublet auroral emissions. These auroral UV signatures are all located in the southern hemisphere in the vicinity of the statistical boundary between open and closed field lines. The energy spectrum of the energetic electrons was simultaneously measured by ASPERA-3/ELS at higher altitude. The UV aurora is generally shifted from the region of enhanced downward electron energy flux by a few to several tens of degrees of latitude, suggesting that precipitation occurs in magnetic cusp like structures along inclined magnetic field lines. The ultraviolet brightness shows no proportionality with the electron flux measured at the spacecraft altitude. The Mars aurora appears as a sporadic short-lived feature. Results of Monte Carlo simulations will be compared with the observed brightness of the Cameron and CO2+ bands.

  19. Quantum control of electronic fluxes during adiabatic attosecond charge migration in degenerate superposition states of benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dongming; Manz, Jörn; Paulus, Beate; Pohl, Vincent; Tremblay, Jean Christophe; Yang, Yonggang

    2017-01-01

    We design four linearly x- and y-polarized as well as circularly right (+) and left (-) polarized, resonant π / 2 -laser pulses that prepare the model benzene molecule in four different degenerate superposition states. These consist of equal (0.5) populations of the electronic ground state S0 (1A1g) plus one of four degenerate excited states, all of them accessible by dipole-allowed transitions. Specifically, for the molecule aligned in the xy-plane, these excited states include different complex-valued linear combinations of the 1E1u,x and 1E1u,y degenerate states. As a consequence, the laser pulses induce four different types of periodic adiabatic attosecond (as) charge migrations (AACM) in benzene, all with the same period, 504 as, but with four different types of angular fluxes. One of the characteristic differences of these fluxes are the two angles for zero fluxes, which appear as the instantaneous angular positions of the "source" and "sink" of two equivalent, or nearly equivalent branches of the fluxes which flow in pincer-type patterns from one molecular site (the "source") to the opposite one (the "sink"). These angles of zero fluxes are either fixed at the positions of two opposite carbon nuclei in the yz-symmetry plane, or at the centers of two opposite carbon-carbon bonds in the xz-symmetry plane, or the angles of zero fluxes rotate in angular forward (+) or backward (-) directions, respectively. As a resume, our quantum model simulations demonstrate quantum control of the electronic fluxes during AACM in degenerate superposition states, in the attosecond time domain, with the laser polarization as the key knob for control.

  20. High Heat Flux Surface Coke Deposition and Removal Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    etc. have on coke deposition from RP-1 and RP-2 as well as showing that we can oxidize and remove these deposits using ozone , would be very...Meeting; 29 Apr. - 3 May, Colorado Springs, CO. 10Billingsley, M.C. H.Y. Lyu and R.W. Bates (2007). "Experimental and Numerical Investigations of RP...5th Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee Joint Meeting, Denver, CO, 14-17 May. 11Linne, D.L., M. L. Meyer, T. Edwards, and D. A. Eitman (1997

  1. Hybrid Heat Pipes for High Heat Flux Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The thermal transport requirements for future spacecraft missions continue to increase, approaching several kilowatts. At the same time the heat acquisition areas...

  2. High Heat Flux Burnout in Subcooled Flow Boiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.P.Celata; M.Cumo; 等

    1995-01-01

    The paper reports the results of an experimental research carried out at the Heat transfer divison of the Energy Department,C.R.Casaccia,on the thermal hydraulic characterization of subcooled flow boiling CHF under typical conditions of thermonuclear fusion reactors.I.e.high liquid velocity and subcooling.The experiment was carried out exploring the following parameters:channel diameter(from 2.5to 8.0 mm),heated length(10 and 15cm) ,liquid velocity (from 2 to 40m/s),exit pressure(from atmospheric to 5.0 MPa),inlet temperature(from 30 to 80℃),channel orientation (vertical and horizontal),A maximum CHF value of 60.6MW/m2 has been obtained under the following conditions:Tin-30°,p=2.5MPa,u=40m/s,D=2.5mm(smooth channel) Turbulence promoters(helically coiled wires)have been employed to further enhance the CHF attainable with subcooled flow boiling.Helically coiled wires allow an increase of 50% of the maximum CHF obtained with smooth channels.

  3. Modular Spray-Cooled Assemblies for High Heat Fluxes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase II project will produce a flight suitable test bench based on a modular spray-cooled assembly that considers NASA power and mass budgets and can...

  4. Correlative Aspects of the Solar Electron Neutrino Flux and Solar Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1994, the Homestake Solar Neutrino Detector obtained 108 observations of the solar electron neutrino flux (less than 0.814 MeV). The "best fit" values derived from these observations suggest an average daily production rate of about 0.485 Ar-37 atom per day, a rate equivalent to about 2.6 SNU (solar neutrino units) or about a factor of 3 below the expected rate from the standard solar model. In order to explain, at least, a portion of this discrepancy, some researchers have speculated that the flux of solar neutrinos is variable, possibly being correlated with various markers of the solar cycle (e.g., sunspot number, the Ap index, etc.). In this paper, using the larger "standard data set," the issue of correlative behavior between solar electron neutrino flux and solar activity is re-examined. The results presented here clearly indicate that no statistically significant association exists between any of the usual markers of solar activity and the solar electron neutrino flux.

  5. Calibrating MMS Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux Measurements and Characterizing 3D Electric Field Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, J. R.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Argall, M. R.; Li, G.; Chen, L. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Le Contel, O.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron drift instruments (EDIs) onboard each MMS spacecraft are designed with large geometric factors (~0.01cm2 str) to facilitate detection of weak (~100 nA) electron beams fired and received by the two gun-detector units (GDUs) when EDI is in its "electric field mode" to determine the local electric and magnetic fields. A consequence of the large geometric factor is that "ambient mode" electron flux measurements (500 eV electrons having 0°, 90°, or 180° pitch angle) can vary depending on the orientation of the EDI instrument with respect to the magnetic field, a nonphysical effect that requires a correction. Here, we present determinations of the θ- and ø-dependent correction factors for the eight EDI GDUs, where θ (ø) is the polar (azimuthal) angle between the GDU symmetry axis and the local magnetic field direction, and compare the corrected fluxes with those measured by the fast plasma instrument (FPI). Using these corrected, high time resolution (~1,000 samples per second) ambient electron fluxes, combined with the unprecedentedly high resolution 3D electric field measurements taken by the spin-plane and axial double probes (SDP and ADP), we are equipped to accurately detect electron-scale current layers and electric field waves associated with the non-Maxwellian (anisotropic and agyrotropic) particle distribution functions predicted to exist in the reconnection diffusion region. We compare initial observations of the diffusion region with distributions and wave analysis from PIC simulations of asymmetric reconnection applicable for modeling reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause, where MMS will begin Science Phase 1 as of September 1, 2015.

  6. Mechanisms of the outer radiation belt electron flux variation during magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M.; Obara, T.; Koshiishi, H.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Goka, T.

    2003-12-01

    We have investigated variations of the energetic electron flux (> 0.4 MeV) and the magnetic field in the outer radiation belt obtained from the Standard DOse Monitor (SDOM) and the MAgnetoMeter (MAM) of the Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA) onboard Tsubasa (Mission Demonstration Test Satellite (MDS)-1). Since Tsubasa operates in geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) with an orbital period of 10 hours and an inclination of 28.5 degrees, it has provided a rare opportunity for directly observing near-equatorial radiation belt plasma particles and the magnetic field during magnetic storms. The decreases of the energetic electron flux during the main phase of the magnetic storms, and the subsequent recoveries and enhancements during the recovery phase in the outer radiation belt are linked respectively to typical variations of the magnetic field. At the moment that the outer radiation belt flux sharply drops during the main phase of the 17 April 2002 magnetic storm, the butterfly distribution is observed at L=5 and the magnetic equator where the magnitude of magnetic field is much smaller than the IGRF model. Calculating the drift motions of the energetic electrons in the Tyganenko 2001 magnetospheric magnetic field model, shows that the drift-shell splitting mechanism could generate the butterfly distribution due to loss of the near-equatorially mirroring electrons through dayside magnetopause boundary. We evaluate roles and contributions of the other possible mechanisms to explain the flux decreases. We discuss the three-dimensional field configuration in the magnetopause to compare with the low earth orbital observation of the outer radiation belt flux.

  7. On the Relationship Between High Speed Solar Wind Streams and Radiation Belt Electron Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua

    2011-01-01

    Both past and recent research results indicate that solar wind speed has a close connection to radiation belt electron fluxes [e.g., Paulikas and Blake, 1979; Reeves et aI., 2011]: a higher solar wind speed is often associated with a higher level of radiation electron fluxes. But the relationship can be very complex [Reeves et aI., 2011]. The study presented here provides further corroboration of this viewpoint by emphasizing the importance of a global perspective and time history. We find that all the events during years 2010 and 2011 where the >0.8 MeV integral electron flux exceeds 10(exp 5) particles/sq cm/sr/s (pfu) at GEO orbit are associated with the high speed streams (HSS) following the onset of the Stream Interaction Region (SIR), with most of them belonging to the long-lasting Corotating Interaction Region (CIR). Our preliminary results indicate that during HSS events, a maximum speed of 700 km/s and above is a sufficient but not necessary condition for the > 0.8 MeV electron flux to reach 10(exp 5) pfu. But in the exception cases of HSS events where the electron flux level exceeds the 10(exp 5) pfu value but the maximum solar wind speed is less than 700 km/s, a prior impact can be noted either from a CME or a transient SIR within 3-4 days before the arrival of the HSS - stressing the importance of time history. Through superposed epoch analysis and studies providing comparisons with the CME events and the HSS events where the flux level fails to reach the 10(exp 5) pfu, we will present the quantitative assessment of behaviors and relationships of various quantities, such as the time it takes to reach the flux threshold value from the stream interface and its dependence on different physical parameters (e.g., duration of the HSS event, its maximum or average of the solar wind speed, IMF Bz, Kp). The ultimate goal is to apply what is derived to space weather forecasting.

  8. Stormtime Dynamics of the Relativistic Electron Flux in Earth's Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliadis, D.

    2011-01-01

    A state-vector representation is a powerful technique for describing complex plasma systems. Its framework can be adapted for classification methods which can be used to analyze the system's history and for prediction methods which can serve to forecast its future activity. A state-vector description is developed for the electron flux dynamics in Earth's radiation belts, based on an 11-year (1993-2003) dataset of high-cadence flux measurements from a low-Earth (SAMPEX) orbit over a wide L range and at a fixed energy (2-6 MeV). A clustering algorithm is used to divide the state space into regions, or clusters of vectors, and it becomes evident that flux intensifications during storms correspond to characteristic transitions in state space following geoeffective interplanetary disturbances (such as interplanetary coronal mass ejections and high-speed streams). Examples are discussed to show that the classification is valid for medium-term (several-days) and long-term (solar-cycle-phase) timescales. The state-vector representation is then used as the basis of a predictive model of the flux distribution given upstream solar wind measurements. It is found that model accuracy of storm prediction is maximized if the model is tuned at a highly nonlinear regime. The relation to earlier state representations and models of the radiation belt flux is discussed.

  9. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Henning

    2016-07-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The results show, for the first time, that neither e+ nor e- can be described by a single power law above 27.2 and 52.3 GeV, respectively. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. The dependence of the electron and positron fluxes on time will also be discussed.

  10. Study of decoherence in a system of superconducting flux-qubits interacting with an ensemble of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboiro, M., E-mail: reboiro@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [IFLP, CONICET-Department of Physics, University of La Plata, c.c. 67 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Civitarese, O., E-mail: osvaldo.civitarese@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [IFLP, CONICET-Department of Physics, University of La Plata, c.c. 67 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Ramírez, R. [IFLP, CONICET-Department of Mathematics, University of La Plata (Argentina)

    2017-03-15

    The degree of coherence in a hybrid system composed of superconducting flux-qubits and an electron ensemble is analysed. Both, the interactions among the electrons and among the superconducting flux-qubits are taken into account. The time evolution of the hybrid system is solved exactly, and discussed in terms of the reduced density matrix of each subsystem. It is seen that the inclusion of a line width, for the electrons and for the superconducting flux-qubits, influences the pattern of spin-squeezing and the coherence of the superconducting flux qubits. - Highlights: • The degree of coherence in a hybrid system, composed of superconducting flux qubits and an electron ensemble, is analysed. • The time evolution of the hybrid system is solved exactly and discussed in terms of the reduced density matrix of each subsystem. • It is shown that the initial state of the system evolves to a stationary squeezed state.

  11. Computation of the electronic flux density in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J; Kenfack, A; Manz, J; Paulus, B; Pérez-Torres, J F; Pohl, V

    2013-09-12

    A molecule in the electronic ground state described in the Born–Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) by the wave function ΨBO = Φ0χ0 (where Φ0 is the time-independent electronic energy eigenfunction and χ0 is a time-dependent nuclear wave packet) exhibits a nonzero nuclear flux density, whereas it always displays zero electronic flux density (EFD), because the electrons are in a stationary state. A hierarchical approach to the computation of the EFD within the context of the BOA, which utilizes only standard techniques of quantum chemistry (to obtain Φ0) and quantum dynamics (to describe the evolution of χ0 on the ground-state potential energy surface), provides a resolution of this puzzling, nonintuitive result. The procedure is applied to H2(+) oriented parallel with the z-axis and vibrating in the ground state (2)Σg(+). First, Φ0 and χ0 are combined by the coupled-channels technique to give the normally dominant z-component of the EFD. Imposition of the constraints of electronic continuity, cylindrical symmetry of Φ0 and two boundary conditions on the EFD through a scaling procedure yields an improved z-component, which is then used to compute the complementary orthogonal ρ-component. The resulting EFD agrees with its highly accurate counterpart furnished by a non-BOA treatment of the system.

  12. Electron-flux infrared response to varying π-bond topology in charged aromatic monomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro Galué, Héctor; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Redlich, Britta

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of delocalized π-electrons with molecular vibrations is key to charge transport processes in π-conjugated organic materials based on aromatic monomers. Yet the role that specific aromatic motifs play on charge transfer is poorly understood. Here we show that the molecular edge topology in charged catacondensed aromatic hydrocarbons influences the Herzberg-Teller coupling of π-electrons with molecular vibrations. To this end, we probe the radical cations of picene and pentacene with benchmark armchair- and zigzag-edges using infrared multiple-photon dissociation action spectroscopy and interpret the recorded spectra via quantum-chemical calculations. We demonstrate that infrared bands preserve information on the dipolar π-electron-flux mode enhancement, which is governed by the dynamical evolution of vibronically mixed and correlated one-electron configuration states. Our results reveal that in picene a stronger charge π-flux is generated than in pentacene, which could justify the differences of electronic properties of armchair- versus zigzag-type families of technologically relevant organic molecules. PMID:27577323

  13. Improvements in electron beam monitoring and heat flux flatness at the JUDITH 2-facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Thomas, E-mail: weber.th@gmx.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Jülich (Germany); Bürger, Andreas; Dominiczak, Karsten; Pintsuk, Gerald [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Jülich (Germany); Banetta, Stefano; Bellin, Boris [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla, 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Mitteau, Raphael; Eaton, Russell [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Monitoring of the much faster electron beam motion by IR camera through a synchronized frame triggering. • Estimation of the heat flux generated by electron beam guns based on calorimetry and FEM simulations. • Consideration of the inclined electron beam loading of rectangular-shaped objects. - Abstract: Three beryllium-armoured small-scale mock-ups and one semi-prototype for the ITER first wall were tested by the electron beam facility JUDITH 2 at Forschungszentrum Jülich. Both testing campaigns with cyclic loads up to 2.5 MW/m{sup 2} are carried out in compliance with the extensive quality and management specifications of ITER Organization (IO) and Fusion for Energy (F4E). Several dedicated calibration experiments were performed before the actual testing in order to fulfil the testing requirements and tolerances. These quality requests have been the motivation for several experimental setup improvements. The most relevant results of these activities, being the electron beam monitoring and the heat flux flatness verification, will be presented.

  14. Electron-flux infrared response to varying π-bond topology in charged aromatic monomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro Galué, Héctor; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Redlich, Britta

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of delocalized π-electrons with molecular vibrations is key to charge transport processes in π-conjugated organic materials based on aromatic monomers. Yet the role that specific aromatic motifs play on charge transfer is poorly understood. Here we show that the molecular edge topology in charged catacondensed aromatic hydrocarbons influences the Herzberg-Teller coupling of π-electrons with molecular vibrations. To this end, we probe the radical cations of picene and pentacene with benchmark armchair- and zigzag-edges using infrared multiple-photon dissociation action spectroscopy and interpret the recorded spectra via quantum-chemical calculations. We demonstrate that infrared bands preserve information on the dipolar π-electron-flux mode enhancement, which is governed by the dynamical evolution of vibronically mixed and correlated one-electron configuration states. Our results reveal that in picene a stronger charge π-flux is generated than in pentacene, which could justify the differences of electronic properties of armchair- versus zigzag-type families of technologically relevant organic molecules.

  15. Liquid-phase catalytic reactor combined with measurement of hot electron flux and chemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedrygailov, Ievgen I.; Lee, Changhwan; Moon, Song Yi; Lee, Hyosun; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the role of electronically nonadiabatic interactions during chemical reactions on metal surfaces in liquid media is of great importance for a variety of applications including catalysis, electrochemistry, and environmental science. Here, we report the design of an experimental apparatus for detection of the highly excited (hot) electrons created as a result of nonadiabatic energy transfer during the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide on thin-film metal-semiconductor nanodiodes. The apparatus enables the measurement of hot electron flows and related phenomena (e.g., surface chemiluminescence) as well as the corresponding reaction rates at different temperatures. The products of the chemical reaction can be characterized in the gaseous phase by means of gas chromatography. The combined measurement of hot electron flux, catalytic activity, and light emission can lead to a fundamental understanding of the elementary processes occurring during the heterogeneous catalytic reaction.

  16. Observations at geosynchronous orbit of a persistent Pc5 geomagnetic pulsation and energetic electron flux modulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Sarris

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A long lasting narrow-band (4–7 mHz Pc5 fluctuation event at geosynchronous orbit is presented through measurements from GOES-8 and GOES-10 and the response of energetic electrons with drift frequencies close to the narrow-band pulsation frequency is monitored through a spectral analysis of flux data from the LANL-SOPA energetic electron instrument. This analysis shows electron flux modulations at the magnetospheric pulsation's frequency as well as at various other frequencies in the Pc5 range, related to the particles' drift-frequencies and their harmonics. A drift resonance effect can be seen, with electron flux modulation becoming more evident in the energy channels of electrons with drift frequencies closer to the wave frequency; however no net increase or decrease in energetic electron flux is observed, indicating that the net energy transfer and transport of electrons is not significant. This Pc5 event has a long duration, being observed for more than a couple of days at geosynchronous orbit over several traversals of the two GOES satellites, and is localized in azimuthal extent. Spectral analysis shows that most of the power is in the transverse components. The frequency of the narrow-band event, as observed at geosynchronous orbit shifts during the time of the event from 7±0.5 mHz to about 4±0.5 mHz. On the ground, CARISMA magnetometers record no distinct narrow-band fluctuation in the magnetic field, and neither does Geotail, which is traversing the outer magnetosphere a few RE further out from geosynchronous orbit, at the same UT and LT that GOES-8 and -10 observe the pulsations, suggesting that that there is no connection to external fluctuations originating in the solar wind. An internal generation mechanism is suggested, such as could be provided by energetic ring current particles, even though conclusive evidence could not be provided for this particular event. Through a statistical study, it is

  17. Bimodal Electron Fluxes of Nearly Relativistic Electrons during the Onset of Solar Particle Events: 1. Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Lingpeng; Klecker, Berndt; Krucker, Saem; Droege, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We report for several solar energetic particle events intensity and anisotropy measurements of energetic electrons in the energy range ~ 27 to ~ 500 keV as observed with the Wind and ACE spacecraft in June 2000. The observations onboard Wind show bimodal pitch angle distributions (PAD), whereas ACE shows PADs with one peak, as usually observed for impulsive injection of electrons at the Sun. During the time of observation Wind was located upstream of the Earth's bow shock, in the dawn - noon sector, at distances of ~ 40 to ~ 70 Earth radii away from the Earth, and magnetically well connected to the quasi-parallel bow shock, whereas ACE, located at the libration point L1, was not connected to the bow shock. The electron intensity-time profiles and energy spectra show that the backstreaming electrons observed at Wind are not of magnetospheric origin. The observations rather suggest that the bi-modal electron PADs are due to reflection or scattering at an obstacle located at a distance of less than ~ 150 Earth r...

  18. Radio Diagnostics of Electron Acceleration Sites During the Eruption of a Flux Rope in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Eoin P.; Vilmer, Nicole; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2016-12-01

    Electron acceleration in the solar corona is often associated with flares and the eruption of twisted magnetic structures known as flux ropes. However, the locations and mechanisms of such particle acceleration during the flare and eruption are still subject to much investigation. Observing the exact sites of particle acceleration can help confirm how the flare and eruption are initiated and how they evolve. Here we use the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to analyze a flare and erupting flux rope on 2014 April 18, while observations from the Nançay Radio Astronomy Facility allow us to diagnose the sites of electron acceleration during the eruption. Our analysis shows evidence of a pre-formed flux rope that slowly rises and becomes destabilized at the time of a C-class flare, plasma jet, and the escape of ≳75 keV electrons from the rope center into the corona. As the eruption proceeds, continued acceleration of electrons with energies of ˜5 keV occurs above the flux rope for a period over 5 minutes. At the flare peak, one site of electron acceleration is located close to the flare site, while another is driven by the erupting flux rope into the corona at speeds of up to 400 km s-1. Energetic electrons then fill the erupting volume, eventually allowing the flux rope legs to be clearly imaged from radio sources at 150-445 MHz. Following the analysis of Joshi et al. (2015), we conclude that the sites of energetic electrons are consistent with flux rope eruption via a tether cutting or flux cancellation scenario inside a magnetic fan-spine structure. In total, our radio observations allow us to better understand the evolution of a flux rope eruption and its associated electron acceleration sites, from eruption initiation to propagation into the corona.

  19. Strong localized variations of the low-altitude energetic electron fluxes in the evening sector near the plasmapause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Titova

    Full Text Available Specific type of energetic electron precipitation accompanied by a sharp increase in trapped energetic electron flux are found in the data obtained from low-altitude NOAA satellites. These strongly localized variations of the trapped and precipitated energetic electron flux have been observed in the evening sector near the plasmapause during recovery phase of magnetic storms. Statistical characteristics of these structures as well as the results of comparison with proton precipitation are described. We demonstrate the spatial coincidence of localized electron precipitation with cold plasma gradient and whistler wave intensification measured on board the DE-1 and Aureol-3 satellites. A simultaneous localized sharp increase in both trapped and precipitating electron flux could be a result of significant pitch-angle isotropization of drifting electrons due to their interaction via cyclotron instability with the region of sharp increase in background plasma density.

    Key words. Ionosphere (particle precipitation; wave-particle interaction Magnetospheric Physics (plasmasphere

  20. Beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation: a treatment of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic molecular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J

    2013-06-01

    Intuition suggests that a molecular system in the electronic ground state Φ0 should exhibit an electronic flux density (EFD) in response to the motion of its nuclei. If that state is described by the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), however, a straightforward calculation of the EFD yields zero, since the electrons are in a stationary state, regardless of the state of the nuclear motion. Here an alternative pathway to a nonzero EFD from a knowledge of only the BOA ground-state wave function is proposed. Via perturbation theory a complete set of approximate vibronic eigenfunctions of the whole Hamiltonian is generated. If the complete non-BOA wave function is expressed in the basis of these vibronic eigenfunctions, the ground-state contribution to the EFD is found to involve a summation over excited states. Evaluation of this sum through the so-called "average excitation energy approximation" produces a nonzero EFD. An explicit formula for the EFD for the prototypical system, namely, oriented H2+ vibrating in the electronic ground state, is derived.

  1. Oxygen flux and dielectric response study of Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conducting (MIEC) heterogeneous functional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbi, Fazle

    Dense mixed ionic-electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes consisting of ionic conductive perovskite-type and/or fluorite-type oxides and high electronic conductive spinel type oxides, at elevated temperature can play a useful role in a number of energy conversion related systems including the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), oxygen separation and permeation membranes, partial oxidization membrane reactors for natural gas processing, high temperature electrolysis cells, and others. This study will investigate the impact of different heterogeneous characteristics of dual phase ionic and electronic conductive oxygen separation membranes on their transport mechanisms, in an attempt to develop a foundation for the rational design of such membranes. The dielectric behavior of a material can be an indicator for MIEC performance and can be incorporated into computational models of MIEC membranes in order to optimize the composition, microstructure, and ultimately predict long term membrane performance. The dielectric behavior of the MIECs can also be an indicator of the transport mechanisms and the parameters they are dependent upon. For this study we chose a dual phase MIEC oxygen separation membrane consisting of an ionic conducting phase: gadolinium doped ceria-Ce0.8 Gd0.2O2 (GDC) and an electronic conductive phase: cobalt ferrite-CoFe2O4 (CFO). The membranes were fabricated from mixtures of Nano-powder of each of the phases for different volume percentages, sintered with various temperatures and sintering time to form systematic micro-structural variations, and characterized by structural analysis (XRD), and micro-structural analysis (SEM-EDS). Performance of the membranes was tested for variable partial pressures of oxygen across the membrane at temperatures from 850°C-1060°C using a Gas Chromatography (GC) system. Permeated oxygen did not directly correlate with change in percent mixture. An intermediate mixture 60%GDC-40%CFO had the highest flux compared to the 50%GDC

  2. A nanoCryotron comparator can connect single-flux quantum circuits to conventional electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Qing-Yuan; Dane, Andrew E; Berggren, Karl K; Ortlepp, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Integration with conventional electronics offers a straightforward and economical approach to upgrading existing superconducting technologies, such as scaling up superconducting detectors into large arrays and combining single flux quantum (SFQ) digital circuits with semiconductor logic and memories. However, direct output signals from superconducting devices (e.g., Josephson junctions) are usually not compatible with the input requirements of conventional devices (e.g., transistors). Here, we demonstrate the use of a single three-terminal superconducting-nanowire device, called the nanocryotron (nTron), as a digital comparator to combine SFQ circuits with mature semiconductor circuits such as complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. Since SFQ circuits can digitize output signals from general superconducting devices and CMOS circuits can interface existing CMOS-compatible electronics, our results demonstrate the feasibility of a general architecture that uses an nTron as an interface to realiz...

  3. Eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by electron transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sintermann

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A system for fast ammonia (NH3 measurements based on a commercial Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer is presented. It uses electron transfer reaction (eTR as ionisation pathway and features a drift tube of polyetheretherketone (PEEK and silica-coated steel. Heating the instrumental inlet and the drift tube to 180° C enabled an effective time resolution of ~1 s and made it possible to apply the eTR-MS for eddy covariance (EC measurements. EC fluxes of NH3 were measured over two agricultural fields in Oensingen, Switzerland, following fertilisations with cattle slurry. Air was aspirated close to a sonic anemometer at a flow of 100 STP L min−1 and was directed through a 23 m long 1/2" PFA tube heated to 150°C to an air-conditioned trailer where the eTR-MS sub-sampled from the large bypass stream. This setup minimised damping of fast NH3 concentration changes between the sampling point and the actual measurement. High-frequency attenuation loss of the NH3 fluxes of 20 to 40% was quantified and corrected for using an empirical ogive method. The instrumental NH3 background signal showed a minor interference with H2O which was characterised in the laboratory. The resulting correction of the NH3 flux after slurry spreading was less than 1‰. The flux detection limit of the EC system was about 5 ng m−2 s−1 while the accuracy of individual flux measurements was estimated 16% for the high-flux regime during these experiments. The NH3 emissions after broad spreading of the slurry showed an initial maximum of 150 μg m2 s−1 with a fast decline in the following hours.

  4. Maximizing spectral flux from self-seeding hard x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fully coherent x rays can be generated by self-seeding x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs. Self-seeding by a forward Bragg diffraction (FBD monochromator has been recently proposed [G. Geloni, V. Kocharyan, and E. Saldin, J. Mod. Opt. 58, 1391 (2011JMOPEW0950-034010.1080/09500340.2011.586473] and demonstrated [J. Amann et al., Nat. Photonics 6, 693 (2012NPAHBY1749-488510.1038/nphoton.2012.180]. Characteristic time T_{0} of FBD determines the power, spectral, and time characteristics of the FBD seed [Yu. Shvyd’ko and R. Lindberg, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 15, 100702 (2012PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.15.100702]. Here we show that for a given electron bunch with duration σ_{e} the spectral flux of the self-seeding XFEL can be maximized, and the spectral bandwidth can be respectively minimized by choosing T_{0}∼σ_{e}/π and by optimizing the electron bunch delay τ_{e}. The choices of T_{0} and τ_{e} are not unique. In all cases, the maximum value of the spectral flux and the minimum bandwidth are primarily determined by σ_{e}. Two-color seeding takes place if T_{0}≪σ_{e}/π. The studies are performed, for a Gaussian electron bunch distribution with the parameters, close to those used in the short-bunch (σ_{e}≃5  fs and long-bunch (σ_{e}≃20  fs operation modes of the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL.

  5. Maximizing spectral flux from self-seeding hard x-ray free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2013-12-01

    Fully coherent x rays can be generated by self-seeding x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). Self-seeding by a forward Bragg diffraction (FBD) monochromator has been recently proposed [G. Geloni, V. Kocharyan, and E. Saldin, J. Mod. Opt. 58, 1391 (2011)JMOPEW0950-034010.1080/09500340.2011.586473] and demonstrated [J. Amann , Nat. Photonics 6, 693 (2012)NPAHBY1749-488510.1038/nphoton.2012.180]. Characteristic time T0 of FBD determines the power, spectral, and time characteristics of the FBD seed [Yu. Shvyd’ko and R. Lindberg, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 15, 100702 (2012)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.15.100702]. Here we show that for a given electron bunch with duration σe the spectral flux of the self-seeding XFEL can be maximized, and the spectral bandwidth can be respectively minimized by choosing T0˜σe/π and by optimizing the electron bunch delay τe. The choices of T0 and τe are not unique. In all cases, the maximum value of the spectral flux and the minimum bandwidth are primarily determined by σe. Two-color seeding takes place if T0≪σe/π. The studies are performed, for a Gaussian electron bunch distribution with the parameters, close to those used in the short-bunch (σe≃5fs) and long-bunch (σe≃20fs) operation modes of the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL.

  6. Galactic electrons and positrons at the Earth:new estimate of the primary and secondary fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, T; Lineros, R; Donato, F; Fornengo, N

    2010-01-01

    [Abridged] The so-called excess of cosmic ray (CR) positrons observed by the PAMELA satellite up to 100 GeV has opened windows for various interpretations involving standard astrophysics and/or a possible exotic contribution from dark matter annihilation or decay. The subsequent Fermi data on CR electrons plus positrons in the range 0.02-1 TeV, and HESS data above 1 TeV have provided additional information on the leptonic content of local Galactic CRs. In this paper, we wish to revisit the full predictions of the so-called "standard" CR lepton fluxes at the Earth of both secondary and primary origins, evaluate the theoretical uncertainties, and determine their level of consistency with respect to the available data. We find that the electron flux in the energy range 5-30 GeV is well reproduced from a smooth distant distribution of sources with index $\\gamma \\sim 2.3-2.4$, while local sources (supernova remnants and pulsars) dominate at higher energy. For positrons, local pulsars have important effect above 5-...

  7. Differential flux measurement of atmospheric pion, muon, electron and positron energy spectra at balloon altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C.; Brunetti, M.T.; Codino, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); Papini, P.; Massimo Brancaccio, F.; Finetti, N. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Researc, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements); Basini, G.; Bongiorno, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ. Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.

    1995-09-01

    The fluxes of atmospheric electrons, positrons, positive and negative muons and negative pions have been determined using the NMSU Wizard-MASS2 balloons-borne instrument. The instrument was launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico, (geomagnetic cut-off about 4.5 GV/c) on september 23, 1991. The flight lasted 9.8 hours and remained above 100.000 ft. Muons and negative pions were observed and their momenta were determined. Since these particles are not a part of the primary component, the measurement of their fluxes provides information regarding production and propagation of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Similarly, observations of electrons and positrons well below the geomagnetic cut-off provides insight into electromagnetic cascade processes in the upper atmosphere. In addition, the determination of the energy spectra of rare particles such as positrons can be used for background subtraction for cosmic ray experiments gathering data below a few g/cm{sup 2} of overlying atmosphere.

  8. Effects of 400 keV electrons flux on two space grade silicone rubbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jochem, H. [ONERA – The French Aerospace Lab, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, UPS, and CNRS, LHFA, UMR 5069, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); CNES – French Aerospace Agency, 18 Avenue Edouard Belin, F-31401 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Rejsek-Riba, V. [ONERA – The French Aerospace Lab, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Maerten, E., E-mail: maerten@chimie.ups-tlse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, and CNRS, LHFA, UMR 5069, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Remaury, S. [CNES – French Aerospace Agency, 18 Avenue Edouard Belin, F-31401 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Solé, S.; Sierra, G. [MAP Coatings – ZI, 2 Rue Clément Ader, 09100 Pamiers (France); Baceiredo, A. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, and CNRS, LHFA, UMR 5069, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Guillaumon, O. [MAP Coatings – ZI, 2 Rue Clément Ader, 09100 Pamiers (France)

    2013-08-15

    Two different space grade silicone rubbers were irradiated by an electron flux of 400 keV. The irradiation impact strongly depends on the chemical structure of rubbers (one reinforced with MQ resins, and the other one functionalized with phenyl groups at the silicon atoms and reinforced with silica). The irradiated rubbers were studied by means of solvent swelling, solid-state {sup 29}Si NMR, and ATR–FTIR spectroscopy. Physical properties were evaluated by thermal (differential scanning calorimetry), mechanical (dynamic mechanical analysis), and thermo-optical (ultraviolet–visible–near infrared spectroscopy) analyses. The formation of silicium T units and Si–CH{sub 2}–Si networks were evidenced by {sup 29}Si NMR, and the increase of the glass transition temperature and of modulus reflect the substantial increase in the macromolecular chain rigidity of the irradiated material. Dramatic damages of mechanical properties were observed, depending on the reinforced materials used. Slight changes of thermo-optical properties were highlighted independently to the initial chemical structure. - Highlights: • Electron flux radiations generate chains cross-linking. • Cross-linking occurs by T and Si–CH{sub 2}–Si units formation. • The cross-linking rate is slightly faster for 2D rubber compared to 3D rubber. • Modulus increases much more significantly for 3D rubber.

  9. Evaluation of ultra-fine grained tungsten under transient high heat flux by high-intensity pulsed ion beam%强流脉冲离子束作用下超细晶钨的抗瞬态热负荷性能评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谈军; 周张健; 朱小鹏; 郭双全; 屈丹丹; 雷明凯; 葛昌纯

    2012-01-01

    采用高能球磨和放电等离子体烧结技术制备纯钨、氧化物弥散强化钨和碳化物弥散强化钨.为了评价钨在瞬态热冲击下的性能,采用强流脉冲离子束,在热流密度高达160 MW/(m2·s-1/2)的条件下对4种不同晶粒尺寸的钨进行抗热冲击试验.与商品钨相比,弥散强化钨在瞬态高热流作用下显现出不同的行为.氧化物弥散强化钨显现出较差的抗热冲击性能,这主要是由于低熔点的第二相Ti和Y2O3的引入,从而使得钨的表面发生熔融、起泡和开裂.而碳化物弥散强化钨合金则显现出较好的抗热冲击性能.%Pure tungsten,oxide dispersion strengthened tungsten and carbide dispersion strengthened tungsten were fabricated by high-energy ball milling and spark plasma sintering process.In order to evaluate the properties of the tungsten alloys under transient high heat flues,four tungsten samples with different grain sizes were tested by high-intensity pulsed ion beam with a heat flux as high as 160 MW/(m2·s-1/2).Compared with the commercial tungsten,the surface modification of the oxide dispersion strengthened tungsten by high-intensity pulsed ion beam is completely different.The oxide dispersion strengthened tungsten shows inferior thermal shock response due to the low melting point second phase of Ti and Y2O3,which results in the surface melting,boiling bubbles and cracking.While the carbide dispersion strengthened tungsten shows better thermal shock response than the commercial tungsten.

  10. A nanocryotron comparator can connect single-flux-quantum circuits to conventional electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing-Yuan; McCaughan, Adam N.; Dane, Andrew E.; Berggren, Karl K.; Ortlepp, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Integration with conventional electronics offers a straightforward and economical approach to upgrading existing superconducting technologies, such as scaling up superconducting detectors into large arrays and combining single flux quantum (SFQ) digital circuits with semiconductor logic gates and memories. However, direct output signals from superconducting devices (e.g., Josephson junctions) are usually not compatible with the input requirements of conventional devices (e.g., transistors). Here, we demonstrate the use of a single three-terminal superconducting-nanowire device, called the nanocryotron (nTron), as a digital comparator to combine SFQ circuits with mature semiconductor circuits such as complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. Since SFQ circuits can digitize output signals from general superconducting devices and CMOS circuits can interface existing CMOS-compatible electronics, our results demonstrate the feasibility of a general architecture that uses an nTron as an interface to realize a ‘super-hybrid’ system consisting of superconducting detectors, superconducting quantum electronics, CMOS logic gates and memories, and other conventional electronics.

  11. High Heat-Load Slits for the PLS Multipole Wiggler

    CERN Document Server

    Gil, Kyehwan; Kim, Young-Chan; Lee, Heung-Soo; Wha Chung, Chin

    2005-01-01

    The HFMX (High Flux Macromolecular X-ray crystallography) beamline under commissioning at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory uses beam from a multipole wiggler for MAD experiment. Two horizontal and vertical slits relevant to high heat load are installed at its front-end. In order to treat high heat load and to reduce beam scattering, the horizontal slit has two glidcop blocks with 10° of vertical inclination and its tungsten blades defining beam size are bolted on backsides of both blocks. The blocks of the slit are adjusted on fixed slides by two actuating bars, respectively. Water through channels machined along the actuating bars cool down the heat load of both blocks. The vertical slit has the same structure as the horizontal slit except its installation direction and angle of vertical inclination. The installed slits show stable operation performance and no alignment for the blocks is required by virtue of a pair of blocks translating on slides. The cooling performance of two slits is also shown to ...

  12. Reactive oxygen species production by forward and reverse electron fluxes in the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly A Selivanov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS produced in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC are primary signals that modulate cellular adaptation to environment, and are also destructive factors that damage cells under the conditions of hypoxia/reoxygenation relevant for various systemic diseases or transplantation. The important role of ROS in cell survival requires detailed investigation of mechanism and determinants of ROS production. To perform such an investigation we extended our rule-based model of complex III in order to account for electron transport in the whole RC coupled to proton translocation, transmembrane electrochemical potential generation, TCA cycle reactions, and substrate transport to mitochondria. It fits respiratory electron fluxes measured in rat brain mitochondria fueled by succinate or pyruvate and malate, and the dynamics of NAD(+ reduction by reverse electron transport from succinate through complex I. The fitting of measured characteristics gave an insight into the mechanism of underlying processes governing the formation of free radicals that can transfer an unpaired electron to oxygen-producing superoxide and thus can initiate the generation of ROS. Our analysis revealed an association of ROS production with levels of specific radicals of individual electron transporters and their combinations in species of complexes I and III. It was found that the phenomenon of bistability, revealed previously as a property of complex III, remains valid for the whole RC. The conditions for switching to a state with a high content of free radicals in complex III were predicted based on theoretical analysis and were confirmed experimentally. These findings provide a new insight into the mechanisms of ROS production in RC.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of magnetic flux density in a magnetic recording head and pseudo soft underlayer by electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Weixing; Hirata, Kei; Yanagisawa, Keiichi; Ishida, Yoichi; Kasai, Hiroto; Yanagiuchi, Katsuaki; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic interaction between the pole tip of a single-pole head and a pseudo soft underlayer in perpendicular magnetic recording was observed by electron holography. The magnetic flux density inside the soft underlayer was quantitatively evaluated. The distribution of magnetic flux density was calculated using the finite element method, and the influences of the modulation of the reference wave and stray fields were investigated by comparison with experimental results. The flux density observed was found to be underestimated due to the modulation of the phase shift in reference wave. The magnetic flux measured experimentally was larger than that inside the specimen because of the relatively large stray fields above and below the specimen in the direction of the electron beam.

  14. Electron heating and particle fluxes in dual frequency atmospheric-pressure helium capacitive discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dingxin; Yang, Aijun; Wang, Xiaohua; Chen, Chen; Rong, Mingzhe; Kong, Michael G.

    2016-12-01

    In this letter, a 1D fluid model has been used to study the electron heating and particle transport in dual frequency atmospheric-pressure helium capacitive discharge with a high-frequency (HF) voltage of 10 MHz and a low-frequency (LF) voltage of 1 MHz. The electric field is decoupled to three components: the HF, the LF and the direct current (DC) ones, and they have much different effects on the plasmas. The eletrons in plasma bulk are mainly heated by the HF electric field, while in plasma sheath they are heated and cooled by the LF and DC electric fields, respectively. With a fixed total input power, the increase of LF power leads to great enhancement of the electrode fluxes of electrons and ions, especially for the energetic electrons of T e  >  2 eV, because more power is dissipated in the vicinity of electrodes and the inelastic collision is more pronounced. Therefore, the particle transport on the treated sample can be greatly enhanced without additional gas heating in dual frequency plasmas, which meets the application requirements more compared to the single frequency plasmas.

  15. A new positron source with high flux and excellent electron-optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Manfred [Physics Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1600, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)]. E-mail: Fink@physics.utexas.edu; Wellenstein, Hermann [Physics Department, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02454 (United States); Nguyen, Scott V. [Physics Department, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy is a well established research tool to study the surface and bulk electron distributions of solids and liquids. These are extracted from the energy and angular distributions of the two 511 keV X-rays, produced during the annihilation of a thermal positron and an electron from the sample. Positron investigations and monitoring, however are currently not used in an industrial environment due to the lack of a sufficiently intense positron sources to record distribution functions with good statistics within minutes. Most positron spectrometers have radioactive sources which produce only modest intensities (10{sup 6} e{sup +}/s). An improvement by at least a factor of 100 is needed to become viable for on-line positron metrology. We propose to combine several technologies to generate a positron beam with good electron-optical properties, such as a small divergence angle and small beam diameter and a flux of 10{sup 8} e{sup +}/s or more. Positrons from a 10 Ci beta source will be moderated with a stack of 12 layers of tungsten meshes. The thermalized positrons will be accelerated into a deflection focusing analyzer (DFA) which focuses the positrons into a small (1-2 mm{sup 2}) area of a second moderator. A rare gas solid will be used to thermalize the positrons once more. The moderating area forms the small emitter source for a accelerating gun that generate a beam of mono-energetic positrons of any desired energy.

  16. Decomposition of no-clean solder flux systems and their effects on the corrosion reliability of electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2016-01-01

    No-clean flux systems are used today for the soldering of electronic printed circuit board assemblies assuming that all the aggressive substances of the flux will vanish during the soldering process i.e. evaporate, decompose or being enclosed safely in the residues. However this is not true in most...... cases, as the flux residue left on a printed circuit board assembly is a key factor compromising the corrosion reliability under humid conditions. This investigation focuses on the chemical degradation of three kinds of solder flux systems based on adipic, succinic, and glutaric acid as a function...... determination. Effect on corrosion reliability was investigated by exposing the test printed circuit board assemblies to humidity after pre-contaminating with pure acids and desired solder flux systems and measuring the charge transferred between electrodes under applied potential bias. Results showed...

  17. ELECTRON HEAT FLUX IN THE SOLAR WIND: ARE WE OBSERVING THE COLLISIONAL LIMIT IN THE 1 AU DATA?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Università degli Studi di Firenze Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Matteini, L. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Pantellini, F. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot 5, place J. Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France)

    2014-07-20

    Using statistically significant data at 1 AU, it has recently been shown (Bale et al.) that in the solar wind, when the Knudsen number K {sub T} (the ratio between the electron mean free path and the electron temperature scale height) drops below about 0.3, the electron heat flux q intensity rapidly approaches the classical collisional Spitzer-Härm limit. Using a fully kinetic model including the effect of Coulomb collisions and the expansion of the solar wind with heliocentric distance, we observe that the heat flux strength does indeed approach the collisional value for Knudsen numbers smaller than about 0.3 in very good agreement with the observations. However, closer inspection of the heat flux properties, such as its variation with the heliocentric distance and its dependence on the plasma parameters, shows that for Knudsen numbers between 0.02 and 0.3 the heat flux is not conveniently described by the Spitzer-Härm formula. We conclude that even though observations at 1 AU seem to indicate that the electron heat flux intensity approaches the collisional limit when the Knudsen drops below ∼0.3, the collisional limit is not a generally valid closure for a Knudsen larger than 0.01. Moreover, the good agreement between the heat flux from our model and the heat flux from solar wind measurements in the high-Knudsen number regime seems to indicate that the heat flux at 1 AU is not constrained by electromagnetic instabilities as both wave-particle and wave-wave interactions are neglected in our calculations.

  18. Design study of JT-60SA divertor for high heat and particle controllability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, H.; Shimizu, K.; Takizuka, T.; Asakura, N.; Sakurai, S.; Matsukawa, M.; Fujita, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    In steady-state high performance plasma over 41 MW/100 s in the JT-60SA tokamak, the heat and particle flux density on the divertor targets are considerably higher than those of existing devices such as JT-60U. A divertor modeling code, SOLDOR/NEUT2D, has been applied in order to optimiz the JT-60SA divertor design in such conditions. The heat load q{sub heat} on divertor target is estimated for a conceptual divertor design as the first step. Simulation of SOL/divertor plasmas is carried out at lower single null divertor (LSN) configuration with I{sub p}/B{sub t}=3.5 MA/2.5 T. For the present calculation, anticipated SOL power flux of Q{sub total}=35 MW and particle fuelling flux of G{sub ion}=5.10{sup 21}/s (n{sub e-dege}=3.10{sup 19}/m) are applied. The pumping speed (S{sub pump}=50 m{sup 3}/s) is specified by an albedo for neutrals in front of the cryopump set bottom of exhaust chamber. The recycling of deuterium is assumed to be 100% at the first wall. For the first simulation, the carbon contamination in SOL/divertor regions is set to 2% of electron density uniformly. Gas puff flux G{sub puff}=0.5.10{sup 21}/s is introduced from outside midplane. We assume particle diffusion coefficient D=0.3 m{sup 2}/s and thermal diffusivity of electron and ion X{sub e}=X{sub i}=1 m{sup 2}/s. As a result, attached and detached plasma conditions are simulated on outer and inner divertor regions, respectively. The heat load around the outer strike point reaches 31 MW/m{sup 2}, which largely exceeds the allowable range of 15 MW/m{sup 2} for CFC materials. Reduction of heat load must be achieved somehow. An effect of the radiation cooling is simulated to reduce such a large heat load as the second step. To enlarge the radiative cooling, we increased the gas puff flux by a factor of ten and the carbon contamination partly in the outer divertor region from 2% to 4%. It gives a favorable result that the peak heat load is reduced to 12 MW/m{sup 2} with radiation enhancement by a

  19. Set anode potentials affect the electron fluxes and microbial community structure in propionate-fed microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Hari Ananda

    2016-12-09

    Anode potential has been shown to be a critical factor in the rate of acetate removal in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), but studies with fermentable substrates and set potentials are lacking. Here, we examined the impact of three different set anode potentials (SAPs; −0.25, 0, and 0.25 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode) on the electrochemical performance, electron flux to various sinks, and anodic microbial community structure in two-chambered MECs fed with propionate. Electrical current (49–71%) and CH4 (22.9–41%) were the largest electron sinks regardless of the potentials tested. Among the three SAPs tested, 0 V showed the highest electron flux to electrical current (71 ± 5%) and the lowest flux to CH4 (22.9 ± 1.2%). In contrast, the SAP of −0.25 V had the lowest electron flux to current (49 ± 6%) and the highest flux to CH4 (41.1 ± 2%). The most dominant genera detected on the anode of all three SAPs based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing were Geobacter, Smithella and Syntrophobacter, but their relative abundance varied among the tested SAPs. Microbial community analysis implies that complete degradation of propionate in all the tested SAPs was facilitated by syntrophic interactions between fermenters and Geobacter at the anode and ferementers and hydrogenotrophic methanogens in suspension.

  20. Set anode potentials affect the electron fluxes and microbial community structure in propionate-fed microbial electrolysis cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Ananda Rao; Katuri, Krishna P.; Logan, Bruce E.; Saikaly, Pascal E.

    2016-01-01

    Anode potential has been shown to be a critical factor in the rate of acetate removal in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), but studies with fermentable substrates and set potentials are lacking. Here, we examined the impact of three different set anode potentials (SAPs; −0.25, 0, and 0.25 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode) on the electrochemical performance, electron flux to various sinks, and anodic microbial community structure in two-chambered MECs fed with propionate. Electrical current (49–71%) and CH4 (22.9–41%) were the largest electron sinks regardless of the potentials tested. Among the three SAPs tested, 0 V showed the highest electron flux to electrical current (71 ± 5%) and the lowest flux to CH4 (22.9 ± 1.2%). In contrast, the SAP of −0.25 V had the lowest electron flux to current (49 ± 6%) and the highest flux to CH4 (41.1 ± 2%). The most dominant genera detected on the anode of all three SAPs based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing were Geobacter, Smithella and Syntrophobacter, but their relative abundance varied among the tested SAPs. Microbial community analysis implies that complete degradation of propionate in all the tested SAPs was facilitated by syntrophic interactions between fermenters and Geobacter at the anode and ferementers and hydrogenotrophic methanogens in suspension. PMID:27934925

  1. Fast measurements of the electron temperature and parallel heat flux in ELMy H-mode on the COMPASS tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, J.; Seidl, J.; Komm, M.; Weinzettl, V.; Panek, R.; Stöckel, J.; Hron, M.; Hacek, P.; Imrisek, M.; Vondracek, P.; Horacek, J.; Devitre, A.; the COMPASS Team

    2017-02-01

    We report the latest results on fast measurements of the electron temperature and parallel heat flux in the COMPASS tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) and divertor region during ELMy H-mode plasmas. The system of ball-pen and Langmuir probes installed on the divertor target, the horizontal reciprocating manipulator and the fast data-acquisition system with sampling frequency rate f  =  5 MSa s-1 allow us to measure the electron temperature and parallel heat flux during inter-ELM and ELM periods with high temporal resolution. The filamentary structure of the electron temperature and parallel heat flux was observed during ELMs in the SOL as well as in the divertor region. The position of the filaments within ELMs is not regular and therefore the resulting conditionally averaged ELM neglects the peak values of the electron temperature and parallel heat flux. We have found a substantial difference between the value of the radial power decay length in the inter-ELM period λ q,inter  =  2.5 mm and the decay length of the peak ELM heat flux λ q,ELM  =  13.1 mm. The decay length of the ELM energy density was found to be λ E,ELM  =  5.4 mm.

  2. Surfaces for high heat dissipation with no Leidenfrost limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Seyed Mohammad; Irajizad, Peyman; Kashyap, Varun; Farokhnia, Nazanin; Ghasemi, Hadi

    2017-07-01

    Heat dissipation from hot surfaces through cooling droplets is limited by the Leidenfrost point (LFP), in which an insulating vapor film prevents direct contact between the cooling droplet and the hot surface. A range of approaches have been developed to raise this limit to higher temperatures, but the limit still exists. Recently, a surface architecture, decoupled hierarchical structure, was developed that allows the suppression of LFP completely. However, heat dissipation by the structure in the low superheat region was inferior to other surfaces and the structure required an extensive micro/nano fabrication procedure. Here, we present a metallic surface structure with no LFP and high heat dissipation capacity in all temperature ranges. The surface features the nucleate boiling phenomenon independent of the temperature with an approximate heat transfer coefficient of 20 kW m-2 K-1. This surface is developed in a one-step process with no micro/nano fabrication. We envision that this metallic surface provides a unique platform for high heat dissipation in power generation, photonics/electronics, and aviation systems.

  3. Relative effect of solder flux chemistry on the humidity related failures in electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    of printed circuit boards under humid conditions. Originality/value - The classification of solder flux systems according to IPC J-STD-004 standard does not specify the WOAs in the flux; however, ranking of the flux systems based on the hygroscopic property of activators would be useful information when...

  4. Radio Diagnostics of Electron Acceleration Sites During the Eruption of a Flux Rope in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Carley, Eoin P; Gallagher, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    Electron acceleration in the solar corona is often associated with flares and the eruption of twisted magnetic structures known as flux ropes. However, the locations and mechanisms of such particle acceleration during the flare and eruption are still subject to much investigation. Observing the exact sites of particle acceleration can help confirm how the flare and eruption are initiated are initiated and how they evolve. Here we use the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to analyse a flare and erupting flux rope on 2014-April-18, while observations from the Nancay Radio Astronomy Facility allows us to diagnose the sites of electron acceleration during the eruption. Our analysis shows evidence for a pre-formed flux rope which slowly rises and becomes destabilised at the time of a C-class flare, plasma jet and the escape of >75 keV electrons from rope center into the corona. As the eruption proceeds, continued acceleration of electrons with energies of ~5 keV occurs above the flux rope for a period over 5 minutes. A...

  5. On the origin of low-energy electrons in the inner magnetosphere: Fluxes and pitch-angle distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, M. H.; Reeves, G. D.; Larsen, B. A.; Friedel, R. F. W.; Thomsen, M. F.; Fernandes, P. A.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Sarno-Smith, L. K.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate knowledge of the plasma fluxes in the inner magnetosphere is essential for both scientific and programmatic applications. Knowledge of the low-energy electrons (approximately tens to hundreds of eV) in the inner magnetosphere is particularly important since these electrons are acted upon by various physical processes, accelerating the electrons to higher energies, and also causing their loss. However, measurements of low-energy electrons are challenging, and as a result, this population has been somewhat neglected previously. This study concerns observations of low-energy electrons made by the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron instrument on board the Van Allen Probes satellites and also observations from geosynchronous orbit made by the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer on board Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites. The fluxes of electrons from 30 eV to 1 keV are quantified as a function of pitch-angle, McIlwain L parameter, and local time for both quiet and active periods. Results indicate two sources for low-energy electrons in this energy range: the low-energy tail of the electron plasma sheet and the high-energy tail of the dayside ionosphere. These populations are identified primarily as a result of their different pitch-angle distributions. Field-aligned outflows from the dayside ionosphere are observed at all L shells during quiet and active periods. Our results also demonstrate that the dayside electron field-aligned fluxes at 30 eV are particularly strong between L values of 6 and 7, indicating an enhanced source within the polar ionosphere.

  6. Comparison of Antarctic riometer radio wave absorption and THEMIS mission energetic electron fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, Elías M.; Vidal, Sergio E.; Foppiano, Alberto J.; Weatherwax, Allan T.; Stepanova, Marina V.

    2012-06-01

    Simultaneous observations of in situ plasma properties in the tail of the Earth's magnetosphere and of ground based instruments, lying on the same geomagnetic field lines, have recently proved to yield significant new results. In most cases magnetosphere ionosphere interactions during the night-time northern hemisphere conditions are studied. Here, observations of energetic electrons in the tail of the Earth's magnetosphere made by the THEMIS mission satellites are compared with auroral radio wave absorption determined by riometers in the Antarctic for sunlit conditions. Days for which satellites and riometers are connected by the same geomagnetic field line are selected using a geomagnetic field model. The six days analysed show clear associations between fluxes and absorptions in some cases. However, these do not necessarily correspond to conjugacy intervals. Hours of positive associations are 1.65 times those for negative associations, all hours and days considered (1.42-3.6 on five days and 0.58 on the other day). These computations are assumed appropriate since the footprints of the satellites used approximately follow corrected geomagnetic parallels for all six days studied. The use of a finer parameterization of geomagnetic models to determine conjugacy may be needed.

  7. The Mimas ghost revisited: An analysis of the electron flux and electron microsignatures observed in the vicinity of Mimas at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenette, D. L.; Stone, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the electron absorption signature observed by the Cosmic Ray System (CRS) on Voyage 2 near the orbit of Mimas is presented. We find that these observations cannot be explained as the absorption signature of Mimas. Combing Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 measurements of the electron flux at Mimas's orbit (L=3.1), we find an electron spectrum where most of the flux above approx 100 keV is concentrated near 1 to 3 MeV. The expected Mimas absorption signature is calculated from this spectrum neglecting radial diffusion. A lower limit on the diffusion coefficient for MeV electrons is obtained. With a diffusion coefficient this large, both the Voyager 2 and the Pioneer 11 small-scale electron absorption signature observations in Mimas's orbit are enigmatic. Thus we refer to the mechanism for producing these signatures as the Mimas ghost. A cloud of material in orbit with Mimas may account for the observed electron signature if the cloud is at least 1% opaque to electrons across a region extending over a few hundred kilometers.

  8. The Mimas ghost revisited - An analysis of the electron flux and electron microsignatures observed in the vicinity of Mimas at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenette, D. L.; Stone, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the electron-absorption signature observed by the cosmic-ray system on Voyager 2 near the orbit of Mimas is presented. It is found that these observations cannot be explained as the absorption signature of Mimas. By combining Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 measurements of the electron flux at Mimas's orbit (L = 3.1), an electron spectrum is found in which most of the flux above about 100 keV is concentrated near 1 to 3 MeV. This spectral form is qualitatively consistent with the bandpass filter model of Van Allen et al. (1980). The expected Mimas absorption signature is calculated from this spectrum neglecting radial diffusion. Since no Mimas absorption signature was observed in the inbound Voyager 2 data, a lower limit on the diffusion coefficient for MeV electrons at L = 3.1 of D greater than 10 to the -8th sq Saturn radii/sec is obtained. With a diffusion coefficient this large, both the Voyager 2 and the Pioneer 11 small-scale electron-absorption-signature observations in Mimas's orbit are enigmatic. Thus the mechanism for producing these signatures is referred to as the Mimas ghost. A cloud of material in orbit with Mimas may account for the observed electron signature if the cloud is at least 1-percent opaque to electrons across a region extending over a few hundred kilometers.

  9. Thermal management of low temperature electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Louis C.; Sehmbey, Maninder S.; Mahefkey, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Operation of electronics at liquid nitrogen temperature is a very attractive possibility. High temperature superconducting circuits operating at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have great potential in supercomputers and in the medical field. The limitations of superconducting switches in handling high power levels can be overcome by employing hybrid circuits where MOSFET switches are used in conjunction with superconducting elements. These hybrid circuits can be employed advantageously in many applications; for example, high-voltage power conversion, and superconducting-brushless-ac motors for locomotives. However, the thermal management of LNT electronics is an issue that has to be addressed. In this paper, two thermal management techniques, direct immersion cooling, and high-heat-flux spray cooling are discussed. Immersion cooling can handle relatively low heat flux levels (100 kW/m2) while spray cooling is capable of very high heat flux removal (over 1000 kW/m2).

  10. Magnetic topology of coronal mass ejections based on ISEE-3 observations of bidirectional electron fluxes at 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    The solar wind electron heat flux is carried primarily by superthermal halo'' electrons with energies at 1 AU of {approximately}80 eV and greater. These halo electrons typically are beamed antisunward along the IMF, indicating effective magnetic connection to the Sun only in one direction. However, ISEE-3 electron observations at 1 AU show that counterstreaming halo beams, suggesting closed magnetic structures, prevail within CMEs. These structures might be magnetic tongues,'' tied to the Sun at both ends, magnetically detached plasmoids, or perhaps complex flux rope structures. We present the results of analysis of ISEE-3 electron observations within 39 CMEs. Parameters analyzed include: the asymmetry between the counterstreaming beams, control by the IMF orientation, and the variation of the electron distributions as a particular CME convects past the spacecraft. We find that some CMEs contain nearly symmetric electron beams, while others are strongly asymmetric, and that beam propagating most nearly antisunward is generally dominant. The more nearly radial the IMF the greater is the symmetry between outward and inward beams. Trends observed as CMEs propagate past the spacecraft probably result primarily from the compression of the leading edge. We present examples of a previously unreported strahl-on-strahl'' distribution, suggesting continued magnetic connection to the corona, in which a narrow antisunward beam is superimposed on a broader beam. Preliminary results show that such spectra are present in a substantial fraction of the observed CMEs. Taken as a whole, our results appear to favor a tongue or flux rope scenario rather than a detached plasmoid.

  11. Effects of the Magnetic Flux and of the Electron Momentum on the Transmission Amplitude in the Aharonov-Bohm Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaresh Kumar, M. V.; Sahoo, Debendranath

    A characterization of the two-terminal open-ring Aharonov-Bohm interferometer is made by analyzing the phase space plots in the complex transmission amplitude plane. Two types of plots are considered: type 1 plot uses the magnetic flux as the variable parameter and type 2 plot which uses the electron momentum as the variable parameter. In type 1 plot, the trajectory closes upon itself only when the ratio R of the arm lengths (of the interferometer) is a rational fraction, and the shape and the type of the generated flower-like pattern is sensitive to the electron momentum. For momenta corresponding to discrete eigenstates of the perfect ring (i.e., the ring without the leads), the trajectory passes through the origin a certain fixed number of times before closing upon itself, whereas for arbitrary momenta it never passes through the origin. Although the transmission coefficient is periodic in the flux with the elementary flux quantum as the basic period, the phenomenon of electron transmission is shown not to be so when analyzed via the present technique. The periodicity is seen to spread over several flux units whenever R is a rational fraction whereas there is absolutely no periodicity present when R is an irrational number. In type 2 plot, closed trajectories passing through the origin a number of times are seen for R being a rational fraction. The case R = 1 (i.e., a symmetric ring) with zero flux is rather pathological — it presents a closed loop surrounding the origin. For irrational R values, the trajectories never close.

  12. Flux balance analysis reveals acetate metabolism modulates cyclic electron flow and alternative glycolytic pathways in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Philip Chapman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultured in the presence of acetate perform mixotrophic growth, involving both photosynthesis and organic carbon assimilation. Under such conditions, cells exhibit a reduced capacity for photosynthesis but a higher growth rate, compared to phototrophic cultures. Better understanding of the downregulation of photosynthesis would enable more efficient conversion of carbon into valuable products like biofuels. In this study, Flux Balance Analysis (FBA and Flux Variability Analysis (FVA have been used with a genome scale model of C. reinhardtii to examine changes in intracellular flux distribution in order to explain their changing physiology. Additionally, a reaction essentiality analysis was performed to identify which reaction subsets are essential for a given growth condition. Our results suggest that exogenous acetate feeds into a modified tricarboxylic acid cycle, which bypasses the CO2 evolution steps, explaining increases in biomass, consistent with experimental data. In addition, reactions of the oxidative pentose phosphate and glycolysis pathways, inactive under phototrophic conditions, show substantial flux under mixotrophic conditions. Importantly, acetate addition leads to an increased flux through cyclic electron flow (CEF, but results in a repression of CO2 fixation via Rubisco, explaining the down regulation of photosynthesis. However, although CEF enhances growth on acetate, it is not essential – impairment of CEF results in alternative metabolic pathways being increased. We have demonstrated how the reactions of photosynthesis interconnect with carbon metabolism on a global scale, and how systems approaches play a viable tool in understanding complex relationships at the scale of the organism.

  13. Flux balance analysis reveals acetate metabolism modulates cyclic electron flow and alternative glycolytic pathways in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Stephen P; Paget, Caroline M; Johnson, Giles N; Schwartz, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultured in the presence of acetate perform mixotrophic growth, involving both photosynthesis and organic carbon assimilation. Under such conditions, cells exhibit a reduced capacity for photosynthesis but a higher growth rate, compared to phototrophic cultures. Better understanding of the down regulation of photosynthesis would enable more efficient conversion of carbon into valuable products like biofuels. In this study, Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and Flux Variability Analysis (FVA) have been used with a genome scale model of C. reinhardtii to examine changes in intracellular flux distribution in order to explain their changing physiology. Additionally, a reaction essentiality analysis was performed to identify which reaction subsets are essential for a given growth condition. Our results suggest that exogenous acetate feeds into a modified tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which bypasses the CO2 evolution steps, explaining increases in biomass, consistent with experimental data. In addition, reactions of the oxidative pentose phosphate and glycolysis pathways, inactive under phototrophic conditions, show substantial flux under mixotrophic conditions. Importantly, acetate addition leads to an increased flux through cyclic electron flow (CEF), but results in a repression of CO2 fixation via Rubisco, explaining the down regulation of photosynthesis. However, although CEF enhances growth on acetate, it is not essential-impairment of CEF results in alternative metabolic pathways being increased. We have demonstrated how the reactions of photosynthesis interconnect with carbon metabolism on a global scale, and how systems approaches play a viable tool in understanding complex relationships at the scale of the organism.

  14. Current-voltage and kinetic energy flux relations for relativistic field-aligned acceleration of auroral electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent spectroscopic observations of Jupiter's "main oval" auroras indicate that the primary auroral electron beam is routinely accelerated to energies of ~100 keV, and sometimes to several hundred keV, thus approaching the relativistic regime. This suggests the need to re-examine the classic non-relativistic theory of auroral electron acceleration by field-aligned electric fields first derived by Knight (1973, and to extend it to cover relativistic situations. In this paper we examine this problem for the case in which the source population is an isotropic Maxwellian, as also assumed by Knight, and derive exact analytic expressions for the field-aligned current density (number flux and kinetic energy flux of the accelerated population, for arbitrary initial electron temperature, acceleration potential, and field strength beneath the acceleration region. We examine the limiting behaviours of these expressions, their regimes of validity, and their implications for auroral acceleration in planetary magnetospheres (and like astrophysical systems. In particular, we show that for relativistic accelerating potentials, the current density increases as the square of the minimum potential, rather than linearly as in the non-relativistic regime, while the kinetic energy flux then increases as the cube of the potential, rather than as the square.

  15. Crossed contributions to electron and heavy-particle transport fluxes for magnetized plasmas in the continuum regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoggins, James B.; Knisely, Carleton P.; Magin, Thierry E.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a unified fluid model for multicomponent plasmas in thermal nonequilibrium accounting for the influence of the electromagnetic field. In a previous work, this model was derived from kinetic theory based on a generalized Chapman-Enskog perturbative solution of the Boltzmann equation, scaled using the ratio of electron to heavy-particle masses. Anisotropic transport properties were derived in terms of bracket integrals. In this work, explicit expressions for asymptotic solutions of the transport properties are derived using a spectral Galerkin projection supplied with Laguerre-Sonine polynomial basis functions, and we analyze the crossed contributions to electron and heavy particle mass and energy fluxes, known as the Kolesnikov effect.

  16. Evidence of Decay of Flux Ratio of Fe to Fe–Ni Line Features with Electron Temperature in Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajmal Jain; Malini Aggarwal; Raghunandan Sharma

    2010-09-01

    We report observational evidence of the decay of the flux ratio of Fe to Fe–Ni line features as a function of plasma electron temperature in solar flares in comparison to that theoretically predicted by Phillips (2004). We present the study of spectral analysis of 14 flares observed by the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) – Low Energy Detector (SLD) payload. The SLD payload employs the state-of-the-art solid state detectors, viz., Si PIN and Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) devices. The sub-keV energy resolution of Si PIN detector allows us to study the Fe-line and Fe–Ni line features appearing at 6.7 and 8 keV, respectively, in greater detail. In order to best-fit the whole spectrum at one time in the desired energy range between 4 and 25 keV we considered Gaussian-line, the multi-thermal power-law and broken power-law functions. We found that the flux ratio of Fe to Fe–Ni line features decays with flare electron temperature by the asymptotic form of polynomial of inverse third order. The relative flux ratio is ∼ 30 at temperature 12 MK which drops to half, ∼ 15 at 20 MK, and at further higher temperatures it decreases smoothly reaching to ∼ 8 at ∼ 50 MK. The flux ratio, however, at a given flare plasma temperature, and its decrease with temperature is significantly lower than that predicted theoretically. We propose that the difference may be due to the consideration of higher densities of Fe and Fe–Ni lines in the theoretical model of Phillips (2004). We suggest revising the Fe and Fe–Ni line densities in the corona. The decay of flux ratio explains the variation of equivalent width and peak energy of these line features with temperature.

  17. Gyrokinetic study of turbulent convection of heavy impurities in tokamak plasmas at comparable ion and electron heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioni, C.; Bilato, R.; Casson, F. J.; Fable, E.; Mantica, P.; Odstrcil, T.; Valisa, M.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Contributors, JET

    2017-02-01

    In tokamaks, the role of turbulent transport of heavy impurities, relative to that of neoclassical transport, increases with increasing size of the plasma, as clarified by means of general scalings, which use the ITER standard scenario parameters as reference, and by actual results from a selection of discharges from ASDEX Upgrade and JET. This motivates the theoretical investigation of the properties of the turbulent convection of heavy impurities by nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in the experimentally relevant conditions of comparable ion and electron heat fluxes. These conditions also correspond to an intermediate regime between dominant ion temperature gradient turbulence and trapped electron mode turbulence. At moderate plasma toroidal rotation, the turbulent convection of heavy impurities, computed with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations, is found to be directed outward, in contrast to that obtained by quasi-linear calculations based on the most unstable linear mode, which is directed inward. In this mixed turbulence regime, with comparable electron and ion heat fluxes, the nonlinear results of the impurity transport can be explained by the coexistence of both ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes in the turbulent state, both contributing to the turbulent convection and diffusion of the impurity. The impact of toroidal rotation on the turbulent convection is also clarified.

  18. Fluctuations in the electron system of a superconductor exposed to a photon flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Visser, P.J.; Baselmans, J.J.A.; Bueno, J.; Llombart, N.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    In a superconductor, in which electrons are paired, the density of unpaired electrons should become zero when approaching zero temperature. Therefore, radiation detectors based on breaking of pairs promise supreme sensitivity, which we demonstrate using an aluminium superconducting microwave resonat

  19. Heat transfer and critical heat flux in a asymmetrically heated tube helicoidal flow; Transfert thermique et flux critique dans un ecoulement helicoidal en tube chauffe asymetriquement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscary, J.

    1995-10-01

    The design of plasma facing components is crucial for plasma performance in next fusion reactors. These elements will be submitted to very high heat flux. They will be actively water-cooled by swirl tubes in the subcooled boiling regime. High heat flux experiments were conducted in order to analyse the heat transfer and to evaluate the critical heat flux. Water-cooled mock-ups were one-side heated by an electron beam gun for different thermal-hydraulic conditions. The critical heat flux was detected by an original method based on the isotherm modification on the heated surface. The wall heat transfer law including forced convection and subcooled boiling regimes was established. Numerical calculations of the material heat transfer conduction allowed the non-homogeneous distribution of the wall temperature and of the wall heat flux to be evaluated. The critical heat flux value was defined as the wall maximum heat flux. A critical heat flux model based on the liquid sublayer dryout under a vapor blanket was established. A good agreement with test results was found. (author). 198 refs., 126 figs., 21 tabs.

  20. Heat transfer and critical heat flux in a spiral flow in an asymmetrical heated tube; Transfert thermique et flux critique dans un ecoulement helicoidal en tube chauffe asymetriquement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscary, J. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Sciences de la Matiere]|[Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    1997-03-01

    The design of plasma facing components is crucial for plasma performance in next fusion reactors. These elements will be submitted to very high heat flux. They will be actively water-cooled by swirl tubes in the subcooled boiling regime. High heat flux experiments were conducted in order to analyse the heat transfer and to evaluate the critical heat flux. Water-cooled mock-ups were one-side heated by an electron beam gun for different thermal-hydraulic conditions. The critical heat flux was detected by an original method based on the isotherm modification on the heated surface. The wall heat transfer law including forced convection and subcooled boiling regimes was established. Numerical calculations of the material heat transfer conduction allowed the non-homogeneous distribution of the wall temperature and of the wall heat flux to be evaluated. The critical heat flux value was defined as the wall maximum heat flux. A critical heat flux model based on the liquid sublayer dryout under a vapor blanket was established. A good agreement with test results was found. (author) 197 refs.

  1. Electronically controlled heat sink for high-power laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrovec, John

    2009-05-01

    We report on a novel electronically controlled active heat sink for high-power laser diodes offering unparalleled capacity in high-heat flux handling and temperature control. The heat sink receives diode waste heat at high flux and transfers it at reduced flux to environment, coolant fluid, heat pipe, or structure. Thermal conductance of the heat sink is electronically adjustable, allowing for precise control of diode temperature and the diode light wavelength. When pumping solid-state or alkaline vapor lasers, diode wavelength can be precisely temperature-tuned to the gain medium absorption features. This paper presents the heat sink physics, engineering design, and performance modeling.

  2. Optical properties and magnetic flux-induced electronic band tuning of a T-graphene sheet and nanoribbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arka; Nandy, Atanu; Chakrabarti, Arunava; Jana, Debnarayan

    2017-08-16

    Tetragonal graphene (T-graphene) is a theoretically proposed dynamically stable, metallic allotrope of graphene. In this theoretical investigation, a tight binding (TB) model is used to unravel the metal to semiconductor transition of this 2D sheet under the influence of an external magnetic flux. In addition, the environment under which the sheet exposes an appreciable direct band gap of 1.41 ± 0.01 eV is examined. Similarly, the electronic band structure of the narrowest armchair T-graphene nanoribbon (NATGNR) also gets modified with different combinations of magnetic fluxes through the elementary rings. The band tuning parameters are critically identified for both systems. It is observed that the induced band gaps vary remarkably with the tuning parameters. We have also introduced an exact analytical approach to address the band structure of the NATGNR in the absence of any magnetic flux. Finally, the optical properties of the sheet and NATGNR are also critically analysed for both parallel and perpendicular polarizations with the help of density functional theory (DFT). Our study predicts that this material and its nanoribbons can be used in optoelectronic devices.

  3. Electronic fluxes during Diels-Alder reactions involving 1,2-benzoquinones: mechanistic insights from the analysis of electron localization function and catastrophe theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Navarrete, Patricio; Domingo, Luis R; Andrés, Juan; Berski, Slawomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2012-11-15

    By means of the joint use of electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory, a theoretical analysis of the energy profile for the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of 4-methoxy-1,2-benzoquinone 1 and methoxyethylene 2 has been carried out. The 12 different structural stability domains obtained by the bonding evolution theory have been identified as well as the bifurcation catastrophes (fold and cusp) responsible for the changes in the topology of the system. This analysis permits finding a relationship between the ELF topology and the evolution of the bond breaking/forming processes and electron pair rearrangements through the reaction progress in terms of the different ways of pairing up the electrons. The reaction mechanism corresponds to an asynchronous electronic flux; first, the O1-C5 bond is formed by the nucleophilic attack of the C5 carbon of the electron rich ethylene 2 on the most electrophilically activated carbonyl O1 oxygen of 1, and once the σ bond has been completed, the formation process of the second O4C6 bond takes place. In addition, the values of the local electrophilicity and local nucleophilcity indices in the framework of conceptual density functional theory accounts for the asychronicity of the process as well as for the observed regioselectivity.

  4. Laminated Magnetic Materials Losses Analysis under Non-Sinusoidal Flux Waveforms in Power Electronics Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Aguglia, D

    2014-01-01

    Losses analyses of laminated magnetic materials subject to non-sinusoidal magnetic flux are presented. Comparative analyses on typical Fe-Si oriented and non-oriented grains and nanocrystalline materials are carried out considering the influence of harmonic phase shift and associated B-H minor loops. Experimental measurements are performed to illustrate the B-H characteristics behaviours. A special experimental effort is given on nanocrystalline material, where Steinmetz coefficients are experimentally identified to analyse the performances of the improved Generalized Steinmetz Equation (iGSE) when phase displaced minor loops occur. It is proven that the iGSE is efficient in predicting nanocrystalline losses versus variable phase displaced harmonics.

  5. The observations of fluxes of relativistic electrons at the latitudes of the auroral oval: results of METEOR-M No.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazantseva, Maria; Antonova, Elizaveta; Marjin, Boris; Barinova, Vera; Myagkova, Irina

    We analyze the simultaneous observations of the fluxes of auroral electrons and the fluxes of relativistic electrons at the external boundary of the outer electron radiation belts using data of METEOR-M No1 satellite for the period from November 3, 2009 till April 30, 2010. The geomagnetic conditions during analyzed period were comparatively quite. METEOR-M No.1 has a polar solar-synchronous circular orbit with an altitude of ~832 km, a period of 101.3 min, and an inclination of 98.068 degrees. The electrons with the energies from 0.1 to 13 MeV and protons from 1 to 260 MeV were measured by GGAK-M instrument composed by semiconductor and scintillator detectors. The plasma electrons with the energies from 0.03 to 16 keV were measured by the segment electrostatic analyzer. The observation of fluxes of relativistic electrons were selected inside the auroral oval connected with the development of magnetospheric substorms. However, the fluxes of relativistic electrons are also observed during absolutely quite time intervals. We compare the obtained results with the observations of CORONAS-FOTON satellite demonstrating the quasistationary (for more than 3 hours) increases of relativistic electrons at the latitudes of the auroral oval and argue that the processes inside the auroral oval can play the considerable role in the acceleration of relativistic electrons.

  6. Structural, electronic and flux dynamics of Gd(Ba2-xPrxCu3O7+& delta superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Mohammadizadeh and M Akhavan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available   The Gd(Ba2-xPrxCu3O single phase polycrystalline samples with 0.00 ≤ x ≤ 1.00 were investigated for structural, electronic and flux dynamic properties. An unusual hump on the resistivity vs. temperature curve of the samples has been observed for particular values of Pr doping. We have found that the Ba atom substitution at the rare earth site could lead to superconductivity in some parts of the grains at Tm~80-90K, which appears as a hump on the (T curve. For all the samples, the two-dimensional variable range hopping (VRH is a dominant conduction mechanism in the normal state. The Pr doping strongly localizes the carriers in the normal state, and finally causes the suppression of superconductivity. The effect of Pr substitution in 123 structure of HTSC at R or Ba site is to increase the pseudo gap temperature Ts, although, Pr at Ba site has a stronger effect on the increase of Ts and suppression of superconductivity. We have also extracted the two dimensionality aspects of HTSC through the similarities between superconductors, two-dimensional electron gas (2D-EG i.e., MOSFETs, and the ultra thin films of conventional superconductors. The magneto resistance of the samples have been studied within thermally activated flux creep and the Ambegaokar and Halperin phase slip models. The derived critical current density, Hc2(T, Hc2(0, and superconducting coherence length show that the Pr- doping, like weak links, decreases the vortex flux pinning energy. Our results imply that understanding the real suppression mechanism of superconductivity by Pr doping in HTSC is connected unavoidably to determination of the exact position of Pr in the structure.

  7. Investigation on the electron flux to the wall in the VENUS ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuillier, T.; Angot, J.; Benitez, J. Y.; Hodgkinson, A.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Xie, D. Z.

    2016-02-01

    The long-term operation of high charge state electron cyclotron resonance ion sources fed with high microwave power has caused damage to the plasma chamber wall in several laboratories. Porosity, or a small hole, can be progressively created in the chamber wall which can destroy the plasma chamber over a few year time scale. A burnout of the VENUS plasma chamber is investigated in which the hole formation in relation to the local hot electron power density is studied. First, the results of a simple model assuming that hot electrons are fully magnetized and strictly following magnetic field lines are presented. The model qualitatively reproduces the experimental traces left by the plasma on the wall. However, it is too crude to reproduce the localized electron power density for creating a hole in the chamber wall. Second, the results of a Monte Carlo simulation, following a population of scattering hot electrons, indicate a localized high power deposited to the chamber wall consistent with the hole formation process. Finally, a hypervapotron cooling scheme is proposed to mitigate the hole formation in electron cyclotron resonance plasma chamber wall.

  8. Investigation on the electron flux to the wall in the VENUS ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuillier, T; Angot, J; Benitez, J Y; Hodgkinson, A; Lyneis, C M; Todd, D S; Xie, D Z

    2016-02-01

    The long-term operation of high charge state electron cyclotron resonance ion sources fed with high microwave power has caused damage to the plasma chamber wall in several laboratories. Porosity, or a small hole, can be progressively created in the chamber wall which can destroy the plasma chamber over a few year time scale. A burnout of the VENUS plasma chamber is investigated in which the hole formation in relation to the local hot electron power density is studied. First, the results of a simple model assuming that hot electrons are fully magnetized and strictly following magnetic field lines are presented. The model qualitatively reproduces the experimental traces left by the plasma on the wall. However, it is too crude to reproduce the localized electron power density for creating a hole in the chamber wall. Second, the results of a Monte Carlo simulation, following a population of scattering hot electrons, indicate a localized high power deposited to the chamber wall consistent with the hole formation process. Finally, a hypervapotron cooling scheme is proposed to mitigate the hole formation in electron cyclotron resonance plasma chamber wall.

  9. Investigation on the electron flux to the wall in the VENUS ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuillier, T., E-mail: thuillier@lpsc.in2p3.fr; Angot, J. [LPSC, Université Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, 53 rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Benitez, J. Y.; Hodgkinson, A.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Xie, D. Z. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The long-term operation of high charge state electron cyclotron resonance ion sources fed with high microwave power has caused damage to the plasma chamber wall in several laboratories. Porosity, or a small hole, can be progressively created in the chamber wall which can destroy the plasma chamber over a few year time scale. A burnout of the VENUS plasma chamber is investigated in which the hole formation in relation to the local hot electron power density is studied. First, the results of a simple model assuming that hot electrons are fully magnetized and strictly following magnetic field lines are presented. The model qualitatively reproduces the experimental traces left by the plasma on the wall. However, it is too crude to reproduce the localized electron power density for creating a hole in the chamber wall. Second, the results of a Monte Carlo simulation, following a population of scattering hot electrons, indicate a localized high power deposited to the chamber wall consistent with the hole formation process. Finally, a hypervapotron cooling scheme is proposed to mitigate the hole formation in electron cyclotron resonance plasma chamber wall.

  10. Faraday Cup for Electron Flux Measurements on the Microtron MT 25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vognar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic criteria for constructing of an evacuated Faraday cup for precise measurement of 5 to 25 MeV electron beam currents in air from a microtron are established. The Faraday cup, built in the microtron laboratory of the Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering of CTU Prague, is described together with the electronic chain and its incorporation in the measuring line on the beam. Measures to reduce the backward escape of electrons are explained. The range of currents is from 10–5 to 10–10 A. The diameter of the Al entry window of the Faraday cup is 1.8 cm, and its area is 2.54 cm2. The thickness of the entry window is 0.1 mm.

  11. Dynamics of multiple flux tubes in sawtoothing KSTAR plasmas heated by electron cyclotron waves: I. Experimental analysis of the tube structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, G. H.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Bierwage, A.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; the KSTAR Team

    2015-01-01

    Multiple (two or more) flux tubes are commonly observed inside and/or near the q = 1 flux surface in KSTAR tokamak plasmas with localized electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (ECH/CD). Detailed 2D and quasi-3D images of the flux tubes obtained by an advanced imaging diagnostic system showed that the flux tubes are m/n = 1/1 field-aligned structures co-rotating around the magnetic axis. The flux tubes typically merge together and become like the internal kink mode of the usual sawtooth, which then collapses like a usual sawtooth crash. A systematic scan of ECH/CD beam position showed a strong correlation with the number of flux tubes. In the presence of multiple flux tubes close to the q = 1 surface, the radially outward heat transport was enhanced, which explains naturally temporal changes of electron temperature. We emphasize that the multiple flux tubes are a universal feature distinct from the internal kink instability and play a critical role in the control of sawteeth using ECH/CD.

  12. Ion and electron heating characteristics of magnetic reconnection in a two flux loop merging experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Y; Tanabe, H; Hayashi, Y; Ii, T; Narushima, Y; Yamada, T; Inomoto, M; Cheng, C Z

    2011-10-28

    Characteristics of the high-power reconnection heating were measured for the first time directly by two-dimensional measurements of ion and electron temperatures. While electrons are heated mainly inside the current sheet by the Ohmic heating power, ions are heated mainly by fast shock or viscosity damping of the reconnection outflow in the two downstream areas. The magnetic reconnection converts the energy of reconnecting magnetic field B(p) mostly to the ion thermal energy, indicating that the reconnection heating energy is proportional to B(p)(2).

  13. Instrumental and analytic techniques for separating protons from electrons in the cosmic ray flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crannell, C. J.; Jones, W. V.; Kurz, R. J.; Silverberg, R. F.; Viehmann, W.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques are being investigated to aid in distinguishing between electrons and the large background of interacting protons which simulate electron-induced electromagnetic cascades. For cosmic ray primaries, incident on the HECRE ionization spectrometer, statistical criteria are employed to test the cascade curves with the incident energy and starting point as free parameters. The physical significance of the distribution of apparent cascade starting points is being studied using Monte Carlo 100-GeV protons. The proposed use of a CsI detector module (totally-active and high Z) to further discriminate against protons is described.

  14. Solar flux variation of the electron temperature morning overshoot in the equatorial F region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolle, Claudia; Liu, H.; Truhlik, V.

    2011-01-01

    Using 8 years of CHAMP satellite observations of the equatorial electron temperature, T-e, we investigate its behavior during the morning overshoot and at ionospheric altitudes below 450 km including its variation with solar activity. The morning T-e has a maximum at the dip equator and decreases...

  15. Energetic electron fluxes in the earth's outer magnetosphere according to observations from the Prognoz-3 station. [40 to 300 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonova, A.E.; Nikolaeva, N.S.

    1978-01-01

    The Energetic electron distribution (from 40 to 300 keV) at middle and high latitudes in the outer magnetosphere of the earth, observed at the Prognoz 3 station from February to October 1973, is discussed. Considerable electron fluxes exist above the noon stable trapping boundary in the region near the equatorial flank of the dayside polar cusp. Pronounced enhancement of the 40 keV electron intensity and some in 300 keV electron bursts were detected on the magnetopause, which are agreement with electron layer measurements from the IMP and HEOS satellites and from the Prognoz 1 station. Quasiperiodic modulation of energetic electron fluxes with a period of about 3 to 5 minutes was observed and can be associated with the magnetopause motion and with oscillations of the magnetic field of the earth.

  16. The diffuse neutrino flux from supernovae: upper limit on the electron neutrino component from the non-observation of antineutrinos at SuperKamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    Lunardini, C

    2006-01-01

    I derive an upper bound on the electron neutrino component of the diffuse supernova neutrino flux from the constraint on the antineutrino component at SuperKamiokande. The connection between antineutrino and neutrino channels is due to the similarity of the muon and tau neutrino and antineutrino fluxes produced in a supernova, and to the conversion of these species into electron neutrinos and antineutrinos inside the star. The limit on the electron neutrino flux is 5.5 cm^-2 s^-1 above 19.3 MeV of neutrino energy, and is stronger than the direct limit from LSD by three orders of magnitude. It represents the minimal sensitivity required at future direct searches, and is intriguingly close to the reach of the SNO and ICARUS experiments. The electron neutrino flux will have a lower bound if the electron antineutrino flux is measured. Indicatively, the first can be smaller than the second at most by a factor of 2-3 depending on the details of the neutrino spectra at production.

  17. Influence of the flux density on the radiation damage of bipolar silicon transistors by protons and electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannikov, Y.; Gorin, B.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Mikhnovich, V.; Gusev, L.

    1981-11-01

    It was found experimentally that the radiation damage of bipolar n-p-n transistors increased by a factor of 8--12 when the proton flux density was reduced from 4.07 x 10/sup 10/ to 2.5 x 10/sup 7/ cm/sup -2/ sec /sup -1/. In the case of p-n-p transistors the effect was opposite: there was a reduction in the radiation damage by a factor of 2--3 when the dose rate was lowered between the same limits. A similar effect was observed for electrons but at dose rates three orders of magnitude greater. The results were attributed to the dependences of the radiation defect-forming reactions on the charge state of defects which was influenced by the formation of disordered regions in the case of proton irradiation.

  18. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y; Manabe, T; Kajita, S; Ohno, N; Takagi, M; Tsuchiya, H; Morisaki, T

    2014-09-01

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ~4 × 10(19) m(-2) s(-1) when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  19. Inter-instrument calibration using magnetic field data from Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM) and Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Teubenbacher, R.; Giner, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Steller, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Chutter, M.; Fornaçon, K.-H.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Carr, C.

    2013-07-01

    We compare the magnetic field data obtained from the Flux-Gate Magnetometer (FGM) and the magnetic field data deduced from the gyration time of electrons measured by the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster to determine the spin axis offset of the FGM measurements. Data are used from orbits with their apogees in the magnetotail, when the magnetic field magnitude was between about 20 nT and 500 nT. Offset determination with the EDI-FGM comparison method is of particular interest for these orbits, because no data from solar wind are available in such orbits to apply the usual calibration methods using the Alfvén waves. In this paper, we examine the effects of the different measurement conditions, such as direction of the magnetic field relative to the spin plane and field magnitude in determining the FGM spin-axis offset, and also take into account the time-of-flight offset of the EDI measurements. It is shown that the method works best when the magnetic field magnitude is less than about 128 nT and when the magnetic field is aligned near the spin-axis direction. A remaining spin-axis offset of about 0.4 ~ 0.6 nT was observed between July and October 2003. Using multi-point multi-instrument measurements by Cluster we further demonstrate the importance of the accurate determination of the spin-axis offset when estimating the magnetic field gradient.

  20. Interinstrument calibration using magnetic field data from the flux-gate magnetometer (FGM) and electron drift instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Teubenbacher, R.; Giner, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Steller, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Chutter, M.; Fornaçon, K.-H.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Carr, C.

    2014-01-01

    We compare the magnetic field data obtained from the flux-gate magnetometer (FGM) and the magnetic field data deduced from the gyration time of electrons measured by the electron drift instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster to determine the spin-axis offset of the FGM measurements. Data are used from orbits with their apogees in the magnetotail, when the magnetic field magnitude was between about 20 and 500 nT. Offset determination with the EDI-FGM comparison method is of particular interest for these orbits, because no data from solar wind are available in such orbits to apply the usual calibration methods using the Alfvén waves. In this paper, we examine the effects of the different measurement conditions, such as direction of the magnetic field relative to the spin plane and field magnitude in determining the FGM spin-axis offset, and also take into account the time-of-flight offset of the EDI measurements. It is shown that the method works best when the magnetic field magnitude is less than about 128 nT and when the magnetic field is aligned near the spin-axis direction. A remaining spin-axis offset of about 0.4 ∼ 0.6 nT was observed for Cluster 1 between July and October 2003. Using multipoint multi-instrument measurements by Cluster we further demonstrate the importance of the accurate determination of the spin-axis offset when estimating the magnetic field gradient.

  1. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: Cluster observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lacombe, Catherine; Matteini, Lorenzo; Santolik, Ondrej; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, Nicole; Mangeney, Andre; de Conchy, Yvonne; Maksimovic, Milan

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies $f\\in[1,400]$ Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In $\\sim 10\\%$ of the selected data, we observe narrow-band, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The life time of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e. lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of the background turbulence, a slow wind, a relative...

  2. Time dependence of electron and positron fluxes measured with the AMS-02 spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Graziani, Maura; Duranti, Matteo

    The electrons (e-) and positrons (e+) are a rare component of Cosmic Rays (CRs) since they constitute respectively only a 1% and 0.1% of cosmic radiation. However, the correct detection of e+- covers a great importance in the astrophysics field since, unlike the hadronic component, they are subjected to strong energy losses through the interaction with Interstellar Medium. As consequence e with energies above GeV that reach the Earth are galactic, with the source inside Kpc and through the study of their primary spectra it is possible to probe the local interstellar medium (LIS) and to indirectly detect new possible sources like pulsar or dark matter. However, these spectra, when measured near Earth, are significantly affected by the solar activity and we have the so-called solar modulation of CRs (SM). The solar activity has a cycle which period is ~11 years, during which it increases reaching a maximum and then decreases again. The intensity of cosmic ray radiation is correlated (or rather anticorrelated...

  3. Measurement of effect of electron cyclotron heating in a tandem mirror plasma using a semiconductor detector array and an electrostatic energy analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, R.; Imai, T.; Kariya, T.; Numakura, T.; Uehara, M.; Tsumura, K.; Ebashi, Y.; Kajino, S.; Endo, Y.; Nakashima, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved soft x-ray and end-loss-electron analyses of the electron cyclotron heated plasmas are carried out by using a semiconductor detector array and an electrostatic energy analyzer in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The flux and the energy spectrum of the end loss electrons are measured by a multi-grid energy analyzer. Recently, the electron cyclotron heating power modulation experiments have been started in order to generate and control the high heat flux and to make the edge localized mode-like intermittent heat load pattern for the divertor simulation studies by the use of these detectors for electron properties.

  4. O2-dependent large electron flow functioned as an electron sink, replacing the steady-state electron flux in photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, but not in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ryosuke; Shimakawa, Ginga; Shaku, Keiichiro; Shimizu, Satoko; Akimoto, Seiji; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Amako, Katsumi; Sugimoto, Toshio; Tamoi, Masahiro; Makino, Amane; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether alternative electron flow (AEF) can replace the photosynthetic electron flow in cyanobacteria, we used an open O2-electrode system to monitor O2-exchange over a long period. In air-grown Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (S. 6803(WT)), the quantum yield of PSII, Y(II), held even after photosynthesis was suppressed by CO2 shortage. The S. 6803 mutant, deficient in flavodiiron (FLV) proteins 1 and 3, showed the same phenotype as S. 6803(WT). In contrast, Y(II) decreased in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 (S. 7942). These results suggest that AEF functioned as the Y(II) in S. 6803 and replaced the photosynthetic electron flux. In contrast, the activity of AEF in S. 7942 was lower. The affinity of AEF for O2 in S. 6803 did not correspond to those of FLVs in bacteria or terminal oxidases in respiration. AEF might be driven by photorespiration.

  5. The development of advanced cooling methods for high-power electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, T. J.; Ciaccio, M. P.; Downing, R. S.; Smith, W. G.

    1990-10-01

    Consideration is given to various technologies developed to meet the difficult cooling requirements of high-density power electronics equipment for the aerospace industry. Topics discussed include liquid impingement cooling, compact high-density cooler, integrally cooled semiconductor, high heat flux cold plane, immersion cooling, modular reflux cooler, and forced-flow two-phase cooling systems. It is concluded that the new technologies are capable of providing the temperature control necessary to maintain desired electronic reliabilities using high-conductance cooling approaches.

  6. The influence of solder mask and hygroscopic flux residues on water layer formation on PCBA surface and corrosion reliability of electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piotrowska, Kamila; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    The presence of solder flux residue on the Printed Circuit Board Assembly (PCBA) surface compromises the corrosion reliability of electronics under humid conditions and can lead to degradation of the device’s lifetime. In this work, the effect of solder mask morphology and hygroscopic residues were...

  7. Prediction of relativistic electron flux in the Earth's outer radiation belt at geostationary orbit by adaptive methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myagkova, I. N.; Dolenko, S. A.; Efitorov, A. O.; Shirokii, V. R.; Sentemova, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates the possibilities of the prediction of the time series of the flux of relativistic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt by parameters of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field measured at the libration point and by the values of the geomagnetic indices. Different adaptive methods are used (namely, artificial neural networks, group method of data handling, and projection to latent structures). The comparison of quality indicators of predictions with a horizon of 1-12 h between each other and with the trivial model prediction has shown that the best result is obtained for the average value of the responses of three neural networks that have been trained with different sets of initial weights. The prediction result of the group method of data handling is close to the result of neural networks, and the projection to latent structures is much worse. It is shown that an increase in the prediction horizon from 1 to 12 h reduces its quality but not dramatically, which makes it possible to use these methods for medium-term prediction.

  8. Development of Modular Spray-Cooled Assemblies for High Heat Fluxes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR project will develop modular spray-cooled assemblies that satisfy NASA power and mass budgets and can be scaled to cool multiple heat sources...

  9. Hybrid Heat Pipes for High Heat Flux Spacecraft Thermal Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Grooved aluminum/ammonia Constant Conductance Heat Pipes (CCHPs) are the standard for thermal control in zero-gravity. Unfortunately, they are limited in terms of...

  10. Fatigue behavior of copper and selected copper alloys for high heat flux applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leedy, K.D.; Stubbins, J.F.; Singh, B.N.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-04-01

    The room temperature fatigue behavior of standard and subsize specimens was examined for five copper alloys: OFHC Cu, two CuNiBe alloys, a CuCrZr alloy, and a Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy. Fatigue tests were run in strain control to failure. In addition to establishing failure lives, the stress amplitudes were monitored as a function of numbers of accrued cycles. The results indicate that the alloys with high initial yield strengths provide the best fatigue response over the range of failure lives examined in the present study: N{sub f} = 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 6}. In fact, the fatigue performance of the best alloys is dominated by the elastic portion of the strain range, as would be expected from the correlation of performance with yield properties. The alumina strengthened alloy and the two CuNiBe alloys show the best overall performance of the group examined here.

  11. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of RP-2 Under High Heat Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    well-known Dittus-Boelter and Sieder -Tate correlations and the NASA/GRC correlation of Stiegemeier et. al is presented for Reynolds numbers between...Boelter and Sieder -Tate correlations and the NASA/GRC correlation of Stiegemeier et. al is presented for Reynolds numbers between 5,000-35,000...530 psi 165 ft/s, 1720 psi Nu, Dittus-Boelter Nu, Sieder -Tate Nu, NASA-GRC 2002 Figure 3. Comparison of experimental data with existing heat

  12. Room temperature creep-fatigue response of selected copper alloys for high heat flux applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, M.; Singh, B.N.; Stubbins, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Two copper alloys, dispersion-strengthened CuAl25 and precipitation-hardened CuCrZr, were examined under fatigue and fatigue with hold time loading conditions. Tests were carried out at room temperature and hold times were imposed at maximum tensile and maximum compressive strains. It was found...... times. The influence of hold times on fatigue life in the low cycle fatigue, short life regime (i.e., at high strain amplitudes) was minimal. When hold time effects were observed, fatigue lives were reduced with hold times as short as two seconds. Appreciable stress relaxation was observed during...... the hold period at all applied strain levels in both tension and compression. In all cases, stresses relaxed quickly within the first few seconds of the hold period and much more gradually thereafter. The CuAl25 alloy showed a larger effect of hold time on reduction of high cycle fatigue life than did...

  13. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G., E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Martin, E., E-mail: martin@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Boscary, J., E-mail: jean.boscary@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Camus, G., E-mail: camus@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Herb, V., E-mail: herb@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Schlosser, J., E-mail: jacques.schlosser@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F., E-mail: frederic.escourbiac@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Missirlian, M., E-mail: marc.missirlian@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2011-10-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  14. Microstructure of U 3Si 2 fuel plates submitted to a high heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Jacquet, P.; Jarousse, C.; Guigon, B.; Ballagny, A.; Sannen, L.

    2004-05-01

    In order to gain insight on the performance limits of U 3Si 2 fuel with Al cladding, fuel plates with a fissile material density of 5.1 and 6.1 g U/cm 3 were irradiated in the BR2 reactor of SCK • CEN in Mol. The plates were intended to be subjected to severe conditions leading to a cladding surface temperature of 180-200 °C and fuel temperatures of 220-240 °C. The irradiation program was stopped after the second cycle based on the visual inspection and wet sipping tests of the elements, correspondingly showing degradations on the outer Al surfaces of the U 3Si 2 plates and the release of fission products. The maximum fuel burn-up was 29% and 25% 235U, respectively. In a PIE program the microstructural causes for this degradation are analysed. It is found that the failure of the plates is entirely related to the corrosion of the Al cladding, which has caused temperatures to rise well beyond the calculated values. In all stages, the fuel grains have retained their integrity and, apart from the formation of an interaction phase with the Al matrix, they do not demonstrate deleterious changes in their physical properties.

  15. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevet, G.; Martin, E.; Boscary, J.; Camus, G.; Herb, V.; Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Missirlian, M.

    2011-10-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  16. A Review of Boiling Heat Transfer Processes at High Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    liquid metals) which can lead to explosive boiling (known as bumping) that can lead to structural damage to hardware. 3 Transition boiling occurs between...to initiate boiling, in some cases having an explosive transition that can cause structural damage to hardware. A thorough understanding of boiling...graphical correlations for the pressure drops encountered in their experiments. About the same time, Staub and Walmet (Ref. 173) identified the two regions

  17. Boiling Heat-Transfer Processes and Their Application in the Cooling of High Heat Flux Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    large for very smooth surfaces or highly wettable fluids (e.g., refrigerants or liquid metals) which can lead to explosive boiling (known as bumping) that...of the high wettability of liquid metals, high superheats are normally required to initiate boiling, in some cases having an explosive transition that...About the same time, Staub and Walmet (Ref. 175) identified the two regions before and after the point of significant vapor generation (SNVG) where the

  18. High heat flux plasma generator for new divertor plasma simulator in Nagoya University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, S.; Ezumi, N.; Ohno, N.; Uesugi, Y.; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    A new divertor simulator called NAGDIS-II has been constructed in order to investigate edge plasma physics in fusion devices. Improved TP-D type plasma source, which consists of LaB{sub 6} cathode with a Mo hollow shield and external heating system, water-cooled intermediate electrode and anode was employed to make a high density plasma in the NAGDIS-II. The performance and reliability of the discharge system was confirmed by quantitatively measuring neutral pressure, heating efficiency and plasma parameters. (author)

  19. Hybrid Cooling Loop Technology for Robust High Heat Flux Cooling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) proposes to develop a hybrid cooling loop and cold plate technology for space systems thermal management. The proposed...

  20. Vapor Compression Refrigeration Loop with Spray Cooling for High Heat Flux Thermal Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Laser diodes are the key component in many space-based applications ranging from communication systems to optical sensors/detectors. Laser diode emitters however...

  1. Development of dispersion-strengthened XD (trademark) Cu alloys for high heat-flux applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. Sharvan

    1993-01-01

    In a previous effort sponsored by NASA LeRC, the XD(trademark) process was used to produce ZrB2 particulate reinforcements in Cu and the resulting extruded material was microstructurally characterized and evaluated in tension over a range of temperatures. A problem that was encountered in that study was microstructural inhomogeneity resulting from the frequent presence of 'ZrB2 agglomerates' that were several microns in size. The presence of these agglomerates was attributed to improper mixing of powders in the green compact used in the XD process for elemental boron powder segregation. In this program, several milling parameters were examined in an effort to optimize this processing step; two levels of ZrB2 reinforcements were considered (7 vol. percent and 15 vol. percent). Microstructures of the reacted powder mass were examined to verify the absence of these agglomerates. Larger bathes of powder were then mixed, reacted, machined to size, canned, and extruded. The microstructure and tensile properties of these extrusions were examined, and the measured properties were correlated with the observed microstructure. Large unreacted or partially reacted Zr particles were present. These particles affected the mechanical properties deleteriously, and their presence is attributed to insufficient heat of reaction during XD synthesis. Alternate processing routes are recommended.

  2. Dynamics of electron fluxes in the slot between radiation belts in November-December 2014 according to data of the Vernov satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myagkova, I. N.; Svertilov, S. I.; Kovtyukh, A. S.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Sibiryakova, D. V.; Balan, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    The variations in the spatial structure and time in electron fluxes with E = 235-300 keV in the slot region (2 radiation belts in the period of November 1, 2014 through December 8, 2014 during weak and moderate geomagnetic disturbances ( Kp -60 nT) are analyzed based on the data of the RELEC complex on board the Vernov satellite (the height and inclination of the orbit are from 640 to 830 km and 98.4°, respectively). Irregular increases in the fluxes of such electrons and formation of a local maximum at L 2.2-3.0 were observed. It has been shown that the intensity of this maximum is inversely proportional to the L value and grows with an increase in the geomagnetic activity level. New features discovered for the first time in the dynamics of radiation belt electrons manifest in the variations in the local structure and dynamics of fluxes of subrelativistic electrons in the slot region.

  3. Solder Flux Residues and Humidity-Related Failures in Electronics: Relative Effects of Weak Organic Acids Used in No-Clean Flux Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    (RH) to ∼99%RH at 25°C. The following parameters were used for characterization of WOAs: mass gain due to water adsorption and deliquescence of the WOA (by quartz crystal microbalance), resistivity of the water layer formed on the printed circuit board (by impedance spectroscopy), and leakage current...... measured using the surface insulation resistance pattern in the potential range from 0 V to 10 V. The combined results indicate the importance of the WOA chemical structure for the water adsorption and therefore conductive water layer formation on the printed circuit board assembly (PCBA). A substantial...... increase of leakage currents and probability of electrochemical migration was observed at humidity levels above the RH corresponding to the deliquescence point of WOAs present as contaminants on the printed circuit boards. The results suggest that use of solder fluxes with WOAs having higher deliquescence...

  4. Flux pinning properties of MgB{sub 2} thin films on Al tape substrates deposited by electron beam evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonekura, K., E-mail: kenji@st.cs.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Fujiyoshi, T.; Sueyoshi, T. [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Doi, T.; Nishikawa, T. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40, Koorimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    MgB{sub 2} thin films were deposited on Al tape substrates by EBE. The MgB{sub 2} thin films on Al tapes show much higher J{sub c} values compared to those of MgB{sub 2} wires fabricated by PIT method. The MgB{sub 2} thin films on Al tapes have c-axis correlated pinning centers. The scaling analysis of macroscopic pinning force indicates that a main pinning center is grain boundary. Flux pinning properties have been investigated in two kinds of MgB{sub 2} thin films deposited on Al tapes by electron beam evaporation: One is a stoichiometric composition and the other is a slightly B-rich composition. The values of critical current density J{sub c} in both MgB{sub 2} thin films on Al tape substrates at 10 K in the magnetic field parallel to the c-axis are higher than those in MgB{sub 2} thin films on Si and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates prepared by the same method. Both the MgB{sub 2} thin films on Al tapes show the large peaks for a magnetic field, B//c in the field-angular dependence of J{sub c}. This result indicates that the MgB{sub 2} thin films have the c-axis correlated pinning centers. Scaling analysis in the reduced macroscopic pinning force density versus the reduced magnetic field at 20 K implies that a main pinning center in both the MgB{sub 2} thin films is grain boundaries. In addition, it was suggested that a nonstoichiometric MgB{sub 2} thin film has additional pinning centers which act effectively in a high magnetic field.

  5. Workshop on high heat load x-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    A workshop on High Heat Load X-Ray Optics'' was held at Argonne National Laboratory on August 3--5, 1989. The object of this workshop was to discuss recent advances in the art of cooling x-ray optics subject to high heat loads from synchrotron beams. The cooling of the first optical element in the intense photon beams that will be produced in the next generation of synchrotron sources is recognized as one of the major challenges that must be faced before one will be able to use these very intense beams in future synchrotron experiments. Considerable advances have been made in this art during the last few years, but much work remains to be done before the heating problem can be said to be completely solved. Special emphasis was placed on recent cooling experiments and detailed finite element'' and finite difference'' calculations comparing experiment with theory and extending theory to optimize performance.

  6. Electron Energy Spectra, Fluxes, and Day-Night Asymmetries of $^{8}$B Solar Neutrinos from the 391-Day Salt Phase SNO Data Set

    CERN Document Server

    Aharmim, B; Anthony, A E; Beier, E W; Bellerive, A; Bergevin, M; Biller, S D; Boger, J; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bullard, T V; Chan, Y D; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Cox, G A; Currat, C A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Deng, H; Doe, P J; Dosanjh, R S; Doucas, G; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Fleurot, F; Formaggio, J A; Frame, K; Frati, W; Fulsom, B G; Gagnon, N; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hall, J C; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Handler, W B; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heelan, L; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hemingway, R J; Hime, A; Howard, C; Howe, M A; Huang, M; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Klein, J R; Kormos, L L; Kos, M S; Krüger, A; Kraus, C V; Krauss, C B; Krumins, A V; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Labranche, H; Lange, R; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Loach, J C; Luoma, S; MacLellan, R; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McGee, S; McGregor, G; Miin, C; Miknaitis, K K S; Moffat, B A; Nally, C W; Neubauer, M S; Nickel, B G; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Oblath, N S; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Ouellet, C V; Peeters, S J M; Poon, A W P; Rielage, K; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rollin, E; Rosendahl, S S E; Rusu, V L; Schwendener, M H; Seibert, S R; Simard, O; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, M W E; Starinsky, N; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Tafirout, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tesic, G; Thomson, M; Thorman, M; Tsui, T; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Wall, B L; Waller, D; Waltham, C E; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Wark, D L; Wendland, J; West, N; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wittich, P; Wouters, J M; Wright, A; Yeh, M; Zuber, K

    2005-01-01

    Results are reported from the complete salt phase of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiment in which NaCl was dissolved in the D$_2$O target. The addition of salt enhanced the signal from neutron capture, as compared to the pure D$_2$O detector. By making a statistical separation of charged-current events from other types based on event-isotropy criteria, the effective electron recoil energy spectrum has been extracted. In units of $ 10^6$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, the total flux of active-flavor neutrinos from $^8$B decay in the Sun is found to be $4.94^{+0.21}_{-0.21}{(stat)}^{+0.38}_{-0.34}{(syst)}$ and the integral flux of electron neutrinos for an undistorted $^8$B spectrum is $1.68^{+0.06}_{-0.06}{(stat)}^{+0.08}_{-0.09}{(syst)}$; the signal from ($\

  7. Melatonin Increases the Chilling Tolerance of Chloroplast in Cucumber Seedlings by Regulating Photosynthetic Electron Flux and the Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hailiang; Ye, Lin; Wang, Yuping; Zhou, Xiaoting; Yang, Junwei; Wang, Jiawei; Cao, Kai; Zou, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to monitor the effects of exogenous melatonin on cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) chloroplasts and explore the mechanisms through which it mitigates chilling stress. Under chilling stress, chloroplast structure was seriously damaged as a result of over-accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as evidenced by the high levels of superoxide anion (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). However, pretreatment with 200 μM melatonin effectively mitigated this by suppressing the levels of ROS in chloroplasts. On the one hand, melatonin enhanced the scavenging ability of ROS by stimulating the ascorbate–glutathione (AsA–GSH) cycle in chloroplasts. The application of melatonin led to high levels of AsA and GSH, and increased the activity of total superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR, EC 1.6.5.4) dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, EC 1.5.5.1), glutathione reductase (GR, EC1.6.4.2) in the AsA–GSH cycle. On the other hand, melatonin lessened the production of ROS in chloroplasts by balancing the distribution of photosynthetic electron flux. Melatonin helped maintain a high level of electron flux in the PCR cycle [Je(PCR)] and in the PCO cycle [Je(PCO)], and suppressed the O2-dependent alternative electron flux Ja(O2-dependent) which is one important ROS source. Results indicate that melatonin increased the chilling tolerance of chloroplast in cucumber seedlings by accelerating the AsA–GSH cycle to enhance ROS scavenging ability and by balancing the distribution of photosynthetic electron flux so as to suppress ROS production. PMID:27999581

  8. Advances on Sensitive Electron-injection based Cameras for Low-Flux, Short-Wave-Infrared Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vala Fathipour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Short-wave infrared (SWIR photon detection has become an essential technology in the modern world. Sensitive SWIR detector arrays with high pixel density, low noise levels and high signal-to-noise-ratios are highly desirable for a variety of applications including biophotonics, light detection and ranging, optical tomography, and astronomical imaging. As such many efforts in infrared detector research are directed towards improving the performance of the photon detectors operating in this wavelength range.We review the history, principle of operation, present status and possible future developments of a sensitive SWIR detector technology, which has demonstrated to be one of the most promising paths to high pixel density focal plane arrays for low flux applications. The so-called electron-injection (EI detector was demonstrated for the first time (in 2007. It offers an overall system-level sensitivity enhancement compared to the p-i-n diode due to a stable internal avalanche-free gain. The amplification method is inherently low noise, and devices exhibit an excess noise of unity. The detector operates in linear-mode and requires only bias voltage of a few volts. The stable detector characteristics, makes formation of high yield large-format, and high pixel density focal plane arrays less challenging compared to other detector technologies such as avalanche photodetectors. Detector is based on the mature InP material system (InP/InAlAs/GaAsSb/InGaAs, and has a cutoff wavelength of 1700 nm. It takes advantage of a unique three-dimensional geometry and combines the efficiency of a large absorbing volume with the sensitivity of a low-dimensional switch (injector to sense and amplify signals. Current devices provide high-speed response ~ 5 ns rise time, and low jitter ~ 12 ps at room temperature. The internal dark current density is ~ 1 μA/cm2 at room temperature decreasing to 0.1 nA/cm2 at 160 K.EI detectors have been designed, fabricated, and

  9. Advances on Sensitive Electron-injection based Cameras for Low-Flux, Short-Wave-Infrared Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathipour, Vala; Bonakdar, Alireza; Mohseni, Hooman

    2016-08-01

    Short-wave infrared (SWIR) photon detection has become an essential technology in the modern world. Sensitive SWIR detector arrays with high pixel density, low noise levels and high signal-to-noise-ratios are highly desirable for a variety of applications including biophotonics, light detection and ranging, optical tomography, and astronomical imaging. As such many efforts in infrared detector research are directed towards improving the performance of the photon detectors operating in this wavelength range. We review the history, principle of operation, present status and possible future developments of a sensitive SWIR detector technology, which has demonstrated to be one of the most promising paths to high pixel density focal plane arrays for low flux applications. The so-called electron-injection (EI) detector was demonstrated for the first time (in 2007). It offers an overall system-level sensitivity enhancement compared to the p-i-n diode due to a stable internal avalanche-free gain. The amplification method is inherently low noise, and devices exhibit an excess noise of unity. The detector operates in linear-mode and requires only bias voltage of a few volts. The stable detector characteristics, makes formation of high yield large-format, and high pixel density focal plane arrays less challenging compared to other detector technologies such as avalanche photodetectors. Detector is based on the mature InP material system (InP/InAlAs/GaAsSb/InGaAs), and has a cutoff wavelength of 1700 nm. It takes advantage of a unique three-dimensional geometry and combines the efficiency of a large absorbing volume with the sensitivity of a low-dimensional switch (injector) to sense and amplify signals. Current devices provide high-speed response ~ 5 ns rise time, and low jitter ~ 12 ps at room temperature. The internal dark current density is ~ 1 μA/cm2 at room temperature decreasing to 0.1 nA/cm2 at 160 K. EI detectors have been designed, fabricated, and tested during two

  10. Pyrolysis kinetics of bagasse at high heating rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubington, J.F.; Aiman, S. (University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Fuel Technology)

    The rate of pyrolysis of bagasse was studied at high heating rates (200-10,000 [degree]C/s) to obtain engineering data for incorporation into computational fluid dynamic models of bagasse ignition and combustion in suspension-fired and swirl burners. Experiments were performed using an electrically-heated grid under a nitrogen atmosphere at atmosphere pressure. Yields of char, tar, individual gas components, and water were measured as a function of peak temperature, for ranges of heating rate, residence time at peak temperature, and particle size. At higher peak temperatures, significant tar cracking occurred so that tar yields passed through a maximum as peak temperature increased. For dry bagasse, this tar cracking produced gases with no change in char yield, suggesting that it occurred external to the particle. Moisture in the atmosphere increased the tar cracking in the vapor phase outside the bagasse particle producing more gases but did not affect the char yield. However, moisture in the bagasse reduced the char yield and further enhanced the tar cracking reactions, producing even more gases (predominantly carbon monoxide). These results suggested an interaction between water vapor and the tar cracking reactions. For the short residence times appropriate to such burners, a single, first-order reaction model gave the best fit to the total weight loss for the ranges of heating rate and particle sizes studied. However, the first-order kinetic parameters fitted to primary tar production were recommended for modeling purposes because the total weight loss included significant yields of noncombustible water and carbon dioxide. Different ultimate primary tar yields were recommended to fit the dry and wet bagasse pyrolysis results. No chemical significance should be attributed to the kinetic parameters, which were determined to provide the simplest and best fit to the pyrolysis data. 19 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Data integrity and electronic calibrations for the Neutral Current Detector phase measurement of the 8B solar neutrino flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox-Mobrand, Gary A.

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a heavy water Cherenkov detector that observed solar neutrinos via elastic-scattering, charge-current and neutral-current interactions. SNO was designed to measure the flux the total 8B solar neutrino flux in three separate phases, making each measurement under a different set of detector conditions and detection mechanisms. In the third phase, an array of 3He proportional counters was installed, called Neutral Current Detectors (NCDs), which detected neutrons liberated in the neutral-current interactions with deuterium. The neutrino flux can be measured in the NCD phase by identification of neutron capture events via pulse-shape analysis techniques. To accomplish this, the transformation of the neutron capture signals caused by the NCD electronics and data acquisition system (NCD DAQ) must be well known. The NCD DAQ electronics model was developed and quantified, resulting in a small contribution to the systematic uncertainties of neutron identification. Of the four currently proposed neutron identification methods, the parameters which characterize the logarithmic amplification of pulse shapes contribute 1.65%, 0.65%, 0.05% and 0.0% to the systematic uncertainty in the number of identified neutrons. A mechanical problem in two NCDs was discovered that caused the detectors to disconnect from the signal cable with little evidence of being disconnected. The work presented here identified two NCDs that suffered from this mechanical problem and estimated the amount of time that each NCD was disconnected. The remaining NCDs are shown to be unaffected by this problem and an upper limit on the amount of time disconnected was estimated. This was accomplished by an analysis of the rate of thermal noise triggers, an instrumental background noise event. The detected rates of background alphas were also measured to test for anomalously low rates. It was determined that these two NCDs should be removed from the final neutrino flux

  12. Design study of JT-60SA divertor for high heat and particle controllability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1, Mukoyama, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan)], E-mail: kawashima.hisato@jaea.go.jp; Shimizu, K.; Takizuka, T.; Asakura, N.; Sakurai, S.; Matsukawa, M.; Fujita, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1, Mukoyama, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    The modification of JT-60 to a fully superconducting coil tokamak, JT-60SA (JT-60 Super Advanced) device, has been programmed to contribute and supplement ITER toward to DEMO. Lower divertor design with the ITER-like lower single null divertor configuration is studied to obtain high heat and particle controllability using SOLDOR/NEUT2D code. With anticipated total power flux into SOL of 37 MW (90% of input power), the peak heat load on outer divertor target can be reduced to 5.8 MW/m{sup 2} at the detached condition by gas puffing in the vertical divertor target with the 'V-shaped corner'. It is {approx}2/5 of the allowable level of 15 MW/m{sup 2}. On the other hand, particle controllability such as control of detached to attached condition by divertor pumping is improved by increase the strike point distance from 20 to 120 mm with above divertor geometry, suggesting that recover from severe detachment at the small distance case can be achieving by elevation of the strike point locations. Optimization of upper divertor design is in progress for high {beta} steady-state operation using upper single null divertor configuration.

  13. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T Z; Behm, K; Dong, C F; Davoine, X; Kalmykov, S Y; Petrov, V; Chvykov, V; Cummings, P; Hou, B; Maksimchuk, A; Nees, J A; Yanovsky, V; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2016-08-26

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays.

  14. Altitude distribution of electron concentration in ionospheric D-region in presence of time-varying solar radiation flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nina, A., E-mail: sandrast@ipb.ac.rs [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 57, Belgrade (Serbia); Cadez, V. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia); Sreckovic, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 57, Belgrade (Serbia); Sulic, D. [Faculty of Ecology and Environmental Protection, Union - Nikola Tesla University, Cara Dusana 62, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we study the influence of solar flares on electron concentration in the terrestrial ionospheric D-region by analyzing the amplitude and phase time variations of very low frequency (VLF) radio waves emitted by DHO transmitter (Germany) and recorded by the AWESOME receiver in Belgrade (Serbia) in real time. The rise of photo-ionization rate in the ionospheric D-region is a typical consequence of solar flare activity as recorded by GOES-15 satellite for the event on March 24, 2011 between 12:01 UT and 12:11 UT. At altitudes around 70 km, the photo-ionization and recombination are the dominant electron gain and electron loss processes, respectively. We analyze the relative contribution of each of these two processes in the resulting electron concentration variation in perturbed ionosphere.

  15. Effect of high heating and cooling rate on interface of diffusion bonded gray cast iron to medium carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt, B. [Firat University, Technical Education Faculty, Metal Department, 23119 Elazig (Turkey); Orhan, N. [Firat University, Technical Education Faculty, Metal Department, 23119 Elazig (Turkey)]. E-mail: norhan@firat.edu.tr; Hascalik, A. [Firat University, Technical Education Faculty, Department of Manufacturing, Elazig (Turkey)

    2007-07-01

    In the present study, a gray cast iron and a medium carbon steel couple were diffusion bonded at the temperatures of 850, 900, 950 and 1000 deg. C under a pressure of 8 MPa for 30 min, and the effects of temperature and high heating and cooling rate on interface formations and microstructure were investigated. After diffusion bonding, scanning electron microscopy, shear test measurements and microhardness measurement of interface region were made. The microstructure at the inside of medium carbon steel of bonded couple consisted of martensite. As a result, from the microstructural observations, a good bonding along the interface of the bonded couples and the interface is free from voids and microcracks.

  16. Design and Calibration of a Novel High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Raphael-Mabel, Sujay Anand

    2005-01-01

    Heat flux gages are important in applications where measurement of the transfer of energy is more important than measurement of the temperature itself. There is a need for a heat flux sensor that can perform reliably for long periods of time in high temperature and high heat flux environment. The primary objective is to design and build a heat flux sensor that is capable of operating for extended periods of time in a high heat flux and high temperature environment. A High Temperature Heat F...

  17. First evidence for correlations between electron fluxes measured by NOAA-POES satellites and large seismic events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battiston, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN-Trento Center for Fundamental Physics and Applications (TIPFA), Povo (Italy); Vitale, Vincenzo [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. Perugia and ASI Science Data Center, Frascati (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    We present the result for the search of correlations between the precipitation of low energy electrons (E>0.3MeV) trapped within the Van Allen Belts and earthquakes with magnitude above 5 Richter scale. We used the electron data measured by the NOAA POES 15,16,17 and 18 satellites collected during a period of 13 years, corresponding to about 18 thousands M>5 earthquakes registered in the NEIC catalog of the U.S. Geological Survey. We defined Particle Burst (PB) the fluctuations of electrons counting rate having a probability <1% to be a background fluctuation. Within a time window of ±36 hours, we observe a clear correlation peak at −1.25±0.25 hours. This result is obtained using data driven algorithms independent from specific modelling of the lithosphere-ionosphere coupling and adding the data collected by each POES satellite. The significance of the observed correlation peak is 5.7 s.d. corresponding to a probability of 1.210{sup −6} of being a statistical fluctuation. The observed correlation involves about 1.410{sup −3} of the earthquakes in that period of time. It provides the first statistically convincing evidence for the existence of a detectable coupling mechanism between the lithosphere and the magnetosphere having well defined time characteristics.

  18. Characteristics of flux-time profiles, temporal evolution, and spatial distribution of radiation-belt electron precipitation bursts in the upper ionosphere before great and giant earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Pulinets

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The analysis of energetic electron observations made by the DEMETER satellite reveals that radiation belt electron precipitation (RBEP bursts are observed in general several (~1-6 days before a large (M > 6.5 earthquake (EQ in the presence of broad band (~1-20 kHz VLF waves. The EBs show in general a relative peak-to-background flux increase usually < 100, they have a time duration of ~0.5 – 3 min, and their energy spectrum reach up to energies <~500 keV. The RBEP activity is observed as one, two or three EBs throughout a semi-orbit, depended on the magnetic field structure above the EQ epicenter. A statistical analysis has been made for earthquakes in Japan, which reveals a standard temporal variation of the number of EBs, which begins with an incremental rate several days before major earthquakes, and after a maximum, decreases so that the electron precipitation ceases above the epicenter. Some earthquake induced EBs were observed not only in the nightside ionosphere, but also in the dayside ionosphere.

     

  19. In situ observations of domain structures and magnetic flux distributions in Mn-Zn and Ni-Zn ferrites by Lorentz microscopy and electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Takehiro; Shindo, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Hideyuki; Sato, Takafumi; Kondo, Koichi

    2007-01-01

    Domain structures and magnetic flux distributions in Mn-Zn and Ni-Zn ferrites are investigated by in situ observations with Lorentz microscopy and electron holography. In situ Lorentz microscopic observation with the magnetic field applied reveals that the domain walls in Mn-Zn ferrite move easily across the grain boundary. On the other hand, each grain of Ni-Zn ferrite is magnetized by domain wall motion inside the grain. By taking a series of holograms with adjustment of the optical axis and astigmatism while the magnetic field is applied, we succeeded in observing the change in magnetic flux distribution quantitatively. Eventually, it is clarified that magnetization rotation does not take place in the magnetization process of Ni-Zn ferrite. The domain wall widths delta in Mn-Zn and Ni-Zn ferrites are evaluated to be 73 and 58 nm, respectively. Furthermore, through direct observation of the domain structure in Ni-Cu-Zn ferrite with Lorentz microscopy, it is found that the grains with size below 1.5 microm diameter are single domain.

  20. Response of NSTX liquid lithium divertor to high heat loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, T., E-mail: tabrams@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Jaworski, M.A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Kallman, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Foley, E.L. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Gray, T.K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kugel, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Levinton, F. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); McLean, A.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Skinner, C.H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Samples of the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) with and without an evaporative Li coating were directly exposed to a neutral beam ex-situ at a power of ∼1.5 MW/m{sup 2} for 1–3 s. Measurements of front face and bulk sample temperature were obtained. Predictions of temperature evolution were derived from a 1D heat flux model. No macroscopic damage occurred when the “bare” sample was exposed to the beam but microscopic changes to the surface were observed. The Li-coated sample developed a lithium hydroxide (LiOH) coating, which did not change even when the front face temperature exceeded the pure Li melting point. These results are consistent with the lack of damage to the LLD surface and imply that heating alone may not expose pure liquid Li if the melting point of surface impurities is not exceeded. This suggests that flow and heat are needed for future PFCs requiring a liquid Li surface.

  1. Unveiling Zn hyperaccumulation in Juncus acutus: implications on the electronic energy fluxes and on oxidative stress with emphasis on non-functional Zn-chlorophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, D; Duarte, B; Caçador, I

    2014-11-01

    Juncus acutus arises as possible hyperaccumulator specie, tolerating exogenous Zn concentrations as high as 60 mM. Zinc concentrations here detected in seedlings germinated in the presence high Zn concentrations, were above the described upper toxic levels for higher plants. Even at the highest Zn concentration, growth inhibition only accounted to approximately 30% of control seedlings biomass, presenting an EC₅₀ value in the range of 10-20 mM of metal. PSII quantum yields showed a marked decline, reflection of changes in the thylakoid structure on the PSII electron donor sites. In fact, the electron transport rate was severely affected by Zn in seedlings exposed to higher Zn concentrations leading to a decrease in their maximum electronic transport rate and consequently presenting lower light saturation and lower photosynthetic efficiencies. Although light absorption capacity was not affected by Zn exposure and uptake, energy trapping flux in the photosynthetic apparatus and transport throughout the electronic chain was severely impaired. This lack of efficiency is related with non-functional Zn-chlorophylls formation. There was a strong linear correlation between exogenous Zn concentration applied and the concentration actually verified in the seedlings tissue with the concentration of both ZnChl a and b. There was also a gradual loss of connectivity between the antennae of the PSII units being this more evident at the higher Zn concentrations and thus impairing the energetic transport. The reduction in light harvesting efficiency, leads inevitably to the accumulation of redox energy inside the cells. To counteract ROS generation, all anti-oxidant enzymatic activities (except catalase) showed a proportional response to exogenous and in vivo Zn concentrations. Not only this plant appears to be highly tolerant to high Zn concentrations, but also it can overcome efficiently the damage produced during this uptake by efficiently dissipating the excessive cellular

  2. Bi-layer structure of counterstreaming energetic electron fluxes: a diagnostic tool of the acceleration mechanism in the Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available For the first time we identify a bi-layer structure of energetic electron fluxes in the Earth's magnetotail and establish (using datasets mainly obtained by the Geotail Energetic Particles and Ion Composition (EPIC/ICS instrument that it actually provides strong evidence for a purely spatial structure. Each bi-layer event is composed of two distinct layers with counterstreaming energetic electron fluxes, parallel and antiparallel to the local ambient magnetic field lines; in particular, the tailward directed fluxes always occur in a region adjacent to the lobes. Adopting the X-line as a standard reconnection model, we determine the occurrence of bi-layer events relatively to the neutral point, in the substorm frame; four (out of the shown seven events are observed earthward and three tailward, a result implying that four events probably occurred with the substorm's local recovery phase. We discuss the bi-layer events in terms of the X-line model; they add more constraints for any candidate electron acceleration mechanism. It should be stressed that until this time, none proposed electron acceleration mechanism has discussed or predicted these layered structures with all their properties. Then we discuss the bi-layer events in terms of the much promising "akis model", as introduced by Sarafopoulos (2008. The akis magnetic field topology is embedded in a thinned plasma sheet and is potentially causing charge separation. We assume that as the Rc curvature radius of the magnetic field line tends to become equal to the ion gyroradius rg, then the ions become non-adiabatic. At the limit Rc=rg the demagnetization process is also under way and the frozen-in magnetic field condition is violated by strong wave turbulence; hence, the ion particles in this geometry are stochastically scattered. In addition, ion diffusion probably takes place across the magnetic field, since an

  3. Flat band analogues and flux driven extended electronic states in a class of geometrically frustrated fractal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Atanu; Pal, Biplab; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate, by explicit construction, that a single band tight binding Hamiltonian defined on a class of deterministic fractals of the b = 3N Sierpinski type can give rise to an infinity of dispersionless, flat-band like states which can be worked out analytically using the scale invariance of the underlying lattice. The states are localized over clusters of increasing sizes, displaying the existence of a multitude of localization areas. The onset of localization can, in principle, be 'delayed' in space by an appropriate choice of the energy of the electron. A uniform magnetic field threading the elementary plaquettes of the network is shown to destroy this staggered localization and generate absolutely continuous sub-bands in the energy spectrum of these non-translationally invariant networks.

  4. Thermal shock tests with beryllium coupons in the electron beam facility JUDITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Schuster, J.L.A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Several grades of American and Russian beryllium have been tested in high heat flux tests by means of an electron beam facility. For safety reasons, major modifications of the facility had to be fulfilled in advance to the tests. The influence of energy densities has been investigated in the range between 1 and 7 MJ/m{sup 2}. In addition the influence of an increasing number of shots at constant energy density has been studied. For all samples, surface profiles have been measured before and after the experiments. Additional information has been gained from scanning electron microscopy, and from metallography.

  5. Photosynthetic acclimation to drought stress in Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck seedlings is largely dependent on thermal dissipation and enhanced electron flux to photosystem I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Huitziméngari; Trejo, Carlos; Peña-Valdivia, Cecilia B; García-Nava, Rodolfo; Conde-Martínez, F Víctor; Cruz-Ortega, Ma Del Rocío

    2014-10-01

    Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck, a crassulacean acid metabolism plant that is adapted to water-limited environments, has great potential for bioenergy production. However, drought stress decreases the requirement for light energy, and if the amount of incident light exceeds energy consumption, the photosynthetic apparatus can be injured, thereby limiting plant growth. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of drought and re-watering on the photosynthetic efficiency of A. salmiana seedlings. The leaf relative water content and leaf water potential decreased to 39.6 % and -1.1 MPa, respectively, over 115 days of water withholding and recovered after re-watering. Drought caused a direct effect on photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry in light-acclimated leaves, as indicated by a decrease in the photosynthetic electron transport rate. Additionally, down-regulation of photochemical activity occurred mainly through the inactivation of PSII reaction centres and an increased thermal dissipation capacity of the leaves. Prompt fluorescence kinetics also showed a larger pool of terminal electron acceptors in photosystem I (PSI) as well as an increase in some JIP-test parameters compared to controls, reflecting an enhanced efficiency and specific fluxes for electron transport from the plastoquinone pool to the PSI terminal acceptors. All the above parameters showed similar levels after re-watering. These results suggest that the thermal dissipation of excess energy and the increased energy conservation from photons absorbed by PSII to the reduction of PSI end acceptors may be an important acclimation mechanism to protect the photosynthetic apparatus from over-excitation in Agave plants.

  6. Critical heat flux thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, F.J. E-mail: fjk@posta.unizar.es

    2002-11-01

    Convective boiling in subcooled water flowing through a heated channel is essential in many engineering applications where high heat flux need to be accommodated, such as in the divertor plates of fusion reactors. There are many available correlations for predicting heat transfer in the individual regimes of the empirical Nukiyama boiling curve, although unfortunately there is no physical fundamentals of such curve. Recently, the author has shown that the classical entropy balance could contain key information about boiling heat transfer. So, it was found that the average thermal gap in the heated channel (the wall temperature minus the average temperature of the coolant fluid) was strongly correlated with the efficiency of a theoretical reversible engine placed in this thermal gap. In this work and from the new proposed correlation, a new expression of the wall temperature in function of the average fluid temperature is derived and successfully checked against experimental data from General Electric. This expression suggests a new and simple definition of the critical heat flux (CHF), a key parameter of the thermal-hydraulic design of fusion reactors. Finally, based on the new definition, the CHF trends are commented.

  7. The Atmospheric Response to High Nonthermal Electron Beam Fluxes in Solar Flares. I. Modeling the Brightest NUV Footpoints in the X1 Solar Flare of 2014 March 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Allred, Joel C.; Daw, Adrian; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats

    2017-02-01

    The 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare (SOL20140329T17:48) produced bright continuum emission in the far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) and highly asymmetric chromospheric emission lines, providing long-sought constraints on the heating mechanisms of the lower atmosphere in solar flares. We analyze the continuum and emission line data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the brightest flaring magnetic footpoints in this flare. We compare the NUV spectra of the brightest pixels to new radiative-hydrodynamic predictions calculated with the RADYN code using constraints on a nonthermal electron beam inferred from the collisional thick-target modeling of hard X-ray data from Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. We show that the atmospheric response to a high beam flux density satisfactorily achieves the observed continuum brightness in the NUV. The NUV continuum emission in this flare is consistent with hydrogen (Balmer) recombination radiation that originates from low optical depth in a dense chromospheric condensation and from the stationary beam-heated layers just below the condensation. A model producing two flaring regions (a condensation and stationary layers) in the lower atmosphere is also consistent with the asymmetric Fe ii chromospheric emission line profiles observed in the impulsive phase.

  8. The Atmospheric Response to High Nonthermal Electron Beam Fluxes in Solar Flares I: Modeling the Brightest NUV Footpoints in the X1 Solar Flare of 2014 March 29

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Adam F; Daw, Adrian N; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare (SOL20140329T17:48) produced bright continuum emission in the far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) and highly asymmetric chromospheric emission lines, providing long-sought constraints on the heating mechanisms of the lower atmosphere in solar flares. We analyze the continuum and emission line data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the brightest flaring magnetic footpoints in this flare. We compare the NUV spectra of the brightest pixels to new radiative-hydrodynamic predictions calculated with the RADYN code using constraints on a nonthermal electron beam inferred from the collisional thick-target modeling of hard X-ray data from RHESSI. We show that the atmospheric response to a high beam flux density satisfactorily achieves the observed continuum brightness in the NUV. The NUV continuum emission in this flare is consistent with hydrogen (Balmer) recombination radiation that originates from low optical depth in a dense chromospheric condensation and from th...

  9. Thermo-Mechanical Analyses of the High Heat Flux Component for ITER Dual Functional Lithium Lead Test Blanket Module

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hongli; BAI Yunqing

    2009-01-01

    The finite element code ANSYS is used to calculate the temperature and stress distributions for the first wall of DFLL-TBM (dual functional lithium lead-test blanket module),for testing in ITER. Preliminary analyses indicate that not only the low temperature design rules,the well-known 3Sm rules, are satisfied for the first wall, but the additional high temperature structural design criteria for the creep damage limits and creep-ratcheting limits are met as well.

  10. High Heat Flux Block Ablator-in-Honeycomb Heat Shield Using Ablator/Aerogel-Filled Foam Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultramet and ARA Ablatives Laboratory previously developed and demonstrated advanced foam-reinforced carbon/phenolic ablators that offer substantially increased high...

  11. Analysis on Relativistic Electron Flux Enhancement Event at GEO in April 2010%2010年4月地球同步轨道相对论电子增强事件分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑金磊; 钟秋珍; 陈良旭; 刘四清; 丁铸

    2012-01-01

    The relativistic electron flux enhancement event at GEO in April 2010 is analyzed in contrasting with other 6 similar events from 2004 to 2010. Solar wind and geomagnetic conditionswhich might trigger this event were analyzed. Analytical results indicate that the relatively weaker magnetic storms were prone to make the high flux part of relativistic electrons closer to GEO orbit, and whistler wave acceleration mechanism probably played important roles. The injection depth of seed electrons was closely related to magnetic storm intensity. Dst index curve is well fitted with the lower edge of higher flux region of 30-100keV electrons. The injection depth of seed electrons determined the region where mass of 〉 300 keV electrons appeared. Because of the relatively weak storms in the relativistic electron flux enhancement event, the seed electrons injected into a shallow region which was close to geosynchronous orbit, leading to relativistic electron flux abnormally enhancement in geosynchronous orbit. The intense substorms in relativistic electron flux enhancement event at GEO in April 2010, which generated sufficient seed electrons and enhanced the wave-particle interaction, was an essential factor leading to relativistic electrons flux enhancement.%为研究2010年4月地球同步轨道相对论电子通量异常增强事件的原因,选取了2004-2010年之间高速太阳风下7个类似事件进行对比分析.探讨了多种可能导致此次异常事件的太阳风和地磁条件.结果表明,较弱的磁暴使得相对论电子高通量区域更接近同步轨道,此外,哨声波加速很可能在2010年4月地球同步轨道相对论电子通量异常增强事件中起到重要作用.磁暴强度与种子电子的注入深度密切相关,表现为Dst指数曲线的形态与能量为30-100keV的电子高通量区域的下边缘高度吻合.能量为30-100keV电子的注入深度影响了能量大于300keV的电子出现的磁层区域

  12. Methane Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Methane (CH4) flux is the net rate of methane exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS LandCarbon project...

  13. Statistical analysis of energetic electron fluxes in the Earth's radiation belts under different geomagnetic activities%地球辐射带能量电子通量在不同地磁活动下的统计分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾旭东; 赵正予; 项薇; 周晨; 汪枫

    2011-01-01

    利用大约15个月的CRRES卫星MEA能量电子观测数据,分别在地磁活动平静(0≤Kp<3)、中等(3≤Kp≤6)及强烈(6<Kp≤9)的条件下,选取电子能量为148 keV,509 keV,1090 keV,1581 keV的辐射带能量电子通量进行统计分析,得到了不同地磁活动条件下地球辐射带高能电子通量在(L,MLT)空间的全球分布模型.结果表明,在2<L<8的磁层区域,高能电子通量分布在不同的地磁活动指数Kp条件下差别明显;在12~18 MLT 时段内高能电子的通量明显增大.%By utilizing the 15-month energetic electron flux data provided by the MEA instrument onboard CRRES, energetic radiation belt electron fluxes are analyzed statistically for electrons at energies of 148 keV, 509 keV, 1090 keV, and 1581 kev under periods of quiet (0≤Kp<3),moderate (3≤Kp≤6) and active (6<Kp≤9) geomagnetic activity condition, respectively. A global model of the Earth's radiation belt electron flux distribution is presented as a function of Lshell, magnetic local time (MLT) and geomagnetic activity condition. The results indicate a strong dependence of radiation belt electron omni-directional flux on the level of geomagnetic activity in the inner magnetosphere within 2<L<8. Considerable increases in energetic electron omni-directional fluxes are also shown to occur in 12~18 MLT sector.

  14. Flux pinning in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  15. Flux Pinning in Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  16. Critical heat flux performance of hypervapotrons proposed for use in the ITER divertor vertical target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youchison, D.L.; Marshall, T.D.; McDonald, J.M.; Lutz, T.J.; Watson, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Driemeyer, D.E. Kubik, D.L.; Slattery, K.T.; Hellwig, T.H. [McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Task T-222 of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program addresses the manufacturing and testing of permanent components for use in the ITER divertor. Thermalhydraulic and critical heat flux performance of the heat sinks proposed for use in the divertor vertical target are part of subtask T-222.4. As part of this effort, two single channel, medium scale, bare copper alloy, hypervapotron mockups were designed, fabricated, and tested using the EB-1200 electron beam system. The objectives of the effort were to develop the design and manufacturing procedures required for construction of robust high heat flux (HHF) components, verify thermalhydraulic, thermomechanical and critical heat flux (CHF) performance under ITER relevant conditions, and perform analyses of HHF data to identify design guidelines and failure criteria and possibly modify any applicable CHF correlations. The design, fabrication, and finite element modeling of two types of hypervapotrons are described; a common version already in use at the Joint European Torus (JET) and a new attached fin design. HHF test data on the attached fin hypervapotron will be used to compare the CHF performance under uniform heating profiles on long heated lengths with that of localized, highly peaked, off nominal profiles.

  17. Thermal shock behaviour of tungsten after high flux H-plasma loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; De Temmerman, G.; Wright, G. M.

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that transient thermal shock loads induce crack networks on tungsten samples especially at low base temperatures. To achieve test conditions which are more relevant for the performance of tungsten-armoured plasma facing components in next step thermonuclear fusion devices tungsten tiles were exposed to high flux hydrogen-plasma in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI and the high heat flux ion beam test facility MARION. Subsequently, the cyclic transient heat load tests were done in the electron beam facility JUDITH 1. The induced damages after these combined tests were examined by microscopically means, profilometry and metallography. The comparison of the obtained results and damage characteristics with those obtained after thermal shock loading show that the preloading of tungsten targets with high flux hydrogen-plasma has significant influence on the thermal shock behaviour of tungsten in terms of crack distance, width, and depth as well as cracked area. Furthermore the plasma parameters, in particular pulse duration and sample temperature during loading, have strong impact on the damage pattern after thermal shock loading.

  18. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  19. Simulation of a two step TGF ignition above cloudtops with MeV electron input fluxes generated in the electric fields of lightning streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    The origin of high energy electrons which contribute to the Runaway Electron Avalanche of a TGF are not precisely known, or yet observed, though the most obvious source would seem to be the products of cosmic ray showers, or electron avalanches generated in the high electric field near the tips of lightning leaders. With our TGF simulation software package LEPTRACK we can easily create all kinds of electric field geometries and are investigating the second scenario with combinations of lightning leader and streamer micro-fields producing electron avalanches, which may or may not be runaway, which are then input to the macro-fields expected at or above thunderstorm cloudtops.We will present the detailed evolution of photon, electron, neutron/proton and ionization density fields resulting to demonstrate the possibility that TGF origin is not one of the two models currently proposed but may be a combination of both.

  20. Manufacture of thick VPS W coatings on relatively large CuZrCr substrate and its steady high heat load performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Chunming, E-mail: denghans@126.com; Liu, Min; Yang, Zhenxiao; Deng, Changguang; Zhou, Kesong; Kuang, Ziqi; Zhang, Jifu

    2014-12-15

    W material is considered as one of potential Plasma Facing Materials (PFMs) for its high melting point, excellent stability at elevated temperature, good thermal conductivity, excellent anti-plasma sputtering and low Tritium retention. Functionally graded W/Cu coating was applied on CuCrZr substrate (250 mm × 120 mm × 30 mm) with compositionally gradient W/Cu as bond coat (0.4–0.6 mm) and 1.5 mm thick W coating as top coat via Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) for continuous deposition of 5 h. Microstructure, chemical composition, porosity and adhesive strength for as sprayed thick W coating on the CuCrZr substrate were characterized by means of SEM, ICP-MS, Mercury Intrusion Porosimeter and tensile strength tester. The steady high heat load (HHL) performance for W/Cu functional gradient coating was evaluated by high energy electron beam. The results showed that thick VPS W coated CuCrZr substrate can withstand the steady high heat load at the electron beam power density of 9 MW/m{sup 2} for 1000 cycles.

  1. Effect of solar electron temperature on pep solar neutrino flux in the chlorine solar neutrino experiment and the gallium solar neutrino experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The rate of the electron-capture reaction of proton,p+e-+p→2H+ve , is calculated considering the temperature of solar electron in the solar center instead of that of solar ion. When the solar electron temperature is two times higher than the solar ion temperature in the solar center, the capture rate pep solar neutrino predicted by the standard solar model (SSM) is decreased to (0.16±0.01) SNU from (0.22±0.01) SNU in the chlorine solar neutrino experiment, and decreased to 2.19 SNU from 3.0 SNU in the gallium solar neutrino experiment.

  2. Generation and transport of fast electrons in the interaction of high intensity laser with matter; Generation et transport des electrons rapides dans l'interaction laser-matiere a haut flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, H

    2005-10-15

    The general context of this study is the Inertial Confinement for thermonuclear controlled fusion and, more precisely, the Fast Igniter (FI). In this context the knowledge of the generation and transport of fast electrons is crucial. This thesis is an experimental study of the generation and transport of fast electrons in the interaction of a high intensity laser ({>=} 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) with a solid target. The main diagnostic used here is the transition radiation. This radiation depends on the electrons which produce it and thus it gives important information on the electrons: energy, temperature, propagation geometry, etc. The spectral, temporal and spatial analysis permitted to put in evidence the acceleration of periodic electron bunches which, in this case, emit a Coherent Transition Radiation (CTR). During this thesis we have developed some theoretical models in order to explain the experimental results. We find this way two kinds of electron bunches, emitted either at the laser frequency ({omega}{sub 0}), either at the double of this frequency (2{omega}{sub 0}), involving several acceleration mechanisms: vacuum heating / resonance absorption and Lorentz force, respectively. These bunches are also observed in the PIC (particle-in-cell) simulations. The electron temperature is of about 2 MeV in our experimental conditions. The electrons are emitted starting from a point source (which is the laser focal spot) and then propagate in a ballistic way through the target. In some cases they can be re-injected in the target by the electrostatic field from the target edges. This diagnostic is only sensitive to the coherent relativistic electrons, which explains the weak total energy that they contain (about a few mJ). The CTR signal emitted by those fast electrons is largely dominating the signal emitted by the less energetic electrons, even if they contain the major part of the energy (about 1 J). (author)

  3. Surface modifications of W divertor components for EAST during exposure to high heat loads with He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C., E-mail: lichun10@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Greuner, H. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Yuan, Y. [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhao, S.X.; Luo, G.N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Böswirth, B. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fu, B.Q.; Jia, Y.Z. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, X. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Liu, W., E-mail: liuw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Flat-type W/Cu plasma-facing components have been developed for the new generation divertor of the Chinese Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. Surface modifications of such actively water-cooled W components following short and long pulse high heat loading coupled with He particle loads with fluence of 3 × 10{sup 22} m{sup −2} have been investigated. An adiabatically loaded W block was investigated as a comparison and exposed to short pulse loads. Blistering was observed on all sample surfaces, but was less pronounced on the components than on the W block, due to the significant lower surface temperature caused by active cooling. For components, longer pulse loads gave rise to a rougher surface. Furthermore, most blisters on components are found to be less than 1 μm in diameter, with just a very few blisters larger than 1 μm, observed only in some near 〈1 1 1〉 grains.

  4. The cryogenic cooling program in high-heat-load optics at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, C.S.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes some of the aspects of the cryogenic optics program at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). A liquid-nitrogen-cooled, high-vacuum, double crystal monochromator is being fabricated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A pumping system capable of delivering a variable flow rate of up to 10 gallons per minute of pressurized liquid nitrogen and removing 5 kilowatts of x-ray power is also being constructed. This specialized pumping system and monochromator will be used to test the viability of cryogenically cooled, high-heat-load synchrotron optics. It has been determined that heat transfer enhancement will be required for optics used with APS insertion devices. An analysis of a porous-matrix-enhanced monochromator crystal is presented. For the particular case investigated, a heat transfer enhancement factor of 5 to 6 was calculated.

  5. HIGH HEATING RATES AFFECTS GREATLY THE INACTIVATION RATE OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Huertas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20ºC/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50ºC/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20ºC/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimates about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than ten times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7ºC/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing.

  6. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S.; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M.; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing. PMID:27563300

  7. Design and construction of an automatic measurement electronic system and graphical neutron flux for the subcritical reactor; Diseno y construccion de un sistema electronico automatico de medicion y graficado del flujo neutronico para el reactor subcritico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez M, J.L.; Balderas, E.G.; Rivero G, T. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) has in its installations with a nuclear subcritical reactor which was designed and constructed with the main purpose to be used in the nuclear sciences education in the Physics areas and Reactors engineering. Within the nuclear experiments that can be realized in this reactor are very interesting those about determinations of neutron and gamma fluxes spectra, since starting from these some interesting nuclear parameters can be obtained. In order to carry out this type of experiments different radioactive sources are used which exceed the permissible doses by far to human beings. Therefore it is necessary the remote handling as of the source as of detectors used in different experiments. In this work it is presented the design of an electronic system which allows the different positions inside of the tank of subcritical reactor at ININ over the radial and axial axes in manual or automatic ways. (Author)

  8. Flux-P: Automating Metabolic Flux Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ebert, Birgitta E.; Anna-Lena Lamprecht; Bernhard Steffen; Blank, Lars M.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in ...

  9. Heat flux and plasma flow in the scrape off layer on the spherical tokamak QUEST with inboard poloidal field null configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onchi, Takumi; Zushi, Hideki; Mishra, Kishore; Hanada, Kazuaki; Idei, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Fujisawa, Akihide; Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Makoto; Kuzmin, Arseny; Nagaoka, Kenichi; QUEST Team

    2014-10-01

    Heat flux and plasma flow in the scrape off layer (SOL) are examined in the inboard poloidal null (IPN) configuration on the spherical tokamak (ST) QUEST. In the ST, trapped energetic electrons on the low field side are widely excursed from the last closed flux surface to SOL so that significant heat loss occurs. Interestingly, plasma flows in the core and the SOL are also observed in IPN though no inductive force like ohmic heating is applied. High heat flux (>1 MW/m2) and sonic flow (M > 1) in far-SOL arise in current ramp-up phase. In quasi-steady state, sawtooth-like oscillation of plasma current with 20 Hz has been observed. Heat flux and subsonic plasma flow in far-SOL are well correlated to plasma current oscillation. The toroidal Mach number largely increases from Mφ ~ 0.1 to ~ 0.5 and drops although the amplitude of plasma current is about 10% of that. Note that such flow modification occurs before plasma current crash, there may be some possibility that phenomena in the SOL or the edge trigger reactions in the core plasma. This work is supported by Grants-in-aid for Scientific Research (S24226020), NIFS Collaboration Research Program (NIFS12KUTR081), and the Collaborative Research Program of Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University.

  10. Revisiting Kadenbach: Electron flux rate through cytochrome c‐oxidase determines the ATP‐inhibitory effect and subsequent production of ROS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhiel, Annika; Weber, Petra; Ramzan, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is the predominant source of ATP. Excessive rates of electron transport cause a higher production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS). There are two regulatory mechanisms known. The first, according to Mitchel, is dependent on the mitochondrial membrane potential that drives ATP synthase for ATP production, and the second, the Kadenbach mechanism, is focussed on the binding of ATP to Cytochrome c Oxidase (CytOx) at high ATP/ADP ratios, which results in an allosteric conformational change to CytOx, causing inhibition. In times of stress, ATP‐dependent inhibition is switched off and the activity of CytOx is exclusively determined by the membrane potential, leading to an increase in ROS production. The second mechanism for respiratory control depends on the quantity of electron transfer to the Heme aa3 of CytOx. When ATP is bound to CytOx the enzyme is inhibited, and ROS formation is decreased, although the mitochondrial membrane potential is increased. PMID:27171124

  11. Revisiting Kadenbach: Electron flux rate through cytochrome c-oxidase determines the ATP-inhibitory effect and subsequent production of ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Sebastian; Rhiel, Annika; Weber, Petra; Ramzan, Rabia

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is the predominant source of ATP. Excessive rates of electron transport cause a higher production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS). There are two regulatory mechanisms known. The first, according to Mitchel, is dependent on the mitochondrial membrane potential that drives ATP synthase for ATP production, and the second, the Kadenbach mechanism, is focussed on the binding of ATP to Cytochrome c Oxidase (CytOx) at high ATP/ADP ratios, which results in an allosteric conformational change to CytOx, causing inhibition. In times of stress, ATP-dependent inhibition is switched off and the activity of CytOx is exclusively determined by the membrane potential, leading to an increase in ROS production. The second mechanism for respiratory control depends on the quantity of electron transfer to the Heme aa3 of CytOx. When ATP is bound to CytOx the enzyme is inhibited, and ROS formation is decreased, although the mitochondrial membrane potential is increased.

  12. Aromatic substitution of the FAD-shielding tryptophan reveals its differential role in regulating electron flux in methionine synthase reductase and cytochrome P450 reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meints, Carla E; Simtchouk, Svetlana; Wolthers, Kirsten R

    2013-03-01

    Methionine synthase reductase (MSR) and cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) transfer reducing equivalents from NADPH via an FAD and FMN cofactor to a redox partner protein. In both enzymes, hydride transfer from NADPH to FAD requires displacement of a conserved tryptophan that lies coplanar to the FAD isoalloxazine ring. Swapping the tryptophan for a smaller aromatic side chain revealed a distinct role for the residue in regulating MSR and CPR catalysis. MSR W697F and W697Y showed enhanced catalysis, noted by increases in kcat and k(cat)/K(m)(NADPH) for steady-state cytochrome c(3+) reduction and a 10-fold increase in the rate constant (k(obs1)) associated with hydride transfer. Elevated primary kinetic isotope effects on k(obs1) for W697F and W697Y suggest that preceding isotopically insensitive steps like displacement of W697 are less rate determining. MSR W697Y, but not MSR W697F, showed detectable formation of the disemiquinone intermediate, indicating that the polarity of the aromatic side chain influences the rate of interflavin electron transfer. By contrast, the CPR variants (W676F and W676Y) displayed modest decreases in cytochrome c(3+) reduction, a 30- and 3.5-fold decrease in the rate of FAD reduction, accumulation of a FADH2 -NADP(+) charge-transfer complex and dramatically suppressed rates of interflavin electron transfer. We conclude for MSR that hydride transfer is 'gated' by the free energy required to disrupt dispersion forces between the FAD isoalloxazine ring and W697. By contrast, the bulky indole ring of W676 accelerates catalysis in CPR by lowering the energy barrier for displacement of the oxidized nicotinamide ring coplanar with the FAD.

  13. Calorimeter probes for measuring high thermal flux. [in electric-arc jet facilities for planetary entry heating simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes expendable, slug-type calorimeter probes developed for measuring high heat-flux levels of 10-30 kW/sq cm in electric-arc jet facilities. The probes are constructed with thin tungsten caps mounted on Teflon bodies; the temperature of the back surface of the tungsten cap is measured, and its rate of change gives the steady-state, absorbed heat flux as the calorimeter probe heats to destruction when inserted into the arc jet. It is concluded that the simple construction of these probes allows them to be expendable and heated to destruction to obtain a measurable temperature slope at high heating rates.

  14. High heat transfer oxidizer heat exchanger design and analysis. [RL10-2B engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmiec, Thomas D.; Kanic, Paul G.; Peckham, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The RL10-2B engine, a derivative of the RL10, is capable of multimode thrust operation. This engine operates at two low thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), which is approximately 1 to 2% of full thrust, and pumped idle (PI), which is 10% of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient engine thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank pre-pressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-2B engine during the low thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidizer heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. The design, concept verification testing and analysis for such a heat exchanger is discussed. The design presented uses a high efficiency compact core to vaporize the oxygen, and in the self-contained unit, attenuates any pressure and flow oscillations which result from unstable boiling in the core. This approach is referred to as the high heat transfer design. An alternative approach which prevents unstable boiling of the oxygen by limiting the heat transfer is referred to as the low heat transfer design and is reported in Pratt & Whitney report FR-19135-2.

  15. Investigation of vacuum properties of CuCrZr alloy for high-heat-load absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shueh, C.; Chan, C. K.; Chang, C. C.; Sheng, I. C.

    2017-01-01

    The Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) uses high-heat-load (HHL) absorbers to protect downstream ultrahigh-vacuum chambers from overheating. In this work, we propose to use the CuCrZr alloy (ASTM C18150) for the HHL absorber body and the ConFlat flanges. We use the throughput method to measure the thermal outgassing rate and a helium leak detector to verify the vacuum seal between the CuCrZr alloy and stainless-steel flanges. The measured outgassing rate of the CuCrZr alloy was 5.8×10-10 Pa m/s after 72 h of pumping and decreased to 2.0 × 10-10 Pa m/s after 100 h of pumping. The leak rate through the vacuum seal between a CuCrZr flange and a stainless-steel flange was less than 1 × 10-10 Pa m3/s even after mounting and unmounting the flanges ten times and baking them at 250 °C. These results indicate that CuCrZr alloy is suitable for integrating HHL components with ConFlat CuCrZr flanges for the absorption of the synchrotron radiation generated by the TPS.

  16. The Topology of Canonical Flux Tubes in Flared Jet Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander Lavine, Eric; You, Setthivoine

    2017-01-01

    Magnetized plasma jets are generally modeled as magnetic flux tubes filled with flowing plasma governed by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We outline here a more fundamental approach based on flux tubes of canonical vorticity, where canonical vorticity is defined as the circulation of the species’ canonical momentum. This approach extends the concept of magnetic flux tube evolution to include the effects of finite particle momentum and enables visualization of the topology of plasma jets in regimes beyond MHD. A flared, current-carrying magnetic flux tube in an ion-electron plasma with finite ion momentum is thus equivalent to either a pair of electron and ion flow flux tubes, a pair of electron and ion canonical momentum flux tubes, or a pair of electron and ion canonical vorticity flux tubes. We examine the morphology of all these flux tubes for increasing electrical currents, different radial current profiles, different electron Mach numbers, and a fixed, flared, axisymmetric magnetic geometry. Calculations of gauge-invariant relative canonical helicities track the evolution of magnetic, cross, and kinetic helicities in the system, and show that ion flow fields can unwind to compensate for an increasing magnetic twist. The results demonstrate that including a species’ finite momentum can result in a very long collimated canonical vorticity flux tube even if the magnetic flux tube is flared. With finite momentum, particle density gradients must be normal to canonical vorticities, not to magnetic fields, so observations of collimated astrophysical jets could be images of canonical vorticity flux tubes instead of magnetic flux tubes.

  17. Flux-P: Automating Metabolic Flux Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta E. Ebert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in this complex analysis, but requires several steps that have to be carried out manually, hence restricting the use of this software for data interpretation to a rather small number of experiments. In this paper, we present Flux-P as an approach to automate and standardize 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, using the Bio-jETI workflow framework. Exemplarily based on the FiatFlux software, it demonstrates how services can be created that carry out the different analysis steps autonomously and how these can subsequently be assembled into software workflows that perform automated, high-throughput intracellular flux analysis of high quality and reproducibility. Besides significant acceleration and standardization of the data analysis, the agile workflow-based realization supports flexible changes of the analysis workflows on the user level, making it easy to perform custom analyses.

  18. A Comparative Study on the Critical Heat Flux Characteristics of Oxidized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Hun; Park, Sung Seek; Kim, Woo Joong; Kim, Nam Jin [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Boiling heat transfer is one of the most important processes in the various industries such as power generation, heat exchangers, cooling of high-power electronics components and cooling of nuclear reactors. The critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon is signified the thermal limit during a boiling heat transfer. The heat transfer coefficient before the CHF is high enough to attain a high heat flux at a relatively low surface heat. However, the heat transfer coefficient remarkably decreases after the CHF occurs therefore the heating surface temperature of heat-transfer apparatus should be greatly increased. This induces risk of physical failure of heat transfer apparatus. Therefore, enhancement of CHF is essential for safety and economic efficiency of heat transfer system. In this study, the CHF characteristics of oxidized carbon nanotube and graphene nanofluids under the pool boiling state were comparative analysis. The pool boiling CHF experiments of oxidized carbon nanotube and graphene nanofluids carried out by the various concentrations. All of the two types of nanofluids showed higher CHF than the pure water. The result shows that the CHF of oxidized graphene nanofluids is higher than the oxidized carbon nanotube nanfluids.

  19. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  20. Effect of oxygen on the production of abnormally high heats of interaction with hydrogen chemisorbed on gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groszek, A.J., E-mail: info@microscal.com [Microscal Limited, 79 Southern Row, London W10 5AL (United Kingdom); Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Science, ul.Niezapominajek 8, Krakow 30-239 (Poland); Lalik, E. [Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Science, ul.Niezapominajek 8, Krakow 30-239 (Poland)

    2011-02-01

    Abnormally high heats, exceeding 1600 kJ/mol (16 eV) per molecular oxygen, are generated by interaction of the oxygen with the hydrogen adsorbed on gold surfaces at 125 deg. C. The highest heats were observed during the interactions of fine gold particles supported on titanium oxide, approaching 1700 kJ/mol for three consecutive 100 nmol pulses of O{sub 2} interacting with the adsorbed hydrogen atoms. The heats rapidly decrease after the hydrogen is consumed. It was also observed that the interactions of the gold particles with pure oxygen in the presence of noble gases, such as argon and helium, produced the heats markedly higher than those observed in the absence of noble gases. The abnormally high heats revealed by this work reach values from 3.5 to 6.1 times higher than the heats of formation of gaseous water from molecular hydrogen and oxygen.

  1. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  2. Development of a high-heat flux cooling element with potential application in a near-term fusion power plant divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Jack Robert, E-mail: jack.nicholas@eng.ox.ac.uk [Osney Thermo-Fluids Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Ireland, Peter [Osney Thermo-Fluids Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Hancock, David [CCFE, Culham, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Robertson, Dan [Rolls-Royce Plc., Derby, Derbyshire (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Laminate jet impingement system introduced for high pressure operation (17 MPa+). • Numerical thermo-fluid analysis on baseline geometry. • Cascade impingement shown to reduce divertor mass flow rate requirements and increase fluid temperature change. • Numerical thermo-fluid analysis validated using scaled experiments with air. - Abstract: A low temperature jet impingement based heat sink module has been developed for potential application in a near-term fusion power plant divertor. The design is composed of a number of hexagonal CuCrZr sheets bonded together in a stack to form a laminate structure. This method allows the production of complex flow paths using relatively simple manufacturing techniques. The thermo-fluid performance of a baseline design employing cascade jet impingement has been assessed and compared to a non-cascade case. Experimental validation of the numerical work was carried out on a scaled model using air as the working fluid. Local heat transfer coefficients were obtained on the surface using surface temperature data from thermochromic liquid crystals.

  3. Continued Optimization of Low-Density Foam-Reinforced Ablatives for High-Velocity, High Heat Flux Earth Return Missions, Phase II Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In previous work for NASA, Ultramet and ARA Ablatives Laboratory developed and demonstrated advanced foam-reinforced carbon/phenolic ablators that offer...

  4. Continued Optimization of Low-Density Foam-Reinforced Ablatives for High-Velocity, High Heat Flux Earth Return Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In previous work for NASA, Ultramet and ARA Ablatives Laboratory developed and demonstrated advanced foam-reinforced carbon/phenolic ablators that offer...

  5. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  6. Patterns of Flux Emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title, A.; Cheung, M.

    2008-05-01

    The high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Solar Optical Telescope on the JAXA Hinode spacecraft have allowed capturing many examples of magnetic flux emergence from the scale of granulation to active regions. The observed patterns of emergence are quite similar. Flux emerges as a array of small bipoles on scales from 1 to 5 arc seconds throughout the region that the flux eventually condenses. Because the fields emerging from the underlying flux rope my appear many in small segments and the total flux (absolute sum) is not a conserved quantity the amount of total flux on the surface may vary significantly during the emergence process. Numerical simulations of flux emergence exhibit patterns similar to observations. Movies of both observations and numerical simulations will be presented.

  7. Design and performance test of miniature capillary pumped loop for electronics cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万珍平; 皮丕辉; 付永清; 汤勇

    2008-01-01

    Considering two characteristics of compact heat dissipation room and high heat flux, a novel miniature capillary pumped loop (MCPL) for electronics cooling was proposed. MCPL consists of evaporator, condenser, vapor and liquid line dissipates heat by boiling and condensation of working fluids with no extra power consumption. Working fluid circulation is ensured by vapor pressure and capillary head. Saturated wick screens vapor and liquid, and ensures one-way flow of working fluid with no extra valve. In order to promote heat dissipation capacity of MCPL, the intensified boiling and condensation structures are embedded into evaporator and condenser respectively, which are useful to increasing boiling and condensation efficiency. Startup and run characteristics are tested by experiments in the condition of different power inputs and working fluids. MCPL is capable of dissipating 80 W of thermal energy and keeping the bottom substrate temperature of evaporator at 80 ℃.

  8. Preparation and Property Study of Graphene Oxide Reinforced Epoxy Resin Insulation Nanocomposites with High Heat Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xinran; Liu, Yongchang; Wu, Zhixiong; Liu, Huiming; Zhang, Zhong; Huang, Rongjin; Huang, Chuanjun; Liu, Zheng; Li, Laifeng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide reinforced epoxy resin nanocomposites were successfully prepared. Compared with unmodified epoxy resin, the heat conductivity of the graphene oxide reinforced epoxy resin nanocomposites had been improved while keeping the insulation performance. The tensile strength was investigated at both room temperature (300 K) and liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). And the fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the materials had excellent mechanical properties, which could be advantages for the applications as insulating layer in low temperature superconducting magnets.

  9. Prompt atmospheric neutrino flux

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Yu Seon; Enberg, Rikard; Kim, C S; Reno, Mary Hall; Sarcevic, Ina; Stasto, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the prompt atmospheric neutrino flux including nuclear correction and $B$ hadron contribution in the different frameworks: NLO perturbative QCD and dipole models. The nuclear effect is larger in the prompt neutrino flux than in the total charm production cross section, and it reduces the fluxes by $10\\% - 30\\%$ depending on the model. We also investigate the uncertainty using the QCD scales allowed by the charm cross section data from RHIC and LHC experiments.

  10. A Novel High-Heat Transfer Low-NO{sub x} Natural Gas Combustion System. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, H.

    2004-01-01

    A novel high-heat transfer low NO(sub x) natural gas combustion system. The objectives of this program are to research, develop, test, and commercialize a novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system for oxygen-, oxygen-enriched air, and air-fired furnaces. This technology will improve the process efficiency (productivity and product quality) and the energy efficiency of high-temperature industrial furnaces by at least 20%. GTI's high-heat transfer burner has applications in high-temperature air, oxygen-enriched air, and oxygen furnaces used in the glass, metals, cement, and other industries. Development work in this program is focused on using this burner to improve the energy efficiency and productivity of glass melting furnaces that are major industrial energy consumers. The following specific project objectives are defined to provide a means of achieving the overall project objectives. (1) Identify topics to be covered, problems requiring attention, equipment to be used in the program, and test plans to be followed in Phase II and Phase III. (2) Use existing codes to develop models of gas combustion and soot nucleation and growth as well as a thermodynamic and parametric description of furnace heat transfer issues. (3) Conduct a parametric study to confirm the increase in process and energy efficiency. (4) Design and fabricate a high-heat transfer low-NOx natural gas burners for laboratory, pilot- and demonstration-scale tests. (5) Test the high-heat transfer burner in one of GTI's laboratory-scale high-temperature furnaces. (6) Design and demonstrate the high-heat transfer burner on GTI's unique pilot-scale glass tank simulator. (7) Complete one long term demonstration test of this burner technology on an Owens Corning full-scale industrial glass melting furnace. (8) Prepare an Industrial Adoption Plan. This Plan will be updated in each program Phase as additional information becomes available. The Plan will include

  11. Three-Dimensional Porous Copper-Graphene Heterostructures with Durability and High Heat Dissipation Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Hokyun; Lee, Seungmin; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Tae-Wook; Lee, Dong Su; Lee, Hyun Jung; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Jeong, Tak; Kim, Sungmin; Ha, Jun-Seok; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2015-08-03

    Porous materials have historically been of interest for a wide range of applications in thermal management, for example, in heat exchangers and thermal barriers. Rapid progress in electronic and optoelectronic technology necessitates more efficient spreading and dissipation of the heat generated in these devices, calling for the development of new thermal management materials. Here, we report an effective technique for the synthesis of porous Cu-graphene heterostructures with pores of about 30 μm and a porosity of 35%. Graphene layers were grown on the surfaces of porous Cu, which was formed via the coalescence of molten Cu microparticles. The surface passivation with graphene layers resulted in a thermal conductivity higher than that of porous Cu, especially at high temperatures (approximately 40% at 1173 K). The improved heat dissipation properties of the porous structures were demonstrated by analysis of the thermal resistance and temperature distribution of LED chips mounted on the structures. The effective combination of the structural and material properties of porous Cu-graphene heterostructures provides a new material for effective thermal management of high-power electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  12. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort.

  13. Video Meteor Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  14. Effect of low and high heating rates on reaction path of Ni(V)/Al multilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maj, Łukasz, E-mail: l.maj@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Morgiel, Jerzy; Szlezynger, Maciej [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Bała, Piotr; Cios, Grzegorz [AGH University of Science and Technology, Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, 30 Kawiory St., 30-055 Kraków (Poland)

    2017-06-01

    The effect of heating rates of Ni(V)/Al NanoFoils{sup ®} was investigated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Ni(V)/Al were subjected to heating by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in-situ TEM or electric pulse. Local chemical analysis was carried out using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Phase analysis was done with X-ray diffractions (XRD) and selected area electron diffractions (SAED). The experiments showed that slow heating in DSC results in development of separate exothermic effects at ∼230 °C, ∼280 °C and ∼390 °C, corresponding to precipitation of Al{sub 3}Ni, Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} and NiAl phases, respectively, i.e. like in vanadium free Ni/Al multilayers. Further heating to 700 °C allowed to obtain a single phase NiAl foil. The average grain size (g.s.) of NiAl phase produced in the DSC heat treated foil was comparable with the Ni(V)/Al multilayer period (∼50 nm), whereas in the case of reaction initiated with electric pulse the g.s. was in the micrometer range. Upon slow heating vanadium tends to segregate to zones parallel to the original multilayer internal interfaces, while in SHS process vanadium-rich phases precipitates at grain boundaries of the NiAl phase. - Highlights: • Peaks in DSC heating of Ni(V)/Al were explained by in-situ TEM observations. • Nucleation of Al{sub 3}Ni, Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} and NiAl at slow heating of Ni(V)/Al was documented. • Near surface NiAl obtained from NanoFoil show Ag precipitates at grain boundaries.

  15. Influence of particle flux on morphology changes of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzi, Luxherta; Schweer, Bernd; Terra, Alexis; Unterberg, Bernhard [Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Juelich (Germany); Temmerman, Greg de [FOM-DIFFER, Association EURATOM-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Oost, Guido van [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    Tungsten is currently considered as the main candidate material for high heat flux components of future fusion devices. Bombardment of tungsten surfaces by large fluences of low energy particles such as hydrogen isotopes and helium can lead to strong microstructural changes which are mechanically unstable. The occurrence of those effects is strongly dependent on the surface temperature and particle flux. In this contribution we present the experiments done at PSI-2 linear plasma device in order to generate surface modifications on tungsten. The power flux density delivered to the target at PSI-2 is up to 2 MWm{sup -2} and the ion flux density is of the order of 10{sup 22}-10{sup 23} m{sup -2}s{sup -1}. A dedicated actively heated sample holder was designed and tested in order to provide the required temperature range from 300 K to 1800 K. We present here the first measurements performed at PSI-2 whereas subsequent experiments are foreseen at Pilot-PSI and MAGNUM-PSI linear plasma devices with higher flux densities up to 10{sup 25} m{sup -2}s{sup -1}.

  16. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H. [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Akiba, M. [Naka Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop of plasma facing components which can resist these. Then, we have established electron beam heat facility ({open_quotes}OHBIS{close_quotes}, Oarai Hot-cell electron Beam Irradiating System) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30kV (constant) and 1.7A, respectively. The loading time of electron beam is more than 0.1ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the mainly dimensions are 500mm in inner diameter, 1000mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10{sup -4}Pa. At present, the facility for thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. And performance estimation on the electron beam is being conducted. Presently, the devices for heat loading tests under steady state will be added to this facility.

  17. Correlations and adsorption mechanisms of aromatic compounds on a high heat temperature treated bamboo biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Yang, Jingjing; Jiang, Yuan; Wu, Wenhao; Lin, Daohui

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nitrobenzenes, phenols, and anilines, on a bamboo biochar produced at 700 °C (Ba700) was investigated with the mechanism discussion by isotherm fitting using the Polanyi-theory based Dubinin-Ashtakhov (DA) model. Correlations of adsorption capacity (Q(0)) of organic compounds with their molecular sizes and melting points, as well as correlations of adsorption affinity (E) with their solvatochromic parameters (i.e., π* and αm), on the biochar, were developed and indicating that adsorption is captured by the pore filling mechanism and derived from the hydrophobic effects of organic compounds and the forming of π-π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interactions and hydrogen bonding interactions of organic molecules with surface sites of the biochar. The effects of organic molecular sizes and melting points on adsorption capacity are ascribed to the molecular sieving effect and the packing efficiency of the organic molecules in the biochar pores, respectively. These correlations can be used to quantitatively estimate the adsorption of organic compounds on biochars from their commonly physicochemical properties including solvatochromic parameters, melting points and molecular cross-sectional area. The prediction using these correlations is important for assessing the unknown adsorption behaviors of new organic compounds and also helpful to guide the surface modification of biochars and make targeted selection in the environmental applications of biochars as adsorbents.

  18. Characterization of ion fluxes and heat fluxes for PMI relevant conditions on Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Clyde; Shaw, Guinevere; Biewer, Theodore; Rapp, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    Plasma characterization, in particular, particle flux and electron and ion temperature distributions nearest to an exposed target, are critical to quantifying Plasma Surface Interaction (PSI). In the Proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), the ion fluxes and heat fluxes are derived from double Langmuir Probes (DLP) and Thomson Scattering in front of the target assuming Bohm conditions at the sheath entrance. Power fluxes derived from ne and Te measurements are compared to heat fluxes measured with IR thermography. The comparison will allow conclusions on the sheath heat transmission coefficient to be made experimentally. Different experimental conditions (low and high density plasmas (0.5 - 6 x 1019 m-3) with different magnetic configuration are compared. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  19. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boosted Fast Flux Loop Project Staff

    2009-09-01

    The Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) project was initiated to determine basic feasibility of designing, constructing, and installing in a host irradiation facility, an experimental vehicle that can replicate with reasonable fidelity the fast-flux test environment needed for fuels and materials irradiation testing for advanced reactor concepts. Originally called the Gas Test Loop (GTL) project, the activity included (1) determination of requirements that must be met for the GTL to be responsive to potential users, (2) a survey of nuclear facilities that may successfully host the GTL, (3) conceptualizing designs for hardware that can support the needed environments for neutron flux intensity and energy spectrum, atmosphere, flow, etc. needed by the experimenters, and (4) examining other aspects of such a system, such as waste generation and disposal, environmental concerns, needs for additional infrastructure, and requirements for interfacing with the host facility. A revised project plan included requesting an interim decision, termed CD-1A, that had objectives of' establishing the site for the project at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), deferring the CD 1 application, and authorizing a research program that would resolve the most pressing technical questions regarding GTL feasibility, including issues relating to the use of booster fuel in the ATR. Major research tasks were (1) hydraulic testing to establish flow conditions through the booster fuel, (2) mini-plate irradiation tests and post-irradiation examination to alleviate concerns over corrosion at the high heat fluxes planned, (3) development and demonstration of booster fuel fabrication techniques, and (4) a review of the impact of the GTL on the ATR safety basis. A revised cooling concept for the apparatus was conceptualized, which resulted in renaming the project to the BFFL. Before the subsequent CD-1 approval request could be made, a decision was made in April

  20. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  1. Aeronet Solar Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SolRad-Net (Solar Radiation Network) is an established network of ground-based sensors providing high-frequency solar flux measurements in quasi-realtime to the...

  2. Flux in Tallinn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise elektroonilise kunsti sümpoosioni ISEA2004 klubiõhtu "Flux in Tallinn" klubis Bon Bon. Eestit esindasid Ropotator, Ars Intel Inc., Urmas Puhkan, Joel Tammik, Taavi Tulev (pseud. Wochtzchee). Klubiõhtu koordinaator Andres Lõo

  3. Flux in Tallinn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise elektroonilise kunsti sümpoosioni ISEA2004 klubiõhtu "Flux in Tallinn" klubis Bon Bon. Eestit esindasid Ropotator, Ars Intel Inc., Urmas Puhkan, Joel Tammik, Taavi Tulev (pseud. Wochtzchee). Klubiõhtu koordinaator Andres Lõo

  4. Nitrous Oxide Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Nitrous Oxide (N20) flux is the net rate of nitrous oxide exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS...

  5. Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The...

  6. Flux Emergence (Theory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Mark C. M.; Isobe, Hiroaki

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic flux emergence from the solar convection zone into the overlying atmosphere is the driver of a diverse range of phenomena associated with solar activity. In this article, we introduce theoretical concepts central to the study of flux emergence and discuss how the inclusion of different physical effects (e.g., magnetic buoyancy, magnetoconvection, reconnection, magnetic twist, interaction with ambient field) in models impact the evolution of the emerging field and plasma.

  7. Theoretical magnetic flux emergence

    OpenAIRE

    MacTaggart, David

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic flux emergence is the subject of how magnetic fields from the solar interior can rise and expand into the atmosphere to produce active regions. It is the link that joins dynamics in the convection zone with dynamics in the atmosphere. In this thesis, we study many aspects of magnetic flux emergence through mathematical modelling and computer simulations. Our primary aim is to understand the key physical processes that lie behind emergence. The first chapter intro...

  8. Flux Emergence (Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C. M. Cheung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic flux emergence from the solar convection zone into the overlying atmosphere is the driver of a diverse range of phenomena associated with solar activity. In this article, we introduce theoretical concepts central to the study of flux emergence and discuss how the inclusion of different physical effects (e.g., magnetic buoyancy, magnetoconvection, reconnection, magnetic twist, interaction with ambient field in models impact the evolution of the emerging field and plasma.

  9. A novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system. Phase 1 final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rue, D.M. [Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Fridman, A. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (United States); Viskanta, R. [Purdue Univ. (United States); Neff, D. [Cumbustion Tec, Inc. (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Phase I of the project focused on acquiring the market needs, modeling, design, and test plan information for a novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system. All goals and objectives were achieved. The key component of the system is an innovative burner technology which combines high temperature natural gas preheating with soot formation and subsequent soot burnout in the flame, increases the system`s energy efficiency and furnace throughput, while minimizing the furnace air emissions, all without external parasitic systems. Work has included identifying industry`s needs and constraints, modeling the high luminosity burner system, designing the prototype burner for initial laboratory-scale testing, defining the test plan, adapting the burner technology to meet the industry`s needs and constraints, and outlining the Industrial Adoption Plan.

  10. High-heat-load monochromator options for the RIXS beamline at the APS with the MBA lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zunping, E-mail: zpliu@anl.gov; Gog, Thomas, E-mail: gog@aps.anl.gov; Stoupin, Stanislav A.; Upton, Mary H.; Ding, Yang; Kim, Jung-Ho; Casa, Diego M.; Said, Ayman H.; Carter, Jason A.; Navrotski, Gary [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    With the MBA lattice for APS-Upgrade, tuning curves of 2.6 cm period undulators meet the source requirements for the RIXS beamline. The high-heat-load monochromator (HHLM) is the first optical white beam component. There are four options for the HHLM such as diamond monochromators with refrigerant of either water or liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}), and silicon monochromators of either direct or indirect cooling system. Their performances are evaluated at energy 11.215 keV (Ir L-III edge). The cryo-cooled diamond monochromator has similar performance as the water-cooled diamond monochromator because GaIn of the Cu-GaIn-diamond interface becomes solid. The cryo-cooled silicon monochromators perform better, not only in terms of surface slope error due to thermal deformation, but also in terms of thermal capacity.

  11. Fatty acids composition as a means to estimate the high heating value (HHV) of vegetable oils and biodiesel fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fassinou, Wanignon Ferdinand; Koua, Kamenan Blaise; Toure, Siaka [Laboratoire d' Energie Solaire, UFR-SSMT, Universite de Cocody (Cote d' Ivoire), 22BP582 Abidjan 22 (Ivory Coast); Sako, Aboubakar; Fofana, Alhassane [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Atmosphere et de Mecanique des Fluides, UFR-SSMT, Universite de Cocody (Cote d' Ivoire), 22BP582 Abidjan 22 (Ivory Coast)

    2010-12-15

    High heating value (HHV) is an important property which characterises the energy content of a fuel such as solid, liquid and gaseous fuels. The previous assertion is particularly important for vegetable oils and biodiesels fuels which are expected to replace fossil oils. Estimation of the HHV of vegetable oils and biodiesels by using their fatty acid composition is the aim of this paper. The comparison between the HHVs predicted by the method and those obtained experimentally gives an average bias error of -0.84% and an average absolute error of 1.71%. These values show the utility, the validity and the applicability of the method to vegetable oils and their derivatives. (author)

  12. History of the development and industrial production of low thermal emissivity coatings for high heat insulating glass units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gläser, Hans J

    2008-05-01

    Low-emissivity (low-E) coatings play a dominate role in high heat insulating multiple glass units with which an essential part of heat energy can be saved in buildings. With such coatings as the main part, and to a lesser part with low thermal conductive filling gases of the units' interspaces, their heat transmittance can be reduced from 6.0 W/m(2)? K for a single glazing--still glazed to a high degree--to 0.4 W/m(2) K for a triple insulating glass unit. This astonishing development is regarded as one of the most important innovations of the flat glass industry in the past century. The roots of low-E coatings in the 1960s, their startup for production in the 1970s, and, most important, further development steps accompanied by, and partly also codesigned actively by the author, are depicted.

  13. The Flux-Flux Correlation Function for Anharmonic Barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Goussev, Arseni; Waalkens, Holger; Wiggins, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The flux-flux correlation function formalism is a standard and widely used approach for the computation of reaction rates. In this paper we introduce a method to compute the classical and quantum flux-flux correlation functions for anharmonic barriers essentially analytically through the use of the classical and quantum normal forms. In the quantum case we show that the quantum normal form reduces the computation of the flux-flux correlation function to that of an effective one dimensional anharmonic barrier. The example of the computation of the quantum flux-flux correlation function for a fourth order anharmonic barrier is worked out in detail, and we present an analytical expression for the quantum mechanical microcanonical flux-flux correlation function. We then give a discussion of the short-time and harmonic limits.

  14. Protected Flux Pairing Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Matthew; Zhang, Wenyuan; Ioffe, Lev; Gershenson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the coherent flux tunneling in a qubit containing two submicron Josephson junctions shunted by a superinductor (a dissipationless inductor with an impedance much greater than the resistance quantum). The two low energy quantum states of this device, " open="|"> 0 and " open="|"> 1, are represented by even and odd number of fluxes in the loop, respectively. This device is dual to the charge pairing Josephson rhombi qubit. The spectrum of the device, studied by microwave spectroscopy, reflects the interference between coherent quantum phase slips in the two junctions (the Aharonov-Casher effect). The time domain measurements demonstrate the suppression of the qubit's energy relaxation in the protected regime, which illustrates the potential of this flux pairing device as a protected quantum circuit. Templeton Foundation, NSF, and ARO.

  15. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boris Filippov; Olesya Martsenyuk; Abhishek K. Srivastava; Wahab Uddin

    2015-03-01

    In the early 1990s, it was found that the strongest disturbances of the space–weather were associated with huge ejections of plasma from the solar corona, which took the form of magnetic clouds when moved from the Sun. It is the collisions of the magnetic clouds with the Earth's magnetosphere that lead to strong, sometimes catastrophic changes in space–weather. The onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is sudden and no reliable forerunners of CMEs have been found till date. The CME prediction methodologies are less developed compared to the methods developed for the prediction of solar flares. The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they lose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading, etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field, which is estimated as decay index (). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are, therefore, good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by a comparison of observed filament heights with calculated decay index distributions. The present paper reviews the formation of magnetic flux ropes, their stable and unstable phases, eruption conditions, and also discusses their physical implications in the solar corona.

  16. Flux-Feedback Magnetic-Suspension Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1990-01-01

    Flux-feedback magnetic-suspension actuator provides magnetic suspension and control forces having linear transfer characteristics between force command and force output over large range of gaps. Hall-effect devices used as sensors for electronic feedback circuit controlling currents flowing in electromagnetic windings to maintain flux linking suspended element at substantially constant value independent of changes in length of gap. Technique provides effective method for maintenance of constant flux density in gap and simpler than previous methods. Applications include magnetic actuators for control of shapes and figures of antennas and of precise segmented reflectors, magnetic suspensions in devices for storage of angular momentum and/or kinetic energy, and systems for control, pointing, and isolation of instruments.

  17. Suppression of Electron Thermal Conduction in High $\\beta$ Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Roberg-Clark, G T; Reynolds, C S; Swisdak, M

    2016-01-01

    Electron heat conduction is explored with particle-in-cell simulations and analytic modeling in a high $\\beta$ system relevant to galaxy clusters. Linear wave theory reveals that whistler waves are driven unstable by electron heat flux even when the heat flux is weak. The resonant interaction of electrons with these waves plays a critical role in controlling the impact of the waves on the heat flux. In a 1D model only electrons moving opposite in direction to the heat flux resonate with the waves and electron heat flux is only modestly reduced. In a 2D system transverse whistlers also resonate with electrons propagating in the direction of the heat flux and resonant overlap leads to strong suppression of electron heat flux. The results suggest that electron heat conduction might be strongly suppressed in galaxy clusters.

  18. Hall Effect–Mediated Magnetic Flux Transport in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M.

    2017-02-01

    The global evolution of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) has recently been shown to be largely controlled by the amount of poloidal magnetic flux threading the disk. The amount of magnetic flux must also coevolve with the disk, as a result of magnetic flux transport, a process that is poorly understood. In weakly ionized gas as in PPDs, magnetic flux is largely frozen in the electron fluid, except when resistivity is large. When the disk is largely laminar, we show that the relative drift between the electrons and ions (the Hall drift), and the ions and neutral fluids (ambipolar drift) can play a dominant role on the transport of magnetic flux. Using two-dimensional simulations that incorporate the Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion (AD) with prescribed diffusivities, we show that when large-scale poloidal field is aligned with disk rotation, the Hall effect rapidly drags magnetic flux inward at the midplane region, while it slowly pushes flux outward above/below the midplane. This leads to a highly radially elongated field configuration as a global manifestation of the Hall-shear instability. This field configuration further promotes rapid outward flux transport by AD at the midplane, leading to instability saturation. In quasi-steady state, magnetic flux is transported outward at approximately the same rate at all heights, and the rate is comparable to the Hall-free case. For anti-aligned field polarity, the Hall effect consistently transports magnetic flux outward, leading to a largely vertical field configuration in the midplane region. The field lines in the upper layer first bend radially inward and then outward to launch a disk wind. Overall, the net rate of outward flux transport is about twice as fast as that of the aligned case. In addition, the rate of flux transport increases with increasing disk magnetization. The absolute rate of transport is sensitive to disk microphysics, which remains to be explored in future studies.

  19. Muon and neutrino fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a new calculation of the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes and the energy spectrum of muon-neutrinos produced in individual extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by proton and gamma-ray primaries is reported. Also explained is the possibility of detecting atmospheric nu sub mu's due to gamma-rays from these sources.

  20. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  1. Generic flux coupling analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimers, A.C.; Goldstein, Y.; Bockmayr, A.

    2015-01-01

    Flux coupling analysis (FCA) has become a useful tool for aiding metabolic reconstructions and guiding genetic manipulations. Originally, it was introduced for constraint-based models of metabolic networks that are based on the steady-state assumption. Recently, we have shown that the steady-state a

  2. Lobotomy of flux compactifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe; Guarino, Adolfo; Roest, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on (6) with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification

  3. Disconnecting Solar Magnetic Flux

    CERN Document Server

    DeForest, C E; McComas, D J

    2011-01-01

    Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by CMEs and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctie shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly-disconnected flux takes the form of a "U"-shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m/s^2 to 320 km/s, expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8uT, 6 Rs above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6x10^11 Wb (1.6x10^19 Mx). We mod...

  4. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  5. 使用地磁脉动参数定量预报地球同步轨道相对论电子通量的建模研究%Quantitative Prediction of Relativistic Electron Flux at Geosynchronous Orbit With Geomagnetic Pulsations Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何甜; 刘四清; 沈华; 龚建村

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-Low Frequency (ULF) waves can accelerate the seed electrons produced with sub-storm injection, which is one of the main mechanisms for relativistic electron in the magnetosphere. Based on the previous studies, the Pi1 pulsation's duration is a good indicator for seed electrons. The Pc5 pulsation's duration and spectra power are good indicators for the efficiency of acceleration. In this paper, geomagnetic field data observed by Memambetsu observatory are used to extract Pil pulsations. The geomagnetic field data observed by GOES-12 satellite and SODANKYLA observatory are used to extract Pc5 pulsations. With these geomagnetic pulsation parameters, a prediction model for relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is established to provide the value of a day in advance. There are two steps. First, referencing the linear prediction filter, a multi-parameter nonlinear function has been built to give a preliminary prediction value for relativistic electron flux at GEO orbit. Then, a Kalman filter is used to correct this preliminary value with the history relativistic electron flux. The data during 2004 is used to train this model. The prediction efficiency of this year is 0.73 and the linear correlation coefficient is 0.85. In the test with data during 2005—2006, the prediction efficiency is 0.69 and the linear correlation coefficient is 0.83, which is a large promotion compared with Persistence model and closed to the imitation REFM model. On one hand, the results show that the ULF wave acceleration mechanism is one of the main mechanisms for relativistic electron. On the other hand, the magnetic pulsation parameters can be well instead of the solar wind speed parameter, which would help to establish a new relativistic electron flux prediction model with ground stations.%磁层超低频波(ULF波)对种子电子的加速机制是磁层相对论电子产生的一个重要机制,而地磁脉动参数可以作为此机制的有效指标.本文采用地磁

  6. Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of titanium hydride (TiH2) powder in air

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Rasooli; M A Boutorabi; M Divandari; A Azarniya

    2013-04-01

    DTA and TGA curves of titanium hydride powder were determined in air at different heating rates. Also the thermal decomposition behaviour of the aforementioned powder at high heating rates was taken into consideration. A great breakthrough of the practical interest in the research was the depiction of the H2-time curves of TiH2 powder at various temperatures in air. In accordance with the results, an increase in heating rate to higher degrees does not change the process of releasing hydrogen from titanium hydride powder, while switching it from internal diffusion to chemical reaction. At temperatures lower than 600 °C, following the diffusion of hydrogen and oxygen atoms in titanium lattice, thin layers TiH phase and oxides form on the powder surface, controlling the process. On the contrary, from 700 °C later on, the process is controlled by oxidation of titanium hydride powder. In fact, the powder oxidation starts around 650 °C and may escalate following an increase in the heating rate too.

  7. Flux pinning in superconductors. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Teruo [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Computer Science and Electronics

    2014-04-01

    Ideal for graduate students studying superconductivity and experts alike. Written by a researcher with more than 30 years experience in the field. All chapters are completely revised. The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of superconductor, specimen size and electric field strength. Recent developments of critical current properties in various high-Tc superconductors and MgB2 are introduced. Other topics are: singularity in the case of transport current in a parallel magnetic field such as deviation from the Josephson relation, reversible flux motion inside pinning potentials which causes deviation from the critical state model prediction, the concept of the minimization of energy dissipation in the flux pinning phenomena which gives the basis for the critical state model, etc. Significant reduction in the AC loss in AC wires with very fine filaments originates from the reversible flux motion which is dominant in the two-dimensional pinning. The concept of minimum energy dissipation explains also the behavior

  8. Effects of Different Activators in the Flux on the Corrosivity of Lead-free Electronic Micro Joining Circuit%钎剂中活化组分对微连接电路腐蚀性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘斌; 黄文超; 王涛

    2012-01-01

    通过制备不同活化剂的松香型钎剂,采用Sn-0.7Cu无铅钎料模拟微连接电路钎焊,利用加速腐蚀实验,研究不同类型、不同含量的活化剂对微连接电路腐蚀性的影响规律。结果表明,含不同活性剂的钎剂残留物的腐蚀性由大到小依次为:盐酸二甲胺、二乙胺盐酸盐、戊二酸、柠檬酸、三乙醇胺、草酸、DL-苹果酸、硬脂酸、月桂酸、丁二酸;添加二乙胺盐酸盐的松香钎剂的扩展率最大,添加柠檬酸的最小,二乙胺盐酸盐的腐蚀性明显强于柠檬酸。%Through the preparation of rosin-based flux with different activators, and simulation of micro joint connection with Sn-0.7Cu lead free solder, by use of accelerated corrosion test, the effects of different types and different levels of the activators on the corrosion in PCBs are studied. The results show that the corrosivity descending order of flux residues with dif- ferent active agents is as follows., dimethylamine hydrochloride, diethylamine hydrochloride,glutaric acid,citric acid, triethanolamine,oxalate, DL-malic acid , hard fatty acid,lauric acid, succinic acid, the expansion rate of rosin flux with added diethylamine hydrochloride is largest and that of citric acid is smallest, the corrosivity of diethylamine hydrochloride is stronger than citric acid.

  9. Thermal performance of ethylene glycol based nanofluids in an electronic heat sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumar, P; Suresh, S

    2014-03-01

    Heat transfer in electronic devices such as micro processors and power converters is much essential to keep these devices cool for the better functioning of the systems. Air cooled heat sinks are not able to remove the high heat flux produced by the today's electronic components. Liquids work better than air in removing heat. Thermal conductivity which is the most essential property of any heat transfer fluid can be enhanced by adding nano scale solid particles which possess higher thermal conductivity than the liquids. In this work the convective heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of the water/ethylene glycol mixture based nanofluids consisting of Al2O3, CuO nanoparticles with a volume concentration of 0.1% are studied experimentally in a rectangular channel heat sink. The nano particles are characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope and the nannofluids are prepared by using an ultrasonic vibrator and Sodium Lauryl Salt surfactant. The experimental results showed that nanofluids of 0.1% volume concentration give higher convective heat transfer coefficient values than the plain water/ethylene glycol mixture which is prepared in the volume ratio of 70:30. There is no much penalty in the pressure drop values due to the inclusion of nano particles in the water/ethylene glycol mixture.

  10. Characterizing In Situ Uranium and Groundwater Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J.; Newman, M. A.; Stucker, V.; Peacock, A.; Ranville, J.; Cabaniss, S.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Perminova, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a new sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of uranium and groundwater fluxes. The sensor uses two sorbents and resident tracers to measure uranium flux and specific discharge directly; but, sensor principles and design should also apply to fluxes of other radionuclides. Flux measurements will assist with obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) and further advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. Project efforts will expand our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in uranium fluxes and those for salient electron donor/acceptors, and groundwater are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The new sensor uses an anion exchange resin to measure uranium fluxes and activated carbon with resident tracers to measure water fluxes. Several anion-exchange resins including Dowex 21K and 21K XLT, Purolite A500, and Lewatit S6328 were tested as sorbents for capturing uranium on the sensor and Lewatit S6328 was determined to be the most effective over the widest pH range. Four branched alcohols proved useful as resident tracers for measuring groundwater flows using activated carbon for both laboratory and field conditions. The flux sensor was redesigned to prevent the discharge of tracers to the environment, and the new design was tested in laboratory box aquifers and the field. Geochemical modeling of equilibrium speciation using Visual Minteq and an up-to-date thermodynamic data base suggested Ca-tricarbonato-uranyl complexes predominate under field conditions, while calculated uranyl ion activities were sensitive to changes in pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkaline earth

  11. Axial flux permanent magnet brushless machines

    CERN Document Server

    Gieras, Jacek F; Kamper, Maarten J

    2008-01-01

    Axial Flux Permanent Magnet (AFPM) brushless machines are modern electrical machines with a lot of advantages over their conventional counterparts. They are being increasingly used in consumer electronics, public life, instrumentation and automation system, clinical engineering, industrial electromechanical drives, automobile manufacturing industry, electric and hybrid electric vehicles, marine vessels and toys. They are also used in more electric aircrafts and many other applications on larger scale. New applications have also emerged in distributed generation systems (wind turbine generators

  12. Contactless heat flux control with photonic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control electric currents in solids using diodes and transistors is undoubtedly at the origin of the main developments in modern electronics which have revolutionized the daily life in the second half of 20th century. Surprisingly, until the year 2000 no thermal counterpart for such a control had been proposed. Since then, based on pioneering works on the control of phononic heat currents new devices were proposed which allow for the control of heat fluxes carried by photons rather than phonons or electrons. The goal of the present paper is to summarize the main advances achieved recently in the field of thermal energy control with photons.

  13. Elastic thickness and heat flux estimates for the uranian satellite Ariel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, G.; Nimmo, F.; Schenk, P.

    2015-04-01

    The surface of Ariel, an icy satellite orbiting Uranus, shows extensional tectonic features suggesting an episode of endogenic heating in the satellite's past. Using topography derived from stereo-photoclinometry, we identified flexural uplift at a rift zone suggesting elastic thickness values in the range 3.8-4.4 km. We estimate the temperature at the base of the lithosphere to be in the range 99-146 K, depending on the strain rate assumed, with corresponding heat fluxes of 28-92 mW/m2. Neither tidal heating, assuming Ariel's current eccentricity, nor radiogenic heat production from the silicate core are enough to cause the inferred heat fluxes. None of three proposed ancient mean-motion resonances produce equilibrium tidal heating values in excess of 4.3 mW/m2. Thus, the origin of the inferred high heat fluxes is currently mysterious.

  14. Triples, Fluxes, and Strings

    CERN Document Server

    De Boer, J; Hori, K; Keurentjes, A; Morgan, J; Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston; Sethi, S K; Boer, Jan de; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hori, Kentaro; Keurentjes, Arjan; Morgan, John; Morrison, David R.; Sethi, Savdeep

    2002-01-01

    We study string compactifications with sixteen supersymmetries. The moduli space for these compactifications becomes quite intricate in lower dimensions, partly because there are many different irreducible components. We focus primarily, but not exclusively, on compactifications to seven or more dimensions. These vacua can be realized in a number ways: the perturbative constructions we study include toroidal compactifications of the heterotic/type I strings, asymmetric orbifolds, and orientifolds. In addition, we describe less conventional M and F theory compactifications on smooth spaces. The last class of vacua considered are compactifications on singular spaces with non-trivial discrete fluxes. We find a number of new components in the string moduli space. Contained in some of these components are M theory compactifications with novel kinds of ``frozen'' singularities. We are naturally led to conjecture the existence of new dualities relating spaces with different singular geometries and fluxes. As our stu...

  15. Atmospheric lepton fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaisser Thomas K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric νμ and νe are discussed, along with the implications of the muon charge ratio for the νµ / ν̅µ ratio. Methods to account for effects of the knee in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum and the energy-dependence of hadronic interactions on the neutrino fluxes are discussed and illustrated in the context of recent results from IceCube. A simple numerical/analytic method is proposed for systematic investigation of uncertainties in neutrino fluxes arising from uncertainties in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum/composition and hadronic interactions.

  16. Lobotomy of flux compactifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe; Guarino, Adolfo; Roest, Diederik

    2014-05-01

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on 6 with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification allowing for critical points. It corresponds to a type IIA background given by a product of two 3-tori with SO(3) twists and results in a unique theory (gauging) with a non-semisimple gauge algebra. Besides the known four AdS solutions surviving the orientifold projection to = 4 induced by O6-planes, this theory contains a novel AdS solution that requires non-trivial orientifold-odd fluxes, hence being a genuine critical point of the = 8 theory.

  17. Lobotomy of flux compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe [Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, University of Uppsala,Box 803, SE-751 08 Uppsala (Sweden); Guarino, Adolfo [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics,Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Roest, Diederik [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on T{sup 6} with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification allowing for critical points. It corresponds to a type IIA background given by a product of two 3-tori with SO(3) twists and results in a unique theory (gauging) with a non-semisimple gauge algebra. Besides the known four AdS solutions surviving the orientifold projection to N=4 induced by O6-planes, this theory contains a novel AdS solution that requires non-trivial orientifold-odd fluxes, hence being a genuine critical point of the N=8 theory.

  18. Soldering in electronics assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Soldering in Electronics Assembly discusses several concerns in soldering of electronic assemblies. The book is comprised of nine chapters that tackle different areas in electronic assembly soldering. Chapter 1 discusses the soldering process itself, while Chapter 2 covers the electronic assemblies. Chapter 3 talks about solders and Chapter 4 deals with flux. The text also tackles the CS and SC soldering process. The cleaning of soldered assemblies, solder quality, and standards and specifications are also discussed. The book will be of great use to professionals who deal with electronic assem

  19. High Flux Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-05

    These approaches are based on proven principles which have served the thermal test community well for years. Other concepts hold promise of being able to...8217. --......- - ... .... - - The thermal test community has developed instrumentation which is quite suitable for the moderate, and relatively constant, flux...on the maximum phase II system fluence of 400 cal/cm2 . Second, the present thermal test community will have confidence in the performance of an

  20. Lobotomy of Flux Compactifications

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Dibitetto; Adolfo Guarino(Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland); Diederik Roest

    2014-01-01

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on $ \\mathbb{T} $ 6 with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification allowing for critical points. It corresponds to a type IIA background given by a product of two 3-tori with SO(3) twists and results in a unique theory (gauging) with a non-semisimple gauge...

  1. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat,...

  2. A ΔE-E semiconductor detector combined with CsI(Tl) crystal for monitoring the relative electrons flux generated in interaction of accelerated nuclei beam on thin targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruceru, M.; Afanasiev, S.; Dryablov, D.; Dubinchik, B.; Igamkulov, Z.

    2015-07-01

    Experimental data are presented, obtained with a ΔE-E semiconductor detector combined with a CsI(Tl) inorganic scintillator crystal. The interaction between a beam of accelerated nuclei and thin targets is analyzed. We show that, as a result of this interaction, the secondary particles, including δ-electrons, are generated. In the case of δ-electrons it is possible to study the beam characteristics and the nature of interaction processes, which is of great interest in high-energy interaction.

  3. Flux-limitation of the Nernst effect in magnetized ICF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgers, Christopher; Barrois, Rion; Wengraf, Joshua; Bissell, John; Brodrick, Jonathan; Kingham, Robert; Read, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Magnetized ICF is a promising scheme which combines the advantages of magnetic and inertial confinement fusion. In the relevant high-energy density plasmas magnetic field evolution is often controlled by the Nernst effect where the magnetic field advects with the electron heat flow. It is well known that non-local thermal transport necessitates a flux-limiter on the heat flow. This suggests that a flux-limiter should also be applied to the Nernst effect. We have shown that this is the case using Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations and that the flux-limter is not the same as that required for the heat flow itself, for example when a NIF-relevant flux-limiter of 0.15 is required to limit the heat flow a Nernst flux limiter of 0.08 is required. We acknowledge support from EPSRC Grant No. EPM011372/1.

  4. Characterization of Free Radicals By Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy in Biochars from Pyrolysis at High Heating Rates and at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker Degn; Larsen Andresen, Mogens

    Understanding fast pyrolysis of biomass-derived materials is an important step in optimization of combustion processes. Similar to coal combustion, the fuel burn out is known to be influenced by the yield and reactivity of chars, produced during pyrolysis. The rapid heating of small biomass...... particles and the short residence time at high temperatures minimize the char yield and increase char reactivity. The differences in chemical composition of organic and inorganic matter between wood and herbaceous biomass affect the operational flexibility of power plants, and increase the complexity...... of mathematical models that can predict yields, composition and rates of product (char, tar, light gases) formation from fast pyrolysis. The modeling of cross-linking and polymerization reactions in biomass pyrolysis includes the formation of free radicals and their disappearance. Knowledge about these radical...

  5. Characterization of free radicals by electron spin resonance spectroscopy in biochars from pyrolysis at high heating rates and at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    chars were related to the decreased mobility of potassium in the char matrix, leading to the less efficient catalytic effects of potassiumon the bond-breaking and radical re-attachments. The high Si levels in the rice husk caused an increase in the char radical concentration compared to the wheat straw...... that the biomass major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin) had a minor effect on remaining radical concentrations comparedto potassium and silica contents. The higher radical concentrations in the wheat straw chars from thedecay stage of pyrolysis in the entrained flow reactor compared to the wood...

  6. Characterization of Free Radicals By Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy in Biochars from Pyrolysis at High Heating Rates and at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker Degn; Larsen Andresen, Mogens

    to the less efficient catalytic effects of potassium on the bond-breaking and radical re-attachments. The high Si levels in the rice husk caused an increase in the char radical concentration compared to the wheat straw because the free radicals were trapped in a char consisting of a molten amorphous silica...... on remaining radical concentrations compared to potassium and silica contents. The higher radical concentrations in the wheat straw chars from the decay stage of pyrolysis in the entrained flow reactor compared to the wood chars were related to the decreased mobility of potassium in the char matrix, leading...

  7. [The flux of historiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzolini, R G

    2001-01-01

    The author places Grmek's editorial within the flux of the historiographical debate which, since the middle of the 1970s, has concentrated on two major crises due to the end of social science-oriented 'scientific history' and to the 'linguistic turn'. He also argues that Grmek's historiographical work of the 1980s and 1990s was to some extent an alternative to certain observed changes in historical fashion and has achieved greater intelligibility because of its commitment to a rational vision of science and historiography.

  8. Refractive Interstellar Scintillation for Flux Density Variations of Two Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周爱芝; 吴鑫基; 艾力·伊沙木丁

    2003-01-01

    The flux density structure functions of PSRs B0525+21 and B2111+46 are calculated with the refractive interstellar scintillation (RISS) theory. The theoretical curves are in good agreement with observations [Astrophys.J. 539 (2000) 300] (hereafter S2000). The spectra of the electron density fluctuations both are of Kolmogorov spectra. We suggest that the flux density variations observed for these two pulsars are attributed to refractive interstellar scintillation, not to intrinsic variability.

  9. Quantum Transport in a Biphenyl Molecule: Effects of Magnetic Flux

    OpenAIRE

    Maiti, Santanu K.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport properties of a biphenyl molecule are studied based on the Green's function formalism. The molecule is sandwiched between two metallic electrodes, where each benzene ring is threaded by a magnetic flux $\\phi$. The results are focused on the effects of the molecule to electrode coupling strength and the magnetic flux $\\phi$. Our numerical study shows that, for a fixed molecular coupling, the current amplitude across the bridge can be {\\em regulated} significantly just by tun...

  10. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Yates, T Y

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  11. Ion flux profiles observed at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, C. M.; Andersson, L.; Lundin, R. N.; Frahm, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    How Mars lost it's water and atmosphere is still an important question. Many studies have investigated high-energy ion fluxes (>10 eV) surrounding the planet and derived ion outflow rates in order to determine atmospheric loss. These rates suggest that the outflow from high-energy ions is not the dominant escape path for atmospheric loss. Over the years increasing evidence has indicated that the loss of low-energy ions are more important than the high-energy ion loss. In this presentation ion observations (down to the spacecraft potential) from the Mars Express (MEX) mission (2010/11), are used to describe the ion altitude distribution at Mars. The focus of this study is below the altitude of ~1000 km. Within the Mars environment, using the MEX electron observations different plasma regions was identified. Supported by electron identification, different altitude profiles of ion fluxes have been analyzed from the different plasma regions. One of the results from this study is that the altitude profile of the ion flux observed below the photoelectron boundary is different when comparing the northern and the southern hemispheres. The ion distributions, resulting altitude profile, the influence of the crustal magnetic field at Mars, and the implications relating to plasma outflow will be discussed in this presentation.

  12. High precision photon flux determination for photon tagging experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymurazyan, A.; Ahmidouch, A.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Asratyan, A.; Baker, K.; Benton, L.; Burkert, V.; Clinton, E.; Cole, P.; Collins, P.; Dale, D.; Danagoulian, S.; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, R.; Deur, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dzyubenko, G.; Ent, R.; Evdokimov, A.; Feng, J.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Gasparian, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Goryachev, V.; Hardy, K.; He, J.; Ito, M.; Jiang, L.; Kashy, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kolarkar, A.; Konchatnyi, M.; Korchin, A.; Korsch, W.; Kosinov, O.; Kowalski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Larin, I.; Lawrence, D.; Li, X.; Martel, P.; Matveev, V.; McNulty, D.; Mecking, B.; Milbrath, B.; Minehart, R.; Miskimen, R.; Mochalov, V.; Nakagawa, I.; Overby, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Payen, M.; Pedroni, R.; Prok, Y.; Ritchie, B.; Salgado, C.; Shahinyan, A.; Sitnikov, A.; Sober, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stevens, W.; Underwood, J.; Vasiliev, A.; Vishnyakov, V.; Wood, M.; Zhou, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory PrimEx Collaboration has developed and implemented a method to control the tagged photon flux in photoproduction experiments at the 1% level over the photon energy range from 4.9 to 5.5 GeV. This method has been successfully implemented in a high precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime. Here, we outline the experimental equipment and the analysis techniques used to accomplish this. These include the use of a total absorption counter for absolute flux calibration, a pair spectrometer for online relative flux monitoring, and a new method for post-bremsstrahlung electron counting.

  13. Modeling flux noise in SQUIDs due to hyperfine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiansheng; Yu, Clare C

    2012-06-15

    Recent experiments implicate spins on the surface of metals as the source of flux noise in superconducting quantum interference devices and indicate that these spins are able to relax without conserving total magnetization. We present a model of 1/f flux noise in which electron spins on the surface of metals can relax via hyperfine interactions. Our results indicate that flux noise would be significantly reduced in superconducting materials where the most abundant isotopes do not have nuclear moments, such as zinc and lead.

  14. The High Latitude D Region During Electron Precipitation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, J. K.; Collis, P. N.; Korth, A.

    1984-01-01

    The fluxes of energetic electrons entering the high-latitude atmosphere during auroral radio absorption events and their effect on the electron density in the auroral D region are discussed. An attempt was made to calculate the radio absorption during precipitation events from the fluxes of energetic electrons measured at geosynchronous orbit, and then to consider the use of absorption measurements to indicate the magnetospheric particle fluxes, the production rates, and electron densities in the D region.

  15. High latitude D region during electron precipitation events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargreaves, J.K.; Collis, P.N.; Korth, A.

    1984-05-01

    The fluxes of energetic electrons entering the high-latitude atmosphere during auroral radio absorption events and their effect on the electron density in the auroral D region are discussed. An attempt was made to calculate the radio absorption during precipitation events from the fluxes of energetic electrons measured at geosynchronous orbit, and then to consider the use of absorption measurements to indicate the magnetospheric particle fluxes, the production rates, and electron densities in the D region.

  16. Heat Flux at the Surface of Metal Foil Heater under Evaporating Sessile Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Marchuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaporating water drops on a horizontal heated substrate were investigated experimentally. The heater was made of a constantan foil with the thickness of 25 μm and size of 42 × 35 mm2. The temperature of the bottom foil surface was measured by the infrared (IR camera. To determine the heat flux density during evaporation of liquid near the contact line, the Cauchy problem for the heat equation was solved using the temperature data. The maximum heat flux density is obtained in the contact line region and exceeds the average heat flux density from the entire foil surface by the factor of 5–7. The average heat flux density in the region wetted by the drop exceeds the average heat flux density from the entire foil surface by the factor of 3–5. This fact is explained by the heat influx from the foil periphery to the drop due to the relatively high heat conductivity coefficient of the foil material and high evaporation rate in the contact line region. Heat flux density profiles for pairs of sessile droplets are also investigated.

  17. Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    2005-09-27

    Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the

  18. Energy flux and characteristic energy of an elemental auroral structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanchester, B.S.; Palmer, J.R. [Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom); Rees, M.H. [Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom)]|[Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Lummerzheim, D. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Kaila, K. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Turunen, T. [Geophysical Observatory, Sodankylae (Finland)

    1994-12-15

    Electron density profiles acquired with the EISCAT radar at 0.2 s time resolution, together with TV images and photometric intensities, were used to study the characteristics of thin (< 1 km) auroral arc structures that drifted through the field of view of the instruments. It is demonstrated that both high time and space resolution are essential for deriving the input parameters of the electron flux responsible for the elemental auroral structures. One such structure required a 400 mW m{sup {minus}2} (erg cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}) downward energy flux carried by an 8 keV monochromatic electron flux equivalent to a current density of 50 {mu}A m{sup {minus}2}. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Computation of 7Be solar neutrino flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Zipiao; SHENG Xiangdong; DAI Changjiang

    2003-01-01

    Within the target range from 0 to 0.1217 times the solar radius, the probability of 7Be existing as an ion with one or two bound electrons is calculated, which is turned out to be about 4.69 %, and about 95.3 1 % 7Be nucleus is completely ionized. After considering the influence of that portion of incompletely ionized 7Be, the renewly calculative result shows that the solar neutrino flux of 7Be will decrease from 45 000 m-2.s-1 to 43 000 m-2.s-1, and the predicted value of the 8B solar neutrino flux will increase from 51 5 m-2.s-1 to 535 m-2.s-1.

  20. Influence of solar flares on behavior of solar neutrino flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyarkin, O. M.; Boyarkina, G. G.

    2016-12-01

    Limiting ourselves to two flavor approximation the motion of the neutrino flux in the solar matter and twisting magnetic field is considered. For the neutrino system described by the 4-component wave function ΨT =(νeL ,νXL ,νbareL ,νbarXL) , where X = μ , τ , an evolution equation is found. Our consideration carries general character, that is, it holds for any SM extensions with massive neutrinos. The resonance transitions of the electron neutrinos are investigated. Factors which influence on the electron neutrino flux, crossing a region of solar flares (SF) are defined. When the SF is absent a terrestrial detector records the electron neutrino flux weakened at the cost both of vacuum oscillations and of the MSW resonance conversion only. On the other hand, the electron neutrino flux passed the SF region in preflare period proves to be further weakened in so far as it undergoes one (Majorana neutrino) or two (Dirac neutrino) additional resonance conversions, apart from the MSW resonance and vacuum oscillations. The hypothesis of the νe-induced decays which states that decreasing the beta decay rates of some elements of the periodic table is caused by reduction of the solar neutrino flux is discussed as well.

  1. Permanent magnet flux-biased magnetic actuator with flux feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a permanent magnet flux-biased magnetic actuator with flux feedback for adjustably suspending an element on a single axis. The magnetic actuator includes a pair of opposing electromagnets and provides bi-directional forces along the single axis to the suspended element. Permanent magnets in flux feedback loops from the opposing electromagnets establish a reference permanent magnet flux-bias to linearize the force characteristics of the electromagnets to extend the linear range of the actuator without the need for continuous bias currents in the electromagnets.

  2. Mesoscopic fluctuations in biharmonically driven flux qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrón, Alejandro; Domínguez, Daniel; Sánchez, María José

    2017-01-01

    We investigate flux qubits driven by a biharmonic magnetic signal, with a phase lag that acts as an effective time reversal broken parameter. The driving induced transition rate between the ground and the excited state of the flux qubit can be thought of as an effective transmittance, profiting from a direct analogy between interference effects at avoided level crossings and scattering events in disordered electronic systems. For time scales prior to full relaxation, but large compared to the decoherence time, this characteristic rate has been accessed experimentally by Gustavsson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 016603 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.016603 and its sensitivity with both the phase lag and the dc flux detuning explored. In this way, signatures of universal conductance fluctuationslike effects have been analyzed and compared with predictions from a phenomenological model that only accounts for decoherence, as a classical noise. Here we go beyond the classical noise model and solve the full dynamics of the driven flux qubit in contact with a quantum bath employing the Floquet-Born-Markov master equation. Within this formalism, the computed relaxation and decoherence rates turn out to be strongly dependent on both the phase lag and the dc flux detuning. Consequently, the associated pattern of fluctuations in the characteristic rates display important differences with those obtained within the mentioned phenomenological model. In particular, we demonstrate the weak localizationlike effect in the average values of the relaxation rate. Our predictions can be tested for accessible but longer time scales than the current experimental times.

  3. Electron kinetics in capacitively coupled plasmas modulated by electron injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Peng, Yanli; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Hong-yu; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    The controlling effect of an electron injection on the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and on the energetic electron flux, in a capacitive radio-frequency argon plasma, is studied using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions model. The input power of the electron beam is as small as several tens of Watts with laboratory achievable emission currents and energies. With the electron injection, the electron temperature decreases but with a significant high energy tail. The electron density, electron temperature in the sheath, and electron heating rate increase with the increasing emission energy. This is attributed to the extra heating of the energetic electrons in the EEDF tail. The non-equilibrium EEDF is obtained for strong non-local distributions of the electric field, electron heating rate, excitation, and ionization rate, indicating the discharge has transited from a volume heating (α-mode dominated) into a sheath heating (γ-mode dominated) type. In addition, the electron injection not only modifies the self-bias voltage, but also enhances the electron flux that can reach the electrodes. Moreover, the relative population of energetic electrons significantly increases with the electron injection compared to that without the electron injection, relevant for modifying the gas and surface chemistry reactions.

  4. Braneworld Flux Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Kanno, S; Wands, D; Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro; Wands, David

    2005-01-01

    We propose a geometrical model of brane inflation where inflation is driven by the flux generated by opposing brane charges and terminated by the collision of the branes, with charge annihilation. We assume the collision process is completely inelastic and the kinetic energy is transformed into the thermal energy after collision. Thereafter the two branes coalesce together and behave as a single brane universe with zero effective cosmological constant. In the Einstein frame, the 4-dimensional effective theory changes abruptly at the collision point. Therefore, our inflationary model is necessarily 5-dimensional in nature. As the collision process has no singularity in 5-dimensional gravity, we can follow the evolution of fluctuations during the whole history of the universe. It turns out that the radion field fluctuations have a steeply tilted, red spectrum, while the primordial gravitational waves have a flat spectrum. Instead, primordial density perturbations could be generated by a curvaton mechanism.

  5. Turbulence-induced magnetic flux asymmetry at nanoscale junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushong, Neil; Pershin, Yuriy; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-11-30

    It was recently predicted [J. Phys. Condens. Matter 18, 11059 (2006)] that turbulence of electron flow may develop at nonadiabatic nanoscale junctions under appropriate conditions. Here we show that such an effect leads to an asymmetric current-induced magnetic field on the two sides of an otherwise symmetric junction. We propose that measuring the fluxes ensuing from these fields across two surfaces placed at the two sides of the junction would provide direct and noninvasive evidence of the transition from laminar to turbulent electron flow. The flux asymmetry is predicted to first increase, reach a maximum, and then decrease with increasing current, i.e., with increasing amount of turbulence.

  6. Optimal fluxes and Reynolds stresses

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    It is remarked that fluxes in conservation laws, such as the Reynolds stresses in the momentum equation of turbulent shear flows, or the spectral energy flux in isotropic turbulence, are only defined up to an arbitrary solenoidal field. While this is not usually significant for long-time averages, it becomes important when fluxes are modelled locally in large-eddy simulations, or in the analysis of intermittency and cascades. As an example, a numerical procedure is introduced to compute fluxes in scalar conservation equations in such a way that their total integrated magnitude is minimised. The result is an irrotational vector field that derives from a potential, thus minimising sterile flux `circuits'. The algorithm is generalised to tensor fluxes and applied to the transfer of momentum in a turbulent channel. The resulting instantaneous Reynolds stresses are compared with their traditional expressions, and found to be substantially different.

  7. Heat Flux Apportionment to Heterogeneous Surfaces Using Flux Footprint Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Heat flux data collected from the Baiyangdian Heterogeneous Field Experiment were analyzed using the footprint method. High resolution (25 m) Landsat-5 satellite imaging was used to determine the land cover as one of four surface types: farmland, lake, wetland, or village. Data from two observation sites in September 2005 were used. One site (Wangjiazhai) was characterized by highly heterogeneous surfaces in the central area of the Baiyangdian: lake/wetland. The other site (Xiongxian) was on land with more uniform surface cover. An improved Eulerian analytical flux footprint model was used to determine "source areas" of the heat fluxes measured at towers located at each site from surrounding landscapes of mixed surface types.In relative terms results show that wetland and lake areas generally contributed most to the observed heat flux at Wangjiazhai, while farmland contributed most at Xiongxian. Given the areal distribution of surface type contributions, calculations were made to obtain the magnitudes of the heat flux from lake, wetland and farmland to the total observed flux and apportioned contributions of each surface type to the sensible and latent heat fluxes. Results show that on average the sensible heat flux from wetland and farmland were comparable over the diurnal cycle, while the latent heat flux from farmland was somewhat larger by about 30-50 W m-2 during daytime. The latent and sensible fluxes from the lake source in daytime were about 50 W m-2 and 100 W m-2 less, respectively, than from wetland and farmland. The results are judged reasonable and serve to demonstrate the potential for flux apportionment over heterogeneous surfaces.

  8. MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT EFFECTS ON ION FLUX BEHAVIORS IN ECR PLASMA SOURCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The available electron cyclotron resonance plasma source has been simulated in two-dimensional configuration space (z, r) and three-dimensional velocity space (Vz, Vr Vθ). The simulation is focused on the magnetic field gradient effects on ion flux behaviors in electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources. The simulation results show that, when the magnetic field gradients increase, electron temperature, plasma density, ionization rate, and ion flux in Zdirection would decrease, while ion energy and plasma potential would increase.

  9. New Examples of Flux Vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Maxfield, Travis; Robbins, Daniel; Sethi, Savdeep

    2013-01-01

    Type IIB toroidal orientifolds are among the earliest examples of flux vacua. By applying T-duality, we construct the first examples of massive IIA flux vacua with Minkowski space-times, along with new examples of type IIA flux vacua. The backgrounds are surprisingly simple with no four-form flux at all. They serve as illustrations of the ingredients needed to build type IIA and massive IIA solutions with scale separation. To check that these backgrounds are actually solutions, we formulate the complete set of type II supergravity equations of motion in a very useful form that treats the R-R fields democratically.

  10. Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory (HFIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory is used to develop advanced, flexible, thin film gauge instrumentation for the Air Force Research Laboratory....

  11. Latest AMS Results on Cosmic Ray fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, Bruna; AMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    AMS-02 is a wide acceptance high-energy physics experiment installed on the International Space Station in May 2011 and it has been operating continuously since then. Accurate studies of CR composition and energy spectra can be performed in AMS thanks to the unprecedented collected statistics - more than 90 billion events as of today - and the redundant measurements of particle charge, velocity, rigidity and energy. In this contribution we will present an overview of the latest results on anti-particles, electrons and light nuclei fluxes. On behalf of the AMS Collaboration.

  12. Parasitic Momentum Flux in the Tokamak Core

    CERN Document Server

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T

    2016-01-01

    A geometrical correction to the E x B drift causes an outward flux of cocurrent momentum whenever electrostatic potential energy is transferred to ion parallel flows. The robust symmetry breaking follows from the free energy flow in phase space and does not depend on any assumed linear eigenmode structure, acting both for axisymmetric fluctuations (such as geodesic acoustic modes) as well as more general nonaxisymmetric fluctuations. The resulting rotation peaking is countercurrent and scales as electron temperature over plasma current. This peaking mechanism can only act when fluctuations are low-frequency enough to excite ion parallel flows, which may explain some recent experimental observations related to rotation reversals.

  13. Electronics and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, George H

    1987-01-01

    Electronics and Electronic Systems explores the significant developments in the field of electronics and electronic devices. This book is organized into three parts encompassing 11 chapters that discuss the fundamental circuit theory and the principles of analog and digital electronics. This book deals first with the passive components of electronic systems, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These topics are followed by a discussion on the analysis of electronic circuits, which involves three ways, namely, the actual circuit, graphical techniques, and rule of thumb. The remaining p

  14. Sediment Diagenesis and Benthic Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, S.; Hedges, J.

    2003-12-01

    Chemical reactions in marine sediments and the resulting fluxes across the sediment-water interface influence the global carbon cycle and the pH of the sea and affect the abundance of CaCO3 and opal-forming plankton in the ocean. On very long timescales these diagenetic reactions control carbon burial in sedimentary rocks and the oxygen content of the atmosphere. Sedimentary deposits that remain after diagenesis are the geochemical artifacts used for interpreting past changes in ocean circulation, biogeochemical cycles, and climate. This chapter is about the processes of diagenesis and burial of the chemical elements that make up the bulk of the particulate matter that reaches the seafloor (organic matter, CaCO3, SiO2, Fe, Mn, and aluminosilicates).Understanding of sediment diagenesis and benthic fluxes has evolved with advances in both experimental methods and modeling. Measurements of chemical concentrations in sediments, their associated pore waters and fluxes at the sediment-water interface have been used to identify the most important reactions. Because transport in pore waters is usually by molecular diffusion, this medium is conducive to interpretation by models of heterogeneous chemical equilibrium and kinetics. Large chemical changes and manageable transport mechanisms have led to elegant models of sediment diagenesis and great advances in understanding of diagenetic processes.We shall see, though, that the environment does not yield totally to simple models of chemical equilibrium and chemical kinetics, and laboratory determined constants often cannot explain the field observations. For example, organic matter degradation rate constants determined from modeling are so variable that there are essentially no constraints on these values from laboratory experiments. In addition, reaction rates of CaCO3 and opal dissolution determined from modeling pore waters usually cannot be reproduced in laboratory experiments of these reactions. The inability to

  15. From elementary flux modes to elementary flux vectors: Metabolic pathway analysis with arbitrary linear flux constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamt, Steffen; Regensburger, Georg; Gerstl, Matthias P; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Schuster, Stefan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Zanghellini, Jürgen; Müller, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) emerged as a formal concept to describe metabolic pathways and have become an established tool for constraint-based modeling and metabolic network analysis. EFMs are characteristic (support-minimal) vectors of the flux cone that contains all feasible steady-state flux vectors of a given metabolic network. EFMs account for (homogeneous) linear constraints arising from reaction irreversibilities and the assumption of steady state; however, other (inhomogeneous) linear constraints, such as minimal and maximal reaction rates frequently used by other constraint-based techniques (such as flux balance analysis [FBA]), cannot be directly integrated. These additional constraints further restrict the space of feasible flux vectors and turn the flux cone into a general flux polyhedron in which the concept of EFMs is not directly applicable anymore. For this reason, there has been a conceptual gap between EFM-based (pathway) analysis methods and linear optimization (FBA) techniques, as they operate on different geometric objects. One approach to overcome these limitations was proposed ten years ago and is based on the concept of elementary flux vectors (EFVs). Only recently has the community started to recognize the potential of EFVs for metabolic network analysis. In fact, EFVs exactly represent the conceptual development required to generalize the idea of EFMs from flux cones to flux polyhedra. This work aims to present a concise theoretical and practical introduction to EFVs that is accessible to a broad audience. We highlight the close relationship between EFMs and EFVs and demonstrate that almost all applications of EFMs (in flux cones) are possible for EFVs (in flux polyhedra) as well. In fact, certain properties can only be studied with EFVs. Thus, we conclude that EFVs provide a powerful and unifying framework for constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks.

  16. Viscous relaxation of Ganymede's impact craters: Constraints on heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Michael; Singer, Kelsi N.; McKinnon, William B.; Schenk, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of crater depths in Ganymede’s dark terrain have revealed substantial numbers of unusually shallow craters indicative of viscous relaxation [see companion paper: Singer, K.N., Schenk, P. M., Bland, M.T., McKinnon, W.B., (2017). Relaxed impact craters on Ganymede: Regional variations and high heat flow. Icarus, submitted]. These viscously relaxed craters provide insight into the thermal history of the dark terrain: the rate of relaxation depends on the size of the crater and the thermal structure of the lithosphere. Here we use finite element simulations of crater relaxation to constrain the heat flux within the dark terrain when relaxation occurred. We show that the degree of viscous relaxation observed cannot be achieved through radiogenic heating alone, even if all of the relaxed craters are ancient and experienced the high radiogenic fluxes present early in the satellite’s history. For craters with diameter ≥ 10 km, heat fluxes of 40–50 mW m-2−2"> can reproduce the observed crater depths, but only if the fluxes are sustained for ∼1 Gyr. These craters can also be explained by shorter-lived “heat pulses” with magnitudes of ∼100 mW m-2−2"> and timescales of 10–100 Myr. At small crater diameters (4 km) the observed shallow depths are difficult to achieve even when heat fluxes as high as 150 mW m-2−2"> are sustained for 1 Gyr. The extreme thermal conditions required to viscously relax small craters may indicate that mechanisms other than viscous relaxation, such as topographic degradation, are also in play at small crater diameters. The timing of the relaxation event(s) is poorly constrained due to the sparsity of adequate topographic information, though it likely occurred in Ganymede’s middle history (neither recently, nor shortly after satellite formation). The consistency between the timing and magnitude of the heat fluxes derived here and those inferred from other tectonic features suggests that a single event

  17. Magnetic flux periodicities and finite momentum pairing in unconventional superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loder, Florian

    2009-12-22

    This work contains a thorough study of the magnetic flux periodicity of loops of conventional and unconventional, especially d-wave, superconductors. Although already in 1961, several independent works showed that the flux period of a conventional superconducting loop is the superconducting flux quantum hc/2e, this question has never been investigated deeply for unconventional superconductors. And indeed, we show here that d-wave superconducting loops show a basic flux period of the normal flux quantum hc/e, a property originating from the nodal quasi-particle states. This doubling of the flux periodicity is best visible in the persistent current circulating in the loop, and it affects other properties of the superconductor such as the periodicity of d-wave Josephson junctions. In the second part of this work, the theory of electron pairing with finite center-of-mass momentum, necessary for the description of superconducting loops, is extended to systems in zero magnetic field. We show that even in the field free case, an unconventional pairing symmetry can lead to a superconducting ground state with finite-momentum electron pairs. Such a state has an inhomogeneous charge density and therefore is a basis for the description of coexistence of superconductivity and stripe order. (orig.)

  18. Earth's surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Davies

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux that is based upon a heat flow data-set with 38 347 measurements, which is 55% more than used in previous estimates. Our methodology, like others, accounts for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust by utilising a half-space cooling approximation. For the rest of Earth's surface, we estimate the average heat flow for different geologic domains as defined by global digital geology maps; and then produce the global estimate by multiplying it by the total global area of that geologic domain. The averaging is done on a polygon set which results from an intersection of a 1 degree equal area grid with the original geology polygons; this minimises the adverse influence of clustering. These operations and estimates are derived accurately using methodologies from Geographical Information Science. We consider the virtually un-sampled Antarctica separately and also make a small correction for hot-spots in young oceanic lithosphere. A range of analyses is presented. These, combined with statistical estimates of the error, provide a measure of robustness. Our final preferred estimate is 47±2 TW, which is greater than previous estimates.

  19. Data Acquisition and Flux Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebmann, C.; Kolle, O; Heinesch, B;

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation....

  20. Superconducting wires and fractional flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá de Melo, C. A. R.

    1996-05-01

    The quantization of flux quanta in superconductors is revisited and analyzed in a new geometry. The system analyzed is a superconducting wire. The geometry is such that the superconducting wire winds N times around an insulating cylinder and that the wire has its end connected back to its beginning, thus producing an N-loop short circuited solenoid. The winding number N acts as a topological index that controls flux quantization. In this case, fractional flux quanta can be measured through the center of the insulating cylinder, provided that the cylinder radius is small enough. The Little-Parks experiment for an identical geometry is discussed. The period of oscillation of the transition temperature of the wire is found to vary as 1/N in units of flux Φ relative to the flux quantum Φ0. When a SQUID is made in such a geometry the maximal current through the SQUID varies with period Φ0/N.

  1. Interpreting Flux from Broadband Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter J; Roming, Peter W A; Siegel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the transformation of observed photometry into flux for the creation of spectral energy distributions and the computation of bolometric luminosities. We do this in the context of supernova studies, particularly as observed with the Swift spacecraft, but the concepts and techniques should be applicable to many other types of sources and wavelength regimes. Traditional methods of converting observed magnitudes to flux densities are not very accurate when applied to UV photometry. Common methods for extinction and the integration of pseudo-bolometric fluxes can also lead to inaccurate results. The sources of inaccuracy, though, also apply to other wavelengths. Because of the complicated nature of translating broad-band photometry into monochromatic flux densities, comparison between observed photometry and a spectroscopic model is best done by comparing in the natural units of the observations. We recommend that integrated flux measurements be made using a spectrum or spectral energy distribution whic...

  2. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

    2008-08-04

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

  3. Evaluation of three thermal protection systems in a hypersonic high-heating-rate environment induced by an elevon deflected 30 deg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Weinstein, I.

    1977-01-01

    Three thermal protection systems proposed for a hypersonic research airplane were subjected to high heating rates in the Langley 8 foot, high temperature structures tunnel. Metallic heat sink (Lockalloy), reusable surface insulation, and insulator-ablator materials were each tested under similar conditions. The specimens were tested for a 10 second exposure on the windward side of an elevon deflected 30 deg. The metallic heat sink panel exhibited no damage; whereas the reusable surface insulation tiles were debonded from the panel and the insulator-ablator panel eroded through its thickness, thus exposing the aluminum structure to the Mach 7 environment.

  4. Critical heat flux in flow boiling in microchannels

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Sujoy Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This Brief concerns the important problem of critical heat flux in flow boiling in microchannels. A companion edition in the SpringerBrief Subseries on Thermal Engineering and Applied Science to “Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Flow Boiling in Microchannels,” by the same author team, this volume is idea for professionals, researchers, and graduate students concerned with electronic cooling.

  5. Interpreting Flux from Broadband Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter J.; Breeveld, Alice; Roming, Peter W. A.; Siegel, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the transformation of observed photometry into flux for the creation of spectral energy distributions (SED) and the computation of bolometric luminosities. We do this in the context of supernova studies, particularly as observed with the Swift spacecraft, but the concepts and techniques should be applicable to many other types of sources and wavelength regimes. Traditional methods of converting observed magnitudes to flux densities are not very accurate when applied to UV photometry. Common methods for extinction and the integration of pseudo-bolometric fluxes can also lead to inaccurate results. The sources of inaccuracy, though, also apply to other wavelengths. Because of the complicated nature of translating broadband photometry into monochromatic flux densities, comparison between observed photometry and a spectroscopic model is best done by forward modeling the spectrum into the count rates or magnitudes of the observations. We recommend that integrated flux measurements be made using a spectrum or SED which is consistent with the multi-band photometry rather than converting individual photometric measurements to flux densities, linearly interpolating between the points, and integrating. We also highlight some specific areas where the UV flux can be mischaracterized.

  6. Effect of second-phase particles on the properties of W-based materials under high-heat loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao–Yue Tan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available W, W-TaC, and W-TiC materials were subjected to heat–load tests in an electron beam facility (10keV, 8kW at 100 pulses. After heat loading, severe cracks and plastic deformation were detected on the surface of pure W materials. However, plastic deformation was the primary change on the surfaces of W-TaC and W-TiC alloys. This phenomenon was due to the second-phase (TaC and TiC particles dispersed in the W matrix, which strengthened the grain boundaries and prevented crack formation and propagation. In addition, the microhardness of W and W-TiC obviously decreased, whereas that of W-TaC did not change considerably before and after heat loading.

  7. Landau Damping of Transverse Waves in the Exosphere by Fast Particle Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidman, D. A.; Jaggi, R. K.

    1962-01-01

    We have investigated the Landau damping of transverse waves propagating in the thermal exospheric plasma, by fast particle fluxes which also exist in these regions. The most intense non-thermal fluxes so far detected are those of the auroral producing electrons and protons measured by McIlwain. We find that these fluxes may considerably damp the propagation of whistler modes through some regions. The damping of hydromagnetic waves in the exosphere by this mechanism is negligible.

  8. Materials compatibility and aging for flux and cleaner combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, Kim M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Piatt, Rochelle [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A materials study of high reliability electronics cleaning is presented here. In Phase 1, mixed type substrates underwent a condensed contaminants application to view a worst- case scenario for unremoved flux with cleaning agent residue for parts in a silicone oil filled environment. In Phase 2, fluxes applied to copper coupons and to printed wiring boards underwent gentle cleaning then accelerated aging in air at 65% humidity and 30 O C. Both sets were aged for 4 weeks. Contaminants were no-clean (ORL0), water soluble (ORH1 liquid and ORH0 paste), and rosin (RMA; ROL0) fluxes. Defluxing agents were water, solvents, and engineered aqueous defluxers. In the first phase, coupons had flux applied and heated, then were placed in vials of oil with a small amount of cleaning agent and additional coupons. In the second phase, pairs of copper coupons and PWB were hand soldered by application of each flux, using tin-lead solder in a strip across the coupon or a set of test components on the PWB. One of each pair was cleaned in each cleaning agent, the first with a typical clean, and the second with a brief clean. Ionic contamination residue was measured before accelerated aging. After aging, substrates were removed and a visual record of coupon damage made, from which a subjective rank was applied for comparison between the various flux and defluxer combinations; more corrosion equated to higher rank. The ORH1 water soluble flux resulted in the highest ranking in both phases, the RMA flux the least. For the first phase, in which flux and defluxer remained on coupons, the aqueous defluxers led to worse corrosion. The vapor phase cleaning agents resulted in the highest ranking in the second phase, in which there was no physical cleaning. Further study of cleaning and rinsing parameters will be required.

  9. A Reconnecting Flux Rope Dynamo

    OpenAIRE

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined in thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow modeling turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into...

  10. Generalised Geometry and Flux Vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Larfors, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    This note discusses the connection between generalised geometry and flux compactifications of string theory. Firstly, we explain in a pedestrian manner how the supersymmetry constraints of type II ${\\mathcal{N}}=1$ flux compactifications can be restated as integrability constraints on certain generalised complex structures. This reformulation uses generalised complex geometry, a mathematical framework that geometrizes the B-field. Secondly, we discuss how exceptional generalised geometry may provide a similar geometrization of the RR fields. Thirdly, we examine the connection between generalised geometry and non-geometry, and finally we present recent developments where generalised geometry is used to construct explicit examples of flux compactifications to flat space.

  11. Large-surface-area diamond (111) crystal plates for applications in high-heat-load wavefront-preserving x-ray crystal optics

    CERN Document Server

    Stoupin, S; Butler, J E; Kolyadin, A V; Katrusha, A

    2016-01-01

    We report fabrication and results of high-resolution X-ray topography characterization of diamond single crystal plates with a large surface area (10$\\times$10 mm$^2$) and (111) crystal surface orientation for applications in high-heat-load X-ray crystal optics. The plates were fabricated by laser cutting of the (111) facets of diamond crystals grown using high-pressure high-temperature method. The intrinsic crystal quality of a selected 3$\\times$7~mm$^2$ crystal region of one of the studied samples was found to be suitable for applications in wavefront-preserving high-heat-load crystal optics. The wavefront characterization was performed using sequential X-ray diffraction topography in the pseudo plane wave configuration and data analysis using rocking curve topography. The variation of the rocking curve width and peak position measured with a spatial resolution of 13$\\times$13 $\\mu m^2$ over the selected region were found to be less than one microradian.

  12. Large-surface-area diamond (111) crystal plates for applications in high-heat-load wavefront-preserving X-ray crystal optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Antipov, Sergey; Butler, James E; Kolyadin, Alexander V; Katrusha, Andrey

    2016-09-01

    Fabrication and results of high-resolution X-ray topography characterization of diamond single-crystal plates with large surface area (10 mm × 10 mm) and (111) crystal surface orientation for applications in high-heat-load X-ray crystal optics are reported. The plates were fabricated by laser-cutting of the (111) facets of diamond crystals grown using high-pressure high-temperature methods. The intrinsic crystal quality of a selected 3 mm × 7 mm crystal region of one of the studied samples was found to be suitable for applications in wavefront-preserving high-heat-load crystal optics. Wavefront characterization was performed using sequential X-ray diffraction topography in the pseudo plane wave configuration and data analysis using rocking-curve topography. The variations of the rocking-curve width and peak position measured with a spatial resolution of 13 µm × 13 µm over the selected region were found to be less than 1 µrad.

  13. Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Priest, E R; Lee, L C

    1990-01-01

    The American Geophysical Union Chapman Conference on the Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes was held at the Hamilton Princess Hotel, Hamilton, Bermuda on March 27–31, 1989. Topics discussed ranged from solar flux ropes, such as photospheric flux tubes, coronal loops and prominences, to flux ropes in the solar wind, in planetary ionospheres, at the Earth's magnetopause, in the geomagnetic tail and deep in the Earth's magnetosphere. Papers presented at that conference form the nucleus of this book, but the book is more than just a proceedings of the conference. We have solicited articles from all interested in this topic. Thus, there is some material in the book not discussed at the conference. Even in the case of papers presented at the conference, there is generally a much more detailed and rigorous presentation than was possible in the time allowed by the oral and poster presentations.

  14. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a light-water cooled and moderated reactor that is the United States’ highest flux reactor-based neutron source. HFIR...

  15. What is flux balance analysis?

    OpenAIRE

    Orth, Jeffrey D.; Thiele, Ines; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2010-01-01

    Flux balance analysis is a mathematical approach for analyzing the flow of metabolites through a metabolic network. This primer covers the theoretical basis of the approach, several practical examples and a software toolbox for performing the calculations.

  16. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  17. Specification of ROP flux shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Byung Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Gray, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1997-06-01

    The CANDU 9 480/SEU core uses 0.9% SEU (Slightly Enriched Uranium) fuel. The use f SEU fuel enables the reactor to increase the radial power form factor from 0.865, which is typical in current natural uranium CANDU reactors, to 0.97 in the nominal CANDU 9 480/SEU core. The difference is a 12% increase in reactor power. An additional 5% increase can be achieved due to a reduced refuelling ripple. The channel power limits were also increased by 3% for a total reactor power increase of 20%. This report describes the calculation of neutron flux distributions in the CANDU 9 480/SEU core under conditions specified by the C and I engineers. The RFSP code was used to calculate of neutron flux shapes for ROP analysis. Detailed flux values at numerous potential detector sites were calculated for each flux shape. (author). 6 tabs., 70 figs., 4 refs.

  18. Flux Emergence at the Photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2006-12-01

    To model the emergence of magnetic fields at the photosphere, we carried out 3D magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) simulations using the MURaM code. Our simulations take into account the effects of compressibility, energy exchange via radiative transfer and partial ionization in the equation of state. All these physical ingredients are essential for a proper treatment of the problem. In the simulations, an initially buoyant magnetic flux tube is embedded in the upper layers of the convection zone. We find that the interaction between the flux tube and the external flow field has an important influence on the emergent morphology of the magnetic field. Depending on the initial properties of the flux tube (e.g. field strength, twist, entropy etc.), the emergence process can also modify the local granulation pattern. The inclusion of radiative transfer allows us to directly compare the simulation results with real observations of emerging flux.

  19. Periodicities in photospheric magnetic flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Wenbin; WANG; Jingxiu

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic field plays an important role in solar structure and activity. In principle, the determination of magnetic flux would provide the best general-purpose index of solar activity. Currently, the periodicity studies corresponding to photospheric magnetic flux (PMF) are very few possibly due to the absence of a uniform flux sequence. In this paper, by using 383 NSO/Kitt Peak magnetic synoptic charts we reconstruct a flux sequence from February 1975 to August 2003 and perform a relatively systemic periodicity analysis with two methods of the Scargle periodogram and the Morlet wavelet transform. As a result, four periods are found at around 1050, 500, 300 and 160 days. We analyze these periods' temporal variabilities in detail and discuss their respective origins briefly.

  20. 高耐热阻燃ABS材料制备及性能研究%Preparation and Properties of High Heat Resistant and Flame Retardant ABS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪炉林; 焦蒨; 王林; 郑一泉; 麦堪成

    2013-01-01

    With acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene(ABS) as substrate resins,by adding styrene-N-phenylmaleimide-maleic anhydride terpolymer (AS-MS-NB) as heat retardancy,high heat resistant ABS masterbatch was prepared with different content of heat retardancy at 240-270 ℃ in a twin-screw extruder. Meanwhile,by adding 1,2-bis(pentabromophenyl)ethane(DBDPE) to the masterbatch,high heat resistant and flame retardant ABS was fabricated by twin-screw extruder at 180-210 ℃. The results show that,the fabricated high heat resistant and flame retardant ABS material both features high heat resistance and flame retardancy, at the same time, the heat resistance and its content have a positive correlation by this two-step method. Meanwhile, with the DBDPE, the masterbatch heat distortion temperature does not decrease remarkably,bending strength,tensile strength and impact strength decrease slightly,but fluidity improves obviously. The fabricated high heat resistant and flame retardant ABS can be widely applied to the motor,blower,power box,microwave ovens,rice cookers,connectors and so on.%以丙烯腈-丁二烯-苯乙烯塑料(ABS)为基体,以苯乙烯-N-苯基马来酰亚胺-马来酸酐三元共聚物(AS-MS-NB)为耐热剂,在双螺杆挤出机中,于240~270℃制备出不同耐热剂含量的高耐热ABS母粒。以此母粒和十溴二苯乙烷(DBDPE)阻燃体系共混,于180~210℃通过双螺杆挤出机制备出高耐热阻燃ABS。结果表明,通过这种两步法制备的高耐热阻燃ABS材料兼具高耐热和阻燃特性,并且耐热剂含量和其制备的阻燃ABS材料的耐热性具有正相关性。同时加入DBDPE未使高耐热阻燃ABS的热变形温度明显降低,弯曲强度、拉伸强度及冲击强度稍有下降,而流动性明显改善,高耐热阻燃ABS可广泛应用于电机、吹风机、电源盒、微波炉、电饭煲、插排等领域。

  1. The Mini-SPT (Space Particle Telescope) for dual use: Precision flux measurement of low energy proton electron and heavy ion with tracking capability and A compact, low-cost realtime local radiation hazard/alarm detector to be used on board a satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpat, Behcet; Ergin, Tulun; Kalemci, Emrah

    2016-07-01

    The Mini-SPT project is the first, and most important, step towards the ambitious goal of creating a low-cost, compact, radiation hardened and high performance space particle telescope that can be mounted, in the near future, as standard particle detector on any satellite. Mini-SPT will be capable of providing high quality physics data on local space environment. In particular high precision flux measurement and tracking of low energy protons and electrons on different orbits with same instrumentation is of paramount importance for studies as geomagnetically trapped fluxes and space weather dynamics, dark matter search, low energy proton anisotropy and its effects on ICs as well as the solar protons studies. In addition, it will provide real-time "differentiable warnings" about the local space radiation hazard to other electronics systems on board the hosting satellite, including different criticality levels and alarm signals to activate mitigation techniques whenever this is strictly necessary to protect them from temporary/permanent failures. A real-time warning system will help satellite subsystems to save significant amount of power and memory with respect to other conventional techniques where the "mitigation" solutions are required to be active during entire mission life. The Mini-SPT will combine the use of technologies developed in cutting-edge high energy physics experiments (including technology from CMS experiments at CERN) and the development of new charged particle detecting systems for their use for the first time in space. The Mini-SPT essential objective is, by using for the first time in space SIPMs (Silicon Photomultipliers) technology for TOF and energy measurements, the production of high quality data with a good time, position and energy resolutions. The mini-SPT will consists of three main sub-units: a- A tracking and dE/dX measuring sub-detector which will be based on silicon pixel detectors (SPD) coupled to the rad-hard chip ROC-DIG (Read

  2. UVIS G280 Flux Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushouse, Howard

    2009-07-01

    Flux calibration, image displacement, and spectral trace of the UVIS G280 grism will be established using observations of the HST flux standard start GD71. Accompanying direct exposures will provide the image displacement measurements and wavelength zeropoints for dispersed exposures. The calibrations will be obtained at the central position of each CCD chip and at the center of the UVIS field. No additional field-dependent variations will be derived.

  3. Boundary fluxes for nonlocal diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortazar, Carmen; Elgueta, Manuel; Rossi, Julio D.; Wolanski, Noemi

    We study a nonlocal diffusion operator in a bounded smooth domain prescribing the flux through the boundary. This problem may be seen as a generalization of the usual Neumann problem for the heat equation. First, we prove existence, uniqueness and a comparison principle. Next, we study the behavior of solutions for some prescribed boundary data including blowing up ones. Finally, we look at a nonlinear flux boundary condition.

  4. P fluxes and exotic branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Davide M.; Riccioni, Fabio; Risoli, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    We consider the N = 1 superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of P fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the Q flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a {T}^6/[{Z}_2× {Z}_2] orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the P flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string theory.

  5. $P$ fluxes and exotic branes

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardo, Davide M; Risoli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We consider the ${\\cal N}=1$ superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of $P$ fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the $Q$ flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a $T^6/[\\mathbb{Z}_2 \\times \\mathbb{Z}_2 ]$ orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the $P$ flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string t...

  6. Electron Cyclotron Emission Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Cristina

    2009-11-01

    There is much interest in studying plasmas that generate hot electrons. The goal of this project is to develop a wide band electron cyclotron radiometer to measure the non-Maxwellian rapid rises in electron temperature. These rapid increases in temperature will then be correlated to instabilities in the plasma. This project explores a type of noncontact temperature measurement. We will attempt to show the feasibility of electron cyclotron emissions to measure the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment's electron plasma temperature. The radiometer has been designed to have 100dB of gain and a sensitivity of 24mV/dB given by its logarithmic amplifier. If successful, this radiometer will be used as a diagnostic tool in later projects such as the proposed experiment studying magnetic reconnection using solar flux loops.

  7. Direct evidence for a three-dimensional magnetic flux rope flanked by two active magnetic reconnection X lines at Earth's magnetopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øieroset, M; Phan, T D; Eastwood, J P; Fujimoto, M; Daughton, W; Shay, M A; Angelopoulos, V; Mozer, F S; McFadden, J P; Larson, D E; Glassmeier, K-H

    2011-10-14

    We report the direct detection by three THEMIS spacecraft of a magnetic flux rope flanked by two active X lines producing colliding plasma jets near the center of the flux rope. The observed density depletion and open magnetic field topology inside the flux rope reveal important three-dimensional effects. There was also evidence for nonthermal electron energization within the flux rope core where the fluxes of 1-4 keV superthermal electrons were higher than those in the converging reconnection jets. The observed ion and electron energizations differ from current theoretical predictions.

  8. Runaway electrons and ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2017-05-01

    The potential for damage, the magnitude of the extrapolation, and the importance of the atypical—incidents that occur once in a thousand shots—make theory and simulation essential for ensuring that relativistic runaway electrons will not prevent ITER from achieving its mission. Most of the theoretical literature on electron runaway assumes magnetic surfaces exist. ITER planning for the avoidance of halo and runaway currents is focused on massive-gas or shattered-pellet injection of impurities. In simulations of experiments, such injections lead to a rapid large-scale magnetic-surface breakup. Surface breakup, which is a magnetic reconnection, can occur on a quasi-ideal Alfvénic time scale when the resistance is sufficiently small. Nevertheless, the removal of the bulk of the poloidal flux, as in halo-current mitigation, is on a resistive time scale. The acceleration of electrons to relativistic energies requires the confinement of some tubes of magnetic flux within the plasma and a resistive time scale. The interpretation of experiments on existing tokamaks and their extrapolation to ITER should carefully distinguish confined versus unconfined magnetic field lines and quasi-ideal versus resistive evolution. The separation of quasi-ideal from resistive evolution is extremely challenging numerically, but is greatly simplified by constraints of Maxwell’s equations, and in particular those associated with magnetic helicity. The physics of electron runaway along confined magnetic field lines is clarified by relations among the poloidal flux change required for an e-fold in the number of electrons, the energy distribution of the relativistic electrons, and the number of relativistic electron strikes that can be expected in a single disruption event.

  9. Emission-Line Fluxes of Northern Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Aksaker, N; Kızıloğlu, Ü; Atalay, B

    2015-01-01

    We present long slit spectrophotometric emission line fluxes of bright and extended (<5 arcsec in diameter) Planetary Nebulae (PNe) selected from Acker et al. 1992 catalog with suitable equitorial coordinates for Northern hemisphere. In total, 17 PNe have been choosen and observed in 2008--2010. To measure absolute fluxes, broad slit sizes, ranging from 3.5\\arcsec to 7.5\\arcsec were used and thus equivalent widths of all observable emission line fluxes were also calculated. Among 17 PNe's observed, line flux measurements of 12 of them were made for the first time. This work also aims to extend the sky coverage of emission line flux standards in Northern hemisphere (Dopita & Hua 1997 - 52 PNe in Southern hemisphere; Wright et al. 2005 - 6 PNe in Northern hemisphere). Electron temperatures and densities, and chemical abundances of these PNe were also calculated in this work. These data is expected to lead the photometric or spectrometric further work for absolute emission line flux measurements needed fo...

  10. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  11. Characterization of local heat fluxes around ICRF antennas on JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campergue, A.-L. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, F77455 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Jacquet, P.; Monakhov, I.; Arnoux, G.; Brix, M.; Sirinelli, A. [Euratom/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Garching (Germany); Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Electronics, Torino (Italy); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    When using Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating, enhanced power deposition on Plasma-Facing Components (PFCs) close to the antennas can occur. Experiments have recently been carried out on JET with the new ITER-Like-Wall (ILW) to characterize the heat fluxes on the protection of the JET ICRF antennas, using Infra-Red (IR) thermography measurement. The measured heat flux patterns along the poloidal limiters surrounding powered antennas were compared to predictions from a simple RF sheath rectification model. The RF electric field, parallel to the static magnetic field in front of the antenna, was evaluated using the TOPICA code, integrating a 3D flattened model of the JET A2 antennas. The poloidal density variation in front of the limiters was obtained from the mapping of the Li-beam or edge reflectometry measurements using the flux surface geometry provided by EFIT equilibrium reconstruction. In many cases, this simple model can well explain the position of the maximum heat flux on the different protection limiters and the heat-flux magnitude, confirming that the parallel RF electric field and the electron plasma density in front of the antenna are the main driving parameters for ICRF-induced local heat fluxes.

  12. First Reconnected Flux Tubes in the Near-Earth Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L.; Lapenta, G.; Newman, D. L.; Spanswick, E. L.; Baker, J. B.; Clausen, L.; Larson, D. E.; Frey, H. U.; Singer, H. J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Ergun, R. E.; Bonnell, J. W.; McFadden, J. P.; Glassmeier, K.; Baumjohann, W.

    2010-12-01

    Following the onset of reconnection, the first reconnecting flux tubes move away from the reconnection site creating an over-dense region in front of their leading edge, with a low density region lagging behind. The initial front observed at the magnetic equator has a fairly well distinguishable magnetic signature, which in space observation constitute a sub category of a broader group classified as magnetic pile-up events (or, alternatively, as dipolarization events). The first reconnecting flux tubes at the magnetic equator do not form a classic shock, but are associated with lower hybrid drift instabilities and whistler waves. As has been shown in work by others, the first reconnecting flux tubes are associated with strong dissipation, especially ion dissipation. In the high density region, the electrons and ions are decelerated and redirected perpendicular to the ejected exhaust. Near the first reconnecting flux tubes the ions gain energy and the electrons consist of two populations, one bi-streaming and the other more energetic (warmer) in the perpendicular direction. One particular magnetospheric disturbance event will be presented form the THEMIS mission where good observations from ground assets exits. Aurora intensification, enhanced 30 keV electrons and ionospheric currents are associated with this event. The radar clearly demonstrate the changes in the convection pattern helping to understand the satellite observations from the THEMIS and the GOES satellites. This reconfiguration event occurs in discrete steps by separate reconnection events.

  13. Data assimilation tool to reconstruct particle flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdarie, Sebastien A.; Maget, Vincent; Lazaro, Didier; Sandberg, Ingmar

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the EU-FP7 MAARBLE project, the Salammbô code and an ensemble Kalman filter is being used to reproduce the electron radiation belt dynamics during storms: (1) The ONERA data assimilation tool has been improved to ingest count rates instead of flux when the instrument response function is available. As an example, the ESA/SREM radiation monitor has complex response functions (proton and electron events are mixed, and for a given specie the instrument responds to a broad range of energies with different efficiencies) which makes very challenging to get fluxes out of count rates. (2) INTEGRAL/SREM, GIOVE-B/SREM, XMM/ERMD and GOES/SEM data assimilation is performed to reproduce with high fidelity the electron belt dynamics during magnetic storms. (3) Because the outputs of the tool are phase space densities, it is then possible to reconstruct INTEGRAL/SREM and GIOVE-B/SREM fluxes time series. In the present talk, an overview of the data assimilation tool will be given. The advantage of using assimilation tool to reconstruct particle flux measurements will be discussed. MAARBLE has received fundings from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-.2010-1, SP1 Cooperation, Collaborative project) under grant agreement n284520. This paper reflects only the authors' views and the European Union is not liable for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

  14. Corrections to the fluxes of a Neutrino Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Broncano, A

    2003-01-01

    In view of their physics goals, future neutrino factories from muon decay aim at an overall flux precision of ${\\cal O}(1%)$ or better. We analytically study the QED radiative corrections to the differential distributions of muon decay. The ${\\cal O}(1%)$ corrections to the energy and angular distributions for electrons are obtained in the ``leading log'' approximation, while the exact corrections are considered for neutrinos. Kinematic uncertainties due to the divergence of the muon beam are considered as well. The resulting corrections to the neutrino flux turn out to be of order ${\\cal O}(0.1%)$, safely below the required precision.

  15. Classical Heat-Flux Measurements in Coronal Plasmas from Collective Thomson-Scattering Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Katz, J.; Froula, D. H.; Rozmus, W.

    2016-10-01

    Collective Thomson scattering was used to measure heat flux in coronal plasmas. The relative amplitude of the Thomson-scattered power into the up- and downshifted electron plasma wave features was used to determine the flux of electrons moving along the temperature gradient at three to four times the electron thermal velocity. Simultaneously, the ion-acoustic wave features were measured. Their relative amplitude was used to measure the flux of the return-current electrons. The frequencies of these ion-acoustic and electron plasma wave features provide local measurements of the electron temperature and density. These spectra were obtained at five locations along the temperature gradient in a laser-produced blowoff plasma. These measurements of plasma parameters are used to infer the Spitzer-Härm flux (qSH = - κ∇Te ) and are in good agreement with the values of the heat flux measured from the scattering-feature asymmetries. Additional experiments probed plasma waves perpendicular to the temperature gradient. The data show small effects resulting from heat flux compared to probing waves along the temperature gradient. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  16. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  17. Two-Phase Flow in High-Heat-Flux Micro-Channel Heat Sink for Refrigeration Cooling Applications. Part 1: Micro-Channel Heat Sink for Direct Refrigeration Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    relation [Shah and London (1978), Incropera and Dewitt (2002)]: Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory 21 AP,pg = L- fsp.,G 2V, (1.3.4) where f,,.,Reg = 24...1.4.1) where q is the fin efficiency. Since the top wall is adiabatic, the fin efficiency is given by [ Incropera and Dewitt (2002)] tanh (m Hh...phase convection heat transfer coefficient prevalent in the highly subcooled inlet is given by the relation ( Incropera and Dewitt, 2002) Nu = -h D

  18. Two-Phase Flow in High-Heat-Flux Micro-Channel Heat Sink for Refrigeration Cooling Applications. Part 2: Low Temperature Hybrid Micro-Channel/Micro-Jet Impingement Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    pressure gradient ( Incropera , 1999). Watson (1964) used inviscid theory to determine Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory 23 thickness h of the wall jet...the pressure drop coefficient, f is inversely proportional to jet Reynolds ( Incropera , 1999) f = KRe,.,, (4.4) and K is fairly constant for the...both pool and forced convection boiling on submerged bodies in saturated liquids", Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, Vol. 26, pp. 389-399. Incropera , F.P

  19. Non-destructive testing of high heat flux components of fusion devices by infrared thermography: modeling and signal processing; Controle non destructif par thermographie infrarouge des composants face au plasma des machines de fusion controlee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cismondi, F

    2007-07-01

    In Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) the joint of the CFC armour material onto the metallic CuCrZr heat sink needs to be significant defects free. Detection of material flaws is a major issue of the PFCs acceptance protocol. A Non-Destructive Technique (NDT) based upon active infrared thermography allows testing PFCs on SATIR tests bed in Cadarache. Up to now defect detection was based on the comparison of the surface temperature evolution of the inspected component with that of a supposed 'defect-free' one (used as a reference element). This work deals with improvement of thermal signal processing coming from SATIR. In particular the contributions of the thermal modelling and statistical signal processing converge in this work. As for thermal modelling, the identification of a sensitive parameter to defect presence allows improving the quantitative estimation of defect Otherwise Finite Element (FE) modeling of SATIR allows calculating the so called deterministic numerical tile. Statistical approach via the Monte Carlo technique extends the numerical tile concept to the numerical population concept. As for signal processing, traditional statistical treatments allow a better localization of the bond defect processing thermo-signal by itself, without utilising a reference signal. Moreover the problem of detection and classification of random signals can be solved by maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio. Two filters maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio are optimized: the stochastic matched filter aims at detects detection and the constrained stochastic matched filter aims at defects classification. Performances are quantified and methods are compared via the ROC curves. (author)

  20. Quantum transport through two series Aharonov-Bohm interferometers with zero total magnetic flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jian-Ming; Wang Rui; Zhang Yong-Ping; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2007-01-01

    With the help of nonequilibrium Green's function technique, the electronic transport through series AharonovBohm (AB) interferometers is investigated. We obtain the AB interference pattern of the transition probability characterized by the algebraic sum φ and the difference θ of two magnetic fluxes, and particularly a general rule of AB oscillation period depending on the ratio of integer quantum numbers of the fluxes. A parity effect is observed, showing the asymmetric AB oscillations with respect to the even and odd quantum numbers of the total flux in antiparallel AB interferometers. It is also shown that the AB flux can shift the Fano resonance peaks of the transmission spectrum.

  1. Physics of magnetic flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Ryutova, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first account of the physics of magnetic flux tubes from their fundamental properties to collective phenomena in an ensembles of flux tubes. The physics of magnetic flux tubes is absolutely vital for understanding fundamental physical processes in the solar atmosphere shaped and governed by magnetic fields. High-resolution and high cadence observations from recent space and  ground-based instruments taken simultaneously at different heights and temperatures not only show the ubiquity of filamentary structure formation but also allow to study how various events are interconnected by system of magnetic flux tubes. The book covers both theory and observations. Theoretical models presented in analytical and phenomenological forms are tailored for practical applications. These are welded with state-of-the-art observations from early decisive ones to the most recent data that open a new phase-space for exploring the Sun and sun-like stars. Concept of magnetic flux tubes is central to various magn...

  2. Towards Hypermedia Electronic Publishing

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantas, Dimitri; Morin, Jean-Henry

    1995-01-01

    The most important problem that decision makers face in today's ever increasing information flux is how to find efficiently and fast the useful information. Hypermedia Electronic Publishing systems, supporting active information distribution and offering hypertext browsing facilities, provide a promising solution to this problem. Nevertheless several issues, like value added services, retrieval and access mechanism, information marketing as well as financial and security aspects should be res...

  3. Electrical and electronic principles

    CERN Document Server

    Knight, S A

    1991-01-01

    Electrical and Electronic Principles, 2, Second Edition covers the syllabus requirements of BTEC Unit U86/329, including the principles of control systems and elements of data transmission. The book first tackles series and parallel circuits, electrical networks, and capacitors and capacitance. Discussions focus on flux density, electric force, permittivity, Kirchhoff's laws, superposition theorem, arrangement of resistors, internal resistance, and powers in a circuit. The text then takes a look at capacitors in circuit, magnetism and magnetization, electromagnetic induction, and alternating v

  4. Analytical model of particle and heat flux collection by dust immersed in dense magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignitchouk, L.; Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.

    2017-10-01

    A comprehensive analytical description is presented for the particle and heat fluxes collected by dust in dense magnetized plasmas. Compared to the widely used orbital motion limited theory, the suppression of cross-field transport leads to a strong reduction of the electron fluxes, while ion collection is inhibited by thin-sheath effects and the formation of a potential overshoot along the field lines. As a result, the incoming heat flux loses its sensitivity to the floating potential, thereby diminishing the importance of electron emission processes in dust survivability. Numerical simulations implementing the new model for ITER-like detached divertor plasmas predict a drastic enhancement of the dust lifetime.

  5. Examination of material performance of W exposed to high heat load: Postmortem analysis of W exposed to TEXTOR plasma and E-beam test stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, T.; Philipps, V.; Nakamura, K.; Fujine, M.; Ueda, Y.; Wada, M.; Schweer, B.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Unterberg, B.

    1997-02-01

    We have examined the behavior of high Z limiters exposed to TEXTOR edge plasma and found that under certain conditions high Z materials are compatible with plasmas. In high density Ohmic plasmas the accumulation of a high Z impurity in the plasma center with significant radiation is observed, whereas an auxiliary heating like NBI and ICRH enhances the impurity exhaust with saw tooth activity. For a practical use of high Z plasma facing materials, extremely high heat load from the plasma becomes a serious concern. In the present work we have conducted the high heat load tests of tungsten (W) using two different heat sources, one is the W limiter exposed to TEXTOR plasma and the other is various W samples heat loaded with an intense E-beam using the JEBIS facility in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). From the test results we have to conclude that W, if applied in the form of the bulk material, should be used above the ductile brittle transition temperature (DBTT) but below about 1500°C to avoid the recrystallization. Maximum heat load tolerable without surface melting is about 20 MW/m 2 for several seconds. The monocrystalline used at high temperatures shows very good performance, though the production of the monocrystalline with a desired shape is not easy. Considering its brittle nature, hard machining and heavy mass, bulk W cannot be a structure material but be used as a thin tile or deposited film on some structure materials. Unfortunately, however, the thermal expansion coefficient of W is so small that brazing of W to a heat sink material like Cu which has a much larger thermal expansion coefficient would easily result in cracking due to the large thermal stress. Thus the development of tungsten plasma facing component (PFC) needs much effort in future.

  6. A Reconnecting Flux Rope Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined in thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow modeling turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the Solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  7. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit Rm→∞ for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  8. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Barenghi, Carlo F; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit R_{m}-->infinity for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  9. BVOC fluxes above mountain grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bamberger

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Grasslands comprise natural tropical savannah over managed temperate fields to tundra and cover one quarter of the Earth's land surface. Plant growth, maintenance and decay result in volatile organic compound (VOCs emissions to the atmosphere. Furthermore, biogenic VOCs (BVOCs are emitted as a consequence of various environmental stresses including cutting and drying during harvesting. Fluxes of BVOCs were measured with a proton-transfer-reaction-mass-spectrometer (PTR-MS over temperate mountain grassland in Stubai Valley (Tyrol, Austria over one growing season (2008. VOC fluxes were calculated from the disjunct PTR-MS data using the virtual disjunct eddy covariance method and the gap filling method. Methanol fluxes obtained with the two independent flux calculation methods were highly correlated (y = 0.95×−0.12, R2 = 0.92. Methanol showed strong daytime emissions throughout the growing season – with maximal values of 9.7 nmol m−2 s−1, methanol fluxes from the growing grassland were considerably higher at the beginning of the growing season in June compared to those measured during October (2.5 nmol m−2 s−1. Methanol was the only component that exhibited consistent fluxes during the entire growing periods of the grass. The cutting and drying of the grass increased the emissions of methanol to up to 78.4 nmol m−2 s−1. In addition, emissions of acetaldehyde (up to 11.0 nmol m−2 s−1, and hexenal (leaf aldehyde, up to 8.6 nmol m−2 s−1 were detected during/after harvesting.

  10. Where is the Open Flux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Jon A.; Downs, Cooper; Caplan, Ronald M.; Lionello, Roberto; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete; Henney, Carl John; Arge, Charles; Owens, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    The Sun’s magnetic field has been observed in the photosphere from ground- and space-based observatories for many years. Global maps of the solar magnetic field based on full disk magnetograms (either built up over a solar rotation, or evolved using flux transport models) are commonly used as boundary conditions for coronal and solar wind models. Maps from different observatories typically agree qualitatively but often disagree quantitatively. Estimation of the coronal/solar wind physics can range from potential field source surface (PFSS) models with empirical prescriptions to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models with realistic energy transport and sub-grid scale descriptions of heating and acceleration. Two primary observational constraints on the models are (1) The open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes observed in emission, and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. We have investigated the July 2010 time period, using PFSS and MHD models computed using several available magnetic maps, coronal hole boundaries detected from STEREO and SDO EUV observations, and estimates of the interplanetary magnetic flux from in situ ACE measurements. We show that for all the model/map combinations, models that agree for (1) underestimate the interplanetary magnetic flux, or, conversely, for models to match (2), the modeled open field regions are larger than observed coronal holes. Alternatively, we estimate the open magnetic flux entirely from solar observations by combining detected coronal hole boundaries with observatory synoptic magnetic maps, and show that this method also underestimates the interplanetary magnetic flux. We discuss possible resolutions.Research supported by NASA, AFOSR, and NSF.

  11. Maximum available flux of charged particles from the laser ablation plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yasuo; Itagaki, Tomonobu; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-12-01

    The laser ablation plasma was characterized for high-flux sources of ion and electron beams. An ablation plasma was biased to a positive or a negative high voltage, and the fluxes of charged particles through a pair of extraction electrodes were measured as a function of the laser intensity IL. Maximum available fluxes and the ratios of electron and ion beam currents Je/Ji were evaluated as a function of the laser irradiance. The ion and the electron fluxes increased with a laser intensity and the current ratio was around 40 at IL = 1.3 × 108 W/cm2 which monotonically decreased with an increase of the laser intensity. The current ratios Je/Ji were correlated to the parameters of ablation plasma measured by the electrostatic probes. The results showed that the ion fluxes are basically enhanced by super-sonically drifting ions in the plasma and the electron fluxes are also enhanced by the drift motion together with a reduction of the sheath potential due to the enhanced ion flux to the surrounding wall.

  12. Flux attenuation at NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Carl E.; Scholl, Kent L.; Lewandowski, Allan A.

    1994-10-01

    The High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has a faceted primary concentrator and a long focal-length-to-diameter ratio (due to its off-axis design). Each primary facet can be aimed individually to produce different flux distributions at the target plane. Two different types of attenuators are used depending on the flux distribution. A sliding-plate attenuator is used primarily when the facets are aimed at the same target point. The alternate attenuator resembles a venetian blind. Both attenuators are located between the concentrator and the focal point. The venetian-blind attenuator is primarily used to control the levels of sunlight failing on a target when the primary concentrators are not focused to a single point. This paper will demonstrate the problem of using the sliding-plate attenuator with a faceted concentrator when the facets are not aimed at the same target point. We will show that although the alternate attenuator necessarily blocks a certain amount of incoming sunlight, even when fully open, it provides a more even attenuation of the flux for alternate aiming strategies.

  13. Measurements of The Neutrino Flux Using Fine-Grained Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xinchun; Mishra, Sanjib; Petti, Roberto; Duyang, Hongyue; LBNE Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The reference design of the near detector for the LBNE/F experiment is a high-resolution Fine-Grained Tracker (FGT) capable of precisely measuring all four species of neutrinos: νμ, νe, νμ and νe. The goals of the FGT is to constrain the systematic errors, below the corresponding statistical error in the far detector, for all oscillation studies; and to conduct a panoply of precision measurements and searches in neutrino physics. We present sensitivity studies - critical to constraining the systematics in oscillation searches - of measurements of the absolute and relative neutrino flux using the various techniques: 1) neutrino electron NC (CC) scattering, 2) νμ proton QE scattering, 3) Coherent ρ production for absolute flux and 4) Low- ν method for relative flux.

  14. Charm production in flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Aguiar, C E; Nazareth, R A M S; Pech, G

    1996-01-01

    We argue that the non-perturbative Schwinger mechanism may play an important role in the hadronic production of charm. We present a flux tube model which assumes that the colliding hadrons become color charged because of gluon exchange, and that a single non-elementary flux tube is built up as they recede. The strong chromoelectric field inside this tube creates quark pairs (including charmed ones) and the ensuing color screening breaks the tube into excited hadronic clusters. On their turn these clusters, or `fireballs', decay statistically into the final hadrons. The model is able to account for the soft production of charmed, strange and lighter hadrons within a unified framework.

  15. Charm production in flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, C. E.; Kodama, T.; Nazareth, R. A. M. S.; Pech, G.

    1996-01-01

    We argue that the nonperturbative Schwinger mechanism may play an important role in the hadronic production of charm. We present a flux tube model which assumes that the colliding hadrons become color charged because of gluon exchange, and that a single nonelementary flux tube is built up as they recede. The strong chromoelectric field inside this tube creates quark pairs (including charmed ones) and the ensuing color screening breaks the tube into excited hadronic clusters. In their turn these clusters, or ``fireballs,'' decay statistically into the final hadrons. The model is able to account for the soft production of charmed, strange, and lighter hadrons within a unified framework.

  16. Initiation of CMEs by Magnetic Flux Emergence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Govind Dubey; Bart van der Holst; Stefaan Poedts

    2006-06-01

    The initiation of solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is studied in the framework of numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The initial CME model includes a magnetic flux rope in spherical, axisymmetric geometry. The initial configuration consists of a magnetic flux rope embedded in a gravitationally stratified solar atmosphere with a background dipole magnetic field. The flux rope is in equilibrium due to an image current below the photosphere. An emerging flux triggering mechanism is used to make this equilibrium system unstable. When the magnetic flux emerges within the filament below the flux rope, this results in a catastrophic behavior similar to previous models. As a result, the flux rope rises and a current sheet forms below it. It is shown that the magnetic reconnection in the current sheet below the flux rope in combination with the outward curvature forces results in a fast ejection of the flux rope as observed for solar CMEs.We have done a parametric study of the emerging flux rate.

  17. Multispecies Density and Temperature Gradient Dependence of Quasilinear Particle and Energy Fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Rewoldt; R.V. Budny; W.M. Tang

    2004-08-09

    The variations of the normalized quasilinear particle and energy fluxes with artificial changes in the density and temperature gradients, as well as the variations of the linear growth rates and real frequencies, for ion temperature gradient and trapped-electron modes, are calculated. The quasilinear fluxes are normalized to the total energy flux, summed over all species. Here, realistic cases for tokamaks and spherical torii are considered which have two impurity species. For situations where there are substantial changes in the normalized fluxes, the ''diffusive approximation,'' in which the normalized fluxes are taken to be linear in the gradients, is seen to be inaccurate. Even in the case of small artificial changes in density or temperature gradients, changes in the fluxes of different species (''off-diagonal'') generally are significant, or even dominant, compared to those for the same species (''diagonal'').

  18. Hard electronics; Hard electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    In the fields of power conversion devices and broadcasting/communication amplifiers, high power, high frequency and low losses are desirable. Further, for electronic elements in aerospace/aeronautical/geothermal surveys, etc., heat resistance to 500degC is required. Devices which respond to such hard specifications are called hard electronic devices. However, with Si which is at the core of the present electronics, the specifications cannot fully be fulfilled because of the restrictions arising from physical values. Accordingly, taking up new device materials/structures necessary to construct hard electronics, technologies to develop these to a level of IC were examined and studied. They are a technology to make devices/IC of new semiconductors such as SiC, diamond, etc. which can handle higher temperature, higher power and higher frequency than Si and also is possible of reducing losses, a technology to make devices of hard semiconducter materials such as a vacuum microelectronics technology using ultra-micro/high-luminance electronic emitter using negative electron affinity which diamond, etc. have, a technology to make devices of oxides which have various electric properties, etc. 321 refs., 194 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Energy distribution asymmetry of electron precipitation signatures at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soobiah, Y. I. J.; Barabash, S.; Nilsson, H.; Stenberg, G.; Lundin, R.; Coates, A. J.; Winningham, J. D.; Frahm, R. A.

    2013-02-01

    The different types of asymmetry observed in the energy distributions of electrons and heavy-ions (M/Q=16-44) during signatures of electron precipitation in the Martian ionosphere have been classified. This has been achieved using the space plasma instrumentation of MEX ASPERA-3 from peri-centre altitude to 2200 km. ASPERA-3 ELS observes signatures of electron precipitation on 43.0% of MEX orbits. Unaccelerated electrons in the form of sudden electron flux enhancements are the most common type of electron precipitation signature at Mars and account for ∼70% of the events observed in this study. Electrons that form unaccelerated electron precipitation signatures are either local ionospheric electrons with enhanced density, or electrons transported from another region of ionosphere, solar wind or tail, or a combination of local and transported electrons. The heating of electrons has a strong influence on the shape of most electron energy spectra from accelerated precipitation signatures. On most occasions the general flow of heavy-ions away from Mars is unchanged during the precipitation of electrons, which is thought to be the result of the finite gyroradius effect of the heavy-ions on crustal magnetic field lines. Only ∼17% of events show some form of heavy-ion acceleration that is either concurrent or at the periphery of an electron precipitation signature. The most common combination of electron and heavy-ion energy distributions for signatures of electron precipitation involves electrons that visually have very little asymmetry or are isotropic and heavy-ions that have a upward net flux, and suggest the upward current associated with aurora. Due to a lack of reliable measurements of electrons travelling towards Mars, it is likely we miss further evidence of upward currents. The second most common combination of electron and heavy-ion energy distributions for signatures of electron precipitation, are those distributions of electrons that are asymmetric and

  20. 电子系统的热仿真及热测试研究%A Study on Thermal Simulation and Thermal Test in Electronic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾林卫

    2011-01-01

    Through introduction of thermal control technology in electronic system , analyzing the relation between reliability of electronic system and thermal simulation. The way and measures of thermal test through introducing research process of cooling module for a project are decribed in details, the function of thermal test in high heat-flux thermal control technology is highlighted. Then,the impro tance of collaborative operation for thermal simulation and thermal test by comparing results of thermal simulation and data of thennal test is explained further with an example.%通过对电子系统热控制技术的介绍,分析了电子系统的可靠性与热仿真之间的关系,阐述了热仿真的优点.详细介绍了热测试的方法和手段,突出了热测试在高热流密度热控技术中的作用,并以实际应用中的热仿真结果与热测试数据进行了比较,进一步说明了热仿真与热测试协同工作,相互验证的重要性.

  1. Black branes in flux compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torroba, Gonzalo; Wang, Huajia

    2013-10-01

    We construct charged black branes in type IIA flux compactifications that are dual to (2 + 1)-dimensional field theories at finite density. The internal space is a general Calabi-Yau manifold with fluxes, with internal dimensions much smaller than the AdS radius. Gauge fields descend from the 3-form RR potential evaluated on harmonic forms of the Calabi-Yau, and Kaluza-Klein modes decouple. Black branes are described by a four-dimensional effective field theory that includes only a few light fields and is valid over a parametrically large range of scales. This effective theory determines the low energy dynamics, stability and thermodynamic properties. Tools from flux compactifications are also used to construct holographic CFTs with no relevant scalar operators, that can lead to symmetric phases of condensed matter systems stable to very low temperatures. The general formalism is illustrated with simple examples such as toroidal compactifications and manifolds with a single size modulus. We initiate the classification of holographic phases of matter described by flux compactifications, which include generalized Reissner-Nordstrom branes, nonsupersymmetric AdS2×R2 and hyperscaling violating solutions.

  2. Investigating radiation belt losses though numerical modelling of precipitating fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP may be the most significant inner radiation belt loss process for some electron energy ranges. One area of uncertainty lies in identifying a typical estimate of the precipitating fluxes from the examples given in the literature to date. Here we aim to solve this difficulty through modelling satellite and ground-based observations of onset and decay of the precipitation and its effects in the ionosphere by examining WEP-produced Trimpi perturbations in subionospheric VLF transmissions. In this study we find that typical Trimpi are well described by the effects of WEP spectra derived from the AE-5 inner radiation belt model for typical precipitating energy fluxes. This confirms the validity of the radiation belt lifetimes determined in previous studies using these flux parameters. We find that the large variation in observed Trimpi perturbation size occurring over time scales of minutes to hours is primarily due to differing precipitation flux levels rather than changing WEP spectra. Finally, we show that high-time resolution measurements during the onset of Trimpi perturbations should provide a useful signature for discriminating WEP Trimpi from non-WEP Trimpi, due to the pulsed nature of the WEP arrival.

  3. Electronic Cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... New FDA Regulations Text Size: A A A Electronic Cigarettes Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are battery operated products designed ... more about: The latest news and events about electronic cigarettes on this FDA page Electronic cigarette basics ...

  4. On the Charm Contribution to the Atmospheric Neutrino Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Halzen, Francis

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the estimate of the charm particle contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux that is expected to dominate at high energies because long-lived high-energy pions and kaons interact in the atmosphere before decaying into neutrinos. We focus on the production of forward charm particles which carry a large fraction of the momentum of the incident proton. In the case of strange particles, such a component is familiar from the abundant production of $K^{+} \\Lambda$ pairs. These forward charm particles can dominate the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux in underground experiments. Modern collider experiments have no coverage in the very large rapidity region where charm forward pair production dominates. Using archival accelerator data as well as IceCube measurements of atmospheric electron and muon neutrino fluxes, we obtain an upper limit on forward $\\bar{D}^0 \\Lambda_c$ pair production and on the associated flux of high-energy atmospheric neutrinos. We conclude that the prompt flux may dominate t...

  5. Project SOLWIND: Space radiation exposure. [evaluation of particle fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    A special orbital radiation study was conducted for the SOLWIND project to evaluate mission-encountered energetic particle fluxes. Magnetic field calculations were performed with a current field model, extrapolated to the tentative spacecraft launch epoch with linear time terms. Orbital flux integrations for circular flight paths were performed with the latest proton and electron environment models, using new improved computational methods. Temporal variations in the ambient electron environment are considered and partially accounted for. Estimates of average energetic solar proton fluences are given for a one year mission duration at selected integral energies ranging from E greater than 10 to E greater than 100 MeV; the predicted annual fluence is found to relate to the period of maximum solar activity during the next solar cycle. The results are presented in graphical and tabular form; they are analyzed, explained, and discussed.

  6. Delivery of completed irradiation vehicles and the quality assurance document to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McDuffee, Joel Lee [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report details the initial fabrication and delivery of two Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) irradiation capsules (ATFSC01 and ATFSC02), with associated quality assurance documentation, to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The capsules and documentation were delivered by September 30, 2015, thus meeting the deadline for milestone M3FT-15OR0202268. These irradiation experiments are testing silicon carbide composite tubes in order to obtain experimental validation of thermo-mechanical models of stress states in SiC cladding irradiated under a prototypic high heat flux. This document contains a copy of the completed capsule fabrication request sheets, which detail all constituent components, pertinent drawings, etc., along with a detailed summary of the capsule assembly process performed by the Thermal Hydraulics and Irradiation Engineering Group (THIEG) in the Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division (RNSD). A complete fabrication package record is maintained by the THIEG and is available upon request.

  7. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Ali Cavasonza, L; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H S; Li, J Q; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, X; Wang, X Q; Wang, Z X; Wei, C C; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J H; Zhang, S D; Zhang, S W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhu, Z Q; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-08-26

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×10^{5} antiproton events and 2.42×10^{9} proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p[over ¯], proton p, and positron e^{+} fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e^{-} flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  8. CrossRef Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M  J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E  F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X  D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M  J; Chang, Y  H; Chen, A  I; Chen, G  M; Chen, H  S; Cheng, L; Chou, H  Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C  H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y  M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M  B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R  J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D  M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K  H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K  C; He, Z  H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T  H; Huang, H; Huang, Z  C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W  Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S  C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G  N; Kim, K  S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M  S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H  T; Lee, S  C; Leluc, C; Li, H  S; Li, J  Q; Li, Q; Li, T  X; Li, W; Li, Z  H; Li, Z  Y; Lim, S; Lin, C  H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S  Q; Lu, Y  S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J  Z; Lv, S  S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D  C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J  Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X  M; Qin, X; Qu, Z  Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P  G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J  S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S  M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E  S; Shan, B  S; Shi, J  Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J  W; Sun, W  H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X  W; Tang, Z  C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C  C; Ting, S  M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J  P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L  Q; Wang, N  H; Wang, Q  L; Wang, X; Wang, X  Q; Wang, Z  X; Wei, C  C; Weng, Z  L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R  Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y  J; Yu, Z  Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J  H; Zhang, S  D; Zhang, S  W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z  M; Zhu, Z  Q; Zhuang, H  L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×105 antiproton events and 2.42×109 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p¯, proton p, and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e− flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  9. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Ali Cavasonza, L.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Aupetit, S.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bindi, V.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Bueno, E. F.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Dong, F.; Donnini, F.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eronen, T.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Formato, V.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R. J.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gómez-Coral, D. M.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kang, S. C.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Konak, C.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. S.; Li, J. Q.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, Hu; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Nelson, T.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shi, J. Y.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Song, J. W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vázquez Acosta, M.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. Q.; Wang, Z. X.; Wei, C. C.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Willenbrock, M.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Yang, Y.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, S. D.; Zhang, S. W.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; AMS Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49 ×1 05 antiproton events and 2.42 ×1 09 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the antiproton p ¯, proton p , and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e- flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  10. The Electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, George

    1972-01-01

    Electrons are elementary particles of atoms that revolve around and outside the nucleus and have a negative charge. This booklet discusses how electrons relate to electricity, some applications of electrons, electrons as waves, electrons in atoms and solids, the electron microscope, among other things.

  11. Hard electronics; Hard electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Hard material technologies were surveyed to establish the hard electronic technology which offers superior characteristics under hard operational or environmental conditions as compared with conventional Si devices. The following technologies were separately surveyed: (1) The device and integration technologies of wide gap hard semiconductors such as SiC, diamond and nitride, (2) The technology of hard semiconductor devices for vacuum micro- electronics technology, and (3) The technology of hard new material devices for oxides. The formation technology of oxide thin films made remarkable progress after discovery of oxide superconductor materials, resulting in development of an atomic layer growth method and mist deposition method. This leading research is expected to solve such issues difficult to be easily realized by current Si technology as high-power, high-frequency and low-loss devices in power electronics, high temperature-proof and radiation-proof devices in ultimate electronics, and high-speed and dense- integrated devices in information electronics. 432 refs., 136 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. Thermotronics: Towards Nanocircuits to Manage Radiative Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2017-02-01

    The control of electric currents in solids is at the origin of the modern electronics revolution that has driven our daily life since the second half of 20th century. Surprisingly, to date, there is no thermal analogue for a control of heat flux. Here, we summarise the very last developments carried out in this direction to control heat exchanges by radiation both in near and far-field in complex architecture networks.

  13. Turbulence-induced magnetic flux asymmetry at nanoscale junctions

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    It was recently predicted [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18, 11059 (2006)] that turbulence of the electron flow may develop at nonadiabatic nanoscale junctions under appropriate conditions. Here we show that such an effect leads to an asymmetric current-induced magnetic field on the two sides of an otherwise symmetric junction. We propose that by measuring the fluxes ensuing from these fields across two surfaces placed at the two sides of the junction would provide direct and noninvasive evidence...

  14. Thermotronics. Towards nanocircuits to manage radiative heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe [Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Palaiseau (France). Lab. Charles Fabry; Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Biehs, Svend-Age [Oldenburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2017-05-01

    The control of electric currents in solids is at the origin of the modern electronics revolution that has driven our daily life since the second half of 20{sup th} century. Surprisingly, to date, there is no thermal analogue for a control of heat flux. Here, we summarise the very last developments carried out in this direction to control heat exchanges by radiation both in near and far-field in complex architecture networks.

  15. Surface modifications of rolled W during exposure to high heat loads with He%轧制钨板在氦源高热流作用下的形貌演化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李纯; Henri Greuner; 周鑫; 罗广南; 刘伟

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tungsten (W) is a promising candidate for future use in fusion reactors as plasma facing material. During operation it will be exposed to both particle irradiation and high heat flux (HHF) loads. Particle irradiation, especially helium (He), is expected to cause significant surface modifications of W, might leading to performance degradation. The effect of heat loading can accelerate such surface damage. Therefore, the performance of W under the combined action of both heat and particle fluxes has to be investigated in more detail.Purpose:The aim is to investigate the surface modifications of rolled W during exposure to combined heating and He particle flux depending on surface temperature, He flux and fluence.Methods: The He-flux/heating experiments were performed on rolled W samples using the neutral beam HHF test facility GLADIS at IPP Garching, Germany. HHF loads generated with He atoms of 2.4 MW·m−2 and 9.5 MW·m−2 were used. W samples were adiabatically loaded to peak surface temperatures of ~1000 K, ~2000 K and ~3000 K, close to melting. He fluences increased from about 1×1021m−2 to 6×1022 m−2.Results: During He-loading at a low surface temperature (~1000 K), with increasing fluence, defects appeared in grains first, and then blistering was observed on the sample surface, with many ruptured blisters to form lids and grooves. The largest blisters formed on grains with near surface normal. As fluence was increased continuously, small holes were formed on the surface, and the grooves still existed. However, at intermediate surface temperature (~2000 K), with increasing fluence, the damage morphology changed from a porous structure with blisters,via a porous structure with grooves, to a small coral-like structure. At high surface temperature (~3000 K), an evolution from a porous structure to a coral-like structure with increasing fluence was observed, and the coral-like structure changed little as the increasing of fluence continuously. It

  16. Effects of abnormally high heat stress on petroleum in reservoir——An example from the Tazhong 18 Well in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An igneous intrusion of 94m thick was discovered intruding into the Silurian sandstone from Tazhong 18 Well. The petroleum previously preserved in the Silurian sandstone reservoir was altered into black carbonaceous bitumen by abnormally high heat stress induced by the igneous intrusion. The reflec-tance of the carbonaceous bitumen reaches as high as 3.54%, indicating that the bitumen had evolved into a high thermal evolution level. Similar to the Silurian samples from the neighboring Tazhong 11, Tazhong 12, Tazhong 45 and Tazhong 47 wells, the distribution of C27, C28 and C29 steranes of the car-bonaceous bitumen is still "V" -shaped and can still be employed as an efficient parameter in oil source correlation. The "V" -shaped distribution indicates that the hydrocarbons from the Tazhong 18 and the neighboring wells were all generated from the Middle-Upper Ordovician hydrocarbon source rocks. However, the oil source correlation parameters associated with and terpanes had been changed greatly by the high heat stress and can no longer be used in oil source correlation. The δ 13C values of the pe-troleum from the neighboring wells are between -32.53‰ and -33.37‰, coincident with those of the Paleozoic marine petroleum in the Tarim Basin. However, the δ 13C values of the carbonaceous bitumen from the Tazhong 18 Well are between -27.18‰ and -29.26‰, isotopically much heavier than the pe-troleum from the neighboring wells. The content of light hydrocarbons (nC14-nC20) of the saturated hydrocarbon fraction in the carbonaceous bitumen is extremely higher than the content of heavy hy-drocarbons. The light/heavy hydrocarbon ratios (ΣnC21-/ΣnC22+) are between 4.56 and 39.17. In the saturated fraction, the even numbered hydrocarbons are predominant to the odd numbered, and the OEP (Odd to Even Predominance) values are between 0.22 and 0.49. However, the content of light hy-drocarbons in the petroleum from the neighboring wells is relatively low and the content of

  17. Effects of abnormally high heat stress on petroleum in reservoir——An example from the Tazhong 18 Well in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU DongYa; JIN ZhiJun; HU WenXuan; ZHANG XueFeng

    2008-01-01

    An igneous intrusion of 94m thick was discovered intruding into the Silurian sandstone from Tazhong 18 Well. The petroleum previously preserved in the Silurian sandstone reservoir was altered into black carbonaceous bitumen by abnormally high heat stress induced by the igneous intrusion. The reflectance of the carbonaceous bitumen reaches as high as 3.54%, indicating that the bitumen had evolved into a high thermal evolution level. Similar to the Silurian samples from the neighboring Tazhong 11,Tazhong 12, Tazhong 45 and Tazhong 47 wells, the distribution of C27, C28 and C29 steranes of the carbonaceous bitumen is still "V"-shaped and can still be employed as an efficient parameter in oil source correlation. The "V"-shaped distribution indicates that the hydrocarbons from the Tazhong 18 and the neighboring wells were all generated from the Middle-Upper Ordovician hydrocarbon source rocks. However, the oil source correlation parameters associated with and terpanes had been changed greatly by the high heat stress and can no longer be used in oil source correlation. The δ13C values of the petroleum from the neighboring wells are between -32.53‰ and -33.37‰, coincident with those of the Paleozoic marine petroleum in the Tarim Basin. However, the δ13C values of the carbonaceous bitumen from the Tazhong 18 Well are between -27.18‰ and -29.26‰, isotopically much heavier than the petroleum from the neighboring wells. The content of light hydrocarbons (nC14-nC20) of the saturated hydrocarbon fraction in the carbonaceous bitumen is extremely higher than the content of heavy hydrocarbons. The light/heavy hydrocarbon ratios (ΣnC21-/ΣnC22+) are between 4.56 and 39.17. In the saturated fraction, the even numbered hydrocarbons are predominant to the odd numbered, and the OEP (Odd to Even Predominance) values are between 0.22 and 0.49. However, the content of light hydrocarbons in the petroleum from the neighboring wells is relatively low and the content of the even

  18. Advanced electric motor technology flux mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doane, George B., III; Campbell, Warren; Dean, Garvin

    1993-01-01

    Design of electric motors which fulfill the needs of Thrust Vector Control (TVC) actuators used in large rocket propelled launch vehicles is covered. To accomplish this end the methodology of design is laid out in some detail. In addition a point design of a motor to fulfill the requirements of a certain actuator specified by MSFC is accomplished and reported upon. In the course of this design great stress has been placed on ridding the actuator of internally generated heat. To conduct the heat out of the motor use is made of the unique properties of the in house MSFC designed driving electronics. This property is that as along as they are operated in a quasi-linear mode the electronics nullify the effects of armature inductance as far as the phase of the armature current versus the rotor position is concerned. Actually the additional inductance due to the extended end turns in this design is of benefit because in the shorted armature failure mode the armature current in the fault (caused by the rotor flux sweeping past the armature) is diminished at a given rotor speed when compared to a more conventional motor with lower inductance. The magnetic circuit is analyzed using electromagnetic finite element methods.

  19. Determination of Energy Fluxes Over Agricultural Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Josefina Argete

    1994-01-01

    An energy budget was conducted over two kinds if surfaces: grass and corn canopy. The net radiative flux and the soil heat flux were directly measured while the latent and sensible heat flux were calculated from the vertical profiles if wet and dry-bulb temperature and wind speed. The crop storage flux was also estimated. Using the gradient or aerodynamic equations, the calculated fluxes when compared to the measured fluxes in the context of an energy budget gave an SEE = 63 Wm-2 over grass a...

  20. Surface morphology and deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high flux D plasma at high temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, Y. Z.; De Temmerman, G.; Luo, G. N.; Xu, H.Y.; Li, C.; Fu, B. Q.; Liu, W.

    2015-01-01

    Surface modifications and deuterium retention induced in tungsten by high fluxes (1024 m−2 s−1) low energy (38 eV) deuterium ions were studied as a function of surface temperature. Blister formation was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction, while deuterium ret