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Sample records for high-field mri reveals

  1. Effects of anesthetic agents on brain blood oxygenation level revealed with ultra-high field MRI.

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    Luisa Ciobanu

    Full Text Available During general anesthesia it is crucial to control systemic hemodynamics and oxygenation levels. However, anesthetic agents can affect cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in a drug-dependent manner, while systemic hemodynamics is stable. Brain-wide monitoring of this effect remains highly challenging. Because T(2*-weighted imaging at ultra-high magnetic field strengths benefits from a dramatic increase in contrast to noise ratio, we hypothesized that it could monitor anesthesia effects on brain blood oxygenation. We scanned rat brains at 7T and 17.2T under general anesthesia using different anesthetics (isoflurane, ketamine-xylazine, medetomidine. We showed that the brain/vessels contrast in T(2*-weighted images at 17.2T varied directly according to the applied pharmacological anesthetic agent, a phenomenon that was visible, but to a much smaller extent at 7T. This variation is in agreement with the mechanism of action of these agents. These data demonstrate that preclinical ultra-high field MRI can monitor the effects of a given drug on brain blood oxygenation level in the absence of systemic blood oxygenation changes and of any neural stimulation.

  2. Effects of anesthetic agents on brain blood oxygenation level revealed with ultra-high field MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciobanu, Luisa; Reynaud, Olivier; Le Bihan, Denis; Uhrig, Lynn; Jarraya, Bechir

    2012-01-01

    During general anesthesia it is crucial to control systemic hemodynamics and oxygenation levels. However, anesthetic agents can affect cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in a drug-dependent manner, while systemic hemodynamics is stable. Brain-wide monitoring of this effect remains highly challenging. Because T2'*-weighted imaging at ultra-high magnetic field strengths benefits from a dramatic increase in contrast to noise ratio, we hypothesized that it could monitor anesthesia effects on brain blood oxygenation. We scanned rat brains at 7 T and 17.2 T under general anesthesia using different anesthetics (isoflurane, ketamine-xylazine, medetomidine). We showed that the brain/vessels contrast in T2'*- weighted images at 17.2 T varied directly according to the applied pharmacological anesthetic agent, a phenomenon that was visible, but to a much smaller extent at 7 T. This variation is in agreement with the mechanism of action of these agents. These data demonstrate that preclinical ultra-high field MRI can monitor the effects of a given drug on brain blood oxygenation level in the absence of systemic blood oxygenation changes and of any neural stimulation. (authors)

  3. High Field fMRI Reveals Thalamocortical Integration of Segregated Cognitive and Emotional Processing in Mediodorsal and Intralaminar Thalamic Nuclei

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    Metzger, C. D.; Eckert, U.; Steiner, J.; Sartorius, A.; Buchmann, J. E.; Stadler, J.; Tempelmann, C.; Speck, O.; Bogerts, B.; Abler, B.; Walter, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thalamocortical loops, connecting functionally segregated, higher order cortical regions, and basal ganglia, have been proposed not only for well described motor and sensory regions, but also for limbic and prefrontal areas relevant for affective and cognitive processes. These functions are, however, more specific to humans, rendering most invasive neuroanatomical approaches impossible and interspecies translations difficult. In contrast, non-invasive imaging of functional neuroanatomy using fMRI allows for the development of elaborate task paradigms capable of testing the specific functionalities proposed for these circuits. Until recently, spatial resolution largely limited the anatomical definition of functional clusters at the level of distinct thalamic nuclei. Since their anatomical distinction seems crucial not only for the segregation of cognitive and limbic loops but also for the detection of their functional interaction during cognitive–emotional integration, we applied high resolution fMRI on 7 Tesla. Using an event-related design, we could isolate thalamic effects for preceding attention as well as experience of erotic stimuli. We could demonstrate specific thalamic effects of general emotional arousal in mediodorsal nucleus and effects specific to preceding attention and expectancy in intralaminar centromedian/parafascicular complex. These thalamic effects were paralleled by specific coactivations in the head of caudate nucleus as well as segregated portions of rostral or caudal cingulate cortex and anterior insula supporting distinct thalamo–striato–cortical loops. In addition to predescribed effects of sexual arousal in hypothalamus and ventral striatum, high resolution fMRI could extent this network to paraventricular thalamus encompassing laterodorsal and parataenial nuclei. We could lend evidence to segregated subcortical loops which integrate cognitive and emotional aspects of basic human behavior such as sexual processing. PMID:21088699

  4. High field fMRI reveals thalamocortical integration of segregated cognitive and emotional processing in mediodorsal and intralaminar thalamic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coraline Danielle Metzger

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Thalamocortical loops, connecting functionally segregated, higher order cortical regions and basal ganglia, have been proposed not only for well described motor and sensory regions, but also for limbic and prefrontal areas relevant for affective and cognitive processes. These functions are, however, more specific to humans, rendering most invasive neuroanatomical approaches impossible and interspecies translations difficult. In contrast, non invasive imaging of functional neuroanatomy using fMRI allows for the development of elaborate task paradigms capable of testing the specific functionalities proposed for these circuits. Until recently, spatial resolution largely limited the anatomical definition of functional clusters at the level of distinct thalamic nuclei. Since their anatomical distinction seems crucial not only for the segregation of cognitive and limbic loops but also for the detection of their functional interaction during cognitive-emotional integration, we applied high resolution fMRI on 7 Tesla.Using an event related design, we could isolate thalamic effects for preceding attention as well as experience of erotic stimuli. We could demonstrate specific thalamic effects of general emotional arousal in mediodorsal nucleus and effects specific to preceding attention and expectancy in intralaminar centromedian/parafascicular complex (CM/PF. These thalamic effects were paralleled by specific coactivations in the head of caudate nucleus as well as segregated portions of rostral or caudal cingulate cortex and anterior insula supporting distinct thalamo-striato-cortical loops. In addition to predescribed effects of sexual arousal in hypothalamus and ventral striatum, high resolution fMRI could extent this network to paraventricular thalamus encompassing laterodorsal and parataenial nuclei. We could lend evidence to segregated subcortical loops which integrate cognitive and emotional aspects of basic human behaviour such as sexual

  5. Threats to ultra-high-field MRI

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    Le Bihan, Denis

    2009-08-01

    In 2004 the European Commission (EC) adopted a directive restricting occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields. This directive (2004/40/CE), which examines the possible health risks of the electromagnetic fields from mobile phones, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and other devices, concluded that upper limits on radiation and applied electromagnetic fields are necessary to prevent workers from suffering any undue acute health effects. But although not initially intended, the biggest impact of the directive could be on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is used in hospitals worldwide to produce images of unrivalled quality of the brain and other soft tissues.

  6. High field MRI in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis: high field-high yield?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattjes, Mike P.; Barkhof, Frederik

    2009-01-01

    Following the approval of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly incorporated into the clinical setting. Especially in the field of neuroimaging, the number of high field MRI applications has been increased dramatically. Taking advantage on increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and chemical shift, higher magnetic field strengths offer new perspectives particularly in brain imaging and also challenges in terms of several technical and physical consequences. Over the past few years, many applications of high field MRI in patients with suspected and definite multiple sclerosis (MS) have been reported including conventional and quantitative MRI methods. Conventional pulse sequences at 3 T offers higher lesion detection rates when compared to 1.5 T, particularly in anatomic regions which are important for the diagnosis of patients with MS. MR spectroscopy at 3 T is characterized by an improved spectral resolution due to increased chemical shift allowing a better quantification of metabolites. It detects significant axonal damage already in patients presenting with clinically isolated syndromes and can quantify metabolites of special interest such as glutamate which is technically difficult to quantify at lower field strengths. Furthermore, the higher susceptibility and SNR offer advantages in the field of functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. The recently introduced new generation of ultra-high field systems beyond 3 T allows scanning in submillimeter resolution and gives new insights into in vivo MS pathology on MRI. The objectives of this article are to review the current knowledge and level of evidence concerning the application of high field MRI in MS and to give some ideas of research perspectives in the future. (orig.)

  7. Whole-globe biomechanics using high-field MRI.

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    Voorhees, Andrew P; Ho, Leon C; Jan, Ning-Jiun; Tran, Huong; van der Merwe, Yolandi; Chan, Kevin; Sigal, Ian A

    2017-07-01

    The eye is a complex structure composed of several interconnected tissues acting together, across the whole globe, to resist deformation due to intraocular pressure (IOP). However, most work in the ocular biomechanics field only examines the response to IOP over smaller regions of the eye. We used high-field MRI to measure IOP induced ocular displacements and deformations over the whole globe. Seven sheep eyes were obtained from a local abattoir and imaged within 48 h using MRI at multiple levels of IOP. IOP was controlled with a gravity perfusion system and a cannula inserted into the anterior chamber. T2-weighted imaging was performed to the eyes serially at 0 mmHg, 10 mmHg, 20 mmHg and 40 mmHg of IOP using a 9.4 T MRI scanner. Manual morphometry was conducted using 3D visualization software to quantify IOP-induced effects at the globe scale (e.g. axial length and equatorial diameters) or optic nerve head scale (e.g. canal diameter, peripapillary sclera bowing). Measurement sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine measurement precision. High-field MRI revealed an outward bowing of the posterior sclera and anterior bulging of the cornea due to IOP elevation. Increments in IOP from 10 to 40 mmHg caused measurable increases in axial length in 6 of 7 eyes of 7.9 ± 5.7% (mean ± SD). Changes in equatorial diameter were minimal, 0.4 ± 1.2% between 10 and 40 mmHg, and in all cases less than the measurement sensitivity. The effects were nonlinear, with larger deformations at normal IOPs (10-20 mmHg) than at elevated IOPs (20-40 mmHg). IOP also caused measurable increases in the nasal-temporal scleral canal diameter of 13.4 ± 9.7% between 0 and 20 mmHg, but not in the superior-inferior diameter. This study demonstrates that high-field MRI can be used to visualize and measure simultaneously the effects of IOP over the whole globe, including the effects on axial length and equatorial diameter, posterior sclera displacement and bowing, and even

  8. Studies on the reliability of high-field intra-operative MRI in brain glioma resection

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    Zhi-jun SONG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the reliability of high-field intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging(iMRI in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.Method One hundred and thirty-one cases of brain glioma(69 males and 62 females,aged from 7 to 79 years with mean of 39.6 years hospitalized from Nov.2009 to Aug.2010 were involved in present study.All the patients were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging(MRI before the operation.The tumors were resected under conventional navigation microscope,and the high-field iMRI was used for all the patients when the operators considered the tumor was satisfactorily resected,while the residual tumor was difficult to detect under the microscope,but resected after being revealed by high-field iMRI.Histopathological examination was performed.The patients without residual tumors recieved high-field MRI scan at day 4 or 5 after operation to evaluate the accuracy of high-field iMRI during operation.Results High quality intra-operative images were obtained by using high-field iMRI.Twenty-eight cases were excluded because their residual tumors were not resected due to their location too close to functional area.Combined with the results of intra-operative histopathological examination and post-operative MRI at the early recovery stage,the sensitivity of high-field iMRI in residual tumor diagnosis was 98.0%(49/50,the specificity was 94.3%(50/53,and the accuracy was 96.1%(99/103.Conclusion High-quality intra-operative imaging could be acquired by high-field iMRI,which maybe used as a safe and reliable method in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.

  9. High field MRI of axillary lymph nodes and breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korteweg, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis nodal characteristics have been assessed with high field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) using a clinical scanner in order to discriminate non-metastatic from metastatic nodes of breast cancer patients. The final goal is to non-invasively determine nodal and tumor stage of breast

  10. The value of high-field MRI (3 T) in the assessment of sellar lesions

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    Pinker, K. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Ba-Ssalamah, A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Wolfsberger, S. [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna (Austria); Mlynarik, V. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Knosp, E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: siegfried.trattnig@univie.ac.at

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of the normal sellar anatomy in vitro and in vivo with high-field MRI and its application in the diagnosis of sellar pathologies in comparison to standard MRI. All high-field MR images were obtained using a 3 T Bruker Medspec 30/80 Scanner with a head birdcage transmit/receive coil and an actively shielded gradient system with a maximum gradient strength of 45 mT/m. Firstly an in vitro study of the sella turcica was performed to depict normal pituitary and sellar anatomy at high field. After a pilot-study this sequence-protocol was established: A RARE sequence (TR/TE = 7790/19 ms; matrix size, 512 x 512; RARE factor = 8, FOV, 200 mm) was used for T2-weighted coronal, axial and sagittal images. A 3D gradient echo sequence with magnetization-preparation (MP-RAGE, TR/TE/TI 33.5/7.6/800 ms, matrix size, 512 x 512; FOV, 200 mm, effective slice thickness, 1.88 mm; 3 averages) was used for acquisition of T1-weighted pre- and post-contrast images. Between January 2002 and March 200458 patients were enrolled in this study. Seven patients were examined for suspected microadenoma and in 51 patients 3T MRI was used to obtain additional information about the sellar lesion already known to be present from standard MRI. In 21 cases the accuracy of the imaging findings was assessed afterwards by comparison with intraoperative findings. The infiltration of the medial cavernous sinus wall was suspected on standard MRI on 15 sides (47%), on high-field MRI on 9 sides (28%) and could be verified by intraoperative findings on 6 sides (19%). Accordingly, sensitivity to infiltration was 83% for 3 T and 67% for standard MRI. Specificity was 84% for 3 T and 58% for standard MRI. Moreover, high-field MRI revealed microadenomas in 7 patients with a median diameter of 4 mm (range 2-9 mm). The segments of the cranial nerves were seen as mean 4 hypointense spots (range 2-5 spots) on high-field MRI in contrast to 3 spots (range 0-4 spots) on standard MRI

  11. Diffuse axonal injury at ultra-high field MRI.

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    Christoph Moenninghoff

    Full Text Available Diffuse axonal injury (DAI is a specific type of traumatic brain injury caused by shearing forces leading to widespread tearing of axons and small vessels. Traumatic microbleeds (TMBs are regarded as a radiological marker for DAI. This study aims to compare DAI-associated TMBs at 3 Tesla (T and 7 T susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI to evaluate possible diagnostic benefits of ultra-high field (UHF MRI.10 study participants (4 male, 6 female, age range 20-74 years with known DAI were included. All MR exams were performed with a 3 T MR system (Magnetom Skyra and a 7 T MR research system (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen, Germany each in combination with a 32-channel-receive coil. The average time interval between trauma and imaging was 22 months. Location and count of TMBs were independently evaluated by two neuroradiologists on 3 T and 7 T SWI images with similar and additionally increased spatial resolution at 7 T. Inter- and intraobserver reliability was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Count and diameter of TMB were evaluated with Wilcoxon signed rank test.Susceptibility weighted imaging revealed a total of 485 TMBs (range 1-190, median 25 at 3 T, 584 TMBs (plus 20%, range 1-262, median 30.5 at 7 T with similar spatial resolution, and 684 TMBs (plus 41%, range 1-288, median 39.5 at 7 T with 10-times higher spatial resolution. Hemorrhagic DAI appeared significantly larger at 7 T compared to 3 T (p = 0.005. Inter- and intraobserver correlation regarding the counted TMB was high and almost equal 3 T and 7 T.7 T SWI improves the depiction of small hemorrhagic DAI compared to 3 T and may be supplementary to lower field strengths for diagnostic in inconclusive or medicolegal cases.

  12. MRI-negative refractory partial epilepsy: role for diffusion tensor imaging in high field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qin; Lui, Su; Li, Chun-Xiao; Jiang, Li-Jun; Ou-Yang, Luo; Tang, He-Han; Shang, Hui-Fang; Huang, Xiao-Qi; Gong, Qi-Yong; Zhou, Dong

    2008-07-01

    Our aim is to use the high field MR scanner (3T) to verify whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) could help in locating the epileptogenic zone in patients with MRI-negative refractory partial epilepsy. Fifteen patients with refractory partial epilepsy who had normal conventional MRI, and 40 healthy volunteers were recruited for the study. DTI was performed on a 3T MR scanner, individual maps of mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were calculated, and Voxel-Based Analysis (VBA) was performed for individual comparison between patients and controls. Voxel-based analysis revealed significant MD increase in variant regions in 13 patients. The electroclinical seizure localization was concurred to seven patients. No patient exhibited regions of significant decreased MD. Regions of significant reduced FA were observed in five patients, with two of these concurring with electroclinical seizure localization. Two patients had regions of significant increase in FA, which were distinct from electroclinical seizure localization. Our study's results revealed that DTI is a responsive neuroradiologic technique that provides information about the epileptogenic areas in patients with MRI-negative refractory partial epilepsy. This technique may also helpful in pre-surgical evaluation.

  13. The optimal use of contrast agents at high field MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Pinker, Kathia; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie

    2006-01-01

    The intravenous administration of a standard dose of conventional gadolinium-based contrast agents produces higher contrast between the tumor and normal brain at 3.0 Tesla (T) than at 1.5 T, which allows reducing the dose to half of the standard one to produce similar contrast at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T. The assessment of cumulative triple-dose 3.0 T images obtained the best results in the detection of brain metastases compared to other sequences. The contrast agent dose for dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging at 3.0 T can be reduced to 0.1 mmol compared to 0.2 mmol at 1.5 T due to the increased susceptibility effects at higher magnetic field strengths. Contrast agent application makes susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) at 3.0 T clinically attractive, with an increase in spatial resolution within the same scan time. Whereas a double dose of conventional gadolinium-based contrast agents was optimal in SWI with respect to sensitivity and image quality, a standard dose of gadobenate dimeglumine, which has a two-fold higher T1-relaxivity in blood, produced the same effect. For MR-arthrography, optimized concentrations of gadolinium-based contrast agents are similar at 3.0 and 1.5 T. In summary, high field MRI requires the optimization of the contrast agent dose in different clinical applications. (orig.)

  14. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

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    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton L.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2013-12-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization' schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than those at 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters.

  15. Acquisition and analysis strategies in functional MRI at high fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windischberger, C.

    2001-08-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging represents a non-invasive technique to examine neuronal activity in the brain. It applies radio waves to excite nuclear spins, using the emitted signal during relaxation for image generation. Signal modulations from local blood flow and oxygenation level changes caused by neuronal activity are the basis for calculating functional brain maps with high spatial resolution. The present work discusses concepts for improving the spatial and temporal resolution, as well as sophisticated analysis approaches. Besides an exhaustive description of image reconstruction algorithms, computational simulations on echo-shifting in echo-planar imaging are presented and effects on spatial resolution are quantified. The results demonstrate that echo-shifting causes only minimal resolution losses for high signal-to-noise data, but leads to severe resolution degradation (up to 30 %) in images with low signal-to-noise ratios. After an overview of the mechanisms that cause fMRI signal changes subsequent to neuronal activity, explorative analysis algorithms like Fuzzy Cluster Analysis, as well as parametric approaches are described and discussed. In the context of fMRI artifacts, effects of respiratory motion are examined. For the first time, well-defined breathing patterns are used to quantify the influences on fMRI signal intensity. Also, the variability of fMRI activation in a mental rotation paradigm are investigated, using single-trial analysis. Such, intra-subject activation consistency was determined successfully. Finally, in a second study on mental rotation explorative data analysis was applied to retrieve neuro-functional hypotheses. (author)

  16. Ultra-high field MRI: Advancing systems neuroscience towards mesoscopic human brain function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumoulin, Serge O; Fracasso, A.; Van der Zwaag, W.; Siero, Jeroen C W; Petridou, Natalia

    2018-01-01

    Human MRI scanners at ultra-high magnetic field strengths of 7 T and higher are increasingly available to the neuroscience community. A key advantage brought by ultra-high field MRI is the possibility to increase the spatial resolution at which data is acquired, with little reduction in image

  17. Remotely detected high-field MRI of porous samples

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    Seeley, Juliette A.; Han, Song-I.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-04-01

    Remote detection of NMR is a novel technique in which an NMR-active sensor surveys an environment of interest and retains memory of that environment to be recovered at a later time in a different location. The NMR or MRI information about the sensor nucleus is encoded and stored as spin polarization at the first location and subsequently moved to a different physical location for optimized detection. A dedicated probe incorporating two separate radio frequency (RF)—circuits was built for this purpose. The encoding solenoid coil was large enough to fit around the bulky sample matrix, while the smaller detection solenoid coil had not only a higher quality factor, but also an enhanced filling factor since the coil volume comprised purely the sensor nuclei. We obtained two-dimensional (2D) void space images of two model porous samples with resolution less than 1.4 mm 2. The remotely reconstructed images demonstrate the ability to determine fine structure with image quality superior to their directly detected counterparts and show the great potential of NMR remote detection for imaging applications that suffer from low sensitivity due to low concentrations and filling factor.

  18. Technical Note: Experimental results from a prototype high-field inline MRI-linac

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    Liney, G. P., E-mail: gary.liney@sswahs.nsw.gov.au [Department of Medical Physics, Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool NSW 2170 (Australia); Dong, B.; Zhang, K. [Department of Medical Physics, Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool NSW 2170 (Australia); and others

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: The pursuit of real-time image guided radiotherapy using optimal tissue contrast has seen the development of several hybrid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-treatment systems, high field and low field, and inline and perpendicular configurations. As part of a new MRI-linac program, an MRI scanner was integrated with a linear accelerator to enable investigations of a coupled inline MRI-linac system. This work describes results from a prototype experimental system to demonstrate the feasibility of a high field inline MR-linac. Methods: The magnet is a 1.5 T MRI system (Sonata, Siemens Healthcare) was located in a purpose built radiofrequency (RF) cage enabling shielding from and close proximity to a linear accelerator with inline (and future perpendicular) orientation. A portable linear accelerator (Linatron, Varian) was installed together with a multileaf collimator (Millennium, Varian) to provide dynamic field collimation and the whole assembly built onto a stainless-steel rail system. A series of MRI-linac experiments was performed to investigate (1) image quality with beam on measured using a macropodine (kangaroo) ex vivo phantom; (2) the noise as a function of beam state measured using a 6-channel surface coil array; and (3) electron contamination effects measured using Gafchromic film and an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Results: (1) Image quality was unaffected by the radiation beam with the macropodine phantom image with the beam on being almost identical to the image with the beam off. (2) Noise measured with a surface RF coil produced a 25% elevation of background intensity when the radiation beam was on. (3) Film and EPID measurements demonstrated electron focusing occurring along the centerline of the magnet axis. Conclusions: A proof-of-concept high-field MRI-linac has been built and experimentally characterized. This system has allowed us to establish the efficacy of a high field inline MRI-linac and study a number of the technical

  19. Awake craniotomy, electrophysiologic mapping, and tumor resection with high-field intraoperative MRI.

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    Parney, Ian F; Goerss, Stephan J; McGee, Kiaran; Huston, John; Perkins, William J; Meyer, Frederic B

    2010-05-01

    Awake craniotomy and electrophysiologic mapping (EPM) is an established technique to facilitate the resection of near eloquent cortex. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) is increasingly used to aid in the resection of intracranial lesions. Standard draping protocols in high-field iMRI units make awake craniotomies challenging, and only two groups have previously reported combined EPM and high-field iMRI. We present an illustrative case describing a simple technique for combining awake craniotomy and EPM with high-field iMRI. A movable platter is used to transfer the patient from the operating table to a transport trolley and into the adjacent MRI and still maintaining the patient's surgical position. This system allows excess drapes to be removed, facilitating awake craniotomy. A 57-year-old right-handed man presented with new onset seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large left temporal mass. The patient underwent an awake, left frontotemporal craniotomy. The EPM demonstrated a single critical area for speech in his inferior frontal gyrus. After an initial tumor debulking, the scalp flap was loosely approximated, the wound was covered with additional drapes, and the excess surrounding drapes were trimmed. An iMRI was obtained. The image-guidance system was re-registered and the patient was redraped. Additional resection was performed, allowing extensive removal of what proved to be an anaplastic astrocytoma. The patient tolerated this well without any new neurological deficits. Standard protocols for positioning and draping in high-field iMRI units make awake craniotomies problematic. This straightforward technique for combined awake EPM and iMRI may facilitate safe removal of large lesions in eloquent cortex. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Large field-of-view transmission line resonator for high field MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johannesson, Kristjan Sundgaard; Boer, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Transmission line resonators is often a preferable choice for coils in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because they provide a number of advantages over traditional loop coils. The size of such resonators, however, is limited to shorter than half a wavelength due to high standing wave....... Achieved magnetic field distribution is compared to the conventional transmission line resonator. Imaging experiments are performed using 7 Tesla MRI system. The developed resonator is useful for building coils with large field-of-view....

  1. Lumbar Modic Changes - A Comparison Between Findings at Low-and High-field MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Tom; Sorensen, Joan S; Henriksson, Gustaf A C

    2012-01-01

    Study Design. A cross-sectional observational study.Objective. To investigate if there is a difference in findings of lumbar Modic changes in low-field (0.3 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as compared to high field (1.5 Tesla).Summary of Background Data. It is a challenge to give patients...

  2. High-field fMRI unveils orientation columns in humans.

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    Yacoub, Essa; Harel, Noam; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    2008-07-29

    Functional (f)MRI has revolutionized the field of human brain research. fMRI can noninvasively map the spatial architecture of brain function via localized increases in blood flow after sensory or cognitive stimulation. Recent advances in fMRI have led to enhanced sensitivity and spatial accuracy of the measured signals, indicating the possibility of detecting small neuronal ensembles that constitute fundamental computational units in the brain, such as cortical columns. Orientation columns in visual cortex are perhaps the best known example of such a functional organization in the brain. They cannot be discerned via anatomical characteristics, as with ocular dominance columns. Instead, the elucidation of their organization requires functional imaging methods. However, because of insufficient sensitivity, spatial accuracy, and image resolution of the available mapping techniques, thus far, they have not been detected in humans. Here, we demonstrate, by using high-field (7-T) fMRI, the existence and spatial features of orientation- selective columns in humans. Striking similarities were found with the known spatial features of these columns in monkeys. In addition, we found that a larger number of orientation columns are devoted to processing orientations around 90 degrees (vertical stimuli with horizontal motion), whereas relatively similar fMRI signal changes were observed across any given active column. With the current proliferation of high-field MRI systems and constant evolution of fMRI techniques, this study heralds the exciting prospect of exploring unmapped and/or unknown columnar level functional organizations in the human brain.

  3. Characteristics of symptomatic chronic subdural haematomas on high-field MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminogo, M.; Moroki, J.; Ochi, A.; Ichikura, A.; Onizuka, M.; Shibayama, A.; Miyake, H.; Shibata, S.

    1999-01-01

    We studied the frequency of various features of the appearances on high-field MRI in symptomatic patients with chronic subdural haematomas (CSDH). The ability to predict recurrence after treatment with one burr-hole procedure using MRI was evaluated. Recurrence was seen in three haematomas of group A and one of group B. Reoperation was most closely correlated with diffuse low signal on T2-weighted images but not with a multiloculated appearance. Low signal on T2 weighting was surprisingly high (72.5 %) and the age of the haematomas as estimated on the MRI correlated well with the interval between the onset of symptoms and MRI. Our findings support the causative role of recurrent bleeding in the enlargement of CSDH. (orig.)

  4. High-field MRI and mercury release from dental amalgam fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, S M J; Neghab, M; Anoosheh, S M H; Bahaeddini, N; Mortazavi, G; Neghab, P; Rajaeifard, A

    2014-04-01

    Mercury is among the most toxic nonradioactive elements which may cause toxicity even at low doses. Some studies showed release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings in individuals who used mobile phone. This study was conducted to assess the effect of high-field MRI on mercury release from dental amalgam filling. We studied two groups of students with identical tooth decays requiring a similar pattern of restorative dentistry. They were exposed to a magnetic flux density of 1.5 T produced by a MRI machine. 16 otherwise healthy students with identical dental decay participated in this study. They underwent similar restorative dentistry procedures and randomly divided into two groups of MRI-exposed and control arms. Urinary concentrations of mercury in the control subjects were measured before (hour 0) and 48 and 72 hrs after amalgam restoration, using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary concentrations of mercury in exposed individuals were determined before (hour 0), and 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after amalgam restoration. Unlike control subjects, they underwent conventional brain MRI (15 min, 99 slices), 24 hrs after amalgam restoration. The mean±SD urinary mercury levels in MRI-exposed individuals increased linearly from a baseline value of 20.70±17.96 to 24.83±22.91 μg/L 72 hrs after MRI. In the control group, the concentration decreased linearly from 20.70±19.77 to 16.14±20.05 μg/L. The difference between urinary mercury in the exposed and control group, 72 hrs after MRI (96 h after restoration),was significant (p=0.046). These findings provide further support for the noxious effect of MRI (exposure to strong magnetic field)and release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings.

  5. High-Field MRI and Mercury Release from Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SMJ Mortazavi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is among the most toxic nonradioactive elements which may cause toxicity even at low doses. Some studies showed release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings in individuals who used mobile phone. This study was conducted to assess the effect of high-field MRI on mercury release from dental amalgam filling. We studied two groups of students with identical tooth decays requiring a similar pattern of restorative dentistry. They were exposed to a magnetic flux density of 1.5 T produced by a MRI machine. 16 otherwise healthy students with identical dental decay participated in this study. They underwent similar restorative dentistry procedures and randomly divided into two groups of MRI-exposed and control arms. Urinary concentrations of mercury in the control subjects were measured before (hour 0 and 48 and 72 hrs after amalgam restoration, using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary concentrations of mercury in exposed individuals were determined before (hour 0, and 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after amalgam restoration. Unlike control subjects, they underwent conventional brain MRI (15 min, 99 slices, 24 hrs after amalgam restoration. The mean±SD urinary mercury levels in MRI-exposed individuals increased linearly from a baseline value of 20.70±17.96 to 24.83±22.91 μg/L 72 hrs after MRI. In the control group, the concentration decreased linearly from 20.70±19.77 to 16.14±20.05 μg/L. The difference between urinary mercury in the exposed and control group, 72 hrs after MRI (96 h after restoration,was significant (p=0.046. These findings provide further support for the noxious effect of MRI (exposure to strong magnetic fieldand release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings.

  6. Sensitivity and specificity considerations for fMRI encoding, decoding, and mapping of auditory cortex at ultra-high field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerel, Michelle; De Martino, Federico; Kemper, Valentin G; Schmitter, Sebastian; Vu, An T; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Formisano, Elia; Yacoub, Essa

    2018-01-01

    Following rapid technological advances, ultra-high field functional MRI (fMRI) enables exploring correlates of neuronal population activity at an increasing spatial resolution. However, as the fMRI blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast is a vascular signal, the spatial specificity of fMRI data is ultimately determined by the characteristics of the underlying vasculature. At 7T, fMRI measurement parameters determine the relative contribution of the macro- and microvasculature to the acquired signal. Here we investigate how these parameters affect relevant high-end fMRI analyses such as encoding, decoding, and submillimeter mapping of voxel preferences in the human auditory cortex. Specifically, we compare a T 2 * weighted fMRI dataset, obtained with 2D gradient echo (GE) EPI, to a predominantly T 2 weighted dataset obtained with 3D GRASE. We first investigated the decoding accuracy based on two encoding models that represented different hypotheses about auditory cortical processing. This encoding/decoding analysis profited from the large spatial coverage and sensitivity of the T 2 * weighted acquisitions, as evidenced by a significantly higher prediction accuracy in the GE-EPI dataset compared to the 3D GRASE dataset for both encoding models. The main disadvantage of the T 2 * weighted GE-EPI dataset for encoding/decoding analyses was that the prediction accuracy exhibited cortical depth dependent vascular biases. However, we propose that the comparison of prediction accuracy across the different encoding models may be used as a post processing technique to salvage the spatial interpretability of the GE-EPI cortical depth-dependent prediction accuracy. Second, we explored the mapping of voxel preferences. Large-scale maps of frequency preference (i.e., tonotopy) were similar across datasets, yet the GE-EPI dataset was preferable due to its larger spatial coverage and sensitivity. However, submillimeter tonotopy maps revealed biases in assigned frequency

  7. Robot-assisted biopsies in a high-field MRI system. First clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, B.; Eichler, K.; Mack, M.G.; Mueller, C.; Kerl, J.M.; Beeres, M.; Thalhammer, A.; Vogl, T.J.; Zangos, S.; Czerny, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical use of MR-guided biopsies in patients with suspicious lesions using a new MR-compatible assistance system in a high-field MR system. Materials and Methods: Six patients with suspicious focal lesions in various anatomic regions underwent percutanous biopsy in a high-field MR system (1.5 T, Magnetom Espree, Siemens) using a new MR-compatible assistance system (Innomotion). The procedures were planned and guided using T1-weighted FLASH and TrueFISP sequences. A servopneumatic drive then moved the guiding arm automatically to the insertion point. An MRI compatible 15G biopsy system (Somatex) was introduced by a physician guided by the needle holder and multiple biopsies were performed using the coaxial technique. The feasibility, duration of the intervention and biopsy findings were analyzed. Results: The proposed new system allows accurate punctures in a high-field MR system. The assistance device did not interfere with the image quality, and guided the needle virtually exactly as planned. Histological examination could be conducted on every patient. The lesion was malignant in four cases, and an infectious etiology was diagnosed for the two remaining lesions. Regarding the differentiation of anatomical and pathological structures and position monitoring of the insertion needle, TrueFISP images are to be given preference. The average intervention time was 41 minutes. Lesions up to 15.4 cm beneath the skin surface were punctured. Conclusion: The proposed MR-guided assistance system can be successfully utilized in a high-field MR system for accurate punctures of even deep lesions in various anatomic regions. (orig.)

  8. Diagnostic relevance of high field MRI in clinical neuroradiology: the advantages and challenges of driving a sports car

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattjes, Mike P.; Barkhof, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    High field MRI operating at 3 T is increasingly being used in the field of neuroradiology on the grounds that higher magnetic field strength should theoretically lead to a higher diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis of several disease entities. This Editorial discusses the exhaustive review by Wardlaw and colleagues of research comparing 3 T MRI with 1.5 T MRI in the field of neuroradiology. Interestingly, the authors found no convincing evidence of improved image quality, diagnostic accuracy, or reduced total examination times using 3 T MRI instead of 1.5 T MRI. These findings are highly relevant since a new generation of high field MRI systems operating at 7 T has recently been introduced. (orig.)

  9. Network Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s Disease via MRI based Shape Diffeomorphometry and High Field Atlasing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I Miller

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines MRI analysis of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD in a network of structures within the medial temporal lobe using diffeomorphometry methods coupled with high-field atlasing in which the entorhinal cortex is partitioned into nine subareas. The morphometry markers for three groups of subjects (controls, preclinical AD and symptomatic AD are indexed to template coordinates measured with respect to these nine subareas. The location and timing of changes are examined within the subareas as it pertains to the classic Braak and Braak staging by comparing the three groups. We demonstrate that the earliest preclinical changes in the population occur in the lateral most sulcal extent in the entorhinal cortex (alluded to as trans entorhinal cortex by Braak and Braak, and then proceeds medially which is consistent with the Braak and Braak staging. We use high field 11T atlasing to demonstrate that the network changes are occurring at the junctures of the substructures in this medial temporal lobe network. Temporal progression of the disease through the network is also examined via changepoint analysis demonstrating earliest changes in entorhinal cortex. The differential expression of rate of atrophy with progression signaling the changepoint time across the network is demonstrated to be signaling in the intermediate caudal subarea of the entorhinal cortex, which has been noted to be proximal to the hippocampus. This coupled to the findings of the nearby basolateral involvement in amygdala demonstrates the selectivity of neurodegeneration in early AD.

  10. Development of High-Field Permanent Magnetic Circuits for NMRI/MRI and Imaging on Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-field permanent magnetic circuits of 1.2 T and 1.5 T with novel magnetic focusing and curved-surface correction are developed. The permanent magnetic circuit comprises a magnetic yoke, main magnetic steel, nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles, plugging magnetic steel, and side magnetic steel. In this work, a novel shimming method is proposed for the effective correction of base magnetic field (B0 inhomogeneities, which is based on passive shimming on the telescope aspheric cutting, grinding, and fine processing technology of the nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles and active shimming adding higher-order gradient coils. Meanwhile, the magnetic resonance imaging dedicated alloy with high-saturation magnetic field induction intensity and high electrical resistivity is developed, and nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles which are made of the dedicated alloy have very good anti-eddy-current effect. In addition, the large temperature coefficient problem of permanent magnet can be effectively controlled by using a high quality temperature controller and deuterium external locking technique. Combining our patents such as gradient coil, RF coil, and integration computer software, two kinds of small animal Micro-MRI instruments are developed, by which the high quality MRI images of mice were obtained.

  11. Acoustic pressure waves induced in human heads by RF pulses from high-field MRI scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, James C; Wang, Zhangwei

    2010-04-01

    The current evolution toward greater image resolution from magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanners has prompted the exploration of higher strength magnetic fields and use of higher levels of radio frequencies (RFs). Auditory perception of RF pulses by humans has been reported during MRI with head coils. It has shown that the mechanism of interaction for the auditory effect is caused by an RF pulse-induced thermoelastic pressure wave inside the head. We report a computational study of the intensity and frequency of thermoelastic pressure waves generated by RF pulses in the human head inside high-field MRI and clinical scanners. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA) guides limit the local specific absorption rate (SAR) in the body-including the head-to 8 W kg(-1). We present results as functions of SAR and show that for a given SAR the peak acoustic pressures generated in the anatomic head model were essentially the same at 64, 300, and 400 MHz (1.5, 7.0, and 9.4 T). Pressures generated in the anatomic head are comparable to the threshold pressure of 20 mPa for sound perception by humans at the cochlea for 4 W kg(-1). Moreover, results indicate that the peak acoustic pressure in the brain is only 2 to 3 times the auditory threshold at the U.S. FDA guideline of 8 W kg(-1). Even at a high SAR of 20 W kg(-1), where the acoustic pressure in the brain could be more than 7 times the auditory threshold, the sound pressure levels would not be more than 17 db above threshold of perception at the cochlea.

  12. Integration of ultra-high field MRI and histology for connectome based research of brain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan eYang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI became increasingly relevant for in vivo neuroscientific research because of improved spatial resolutions. However, this is still the unchallenged domain of histological studies, which long played an important role in the investigation of neuropsychiatric disorders. While the field of biological psychiatry strongly advanced on macroscopic levels, current developments are rediscovering the richness of immunohistological information when attempting a multi-level systematic approach to brain function and dysfunction. For most studies, histology sections lost information on three-dimensional reconstructions. Translating histological sections to 3D-volumes would thus not only allow for multi-stain and multi-subject alignment in post mortem data, but also provide a crucial step in big data initiatives involving the network analyses currently performed with in vivo MRI. We therefore investigated potential pitfalls during integration of MR and histological information where no additional blockface information is available. We demonstrated that strengths and requirements from both methods seem to be ideally merged at a spatial resolution of 200 μm. However, the success of this approach is heavily dependent on choices of hardware, sequence and reconstruction. We provide a fully automated pipeline that optimizes histological 3D reconstructions, providing a potentially powerful solution not only for primary human post mortem research institutions in neuropsychiatric research, but also to help alleviate the massive workloads in neuroanatomical atlas initiatives. We further demonstrate (for the first time the feasibility and quality of ultra-high spatial resolution (150 µm isotopic imaging of the entire human brain MRI at 7T, offering new opportunities for analyses on MR-derived information.

  13. TH-AB-BRA-12: Experimental Results From the First High-Field Inline MRI-Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keall, P [University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales (Australia); Dong, B; Zhang, K; Liney, G [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Vial, P; Walker, A; Begg, J; Rai, R [Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Holloway, L; Barton, M [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Crozier, S [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The pursuit of real-time image guided radiotherapy using optimal tissue contrast has seen the development of several hybrid MRI-treatment systems, high field and low field, and inline and perpendicular configurations. As part of a new MRI-Linac program, an MRI scanner was integrated with a linear accelerator to enable investigations of a coupled inline MRI-Linac system. This work describes our experimental results from the first high-field inline MRI-Linac. Methods: A 1.5 Tesla magnet (Sonata, Siemens) was located in a purpose built RF cage enabling shielding from and close proximity to a linear accelerator with inline orientation. A portable linear accelerator (Linatron, Varian) was installed together with a multi-leaf collimator (Millennium, Varian) to provide dynamic field collimation and the whole assembly built onto a stainless-steel rail system. A series of MRI-Linac experiments was performed to investigate: (1) image quality with beam on measured using a macropodine (kangaroo) ex vivo phantom; (2) the noise as a function of beam state measured using a 6-channel surface coil array and; (3) electron focusing measured using GafChromic film. Results: (1) The macropodine phantom image quality with the beam on was almost identical to that with the beam off. (2) Noise measured with a surface RF coil produced a 25% elevation of background noise when the radiation beam was on. (3) Film measurements demonstrated electron focusing occurring at the center of the radiation field. Conclusion: The first high-field MRI-Linac has been built and experimentally characterized. This system has allowed us to establish the efficacy of a high field in-line MRI-Linac and study a number of the technical challenges and solutions. Supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, the Australian Research Council, the Australian Cancer Research Foundation and the Health and Hospitals Fund.

  14. The capability of high field MRI in demonstrating post-mortem fetal brains at different gestational age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhonghe; Liu Shuwei; Lin Xiangtao; Gen Hequn; Teng Gaojun; Fang Fang; Zang Fengchao; Yu Taifei; Zhao Bin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the capability of high field MRI in demonstrating the post-mortem fetal brains at different gestational age (GA). Methods: One hundred and eight post-mortem fetal brains of 14-40 weeks GA were evaluated by 3.0 T MRI. Eleven brains of 14 to 27 weeks GA with good 3.0 T MRI images were chosen and scanned by 7.0 T MRI. The developing sulci, layered structures of fetal cerebral cortex and basal nuclei were evaluated on MRI of different Tesla (3.0 T and 7.0 T) and their results analyzed. Results: On T 1 WI of 3.0 T MRI, the layered structures of fetal cerebral cortex were present at 14 weeks GA, the sulci were more accurately identified after 16 weeks GA. The basal nuclei were clearly distinguishable after 20 weeks CA, and these structures were better visualized as the GA increased. On T 2 WI of 7.0 T MRI, the sulci, layered structures of fetal cerebral cortex and basal nuclei were shown more clearly at the same GA when compared to 3.0 T, especially the sulci at the early developmental stages. Conclusions: T 1 WI of 3.0 T MRI could show the developing structures of post-mortem fetal brain well, but the T 2 WI of 7.0 T MRI were comparatively better. (authors)

  15. High-Field MRI-Compatible Needle Placement Robot for Prostate Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    SU, Hao; CAMILO, Alex; COLE, Gregory A.; HATA, Nobuhiko; TEMPANY, Clare M.; FISCHER, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible needle placement system actuated by piezoelectric actuators for prostate brachytherapy and biopsy. An MRI-compatible modular 3 degree-of-freedom (DOF) needle driver module coupled with a 3-DOF x-y-z stage is proposed as a slave robot to precisely deliver radioactive brachytherapy seeds under interactive MRI guidance. The needle driver module provides for needle cannula rotation, needle insertion and cannula retrac...

  16. Assessment and Monitoring of RF Safety for Ultra-High Field MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Restivo, MC

    2017-01-01

    The radio frequency (RF) energy deposited in a human subject undergoing a 7T MRI scan has the potential to cause localized tissue heating. The use of parallel transmit MRI at 7T increases the risk of localized heating due interference effects among the simultaneously transmitting channels. The

  17. Accuracy of high-field intraoperative MRI in the detectability of residual tumor in glioma grade IV resections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Mager, Ann-Kathrin [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Radiology/Neurologie; Goetz, Claudia; Kremer, Paul [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Detsch, Oliver [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine; Theisgen, Hannah-Katharina [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Friese, Michael; Gottschalk, Joachim [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology and Neuropathology; Schwindt, Wolfram [Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2017-06-15

    To assess the sensitivity/specificity of tumor detection by T1 contrast enhancement in intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) in comparison to histopathological assessment as the gold standard in patients receiving surgical resection of grade IV glioblastoma. 68 patients with a primary or a recurrent glioblastoma scheduled for surgery including fluorescence guidance and neuronavigation were included (mean age: 59 years, 26 female, 42 male patients). The ioMRI after the first resection included transverse FLAIR, DWI, T2-FFE and T1 - 3 d FFE ± GD-DPTA. The second resection was performed whenever residual contrast-enhancing tissue was detected on ioMRI. Resected tissue samples were histopathologically evaluated (gold standard). Additionally, we evaluated the early postoperative MRI scan acquired within 48 h post-OP for remaining enhancing tissue and compared them with the ioMRI scan. In 43 patients ioMRI indicated residual tumorous tissue, which could be confirmed in the histological specimens of the second resection. In 16 (4 with recurrent, 12 with primary glioblastoma) cases, ioMRI revealed truly negative results without residual tumor and follow-up MRI confirmed complete resection. In 7 cases (3 with recurrent, 4 with primary glioblastoma) ioMRI revealed a suspicious result without tumorous tissue in the histopathological workup. In 2 (1 for each group) patients, residual tumorous tissue was detected in spite of negative ioMRI. IoMRI had a sensitivity of 95 % (94 % recurrent and 96 % for primary glioblastoma) and a specificity of 69.5 % (57 % and 75 %, respectively). The positive predictive value was 86 % (84 % for recurrent and 87 % for primary glioblastoma), and the negative predictive value was 88 % (80 % and 92 %, respectively). ioMRI is effective for detecting remaining tumorous tissue after glioma resection. However, scars and leakage of contrast agent can be misleading and limit specificity. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) presents with a high sensitivity for residual

  18. Accuracy of high-field intraoperative MRI in the detectability of residual tumor in glioma grade IV resections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Mager, Ann-Kathrin; Goetz, Claudia; Kremer, Paul; Detsch, Oliver; Theisgen, Hannah-Katharina; Friese, Michael; Gottschalk, Joachim; Schwindt, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity/specificity of tumor detection by T1 contrast enhancement in intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) in comparison to histopathological assessment as the gold standard in patients receiving surgical resection of grade IV glioblastoma. 68 patients with a primary or a recurrent glioblastoma scheduled for surgery including fluorescence guidance and neuronavigation were included (mean age: 59 years, 26 female, 42 male patients). The ioMRI after the first resection included transverse FLAIR, DWI, T2-FFE and T1 - 3 d FFE ± GD-DPTA. The second resection was performed whenever residual contrast-enhancing tissue was detected on ioMRI. Resected tissue samples were histopathologically evaluated (gold standard). Additionally, we evaluated the early postoperative MRI scan acquired within 48 h post-OP for remaining enhancing tissue and compared them with the ioMRI scan. In 43 patients ioMRI indicated residual tumorous tissue, which could be confirmed in the histological specimens of the second resection. In 16 (4 with recurrent, 12 with primary glioblastoma) cases, ioMRI revealed truly negative results without residual tumor and follow-up MRI confirmed complete resection. In 7 cases (3 with recurrent, 4 with primary glioblastoma) ioMRI revealed a suspicious result without tumorous tissue in the histopathological workup. In 2 (1 for each group) patients, residual tumorous tissue was detected in spite of negative ioMRI. IoMRI had a sensitivity of 95 % (94 % recurrent and 96 % for primary glioblastoma) and a specificity of 69.5 % (57 % and 75 %, respectively). The positive predictive value was 86 % (84 % for recurrent and 87 % for primary glioblastoma), and the negative predictive value was 88 % (80 % and 92 %, respectively). ioMRI is effective for detecting remaining tumorous tissue after glioma resection. However, scars and leakage of contrast agent can be misleading and limit specificity. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) presents with a high sensitivity for residual

  19. The value of conventional high-field MRI in MS in the light of the McDonald criteria: a literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Line Sofie Lunde; Larsson, H B W; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini

    2010-01-01

    in MS. The aim of this paper was to review MRI studies in MS where a direct comparison of MRI at high field with MRI at 1-1.5 tesla (T) had been performed. The studies evaluated were found by searching Pubmed with relevant terms including MeSH terms. The reviewed studies all found the conspicuity...

  20. High-Field MRI-Compatible Needle Placement Robot for Prostate Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    SU, Hao; CAMILO, Alex; COLE, Gregory A.; HATA, Nobuhiko; TEMPANY, Clare M.; FISCHER, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible needle placement system actuated by piezoelectric actuators for prostate brachytherapy and biopsy. An MRI-compatible modular 3 degree-of-freedom (DOF) needle driver module coupled with a 3-DOF x-y-z stage is proposed as a slave robot to precisely deliver radioactive brachytherapy seeds under interactive MRI guidance. The needle driver module provides for needle cannula rotation, needle insertion and cannula retraction to enable the brachytherapy procedure with the preloaded needles. The device mimics the manual physician gesture by two point grasping (hub and base) and provides direct force measurement of needle insertion force by fiber optic force sensors. The fabricated prototype is presented and an experiment with phantom trials in 3T MRI is analyzed to demonstrate the system compatibility. PMID:21335868

  1. First patients treated with a 1.5 T MRI-Linac: clinical proof of concept of a high-precision, high-field MRI guided radiotherapy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaymakers, B. W.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, I. M.; Bol, G. H.; Glitzner, M.; Kotte, A. N. T. J.; van Asselen, B.; de Boer, J. C. J.; Bluemink, J. J.; Hackett, S. L.; Moerland, M. A.; Woodings, S. J.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; van Zijp, H. M.; Philippens, M. E. P.; Tijssen, R.; Kok, J. G. M.; de Groot-van Breugel, E. N.; Kiekebosch, I.; Meijers, L. T. C.; Nomden, C. N.; Sikkes, G. G.; Doornaert, P. A. H.; Eppinga, W. S. C.; Kasperts, N.; Kerkmeijer, L. G. W.; Tersteeg, J. H. A.; Brown, K. J.; Pais, B.; Woodhead, P.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2017-12-01

    The integration of 1.5 T MRI functionality with a radiotherapy linear accelerator (linac) has been pursued since 1999 by the UMC Utrecht in close collaboration with Elekta and Philips. The idea behind this integrated device is to offer unrivalled, online and real-time, soft-tissue visualization of the tumour and the surroundings for more precise radiation delivery. The proof of concept of this device was given in 2009 by demonstrating simultaneous irradiation and MR imaging on phantoms, since then the device has been further developed and commercialized by Elekta. The aim of this work is to demonstrate the clinical feasibility of online, high-precision, high-field MRI guidance of radiotherapy using the first clinical prototype MRI-Linac. Four patients with lumbar spine bone metastases were treated with a 3 or 5 beam step-and-shoot IMRT plan. The IMRT plan was created while the patient was on the treatment table and based on the online 1.5 T MR images; pre-treatment CT was deformably registered to the online MRI to obtain Hounsfield values. Bone metastases were chosen as the first site as these tumors can be clearly visualized on MRI and the surrounding spine bone can be detected on the integrated portal imager. This way the portal images served as an independent verification of the MRI based guidance to quantify the geometric precision of radiation delivery. Dosimetric accuracy was assessed post-treatment from phantom measurements with an ionization chamber and film. Absolute doses were found to be highly accurate, with deviations ranging from 0.0% to 1.7% in the isocenter. The geometrical, MRI based targeting as confirmed using portal images was better than 0.5 mm, ranging from 0.2 mm to 0.4 mm. In conclusion, high precision, high-field, 1.5 T MRI guided radiotherapy is clinically feasible.

  2. The value of conventional high-field MRI in MS in the light of the McDonald criteria: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunde Larsen, L S; Larsson, H B W; Frederiksen, J L

    2010-09-01

    The diagnosis of MS is based on the revised McDonald criteria and is multidisciplinary. Both clinical and paraclinical measures are included. High-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming increasingly available and it is therefore necessary to clarify possible advantages of high-field MRI in MS. The aim of this paper was to review MRI studies in MS where a direct comparison of MRI at high field with MRI at 1-1.5 tesla (T) had been performed. The studies evaluated were found by searching Pubmed with relevant terms including MeSH terms. The reviewed studies all found the conspicuity of lesions to be better at high field. Of the seven studies, six found more and bigger lesions at high-field MRI. In the present paper, the relevant MRI sequences are evaluated in detail. The detection of more lesions at high-field strength did not seem to lead to earlier diagnosis of clinically definite multiple sclerosis. Further larger studies of patients with clinically isolated syndromes are needed to settle the question of a diagnostic consequence of high-field imaging in MS. We suggest that the next revision of the McDonald diagnostic criteria include a recommendation of field strength.

  3. The development of the region of basal nuclei in fetus using MRI of high field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Hequn; Zhang Zhonghe; Liu Shuwei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the developmental process of the region of basal nuclei of postmortem fetuses by 3.0 T and 7.0 T MRI. Methods: One hundred and thirty-one postmortem fetuses of 14 to 40 weeks of gestational age (GA) were scanned by 3.0 T MR, of which 11 fetuses of 14-27 weeks of GA were chosen and scanned by 7.0 T MR. The time when the structures in the region of basal nuclei could be detected and the changes of MR signal intensity were analyzed for MRI of different Tesla. Results: On 3.0 T MRI, the dorsal thalamus could be delineated as early as 14 weeks of GA. The germinal matrix, caudate nucleus, and putamen could be visualized as early as 15 weeks of GA. The globus pallidus could be described as early as 18 weeks of GA, and the internal capsule and external capsule could be shown as early as 20 weeks of GA. The signal of the caudate nucleus during 15-30 weeks of GA was relatively hypointense on T 1 WI and hyperintense on T 2 WI, but during 31-40 weeks of GA, it was relatively hyperintense on T 1 WI and hypointense on T 2 WI. The putamen had a relatively high signal intensity on T 1 WI and low signal intensity on T 2 WI during 15-17 weeks of GA, and it appeared patchy during 18-25 weeks of GA, then it had a relatively low signal intensity on T 1 WI and high signal intensity on T 2 WI during 26-30 weeks of GA, and during 31-40 weeks of GA, its signal intensity was relatively high on T 1 WI and low on T 2 WI. The globus pallidus had a relatively high signal intensity on T 1 WI and low signal intensity on T 2 WI during 20- 40 weeks of GA. Compared to the 3.0 T MRI, the T 2 images of 7.0 T MRI were more clear, and most structures in the region of basal nuclei could be clearly displayed as early as 16 weeks of GA, such as the germinal matrix, caudate nucleus, dorsal thalamus, putamen, globus pallidus, internal capsule, and extemal capsule. The claustrum could be delineated as early as 18 weeks of GA on 7.0 T MRI. Conclusions: 3.0 T MRI could show the development

  4. Safety implications of high-field MRI: actuation of endogenous magnetic iron oxides in the human body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Dobson

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging scanners have become ubiquitous in hospitals and high-field systems (greater than 3 Tesla are becoming increasingly common. In light of recent European Union moves to limit high-field exposure for those working with MRI scanners, we have evaluated the potential for detrimental cellular effects via nanomagnetic actuation of endogenous iron oxides in the body.Theoretical models and experimental data on the composition and magnetic properties of endogenous iron oxides in human tissue were used to analyze the forces on iron oxide particles.Results show that, even at 9.4 Tesla, forces on these particles are unlikely to disrupt normal cellular function via nanomagnetic actuation.

  5. Widespread inflammation in CLIPPERS syndrome indicated by autopsy and ultra-high-field 7T MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Morten; Ruprecht, Klemens; Sinnecker, Tim

    2016-01-01

    , and axonal damage, and (3) the possibility of lymphoma. RESULTS: In the autopsy case, perivascular inflammation dominated by CD4+ T cells was not only detected in the brainstem and cerebellum but also in brain areas with normal appearance on 3.0T MRI, including supratentorial regions and cranial nerve roots...

  6. Electromagnetic and Thermal Aspects of Radiofrequency Field Propagation in Ultra-High Field MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lier, A.L.H.M.W.

    2012-01-01

    In MRI, a radiofrequency (RF) pulse is used to generate a signal from the spins that are polarized by a strong magnetic field. For higher magnetic field strengths, a higher frequency of the RF pulse is required in order to match the Larmor frequency. A higher frequency, in turn, leads to a shorter

  7. Feasibility of using ultra-high field (7 T MRI for clinical surgical targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Duchin

    Full Text Available The advantages of ultra-high magnetic field (7 Tesla MRI for basic science research and neuroscience applications have proven invaluable. Structural and functional MR images of the human brain acquired at 7 T exhibit rich information content with potential utility for clinical applications. However, (1 substantial increases in susceptibility artifacts, and (2 geometrical distortions at 7 T would be detrimental for stereotactic surgeries such as deep brain stimulation (DBS, which typically use 1.5 T images for surgical planning. Here, we explore whether these issues can be addressed, making feasible the use of 7 T MRI to guide surgical planning. Twelve patients with Parkinson's disease, candidates for DBS, were scanned on a standard clinical 1.5 T MRI and a 7 T MRI scanner. Qualitative and quantitative assessments of global and regional distortion were evaluated based on anatomical landmarks and transformation matrix values. Our analyses show that distances between identical landmarks on 1.5 T vs. 7 T, in the mid-brain region, were less than one voxel, indicating a successful co-registration between the 1.5 T and 7 T images under these specific imaging parameter sets. On regional analysis, the central part of the brain showed minimal distortion, while inferior and frontal areas exhibited larger distortion due to proximity to air-filled cavities. We conclude that 7 T MR images of the central brain regions have comparable distortions to that observed on a 1.5 T MRI, and that clinical applications targeting structures such as the STN, are feasible with information-rich 7 T imaging.

  8. Image-guided spinal injection procedures in open high-field MRI with vertical field orientation: feasibility and technical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitparth, F.; Walter, T.; Wonneberger, U.; Wagner, M.; Hermann, K.G.; Hamm, B.; Teichgraeber, U. [Charite, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Chopra, S. [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Wichlas, F. [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    We prospectively evaluated the feasibility and technical features of MR-guided lumbosacral injection procedures in open high-field MRI at 1.0 T. In a CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O phantom and five human cadaveric spines, fluoroscopy sequences (proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo (PDw TSE), T1w TSE, T2w TSE; balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP), T1w gradient echo (GE), T2w GE) were evaluated using two MRI-compatible 20-G Chiba-type needles. Artefacts were analysed by varying needle orientation to B{sub 0}, frequency-encoding direction and slice orientation. Image quality was described using the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Subsequently, a total of 183 MR-guided nerve root (107), facet (53) and sacroiliac joint (23) injections were performed in 53 patients. In vitro, PDw TSE sequence yielded the best needle-tissue contrasts (CNR = 45, 18, 15, 9, and 8 for needle vs. fat, muscle, root, bone and sclerosis, respectively) and optimal artefact sizes (width and tip shift less than 5 mm). In vivo, PDw TSE sequence was sufficient in all cases. The acquisition time of 2 s facilitated near-real-time MRI guidance. Drug delivery was technically successful in 100% (107/107), 87% (46/53) and 87% (20/23) of nerve root, facet and sacroiliac joint injections, respectively. No major complications occurred. The mean procedure time was 29 min (range 19-67 min). MR-guided spinal injections in open high-field MRI are feasible and accurate using fast TSE sequence designs. (orig.)

  9. Contrast-enhanced ultra-high-field liver MRI: A feasibility trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umutlu, Lale, E-mail: Lale.Umutlu@uk-essen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Bitz, Andreas K.; Maderwald, Stefan; Orzada, Stephan; Kinner, Sonja; Kraff, Oliver; Brote, Irina; Ladd, Susanne C.; Schroeder, Tobias; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald; Ladd, Mark E. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics, University Nuernberg-Erlangen (Germany); Lauenstein, Thomas C. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced 7 T MRI of the liver using an eight-channel radiofrequency (RF) transmit/receive body-coil. 16 healthy subjects were examined on a 7 T MR system utilizing a custom-built eight-channel RF body-coil suitable for RF-shimming. The following data were acquired: (1) steady state free precession imaging, (2) T2w turbo spin echo imaging, (3) T1w in and opposed-phase imaging, (4) T1w 3D FLASH images pre-contrast and in arterial, portal-venous and venous phase and (5) a fat-saturated pre- and post-contrast 2D FLASH sequence. Visual evaluation of (1) the delineation of liver vasculature, (2) the overall image quality, and (3) artifact presence and consequent image impairment was performed. SNR of the liver parenchyma was measured for the contrast-enhanced 2D and 3D FLASH sequences. For statistical analysis, a Wilcoxon-Rank Test was used. Best delineation of non-enhanced liver vasculature and overall image quality was found for 2D FLASH MRI, with only slight improvement in vessel conspicuity after the application of contrast media. T2-weighted TSE imaging remained strongly impaired, falling short of diagnostic relevance and precluding a clinical application. Our results demonstrate the feasibility and diagnostic potential of dedicated contrast-enhanced 7 T liver MRI as well as the potential for non-contrast-enhanced angiographic application.

  10. Post-mortem inference of the human hippocampal connectivity and microstructure using ultra-high field diffusion MRI at 11.7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaujoin, Justine; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Boumezbeur, Fawzi; Axer, Markus; Bernard, Jeremy; Poupon, Fabrice; Schmitz, Daniel; Mangin, Jean-François; Poupon, Cyril

    2018-06-01

    The human hippocampus plays a key role in memory management and is one of the first structures affected by Alzheimer's disease. Ultra-high magnetic resonance imaging provides access to its inner structure in vivo. However, gradient limitations on clinical systems hinder access to its inner connectivity and microstructure. A major target of this paper is the demonstration of diffusion MRI potential, using ultra-high field (11.7 T) and strong gradients (750 mT/m), to reveal the extra- and intra-hippocampal connectivity in addition to its microstructure. To this purpose, a multiple-shell diffusion-weighted acquisition protocol was developed to reach an ultra-high spatio-angular resolution with a good signal-to-noise ratio. The MRI data set was analyzed using analytical Q-Ball Imaging, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), and Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density Imaging models. High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging estimates allowed us to obtain an accurate tractography resolving more complex fiber architecture than DTI models, and subsequently provided a map of the cross-regional connectivity. The neurite density was akin to that found in the histological literature, revealing the three hippocampal layers. Moreover, a gradient of connectivity and neurite density was observed between the anterior and the posterior part of the hippocampus. These results demonstrate that ex vivo ultra-high field/ultra-high gradients diffusion-weighted MRI allows the mapping of the inner connectivity of the human hippocampus, its microstructure, and to accurately reconstruct elements of the polysynaptic intra-hippocampal pathway using fiber tractography techniques at very high spatial/angular resolutions.

  11. Design and implementation of a simple multinuclear MRI system for ultra high-field imaging of animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang-Hoon; Ha, YongHyun; Veeraiah, Pandichelvam; Felder, Jörg; Möllenhoff, Klaus; Shah, N. Jon

    2016-12-01

    Non-proton MRI has recently garnered gathering interest with the increased availability of ultra high-field MRI system. Assuming the availability of a broadband RF amplifier, performing multinuclear MR experiments essentially requires additional hardware, such as an RF resonator and a T/R switch for each nucleus. A double- or triple-resonant RF probe is typically constructed using traps or PIN-diode circuits, but this approach degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image quality compared to a single-resonant coil and this is a limiting factor. In this work, we have designed the required hardware for multinuclear MR imaging experiments employing six single-resonant coil sets and a purpose-built animal bed; these have been implemented into a home-integrated 9.4 T preclinical MRI scanner. System capabilities are demonstrated by distinguishing concentration differences and sensitivity of X-nuclei imaging and spectroscopy without SNR penalty for any nuclei, no subject interruption and no degradation of the static shim conditions.

  12. The value of conventional high-field MRI in MS in the light of the McDonald criteria: a literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Line Sofie Lunde; Larsson, H B W; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of MS is based on the revised McDonald criteria and is multidisciplinary. Both clinical and paraclinical measures are included. High-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming increasingly available and it is therefore necessary to clarify possible advantages of high-field MRI...... multiple sclerosis. Further larger studies of patients with clinically isolated syndromes are needed to settle the question of a diagnostic consequence of high-field imaging in MS. We suggest that the next revision of the McDonald diagnostic criteria include a recommendation of field strength....

  13. Multishot versus single-shot pulse sequences in very high field fMRI: a comparison using retinotopic mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jascha D Swisher

    Full Text Available High-resolution functional MRI is a leading application for very high field (7 Tesla human MR imaging. Though higher field strengths promise improvements in signal-to-noise ratios (SNR and BOLD contrast relative to fMRI at 3 Tesla, these benefits may be partially offset by accompanying increases in geometric distortion and other off-resonance effects. Such effects may be especially pronounced with the single-shot EPI pulse sequences typically used for fMRI at standard field strengths. As an alternative, one might consider multishot pulse sequences, which may lead to somewhat lower temporal SNR than standard EPI, but which are also often substantially less susceptible to off-resonance effects. Here we consider retinotopic mapping of human visual cortex as a practical test case by which to compare examples of these sequence types for high-resolution fMRI at 7 Tesla. We performed polar angle retinotopic mapping at each of 3 isotropic resolutions (2.0, 1.7, and 1.1 mm using both accelerated single-shot 2D EPI and accelerated multishot 3D gradient-echo pulse sequences. We found that single-shot EPI indeed led to greater temporal SNR and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR than the multishot sequences. However, additional distortion correction in postprocessing was required in order to fully realize these advantages, particularly at higher resolutions. The retinotopic maps produced by both sequence types were qualitatively comparable, and showed equivalent test/retest reliability. Thus, when surface-based analyses are planned, or in other circumstances where geometric distortion is of particular concern, multishot pulse sequences could provide a viable alternative to single-shot EPI.

  14. Intracellular bimodal nanoparticles based on quantum dots for high-field MRI at 21.1 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jens T; Kogot, Joshua M; Lovingood, Derek D; Strouse, Geoffrey F; Grant, Samuel C

    2010-09-01

    Multimodal, biocompatible contrast agents for high magnetic field applications represent a new class of nanomaterials with significant potential for tracking of fluorescence and MR in vitro and vivo. Optimized for high-field MR applications-including biomedical imaging at 21.1 T, the highest magnetic field available for MRI-these nanoparticles capitalize on the improved performance of chelated Dy(3+) with increasing magnetic field coupled to a noncytotoxic Indium Phosphide/Zinc Sulfide (InP/ZnS) quantum dot that provides fluorescence detection, MR responsiveness, and payload delivery. By surface modifying the quantum dot with a cell-penetrating peptide sequence coupled to an MR contrast agent, the bimodal nanomaterial functions as a self-transfecting high-field MR/optical contrast agent for nonspecific intracellular labeling. Fluorescent images confirm sequestration in perinuclear vesicles of labeled cells, with no apparent cytotoxicity. These techniques can be extended to impart cell selectivity or act as a delivery vehicle for genetic or pharmaceutical interventions. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. High field MRI: safety and protection problems related to the installation and the management of a 4T equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, A.; Speranza, A.; DELIA, R.; ANTOLINI, R.; FERRARI, P.; FILIPPI, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Physics Department of Trento University (Italy), in collaboration with Bruker Biospin decided to set up a 4 T MR system for research in the neurological field as well as on the biological effects of high field MRI. Nowadays the number of similar apparatus set up in the world is very low, several of these operate in the USA, some in Australia and one in Israel. Due to the very low diffusion of these equipments and to the few knowledge today available about the biological effects by clinical application of high field MRI, the problems related to the installation of the apparatus from the safety point of view are not well standardized. Therefore, in Trento, it has been necessary to deal with many problems regarding the set up of the MRI apparatus, taking also into account the current law in Italy with respect the safety and protection in MRI applications. In the present paper the Authors show the carried out studies and analyses, in relation to the organization of the safety aspects. These studies have resulted in arranging specific guidelines for: working in controlled way; emergency procedures for the patient advanced life support; procedures for the protocol of patient protection; rules for the safety of the operators, patients and general public. The carried out analyses have mainly taken into account the danger identification and the risk evaluation. For this reason it was set up a test protocol regarding:the performing tests, the very detailed test modalities for their periodic performance and the test sequence. For the patient safety and protection it has been necessary to put care, in the first step of the survey, to the subjects in critical situations, due to: working activity, clinical history, health conditions of the patient at the moment of the examination. So it has been necessary to set up an anamnesis questionnaire for the patient, finalized to spot: (1) the patients with particular contraindications for the MR examination; (2) the patients which

  16. High field MRI: safety and protection problems related to the installation and the management of a 4T equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, A.; Speranza, A. [National Research Council, Institute of Bioimaging and Biostructures- Dep.of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences - University Federico II, Napoli (Italy); DELIA, R. [University of Rome - Medicine and Surgery Faculty - La Sapienza Sez. Rieti (Italy); ANTOLINI, R. [University of Trento - Department of Physics, Trento (Italy); FERRARI, P. [University of Trento - Direction of Polo di Rovereto, Trento (Italy); FILIPPI, M. [University of Trento Prevention and Protection Service, Trento (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The Physics Department of Trento University (Italy), in collaboration with Bruker Biospin decided to set up a 4 T MR system for research in the neurological field as well as on the biological effects of high field MRI. Nowadays the number of similar apparatus set up in the world is very low, several of these operate in the USA, some in Australia and one in Israel. Due to the very low diffusion of these equipments and to the few knowledge today available about the biological effects by clinical application of high field MRI, the problems related to the installation of the apparatus from the safety point of view are not well standardized. Therefore, in Trento, it has been necessary to deal with many problems regarding the set up of the MRI apparatus, taking also into account the current law in Italy with respect the safety and protection in MRI applications. In the present paper the Authors show the carried out studies and analyses, in relation to the organization of the safety aspects. These studies have resulted in arranging specific guidelines for: working in controlled way; emergency procedures for the patient advanced life support; procedures for the protocol of patient protection; rules for the safety of the operators, patients and general public. The carried out analyses have mainly taken into account the danger identification and the risk evaluation. For this reason it was set up a test protocol regarding:the performing tests, the very detailed test modalities for their periodic performance and the test sequence. For the patient safety and protection it has been necessary to put care, in the first step of the survey, to the subjects in critical situations, due to: working activity, clinical history, health conditions of the patient at the moment of the examination. So it has been necessary to set up an anamnesis questionnaire for the patient, finalized to spot: (1) the patients with particular contraindications for the MR examination; (2) the patients which

  17. Bridging the gap between system and cell: The role of ultra-high field MRI in human neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Robert; De Haan, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The volume of published research at the levels of systems and cellular neuroscience continues to increase at an accelerating rate. At the same time, progress in psychiatric medicine has stagnated and scientific confidence in cognitive psychology research is under threat due to careless analysis methods and underpowered experiments. With the advent of ultra-high field MRI, with submillimeter image voxels, imaging neuroscience holds the potential to bridge the cellular and systems levels. Use of these accurate and precisely localized quantitative measures of brain activity may go far in providing more secure foundations for psychology, and hence for more appropriate treatment and management of psychiatric illness. However, fundamental issues regarding the construction of testable mechanistic models using imaging data require careful consideration. This chapter summarizes the characteristics of acceptable models of brain function and provides concise descriptions of the relevant types of neuroimaging data that have recently become available. Approaches to data-driven experiments and analyses are described that may lead to more realistic conceptions of the competences of neural assemblages, as they vary across the brain's complex neuroanatomy. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. GPU-accelerated FDTD modeling of radio-frequency field-tissue interactions in high-field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jieru; Liu, Feng; Weber, Ewald; Li, Yu; Crozier, Stuart

    2011-06-01

    The analysis of high-field RF field-tissue interactions requires high-performance finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computing. Conventional CPU-based FDTD calculations offer limited computing performance in a PC environment. This study presents a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based parallel-computing framework, producing substantially boosted computing efficiency (with a two-order speedup factor) at a PC-level cost. Specific details of implementing the FDTD method on a GPU architecture have been presented and the new computational strategy has been successfully applied to the design of a novel 8-element transceive RF coil system at 9.4 T. Facilitated by the powerful GPU-FDTD computing, the new RF coil array offers optimized fields (averaging 25% improvement in sensitivity, and 20% reduction in loop coupling compared with conventional array structures of the same size) for small animal imaging with a robust RF configuration. The GPU-enabled acceleration paves the way for FDTD to be applied for both detailed forward modeling and inverse design of MRI coils, which were previously impractical.

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: dedicated low-field (0.25-T) versus high-field (3.0-T) MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan K.L.; Griffith, James F.; Wang, D.F.; Yeung, David K.W. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Shi, L. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Division of Neurology, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Li, Edmund K.; Tam, L.S. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, SAR (China)

    2015-08-15

    To compare the assessment of wrist synovitis severity, synovial volume and synovial perfusion parameters on a dedicated low-field (0.25-T) to that of a high-field (3-T) whole-body MR system in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-one patients (mean age 50.0 ± 9.8 years) with active RA were recruited prospectively. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI examination of the most severely affected wrist was performed at both 0.25 T and 3 T. Three MRI-derived parameters, synovitis severity (RAMRIS grade), synovial volume (ml{sup 3}) and synovial perfusion indices (maximum enhancement and enhancement slope), were compared. Comparing 0.25- and 3-T MRI, there was excellent agreement for semiquantitative assessment (r: 0.80, p < 0.00001) of synovitis (RAMRIS) as well as quantitative assessment (r: 0.94, p < 0.00001) of synovial volume. Good agreement for synovial Emax (r: 0.6, p = 0.002) and fair agreement (r: 0.5, p = 0.02) for synovial Eslope was found. Imaging of the RA wrist at 0.25 T yields excellent correlation with 3 T with regard to the synovitis activity score (RAMRIS) and synovial volume measurement. Fair to good correlation between low- (0.25-T) and high-field (3-T) MR systems was found for perfusion parameters, being better for Emax than for Eslope. (orig.)

  20. Survey of risks related to static magnetic fields in ultra high field MRI; Bestandsaufnahme zu Risiken durch statische Magnetfelder im Zusammenhang mit der Ultrahochfeld-MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, H.E. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Kognitions- und Neurowissenschaften, Leipzig (Germany); Cramon, D.Y. von [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Kognitions- und Neurowissenschaften, Leipzig (Germany); Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    2008-04-15

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), substantial improvements with respect to sensitivity are expected due to the development of so-called ultra high field scanners, i.e., whole-body scanners with a magnetic field strength of 7 T or above. Users of this technology need to evaluate this benefit for potential risks since commercially available systems are not certified as a medical device for human use. This review provides a detailed survey of static field bioeffects related to the exposure of subjects being scanned, to occupational exposure, and to exposure of the general public under consideration of current standards and directives. According to present knowledge, it is not expected that exposure of human subjects to static magnetic fields of 7 T implies a specific risk of damage or disease provided that known contraindications are observed. The available database does not permit definition of exact thresholds for harmful effects. However, experience from previous application of ultra high field MRI indicates that transient phenomena, such as vertigo, nausea, metallic taste, or magnetophosphenes, are more frequently observed. In particular, movements in the field or the gradient of the fringe field seem to lead to detectable effects. Besides such observations, there is a strong demand for systematic investigation of potential interaction mechanisms related to static field exposure during MRI examinations. (orig.)

  1. Biophysical modeling of high field diffusion MRI demonstrates micro-structural aberration in chronic mild stress rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Chuhutin, Andrey; Wiborg, Ove

    2016-01-01

    anhedonia is considered to be a realistic model of depression in studies of animal subjects. Stereological and neuronal tracing techniques have demonstrated persistent remodeling of microstructure in hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdala of CMS brains. Recent developments in diffusion MRI (d...... microstructure in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, caudate putamen and amygdala regions of CMS rat brains by comparison to brains from normal controls. To validate findings of CMS induced microstructural alteration, histology was performed to determine neurite, nuclear and astrocyte density. d-MRI based...... neurite density and tensor-based mean kurtosis (MKT) were significantly higher, while mean diffusivity (MD), extracellular diffusivity (Deff) and intra-neurite diffusivity(DL) were significantly lower in the amygdala of CMS rat brains. Deff was also significantly lower in the hippocampus and caudate...

  2. Summary of high field diffusion MRI and microscopy data demonstrate microstructural aberration in chronic mild stress rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Chuhutin, Andrey; Wiborg, Ove

    2016-01-01

    amygdala of the same brain hemispheres is also included with three different stains: DiI and Hoechst stained microscopic images (confocal microscopy) andALDH1L1 antibody based immunohistochemistry.These stains may be used to evaluate neurite density (DiI), nuclear density (Hoechst) and astrocytic density...... (ALDH1L1). This combination of high field diffusion data and high resolution images from microscopy enables comparison of microstructural parameters derived from diffusion MRIto histological microstructure. The data provided here is used in the article (Jespersen, 2016) [1]....

  3. Correction of inhomogeneous RF field using multiple SPGR signals for high-field spin-echo MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Yoshiyuki; Monma, Masahiko; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Kimura, Hirohiko; Uematsu, Hidemasa; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Isao

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose a simple and useful method for correcting nonuniformity of high-field (3 Tesla) T 1 -weighted spin-echo (SE) images based on a B1 field map estimated from gradient recalled echo (GRE) signals. The method of this study was to estimate B1 inhomogeneity, spoiled gradient recalled echo (SPGR) images were collected using a fixed repetition time of 70 ms, flip angles of 45 and 90 degrees, and echo times of 4.8 and 10.4 ms. Selection of flip angles was based on the observation that the relative intensity changes in SPGR signals were very similar among different tissues at larger flip angles than the Ernst angle. Accordingly, spatial irregularity that was observed on a signal ratio map of the SPGR images acquired with these 2 flip angles was ascribed to inhomogeneity of the B1 field. Dual echo time was used to eliminate T 2 * effects. The ratio map that was acquired was scaled to provide an intensity correction map for SE images. Both phantom and volunteer studies were performed using a 3T magnetic resonance scanner to validate the method. In the phantom study, the uniformity of the T 1 -weighted SE image improved by 23%. Images of human heads also showed practically sufficient improvement in the image uniformity. The present method improves the image uniformity of high-field T 1 -weighted SE images. (author)

  4. Robot-assisted biopsies in a high-field MRI system. First clinical results; Roboterunterstuetzte Punktion in einem Hochfeld-Kernspintomografen. Erste klinische Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schell, B.; Eichler, K.; Mack, M.G.; Mueller, C.; Kerl, J.M.; Beeres, M.; Thalhammer, A.; Vogl, T.J.; Zangos, S. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Czerny, C. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Unfall-, Hand- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical use of MR-guided biopsies in patients with suspicious lesions using a new MR-compatible assistance system in a high-field MR system. Materials and Methods: Six patients with suspicious focal lesions in various anatomic regions underwent percutanous biopsy in a high-field MR system (1.5 T, Magnetom Espree, Siemens) using a new MR-compatible assistance system (Innomotion). The procedures were planned and guided using T1-weighted FLASH and TrueFISP sequences. A servopneumatic drive then moved the guiding arm automatically to the insertion point. An MRI compatible 15G biopsy system (Somatex) was introduced by a physician guided by the needle holder and multiple biopsies were performed using the coaxial technique. The feasibility, duration of the intervention and biopsy findings were analyzed. Results: The proposed new system allows accurate punctures in a high-field MR system. The assistance device did not interfere with the image quality, and guided the needle virtually exactly as planned. Histological examination could be conducted on every patient. The lesion was malignant in four cases, and an infectious etiology was diagnosed for the two remaining lesions. Regarding the differentiation of anatomical and pathological structures and position monitoring of the insertion needle, TrueFISP images are to be given preference. The average intervention time was 41 minutes. Lesions up to 15.4 cm beneath the skin surface were punctured. Conclusion: The proposed MR-guided assistance system can be successfully utilized in a high-field MR system for accurate punctures of even deep lesions in various anatomic regions. (orig.)

  5. Assessment of Myocardial Remodeling Using an Elastin/Tropoelastin Specific Agent with High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protti, Andrea; Lavin, Begoña; Dong, Xuebin; Lorrio, Silvia; Robinson, Simon; Onthank, David; Shah, Ajay M; Botnar, Rene M

    2015-08-13

    Well-defined inflammation, proliferation, and maturation phases orchestrate the remodeling of the injured myocardium after myocardial infarction (MI) by controlling the formation of new extracellular matrix. The extracellular matrix consists mainly of collagen but also fractions of elastin. It is thought that elastin is responsible for maintaining elastic properties of the myocardium, thus reducing the risk of premature rupture. An elastin/tropoelastin-specific contrast agent (Gd-ESMA) was used to image tropoelastin and mature elastin fibers for in vivo assessment of extracellular matrix remodeling post-MI. Gd-ESMA enhancement was studied in a mouse model of myocardial infarction using a 7 T MRI scanner and results were compared to those achieved after injection of a nonspecific control contrast agent, gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). In the infarcted tissue, Gd-ESMA uptake (measured as R1 relaxation rate) steadily increased from day 3 to day 21 as a result of the synthesis of elastin/tropoelastin. R1 values were in good agreement with histological findings. A similar R1 behavior was observed in the remote myocardium. No mature cross-linked elastin was found at any time point. In contrast, Gd-DTPA uptake was only observed in the infarct with no changes in R1 values between 3 and 21 days post-MI. We demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo imaging of extracellular matrix remodeling post-MI using a tropoelastin/elastin binding MR contrast agent, Gd-ESMA. We found that tropoelastin is the main contributor to the increased MRI signal at late stages of MI where its augmentation in areas of infarction was in good agreement with the R1 increase. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  6. Ultra-high field NMR and MRI - the role of magnet technology to increase sensitivity and specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Ewald; Laistler, Elmar; Schmitt, Franz; Kontaxis, Georg

    2017-08-01

    "History, of course, is difficult to write, if for no other reason, than that it has so many players and so many authors." - P. J. Keating (former Australian Prime Minister) Starting with post-war developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) a race for stronger and stronger magnetic fields has begun in the 1950s to overcome the inherently low sensitivity of this promising method. Further challenges were larger magnet bores to accommodate small animals and eventually humans. Initially, resistive electromagnets with small pole distances, or sample volumes, and field strengths up to 2.35 T (or 100 MHz 1H frequency) were used in applications in physics, chemistry, and material science. This was followed by stronger and more stable (NbTi based) superconducting magnet technology typically implemented first for small-bore systems in analytical chemistry, biochemistry and structural biology, and eventually allowing larger horizontal-bore magnets with diameters large enough to fit small laboratory animals. By the end of the 1970s, first low-field resistive magnets big enough to accommodate humans were developed and superconducting whole-body systems followed. Currently, cutting-edge analytical NMR systems are available at proton frequencies up to 1 GHz (23.5 T) based on Nb3Sn at 1.9 K. A new 1.2 GHz system (28 T) at 1.9 K, operating in persistent mode but using a combination of low and high temperature multi-filament superconductors is to be released. Preclinical instruments range from small-bore animal systems with typically 600 - 800 MHz (14.1 - 18.8 T) up to 900 MHz (21 T) at 1.9 K. Human whole-body MRI systems currently operate up to 10.5 T. Hybrid combined superconducting and resistive electromagnets with even higher field strength of 45 T dc and 100 T pulsed, are available for material research, of course with smaller free bore diameters. This rather costly development towards higher and higher field strength is a consequence of the inherently low and, thus

  7. Mapping the organization of axis of motion selective features in human area MT using high-field fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zimmermann

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI at high magnetic fields has made it possible to investigate the columnar organization of the human brain in vivo with high degrees of accuracy and sensitivity. Until now, these results have been limited to the organization principles of early visual cortex (V1. While the middle temporal area (MT has been the first identified extra-striate visual area shown to exhibit a columnar organization in monkeys, evidence of MT's columnar response properties and topographic layout in humans has remained elusive. Research using various approaches suggests similar response properties as in monkeys but failed to provide direct evidence for direction or axis of motion selectivity in human area MT. By combining state of the art pulse sequence design, high spatial resolution in all three dimensions (0.8 mm isotropic, optimized coil design, ultrahigh field magnets (7 Tesla and novel high resolution cortical grid sampling analysis tools, we provide the first direct evidence for large-scale axis of motion selective feature organization in human area MT closely matching predictions from topographic columnar-level simulations.

  8. High field FMRI reveals thalamocortical integration of segregated cognitive and emotional processing in mediodorsal and intralaminar thalamic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, C D; Eckert, U; Steiner, J; Sartorius, A; Buchmann, J E; Stadler, J; Tempelmann, C; Speck, O; Bogerts, B; Abler, B; Walter, M

    2010-01-01

    Thalamocortical loops, connecting functionally segregated, higher order cortical regions, and basal ganglia, have been proposed not only for well described motor and sensory regions, but also for limbic and prefrontal areas relevant for affective and cognitive processes. These functions are, however, more specific to humans, rendering most invasive neuroanatomical approaches impossible and interspecies translations difficult. In contrast, non-invasive imaging of functional neuroanatomy using fMRI allows for the development of elaborate task paradigms capable of testing the specific functionalities proposed for these circuits. Until recently, spatial resolution largely limited the anatomical definition of functional clusters at the level of distinct thalamic nuclei. Since their anatomical distinction seems crucial not only for the segregation of cognitive and limbic loops but also for the detection of their functional interaction during cognitive-emotional integration, we applied high resolution fMRI on 7 Tesla. Using an event-related design, we could isolate thalamic effects for preceding attention as well as experience of erotic stimuli. We could demonstrate specific thalamic effects of general emotional arousal in mediodorsal nucleus and effects specific to preceding attention and expectancy in intralaminar centromedian/parafascicular complex. These thalamic effects were paralleled by specific coactivations in the head of caudate nucleus as well as segregated portions of rostral or caudal cingulate cortex and anterior insula supporting distinct thalamo-striato-cortical loops. In addition to predescribed effects of sexual arousal in hypothalamus and ventral striatum, high resolution fMRI could extent this network to paraventricular thalamus encompassing laterodorsal and parataenial nuclei. We could lend evidence to segregated subcortical loops which integrate cognitive and emotional aspects of basic human behavior such as sexual processing.

  9. Steering Electromagnetic Fields in MRI: Investigating Radiofrequency Field Interactions with Endogenous and External Dielectric Materials for Improved Coil Performance at High Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Manushka

    Although 1.5 and 3 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance (MR) systems remain the clinical standard, the number of 7 T MR systems has increased over the past decade because of the promise of higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which can translate to images with higher resolution, improved image quality and faster acquisition times. However, there are a number of technical challenges that have prevented exploiting the full potential of ultra-high field (≥ 7 T) MR imaging (MRI), such as the inhomogeneous distribution of the radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field and specific energy absorption rate (SAR), which can compromise image quality and patient safety. To better understand the origin of these issues, we first investigated the dependence of the spatial distribution of the magnetic field associated with a surface RF coil on the operating frequency and electrical properties of the sample. Our results demonstrated that the asymmetries between the transmit (B1+) and receive (B 1-) circularly polarized components of the magnetic field, which are in part responsible for RF inhomogeneity, depend on the electric conductivity of the sample. On the other hand, when sample conductivity is low, a high relative permittivity can result in an inhomogeneous RF field distribution, due to significant constructive and destructive interference patterns between forward and reflected propagating magnetic field within the sample. We then investigated the use of high permittivity materials (HPMs) as a method to alter the field distribution and improve transmit and receive coil performance in MRI. We showed that HPM placed at a distance from an RF loop coil can passively shape the field within the sample. Our results showed improvement in transmit and receive sensitivity overlap, extension of coil field-of-view, and enhancement in transmit/receive efficiency. We demonstrated the utility of this concept by employing HPM to improve performance of an existing commercial head coil for the

  10. Transient cerebellopontine demyelinisation revealed by MRI in acute cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufricht, C.A.; Tenner, W.; Rosenmayr, F.; Stiglbauer, R.

    1990-01-01

    An eight year old boy was admitted to our ward with a history of abrupt onset of rapidly progressive gait disorder, nausea, vertigo and vomiting. The clinical as well as the laboratory findings suggested the diagnosis of acute cerebellar ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), however, showed marked demyelinisation in the cerebellar region and visual evoked potentials were pathologic. After immunosuppression the patient promptly improved clinically and the lesions depicted by MRI disappeared almost completely. (orig.)

  11. High-resolution T{sub 2}-weighted cervical cancer imaging: a feasibility study on ultra-high-field 7.0-T MRI with an endorectal monopole antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogendam, Jacob P.; Verheijen, Rene H.M.; Zweemer, Ronald P. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Gynaecological Oncology, UMC Utrecht Cancer Centre, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kalleveen, Irene M.L.; Castro, Catalina S.A. de; Raaijmakers, Alexander J.E.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Klomp, Dennis W.J.; Veldhuis, Wouter B. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-03-15

    We studied the feasibility of high-resolution T{sub 2}-weighted cervical cancer imaging on an ultra-high-field 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system using an endorectal antenna of 4.7-mm thickness. A feasibility study on 20 stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer patients was conducted. All underwent pre-treatment 1.5-T MRI. At 7.0-T MRI, an external transmit/receive array with seven dipole antennae and a single endorectal monopole receive antenna were used. Discomfort levels were assessed. Following individualised phase-based B{sub 1} {sup +} shimming, T{sub 2}-weighted turbo spin echo sequences were completed. Patients had stage IB1 (n = 9), IB2 (n = 4), IIA1 (n = 1) or IIB (n = 6) cervical cancer. Discomfort (ten-point scale) was minimal at placement and removal of the endorectal antenna with a median score of 1 (range, 0-5) and 0 (range, 0-2) respectively. Its use did not result in adverse events or pre-term session discontinuation. To demonstrate feasibility, T{sub 2}-weighted acquisitions from 7.0-T MRI are presented in comparison to 1.5-T MRI. Artefacts on 7.0-T MRI were due to motion, locally destructive B{sub 1} interference, excessive B{sub 1} under the external antennae and SENSE reconstruction. High-resolution T{sub 2}-weighted 7.0-T MRI of stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer is feasible. The addition of an endorectal antenna is well tolerated by patients. (orig.)

  12. An open-source hardware and software system for acquisition and real-time processing of electrophysiology during high field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdon, Patrick L; Millan, Hernan; Fuller, Peter L; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2008-11-15

    Simultaneous recording of electrophysiology and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of growing importance in neuroscience. Rapidly evolving clinical and scientific requirements have created a need for hardware and software that can be customized for specific applications. Hardware may require customization to enable a variety of recording types (e.g., electroencephalogram, local field potentials, or multi-unit activity) while meeting the stringent and costly requirements of MRI safety and compatibility. Real-time signal processing tools are an enabling technology for studies of learning, attention, sleep, epilepsy, neurofeedback, and neuropharmacology, yet real-time signal processing tools are difficult to develop. We describe an open-source system for simultaneous electrophysiology and fMRI featuring low-noise (tested up to 7T), and user-programmable real-time signal processing. The hardware distribution provides the complete specifications required to build an MRI-compatible electrophysiological data acquisition system, including circuit schematics, print circuit board (PCB) layouts, Gerber files for PCB fabrication and robotic assembly, a bill of materials with part numbers, data sheets, and vendor information, and test procedures. The software facilitates rapid implementation of real-time signal processing algorithms. This system has been used in human EEG/fMRI studies at 3 and 7T examining the auditory system, visual system, sleep physiology, and anesthesia, as well as in intracranial electrophysiological studies of the non-human primate visual system during 3T fMRI, and in human hyperbaric physiology studies at depths of up to 300 feet below sea level.

  13. Development and application of multiple-quantum coherence techniques for in vivo sodium MRI at high and ultra-high field strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiege, Daniel Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can quantify directly and non-invasively tissue sodium concentration levels in vivo. Tissue sodium concentration levels are tightly regulated and have been shown to be directly linked to cell viability. The intracellular sodium concentration is an even more specific parameter. The triple-quantum filtering (TQF) technique for sodium MRI has been suggested to detect the intracellular sodium only. Despite their huge potential, only few studies with sodium MRI have been carried out because of the long acquisition times of sodium MRI techniques, their susceptibility to static field inhomogeneities and their limited signal-to-noise ratio compared to proton MRI. Three novel techniques that address these limitations are presented in this thesis: (a) a sodium MRI sequence that acquires simultaneously both tissue sodium concentration maps and TQF images, (b) a phase-rotation scheme that allows for the acquisition of static field inhomogeneity insensitive TQF images, and (c) the combination of the two aforementioned techniques with optimised parameters at the ultra-high fi eld strength of 9.4 T in vivo. The SISTINA sequence - simultaneous single-quantum and triple-quantum filtered imaging of 23 Na - is presented. The sequence is based on a TQF acquisition with a Cartesian readout and a three-pulse preparation. The delay between the first two pulses is used for an additional ultra-short echo time 3D radial readout. The method was implemented on a 4T scanner. It is validated in phantoms and in healthy volunteers that this additional readout does not interfere with the TQ preparation. The method is applied to three cases of brain tumours. The tissue sodium concentration maps and TQF images are presented and compared to 1 H MR and positron emission tomography images. The three-pulse TQF preparation is sensitive to static field inhomogeneities. This problem is caused by destructive interference of different coherence pathways. To address

  14. Weight loss is effective for symptomatic relief in obese subjects with knee osteoarthritis independently of joint damage severity assessed by high-field MRI and radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbergsen, H.; Boesen, M.; Lohmander, L. S.

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing prevalence of older and obese citizens, the problems of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) will escalate. Weight loss is recommended for obese KOA patients and in a majority of cases this leads to symptomatic relief. We hypothesized that pre-treatment structural status of the knee joint......, assessed by radiographs, 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and knee-joint alignment, may influence the symptomatic changes following a significant weight reduction....

  15. SU-G-TeP3-12: Retrospective Assessment of R2star Using Ultra-High Field MRI in a Rodent Model of Radiation Necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belliveau, J [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Menon, R [University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To establish a quantitative MRI method that would be capable of predicting radiation necrosis without using a contrast agent. Methods: Healthy male Fischer 344 rats were irradiated using an animal irradiator capable of delivering 2.3 Gy/min with a kVp of 225 V. A dose of 40 Gy was given to half the brain in a single session. Rats were scanned using a 9.4 T animal MRI before irradiation and every two weeks following radiation until either necrosis developed or they were sacrificed for health reasons. A multi-echo gradient-echo sequence was acquired at every time point and the apparent transverse relaxation rate R{sub 2}* was calculated based on the measured signal decay. At the last time point, an ROI mask with an R{sub 2}* value of greater than 45 s{sup −1} was applied in the area of the external and internal capsule where radiation necrosis was confirmed. A retrospective analysis was performed to determine whether R{sub 2}* values would be able to predict where radiation necrosis would occur. Results: Radiation necrosis was morphologically visible between weeks 22–24 following treatment. Gadolinium MRI and histology confirmed radiation necrosis in the area of MRI enhancement. Our data suggests that there is a trend towards significance in the lesion as early as 12 weeks prior to morphological changes on MRI with significance occurring 6 weeks prior (p≤0.05, p≤0.01 at week 24). Measurements of the R{sub 2}* in the hippocampus did not show any significant difference; however, there are areas of visible R{sub 2}* change within sub-hippocampal regions. Conclusion: R{sub 2}* is a promising method that could be able to predict an underlying disease process that occurs prior to radiation necrosis. The constant increase in R{sub 2}* values suggests a possible neuroinflammatory mechanism rather than an acute vascular event where R{sub 2}* would tend to decrease in the area.

  16. Assessment of liver tumor response by high-field (3 T) MRI after radiofrequency ablation: Short- and mid-term evolution of diffusion parameters within the ablation zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Tri-Linh, E-mail: tluonmac@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Becce, Fabio; Bize, Pierre; Denys, Alban; Meuli, Reto; Schmidt, Sabine [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of malignant liver lesions on diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) before and after successful radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation). Materials and methods: Thirty-two patients with 43 malignant liver lesions (23/20: metastases/hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC)) underwent liver MRI (3.0 T) before (<1 month) and after RF ablation (at 1, 3 and 6 months) using T2-, gadolinium-enhanced T1- and DWI-weighted MR sequences. Jointly, two radiologists prospectively measured ADCs for each lesion by means of two different regions of interest (ROIs), first including the whole lesion and secondly the area with the visibly most restricted diffusion (MRDA) on ADC map. Changes of ADCs were evaluated with ANOVA and Dunnett tests. Results: Thirty-one patients were successfully treated, while one patient was excluded due to focal recurrence. In metastases (n = 22), the ADC in the whole lesion and in MRDA showed an up-and-down evolution. In HCC (n = 20), the evolution of ADC was more complex, but with significantly higher values (p = 0.013) at 1 and 6 months after RF ablation. Conclusion: The ADC values of malignant liver lesions successfully treated by RF ablation show a predictable evolution and may help radiologists to monitor tumor response after treatment.

  17. MR-guided percutaneous biopsy of solitary pulmonary lesions using a 1.0-T open high-field MRI scanner with respiratory gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Huang, Jie; Xu, Yujun; He, Xiangmeng; Lue, Yubo; Liu, Qiang; Li, Chengli [Department of Interventional MRI, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong Key Laboratory of Advanced Medical Imaging Technologies and Applications, Jinan, Shandong (China); Li, Lei [Qingdao Central Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto [Turku University Hospital, The South Western Finland Imaging Centre, Turku (Finland)

    2017-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility, safety and accuracy of MR-guided percutaneous biopsy of solitary pulmonary lesions using a 1.0-T open MR scanner with respiratory gating. Sixty-five patients with 65 solitary pulmonary lesions underwent MR-guided percutaneous coaxial cutting needle biopsy using a 1.0-T open MR scanner with respiratory gating. Lesions were divided into two groups according to maximum lesion diameters: ≤2.0 cm (n = 31) and >2.0 cm (n = 34). The final diagnosis was established in surgery and subsequent histology. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were compared between the groups using Fisher's exact test. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of MRI-guided percutaneous pulmonary biopsy in diagnosing malignancy were 96.9 %, 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were 96.8 %, 96.3 % and 100 % for lesions 2.0 cm or smaller and 97.1 %, 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively, for lesions larger than 2.0 cm. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). Biopsy-induced complications encountered were pneumothorax in 12.3 % (8/65) and haemoptysis in 4.6 % (3/65). There were no serious complications. MRI-guided percutaneous biopsy using a 1.0-T open MR scanner with respiratory gating is an accurate and safe diagnostic technique in evaluation of pulmonary lesions. (orig.)

  18. Spontaneous bilateral subdural haematomas in the posterior cranial fossa revealed by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollo, C.; Porchet, F.; Meuli, R.

    2003-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman treated for acute myeloproliferative disease developed progressive stupor. CT showed obstructive hydrocephalus resulting from unexplained mass effect on the fourth ventricle. MRI revealed bilateral extra-axial collections in the posterior cranial fossa, giving high signal on T1- and T2-weighted images, suggesting subacute subdural haematomas. Subdural haematomas can be suspected on CT when there is unexplained mass effect. MRI may be essential to confirm the diagnosis and plan appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  19. Spontaneous bilateral subdural haematomas in the posterior cranial fossa revealed by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollo, C.; Porchet, F. [Department of Neurosurgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011, Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, R. [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2003-08-01

    A 52-year-old woman treated for acute myeloproliferative disease developed progressive stupor. CT showed obstructive hydrocephalus resulting from unexplained mass effect on the fourth ventricle. MRI revealed bilateral extra-axial collections in the posterior cranial fossa, giving high signal on T1- and T2-weighted images, suggesting subacute subdural haematomas. Subdural haematomas can be suspected on CT when there is unexplained mass effect. MRI may be essential to confirm the diagnosis and plan appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  20. Assessment of cartilage-dedicated sequences at ultra-high-field MRI: comparison of imaging performance and diagnostic confidence between 3.0 and 7.0 T with respect to osteoarthritis-induced changes at the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Robert [University of California, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); University Hospitals - Campus Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Krug, Roland; Zuo, Jin; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kelley, Douglas A.C. [General Electrics Healthcare Technologies, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ma, C.B. [University of California, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The objectives of the study were to optimize three cartilage-dedicated sequences for in vivo knee imaging at 7.0 T ultra-high-field (UHF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to compare imaging performance and diagnostic confidence concerning osteoarthritis (OA)-induced changes at 7.0 and 3.0 T MRI. Optimized MRI sequences for cartilage imaging at 3.0 T were tailored for 7.0 T: an intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo (IM-w FSE), a fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and a T1-weighted 3D high-spatial-resolution volumetric fat-suppressed spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) sequence. Three healthy subjects and seven patients with mild OA were examined. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), diagnostic confidence in assessing cartilage abnormalities, and image quality were determined. Abnormalities were assessed with the whole organ magnetic resonance imaging score (WORMS). Focal cartilage lesions and bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) were also quantified. At 7.0 T, SNR was increased (p<0.05) for all sequences. For the IM-w FSE sequence, limitations with the specific absorption rate (SAR) required modifications of the scan parameters yielding an incomplete coverage of the knee joint, extensive artifacts, and a less effective fat saturation. CNR and image quality were increased (p<0.05) for SPGR and FIESTA and decreased for IM-w FSE. Diagnostic confidence for cartilage lesions was highest (p<0.05) for FIESTA at 7.0 T. Evaluation of BMEP was decreased (p < 0.05) at 7.0 T due to limited performance of IM-w FSE. Gradient echo-based pulse sequences like SPGR and FIESTA are well suited for imaging at UHF which may improve early detection of cartilage lesions. However, UHF IM-w FSE sequences are less feasible for clinical use. (orig.)

  1. Assessment of cartilage-dedicated sequences at ultra-high-field MRI: comparison of imaging performance and diagnostic confidence between 3.0 and 7.0 T with respect to osteoarthritis-induced changes at the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, Robert; Krug, Roland; Zuo, Jin; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.; Kelley, Douglas A.C.; Ma, C.B.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to optimize three cartilage-dedicated sequences for in vivo knee imaging at 7.0 T ultra-high-field (UHF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to compare imaging performance and diagnostic confidence concerning osteoarthritis (OA)-induced changes at 7.0 and 3.0 T MRI. Optimized MRI sequences for cartilage imaging at 3.0 T were tailored for 7.0 T: an intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo (IM-w FSE), a fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and a T1-weighted 3D high-spatial-resolution volumetric fat-suppressed spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) sequence. Three healthy subjects and seven patients with mild OA were examined. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), diagnostic confidence in assessing cartilage abnormalities, and image quality were determined. Abnormalities were assessed with the whole organ magnetic resonance imaging score (WORMS). Focal cartilage lesions and bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) were also quantified. At 7.0 T, SNR was increased (p<0.05) for all sequences. For the IM-w FSE sequence, limitations with the specific absorption rate (SAR) required modifications of the scan parameters yielding an incomplete coverage of the knee joint, extensive artifacts, and a less effective fat saturation. CNR and image quality were increased (p<0.05) for SPGR and FIESTA and decreased for IM-w FSE. Diagnostic confidence for cartilage lesions was highest (p<0.05) for FIESTA at 7.0 T. Evaluation of BMEP was decreased (p < 0.05) at 7.0 T due to limited performance of IM-w FSE. Gradient echo-based pulse sequences like SPGR and FIESTA are well suited for imaging at UHF which may improve early detection of cartilage lesions. However, UHF IM-w FSE sequences are less feasible for clinical use. (orig.)

  2. Dissecting the pathobiology of altered MRI signal in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A post mortem whole brain sampling strategy for the integration of ultra-high-field MRI and quantitative neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallebage-Gamarallage, Menuka; Foxley, Sean; Menke, Ricarda A L; Huszar, Istvan N; Jenkinson, Mark; Tendler, Benjamin C; Wang, Chaoyue; Jbabdi, Saad; Turner, Martin R; Miller, Karla L; Ansorge, Olaf

    2018-03-13

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a clinically and histopathologically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder, in which therapy is hindered by the rapid progression of disease and lack of biomarkers. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated its potential for detecting the pathological signature and tracking disease progression in ALS. However, the microstructural and molecular pathological substrate is poorly understood and generally defined histologically. One route to understanding and validating the pathophysiological correlates of MRI signal changes in ALS is to directly compare MRI to histology in post mortem human brains. The article delineates a universal whole brain sampling strategy of pathologically relevant grey matter (cortical and subcortical) and white matter tracts of interest suitable for histological evaluation and direct correlation with MRI. A standardised systematic sampling strategy that was compatible with co-registration of images across modalities was established for regions representing phosphorylated 43-kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (pTDP-43) patterns that were topographically recognisable with defined neuroanatomical landmarks. Moreover, tractography-guided sampling facilitated accurate delineation of white matter tracts of interest. A digital photography pipeline at various stages of sampling and histological processing was established to account for structural deformations that might impact alignment and registration of histological images to MRI volumes. Combined with quantitative digital histology image analysis, the proposed sampling strategy is suitable for routine implementation in a high-throughput manner for acquisition of large-scale histology datasets. Proof of concept was determined in the spinal cord of an ALS patient where multiple MRI modalities (T1, T2, FA and MD) demonstrated sensitivity to axonal degeneration and associated heightened inflammatory changes in the lateral corticospinal tract. Furthermore

  3. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellens, N; Farahani, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  4. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellens, N [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Farahani, K [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  5. Ultra high field magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lethimonnier, F.; Vedrine, P.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding human brain function, brain development and brain dysfunction is one of the great challenges of the twenty first century. Biomedical imaging has now run up against a number of technical constraints that are exposing limits to its potential. In order to overcome the current limits to high-field magnetic resonance cerebral imaging (MRI) and unleash its fullest potential, the Cea has built NeuroSpin, an ultra-high-field neuroimaging facility at its Saclay centre (in the Essonne). NeuroSpin already boasts three fully operational MRI systems. The first is a 3-tesla high-field system and the second is a very-high-field 7-tesla system, both of which are dedicated to clinical studies and investigations in humans, while the third is an ultra-high-field 17.65-tesla system designed for studies on small animals. In 2011, NeuroSpin will be commissioning an 11.7-tesla ultra-high-field system of unprecedented power that is designed for research on human subjects. The level of the magnetic field and the scale required will make this joint French-German project to build the magnet a breakthrough in the international arena. (authors)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot involvement in patients with spondyloarthritides: Comparison of low-field and high-field strength units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshed, Iris; Althoff, Christian E. [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Feist, Eugen [Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Minden, Kirsten [Helios Clinics, 2nd Children' s Hospital Berlin-Buch, Rheumatology Unit, Berlin (Germany); German Rheumatology Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Schink, Tania [Department of Medical Biometry, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Hermann, Kay-Geert A. [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: kgh@charite.de

    2008-01-15

    Objective: To compare MRI evaluation of a painful hindfoot of patients with spondyloarthritides (SpA) on low-field (0.2 T) versus high-field (1.5 T) MRI. Materials and methods: Patients with SpA and hindfoot pain were randomly referred to either high-field or low-field MRI. Twenty-seven patients were evaluated (male/female: 17:10; mean age: 39 {+-} 1.4 years). Fifteen patients were examined by low-field and 12 by high-field MRI. Two patients (evaluated by high-field MRI) were excluded. Images were separately read by two radiologists who later reached a consensus. In each patient the prevalence of erosions, fluid, synovitis or bone marrow edema of the hindfoot joints, tendinosis or tenosynovitis of tendons, enthesitis of the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon and retrocalcaneal bursitis were recorded. Clinical and demographic parameters were comparable between both groups. Results: MRI evaluation of joints and tendons of the hindfoot revealed no significant differences in patients with SpA groups for all parameters. Analyzing all joints or tendons together, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Low-field and high-field MRI provide comparable information for evaluation of inflammatory hindfoot involvement. Thus, low-field MRI can be considered as a reliable diagnostic tool for the detection of hindfoot abnormalities in SpA patients.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot involvement in patients with spondyloarthritides: Comparison of low-field and high-field strength units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshed, Iris; Althoff, Christian E.; Feist, Eugen; Minden, Kirsten; Schink, Tania; Hamm, Bernd; Hermann, Kay-Geert A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare MRI evaluation of a painful hindfoot of patients with spondyloarthritides (SpA) on low-field (0.2 T) versus high-field (1.5 T) MRI. Materials and methods: Patients with SpA and hindfoot pain were randomly referred to either high-field or low-field MRI. Twenty-seven patients were evaluated (male/female: 17:10; mean age: 39 ± 1.4 years). Fifteen patients were examined by low-field and 12 by high-field MRI. Two patients (evaluated by high-field MRI) were excluded. Images were separately read by two radiologists who later reached a consensus. In each patient the prevalence of erosions, fluid, synovitis or bone marrow edema of the hindfoot joints, tendinosis or tenosynovitis of tendons, enthesitis of the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon and retrocalcaneal bursitis were recorded. Clinical and demographic parameters were comparable between both groups. Results: MRI evaluation of joints and tendons of the hindfoot revealed no significant differences in patients with SpA groups for all parameters. Analyzing all joints or tendons together, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Low-field and high-field MRI provide comparable information for evaluation of inflammatory hindfoot involvement. Thus, low-field MRI can be considered as a reliable diagnostic tool for the detection of hindfoot abnormalities in SpA patients

  8. Imaging-genomics reveals driving pathways of MRI derived volumetric tumor phenotype features in Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossmann, Patrick; Gutman, David A.; Dunn, William D. Jr; Holder, Chad A.; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) tumors exhibit strong phenotypic differences that can be quantified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but the underlying biological drivers of these imaging phenotypes remain largely unknown. An Imaging-Genomics analysis was performed to reveal the mechanistic associations between MRI derived quantitative volumetric tumor phenotype features and molecular pathways. One hundred fourty one patients with presurgery MRI and survival data were included in our analysis. Volumetric features were defined, including the necrotic core (NE), contrast-enhancement (CE), abnormal tumor volume assessed by post-contrast T1w (tumor bulk or TB), tumor-associated edema based on T2-FLAIR (ED), and total tumor volume (TV), as well as ratios of these tumor components. Based on gene expression where available (n = 91), pathway associations were assessed using a preranked gene set enrichment analysis. These results were put into context of molecular subtypes in GBM and prognostication. Volumetric features were significantly associated with diverse sets of biological processes (FDR < 0.05). While NE and TB were enriched for immune response pathways and apoptosis, CE was associated with signal transduction and protein folding processes. ED was mainly enriched for homeostasis and cell cycling pathways. ED was also the strongest predictor of molecular GBM subtypes (AUC = 0.61). CE was the strongest predictor of overall survival (C-index = 0.6; Noether test, p = 4x10 −4 ). GBM volumetric features extracted from MRI are significantly enriched for information about the biological state of a tumor that impacts patient outcomes. Clinical decision-support systems could exploit this information to develop personalized treatment strategies on the basis of noninvasive imaging. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2659-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  9. High Field Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-12-15

    A Workshop was held in Frascati at the end of September under the title 'Generation of High Fields for Particle Acceleration to Very High Energies'. It was organized by the CERN Accelerator School, the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) and the Italian INFN and was a further stage in the exploratory moves towards new techniques of acceleration. Such techniques might become necessary to respond to the needs of high energy physics some decades from now when the application of conventional techniques will probably have reached their limits.

  10. Voxel-based MRI intensitometry reveals extent of cerebral white matter pathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Hartung

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is characterized by progressive loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Advanced MRI techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging have shown great potential in capturing a common white matter pathology. However the sensitivity is variable and diffusion tensor imaging is not yet applicable to the routine clinical environment. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM has revealed grey matter changes in ALS, but the bias-reducing algorithms inherent to traditional VBM are not optimized for the assessment of the white matter changes. We have developed a novel approach to white matter analysis, namely voxel-based intensitometry (VBI. High resolution T1-weighted MRI was acquired at 1.5 Tesla in 30 ALS patients and 37 age-matched healthy controls. VBI analysis at the group level revealed widespread white matter intensity increases in the corticospinal tracts, corpus callosum, sub-central, frontal and occipital white matter tracts and cerebellum. VBI results correlated with disease severity (ALSFRS-R and patterns of cerebral involvement differed between bulbar- and limb-onset. VBI would be easily translatable to the routine clinical environment, and once optimized for individual analysis offers significant biomarker potential in ALS.

  11. Cortical and Subcortical Coordination of Visual Spatial Attention Revealed by Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jessica J; Boehler, Carsten N; Roberts, Kenneth C; Chen, Ling-Chia; Krebs, Ruth M; Song, Allen W; Woldorff, Marty G

    2017-08-16

    Visual spatial attention has been studied in humans with both electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) individually. However, due to the intrinsic limitations of each of these methods used alone, our understanding of the systems-level mechanisms underlying attentional control remains limited. Here, we examined trial-to-trial covariations of concurrently recorded EEG and fMRI in a cued visual spatial attention task in humans, which allowed delineation of both the generators and modulators of the cue-triggered event-related oscillatory brain activity underlying attentional control function. The fMRI activity in visual cortical regions contralateral to the cued direction of attention covaried positively with occipital gamma-band EEG, consistent with activation of cortical regions representing attended locations in space. In contrast, fMRI activity in ipsilateral visual cortical regions covaried inversely with occipital alpha-band oscillations, consistent with attention-related suppression of the irrelevant hemispace. Moreover, the pulvinar nucleus of the thalamus covaried with both of these spatially specific, attention-related, oscillatory EEG modulations. Because the pulvinar's neuroanatomical geometry makes it unlikely to be a direct generator of the scalp-recorded EEG, these covariational patterns appear to reflect the pulvinar's role as a regulatory control structure, sending spatially specific signals to modulate visual cortex excitability proactively. Together, these combined EEG/fMRI results illuminate the dynamically interacting cortical and subcortical processes underlying spatial attention, providing important insight not realizable using either method alone. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Noninvasive recordings of changes in the brain's blood flow using functional magnetic resonance imaging and electrical activity using electroencephalography in humans have individually shown that shifting attention to a location in space

  12. Concurrent tACS-fMRI Reveals Causal Influence of Power Synchronized Neural Activity on Resting State fMRI Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bächinger, Marc; Zerbi, Valerio; Moisa, Marius; Polania, Rafael; Liu, Quanying; Mantini, Dante; Ruff, Christian; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2017-05-03

    Resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) is commonly used to study the brain's intrinsic neural coupling, which reveals specific spatiotemporal patterns in the form of resting state networks (RSNs). It has been hypothesized that slow rs-fMRI oscillations (5 Hz); however, causal evidence for this relationship is currently lacking. Here we measured rs-fMRI in humans while applying transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to entrain brain rhythms in left and right sensorimotor cortices. The two driving tACS signals were tailored to the individual's α rhythm (8-12 Hz) and fluctuated in amplitude according to a 1 Hz power envelope. We entrained the left versus right hemisphere in accordance to two different coupling modes where either α oscillations were synchronized between hemispheres (phase-synchronized tACS) or the slower oscillating power envelopes (power-synchronized tACS). Power-synchronized tACS significantly increased rs-fMRI connectivity within the stimulated RSN compared with phase-synchronized or no tACS. This effect outlasted the stimulation period and tended to be more effective in individuals who exhibited a naturally weak interhemispheric coupling. Using this novel approach, our data provide causal evidence that synchronized power fluctuations contribute to the formation of fMRI-based RSNs. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that the brain's intrinsic coupling at rest can be selectively modulated by choosing appropriate tACS signals, which could lead to new interventions for patients with altered rs-fMRI connectivity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) has become an important tool to estimate brain connectivity. However, relatively little is known about how slow hemodynamic oscillations measured with fMRI relate to electrophysiological processes. It was suggested that slowly fluctuating power envelopes of electrophysiological signals synchronize across brain areas and that the topography of this activity is spatially correlated to

  13. High field electron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Duff, J.

    1985-12-01

    High field electron linacs are considered as potential candidates to provide very high energies beyond LEP. Since almost twenty years not much improvement has been made on linac technologies as they have been mostly kept at low and medium energies to be used as injectors for storage rings. Today, both their efficiency and their performances are being reconsidered, and for instance the pulse compression sheme developed at SLAC and introduced to upgrade the energy of that linac is a first step towards a new generation of linear accelerators. However this is not enough in terms of power consumption and more development is needed to improve both the efficiency of accelerating structures and the performances of RF power sources

  14. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  15. Radiofrequency solutions in clinical high field magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreychenko, A.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) benefit from the sensitivity gain at high field (≥7T). However, high field brings also certain challenges associated with growing frequency and spectral dispersion. Frequency growth results in degraded performance of large volume radiofrequency

  16. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  17. fMRI Analysis-by-Synthesis Reveals a Dorsal Hierarchy That Extracts Surface Slant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Hiroshi; Welchman, Andrew E

    2015-07-08

    The brain's skill in estimating the 3-D orientation of viewed surfaces supports a range of behaviors, from placing an object on a nearby table, to planning the best route when hill walking. This ability relies on integrating depth signals across extensive regions of space that exceed the receptive fields of early sensory neurons. Although hierarchical selection and pooling is central to understanding of the ventral visual pathway, the successive operations in the dorsal stream are poorly understood. Here we use computational modeling of human fMRI signals to probe the computations that extract 3-D surface orientation from binocular disparity. To understand how representations evolve across the hierarchy, we developed an inference approach using a series of generative models to explain the empirical fMRI data in different cortical areas. Specifically, we simulated the responses of candidate visual processing algorithms and tested how well they explained fMRI responses. Thereby we demonstrate a hierarchical refinement of visual representations moving from the representation of edges and figure-ground segmentation (V1, V2) to spatially extensive disparity gradients in V3A. We show that responses in V3A are little affected by low-level image covariates, and have a partial tolerance to the overall depth position. Finally, we show that responses in V3A parallel perceptual judgments of slant. This reveals a relatively short computational hierarchy that captures key information about the 3-D structure of nearby surfaces, and more generally demonstrates an analysis approach that may be of merit in a diverse range of brain imaging domains. Copyright © 2015 Ban and Welchman.

  18. Data-driven analysis of simultaneous EEG/fMRI reveals neurophysiological phenotypes of impulse control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmüser, Lena; Sebastian, Alexandra; Mobascher, Arian; Lieb, Klaus; Feige, Bernd; Tüscher, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Response inhibition is the ability to suppress inadequate but prepotent or ongoing response tendencies. A fronto-striatal network is involved in these processes. Between-subject differences in the intra-individual variability have been suggested to constitute a key to pathological processes underlying impulse control disorders. Single-trial EEG/fMRI analysis allows to increase sensitivity for inter-individual differences by incorporating intra-individual variability. Thirty-eight healthy subjects performed a visual Go/Nogo task during simultaneous EEG/fMRI. Of 38 healthy subjects, 21 subjects reliably showed Nogo-related ICs (Nogo-IC-positive) while 17 subjects (Nogo-IC-negative) did not. Comparing both groups revealed differences on various levels: On trait level, Nogo-IC-negative subjects scored higher on questionnaires regarding attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder; on a behavioral level, they displayed slower response times (RT) and higher intra-individual RT variability while both groups did not differ in their inhibitory performance. On the neurophysiological level, Nogo-IC-negative subjects showed a hyperactivation of left inferior frontal cortex/insula and left putamen as well as significantly reduced P3 amplitudes. Thus, a data-driven approach for IC classification and the resulting presence or absence of early Nogo-specific ICs as criterion for group selection revealed group differences at behavioral and neurophysiological levels. This may indicate electrophysiological phenotypes characterized by inter-individual variations of neural and behavioral correlates of impulse control. We demonstrated that the inter-individual difference in an electrophysiological correlate of response inhibition is correlated with distinct, potentially compensatory neural activity. This may suggest the existence of electrophysiologically dissociable phenotypes of behavioral and neural motor response inhibition with the Nogo-IC-positive phenotype possibly providing

  19. Revealing the functional neuroanatomy of intrinsic alertness using fMRI: methodological peculiarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Benjamin; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Sack, Alexander T; Sack, Alexander; Heinecke, Armin; Willmes, Klaus; Sturm, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Clinical observations and neuroimaging data revealed a right-hemisphere fronto-parietal-thalamic-brainstem network for intrinsic alertness, and additional left fronto-parietal activity during phasic alertness. The primary objective of this fMRI study was to map the functional neuroanatomy of intrinsic alertness as precisely as possible in healthy participants, using a novel assessment paradigm already employed in clinical settings. Both the paradigm and the experimental design were optimized to specifically assess intrinsic alertness, while at the same time controlling for sensory-motor processing. The present results suggest that the processing of intrinsic alertness is accompanied by increased activity within the brainstem, thalamus, anterior cingulate gyrus, right insula, and right parietal cortex. Additionally, we found increased activation in the left hemisphere around the middle frontal gyrus (BA 9), the insula, the supplementary motor area, and the cerebellum. Our results further suggest that rather minute aspects of the experimental design may induce aspects of phasic alertness, which in turn might lead to additional brain activation in left-frontal areas not normally involved in intrinsic alertness. Accordingly, left BA 9 activation may be related to co-activation of the phasic alertness network due to the switch between rest and task conditions functioning as an external warning cue triggering the phasic alertness network. Furthermore, activation of the intrinsic alertness network during fixation blocks due to enhanced expectancy shortly before the switch to the task block might, when subtracted from the task block, lead to diminished activation in the typical right hemisphere intrinsic alertness network. Thus, we cautiously suggest that--as a methodological artifact--left frontal activations might show up due to phasic alertness involvement and intrinsic alertness activations might be weakened due to contrasting with fixation blocks, when assessing the

  20. Assessment of Abdominal Fat Using High-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Anthropometric and Biochemical Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Radaideh, Ali; Tayyem, Reema; Al-Fayomi, Kholoud; Nimer, Nisreen; Malkawi, Amer; Al-Zu Bi, Rana; Agraib, Lana; Athamneh, Imad; Hijjawi, Nawal

    2016-12-01

    To measure the abdominal subcutaneous fat (SF) and visceral fat (VF) volumes using high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to investigate their association with selected anthropometric and biochemical parameters among obese and nonobese apparently healthy participants. A cross-sectional study was conducted by recruiting 167 healthy participants. Abdominal scans were acquired at 3T MRI, and the SF and VF were segmented and their volumes were calculated. Selected anthropometric and biochemical measurements were also determined. A significant difference (P abdominal fat volumes, leptin, resistin, adiponectin and waist circumference. Waist circumferences were measured by tape and MRI. Findings revealed that MRI-measured fat volumes were different between males and females and had a significant (P fat volumes were found to correlate moderately with interleukin-6 and weakly with cholesterol, serum triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein. Except for cholesterol, all measured biochemical variables and abdominal fat volumes in the current study were significantly associated with body mass index. All anthropometric and biochemical parameters showed weak-to-strong associations with the MRI-measured fat volumes. Abdominal fat distribution was different between males and females and their correlations with some lipid profiles were found to be sex dependent. These findings revealed that MRI can be used as an alternative tool for obesity assessment. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The neural substrates of musical memory revealed by fMRI and two semantic tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussard, M; Rauchs, G; Landeau, B; Viader, F; Desgranges, B; Eustache, F; Platel, H

    2010-12-01

    Recognizing a musical excerpt without necessarily retrieving its title typically reflects the existence of a memory system dedicated to the retrieval of musical knowledge. The functional distinction between musical and verbal semantic memory has seldom been investigated. In this fMRI study, we directly compared the musical and verbal memory of 20 nonmusicians, using a congruence task involving automatic semantic retrieval and a familiarity task requiring more thorough semantic retrieval. In the former, participants had to access their semantic store to retrieve musical or verbal representations of melodies or expressions they heard, in order to decide whether these were then given the right ending or not. In the latter, they had to judge the level of familiarity of musical excerpts and expressions. Both tasks revealed activation of the left inferior frontal and posterior middle temporal cortices, suggesting that executive and selection processes are common to both verbal and musical retrievals. Distinct patterns of activation were observed within the left temporal cortex, with musical material mainly activating the superior temporal gyrus and verbal material the middle and inferior gyri. This cortical organization of musical and verbal semantic representations could explain clinical dissociations featuring selective disturbances for musical or verbal material. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. MRI Texture Analysis Reveals Deep Gray Nuclei Damage in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque, Milena; Anjos, Lara G V; Maia Tavares de Andrade, Helen; de Oliveira, Márcia S; Castellano, Gabriela; Junqueira Ribeiro de Rezende, Thiago; Nucci, Anamarli; França Junior, Marcondes Cavalcante

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by extensive corticospinal damage, but extrapyramidal involvement is suggested in pathological studies. Texture analysis (TA) is an image processing technique that evaluates the distribution of gray levels between pixels in a given region of interest (ROI). It provides quantitative data and has been employed in several neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we used TA to investigate possible deep gray nuclei (DGN) abnormalities in a cohort of ALS patients. Thirty-two ALS patients and 32 healthy controls underwent MRI in a 3T scanner. The T1 volumetric sequence was used for DGN segmentation and extraction of 11 texture parameters using the MaZda software. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney non-parametric test, with a significance level set at α = 0.025 (FDR-corrected) for TA. Patients had significantly higher values for the parameter correlation (CO) in both thalami and in the right caudate nucleus compared to healthy controls. Also, the parameter Inverse Difference Moment or Homogeneity (IDM) presented significantly smaller values in the ALS group in both thalami. TA of T1 weighted images revealed DGN alterations in patients with ALS, namely in the thalami and caudate nuclei. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  3. fMRI of Simultaneous Interpretation Reveals the Neural Basis of Extreme Language Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Moser-Mercer, Barbara; Michel, Christoph M; Golestani, Narly

    2015-12-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural basis of extreme multilingual language control in a group of 50 multilingual participants. Comparing brain responses arising during simultaneous interpretation (SI) with those arising during simultaneous repetition revealed activation of regions known to be involved in speech perception and production, alongside a network incorporating the caudate nucleus that is known to be implicated in domain-general cognitive control. The similarity between the networks underlying bilingual language control and general executive control supports the notion that the frequently reported bilingual advantage on executive tasks stems from the day-to-day demands of language control in the multilingual brain. We examined neural correlates of the management of simultaneity by correlating brain activity during interpretation with the duration of simultaneous speaking and hearing. This analysis showed significant modulation of the putamen by the duration of simultaneity. Our findings suggest that, during SI, the caudate nucleus is implicated in the overarching selection and control of the lexico-semantic system, while the putamen is implicated in ongoing control of language output. These findings provide the first clear dissociation of specific dorsal striatum structures in polyglot language control, roles that are consistent with previously described involvement of these regions in nonlinguistic executive control. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Common brain regions underlying different arithmetic operations as revealed by conjunct fMRI-BOLD activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, Thorsten; Code, Chris; Herrmann, Manfred

    2007-10-03

    The issue of how and where arithmetic operations are represented in the brain has been addressed in numerous studies. Lesion studies suggest that a network of different brain areas are involved in mental calculation. Neuroimaging studies have reported inferior parietal and lateral frontal activations during mental arithmetic using tasks of different complexities and using different operators (addition, subtraction, etc.). Indeed, it has been difficult to compare brain activation across studies because of the variety of different operators and different presentation modalities used. The present experiment examined fMRI-BOLD activity in participants during calculation tasks entailing different arithmetic operations -- addition, subtraction, multiplication and division -- of different complexities. Functional imaging data revealed a common activation pattern comprising right precuneus, left and right middle and superior frontal regions during all arithmetic operations. All other regional activations were operation specific and distributed in prominently frontal, parietal and central regions when contrasting complex and simple calculation tasks. The present results largely confirm former studies suggesting that activation patterns due to mental arithmetic appear to reflect a basic anatomical substrate of working memory, numerical knowledge and processing based on finger counting, and derived from a network originally related to finger movement. We emphasize that in mental arithmetic research different arithmetic operations should always be examined and discussed independently of each other in order to avoid invalid generalizations on arithmetics and involved brain areas.

  5. Ex-vivo diffusion MRI reveals microstructural alterations in stress-sensitive brain regions: A chronic mild stress recovery study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Hansen, Brian; Wiborg, Ove

    Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide and causes significant microstructural alterations in stress-sensitive brain regions. However, the potential recovery of these microstructural alterations has not previously been investigated, which we, therefore, set out to do using diffusion...... MRI (d-MRI) in the chronic mild stress (CMS) rat model of depression. This study reveals significant microstructural alterations after 8 weeks of recovery, in the opposite direction to change induced by stress in the acute phase of the experiment. Such findings may be useful in the prognosis...... of depression or for monitoring treatment response....

  6. High-Field Accelerator Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijk, G de

    2014-01-01

    In this lecture an overview is given of the present technology for high field accelerator magnets. We indicate how to get high fields and what are the most important parameters. The available conductors and their limitations are presented followed by the most relevant types of coils and support structures. We conclude by showing a number of recent examples of development magnets which are either pure R&D objects or models for the LHC luminosity upgrade

  7. MRI findings of a remote and isolated vaginal metastasis revealing an adenocarcinoma of the mid-sigmoid colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Arco, Felice; Pizzuti, Laura Micol; Romano, Federica; Natella, Valentina; Laccetti, Ettore; Storto, Giovanni; Maurea, Simone; Mainenti, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    A remote vaginal metastasis from a colo-rectal carcinoma is extremely rare. Only few cases have been described in the literature. The radiological appearances of a vaginal metastasis from colon-rectal cancer have not been extensively investigated. We report the MRI findings with clinical and pathological correlations of a remote and isolated vaginal metastasis revealing a mid-sigmoid adenocarcinoma in a 67 years old woman

  8. fMRI reveals reciprocal inhibition between social and physical cognitive domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Anthony I.; Dawson, Abigail; Begany, Katelyn; Leckie, Regina L.; Barry, Kevin; Ciccia, Angela; Snyder, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Two lines of evidence indicate that there exists a reciprocal inhibitory relationship between opposed brain networks. First, most attention-demanding cognitive tasks activate a stereotypical set of brain areas, known as the task-positive network and simultaneously deactivate a different set of brain regions, commonly referred to as the task negative or default mode network. Second, functional connectivity analyses show that these same opposed networks are anti-correlated in the resting state. We hypothesize that these reciprocally inhibitory effects reflect two incompatible cognitive modes, each of which is directed towards understanding the external world. Thus, engaging one mode activates one set of regions and suppresses activity in the other. We test this hypothesis by identifying two types of problem-solving task which, on the basis of prior work, have been consistently associated with the task positive and task negative regions: tasks requiring social cognition, i.e., reasoning about the mental states of other persons, and tasks requiring physical cognition, i.e., reasoning about the causal/mechanical properties of inanimate objects. Social and mechanical reasoning tasks were presented to neurologically normal participants during fMRI. Each task type was presented using both text and video clips. Regardless of presentation modality, we observed clear evidence of reciprocal suppression: social tasks deactivated regions associated with mechanical reasoning and mechanical tasks deactivated regions associated with social reasoning. These findings are not explained by self-referential processes, task engagement, mental simulation, mental time travel or external vs. internal attention, all factors previously hypothesized to explain default mode network activity. Analyses of resting state data revealed a close match between the regions our tasks identified as reciprocally inhibitory and regions of maximal anti-correlation in the resting state. These results indicate

  9. fMRI reveals reciprocal inhibition between social and physical cognitive domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Anthony I; Dawson, Abigail J; Begany, Katelyn L; Leckie, Regina L; Barry, Kevin P; Ciccia, Angela H; Snyder, Abraham Z

    2013-02-01

    Two lines of evidence indicate that there exists a reciprocal inhibitory relationship between opposed brain networks. First, most attention-demanding cognitive tasks activate a stereotypical set of brain areas, known as the task-positive network and simultaneously deactivate a different set of brain regions, commonly referred to as the task negative or default mode network. Second, functional connectivity analyses show that these same opposed networks are anti-correlated in the resting state. We hypothesize that these reciprocally inhibitory effects reflect two incompatible cognitive modes, each of which may be directed towards understanding the external world. Thus, engaging one mode activates one set of regions and suppresses activity in the other. We test this hypothesis by identifying two types of problem-solving task which, on the basis of prior work, have been consistently associated with the task positive and task negative regions: tasks requiring social cognition, i.e., reasoning about the mental states of other persons, and tasks requiring physical cognition, i.e., reasoning about the causal/mechanical properties of inanimate objects. Social and mechanical reasoning tasks were presented to neurologically normal participants during fMRI. Each task type was presented using both text and video clips. Regardless of presentation modality, we observed clear evidence of reciprocal suppression: social tasks deactivated regions associated with mechanical reasoning and mechanical tasks deactivated regions associated with social reasoning. These findings are not explained by self-referential processes, task engagement, mental simulation, mental time travel or external vs. internal attention, all factors previously hypothesized to explain default mode network activity. Analyses of resting state data revealed a close match between the regions our tasks identified as reciprocally inhibitory and regions of maximal anti-correlation in the resting state. These results

  10. Which MRI sequence of the spine best reveals bone-marrow metastases of neuroblastoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, James S.; Jaramillo, Diego; Siegel, Marilyn J.; Farooqui, Saleem O.; Fletcher, Barry D.; Hoffer, Fredric A.

    2005-01-01

    MRI is an effective tool in evaluating bone marrow metastases. However, no study has defined which MRI sequences or image characteristics best correlate with bone-marrow metastases in neuroblastoma. To identify and refine MRI criteria and sequence selection for the diagnosis of bone-marrow metastases in children with neuroblastoma. Ninety-one children (mean age: 3.2 years; standard deviation: 2.8 years) enrolled in the RDOG IV study participated in our study. Forty-five children had bone metastases determined by bone-marrow aspiration or biopsy (n=4), radionuclide imaging (n=2), or both (n=39). Spine lesions were characterized using coronal T1-weighted (T1W) sagittal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and coronal gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (GAD) MR sequences. Contingency table analysis was performed to determine which MRI sequences and characteristics were associated with metastases. The MRI criteria for metastatic disease were then developed for each imaging sequence. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy of these criteria were determined for the whole group, children younger than 12 months old, and children 12 months and older. The MR characteristics that had significant (P ≤ 0.05) associations with metastases were homogeneous low T1-signal intensity, homogeneous high STIR-signal intensity, and heterogeneous pattern on T1, STIR, or GAD. Homogeneous low T1-signal had the highest sensitivity (88%), but a specificity of 62% for detecting metastases. A heterogeneous pattern on GAD was highly specific (97%), but relatively insensitive (65%) for detecting metastases. These MR characteristics were most accurate in children 12 months and older. The combination of non-contrast-enhanced T1W and GAD sequences can be used to determine the presence of spinal metastases in children with neuroblastoma, particularly those children who are 1 year and older. (orig.)

  11. Human fMRI Reveals That Delayed Action Re-Recruits Visual Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, Anthony; Monaco, Simona; Kaufman, Liam D.; Culham, Jody C.

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral and neuropsychological research suggests that delayed actions rely on different neural substrates than immediate actions; however, the specific brain areas implicated in the two types of actions remain unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure human brain activation during delayed grasping and reaching. Specifically, we examined activation during visual stimulation and action execution separated by a 18-s delay interval in which subjects had to rememb...

  12. Impaired glymphatic perfusion after strokes revealed by contrast-enhanced MRI: a new target for fibrinolysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaberel, Thomas; Gakuba, Clement; Goulay, Romain; Martinez De Lizarrondo, Sara; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Emery, Evelyne; Touze, Emmanuel; Vivien, Denis; Gauberti, Maxime

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of different stroke subtypes on the glymphatic system using MRI. We first improved and characterized an in vivo protocol to measure the perfusion of the glymphatic system using MRI after minimally invasive injection of a gadolinium chelate within the cisterna magna. Then, the integrity of the glymphatic system was evaluated in 4 stroke models in mice including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), intracerebral hemorrhage, carotid ligature, and embolic ischemic stroke. We were able to reliably evaluate the glymphatic system function using MRI. Moreover, we provided evidence that the glymphatic system was severely impaired after SAH and in the acute phase of ischemic stroke, but was not altered after carotid ligature or in case of intracerebral hemorrhage. Notably, this alteration in glymphatic perfusion reduced brain clearance rate of low-molecular-weight compounds. Interestingly, glymphatic perfusion after SAH can be improved by intracerebroventricular injection of tissue-type plasminogen activator. Moreover, spontaneous arterial recanalization was associated with restoration of the glymphatic function after embolic ischemic stroke. SAH and acute ischemic stroke significantly impair the glymphatic system perfusion. In these contexts, injection of tissue-type plasminogen activator either intracerebroventricularly to clear perivascular spaces (for SAH) or intravenously to restore arterial patency (for ischemic stroke) may improve glymphatic function. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Multi-slice MRI reveals heterogeneity in disease distribution along the length of muscle in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzanowski, Stephen M; Baligand, Celine; Willcocks, Rebecca J; Deol, Jasjit; Schmalfuss, Ilona; Lott, Donovan J; Daniels, Michael J; Senesac, Claudia; Walter, Glenn A; Vandenborne, Krista

    2017-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) causes progressive pathologic changes to muscle secondary to a cascade of inflammation, lipid deposition, and fibrosis. Clinically, this manifests as progressive weakness, functional loss, and premature mortality. Though insult to whole muscle groups is well established, less is known about the relationship between intramuscular pathology and function. Differences of intramuscular heterogeneity across muscle length were assessed using an ordinal MRI grading scale in lower leg muscles of boys with DMD and correlated to patient's functional status. Cross sectional T 1 weighted MRI images with fat suppression were obtained from ambulatory boys with DMD. Six muscles (tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, peroneus, soleus, medial and lateral gastrocnemii) were graded using an ordinal grading scale over 5 slice sections along the lower leg length. The scores from each slice were combined and results were compared to global motor function and age. Statistically greater differences of involvement were observed at the proximal ends of muscle compared to the midbellies. Multi-slice assessment correlated significantly to age and the Vignos functional scale, whereas single-slice assessment correlated to the Vignos functional scale only. Lastly, differential disease involvement of whole muscle groups and intramuscular heterogeneity were observed amongst similar age subjects. A multi-slice ordinal MRI grading scale revealed that muscles are not uniformly affected, with more advanced disease visible near the tendons in a primarily ambulatory population with DMD. A geographically comprehensive evaluation of the heterogeneously affected muscle in boys with DMD may more accurately assess disease involvement.

  14. Abnormal regional homogeneity in patients with essential tremor revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Fang

    Full Text Available Essential tremor (ET is one of the most common movement disorders in human adults. It can be characterized as a progressive neurological disorder of which the most recognizable feature is a tremor of the arms or hands that is apparent during voluntary movements such as eating and writing. The pathology of ET remains unclear. Resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI, as a non-invasive imaging technique, was employed to investigate abnormalities of functional connectivity in ET in the brain. Regional homogeneity (ReHo was used as a metric of RS-fMRI to assess the local functional connectivity abnormality in ET with 20 ET patients and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HC. The ET group showed decreased ReHo in the anterior and posterior bilateral cerebellar lobes, the bilateral thalamus and the insular lobe, and increased ReHo in the bilateral prefrontal and parietal cortices, the left primary motor cortex and left supplementary motor area. The abnormal ReHo value of ET patients in the bilateral anterior cerebellar lobes and the right posterior cerebellar lobe were negatively correlated with the tremor severity score, while positively correlated with that in the left primary motor cortex. These findings suggest that the abnormality in cerebello-thalamo-cortical motor pathway is involved in tremor generation and propagation, which may be related to motor-related symptoms in ET patients. Meanwhile, the abnormality in the prefrontal and parietal regions may be associated with non-motor symptoms in ET. These findings suggest that the ReHo could be utilized for investigations of functional-pathological mechanism of ET.

  15. Presbycusis Disrupts Spontaneous Activity Revealed by Resting-State Functional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Presbycusis, age-related hearing loss, is believed to involve neural changes in the central nervous system, which is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The goal of this study was to determine if presbycusis disrupted spontaneous neural activity in specific brain areas involved in auditory processing, attention and cognitive function using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI approach.Methods: Hearing and resting-state fMRI measurements were obtained from 22 presbycusis patients and 23 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy controls. To identify changes in spontaneous neural activity associated with age-related hearing loss, we compared the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF and regional homogeneity (ReHo of fMRI signals in presbycusis patients vs. controls and then determined if these changes were linked to clinical measures of presbycusis.Results: Compared with healthy controls, presbycusis patients manifested decreased spontaneous activity mainly in the superior temporal gyrus (STG, parahippocampal gyrus (PHG, precuneus and inferior parietal lobule (IPL as well as increased neural activity in the middle frontal gyrus (MFG, cuneus and postcentral gyrus (PoCG. A significant negative correlation was observed between ALFF/ReHo activity in the STG and average hearing thresholds in presbycusis patients. Increased ALFF/ReHo activity in the MFG was positively correlated with impaired Trail-Making Test B (TMT-B scores, indicative of impaired cognitive function involving the frontal lobe.Conclusions: Presbycusis patients have disrupted spontaneous neural activity reflected by ALFF and ReHo measurements in several brain regions; these changes are associated with specific cognitive performance and speech/language processing. These findings mainly emphasize the crucial role of aberrant resting-state ALFF/ReHo patterns in presbycusis patients and will lead to a better understanding of the

  16. Presbycusis Disrupts Spontaneous Activity Revealed by Resting-State Functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chen; Chen, Huiyou; Jiang, Liang; Bo, Fan; Xu, Jin-Jing; Mao, Cun-Nan; Salvi, Richard; Yin, Xindao; Lu, Guangming; Gu, Jian-Ping

    2018-01-01

    Purpose : Presbycusis, age-related hearing loss, is believed to involve neural changes in the central nervous system, which is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The goal of this study was to determine if presbycusis disrupted spontaneous neural activity in specific brain areas involved in auditory processing, attention and cognitive function using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) approach. Methods : Hearing and resting-state fMRI measurements were obtained from 22 presbycusis patients and 23 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy controls. To identify changes in spontaneous neural activity associated with age-related hearing loss, we compared the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) of fMRI signals in presbycusis patients vs. controls and then determined if these changes were linked to clinical measures of presbycusis. Results : Compared with healthy controls, presbycusis patients manifested decreased spontaneous activity mainly in the superior temporal gyrus (STG), parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), precuneus and inferior parietal lobule (IPL) as well as increased neural activity in the middle frontal gyrus (MFG), cuneus and postcentral gyrus (PoCG). A significant negative correlation was observed between ALFF/ReHo activity in the STG and average hearing thresholds in presbycusis patients. Increased ALFF/ReHo activity in the MFG was positively correlated with impaired Trail-Making Test B (TMT-B) scores, indicative of impaired cognitive function involving the frontal lobe. Conclusions : Presbycusis patients have disrupted spontaneous neural activity reflected by ALFF and ReHo measurements in several brain regions; these changes are associated with specific cognitive performance and speech/language processing. These findings mainly emphasize the crucial role of aberrant resting-state ALFF/ReHo patterns in presbycusis patients and will lead to a better understanding of the

  17. Concurrent TMS-fMRI Reveals Interactions between Dorsal and Ventral Attentional Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitao, Joana; Thielscher, Axel; Tuennerhoff, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    interactively in this process. This fMRI study used concurrent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a causal perturbation approach to investigate the interactions between dorsal and ventral attentional systems and sensory processing areas. In a sustained spatial attention paradigm, human participants......Adaptive behavior relies on combining bottom-up sensory inputs with top-down control signals to guide responses in line with current goals and task demands. Over the past decade, accumulating evidence has suggested that the dorsal and ventral frontoparietal attentional systems are recruited......-TMS relative to Sham-TMS increased activation in the parietal cortex regardless of sensory stimulation, confirming the neural effectiveness of TMS stimulation. Visual targets increased activations in the anterior insula, a component of the ventral attentional system responsible for salience detection...

  18. Repeated diffusion MRI reveals earliest time point for stratification of radiotherapy response in brain metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Johannesen, Helle H; Geertsen, Poul

    2017-01-01

    An imaging biomarker for early prediction of treatment response potentially provides a non-invasive tool for better prognostics and individualized management of the disease. Radiotherapy (RT) response is generally related to changes in gross tumor volume manifesting months later. In this prospect......An imaging biomarker for early prediction of treatment response potentially provides a non-invasive tool for better prognostics and individualized management of the disease. Radiotherapy (RT) response is generally related to changes in gross tumor volume manifesting months later....... In this prospective study we investigated the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), perfusion fraction and pseudo diffusion coefficient derived from diffusion weighted MRI as potential early biomarkers for radiotherapy response of brain metastases. It was a particular aim to assess the optimal time point...

  19. Non-parametric Bayesian graph models reveal community structure in resting state fMRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther; Madsen, Kristoffer H.; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data using network models is of increasing interest. It is often desirable to group nodes into clusters to interpret the communication patterns between nodes. In this study we consider three different nonparametric Bayesian...... models for node clustering in complex networks. In particular, we test their ability to predict unseen data and their ability to reproduce clustering across datasets. The three generative models considered are the Infinite Relational Model (IRM), Bayesian Community Detection (BCD), and the Infinite...... between clusters. BCD restricts the between-cluster link probabilities to be strictly lower than within-cluster link probabilities to conform to the community structure typically seen in social networks. IDM only models a single between-cluster link probability, which can be interpreted as a background...

  20. Multiple long bone cysts revealed by MRI in trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II predisposing to pathological fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konala, Praveen; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Kiely, Nigel [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Noakes, Charlotte [Oxford University Hospital, The Oxford Genetics Laboratories, Oxford (United Kingdom); Blair, Edward [Oxford University Hospital, Department of Clinical Genetics, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-15

    Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II is a rare genetic disorder with the few published case reports mainly reporting the radiographic skeletal manifestations. There are no published imaging reports of long bone cysts involving multiple bones in this condition. We report a unique case of bone cysts involving multiple long bones detected with MRI in a patient with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II complicated by a subsequent pathological fracture. It is possible that the bone cysts are a previously undescribed feature of this syndrome; however, the evidence is insufficient to establish a definite association. Chromosomal abnormality identified in this patient is consistent with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II with no unusual features. Although the nature of these bone cysts is unclear, they are one of the causes of the known increased fracture risk observed in this syndrome. (orig.)

  1. Functional MRI reveals expert-novice differences during sport-related anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael J; Bishop, Daniel T; Jackson, Robin C; Abernethy, Bruce

    2010-01-27

    We examined the effect of expertise on cortical activation during sports anticipation using functional MRI. In experiment 1, recreational players predicted badminton stroke direction and the pattern of active clusters was consistent with a proposed perception-of-action network. This pattern was not replicated in a stimulus-matched, action-unrelated control task. In experiment 2, players of three different skill levels anticipated stroke direction from clips occluded either 160 ms before or 80 ms after racquet-shuttle contact. Early-occluded sequences produced more activation than late-occluded sequences overall, in most cortical regions of interest, but experts showed an additional enhancement in medial, dorsolateral and ventrolateral frontal cortex. Anticipation in open-skill sports engages cortical areas integral to observing and understanding others' actions; such activity is enhanced in experts.

  2. Intratumor heterogeneity of DCE-MRI reveals Ki-67 proliferation status in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hu; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Bin; Shao, Guoliang; Li, Lihua

    2018-03-01

    Breast cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease both biologically and clinically, and certain pathologic parameters, i.e., Ki67 expression, are useful in predicting the prognosis of patients. The aim of the study is to identify intratumor heterogeneity of breast cancer for predicting Ki-67 proliferation status in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients. A dataset of 77 patients was collected who underwent dynamic contrast enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) examination. Of these patients, 51 were high-Ki-67 expression and 26 were low-Ki-67 expression. We partitioned the breast tumor into subregions using two methods based on the values of time to peak (TTP) and peak enhancement rate (PER). Within each tumor subregion, image features were extracted including statistical and morphological features from DCE-MRI. The classification models were applied on each region separately to assess whether the classifiers based on features extracted from various subregions features could have different performance for prediction. An area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was computed using leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) method. The classifier using features related with moderate time to peak achieved best performance with AUC of 0.826 than that based on the other regions. While using multi-classifier fusion method, the AUC value was significantly (P=0.03) increased to 0.858+/-0.032 compare to classifier with AUC of 0.778 using features from the entire tumor. The results demonstrated that features reflect heterogeneity in intratumoral subregions can improve the classifier performance to predict the Ki-67 proliferation status than the classifier using features from entire tumor alone.

  3. Individual differences in decision making competence revealed by multivariate fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Tanveer; Román, Francisco J; Operskalski, Joachim T; Zwilling, Christopher E; Barbey, Aron K

    2018-06-01

    While an extensive literature in decision neuroscience has elucidated the neurobiological foundations of decision making, prior research has focused primarily on group-level effects in a sample population. Due to the presence of inherent differences between individuals' cognitive abilities, it is also important to examine the neural correlates of decision making that explain interindividual variability in cognitive performance. This study therefore investigated how individual differences in decision making competence, as measured by the Adult Decision Making Competence (A-DMC) battery, are related to functional brain connectivity patterns derived from resting-state fMRI data in a sample of 304 healthy participants. We examined connectome-wide associations, identifying regions within frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortex that demonstrated significant associations with decision making competence. We then assessed whether the functional interactions between brain regions sensitive to decision making competence and seven intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) were predictive of specific facets of decision making assessed by subtests of the A-DMC battery. Our findings suggest that individual differences in specific facets of decision making competence are mediated by ICNs that support executive, social, and perceptual processes, and motivate an integrative framework for understanding the neural basis of individual differences in decision making competence. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A study of the deep structure of the energy landscape of glassy polystyrene: the exponential distribution of the energy barriers revealed by high-field electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bercu, V; Martinelli, M; Massa, C A; Pardi, L A; Leporini, D

    2004-01-01

    The reorientation of one small paramagnetic molecule (spin probe) in glassy polystyrene (PS) is studied by high-field electron spin resonance spectroscopy at two different Larmor frequencies (190 and 285 GHz). The exponential distribution of the energy barriers for the rotational motion of the spin probe is unambiguously evidenced at both 240 and 270 K. The same shape for the distribution of the energy barriers of PS was evidenced by the master curves provided by previous mechanical and light scattering studies. The breadth of the energy barrier distribution of the spin probe is in the range of the estimates of the breadth of the PS energy barrier distribution. The evidence that the deep structure of the energy landscape of PS exhibits the exponential shape of the energy barrier distribution agrees with the results from extreme-value statistics (Bouchaud and Mezard 1997 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 30 7997) and the trap model by Bouchaud and co-workers (1996 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 29 3847, 2001 Phys. Rev. B 64 104417). (letter to the editor)

  5. Influence of emotional expression on memory recognition bias in schizophrenia as revealed by fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergerie, Karine; Armony, Jorge L; Menear, Matthew; Sutton, Hazel; Lepage, Martin

    2010-07-01

    We recently showed that, in healthy individuals, emotional expression influences memory for faces both in terms of accuracy and, critically, in memory response bias (tendency to classify stimuli as previously seen or not, regardless of whether this was the case). Although schizophrenia has been shown to be associated with deficit in episodic memory and emotional processing, the relation between these processes in this population remains unclear. Here, we used our previously validated paradigm to directly investigate the modulation of emotion on memory recognition. Twenty patients with schizophrenia and matched healthy controls completed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of recognition memory of happy, sad, and neutral faces. Brain activity associated with the response bias was obtained by correlating this measure with the contrast subjective old (ie, hits and false alarms) minus subjective new (misses and correct rejections) for sad and happy expressions. Although patients exhibited an overall lower memory performance than controls, they showed the same effects of emotion on memory, both in terms of accuracy and bias. For sad faces, the similar behavioral pattern between groups was mirrored by a largely overlapping neural network, mostly involved in familiarity-based judgments (eg, parahippocampal gyrus). In contrast, controls activated a much larger set of regions for happy faces, including areas thought to underlie recollection-based memory retrieval (eg, superior frontal gyrus and hippocampus) and in novelty detection (eg, amygdala). This study demonstrates that, despite an overall lower memory accuracy, emotional memory is intact in schizophrenia, although emotion-specific differences in brain activation exist, possibly reflecting different strategies.

  6. Human fMRI reveals that delayed action re-recruits visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Singhal

    Full Text Available Behavioral and neuropsychological research suggests that delayed actions rely on different neural substrates than immediate actions; however, the specific brain areas implicated in the two types of actions remain unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to measure human brain activation during delayed grasping and reaching. Specifically, we examined activation during visual stimulation and action execution separated by a 18-s delay interval in which subjects had to remember an intended action toward the remembered object. The long delay interval enabled us to unambiguously distinguish visual, memory-related, and action responses. Most strikingly, we observed reactivation of the lateral occipital complex (LOC, a ventral-stream area implicated in visual object recognition, and early visual cortex (EVC at the time of action. Importantly this reactivation was observed even though participants remained in complete darkness with no visual stimulation at the time of the action. Moreover, within EVC, higher activation was observed for grasping than reaching during both vision and action execution. Areas in the dorsal visual stream were activated during action execution as expected and, for some, also during vision. Several areas, including the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS, dorsal premotor cortex (PMd, primary motor cortex (M1 and the supplementary motor area (SMA, showed sustained activation during the delay phase. We propose that during delayed actions, dorsal-stream areas plan and maintain coarse action goals; however, at the time of execution, motor programming requires re-recruitment of detailed visual information about the object through reactivation of (1 ventral-stream areas involved in object perception and (2 early visual areas that contain richly detailed visual representations, particularly for grasping.

  7. Human fMRI reveals that delayed action re-recruits visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Anthony; Monaco, Simona; Kaufman, Liam D; Culham, Jody C

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral and neuropsychological research suggests that delayed actions rely on different neural substrates than immediate actions; however, the specific brain areas implicated in the two types of actions remain unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure human brain activation during delayed grasping and reaching. Specifically, we examined activation during visual stimulation and action execution separated by a 18-s delay interval in which subjects had to remember an intended action toward the remembered object. The long delay interval enabled us to unambiguously distinguish visual, memory-related, and action responses. Most strikingly, we observed reactivation of the lateral occipital complex (LOC), a ventral-stream area implicated in visual object recognition, and early visual cortex (EVC) at the time of action. Importantly this reactivation was observed even though participants remained in complete darkness with no visual stimulation at the time of the action. Moreover, within EVC, higher activation was observed for grasping than reaching during both vision and action execution. Areas in the dorsal visual stream were activated during action execution as expected and, for some, also during vision. Several areas, including the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS), dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), primary motor cortex (M1) and the supplementary motor area (SMA), showed sustained activation during the delay phase. We propose that during delayed actions, dorsal-stream areas plan and maintain coarse action goals; however, at the time of execution, motor programming requires re-recruitment of detailed visual information about the object through reactivation of (1) ventral-stream areas involved in object perception and (2) early visual areas that contain richly detailed visual representations, particularly for grasping.

  8. Functional Connectivity Estimated from Resting-State fMRI Reveals Selective Alterations in Male Adolescents with Pure Conduct Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Mei Lu

    Full Text Available Conduct disorder (CD is characterized by a persistent pattern of antisocial behavior and aggression in childhood and adolescence. Previous task-based and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies have revealed widespread brain regional abnormalities in adolescents with CD. However, whether the resting-state networks (RSNs are altered in adolescents with CD remains unknown. In this study, resting-state fMRI data were first acquired from eighteen male adolescents with pure CD and eighteen age- and gender-matched typically developing (TD individuals. Independent component analysis (ICA was implemented to extract nine representative RSNs, and the generated RSNs were then compared to show the differences between the CD and TD groups. Interestingly, it was observed from the brain mapping results that compared with the TD group, the CD group manifested decreased functional connectivity in four representative RSNs: the anterior default mode network (left middle frontal gyrus, which is considered to be correlated with impaired social cognition, the somatosensory network (bilateral supplementary motor area and right postcentral gyrus, the lateral visual network (left superior occipital gyrus, and the medial visual network (right fusiform, left lingual gyrus and right calcarine, which are expected to be relevant to the perceptual systems responsible for perceptual dysfunction in male adolescents with CD. Importantly, the novel findings suggested that male adolescents with pure CD were identified to have dysfunctions in both low-level perceptual networks (the somatosensory network and visual network and a high-order cognitive network (the default mode network. Revealing the changes in the functional connectivity of these RSNs enhances our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of emotion and social cognition and the regulation of perception in adolescents with CD.

  9. Phase-synchronization-based parcellation of resting state fMRI signals reveals topographically organized clusters in early visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gravel, Nicolás G; Harvey, Ben M; Renken, Remco K; Dumoulin, Serge O; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2018-01-01

    Resting-state fMRI is widely used to study brain function and connectivity. However, interpreting patterns of resting state (RS) fMRI activity remains challenging as they may arise from different neuronal mechanisms than those triggered by exogenous events. Currently, this limits the use of RS-fMRI

  10. Large scale fusion of gray matter and resting-state functional MRI reveals common and shared biological markers across the psychosis spectrum in the B-SNIP cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eWang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate whether aberrant interactions between brain structure and function present similarly or differently across probands with psychotic illnesses (schizophrenia (SZ, schizoaffective disorder (SAD, and bipolar I disorder with psychosis (BP and whether these deficits are shared with their first-degree non-psychotic relatives. A total of 1199 subjects were assessed, including 220 SZ, 147 SAD, 180 psychotic BP, 150 first-degree relatives of SZ, 126 SAD relatives, 134 BP relatives and 242 healthy controls. All subjects underwent structural MRI (sMRI and resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI scanning. Joint independent analysis (jICA was used to fuse sMRI gray matter (GM and rs-fMRI amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF data to identify the relationship between the two modalities. Joint ICA revealed two significantly fused components. The association between functional brain alteration in a prefrontal-striatal-thalamic-cerebellar network and structural abnormalities in the default mode network (DMN was found to be common across psychotic diagnoses and correlated with cognitive function, social function and Schizo-Bipolar Scale (SBS scores. The fused alteration in the temporal lobe was unique to SZ and SAD. The above effects were not seen in any relative group (including those with cluster-A personality. Using a multivariate fused approach involving two widely used imaging markers we demonstrate both shared and distinct biological traits across the psychosis spectrum. Further, our results suggest that the above traits are psychosis biomarkers rather than endophenotypes.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuberger, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuberger, Thomas

    2009-06-23

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  13. Collaborative activity between parietal and dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex in dynamic spatial working memory revealed by fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwadkar, V A; Carpenter, P A; Just, M A

    2000-07-01

    Functional MRI was used to determine how the constituents of the cortical network subserving dynamic spatial working memory respond to two types of increases in task complexity. Participants mentally maintained the most recent location of either one or three objects as the three objects moved discretely in either a two- or three-dimensional array. Cortical activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC) and the parietal cortex increased as a function of the number of object locations to be maintained and the dimensionality of the display. An analysis of the response characteristics of the individual voxels showed that a large proportion were activated only when both the variables imposed the higher level of demand. A smaller proportion were activated specifically in response to increases in task demand associated with each of the independent variables. A second experiment revealed the same effect of dimensionality in the parietal cortex when the movement of objects was signaled auditorily rather than visually, indicating that the additional representational demands induced by 3-D space are independent of input modality. The comodulation of activation in the prefrontal and parietal areas by the amount of computational demand suggests that the collaboration between areas is a basic feature underlying much of the functionality of spatial working memory. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. Diffusion tensor MRI tractography reveals increased fractional anisotropy (FA) in arcuate fasciculus following music-cued motor training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Emma; Schaefer, Rebecca S; Bastin, Mark E; Roberts, Neil; Overy, Katie

    2017-08-01

    Auditory cues are frequently used to support movement learning and rehabilitation, but the neural basis of this behavioural effect is not yet clear. We investigated the microstructural neuroplasticity effects of adding musical cues to a motor learning task. We hypothesised that music-cued, left-handed motor training would increase fractional anisotropy (FA) in the contralateral arcuate fasciculus, a fibre tract connecting auditory, pre-motor and motor regions. Thirty right-handed participants were assigned to a motor learning condition either with (Music Group) or without (Control Group) musical cues. Participants completed 20minutes of training three times per week over four weeks. Diffusion tensor MRI and probabilistic neighbourhood tractography identified FA, axial (AD) and radial (RD) diffusivity before and after training. Results revealed that FA increased significantly in the right arcuate fasciculus of the Music group only, as hypothesised, with trends for AD to increase and RD to decrease, a pattern of results consistent with activity-dependent increases in myelination. No significant changes were found in the left ipsilateral arcuate fasciculus of either group. This is the first evidence that adding musical cues to movement learning can induce rapid microstructural change in white matter pathways in adults, with potential implications for therapeutic clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Right and left amygdalae activation in patients with major depression receiving antidepressant treatment, as revealed by fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Huang, Min-Wei; Hung, I-Chung; Lane, Hsien-Yuan; Hou, Chun-Ju

    2014-10-08

    treatment for each emotion tested. In the future, changes in BOLD signals as revealed by fMRI might be useful in evaluating the clinical manifestation of major depression.

  16. Robotic Prostate Biopsy in Closed MRI Scanner

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fischer, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    .... This work enables prostate brachytherapy and biopsy procedures in standard high-field diagnostic MRI scanners through the development of a robotic needle placement device specifically designed...

  17. Methodological aspects of functional neuroimaging at high field strength: a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheef, L.; Landsberg, M.W.; Boecker, H.

    2007-01-01

    The last few years have proven that high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is superior in nearly every way to conventional equipment up to 1.5 tesla (T). Following the global success of 3T-scanners in research institutes and medical practices, a new generation of MRI devices with field strengths of 7T and higher is now on the horizon. The introduction of ultra high fields has brought MRI technology closer to the physical limitations and increasingly greater costs are required to achieve this goal. This article provides a critical overview of the advantages and problems of functional neuroimaging using ultra high field strengths. This review is principally limited to T2*-based functional imaging techniques not dependent on contrast agents. The main issues include the significance of high field technology with respect to SNR, CNR, resolution, and sequences, as well as artifacts, noise exposure, and SAR. Of great relevance is the discussion of parallel imaging, which will presumably determine the further development of high and ultra high field strengths. Finally, the importance of high field strengths for functional neuroimaging is explained by selected publications. (orig.)

  18. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and MRI Reveal No Evidence for Brain Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Neva M.; Shaw, Dennis. W. W.; Richards, Todd L.; Estes, Annette M.; Friedman, Seth D.; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A.; Dager, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ([superscript 1]HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally…

  19. LLNL high-field coil program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    An overview is presented of the LLNL High-Field Superconducting Magnet Development Program wherein the technology is being developed for producing fields in the range of 15 T and higher for both mirror and tokamak applications. Applications requiring less field will also benefit from this program. In addition, recent results on the thermomechanical performance of cable-in-conduit conductor systems are presented and their importance to high-field coil design discussed

  20. Development of high field superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Fujio; Takeo, Masakatsu.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, in connection with nuclear fusion research, the development of high field superconducting magnets showed rapid progress. The development of high field magnets of 15 T class by the techniques of winding after heat treatment has been continued in various places, as these techniques are suitable to make large magnets. In 1985, Kyushu University attained the record of 15.5 T. However in high field magnets, there are many problems peculiar to them, and the basic research related to those is demanded. In this report, these general problems, the experience of the design and manufacture in Kyushu University and the related problems are described. The superconducting magnet installed in the Superconducting Magnet Research Center of Kyushu University attained the record of 15.5 T for the first time in March, 1985. In superconducting magnets, very difficult problem must be solved since superconductivity, heat and mechanical force are inter related. The problems of the wire materials for high field, the scale of high field magnets, the condition limiting mean current density, and the development of high field magnets in Kyushu University are described. (Kako, I.)

  1. Personality traits related to juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: MRI reveals prefrontal abnormalities through a voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo Filho, Gerardo Maria; Jackowski, Andrea Parolin; Lin, Katia; Guaranha, Mirian S B; Guilhoto, Laura M F F; da Silva, Henrique Hattori; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Júnior, Henrique Carrete; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca; Yacubian, Elza Márcia T

    2009-06-01

    Studies involving juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) patients have demonstrated an elevated prevalence of cluster B personality disorders (PD) characterized as emotional instability, immaturity, unsteadiness, lack of discipline, and rapid mood changes. We aimed to verify a possible correlation between structural brain abnormalities in magnetic resonance image (MRI) and the PD in JME using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Sixteen JME patients with cluster B PD, 38 JME patients without psychiatric disorders, and 30 healthy controls were submitted to a psychiatric evaluation through SCID I and II and to a MRI scan. Significant reduction in thalami and increase in mesiofrontal and frontobasal regions' volumes were observed mainly in JME patients with PD. Structural alterations of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), involved in regulation of mood reactivity, impulsivity, and social behavior, were also observed. This study supports the hypothesis of frontobasal involvement in the pathophysiology of cluster B PD related to JME.

  2. Baseline brain activity changes in patients with clinically isolated syndrome revealed by resting-state functional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yaou; Duan, Yunyun; Liang, Peipeng; Jia, Xiuqin; Yu, Chunshui [Dept. of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China); Ye, Jing [Dept. of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China); Butzkueven, Helmut [Dept. of Medicine, Univ. of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Dong, Huiqing [Dept. of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China); Li, Kuncheng [Dept. of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of MRI and Brain Informatics, Beijing (China)], E-mail: likuncheng1955@yahoo.com.cn

    2012-11-15

    Background A clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) is the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Previous task-related functional MRI studies demonstrate functional reorganization in patients with CIS. Purpose To assess baseline brain activity changes in patients with CIS by using the technique of regional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) as an index in resting-state fMRI. Material and Methods Resting-state fMRIs data acquired from 37 patients with CIS and 37 age- and sex-matched normal controls were compared to investigate ALFF differences. The relationships between ALFF in regions with significant group differences and the EDSS (Expanded Disability Status Scale), disease duration, and T2 lesion volume (T2LV) were further explored. Results Patients with CIS had significantly decreased ALFF in the right anterior cingulate cortex, right caudate, right lingual gyrus, and right cuneus (P < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons using Monte Carlo simulation) compared to normal controls, while no significantly increased ALFF were observed in CIS. No significant correlation was found between the EDSS, disease duration, T2LV, and ALFF in regions with significant group differences. Conclusion In patients with CIS, resting-state fMRI demonstrates decreased activity in several brain regions. These results are in contrast to patients with established MS, in whom ALFF demonstrates several regions of increased activity. It is possible that this shift from decreased activity in CIS to increased activity in MS could reflect the dynamics of cortical reorganization.

  3. Somatosensory BOLD fMRI reveals close link between salient blood pressure changes and the murine neuromatrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Henning Matthias; Todiras, Mihail; Hodge, Russ; Huelnhagen, Till; Millward, Jason Michael; Turner, Robert; Seeliger, Erdmann; Bader, Michael; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2018-05-15

    The neuromatrix, or "pain matrix", is a network of cortical brain areas which is activated by noxious as well as salient somatosensory stimulation. This has been studied in mice and humans using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI. Here we demonstrate that BOLD effects observed in the murine neuromatrix in response to salient somatosensory stimuli are prone to reflect mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) changes, rather than neural activity. We show that a standard electrostimulus typically used in murine somatosensory fMRI can induce substantial elevations in MABP. Equivalent drug-induced MABP changes - without somatosensory stimulation - evoked BOLD patterns in the neuromatrix strikingly similar to those evoked by electrostimulation. This constitutes a serious caveat for murine fMRI. The regional specificity of these BOLD patterns can be attributed to the co-localization of the neuromatrix with large draining veins. Based on these findings we propose a cardiovascular support mechanism whereby abrupt elevations in MABP provide additional energy supply to the neuromatrix and other essential brain areas in fight-or-flight situations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of High Field MR Imaging and Spectroscopy Techniques of the Prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arteaga de Castro, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis summarizes the work of the development of new techniques for obtaining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) of the prostate at the ultra high field of 7 tesla (T). The 7 T field strength presents various challenges such as the shortening of the wavelength and the lower

  5. Combination of DTI and fMRI reveals the white matter changes correlating with the decline of default-mode network activity in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianjun; Di, Qian; Li, Yao; Zhao, Xiaojie

    2009-02-01

    Recently, evidences from fMRI studies have shown that there was decreased activity among the default-mode network in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and DTI researches also demonstrated that demyelinations exist in white matter of AD patients. Therefore, combining these two MRI methods may help to reveal the relationship between white matter damages and alterations of the resting state functional connectivity network. In the present study, we tried to address this issue by means of correlation analysis between DTI and resting state fMRI images. The default-mode networks of AD and normal control groups were compared to find the areas with significantly declined activity firstly. Then, the white matter regions whose fractional anisotropy (FA) value correlated with this decline were located through multiple regressions between the FA values and the BOLD response of the default networks. Among these correlating white matter regions, those whose FA values also declined were found by a group comparison between AD patients and healthy elderly control subjects. Our results showed that the areas with decreased activity among default-mode network included left posterior cingulated cortex (PCC), left medial temporal gyrus et al. And the damaged white matter areas correlated with the default-mode network alterations were located around left sub-gyral temporal lobe. These changes may relate to the decreased connectivity between PCC and medial temporal lobe (MTL), and thus correlate with the deficiency of default-mode network activity.

  6. Task-Related Edge Density (TED)-A New Method for Revealing Dynamic Network Formation in fMRI Data of the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Gabriele; Stelzer, Johannes; Zuber, Verena; Buschmann, Tilo; Margulies, Daniel; Bartels, Andreas; Scheffler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The formation of transient networks in response to external stimuli or as a reflection of internal cognitive processes is a hallmark of human brain function. However, its identification in fMRI data of the human brain is notoriously difficult. Here we propose a new method of fMRI data analysis that tackles this problem by considering large-scale, task-related synchronisation networks. Networks consist of nodes and edges connecting them, where nodes correspond to voxels in fMRI data, and the weight of an edge is determined via task-related changes in dynamic synchronisation between their respective times series. Based on these definitions, we developed a new data analysis algorithm that identifies edges that show differing levels of synchrony between two distinct task conditions and that occur in dense packs with similar characteristics. Hence, we call this approach "Task-related Edge Density" (TED). TED proved to be a very strong marker for dynamic network formation that easily lends itself to statistical analysis using large scale statistical inference. A major advantage of TED compared to other methods is that it does not depend on any specific hemodynamic response model, and it also does not require a presegmentation of the data for dimensionality reduction as it can handle large networks consisting of tens of thousands of voxels. We applied TED to fMRI data of a fingertapping and an emotion processing task provided by the Human Connectome Project. TED revealed network-based involvement of a large number of brain areas that evaded detection using traditional GLM-based analysis. We show that our proposed method provides an entirely new window into the immense complexity of human brain function.

  7. Task-Related Edge Density (TED-A New Method for Revealing Dynamic Network Formation in fMRI Data of the Human Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Lohmann

    Full Text Available The formation of transient networks in response to external stimuli or as a reflection of internal cognitive processes is a hallmark of human brain function. However, its identification in fMRI data of the human brain is notoriously difficult. Here we propose a new method of fMRI data analysis that tackles this problem by considering large-scale, task-related synchronisation networks. Networks consist of nodes and edges connecting them, where nodes correspond to voxels in fMRI data, and the weight of an edge is determined via task-related changes in dynamic synchronisation between their respective times series. Based on these definitions, we developed a new data analysis algorithm that identifies edges that show differing levels of synchrony between two distinct task conditions and that occur in dense packs with similar characteristics. Hence, we call this approach "Task-related Edge Density" (TED. TED proved to be a very strong marker for dynamic network formation that easily lends itself to statistical analysis using large scale statistical inference. A major advantage of TED compared to other methods is that it does not depend on any specific hemodynamic response model, and it also does not require a presegmentation of the data for dimensionality reduction as it can handle large networks consisting of tens of thousands of voxels. We applied TED to fMRI data of a fingertapping and an emotion processing task provided by the Human Connectome Project. TED revealed network-based involvement of a large number of brain areas that evaded detection using traditional GLM-based analysis. We show that our proposed method provides an entirely new window into the immense complexity of human brain function.

  8. Task-Related Edge Density (TED)—A New Method for Revealing Dynamic Network Formation in fMRI Data of the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Gabriele; Stelzer, Johannes; Zuber, Verena; Buschmann, Tilo; Margulies, Daniel; Bartels, Andreas; Scheffler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The formation of transient networks in response to external stimuli or as a reflection of internal cognitive processes is a hallmark of human brain function. However, its identification in fMRI data of the human brain is notoriously difficult. Here we propose a new method of fMRI data analysis that tackles this problem by considering large-scale, task-related synchronisation networks. Networks consist of nodes and edges connecting them, where nodes correspond to voxels in fMRI data, and the weight of an edge is determined via task-related changes in dynamic synchronisation between their respective times series. Based on these definitions, we developed a new data analysis algorithm that identifies edges that show differing levels of synchrony between two distinct task conditions and that occur in dense packs with similar characteristics. Hence, we call this approach “Task-related Edge Density” (TED). TED proved to be a very strong marker for dynamic network formation that easily lends itself to statistical analysis using large scale statistical inference. A major advantage of TED compared to other methods is that it does not depend on any specific hemodynamic response model, and it also does not require a presegmentation of the data for dimensionality reduction as it can handle large networks consisting of tens of thousands of voxels. We applied TED to fMRI data of a fingertapping and an emotion processing task provided by the Human Connectome Project. TED revealed network-based involvement of a large number of brain areas that evaded detection using traditional GLM-based analysis. We show that our proposed method provides an entirely new window into the immense complexity of human brain function. PMID:27341204

  9. VISARTTM superconducting MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Yoshiyuki; Goro, Takehiko; Yamagata, Hitoshi.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed VISART TM , a 1.5 T high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system based on technology developed for both the FLEXART TM (0.5T) and MRT-200/GP (1.5T) systems as the first and second products, respectively, of a new series of MRI systems. VISART TM is a newly coined word combining VISion and state-of-the-ART. A higher power gradient system and new high-speed imaging techniques have been developed to meet the market demand for higher resolution images and shorter scan times. The product concepts of VISART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, flexible clinical application, and ease of use, all of which are essential features for an MRI system in the high-field MRI market segment. (author)

  10. The mean–variance relationship reveals two possible strategies for dynamic brain connectivity analysis in fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, William H.; Fransson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    When studying brain connectivity using fMRI, signal intensity time-series are typically correlated with each other in time to compute estimates of the degree of interaction between different brain regions and/or networks. In the static connectivity case, the problem of defining which connections that should be considered significant in the analysis can be addressed in a rather straightforward manner by a statistical thresholding that is based on the magnitude of the correlation coefficients. More recently, interest has come to focus on the dynamical aspects of brain connectivity and the problem of deciding which brain connections that are to be considered relevant in the context of dynamical changes in connectivity provides further options. Since we, in the dynamical case, are interested in changes in connectivity over time, the variance of the correlation time-series becomes a relevant parameter. In this study, we discuss the relationship between the mean and variance of brain connectivity time-series and show that by studying the relation between them, two conceptually different strategies to analyze dynamic functional brain connectivity become available. Using resting-state fMRI data from a cohort of 46 subjects, we show that the mean of fMRI connectivity time-series scales negatively with its variance. This finding leads to the suggestion that magnitude- versus variance-based thresholding strategies will induce different results in studies of dynamic functional brain connectivity. Our assertion is exemplified by showing that the magnitude-based strategy is more sensitive to within-resting-state network (RSN) connectivity compared to between-RSN connectivity whereas the opposite holds true for a variance-based analysis strategy. The implications of our findings for dynamical functional brain connectivity studies are discussed. PMID:26236216

  11. The mean-variance relationship reveals two possible strategies for dynamic brain connectivity analysis in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, William H; Fransson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    When studying brain connectivity using fMRI, signal intensity time-series are typically correlated with each other in time to compute estimates of the degree of interaction between different brain regions and/or networks. In the static connectivity case, the problem of defining which connections that should be considered significant in the analysis can be addressed in a rather straightforward manner by a statistical thresholding that is based on the magnitude of the correlation coefficients. More recently, interest has come to focus on the dynamical aspects of brain connectivity and the problem of deciding which brain connections that are to be considered relevant in the context of dynamical changes in connectivity provides further options. Since we, in the dynamical case, are interested in changes in connectivity over time, the variance of the correlation time-series becomes a relevant parameter. In this study, we discuss the relationship between the mean and variance of brain connectivity time-series and show that by studying the relation between them, two conceptually different strategies to analyze dynamic functional brain connectivity become available. Using resting-state fMRI data from a cohort of 46 subjects, we show that the mean of fMRI connectivity time-series scales negatively with its variance. This finding leads to the suggestion that magnitude- versus variance-based thresholding strategies will induce different results in studies of dynamic functional brain connectivity. Our assertion is exemplified by showing that the magnitude-based strategy is more sensitive to within-resting-state network (RSN) connectivity compared to between-RSN connectivity whereas the opposite holds true for a variance-based analysis strategy. The implications of our findings for dynamical functional brain connectivity studies are discussed.

  12. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  13. Abnormal regional spontaneous neuronal activity associated with symptom severity in treatment-naive patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Linlin; Fu, Xiangshuai; Wang, Shuai; Tang, Qunfeng; Chen, Xingui; Cheng, Lin; Zhang, Fuquan; Zhou, Zhenhe; Tian, Lin

    2017-02-15

    A large number of neuroimaging studies have revealed the dysfunction of brain activities in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) during various tasks. However, regional spontaneous activity abnormalities in OCD are gradually being revealed. In this current study, we aimed to investigate cerebral regions with abnormal spontaneous activity using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and further explored the relationship between the spontaneous neuronal activity and symptom severity of patients with OCD. Thirty-one patients with OCD and 32 age-and sex-matched normal controls received the fMRI scans and fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) approach was applied to identify the abnormal brain activity. We found that patients with OCD showed decreased fALFF not only in the cortical-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuits like the thalamus, but also in other cerebral systems like the cerebellum, the parietal cortex and the temporal cortex. Additionally, OCD patients demonstrated significant associations between decreased fALFF and obsessive-compulsive symptom severity in the thalamus, the paracentral lobule and the cerebellum. Our results provide evidence for abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in distributed cerebral areas and support the notion that brain areas outside the CSTC circuits may also play an important role in the pathophysiology of OCD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Framing effects reveal discrete lexical-semantic and sublexical procedures in reading: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelli, Laura; Marelli, Marco; Berlingeri, Manuela; Tettamanti, Marco; Sberna, Maurizio; Paulesu, Eraldo; Luzzatti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    According to the dual-route model, a printed string of letters can be processed by either a grapheme-to-phoneme conversion (GPC) route or a lexical-semantic route. Although meta-analyses of the imaging literature support the existence of distinct but interacting reading procedures, individual neuroimaging studies that explored neural correlates of reading yielded inconclusive results. We used a list-manipulation paradigm to provide a fresh empirical look at this issue and to isolate specific areas that underlie the two reading procedures. In a lexical condition, we embedded disyllabic Italian words (target stimuli) in lists of either loanwords or trisyllabic Italian words with unpredictable stress position. In a GPC condition, similar target stimuli were included within lists of pseudowords. The procedure was designed to induce participants to emphasize either the lexical-semantic or the GPC reading procedure, while controlling for possible linguistic confounds and keeping the reading task requirements stable across the two conditions. Thirty-three adults participated in the behavioral study, and 20 further adult participants were included in the fMRI study. At the behavioral level, we found sizeable effects of the framing manipulations that included slower voice onset times for stimuli in the pseudoword frames. At the functional anatomical level, the occipital and temporal regions, and the intraparietal sulcus were specifically activated when subjects were reading target words in a lexical frame. The inferior parietal and anterior fusiform cortex were specifically activated in the GPC condition. These patterns of activation represented a valid classifying model of fMRI images associated with target reading in both frames in the multi-voxel pattern analyses. Further activations were shared by the two procedures in the occipital and inferior parietal areas, in the premotor cortex, in the frontal regions and the left supplementary motor area. These regions are most

  15. The compensatory dynamic of inter-hemispheric interactions in visuospatial attention revealed using rTMS and fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ela B Plow

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A balance of mutual tonic inhibition between bi-hemispheric posterior parietal cortices is believed to play an important role in bilateral visual attention. However, experimental support for this notion has been mainly drawn from clinical models of unilateral damage. We have previously shown that low-frequency repetitive TMS (rTMS over the intraparietal sulcus (IPS generates a contralateral attentional deficit in bilateral visual tracking. Here, we used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI to study whether rTMS temporarily disrupts the inter-hemispheric balance between bilateral IPS in visual attention. Following application of 1 Hz rTMS over the left IPS, subjects performed a bilateral visual tracking task while their brain activity was recorded using fMRI. Behaviorally, tracking accuracy was reduced immediately following rTMS. Areas ventro-lateral to left IPS, including inferior parietal lobule (IPL, lateral IPS (LIPS, and middle occipital gyrus (MoG, showed decreased activity following rTMS, while dorsomedial areas, such as Superior Parietal Lobule (SPL, Superior occipital gyrus (SoG, and lingual gyrus, as well as middle temporal areas (MT+, showed higher activity. The brain activity of the homologues of these regions in the un-stimulated, right hemisphere was reversed. Interestingly, the evolution of network-wide activation related to attentional behavior following rTMS showed that activation of most occipital synergists adaptively compensated for contralateral and ipsilateral decrement after rTMS, but that of parietal synergists, and SoG remained competing. This pattern of ipsilateral and contralateral activations empirically supports the hypothesized loss of inter-hemispheric balance that underlies clinical manifestation of visual attentional extinction.

  16. Gender differences in the structural connectome of the teenage brain revealed by generalized q-sampling MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeu-Sheng Tyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The question of whether there are biological differences between male and female brains is a fraught one, and political positions and prior expectations seem to have a strong influence on the interpretation of scientific data in this field. This question is relevant to issues of gender differences in the prevalence of psychiatric conditions, including autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, Tourette's syndrome, schizophrenia, dyslexia, depression, and eating disorders. Understanding how gender influences vulnerability to these conditions is significant. Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI provides a non-invasive method to investigate brain microstructure and the integrity of anatomical connectivity. Generalized q-sampling imaging (GQI has been proposed to characterize complicated fiber patterns and distinguish fiber orientations, providing an opportunity for more accurate, higher-order descriptions through the water diffusion process. Therefore, we aimed to investigate differences in the brain's structural network between teenage males and females using GQI. This study included 59 (i.e., 33 males and 26 females age- and education-matched subjects (age range: 13 to 14 years. The structural connectome was obtained by graph theoretical and network-based statistical (NBS analyses. Our findings show that teenage male brains exhibit better intrahemispheric communication, and teenage female brains exhibit better interhemispheric communication. Our results also suggest that the network organization of teenage male brains is more local, more segregated, and more similar to small-world networks than teenage female brains. We conclude that the use of an MRI study with a GQI-based structural connectomic approach like ours presents novel insights into network-based systems of the brain and provides a new piece of the puzzle regarding gender differences.

  17. Gender differences in the structural connectome of the teenage brain revealed by generalized q-sampling MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Liao, Jan-Ray; Shen, Chao-Yu; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Weng, Jun-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The question of whether there are biological differences between male and female brains is a fraught one, and political positions and prior expectations seem to have a strong influence on the interpretation of scientific data in this field. This question is relevant to issues of gender differences in the prevalence of psychiatric conditions, including autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Tourette's syndrome, schizophrenia, dyslexia, depression, and eating disorders. Understanding how gender influences vulnerability to these conditions is significant. Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) provides a non-invasive method to investigate brain microstructure and the integrity of anatomical connectivity. Generalized q-sampling imaging (GQI) has been proposed to characterize complicated fiber patterns and distinguish fiber orientations, providing an opportunity for more accurate, higher-order descriptions through the water diffusion process. Therefore, we aimed to investigate differences in the brain's structural network between teenage males and females using GQI. This study included 59 (i.e., 33 males and 26 females) age- and education-matched subjects (age range: 13 to 14 years). The structural connectome was obtained by graph theoretical and network-based statistical (NBS) analyses. Our findings show that teenage male brains exhibit better intrahemispheric communication, and teenage female brains exhibit better interhemispheric communication. Our results also suggest that the network organization of teenage male brains is more local, more segregated, and more similar to small-world networks than teenage female brains. We conclude that the use of an MRI study with a GQI-based structural connectomic approach like ours presents novel insights into network-based systems of the brain and provides a new piece of the puzzle regarding gender differences.

  18. High-field superferric MR magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huson, F.R.; Carcagno, R.; Colvin, J.

    1987-01-01

    Current large-bore (>20 cm), high-field (2-T) MR magnets have major implementation disadvantages, mostly related to the extensive stray field of traditional air-core superconducting magnets. To circumvent this problem, the authors designed, constructed, and tested a 30-cm prototype superconducting, self-shielded, high field magnet. This unshimmed superferric magnet can operate between 0.5 and 4 T with a field quality of about one part per million over one quarter of its aperture. The magnet can be ramped from one field strength to another in approximately 10 minutes. The 5-Gauss line extends less than 1 meter outside the magnet structure. Further details, including MR measurements and images, are demonstrated, as well as 1-meter bore scale-up projections

  19. High-field dipoles for future accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wipf, S.L.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents the concept for building superconducting accelerator dipoles with record high fields. Economic considerations favor the highest possible current density in the windings. Further discussion indicates that there is an optimal range of pinning strength for a superconducting material and that it is not likely for multifilamentary conductors to ever equal the potential performance of tape conductors. A dipole design with a tape-wound, inner high-field winding is suggested. Methods are detailed to avoid degradation caused by flux jumps and to overcome problems with the dipole ends. Concerns for force support structure and field precision are also addressed. An R and D program leading to a prototype 11-T dipole is outlined. Past and future importance of superconductivity to high-energy physics is evident from a short historical survey. Successful dipoles in the 10- to 20-T range will allow interesting options for upgrading present largest accelerators

  20. High field dipole magnet design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, T.H.

    1988-12-01

    High field dipole magnets will play a crucial role in the development of future accelerators whether at Fermilab or elsewhere. This paper presents conceptual designs for two such dipoles; 6.6 and 8.8 Tesla, with special focus on their suitability for upgrades to the Fermilab Tevatron. Descriptions and cross-sectional views will be presented as will preliminary estimates of heat loads and costs. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Advances in high field laser physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sheng, Zhengming; Chen, Liming; Lu, Wei; Shen, Baifei

    2019-01-01

    High field laser physics emerged with the advent of ultrashort intense lasers about 25 years ago. It has developed into a frontier of cross-disciplinary studies, covering attosecond X-ray physics, particle accelerator physics, and physics of inertial confined fusion, etc., with prospects of wide applications. Because this is a new and rapidly developing field, so far there are only 2-3 related books available. There are a few review articles in some journals, which are limited to specific topics in high field physics. There are quite a few conference proceedings in this field, which are the collections of papers presented at conferences. In this book, a few leading experts working on different subjects in this field are invited to introduce the key topics in high field laser physics, which cover the involved fundamental physics, the recent advances, as well as the prospects of future applications. It shall be very useful to graduate students, young researchers, and people who want to have an overview of thi...

  2. Strain sensors for high field pulse magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Christian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zheng, Yan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Easton, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an investigation into several strain sensing technologies that are being considered to monitor mechanical deformation within the steel reinforcement shells used in high field pulsed magnets. Such systems generally operate at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate heating issues that are inherent in the coils of nondestructive, high field pulsed magnets. The objective of this preliminary study is to characterize the performance of various strain sensing technologies at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 C). Four sensor types are considered in this investigation: fiber Bragg gratings (FBG), resistive foil strain gauges (RFSG), piezoelectric polymers (PVDF), and piezoceramics (PZT). Three operational conditions are considered for each sensor: bond integrity, sensitivity as a function of temperature, and thermal cycling effects. Several experiments were conducted as part of this study, investigating adhesion with various substrate materials (stainless steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber), sensitivity to static (FBG and RFSG) and dynamic (RFSG, PVDF and PZT) load conditions, and sensor diagnostics using PZT sensors. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), and the results of this study will be used to identify the set of sensing technologies that would be best suited for integration within high field pulsed magnets at the NHMFL facility.

  3. Auditory-motor interaction revealed by fMRI: speech, music, and working memory in area Spt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickok, Gregory; Buchsbaum, Bradley; Humphries, Colin; Muftuler, Tugan

    2003-07-01

    The concept of auditory-motor interaction pervades speech science research, yet the cortical systems supporting this interface have not been elucidated. Drawing on experimental designs used in recent work in sensory-motor integration in the cortical visual system, we used fMRI in an effort to identify human auditory regions with both sensory and motor response properties, analogous to single-unit responses in known visuomotor integration areas. The sensory phase of the task involved listening to speech (nonsense sentences) or music (novel piano melodies); the "motor" phase of the task involved covert rehearsal/humming of the auditory stimuli. A small set of areas in the superior temporal and temporal-parietal cortex responded both during the listening phase and the rehearsal/humming phase. A left lateralized region in the posterior Sylvian fissure at the parietal-temporal boundary, area Spt, showed particularly robust responses to both phases of the task. Frontal areas also showed combined auditory + rehearsal responsivity consistent with the claim that the posterior activations are part of a larger auditory-motor integration circuit. We hypothesize that this circuit plays an important role in speech development as part of the network that enables acoustic-phonetic input to guide the acquisition of language-specific articulatory-phonetic gestures; this circuit may play a role in analogous musical abilities. In the adult, this system continues to support aspects of speech production, and, we suggest, supports verbal working memory.

  4. Changes in low-frequency fluctuations in patients with antisocial personality disorder revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huasheng Liu

    Full Text Available Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD is a personality disorder that is most commonly associated with the legal and criminal justice systems. The study of the brain in APD has important implications in legal contexts and in helping ensure social stability. However, the neural contribution to the high prevalence of APD is still unclear. In this study, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate the underlying neural mechanisms of APD. Thirty-two healthy individuals and thirty-five patients with APD were recruited. The amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF was analyzed for the whole brain of all subjects. Our results showed that APD patients had a significant reduction in the ALFF in the right orbitofrontal cortex, the left temporal pole, the right inferior temporal gyrus, and the left cerebellum posterior lobe compared to normal controls. We observed that the right orbitofrontal cortex had a negative correlation between ALFF values and MMPI psychopathic deviate scores. Alterations in ALFF in these specific brain regions suggest that APD patients may be associated with abnormal activities in the fronto-temporal network. We propose that our results may contribute in a clinical and forensic context to a better understanding of APD.

  5. Distinct neural networks for target feature versus dimension changes in visual search, as revealed by EEG and fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stefanie I; Grubert, Anna; Dux, Paul E

    2014-11-15

    In visual search, responses are slowed, from one trial to the next, both when the target dimension changes (e.g., from a color target to a size target) and when the target feature changes (e.g., from a red target to a green target) relative to being repeated across trials. The present study examined whether such feature and dimension switch costs can be attributed to the same underlying mechanism(s). Contrary to this contention, an EEG study showed that feature changes influenced visual selection of the target (i.e., delayed N2pc onset), whereas dimension changes influenced the later process of response selection (i.e., delayed s-LRP onset). An fMRI study provided convergent evidence for the two-system view: Compared with repetitions, feature changes led to increased activation in the occipital cortex, and superior and inferior parietal lobules, which have been implicated in spatial attention. By contrast, dimension changes led to activation of a fronto-posterior network that is primarily linked with response selection (i.e., pre-motor cortex, supplementary motor area and frontal areas). Taken together, the results suggest that feature and dimension switch costs are based on different processes. Specifically, whereas target feature changes delay attention shifts to the target, target dimension changes interfere with later response selection operations. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-01-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs

  7. Optogenetic activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons at the dorsal and ventral hippocampus evokes distinct brain-wide responses revealed by mouse fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Takata

    Full Text Available The dorsal and ventral hippocampal regions (dHP and vHP are proposed to have distinct functions. Electrophysiological studies have revealed intra-hippocampal variances along the dorsoventral axis. Nevertheless, the extra-hippocampal influences of dHP and vHP activities remain unclear. In this study, we compared the spatial distribution of brain-wide responses upon dHP or vHP activation and further estimate connection strengths between the dHP and the vHP with corresponding extra-hippocampal areas. To achieve this, we first investigated responses of local field potential (LFP and multi unit activities (MUA upon light stimulation in the hippocampus of an anesthetized transgenic mouse, whose CA1 pyramidal neurons expressed a step-function opsin variant of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2. Optogenetic stimulation increased hippocampal LFP power at theta, gamma, and ultra-fast frequency bands, and augmented MUA, indicating light-induced activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Brain-wide responses examined using fMRI revealed that optogenetic activation at the dHP or vHP caused blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD fMRI signals in situ. Although activation at the dHP induced BOLD responses at the vHP, the opposite was not observed. Outside the hippocampal formation, activation at the dHP, but not the vHP, evoked BOLD responses at the retrosplenial cortex (RSP, which is in line with anatomical evidence. In contrast, BOLD responses at the lateral septum (LS were induced only upon vHP activation, even though both dHP and vHP send axonal fibers to the LS. Our findings suggest that the primary targets of dHP and vHP activation are distinct, which concurs with attributed functions of the dHP and RSP in spatial memory, as well as of the vHP and LS in emotional responses.

  8. Super high field ohmically heated tokamak operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, D.R.; Bromberg, L.; Leclaire, R.J.; Potok, R.E.; Jassby, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The authors discuss a super high field mode of tokamak operation that uses ohmic heating or near ohmic heating to ignition. The super high field mode of operation uses very high values of Β/sup 2/α, where Β is the magnetic field and a is the minor radius (Β/sup 2/α > 100 T/sup 2/m). We analyze copper magnet devices with major radii from 1.7 to 3.0 meters. Minimizing or eliminating the need for auxiliary heating has the potential advantages of reducing uncertainty in extrapolating the energy confinement time of current tokamak devices, and reducing engineering problems associated with large auxiliary heating requirements. It may be possible to heat relatively short pulse, inertially cooled tokamaks to ignition with ohmic power alone. However, there may be advantages in using a very small amount of auxiliary power (less than the ohmic heating power) to boost the ohmic heating and provide a faster start-up, expecially in relatively compact devices

  9. The Pioneer XI high field fluxgate magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna, M. A.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    The high field fluxgate magnetometer experiment flown aboard the Pioneer XI spacecraft is described. This extremely simple instrument was used to extend the spacecraft's upper-limit measurement capability by approximately an order of magnitude (from 0.14 mT to 1.00 mT) with minimum power and volume requirements. This magnetometer was designed to complement the low-field measurements provided by a helium vector magnetometer and utilizes magnetic ring core sensors with biaxial orthogonal sense coils. The instrument is a single-range, triaxial-fluxgate magnetometer capable of measuring fields of up to 1 mT along each orthogonal axis, with a maximum resolution of 1 microT.

  10. Tritium system for compact high field devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roccella, M.; Bonizzoni, G.; Chiesa, P.; Ghezzi, F.; Nassi, M.; Pavesi, U.; Amedeo, P.; Boschetti, G.; Giffanti, F.; Moriggio, A.

    1988-01-01

    Some theoretical results and the current status of the work on a prototype plant for the Tritium cycle of compact high-field tokamaks (such as, Ignitor, CIT, etc.), using the SAES Getter St 707 getter material, are described in this report. The schematics and present status of the main subplants of the cycle are reported together with some experimental results demostrating the possibility of utilizing the St 707 material to purify the inert atmosphere of the glove-boxes and the secondary containment of the double-containment metal canalization which is to eventually house the various parts of the plant. Finally, as an example, the FTU machine, under construction at ENEA Frascati, has been taken as a reference, and theoretical evaluations are given for the inventory, permeation and release of the Tritium from the first wall and the thermal shieldes of such a tokamak

  11. High-field electron-photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartemann, F V.

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in novel technologies (including chirped-pulse amplification, femtosecond laser systems operating in the TW-PW range, high-gradient rf photoinjectors, and synchronized relativistic electron bunches with subpicosecond durations and THz bandwidths) allow experimentalists to study the interaction of relativistic electrons with ultrahigh-intensity photon fields. Ponderomotive scattering can accelerate these electrons with extremely high gradients in a three-dimensional vacuum laser focus. The nonlinear Doppler shift induced by relativistic radiation pressure in Compton backscattering is shown to yield complex nonlinear spectra which can be modified by using temporal laser pulse shaping techniques. Colliding laser pulses, where ponderomotive acceleration and Compton backscattering are combined, could also yield extremely short wavelength photons. Finally, one expects strong radiative corrections when the Doppler-upshifted laser wavelength approaches the Compton scale. These are discussed within the context of high-field classical electrodynamics, a new discipline borne out of the aforementioned innovations

  12. High field conditioning of cryogenic RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, M.; Debiak, T.; Lom, C.; Shephard, W.; Sredniawski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Space-based and other related accelerators have conditioning and operation requirements that are not found in most machines. The use of cryogenic copper, relatively poor vacuum, and limited power storage and operating time put unusual demands on the high-field conditioning process and present some concerns. Two CW cryogenic engineering model open-quotes sparkerclose quotes cavities have been fabricated and tested to fairly high field levels. Tests included initial and repeated conditioning as well as sustained RF operations. The two cavities were an engineering model TDL and an engineering model RFQ. Both cavities operated at 425 MHz. The DTL was conditioned to 46 MV/m at 100% duty factor (CW) at cryogenic temperature. This corresponds to a gap voltage of 433 kV and a real estate accelerating gradient (energy gain/total cavity length) of 6.97 MV/m. The authors believe this to be record performance for cryo CW operation. During cryo pulsed operation, the same cavity reached 48 MV/m with 200 μsec pulses at 0.5% DF. The RFQ was conditioned to 30 MV/m CW at cryo, 85 kV gap voltage. During a brief period of cryo pulsed operation, the RFQ operated at 46 MV/m, or 125 kV gap voltage. Reconditioning experiments were performed on both cavities and no problems were encountered. It should be noted that the vacuum levels were not very stringent during these tests and no special cleanliness or handling procedures were followed. The results of these tests indicate that cavities can run CW without difficulty at cryogenic temperatures at normal conservative field levels. Higher field operation may well be possible, and if better vacuums are used and more attention is paid to cleanliness, much higher fields may be attainable

  13. Distinct BOLD fMRI Responses of Capsaicin-Induced Thermal Sensation Reveal Pain-Related Brain Activation in Nonhuman Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Bakar Ali Asad

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of the adult population suffer from chronic pain that is not adequately treated by current therapies, highlighting a great need for improved treatment options. To develop effective analgesics, experimental human and animal models of pain are critical. Topically/intra-dermally applied capsaicin induces hyperalgesia and allodynia to thermal and tactile stimuli that mimics chronic pain and is a useful translation from preclinical research to clinical investigation. Many behavioral and self-report studies of pain have exploited the use of the capsaicin pain model, but objective biomarker correlates of the capsaicin augmented nociceptive response in nonhuman primates remains to be explored.Here we establish an aversive capsaicin-induced fMRI model using non-noxious heat stimuli in Cynomolgus monkeys (n = 8. BOLD fMRI data were collected during thermal challenge (ON:20 s/42°C; OFF:40 s/35°C, 4-cycle at baseline and 30 min post-capsaicin (0.1 mg, topical, forearm application. Tail withdrawal behavioral studies were also conducted in the same animals using 42°C or 48°C water bath pre- and post- capsaicin application (0.1 mg, subcutaneous, tail.Group comparisons between pre- and post-capsaicin application revealed significant BOLD signal increases in brain regions associated with the 'pain matrix', including somatosensory, frontal, and cingulate cortices, as well as the cerebellum (paired t-test, p<0.02, n = 8, while no significant change was found after the vehicle application. The tail withdrawal behavioral study demonstrated a significant main effect of temperature and a trend towards capsaicin induced reduction of latency at both temperatures.These findings provide insights into the specific brain regions involved with aversive, 'pain-like', responses in a nonhuman primate model. Future studies may employ both behavioral and fMRI measures as translational biomarkers to gain deeper understanding of pain processing and evaluate

  14. Structural alloys for high field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Research toward structural alloys for use in high field superconducting magnets is international in scope, and has three principal objectives: the selection or development of suitable structural alloys for the magnet support structure, the identification of mechanical phenomena and failure modes that may influence service behavior, and the design of suitable testing procedures to provide engineering design data. This paper reviews recent progress toward the first two of these objectives. The structural alloy needs depend on the magnet design and superconductor type and differ between magnets that use monolithic and those that employ force-cooled or ICCS conductors. In the former case the central requirement is for high strength, high toughness, weldable alloys that are used in thick sections for the magnet case. In the latter case the need is for high strength, high toughness alloys that are used in thin welded sections for the conductor conduit. There is productive current research on both alloy types. The service behavior of these alloys is influenced by mechanical phenomena that are peculiar to the magnet environment, including cryogenic fatigue, magnetic effects, and cryogenic creep. The design of appropriate mechanical tests is complicated by the need for testing at 4 0 K and by rate effects associated with adiabatic heating during the tests. 46 refs

  15. High-field proton MRS of human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Costanzo, Alfonso E-mail: alfonso.dicostanzo@unina2.it; Trojsi, F.; Tosetti, M.; Giannatempo, G.M.; Nemore, F.; Piccirillo, M.; Bonavita, S.; Tedeschi, G.; Scarabino, T

    2003-11-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) of the brain reveals specific biochemical information about cerebral metabolites, which may support clinical diagnoses and enhance the understanding of neurological disorders. The advantages of performing {sup 1}H-MRS at higher field strengths include better signal to noise ratio (SNR) and increased spectral, spatial and temporal resolution, allowing the acquisition of high quality, easily quantifiable spectra in acceptable imaging times. In addition to improved measurement precision of N-acetylaspartate, choline, creatine and myo-inositol, high-field systems allow the high-resolution measurement of other metabolites, such as glutamate, glutamine, {gamma}-aminobutyric acid, scyllo-inositol, aspartate, taurine, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, glucose and branched amino acids, thus extending the range of metabolic information. However, these advantages may be hampered by intrinsic field-dependent technical difficulties, such as decreased T2 signal, chemical shift dispersion errors, J-modulation anomalies, increased magnetic susceptibility, eddy current artifacts, limitations in the design of homogeneous and sensitive radiofrequency (RF) coils, magnetic field instability and safety issues. Several studies demonstrated that these limitations could be overcome, suggesting that the appropriate optimization of high-field {sup 1}H-MRS would expand the application in the fields of clinical research and diagnostic routine.

  16. Violence-related content in video game may lead to functional connectivity changes in brain networks as revealed by fMRI-ICA in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvyagintsev, M; Klasen, M; Weber, R; Sarkheil, P; Esposito, F; Mathiak, K A; Schwenzer, M; Mathiak, K

    2016-04-21

    In violent video games, players engage in virtual aggressive behaviors. Exposure to virtual aggressive behavior induces short-term changes in players' behavior. In a previous study, a violence-related version of the racing game "Carmageddon TDR2000" increased aggressive affects, cognitions, and behaviors compared to its non-violence-related version. This study investigates the differences in neural network activity during the playing of both versions of the video game. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recorded ongoing brain activity of 18 young men playing the violence-related and the non-violence-related version of the video game Carmageddon. Image time series were decomposed into functional connectivity (FC) patterns using independent component analysis (ICA) and template-matching yielded a mapping to established functional brain networks. The FC patterns revealed a decrease in connectivity within 6 brain networks during the violence-related compared to the non-violence-related condition: three sensory-motor networks, the reward network, the default mode network (DMN), and the right-lateralized frontoparietal network. Playing violent racing games may change functional brain connectivity, in particular and even after controlling for event frequency, in the reward network and the DMN. These changes may underlie the short-term increase of aggressive affects, cognitions, and behaviors as observed after playing violent video games. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Beneficial impact of high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging on the efficacy of pediatric low-grade glioma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, Constantin; Breitkopf, Martin; Ms; Bisdas, Sotirios; Freitas, Rousinelle da Silva; Dimostheni, Artemisia; Ebinger, Martin; Wolff, Markus; Tatagiba, Marcos; Schuhmann, Martin U

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) is assumed to safely improve the extent of resection (EOR) in patients with gliomas. This study focuses on advantages of this imaging technology in elective low-grade glioma (LGG) surgery in pediatric patients. The surgical results of conventional and 1.5-T iMRI-guided elective LGG surgery in pediatric patients were retrospectively compared. Tumor volumes, general clinical data, EOR according to reference radiology assessment, and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed. Sixty-five patients were included in the study, of whom 34 had undergone conventional surgery before the iMRI unit opened (pre-iMRI period) and 31 had undergone surgery with iMRI guidance (iMRI period). Perioperative data were comparable between the 2 cohorts, apart from larger preoperative tumor volumes in the pre-iMRI period, a difference without statistical significance, and (as expected) significantly longer surgeries in the iMRI group. According to 3-month postoperative MRI studies, an intended complete resection (CR) was achieved in 41% (12 of 29) of the patients in the pre-iMRI period and in 71% (17 of 24) of those in the iMRI period (p = 0.05). Of those cases in which the surgeon was postoperatively convinced that he had successfully achieved CR, this proved to be true in only 50% of cases in the pre-iMRI period but in 81% of cases in the iMRI period (p = 0.055). Residual tumor volumes on 3-month postoperative MRI were significantly smaller in the iMRI cohort (p surgery was noticeably better for the entire iMRI cohort and in iMRI patients with postoperatively assumed CR, but did not quite reach statistical significance. Moreover, PFS was highly significantly better in patients with CRs than in those with incomplete resections (p < 0.001). Significantly better surgical results (CR) and PFS were achieved after using iMRI in patients in whom total resections were intended. Therefore, the use of high-field iMRI is strongly recommended for electively planned LGG

  18. High field superconductor development and understanding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larbalestier, David C. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Lee, Peter J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Tarantini, Chiara [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2014-09-28

    All present circular accelerators use superconducting magnets to bend and to focus the particle beams. The most powerful of these machines is the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN. The main ring dipole magnets of the LHC are made from Nb-Ti but, as the machine is upgraded to higher luminosity, more powerful magnets made of Nb3Sn will be required. Our work addresses how to make the Nb3Sn conductors more effective and more suitable for use in the LHC. The most important property of the superconducting conductor used for an accelerator magnet is that it must have very high critical current density, the property that allows the generation of high magnetic fields in small spaces. Nb3Sn is the original high field superconductor, the material which was discovered in 1960 to allow a high current density in the field of about 9 T. For the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC, much higher current densities in fields of about 12 Tesla will be required. The critical value of the current density is of order 2600 A/mm2 in a field of 12 Tesla. But there are very important secondary factors that complicate the attainment of this critical current density. The first is that the effective filament diameter must be no larger than about 40 µm. The second factor is that 50% of the cross-section of the Nb3Sn conductor that is pure copper must be protected from any poisoning by any Sn leakage through the diffusion barrier that protects the package of niobium and tin from which the Nb3Sn is formed by a high temperature reaction. These three, somewhat conflicting requirements, mean that optimization of the conductor is complex. The work described in this contract report addresses these conflicting requirements. They show that very sophisticated characterizations can uncover the way to satisfy all 3 requirements and they also suggest that the ultimate optimization of Nb3Sn is still not yet in sight

  19. Orchestrating Proactive and Reactive Mechanisms for Filtering Distracting Information: Brain-Behavior Relationships Revealed by a Mixed-Design fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Francesco; Demeter, Elise; Roberts, Kenneth C.; Chelazzi, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Given the information overload often imparted to human cognitive-processing systems, suppression of irrelevant and distracting information is essential for successful behavior. Using a hybrid block/event-related fMRI design, we characterized proactive and reactive brain mechanisms for filtering distracting stimuli. Participants performed a flanker task, discriminating the direction of a target arrow in the presence versus absence of congruent or incongruent flanking distracting arrows during either Pure blocks (distracters always absent) or Mixed blocks (distracters on 80% of trials). Each Mixed block had either 20% or 60% incongruent trials. Activations in the dorsal frontoparietal attention network during Mixed versus Pure blocks evidenced proactive (blockwise) recruitment of a distraction-filtering mechanism. Sustained activations in right middle frontal gyrus during 60% Incongruent blocks correlated positively with behavioral indices of distraction-filtering (slowing when distracters might occur) and negatively with distraction-related behavioral costs (incongruent vs congruent trials), suggesting a role in coordinating proactive filtering of potential distracters. Event-related analyses showed that incongruent trials elicited greater reactive activations in 20% (vs 60%) Incongruent blocks for counteracting distraction and conflict, including in the insula and anterior cingulate. Context-related effects in occipitoparietal cortex consisted of greater target-evoked activations for distracter-absent trials (central-target-only) in Mixed versus Pure blocks, suggesting enhanced attentional engagement. Functional-localizer analyses in V1/V2/V3 revealed less distracter-processing activity in 60% (vs 20%) Incongruent blocks, presumably reflecting tonic suppression by proactive filtering mechanisms. These results delineate brain mechanisms underlying proactive and reactive filtering of distraction and conflict, and how they are orchestrated depending on distraction

  20. Intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring-guided surgery for treating supratentorial cavernomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang-Ye; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Xu, Bai-Nan

    2016-09-01

    To determine the beneficial effects of intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring-guided surgery for treating supratentorial cavernomas. Twelve patients with 13 supratentorial cavernomas were prospectively enrolled and operated while using a 1.5 T intraoperative MRI, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring. All cavernomas were deeply located in subcortical areas or involved critical areas. Intraoperative high-field MRIs were obtained for the intraoperative "visualization" of surrounding eloquent structures, "brain shift" corrections, and navigational plan updates. All cavernomas were successfully resected with guidance from intraoperative MRI, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring. In 5 cases with supratentorial cavernomas, intraoperative "brain shift" severely deterred locating of the lesions; however, intraoperative MRI facilitated precise locating of these lesions. During long-term (>3 months) follow-up, some or all presenting signs and symptoms improved or resolved in 4 cases, but were unchanged in 7 patients. Intraoperative high-field MRI, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring are helpful in surgeries for the treatment of small deeply seated subcortical cavernomas.

  1. Functional MRI examination of empathy for pain in people with schizophrenia reveals abnormal activation related to cognitive perspective-taking but typical activation linked to affective sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistoli, Damien; Lavoie, Marie-Audrey; Sutliff, Stephanie; Jackson, Philip L.; Achim, Amélie M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is associated with important disturbances in empathy that are related to everyday functioning. Empathy is classically defined as including affective (sharing others’ emotions) and cognitive (taking others’ cognitive perspectives) processes. In healthy individuals, studies on empathy for pain revealed specific brain systems associated with these sets of processes, notably the anterior middle cingulate (aMCC) and anterior insula (AI) for affective sharing and the bilateral temporoparietal junction (TPJ) for the cognitive processes, but the integrity of these systems in patients with schizophrenia remains uncertain. Methods Patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls performed a pain empathy task while undergoing fMRI scanning. Participants observed pictures of hands in either painful or nonpainful situations and rated the level of pain while imagining either themselves (self) or an unknown person (other) in these situations. Results We included 27 patients with schizophrenia and 21 healthy controls in our analyses. For the pain versus no pain contrast, patients showed overall typical activation patterns in the aMCC and AI, with only a small part of the aMCC showing reduced activation compared with controls. For the other versus self contrast, patients showed an abnormal modulation of activation in the TPJ bilaterally (extending to the posterior superior temporal sulcus, referred to as the TPJ/pSTS). Limitations The design included an unnecessary manipulation of the visual perspective that reduced the number of trials for analysis. The sample size may not account for the heterogeneity of schizophrenia. Conclusion People with schizophrenia showed relatively intact brain activation when observing others’ pain, but showed abnormalities when asked to take the cognitive perspectives of others. PMID:28556774

  2. Area-specific modulation of neural activation comparing escitalopram and citalopram revealed by pharmaco-fMRI: a randomized cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windischberger, Christian; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Holik, Alexander; Spindelegger, Christoph; Stein, Patrycja; Moser, Ulrike; Gerstl, Florian; Fink, Martin; Moser, Ewald; Kasper, Siegfried

    2010-01-15

    Area-specific and stimulation-dependent changes of human brain activation by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are an important issue for improved understanding of treatment mechanisms, given the frequent prescription of these drugs in depression and anxiety disorders. The aim of this neuroimaging study was to investigate differences in BOLD-signal caused by administration of the SSRIs escitalopram and citalopram using pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging (pharmaco-fMRI). Eighteen healthy subjects participated in a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study in cross-over repeated measures design. Each volunteer performed facial emotional discrimination and a sensorimotor control paradigm during three scanning sessions. Citalopram (20 mg/d), escitalopram (10 mg/d) and placebo were administered for 10 days each with a drug-free period of at least 21 days. Significant pharmacological effects on BOLD-signal were found in the amygdala, medial frontal gyrus, parahippocampal, fusiform and middle temporal gyri. Post-hoc t-tests revealed decreased BOLD-signal in the right amygdala and left parahippocampal gyrus in both pharmacological conditions, compared to placebo. Escitalopram, compared to citalopram, induced a decrease of BOLD-signal in the medial frontal gyrus and an increase in the right fusiform and left parahippocampal gyri. Drug effects were concentrated in brain regions with dense serotonergic projections. Both escitalopram and citalopram attenuated BOLD-signal in the amygdala and parahippocampal cortex to emotionally significant stimuli compared to control stimuli. We believe that reduced reactivity in the medial frontal gyrus found for escitalopram compared to citalopram administration might explain the response differences between study drugs as demonstrated in previous clinical trials.

  3. Control over the Strength of Connections Between Modules: A Double Dissociation Between Stimulus Format and Task Revealed by Granger Causality Mapping in fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt eAnderson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on theoretical and computational work with the localist Dual Route reading model and results from behavioral studies, Besner, Moroz, and O'Malley (2011 proposed that the ability to perform tasks that require overriding stimulus-specific defaults (e.g., semantics when naming Arabic numerals, and phonology when evaluating the parity of number words necessitate the ability to modulate the strength of connections between cognitive modules for lexical representation, semantics, and phonology on a task- and stimulus-specific basis. We used fMRI to evaluate this account by assessing changes in functional connectivity while participants performed tasks that did and did not require such stimulus-task default overrides. The occipital region showing the greatest modulation of BOLD signal strength for the two stimulus types was used as the seed region for Granger Causality Mapping (GCM. Our GCM analysis revealed a region of rostromedial frontal cortex with a crossover interaction. When participants performed tasks that required overriding stimulus type defaults (i.e., parity judgments of number words and naming Arabic numerals functional connectivity between the occipital region and rostromedial frontal cortex was present. Statistically significant functional connectivity was absent when the tasks were the default for the stimulus type (i.e., parity judgments of Arabic numerals and reading number words. This frontal region (BA 10 has previously been shown to be involved in goal-directed behaviour and maintenance of a specific task-set. We conclude that overriding stimulus-task defaults requires a modulation of connection strengths between cognitive modules and that the override mechanism predicted from cognitive theory is instantiated by frontal modulation of neural activity of brain regions specialized for sensory processing.

  4. Principal States of Dynamic Functional Connectivity Reveal the Link Between Resting-State and Task-State Brain: An fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lin; Zhu, Yang; Sun, Junfeng; Deng, Lifu; He, Naying; Yang, Yang; Ling, Huawei; Ayaz, Hasan; Fu, Yi; Tong, Shanbao

    2018-01-25

    Task-related reorganization of functional connectivity (FC) has been widely investigated. Under classic static FC analysis, brain networks under task and rest have been demonstrated a general similarity. However, brain activity and cognitive process are believed to be dynamic and adaptive. Since static FC inherently ignores the distinct temporal patterns between rest and task, dynamic FC may be more a suitable technique to characterize the brain's dynamic and adaptive activities. In this study, we adopted [Formula: see text]-means clustering to investigate task-related spatiotemporal reorganization of dynamic brain networks and hypothesized that dynamic FC would be able to reveal the link between resting-state and task-state brain organization, including broadly similar spatial patterns but distinct temporal patterns. In order to test this hypothesis, this study examined the dynamic FC in default-mode network (DMN) and motor-related network (MN) using Blood-Oxygenation-Level-Dependent (BOLD)-fMRI data from 26 healthy subjects during rest (REST) and a hand closing-and-opening (HCO) task. Two principal FC states in REST and one principal FC state in HCO were identified. The first principal FC state in REST was found similar to that in HCO, which appeared to represent intrinsic network architecture and validated the broadly similar spatial patterns between REST and HCO. However, the second FC principal state in REST with much shorter "dwell time" implied the transient functional relationship between DMN and MN during REST. In addition, a more frequent shifting between two principal FC states indicated that brain network dynamically maintained a "default mode" in the motor system during REST, whereas the presence of a single principal FC state and reduced FC variability implied a more temporally stable connectivity during HCO, validating the distinct temporal patterns between REST and HCO. Our results further demonstrated that dynamic FC analysis could offer unique

  5. MRI of 'brain death'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shigeki; Itoh, Takahiko; Tuchida, Shohei; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Asari, Shoji; Nishimoto, Akira; Sanou, Kazuo.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was undertaken for two patients who suffered from severe cerebrovascular diseases and were clinically brain dead. The MRI system we used was Resona (Yokogawa Medical Systems, superconductive system 0.5 T) and the CT apparatus was Toshiba TCT-300. Initial CT and MRI were undertaken as soon as possible after admission, and repeated sequentially. After diagnosis of brain death, we performed angiography to determine cerebral circulatory arrest, and MRI obtained at the same time was compared with the angiogram and CT. Case 1 was a 77-year-old man who was admitted in an unconscious state. CT and MRI on the second day after hospitalization revealed cerebellar infarction. He was diagnosed as brain dead on day 4. Case 2 was a 35-year-old man. When he was transferred to our hospital, he was in cardiorespiratory arrested. Cardiac resuscitation was successful but no spontaneous respiration appeared. CT and MRI on admission revealed right intracerebral hemorrhage. Angiography revealed cessation of contrast medium in intracranial vessels in both of the patients. We found no 'flow signal void sign' in the bilateral internal carotid and basilar arteries on MRI images in both cases after brain death. MRI, showing us the anatomical changes of the brain, clearly revealed brain herniations, even though only nuclear findings of 'brain tamponade' were seen on CT. But in Case 1, we could not see the infarct lesions in the cerebellum on MR images obtained after brain death. This phenomenon was caused by the whole brain ischemia masking the initial ischemic lesions. We concluded that MRI was useful not only the anatomical display of lesions and brain herniation with high contrast resolution but for obtaining information on cerebral circulation of brain death. (author)

  6. Single-trial EEG-informed fMRI reveals spatial dependency of BOLD signal on early and late IC-ERP amplitudes during face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsich, Jonathan; Bénar, Christian; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Descoins, Médéric; Soulier, Elisabeth; Le Troter, Arnaud; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Liégeois-Chauvel, Catherine; Guye, Maxime

    2014-10-15

    Simultaneous EEG-fMRI has opened up new avenues for improving the spatio-temporal resolution of functional brain studies. However, this method usually suffers from poor EEG quality, especially for evoked potentials (ERPs), due to specific artifacts. As such, the use of EEG-informed fMRI analysis in the context of cognitive studies has particularly focused on optimizing narrow ERP time windows of interest, which ignores the rich diverse temporal information of the EEG signal. Here, we propose to use simultaneous EEG-fMRI to investigate the neural cascade occurring during face recognition in 14 healthy volunteers by using the successive ERP peaks recorded during the cognitive part of this process. N170, N400 and P600 peaks, commonly associated with face recognition, were successfully and reproducibly identified for each trial and each subject by using a group independent component analysis (ICA). For the first time we use this group ICA to extract several independent components (IC) corresponding to the sequence of activation and used single-trial peaks as modulation parameters in a general linear model (GLM) of fMRI data. We obtained an occipital-temporal-frontal stream of BOLD signal modulation, in accordance with the three successive IC-ERPs providing an unprecedented spatio-temporal characterization of the whole cognitive process as defined by BOLD signal modulation. By using this approach, the pattern of EEG-informed BOLD modulation provided improved characterization of the network involved than the fMRI-only analysis or the source reconstruction of the three ERPs; the latter techniques showing only two regions in common localized in the occipital lobe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Resting-state fMRI revealed different brain activities responding to valproic acid and levetiracetam in benign epilepsy with central-temporal spikes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qirui; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Qiang; Wu, Han; Li, Zhipeng; Lu, Guangming [Nanjing University School of Medicine, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing (China); Yang, Fang; Li, Qian [Nanjing University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing (China); Hu, Zheng [Nanjing Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurology, Nanjing (China); Dante, Mantini [Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Sciences, KU Leuven (Belgium); Li, Kai [Suzhou University, Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Suzhou (China)

    2017-05-15

    Our aim was to investigate regional difference in brain activities in response to antiepileptic drug (AED) medications in benign epilepsy with central-temporal spikes (BECTS) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Fifty-seven patients with BECTS underwent resting-state fMRI scans after receiving either valproic acid (VPA) (n = 15), levetiracetam (LEV) (n = 21), or no medication (n = 21). fMRI regional homogeneity (ReHo) parameter among the three groups of patients were compared and were correlated with total doses of AED in the two medicated groups. Compared with patients on no-medication, patients receiving either VPA or LEV showed decreased ReHo in the central-temporal region, frontal cortex, and thalamus. In particular, the VPA group showed greater ReHo decrease in the thalamus and milder in cortices and caudate heads compared with the LEV group. In addition, the VPA group demonstrated a negative correlation between ReHo values in the central-temporal region and medication dose. Both VPA and LEV inhibit resting-state neural activity in the central-temporal region, which is the main epileptogenic focus of BECTS. VPA reduced brain activity in the cortical epileptogenic regions and thalamus evenly, whereas LEV reduced brain activity predominantly in the cortices. Interestingly, VPA showed a cumulative effect on inhibiting brain activity in the epileptogenic regions in BECTS. (orig.)

  8. A polymeric micelle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent reveals blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability for macromolecules in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Kouichi; Wang, Zuojun; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Aoki, Ichio; Yokoyama, Masayuki

    2017-05-10

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening is a key phenomenon for understanding ischemia-reperfusion injuries that are directly linked to hemorrhagic transformation. The recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator (rtPA) increases the risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhages. Recent imaging technologies have advanced our understanding of pathological BBB disorders; however, an ongoing challenge in the pre-"rtPA treatment" stage is the task of developing a rigorous method for hemorrhage-risk assessments. Therefore, we examined a novel method for assessment of rtPA-extravasation through a hyper-permeable BBB. To examine the image diagnosis of rtPA-extravasation for a rat transient occlusion-reperfusion model, in this study we used a polymeric micelle MRI contrast-agent (Gd-micelles). Specifically, we used two MRI contrast agents at 1h after reperfusion. Gd-micelles provided very clear contrast images in 15.5±10.3% of the ischemic hemisphere at 30min after i.v. injection, whereas a classic gadolinium chelate MRI contrast agent provided no satisfactorily clear images. The obtained images indicate both the hyper-permeable BBB area for macromolecules and the distribution area of macromolecules in the ischemic hemisphere. Owing to their large molecular weight, Gd-micelles remained in the ischemic hemisphere through the hyper-permeable BBB. Our results indicate the feasibility of a novel clinical diagnosis for evaluating rtPA-related hemorrhage risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Resting-state fMRI revealed different brain activities responding to valproic acid and levetiracetam in benign epilepsy with central-temporal spikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qirui; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Qiang; Wu, Han; Li, Zhipeng; Lu, Guangming; Yang, Fang; Li, Qian; Hu, Zheng; Dante, Mantini; Li, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate regional difference in brain activities in response to antiepileptic drug (AED) medications in benign epilepsy with central-temporal spikes (BECTS) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Fifty-seven patients with BECTS underwent resting-state fMRI scans after receiving either valproic acid (VPA) (n = 15), levetiracetam (LEV) (n = 21), or no medication (n = 21). fMRI regional homogeneity (ReHo) parameter among the three groups of patients were compared and were correlated with total doses of AED in the two medicated groups. Compared with patients on no-medication, patients receiving either VPA or LEV showed decreased ReHo in the central-temporal region, frontal cortex, and thalamus. In particular, the VPA group showed greater ReHo decrease in the thalamus and milder in cortices and caudate heads compared with the LEV group. In addition, the VPA group demonstrated a negative correlation between ReHo values in the central-temporal region and medication dose. Both VPA and LEV inhibit resting-state neural activity in the central-temporal region, which is the main epileptogenic focus of BECTS. VPA reduced brain activity in the cortical epileptogenic regions and thalamus evenly, whereas LEV reduced brain activity predominantly in the cortices. Interestingly, VPA showed a cumulative effect on inhibiting brain activity in the epileptogenic regions in BECTS. (orig.)

  10. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  11. An intra-neural microstimulation system for ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging and magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Paul M; Watkins, Roger H; O'Neill, George C; Ackerley, Rochelle; Sanchez-Panchuelo, Rosa; McGlone, Francis; Brookes, Matthew J; Wessberg, Johan; Francis, Susan T

    2017-10-01

    Intra-neural microstimulation (INMS) is a technique that allows the precise delivery of low-current electrical pulses into human peripheral nerves. Single unit INMS can be used to stimulate individual afferent nerve fibres during microneurography. Combining this with neuroimaging allows the unique monitoring of central nervous system activation in response to unitary, controlled tactile input, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) providing exquisite spatial localisation of brain activity and magnetoencephalography (MEG) high temporal resolution. INMS systems suitable for use within electrophysiology laboratories have been available for many years. We describe an INMS system specifically designed to provide compatibility with both ultra-high field (7T) fMRI and MEG. Numerous technical and safety issues are addressed. The system is fully analogue, allowing for arbitrary frequency and amplitude INMS stimulation. Unitary recordings obtained within both the MRI and MEG screened-room environments are comparable with those obtained in 'clean' electrophysiology recording environments. Single unit INMS (current met. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Microstrip Resonator for High Field MRI with Capacitor-Segmented Strip and Ground Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Boer, Vincent; Petersen, Esben Thade

    2017-01-01

    ) segmenting stripe and ground plane of the resonator with series capacitors. The design equations for capacitors providing symmetric current distribution are derived. The performance of two types of segmented resonators are investigated experimentally. To authors’ knowledge, a microstrip resonator, where both......, strip and ground plane are capacitor-segmented, is shown here for the first time....

  13. Brain-heart interactions: challenges and opportunities with functional magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Catie; Raven, Erika P; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-05-13

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (UHF) strengths (7 T and above) offers unique opportunities for studying the human brain with increased spatial resolution, contrast and sensitivity. However, its reliability can be compromised by factors such as head motion, image distortion and non-neural fluctuations of the functional MRI signal. The objective of this review is to provide a critical discussion of the advantages and trade-offs associated with UHF imaging, focusing on the application to studying brain-heart interactions. We describe how UHF MRI may provide contrast and resolution benefits for measuring neural activity of regions involved in the control and mediation of autonomic processes, and in delineating such regions based on anatomical MRI contrast. Limitations arising from confounding signals are discussed, including challenges with distinguishing non-neural physiological effects from the neural signals of interest that reflect cardiorespiratory function. We also consider how recently developed data analysis techniques may be applied to high-field imaging data to uncover novel information about brain-heart interactions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. Brain functional BOLD perturbation modelling for forward fMRI and inverse mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer; Calhoun, Vince

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To computationally separate dynamic brain functional BOLD responses from static background in a brain functional activity for forward fMRI signal analysis and inverse mapping. Methods A brain functional activity is represented in terms of magnetic source by a perturbation model: χ = χ0 +δχ, with δχ for BOLD magnetic perturbations and χ0 for background. A brain fMRI experiment produces a timeseries of complex-valued images (T2* images), whereby we extract the BOLD phase signals (denoted by δP) by a complex division. By solving an inverse problem, we reconstruct the BOLD δχ dataset from the δP dataset, and the brain χ distribution from a (unwrapped) T2* phase image. Given a 4D dataset of task BOLD fMRI, we implement brain functional mapping by temporal correlation analysis. Results Through a high-field (7T) and high-resolution (0.5mm in plane) task fMRI experiment, we demonstrated in detail the BOLD perturbation model for fMRI phase signal separation (P + δP) and reconstructing intrinsic brain magnetic source (χ and δχ). We also provided to a low-field (3T) and low-resolution (2mm) task fMRI experiment in support of single-subject fMRI study. Our experiments show that the δχ-depicted functional map reveals bidirectional BOLD χ perturbations during the task performance. Conclusions The BOLD perturbation model allows us to separate fMRI phase signal (by complex division) and to perform inverse mapping for pure BOLD δχ reconstruction for intrinsic functional χ mapping. The full brain χ reconstruction (from unwrapped fMRI phase) provides a new brain tissue image that allows to scrutinize the brain tissue idiosyncrasy for the pure BOLD δχ response through an automatic function/structure co-localization. PMID:29351339

  15. Brain functional BOLD perturbation modelling for forward fMRI and inverse mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Robinson, Jennifer; Calhoun, Vince

    2018-01-01

    To computationally separate dynamic brain functional BOLD responses from static background in a brain functional activity for forward fMRI signal analysis and inverse mapping. A brain functional activity is represented in terms of magnetic source by a perturbation model: χ = χ0 +δχ, with δχ for BOLD magnetic perturbations and χ0 for background. A brain fMRI experiment produces a timeseries of complex-valued images (T2* images), whereby we extract the BOLD phase signals (denoted by δP) by a complex division. By solving an inverse problem, we reconstruct the BOLD δχ dataset from the δP dataset, and the brain χ distribution from a (unwrapped) T2* phase image. Given a 4D dataset of task BOLD fMRI, we implement brain functional mapping by temporal correlation analysis. Through a high-field (7T) and high-resolution (0.5mm in plane) task fMRI experiment, we demonstrated in detail the BOLD perturbation model for fMRI phase signal separation (P + δP) and reconstructing intrinsic brain magnetic source (χ and δχ). We also provided to a low-field (3T) and low-resolution (2mm) task fMRI experiment in support of single-subject fMRI study. Our experiments show that the δχ-depicted functional map reveals bidirectional BOLD χ perturbations during the task performance. The BOLD perturbation model allows us to separate fMRI phase signal (by complex division) and to perform inverse mapping for pure BOLD δχ reconstruction for intrinsic functional χ mapping. The full brain χ reconstruction (from unwrapped fMRI phase) provides a new brain tissue image that allows to scrutinize the brain tissue idiosyncrasy for the pure BOLD δχ response through an automatic function/structure co-localization.

  16. High field, low current operation of engineering test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.; Cohn, D.R.; Bromberg, L.; Williams, J.E.C.

    1987-06-01

    Steady state engineering test reactors with high field, low current operation are investigated and compared to high current, lower field concepts. Illustrative high field ETR parameters are R = 3 m, α ∼ 0.5 m, B ∼ 10 T, β = 2.2% and I = 4 MA. For similar wall loading the fusion power of an illustrative high field, low current concept could be about 50% that of a lower field device like TIBER II. This reduction could lead to a 50% decrease in tritium consumption, resulting in a substantial decrease in operating cost. Furthermore, high field operation could lead to substantially reduced current drive requirements and cost. A reduction in current drive source power on the order of 40 to 50 MW may be attainable relative to a lower field, high current design like TIBER II implying a possible cost savings on the order of $200 M. If current drive is less efficient than assumed, the savings could be even greater. Through larger β/sub p/ and aspect ratio, greater prospects for bootstrap current operation also exist. Further savings would be obtained from the reduced size of the first wall/blanket/shield system. The effects of high fields on magnet costs are very dependent on technological assumptions. Further improvements in the future may lie with advances in superconducting and structural materials

  17. Diffusion MRI and MR spectroscopy reveal microstructural and metabolic brain alterations in chronic mild stress exposed rats: A CMS recovery study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Hansen, Brian; Wiborg, Ove; Kroenke, Christopher D; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj

    2018-02-15

    Chronic mild stress (CMS) induced depression elicits several debilitating symptoms and causes a significant economic burden on society. High variability in the symptomatology of depression poses substantial impediment to accurate diagnosis and therapy outcome. CMS exposure induces significant metabolic and microstructural alterations in the hippocampus (HP), prefrontal cortex (PFC), caudate-putamen (CP) and amygdala (AM), however, recovery from these maladaptive changes are limited and this may provide negative effects on the therapeutic treatment and management of depression. The present study utilized anhedonic rats from the unpredictable CMS model of depression to study metabolic recovery in the ventral hippocampus (vHP) and microstructural recovery in the HP, AM, CP, and PFC. The study employed 1 H MR spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) and in-vivo diffusion MRI (d-MRI) at the age of week 18 (week 1 post CMS exposure) week 20 (week 3 post CMS) and week 25 (week 8 post CMS exposure) in the anhedonic group, and at the age of week 18 and week 22 in the control group. The d-MRI data have provided an array of diffusion tensor metrics (FA, MD, AD, and RD), and fast kurtosis metrics (MKT, W L and W T ). CMS exposure induced a significant metabolic alteration in vHP, and significant microstructural alterations were observed in the HP, AM, and PFC in comparison to the age match control and within the anhedonic group. A significantly high level of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) was observed in vHP at the age of week 18 in comparison to age match control and week 20 and week 25 of the anhedonic group. HP and AM showed significant microstructural alterations up to the age of week 22 in the anhedonic group. PFC showed significant microstructural alterations only at the age of week 18, however, most of the metrics showed significantly higher value at the age of week 20 in the anhedonic group. The significantly increased NAA concentration may indicate impaired catabolism due to astrogliosis or

  18. Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Analysis of the Developmental Changes of Tourette Syndrome Reveal Reduced Diffusion in the Cortico-Striato-Thalamo-Cortical Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debes, Nanette; Jeppesen, Signe; Raghava, Jayachandra Mitta

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical pathways are involved in Tourette syndrome. We performed a longitudinal imaging study in 22 patients and 21 healthy controls in order to examine the development of tics and its correlation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings....... Patients were divided in a group with persisting and a group with remission of tics. We found a decrease in volume of left putamen in controls, but not in patients. We found changes in mean diffusivity between patients and controls in right caudate nucleus, thalamus, and frontal lobe. In contrast...... to controls, parallel and perpendicular diffusivity decreased in patients and were most pronounced in the patients with persisting tics compared to those with remission. The findings suggest that the development of the brain in patients with remission resembles the normal development more than in patients...

  19. Voxel-Based Morphometry and fMRI Revealed Differences in Brain Gray Matter in Breastfed and Milk Formula-Fed Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, X; Andres, A; Pivik, R T; Cleves, M A; Snow, J H; Ding, Z; Badger, T M

    2016-04-01

    Infant diets may have significant impact on brain development in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate brain gray matter structure and function in 8-year-old children who were predominantly breastfed or fed cow's milk formula as infants. Forty-two healthy children (breastfed: n = 22, 10 boys and 12 girls; cow's milk formula: n = 20, 10 boys and 10 girls) were studied by using structural MR imaging (3D T1-weighted imaging) and blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI (while performing tasks involving visual perception and language functions). They were also administered standardized tests evaluating intelligence (Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales) and language skills (Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals). Total brain gray matter volume did not differ between the breastfed and cow's milk formula groups. However, breastfed children had significantly higher (P left inferior temporal lobe and left superior parietal lobe compared with cow's milk formula-fed children. Breastfed children showed significantly more brain activation in the right frontal and left/right temporal lobes on fMRI when processing the perception task and in the left temporal/occipital lobe when processing the visual language task than cow's milk formula-fed children. The imaging findings were associated with significantly better performance for breastfed than cow's milk formula-fed children on both tasks. Our findings indicated greater regional gray matter development and better regional gray matter function in breastfed than cow's milk formula-fed children at 8 years of age and suggested that infant diets may have long-term influences on brain development in children. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  20. High-field EPR spectroscopy of thermal donors in silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, R.; Rasmussen, F.B.; Gregorkiewicz, T.

    1997-01-01

    Thermal donors generated in p-type boron-doped Czochralski-grown silicon by a 450 degrees C heat treatment have been studied by high-field magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In the experiments conducted at a microwave frequency of 140 GHz and in a magnetic field of approximately 5 T four individual...

  1. The Pioneer 11 high-field fluxgate magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1973-01-01

    The High Field Fluxgate Magnetometer Experiment flow aboard the Pioneer 11 spacecraft to investigate Jupiter's magnetic field is described. The instrument extends the spacecraft's upper limit measurement capability by more than an order of magnitude to 17.3 gauss with minimum power and volume requirements.

  2. High-field magnetization of UCuGe single crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andreev, Alexander V.; Mushnikov, N. V.; Gozo, T.; Honda, F.; Sechovský, V.; Prokeš, K.

    346-347, - (2004), s. 132-136 ISSN 0921-4526 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0739 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : uranium intermetallics * UCuGe * high fields * magnetic anisotropy * field-induced phase transition Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.679, year: 2004

  3. The high field superconducting magnet program at LLNL: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.R.; Chaplin, M.R.; Kerns, J.A.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.; Slack, D.S.; Summers, L.T.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    In FY 86 the program continued along several interrelated thrust areas. These thrust areas have been broadly labeled as follows: (1) Superconductor Research and Technology; (2) Magnet Systems Materials Technology; (3) Magnet Systems Design Technology; (4) High Field Test Facility; and (5) Technology Transfer

  4. High field Moessbauer spectroscopy using water-cooled magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappert, J.; Regnard, J. R.

    1974-07-01

    A high field Moessbauer spectrometer using a Bitter coil producing fields of up to 155 kOe is described. Problems encountered in the design of this type of equipment are discussed and preliminary results demonstrating the performance of the spectrometer are presented.

  5. Awake craniotomy for gliomas in a high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging suite: analysis of 42 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldaun, Marcos V C; Khawja, Shumaila N; Levine, Nicholas B; Rao, Ganesh; Lang, Frederick F; Weinberg, Jeffrey S; Tummala, Sudhakar; Cowles, Charles E; Ferson, David; Nguyen, Anh-Thuy; Sawaya, Raymond; Suki, Dima; Prabhu, Sujit S

    2014-10-01

    The object of this study was to describe the experience of combining awake craniotomy techniques with high-field (1.5 T) intraoperative MRI (iMRI) for tumors adjacent to eloquent cortex. From a prospective database the authors obtained and evaluated the records of all patients who had undergone awake craniotomy procedures with cortical and subcortical mapping in the iMRI suite. The integration of these two modalities was assessed with respect to safety, operative times, workflow, extent of resection (EOR), and neurological outcome. Between February 2010 and December 2011, 42 awake craniotomy procedures using iMRI were performed in 41 patients for the removal of intraaxial tumors. There were 31 left-sided and 11 right-sided tumors. In half of the cases (21 [50%] of 42), the patient was kept awake for both motor and speech mapping. The mean duration of surgery overall was 7.3 hours (range 4.0-13.9 hours). The median EOR overall was 90%, and gross-total resection (EOR ≥ 95%) was achieved in 17 cases (40.5%). After viewing the first MR images after initial resection, further resection was performed in 17 cases (40.5%); the mean EOR in these cases increased from 56% to 67% after further resection. No deficits were observed preoperatively in 33 cases (78.5%), and worsening neurological deficits were noted immediately after surgery in 11 cases (26.2%). At 1 month after surgery, however, worsened neurological function was observed in only 1 case (2.3%). There was a learning curve with regard to patient positioning and setup times, although it did not adversely affect patient outcomes. Awake craniotomy can be safely performed in a high-field (1.5 T) iMRI suite to maximize tumor resection in eloquent brain areas with an acceptable morbidity profile at 1 month.

  6. Global and system-specific resting-state fMRI fluctuations are uncorrelated: principal component analysis reveals anti-correlated networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Felix; Bellec, Pierre; Shmuel, Amir

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the global average signal (GAS) on functional-magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-based resting-state functional connectivity is a matter of ongoing debate. The global average fluctuations increase the correlation between functional systems beyond the correlation that reflects their specific functional connectivity. Hence, removal of the GAS is a common practice for facilitating the observation of network-specific functional connectivity. This strategy relies on the implicit assumption of a linear-additive model according to which global fluctuations, irrespective of their origin, and network-specific fluctuations are super-positioned. However, removal of the GAS introduces spurious negative correlations between functional systems, bringing into question the validity of previous findings of negative correlations between fluctuations in the default-mode and the task-positive networks. Here we present an alternative method for estimating global fluctuations, immune to the complications associated with the GAS. Principal components analysis was applied to resting-state fMRI time-series. A global-signal effect estimator was defined as the principal component (PC) that correlated best with the GAS. The mean correlation coefficient between our proposed PC-based global effect estimator and the GAS was 0.97±0.05, demonstrating that our estimator successfully approximated the GAS. In 66 out of 68 runs, the PC that showed the highest correlation with the GAS was the first PC. Since PCs are orthogonal, our method provides an estimator of the global fluctuations, which is uncorrelated to the remaining, network-specific fluctuations. Moreover, unlike the regression of the GAS, the regression of the PC-based global effect estimator does not introduce spurious anti-correlations beyond the decrease in seed-based correlation values allowed by the assumed additive model. After regressing this PC-based estimator out of the original time-series, we observed robust anti

  7. Impact of high field (3.0 T) magnetic resonance imaging on diagnosis of osteochondral defects in the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schibany, N.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Marlovits, S.; Mlynarik, V.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.M.; Striessnig, G.; Shodjai-Baghini, M.; Heinze, G.; Trattnig, S.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate high field magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for imaging of osteochondral defects. Materials and methods: Nine osteochondral defects were simulated in three cadaveric talus specimens using a diamond drill. All specimens were examined on a 1.0 T MR unit and a 3.0 T MR unit. A T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence with a 2 mm slice thickness and a 256 x 256 matrix size was used on both scanners. The visibility of the osteochondral separation and the presence of susceptibility artifacts at the drilling bores were scored on all images. Results: Compared to the 1.0 T MR unit, the protocol on the 3.0 T MR unit allowed a better delineation of the disruption of the articular cartilage and a better demarcation of the subchondral defect. Differences regarding the visualization of the subchondral defect were found to be statistically significant (P 0.05). The average SNR was higher using 3.0 T MRI (SNR = 12), compared to 1.0 T MRI (SNR = 7). Conclusion: High field MRI enables the acquisition of images with sufficient resolution and higher SNR and has therefore the potential to improve the staging of osteochondral defects

  8. Trait impulsivity and impaired prefrontal impulse inhibition function in adolescents with internet gaming addiction revealed by a Go/No-Go fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei-na; Sun, Jin-hua; Sun, Ya-Wen; Chen, Xue; Zhou, Yan; Zhuang, Zhi-guo; Li, Lei; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Jian-rong; Du, Ya-song

    2014-05-30

    Recent studies suggest that Internet gaming addiction (IGA) is an impulse disorder, or is at least related to impulse control disorders. In the present study, we hypothesized that different facets of trait impulsivity may be specifically linked to the brain regions with impaired impulse inhibition function in IGA adolescents. Seventeen adolescents with IGA and seventeen healthy controls were scanned during performance of a response-inhibition Go/No-Go task using a 3.0 T MRI scanner. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS)-11 was used to assess impulsivity. There were no differences in the behavioral performance on the Go/No-Go task between the groups. However, the IGA group was significantly hyperactive during No-Go trials in the left superior medial frontal gyrus, right anterior cingulate cortex, right superior/middle frontal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, left precentral gyrus, and left precuneus and cuneus. Further, the bilateral middle temporal gyrus, bilateral inferior temporal gyrus, and right superior parietal lobule were significantly hypoactive during No-Go trials. Activation of the left superior medial frontal gyrus was positively associated with BIS-11 and Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS) total score across IGA participants. Our data suggest that the prefrontal cortex may be involved in the circuit modulating impulsivity, while its impaired function may relate to high impulsivity in adolescents with IGA, which may contribute directly to the Internet addiction process.

  9. 3D texture analysis reveals imperceptible MRI textural alterations in the thalamus and putamen in progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 1, EPM1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Suoranta

    Full Text Available Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 1 (EPM1 is an autosomal recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by young onset age, myoclonus and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures. At the time of diagnosis, the visual assessment of the brain MRI is usually normal, with no major changes found later. Therefore, we utilized texture analysis (TA to characterize and classify the underlying properties of the affected brain tissue by means of 3D texture features. Sixteen genetically verified patients with EPM1 and 16 healthy controls were included in the study. TA was performed upon 3D volumes of interest that were placed bilaterally in the thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, caudate nucleus and putamen. Compared to the healthy controls, EPM1 patients had significant textural differences especially in the thalamus and right putamen. The most significantly differing texture features included parameters that measure the complexity and heterogeneity of the tissue, such as the co-occurrence matrix-based entropy and angular second moment, and also the run-length matrix-based parameters of gray-level non-uniformity, short run emphasis and long run emphasis. This study demonstrates the usability of 3D TA for extracting additional information from MR images. Textural alterations which suggest complex, coarse and heterogeneous appearance were found bilaterally in the thalamus, supporting the previous literature on thalamic pathology in EPM1. The observed putamenal involvement is a novel finding. Our results encourage further studies on the clinical applications, feasibility, reproducibility and reliability of 3D TA.

  10. Memory retrieval of smoking-related images induce greater insula activation as revealed by an fMRI-based delayed matching to sample task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Amy C; Ross, Robert S; Farmer, Stacey; Frederick, Blaise B; Nickerson, Lisa D; Lukas, Scott E; Stern, Chantal E

    2015-03-01

    Nicotine dependence is a chronic and difficult to treat disorder. While environmental stimuli associated with smoking precipitate craving and relapse, it is unknown whether smoking cues are cognitively processed differently than neutral stimuli. To evaluate working memory differences between smoking-related and neutral stimuli, we conducted a delay-match-to-sample (DMS) task concurrently with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in nicotine-dependent participants. The DMS task evaluates brain activation during the encoding, maintenance and retrieval phases of working memory. Smoking images induced significantly more subjective craving, and greater midline cortical activation during encoding in comparison to neutral stimuli that were similar in content yet lacked a smoking component. The insula, which is involved in maintaining nicotine dependence, was active during the successful retrieval of previously viewed smoking versus neutral images. In contrast, neutral images required more prefrontal cortex-mediated active maintenance during the maintenance period. These findings indicate that distinct brain regions are involved in the different phases of working memory for smoking-related versus neutral images. Importantly, the results implicate the insula in the retrieval of smoking-related stimuli, which is relevant given the insula's emerging role in addiction. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. MRI diagnosis of meningovascular neurosyphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shuang; Qian Jianguo; Feng Xiaoyuan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value and limitation of MRI in the diagnosis of meningovascular neurosyphilis. Methods: Five cases of neurosyphilis confirmed by clinical history/laboratory were examined with MRI (3 plain MRI, 2 enhanced MRI). The results of blood and CSF TPPA/RPR were positive and HIV was negative. Results: Abnormal signals were demonstrated in the temporal lobe in 3 cases, and infarction was revealed in the basal ganglion and periventricular white matter in another 2 cases. There was no marked contrast enhancement in the 2 cases. Conclusion: Meningovascular neurosyphilis has no characteristic features on MRI, but MRI is an effective method in delineating the size, range, and characters of neurosyphilis, and it is also an useful modality to follow-up after antibiotic therapy. (authors)

  12. Superconducting magnet systems for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawksworth, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    MRI is the first large scale commercial application of superconductivity and has not achieved the status of a mature industry with an annual turnover in the magnet industry alone in excess of $150M. Conservative estimates put the investment of the medical industry in MRI as a whole at more than a billion dollars. In the nine years since shipment of the first superconducting whole body imaging magnets of 0.3 Tesla field the standard product of the industry has become a system of 1 meter bore and field strength 0.5 Tesla to 1.5 Tesla. In this paper the evolution of present day MRI magnets from small bore but high field spectrometer magnets is reviewed and the direction of future developments discussed

  13. Ultrasound versus high field magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, York Kiat; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advances in the field of musculoskeletal imaging, especially in the application of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both modalities offer significant advantages over the previous...

  14. Novel techniques for 7 tesla breast MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, T.A.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis introduced several new techniques to the field of 7 tesla breast MRI, enabling high field multi-parametric MR imaging and, potentially, patient specific treatment planning. Chapter 2 described the development of a RF coil setup for bilateral breast MR imaging and 31P spectroscopy. This

  15. High field superconductor development and understanding project, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larbalestier, David C.; Lee, Peter J.

    2009-07-15

    Over 25 years the Applied Superconductivity Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provided a vital technical resource to the High Energy Physics community covering development in superconducting strand for HEP accelerator magnet development. In particular the work of the group has been to develop the next generation of high field superconductors for high field application. Grad students Mike Naus, Chad Fischer, Arno Godeke and Matt Jewell improved our understanding of the microstructure and microchemistry of Nb3Sn and their impact on the physical and mechanical properties. The success of this work has led to the continued funding of this work at the ASC after it moved to the NHMFL and also to direct funding from BNL for some aspects of Nb3Sn cable evaluation.

  16. High field dielectric properties of anisotropic polymer-ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomer, V.; Randall, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    Using dielectrophoretic assembly, we create anisotropic composites of BaTiO 3 particles in a silicone elastomer thermoset polymer. We study a variety of electrical properties in these composites, i.e., permittivity, dielectric breakdown, and energy density as function of ceramic volume fraction and connectivity. The recoverable energy density of these electric-field-structured composites is found to be highly dependent on the anisotropy present in the system. Our results indicate that x-y-aligned composites exhibit higher breakdown strengths along with large recoverable energy densities when compared to 0-3 composites. This demonstrates that engineered anisotropy can be employed to control dielectric breakdown strengths and nonlinear conduction at high fields in heterogeneous systems. Consequently, manipulation of anisotropy in high-field dielectric properties can be exploited for the development of high energy density polymer-ceramic systems

  17. A design proposal for high field dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Shintomi, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Wake, M.

    1981-06-01

    A design of the high field dipole magnet which is going to be constructed in the KEK-Fermilab collaboration program is proposed. The central field of the magnet is meant to achieve 10 T by the use of ternary alloy conductor in the 1.8 K superfluid environment under atmospheric pressure. Since the electro-magnetic force in such a high field region is strong enough to give a fatal problem, a careful calculation is necessary for the magnet design. The program POISSON and LINDA were used for the magnetic field calculation. The computer code ISAS which is originated from NASTRAN developed at NASA was applied to calculate the stress and the deformation. A horizontal cryostat desigh for the operation of the 10 T dipole magnet is also proposed. (author)

  18. Mechanical design of a high field common coil magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, S; Dietderich, D R; Gourlay, S A; Gupta, R; McInturff, A; Millos, G; Scanlan, R M

    1999-01-01

    A common coil design for high field 2-in-1 accelerator magnets has been previously presented as a "conductor-friendly" option for high field magnets applicable for a Very Large Hadron Collider. This paper presents the mechanical design for a 14 tesla 2-in-1 dipole based on the common coil design approach. The magnet will use a high current density Nb/sub 3/Sn conductor. The design addresses mechanical issues particular to the common coil geometry: horizontal support against coil edges, vertical preload on coil faces, end loading and support, and coil stresses and strains. The magnet is the second in a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of the common coil design approach. (9 refs).

  19. Functional and anatomical dissociation between the orthographic lexicon and the orthographic buffer revealed in reading and writing Chinese characters by fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Chang, Erik C; Chen, Sinead H Y; Lin, Yi-Chen; Wu, Denise H

    2016-04-01

    The contribution of orthographic representations to reading and writing has been intensively investigated in the literature. However, the distinction between neuronal correlates of the orthographic lexicon and the orthographic (graphemic) buffer has rarely been examined in alphabetic languages and never been explored in non-alphabetic languages. To determine whether the neural networks associated with the orthographic lexicon and buffer of logographic materials are comparable to those reported in the literature, the present fMRI experiment manipulated frequency and the stroke number of Chinese characters in the tasks of form judgment and stroke judgment, which emphasized the processing of character recognition and writing, respectively. It was found that the left fusiform gyrus exhibited higher activation when encountering low-frequency than high-frequency characters in both tasks, which suggested this region to be the locus of the orthographic lexicon that represents the knowledge of character forms. On the other hand, the activations in the posterior part of the left middle frontal gyrus and in the left angular gyrus were parametrically modulated by the stroke number of target characters only in the stroke judgment task, which suggested these regions to be the locus of the orthographic buffer that represents the processing of stroke sequence in writing. These results provide the first evidence for the functional and anatomical dissociation between the orthographic lexicon and buffer in reading and writing Chinese characters. They also demonstrate the critical roles of the left fusiform area and the frontoparietal network to the long-term and short-term representations of orthographic knowledge, respectively, across different orthographies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional dissociation of transient and sustained fMRI BOLD components in human auditory cortex revealed with a streaming paradigm based on interaural time differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadwinkel, Stefan; Gutschalk, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    A number of physiological studies suggest that feature-selective adaptation is relevant to the pre-processing for auditory streaming, the perceptual separation of overlapping sound sources. Most of these studies are focused on spectral differences between streams, which are considered most important for streaming. However, spatial cues also support streaming, alone or in combination with spectral cues, but physiological studies of spatial cues for streaming remain scarce. Here, we investigate whether the tuning of selective adaptation for interaural time differences (ITD) coincides with the range where streaming perception is observed. FMRI activation that has been shown to adapt depending on the repetition rate was studied with a streaming paradigm where two tones were differently lateralized by ITD. Listeners were presented with five different ΔITD conditions (62.5, 125, 187.5, 343.75, or 687.5 μs) out of an active baseline with no ΔITD during fMRI. The results showed reduced adaptation for conditions with ΔITD ≥ 125 μs, reflected by enhanced sustained BOLD activity. The percentage of streaming perception for these stimuli increased from approximately 20% for ΔITD = 62.5 μs to > 60% for ΔITD = 125 μs. No further sustained BOLD enhancement was observed when the ΔITD was increased beyond ΔITD = 125 μs, whereas the streaming probability continued to increase up to 90% for ΔITD = 687.5 μs. Conversely, the transient BOLD response, at the transition from baseline to ΔITD blocks, increased most prominently as ΔITD was increased from 187.5 to 343.75 μs. These results demonstrate a clear dissociation of transient and sustained components of the BOLD activity in auditory cortex. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2010 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Task-based and resting-state fMRI reveal compensatory network changes following damage to left inferior frontal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, Glyn P; Thompson, Hannah E; Hymers, Mark; Millman, Rebecca E; Rodd, Jennifer M; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; Smallwood, Jonathan; Jefferies, Elizabeth

    2018-02-01

    Damage to left inferior prefrontal cortex in stroke aphasia is associated with semantic deficits reflecting poor control over conceptual retrieval, as opposed to loss of knowledge. However, little is known about how functional recruitment within the semantic network changes in patients with executive-semantic deficits. The current study acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from 14 patients with semantic aphasia, who had difficulty with flexible semantic retrieval following left prefrontal damage, and 16 healthy age-matched controls, allowing us to examine activation and connectivity in the semantic network. We examined neural activity while participants listened to spoken sentences that varied in their levels of lexical ambiguity and during rest. We found group differences in two regions thought to be good candidates for functional compensation: ventral anterior temporal lobe (vATL), which is strongly implicated in comprehension, and posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG), which is hypothesized to work together with left inferior prefrontal cortex to support controlled aspects of semantic retrieval. The patients recruited both of these sites more than controls in response to meaningful sentences. Subsequent analysis identified that, in control participants, the recruitment of pMTG to ambiguous sentences was inversely related to functional coupling between pMTG and anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG) at rest, while the patients showed the opposite pattern. Moreover, stronger connectivity between pMTG and aSTG in patients was associated with better performance on a test of verbal semantic association, suggesting that this temporal lobe connection supports comprehension in the face of damage to left inferior prefrontal cortex. These results characterize network changes in patients with executive-semantic deficits and converge with studies of healthy participants in providing evidence for a distributed system underpinning semantic control that

  2. High-field magnetization of dilute rare earths in yttrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touborg, P.; Høg, J.; Cock, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetization measurements have been performed on single crystals of Y containing small amounts of Tb, Dy, or Er at 4.2 K in fields up to 295 × 105 A/m (370 kOe). Crystal-field and molecular-field parameters obtained from measurements of the initial susceptibility versus temperature give a satisf...... a satisfactory quantitative account of the high-field magnetization. This includes characteristic features due to the crossing and mixing of crystal-field levels....

  3. Ultra-high-field magnets for future hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, P.M.; Shen, W.

    1997-01-01

    Several new concepts in magnetic design and coil fabrication are being incorporated into designs for ultra-high field collider magnets: a 16 Tesla block-coil dual dipole, also using Nb 3 Sn cable, featuring simple pancake coil construction and face-loaded prestress geometry; a 330 T/m block-coil quadrupole; and a ∼ 20 Tesla pipe-geometry dual dipole, using A15 or BSCCO tape. Field design and fabrication issues are discussed for each magnet

  4. High-field Magnet Development toward the High Luminosity LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, Giorgio [Fermilab

    2014-07-01

    The upcoming Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on the use of Accelerator Quality Nb3Sn Magnets which have been the focus of an intense R&D effort in the last decade. This contribution will describe the R&D and results of Nb3Sn Accelerator Quality High Field Magnets development efforts, with emphasis on the activities considered for the HL-LHC upgrades.

  5. High-field spin dynamics of antiferromagnetic quantum spin chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enderle, M.; Regnault, L.P.; Broholm, C.

    2000-01-01

    present recent work on the high-field spin dynamics of the S = I antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains NENP (Haldane ground state) and CsNiCl3 (quasi-1D HAF close to the quantum critical point), the uniform S = 1/2 chain CTS, and the spin-Peierls system CuGeO3. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B,V. All rights...

  6. Design considerations for a large aperture high field superconducting dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harfoush, F.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Harrison, M.; Kerby, J.; Koepke, K.; Mantsch, P.; Nicol, T.; Riddiford, A.; Theilacker, J.

    1989-03-01

    The final phase of the Fermilab upgrade proposal calls for a new ring of superconducting magnets to be placed in the existing Main Accelerator tunnel. The goal of this design study is to specify a high field dipole (HFD) that is capable of supporting fixed target operation (ramping, resonant extraction) at a field of 6.6T (1.5 Tev) and colliding beam physics at 8.0T (1.8 Tev). The magnetic field quality at high field is set by the large amplitude orbits associated with resonant extraction. The field quality must therefore be at least as good as the existing Tevatron magnets which fulfill these criteria. The high fields and large aperture of this magnet result in large forces on the coil and collar assemblies. Therefore, the cold mass design must be able to sustain these forces while providing sufficient cooling to the coils during 4.2 K fixed target operation, and a minimum heat load during 1.8 K collider operation. The design work is still in progress but a cosine-theta, cold-iron dipole with a 70mm inner diameter coil has been tentatively adopted. This report presents details on the conductor and cable parameters, coil cross-section, projected manufacturing tolerances, iron yoke design, and cold mass assembly. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Design considerations for a large aperture high field superconducting dipole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harfoush, F.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Harrison, M.; Kerby, J.; Koepke, K.; Mantsch, P.; Nicol, T.; Riddiford, A.; Theilacker, J.

    1989-03-01

    The final phase of the Fermilab upgrade proposal calls for a new ring of superconducting magnets to be placed in the existing Main Accelerator tunnel. The goal of this design study is to specify a high field dipole (HFD) that is capable of supporting fixed target operation (ramping, resonant extraction) at a field of 6.6T (1.5 Tev) and colliding beam physics at 8.0T (1.8 Tev). The magnetic field quality at high field is set by the large amplitude orbits associated with resonant extraction. The field quality must therefore be at least as good as the existing Tevatron magnets which fulfill these criteria. The high fields and large aperture of this magnet result in large forces on the coil and collar assemblies. Therefore, the cold mass design must be able to sustain these forces while providing sufficient cooling to the coils during 4.2 K fixed target operation, and a minimum heat load during 1.8 K collider operation. The design work is still in progress but a cosine-theta, cold-iron dipole with a 70mm inner diameter coil has been tentatively adopted. This report presents details on the conductor and cable parameters, coil cross-section, projected manufacturing tolerances, iron yoke design, and cold mass assembly. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Small animal MRI: clinical MRI as an interface to basic biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkernelle, J.G.; Stelter, L.; Hamm, B.; Teichgraeber, U.

    2008-01-01

    The demand for highly resolved small animal MRI for the purpose of biomedical research has increased constantly. Dedicated small animal MRI scanners working at ultra high field strengths from 4.7 to 7.0 T and even above are MRI at its best. However, using high resolution RF coils in clinical scanners up to 3.0 T, small animal MRI can achieve highly resolved images showing excellent tissue contrast. In fact, in abundant experimental studies, clinical MRI is used for small animal imaging. Mostly clinical RF coils in the single-loop design are applied. In addition, custom-built RF coils and even gradient inserts are used in a clinical scanner. For the reduction of moving artifacts, special MRI-compatible animal ECG und respiration devices are available. In conclusion, clinical devices offer broad availability, are less expense in combination with good imaging performance and provide a translational nature of imaging results. (orig.)

  9. Cerebral malaria: susceptibility weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinit Baliyan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria is one of the fatal complications of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Pathogenesis involves cerebral microangiopathy related to microvascular plugging by infected red blood cells. Conventional imaging with MRI and CT do not reveal anything specific in case of cerebral malaria. Susceptibility weighted imaging, a recent advance in the MRI, is very sensitive to microbleeds related to microangiopathy. Histopathological studies in cerebral malaria have revealed microbleeds in brain parenchyma secondary to microangiopathy. Susceptibility weighted imaging, being exquisitely sensitive to microbleeds may provide additional information and improve the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in cerebral malaria.

  10. MRI Primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Designed for studies, radiologists, and clinicians at all levels of training, this book provides a basic introduction to the principles, physics, and instrumentation of magnetic resonance imaging. The fundamental concepts that are essential for the optimal clinical use of MRI are thoroughly explained in easily accessible terms. To facilitate the reader's comprehension, the material is presented nonmathematically, using no equations and a minimum of symbols and abbreviations. MRI Primer presents a clear account of the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and the use of gradient magnetic fields to create clinically useful images of cross-sectional slices. Close attention is given to the magnetization vector as a means of expressing nuclear behavior, the role of T 1 and T 2 weighing in imaging, the use of contrast agents, and the pulse sequences most often used in clinical practice, as well as to the relative capabilities and limitations of MRI and CT. The basic hardware components of an MRI scanner are described in detail. Sample MRI scans illustrate how MRI characterizes tissue. An appendix provides a brief introduction to quantum processes in MRI

  11. Correspondent Functional Topography of the Human Left Inferior Parietal Lobule at Rest and Under Task Revealed Using Resting-State fMRI and Coactivation Based Parcellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaojian; Xie, Sangma; Guo, Xin; Becker, Benjamin; Fox, Peter T; Eickhoff, Simon B; Jiang, Tianzi

    2017-03-01

    The human left inferior parietal lobule (LIPL) plays a pivotal role in many cognitive functions and is an important node in the default mode network (DMN). Although many previous studies have proposed different parcellation schemes for the LIPL, the detailed functional organization of the LIPL and the exact correspondence between the DMN and LIPL subregions remain unclear. Mounting evidence indicates that spontaneous fluctuations in the brain are strongly associated with cognitive performance at the behavioral level. However, whether a consistent functional topographic organization of the LIPL during rest and under task can be revealed remains unknown. Here, they used resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) and task-related coactivation patterns separately to parcellate the LIPL and identified seven subregions. Four subregions were located in the supramarginal gyrus (SMG) and three subregions were located in the angular gyrus (AG). The subregion-specific networks and functional characterization revealed that the four anterior subregions were found to be primarily involved in sensorimotor processing, movement imagination and inhibitory control, audition perception and speech processing, and social cognition, whereas the three posterior subregions were mainly involved in episodic memory, semantic processing, and spatial cognition. The results revealed a detailed functional organization of the LIPL and suggested that the LIPL is a functionally heterogeneous area. In addition, the present study demonstrated that the functional architecture of the LIPL during rest corresponds with that found in task processing. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1659-1675, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Analysing radio-frequency coil arrays in high-field magnetic resonance imaging by the combined field integral equation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Shumin; Duyn, Jeff H [Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, 10/B1D728, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2006-06-21

    We present the combined field integral equation (CFIE) method for analysing radio-frequency coil arrays in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three-dimensional models of coils and the human body were used to take into account the electromagnetic coupling. In the method of moments formulation, we applied triangular patches and the Rao-Wilton-Glisson basis functions to model arbitrarily shaped geometries. We first examined a rectangular loop coil to verify the CFIE method and also demonstrate its efficiency and accuracy. We then studied several eight-channel receive-only head coil arrays for 7.0 T SENSE functional MRI. Numerical results show that the signal dropout and the average SNR are two major concerns in SENSE coil array design. A good design should be a balance of these two factors.

  13. Homogenous BSCCO-2212 Round Wires for Very High Field Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Scott; Holesinger, Terry; Huang, Ybing

    2012-01-01

    The performance demands on modern particle accelerators generate a relentless push towards higher field magnets. In turn, advanced high field magnet development places increased demands on superconducting materials. Nb3Sn conductors have been used to achieve 16 T in a prototype dipole magnet and are thought to have the capability for ∼18 T for accelerator magnets (primarily dipoles but also higher order multipole magnets). However there have been suggestions and proposals for such magnets higher than 20 T. The High Energy Physics Community (HEP) has identified important new physics opportunities that are enabled by extremely high field magnets: 20 to 50 T solenoids for muon cooling in a muon collider (impact: understanding of neutrinos and dark matter); and 20+ T dipoles and quadrupoles for high energy hadron colliders (impact: discovery reach far beyond present). This proposal addresses the latest SBIR solicitation that calls for grant applications that seek to develop new or improved superconducting wire technologies for magnets that operate at a minimum of 12 Tesla (T) field, with increases up to 15 to 20 T sought in the near future (three to five years). The long-term development of accelerator magnets with fields greater than 20 T will require superconducting wires having significantly better high-field properties than those possessed by current Nb 3 Sn or other A15 based wires. Given the existing materials science base for Bi-2212 wire processing, we believe that Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O y (Bi-2212) round wires can be produced in km-long piece lengths with properties suitable to meet both the near term and long term needs of the HEP community. The key advance will be the translation of this materials science base into a robust, high-yield wire technology. While the processing and application of A15 materials have advanced to a much higher level than those of the copper oxide-based, high T c (HTS) counterparts, the HTS materials have the very significant advantage

  14. MRI of oriental cholangiohepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wani, N.A., E-mail: ahmad77chinar@gmail.co [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar (India); Robbani, I.; Kosar, T. [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar (India)

    2011-02-15

    Oriental cholangiohepatitis (OCH) also called recurrent pyogenic cholangitis is characterized by intrahepatic duct calculi, strictures, and recurrent infections. In turn cholangitis can result in multiple hepatic abscesses, further biliary strictures, and in severe cases, progressive hepatic parenchymal destruction, cirrhosis, and portal hypertension. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and conventional T1-weighted (T1 W) and T2-weighted (T2 W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings have been described in patients with OCH. MRCP findings include duct dilation, strictures, and calculi. MRCP can help to localize the diseased ducts and determine the severity of involvement. T1 and T2 W sequences reveal the parenchymal changes of atrophy, abscess formation, and portal hypertension in addition to calculi. Post-treatment changes are also well depicted using MRI. Comprehensive, non-invasive assessment is achieved by using conventional MRI and MRCP in OCH providing a roadmap for endoscopic or surgical management.

  15. Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  16. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing aids Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work How the Test will ... an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause ...

  17. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  18. Young's moduli of cables for high field superconductive dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shunji; Shintomi, Takakazu.

    1983-01-01

    Superconductive dipole magnets for big accelerators are subjected to enormous electro-magnetic force, when they are operated with high field such as 10 Tesla. They should be constructed by means of superconductive cables, which have high Young's modulus, to obtain good performance. To develop such cables we measured the Young's moduli of cables for practical use of accelerator magnets. They are monolithic and compacted strand cables. We measured also Young's moduli of monolithic copper and brass cables for comparison. The obtained data showed the Young's moduli of 35 and 15 GPa for the monolithic and compacted strand cables, respectively. (author)

  19. High Field Magnet R and D in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourlay, Stephen A.

    2003-01-01

    Accelerator magnet technology is currently dominated by the use of NbTi superconductor. New and more demanding applications for superconducting accelerator magnets require the use of alternative materials. Several programs in the US are taking advantage of recent improvements in Nb 3 Sn to develop high field magnets for new applications. Highlights and challenges of the US R and D program are presented along with the status of conductor development. In addition, a new R and D focus, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program, will be discussed

  20. High-field susceptibility in ferromagnetic NpOs2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlap, B.D.; Aldred, A.T.; Lam, D.J.; Davidson, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    NpOs 2 is known to be a ferromagnet with a Curie temperature of 7.5 0 K. Previous bulk magnetization measurements indicated a field-induced magnetization even well below the transition temperature. By a measurement of the local high-field susceptibility, using the Moessbauer effect in 237 Np, a susceptibility of (1.2 +- 0.2) x 10 -2 emu/mole at 1.6 0 K is obtained, in general agreement with the bulk measurement. Such a large susceptibility is best understood by a model f itinerant magnetism, although other properties of the material indicate localized behavior

  1. High Field Magnet R and D in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourlay, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Accelerator magnet technology is currently dominated by the use of NbTi superconductor. New and more demanding applications for superconducting accelerator magnets require the use of alternative materials. Several programs in the US are taking advantage of recent improvements in Nb 3 Sn to develop high field magnets for new applications. Highlights and challenges of the US R and D program are presented along with the status of conductor development. In addition, a new R and D focus, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program, will be discussed.

  2. A commercial tokamak reactor using super high field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.; Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Williams, J.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper explores the range of possibilities for producing super high fields with advanced superconducting magnets. Obtaining magnetic fields greater than about 18 T at the coil in a large superconducting magnet system will require advances in many areas of magnet technology. These needs are discussed and potential solutions (advanced superconductors, structural materials and design methods) evaluated. A point design for a commercial reactor with magnetic field at the coil of 24 T and fusion power of 1800 MW is presented. Critical issues and parameters for magnet design are identified. 20 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  3. The Mechanical Design Optimization of a High Field HTS Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalitha, SL; Gupta, RC

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design optimization of a large aperture, high field (24 T at 4 K) solenoid for a 1.7 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage device. The magnet is designed to be built entirely of second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor tape with excellent electrical and mechanical properties at the cryogenic temperatures. The critical parameters that govern the magnet performance are examined in detail through a multiphysics approach using ANSYS software. The analysis results formed the basis for the performance specification as well as the construction of the magnet.

  4. Ultra-high field upper extremity peripheral nerve and non-contrast enhanced vascular imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh B Raval

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy of Ultra-high field [UHF] 7 Tesla [T] MRI as compared to 3T MRI in non-contrast enhanced [nCE] imaging of structural anatomy in the elbow, forearm, and hand [upper extremity].A wide range of sequences including T1 weighted [T1] volumetric interpolate breath-hold exam [VIBE], T2 weighted [T2] double-echo steady state [DESS], susceptibility weighted imaging [SWI], time-of-flight [TOF], diffusion tensor imaging [DTI], and diffusion spectrum imaging [DSI] were optimized and incorporated with a radiofrequency [RF] coil system composed of a transverse electromagnetic [TEM] transmit coil combined with an 8-channel receive-only array for 7T upper extremity [UE] imaging. In addition, Siemens optimized protocol/sequences were used on a 3T scanner and the resulting images from T1 VIBE and T2 DESS were compared to that obtained at 7T qualitatively and quantitatively [SWI was only qualitatively compared]. DSI studio was utilized to identify nerves based on analysis of diffusion weighted derived fractional anisotropy images. Images of forearm vasculature were extracted using a paint grow manual segmentation method based on MIPAV [Medical Image Processing, Analysis, and Visualization].High resolution and high quality signal-to-noise ratio [SNR] and contrast-to-noise ratio [CNR]-images of the hand, forearm, and elbow were acquired with nearly homogeneous 7T excitation. Measured [performed on the T1 VIBE and T2 DESS sequences] SNR and CNR values were almost doubled at 7T vs. 3T. Cartilage, synovial fluid and tendon structures could be seen with higher clarity in the 7T T1 and T2 weighted images. SWI allowed high resolution and better quality imaging of large and medium sized arteries and veins, capillary networks and arteriovenous anastomoses at 7T when compared to 3T. 7T diffusion weighted sequence [not performed at 3T] demonstrates that the forearm nerves are clearly delineated by fiber tractography. The

  5. High-field magnetic resonance imaging of the human temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Colon-Perez

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Fresh ex vivo MR imaging, along with tractography, revealed complex intra-temporal structural variation corresponding to neuronal cell body layers, dendritic fields, and axonal projection systems evident histologically. This is the first study to describe in detail the human temporal lobe structural organization using high-field MR imaging and tractography. By preserving the 3-dimensional structures of the hippocampus and surrounding structures, specific changes in anatomy may inform us about the changes that occur in TLE in relation to the disease process and structural underpinnings in epilepsy-related memory dysfunction.

  6. High-field, high-density tokamak power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, D.R.; Cook, D.L.; Hay, R.D.; Kaplan, D.; Kreischer, K.; Lidskii, L.M.; Stephany, W.; Williams, J.E.C.; Jassby, D.L.; Okabayashi, M.

    1977-11-01

    A conceptual design of a compact (R 0 = 6.0 m) high power density (average P/sub f/ = 7.7 MW/m 3 ) tokamak demonstration power reactor has been developed. High magnetic field (B/sub t/ = 7.4 T) and moderate elongation (b/a = 1.6) permit operation at the high density (n(0) approximately 5 x 10 14 cm -3 ) needed for ignition in a relatively small plasma, with a spatially-averaged toroidal beta of only 4%. A unique design for the Nb 3 Sn toroidal-field magnet system reduces the stress in the high-field trunk region, and allows modularization for simpler disassembly. The modest value of toroidal beta permits a simple, modularized plasma-shaping coil system, located inside the TF coil trunk. Heating of the dense central plasma is attained by the use of ripple-assisted injection of 120-keV D 0 beams. The ripple-coil system also affords dynamic control of the plasma temperature during the burn period. A FLIBE-lithium blanket is designed especially for high-power-density operation in a high-field environment, and gives an overall tritium breeding ratio of 1.05 in the slowly pumped lithium

  7. Background field coils for the High Field Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbasnik, J.P.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Jewell, A.M.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.; Chaplin, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The High Field Test Facility (HFTF), presently under construction at LLNL, is a set of superconducting coils that will be used to test 1-m-o.d. coils of prototype conductors for fusion magnets in fields up to 12 T. The facility consists of two concentric sets of coils; the outer set is a stack of Nb-Ti solenoids, and the inner set is a pair of solenoids made of cryogenically-stabilized, multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn superconductor, developed for use in mirror-fusion magnets. The HFTF system is designed to be parted along the midplane to allow high-field conductors, under development for Tokamak fusion machines, to be inserted and tested. The background field coils were wound pancake-fashion, with cold-welded joints at both the inner and outer diameters. Turn-to-turn insulation was fabricated at LLNL from epoxy-fiberglass strip. The coils were assembled and tested in our 2-m-diam cryostat to verify their operation

  8. Compact high-field superconducting quadrupole magnet with holmium poles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, D.B.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Lobb, C.T.; Menzel, M.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Walstrom, P.L. (Grumman Space Systems, Los Alamos, NM (United States))

    1992-03-15

    A compact high-field superconducting quadrupole magnet was designed and built with poles made of the rare-earth metal holmium. The magnet is intended for use in superconducting coupled-cavity linear accelerators where compact high-field quadrupoles are needed, but where the use of permanent magnets is ruled out because of trapped-flux losses. The magnet has a clear bore diameter of 1.8 cm, outside diameter of 11 cm, length of 11 cm, and pole tip length of 6 cm. The effect of using holmium, a material with a higher saturation field than iron, was investigated by replacing poles made of iron with identical poles made of holmium. The magnet was operated at a temperature of 4.2 K and reached a peak quadrupole field gradient of 355 T/m, a 10% increase over the same magnet with iron poles. This increase in performance is consistent with calculations based on B-H curves that were measured for holmium at 4.2 K. (orig.).

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging with ultra-high fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windischberger, C.; Schoepf, V.; Sladky, R.; Moser, E.; Fischmeister, F.P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is currently the primary method for non-invasive functional localization in the brain. With the emergence of MR systems with field strengths of 4 Tesla and above, neuronal activation may be studied with unprecedented accuracy. In this article we present different approaches to use the improved sensitivity and specificity for expanding current fMRT resolution limits in space and time based on several 7 Tesla studies. In addition to the challenges that arise with ultra-high magnetic fields possible solutions will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  10. Multivariate imaging-genetics study of MRI gray matter volume and SNPs reveals biological pathways correlated with brain structural differences in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabin Khadka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder affecting children, adolescents, and adults. Its etiology is not well-understood, but it is increasingly believed to result from diverse pathophysiologies that affect the structure and function of specific brain circuits. Although one of the best-studied neurobiological abnormalities in ADHD is reduced fronto-striatal-cerebellar gray matter volume, its specific genetic correlates are largely unknown. Methods: In this study, T1-weighted MR images of brain structure were collected from 198 adolescents (63 ADHD-diagnosed. A multivariate parallel independent component analysis technique (Para-ICA identified imaging-genetic relationships between regional gray matter volume and single nucleotide polymorphism data. Results: Para-ICA analyses extracted 14 components from genetic data and 9 from MR data. An iterative cross-validation using randomly-chosen sub-samples indicated acceptable stability of these ICA solutions. A series of partial correlation analyses controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity revealed two genotype-phenotype component pairs significantly differed between ADHD and non-ADHD groups, after a Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. The brain phenotype component not only included structures frequently found to have abnormally low volume in previous ADHD studies, but was also significantly associated with ADHD differences in symptom severity and performance on cognitive tests frequently found to be impaired in patients diagnosed with the disorder. Pathway analysis of the genotype component identified several different biological pathways linked to these structural abnormalities in ADHD. Conclusions: Some of these pathways implicate well-known dopaminergic neurotransmission and neurodevelopment hypothesized to be abnormal in ADHD. Other more recently implicated pathways included glutamatergic and GABA-eric physiological systems

  11. Internal Stresses in Wires for High Field Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.; Lawson, A.C.; Von Dreele, R.B.; Wood, J.T.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The codeformation of Cu-Ag or Cu-Nb composite wires used for high field magnets has a number of important microstructural consequences, including the production of very fine scale structures, the development of very high internal surface area to volume ratios during the drawing and the storage of defects at interphase interfaces. In addition, the fabrication and codeformation of phases which differ in crystal structure, thermal expansion, elastic modulus and lattice parameter lead to the development of short wavelength internal stresses. These internal stresses are measured by neutron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy as a function of the imposed drawing strain. The internal stresses lead to important changes in elastic plastic response which can be related to both magnet design and service life and these aspects will be described in detail

  12. High field nuclear magnetic resonance application to polysaccharide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincendon, Marc

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been applied to polysaccharide chemistry using time averaging technique and high fields (100 and 250 MHz). The three methyl signals of methyl cellulose and cellulose triacetate are separated, and the C-6 substituent has been identified. Biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose has been performed using deuterium labelled D-glucose and Acetobacter xylinum. Per-acetylated derivative of bacterial cellulose has been studied by NMR; this study permitted us to determine the quantity of deuterium on each position of the anhydro-glucose unit in the polymer. NMR has also been used to see the anomeric end chain of cellulose and amylose derivatives and to show the fixation of bromine and t-butyl group on the free anomeric end chain of cellulose triacetate. (author) [fr

  13. Sudden flux change studies in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feher, S.; Bordini, B.; Carcagno, R.; Makulski, A.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the High Field Magnet Program at Fermilab many magnets have been tested which utilize multi strand Rutherford type cable made of state-of-the art Nb 3 Sn strands. During these magnet tests we observed sudden flux changes by monitoring coil voltages and the magnetic field close to the magnets. These flux changes might be linked to magnet instabilities. The voltage spike signals were correlated with quench antenna signals, a strong indication that these are magnet phenomena. With a new high resolution voltage spike detection system, we were able to observe the detailed structure of the spikes. Two fundamentally different signal shapes were distinguished, most likely generated by different mechanisms

  14. Voltage spike detection in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orris, D.F.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A measurement system for the detection of small magnetic flux changes in superconducting magnets, which are due to either mechanical motion of the conductor or flux jump, has been developed at Fermilab. These flux changes are detected as small amplitude, short duration voltage spikes, which are {approx}15mV in magnitude and lasts for {approx}30 {micro}sec. The detection system combines an analog circuit for the signal conditioning of two coil segments and a fast data acquisition system for digitizing the results, performing threshold detection, and storing the resultant data. The design of the spike detection system along with the modeling results and noise analysis will be presented. Data from tests of high field Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets at currents up to {approx}20KA will also be shown.

  15. Voltage spike detection in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orris, D.F.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.

    2004-01-01

    A measurement system for the detection of small magnetic flux changes in superconducting magnets, which are due to either mechanical motion of the conductor or flux jump, has been developed at Fermilab. These flux changes are detected as small amplitude, short duration voltage spikes, which are ∼15mV in magnitude and lasts for ∼30(micro)sec. The detection system combines an analog circuit for the signal conditioning of two coil segments and a fast data acquisition system for digitizing the results, performing threshold detection, and storing the resultant data. The design of the spike detection system along with the modeling results and noise analysis will be presented. Data from tests of high field Nb3Sn magnets at currents up to ∼20KA will also be shown

  16. Safety aspects in high-field magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlenweg, M.; Trattnig, S.; Schaefers, G.

    2008-01-01

    With more and more 3 Tesla high-field magnetic resonance (MR) scanners entering clinical routine, the safety notion in MR imaging has also reached a new dimension. The first part of this paper deals with the three most important sources of physical interaction (static magnetic field, gradient and HF fields). The paper discusses the differences compared with the traditional clinical 1.5 T standard scanners, the impact on human beings, the interactions with metallic objects and the relevant safety standards. The second part of the paper examines the issue of MR safety as seen in clinical practice and tries to demonstrate optimization potentials. This includes structural optimization in information distribution and hospital organization as well as test standards and labeling guidelines. (orig.) [de

  17. MRI of congenital urethroperineal fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadimi-Mahani, Maryam; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Pai, Deepa; DiPietro, Michael [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Park, John [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Urology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We present the MRI features of a congenital urethroperineal fistula diagnosed in a 12-year-old boy being evaluated after a single urinary tract infection. This diagnosis was initially suggested by voiding cystourethrogram and confirmed by MRI. Imaging revealed an abnormal fluid-filled tract arising from the posterior urethra and tracking to the perineal skin surface that increased in size during micturition. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the abnormal tract confirmed the diagnosis of congenital urethroperineal fistula. MRI played important roles in confirming the diagnosis and assisting surgical planning. (orig.)

  18. MRI of congenital urethroperineal fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghadimi-Mahani, Maryam; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Pai, Deepa; DiPietro, Michael; Park, John

    2010-01-01

    We present the MRI features of a congenital urethroperineal fistula diagnosed in a 12-year-old boy being evaluated after a single urinary tract infection. This diagnosis was initially suggested by voiding cystourethrogram and confirmed by MRI. Imaging revealed an abnormal fluid-filled tract arising from the posterior urethra and tracking to the perineal skin surface that increased in size during micturition. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the abnormal tract confirmed the diagnosis of congenital urethroperineal fistula. MRI played important roles in confirming the diagnosis and assisting surgical planning. (orig.)

  19. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  20. Portable MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  1. High resolution anatomical and quantitative MRI of the entire human occipital lobe ex vivo at 9.4 T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengupta, S.; Lagos Fritz, F.J.; Harms, R.L.; Hildebrand, S.; Tse, D.H.Y.; Poser, B.A.; Goebel, R.; Roebroeck, A.

    Several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasts are sensitive to myelin content in gray matter in vivo which has ignited ambitions of MRI-based in vivo cortical histology. Ultra-high field (UHF) MRI, at fields of 7 T and beyond, is crucial to provide the resolution and contrast needed to sample

  2. Blood Flow and Brain Function: Investigations of neurovascular coupling using BOLD fMRI at 7 tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siero, J.C.W.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of ultra high field (7 tesla) MRI systems has opened the possibility to probe biological processes of the human body in great detail. Especially for studying brain function using BOLD fMRI there is a large benefit from the increased magnetic field strength. BOLD fMRI is the working horse

  3. Fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  4. Interventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Junta; Dohi, Michiko; Yoshihiro, Akiko; Mogami, Takuji; Kuwada, Tomoko; Nakata, Norio [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital

    2000-06-01

    Open type MR system and fast sequence is now available and MRI becomes a new modality for interventional Radiology, including biopsy, drainage operation, and monitoring for minimally invasive therapy. Experimental studies of temperature monitoring were performed under hot and cold status. Signal changes of porcine disc and meat under microwave and laser ablation were observed as low signal area by signal intensity method. Using proton chemical shift method, signal change by laser ablation was displaced color imaging and correlated with thermometric temperature measurement. The very T2 relaxation time of ice affords excellent contrast between ice and surrounding gelatin tissue allowing acute depiction of the extent of the iceball under MRI. (author)

  5. Fetal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  6. Hole-exciton interaction induced high field decay of magneto-electroluminescence in Alq{sub 3}-based organic light-emitting diodes at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tingting; Holford, D. F.; Gu, Hang; Kreouzis, T. [Materials Research Institute and School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Zhang, Sijie, E-mail: Sijie.zhang@scu.edu.cn, E-mail: w.gillin@qmul.ac.uk [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Gillin, W. P., E-mail: Sijie.zhang@scu.edu.cn, E-mail: w.gillin@qmul.ac.uk [Materials Research Institute and School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2016-01-11

    The magnetic field effects on the electroluminescence of aluminium tris-(8-hydroxyqinoline) (Alq{sub 3}) based organic light emitting diodes have been investigated by varying the electron/hole ratio in the emissive layer. Experimental results reveal that a negative high field effect in the magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) can be found in devices with very low triplet exciton concentration at room temperature. This suggests triplet-triplet annihilation cannot be used to explain the negative high field MEL in the Alq{sub 3} system. Our results suggest that hole-exciton interaction may be the origin of the negative high field MEL and also, in parallel with this interaction, there is also the more common positive high field process occurring which has been tentatively attributed to electron-exciton interactions. The competition between these different processes decides the final shape of the MEL at high fields.

  7. Hole-exciton interaction induced high field decay of magneto-electroluminescence in Alq3-based organic light-emitting diodes at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Holford, D. F.; Gu, Hang; Kreouzis, T.; Zhang, Sijie; Gillin, W. P.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic field effects on the electroluminescence of aluminium tris-(8-hydroxyqinoline) (Alq3) based organic light emitting diodes have been investigated by varying the electron/hole ratio in the emissive layer. Experimental results reveal that a negative high field effect in the magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) can be found in devices with very low triplet exciton concentration at room temperature. This suggests triplet-triplet annihilation cannot be used to explain the negative high field MEL in the Alq3 system. Our results suggest that hole-exciton interaction may be the origin of the negative high field MEL and also, in parallel with this interaction, there is also the more common positive high field process occurring which has been tentatively attributed to electron-exciton interactions. The competition between these different processes decides the final shape of the MEL at high fields.

  8. Revealing Rembrandt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Parker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Our results emphasised the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt’s portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings.

  9. High field strength magnetic resonance imaging in paediatric brain tumour surgery--its role in prevention of early repeat resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avula, Shivaram; Pettorini, Benedetta; Abernethy, Laurence; Pizer, Barry; Williams, Dawn; Mallucci, Conor

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the surgical and imaging outcome in children who underwent brain tumour surgery with intention of complete tumour resection, prior to and following the start of intra-operative MRI (ioMRI) service. ioMRI service for brain tumour resection commenced in October 2009. A cohort of patients operated between June 2007 and September 2009 with a pre-surgical intention of complete tumour resection were selected (Group A). A similar number of consecutive cases were selected from a prospective database of patients undergoing ioMRI (Group B). The demographics, imaging, pathology and surgical outcome of both groups were compared. Thirty-six of 47 cases from Group A met the inclusion criterion and 36 cases were selected from Group B; 7 of the 36 cases in Group A had unequivocal evidence of residual tumour on the post-operative scan; 5 (14%) of them underwent repeat resection within 6 months post-surgery. In Group B, ioMRI revealed unequivocal evidence of residual tumour in 11 of the 36 cases following initial resection. In 10 of these 11 cases, repeat resections were performed during the same surgical episode and none of these 11 cases required repeat surgery in the following 6 months. Early repeat resection rate was significantly different between both groups (p = 0.003). Following the advent of ioMRI at our institution, the need for repeat resection within 6 months has been prevented in cases where ioMRI revealed unequivocal evidence of residual tumour.

  10. Workshop on High-Field NMR and Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory have been working toward the establishment of a new Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC). The primary scientific thrust of this new research center is in the areas of theoretical chemistry, chemical dynamics, surface and interfacial science, and studies on the structure and interactions of biological macromolecules. The MSRC will provide important new capabilities for studies on the structure of biological macromolecules. The MSRC program includes several types of advanced spectroscopic techniques for molecular structure analysis, and a theory and modeling laboratory for molecular mechanics/dynamics calculations and graphics. It is the goal to closely integrate experimental and theoretical studies on macromolecular structure, and to join these research efforts with those of the molecular biological programs to provide new insights into the structure/function relationships of biological macromolecules. One of the areas of structural biology on which initial efforts in the MSRC will be focused is the application of high field, 2-D NMR to the study of biological macromolecules. First, there is interest in obtaining 3-D structural information on large proteins and oligonucleotides. Second, one of the primary objectives is to closely link theoretical approaches to molecular structure analysis with the results obtained in experimental research using NMR and other spectroscopies.

  11. Pulsed-High Field/High-Frequency EPR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhs, Michael; Moebius, Klaus

    Pulsed high-field/high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is used to disentangle many kinds of different effects often obscured in continuous wave (cw) EPR spectra at lower magnetic fields/microwave frequencies. While the high magnetic field increases the resolution of G tensors and of nuclear Larmor frequencies, the high frequencies allow for higher time resolution for molecular dynamics as well as for transient paramagnetic intermediates studied with time-resolved EPR. Pulsed EPR methods are used for example for relaxation-time studies, and pulsed Electron Nuclear DOuble Resonance (ENDOR) is used to resolve unresolved hyperfine structure hidden in inhomogeneous linewidths. In the present article we introduce the basic concepts and selected applications to structure and mobility studies on electron transfer systems, reaction centers of photosynthesis as well as biomimetic models. The article concludes with an introduction to stochastic EPR which makes use of an other concept for investigating resonance systems in order to increase the excitation bandwidth of pulsed EPR. The limited excitation bandwidth of pulses at high frequency is one of the main limitations which, so far, made Fourier transform methods hardly feasible.

  12. The design of a large aperture high field dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harfoush, F.; Harrison, M.; Kerby, J.; Koepke, K.; Mantsch, P.; Nicol, T.; Riddiford, A.; Theilacker, J.

    1989-12-01

    The impetus for this design report originated in the Snowmass 88 meeting where the subject of higher energies within the constraints of the existing Tevatron tunnel enclosure was investigated. It was determined that beam transport to the fixed target experimental areas was possible up to an energy of ∼1.5 Tev. Collider operation was feasible at somewhat higher energies (1.8 Tev), primarily limited by the ability to design a single turn beam abort system within the constraints of the straight section length. A new accelerator in the existing tunnel would, of necessity, have a similar though not identical lattice and straight section layout to the present Tevatron. Thus when issues arose in the magnet design requiring input from the accelerator standpoint we have assumed a Tevatron like machine. The possibility of using these high field magnets as elements in the existing Tevatron to create new 'warm space,' for another Interaction Region for example, also emphasizes compatibility with the present machine. 16 refs., 62 figs., 23 tabs

  13. Design of a high field uniformity electromagnet for Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itteera, Janvin; Singh, Kumud; Teotia, Vikas; Ukarde, Priti; Malhotra, Sanjay; Taly, Y.K.; Joshi, Manoj; Rao, Pushpa

    2013-01-01

    An ion trap (Penning trap) facility is being developed at BARC for spectroscopy studies. This requires the design of an iron core electromagnet capable of generating high magnetic fields (∼1.7T) at the centre of an 88 mm long air gap. This electromagnet provides the requisite dipole magnetic field which when superimposed on the electrostatic quadrupoles ensures a stable trapping of ions. To conduct high precision spectroscopy studies, we need to ensure a high degree of magnetic field uniformity ( 3 volume (Trap zone). Various pole shoe profiles were studied and modelled, FEM simulation of the same were conducted to compute the magnetic field intensity and field uniformity. Owing to the large air gap and requirement of high field intensity in the GFR, the exciting coils need to handle high current densities, which require water cooled systems. Double Pan-Cake coil design is selected for powering the magnet. Electrical, thermal and hydraulic designs of the coils are completed and a prototype double pancake coil was fabricated and tested for verifying the electrical and thermal parameter. The spatial field homogeneity is achieved by shimming the pole tip. Temporal stability of magnet requires a highly stable power supply for exciting the coils and its stability class is derived from FEM simulations. This paper discusses the electromagnetic design and development of the penning trap magnet being developed at BARC. (author)

  14. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Paz, R.L.; Floris, R.; Norman, D.; Enzmann, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-one high-field MR imaging studies (1.5 T, General Electric Signa) of the spinal cord were performed in 42 patients (27 female, 15 male; mean age, 40 years) with clinically definitive (n = 34) or probable (n = 8) multiple sclerosis and suspected spinal cord lesions. MR imaging showed focal spinal cord abnormalities in 38 (75%) of 51 studies. T2-weighted images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 38 studies, T1-weighted images were abnormal (showing areas of low signal intensity or mass effect) in 16 (42%) of 38, and GRASS images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 9 (82%) of 11 cases. Brain MR imaging showed periventricular lesions typical of multiple sclerosis in 34 (81%) of 42 studies. Spinal cord studies were positive in eight cases with normal brain MR images, and brain studies were positive in 13 instances of normal spinal cord MR images. Four lesions were at the cervicomedullary junction, 44 in the cervical spinal cord, and three in the thoracic cord. Mass effect in cord lesions, simulating neoplasm, was seen in seven patients during the acute symptomatic phase. Serial studies in three patients with decreasing symptoms showed a reduction after 3-4 weeks and resolution of the mass effect after 2-6 months

  15. Design of High Field Multipole Wiggler at PLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. E.; Park, K. H.; Lee, H. G.; Suh, H. S.; Han, H. S.; Jung, Y. G.; Chung, C. W.

    2007-01-01

    Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) is developing a high field multipole wiggler for new EXAFS beamline. The beamline is planning to utilize very high photon energy (∼40keV) synchrotron radiation at Pohang Light Source (PLS). To achieve higher critical photon energy, the wiggler field need to be maximized. A magnetic structure with wedged pole and blocks with additional side blocks which are similar to asymmetric wiggler of ESRF are designed to achieve higher flux density. The end structures were designed to be asymmetric along the beam direction to ensure systematic zero 1st field integral. The thickness of the last magnets were adjusted to minimize the transition sequence to the fully developed periodic field. This approach is more convenient to control than adjusting the strength of the end magnets. The final design features 140mm period, 2.5 Tesla peak flux density at 12mm pole gap, 1205mm magnetic structure length with 16 full field poles. In this article, all the design, engineering efforts for the HFMSII wiggler will be described

  16. The High Field Path to Practical Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumgaard, Robert; Whyte, D.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z.; Brunner, D.; Sorbom, B.; Marmar, E.; Minervini, J.; Bonoli, P.; Irby, J.; Labombard, B.; Terry, J.; Vieira, R.; Wukitch, S.

    2017-10-01

    We propose a faster, lower cost development path for fusion energy enabled by high temperature superconductors, devices at high magnetic field, innovative technologies and modern approaches to technology development. Timeliness, scale, and economic-viability are the drivers for fusion energy to combat climate change and aid economic development. The opportunities provided by high-temperature superconductors, innovative engineering and physics, and new organizational structures identified over the last few years open new possibilities for realizing practical fusion energy that could meet mid-century de-carbonization needs. We discuss re-factoring the fusion energy development path with an emphasis on concrete risk retirement strategies utilizing a modular approach based on the high-field tokamak that leverages the broader tokamak physics understanding of confinement, stability, and operational limits. Elements of this plan include development of high-temperature superconductor magnets, simplified immersion blankets, advanced long-leg divertors, a compact divertor test tokamak, efficient current drive, modular construction, and demountable magnet joints. An R&D plan culminating in the construction of an integrated pilot plant and test facility modeled on the ARC concept is presented.

  17. Role of MRI in paediatric neurooncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Padma

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of children with suspected brain tumours has undergone major advances over the last few decades. MRI has become the primary imaging modality in the initial diagnosis and in follow up of established tumours. Some of the newer techniques are still in the evolutionary phase and not yet routinely used in all centres around the world. However, with the advent of the high field strength magnets and more sophisticated MRI techniques such as MR spectroscopy and MR perfusion, the potential for more rapid and accurate diagnosis is expanding

  18. 4 T MRI of chondrocalcinosis in combination with three-dimensional CT, radiography, and arthroscopy: a report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suan, J.C.; Chhem, R.K.; Gati, J.S.; Norley, C.J.; Holdsworth, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    To describe 4 T MRI techniques in imaging chondrocalcinosis within the knee and examine the results together with those demonstrated using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography, conventional radiography, and arthroscopy. From a larger clinical imaging study of early osteoarthritis, knee arthroscopy patients were imaged using high-field MRI and high-resolution 3D CT prior to their surgery. Retrospective review of the imaging data diagnosed three patients with chondrocalcinosis. Fat-suppressed 3D spoiled gradient (3D SPGR) and two-dimensional fat-suppressed fast spin echo (FSE) imaging was performed at 4 T. The MR images, multi-planar reformatted CT (MPR-CT) and maximum intensity projection CT (MIP-CT) images, and radiographs were examined by a musculoskeletal radiologist for the presence and location of chondrocalcinosis. The findings from arthroscopy were also included. MRI showed 16 sites of punctate hypointense regions from 18 articular surfaces and five of six menisci with similar signal characteristics. Both meniscal chondrocalcinosis and meniscal tears were clearly visible using the 3D SPGR sequence. Only three sites were demonstrated to have calcification using MPR-CT and MIP-CT revealed an additional three. In articular cartilage surfaces showing surface disruption, arthroscopy demonstrated 11 sites with crystal deposition. Arthroscopy also revealed five menisci with calcification present. Our preliminary findings suggest that imaging chondrocalcinosis using spoiled gradient 4 T MRI is superior and complementary to the other imaging modalities in the detection of crystal deposition in both articular cartilage and menisci. (orig.)

  19. 4 T MRI of chondrocalcinosis in combination with three-dimensional CT, radiography, and arthroscopy: a report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suan, J.C.; Chhem, R.K.; Gati, J.S.; Norley, C.J.; Holdsworth, D.W. [Robarts Research Institute, Imaging Research Laboratories, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-11-01

    To describe 4 T MRI techniques in imaging chondrocalcinosis within the knee and examine the results together with those demonstrated using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography, conventional radiography, and arthroscopy. From a larger clinical imaging study of early osteoarthritis, knee arthroscopy patients were imaged using high-field MRI and high-resolution 3D CT prior to their surgery. Retrospective review of the imaging data diagnosed three patients with chondrocalcinosis. Fat-suppressed 3D spoiled gradient (3D SPGR) and two-dimensional fat-suppressed fast spin echo (FSE) imaging was performed at 4 T. The MR images, multi-planar reformatted CT (MPR-CT) and maximum intensity projection CT (MIP-CT) images, and radiographs were examined by a musculoskeletal radiologist for the presence and location of chondrocalcinosis. The findings from arthroscopy were also included. MRI showed 16 sites of punctate hypointense regions from 18 articular surfaces and five of six menisci with similar signal characteristics. Both meniscal chondrocalcinosis and meniscal tears were clearly visible using the 3D SPGR sequence. Only three sites were demonstrated to have calcification using MPR-CT and MIP-CT revealed an additional three. In articular cartilage surfaces showing surface disruption, arthroscopy demonstrated 11 sites with crystal deposition. Arthroscopy also revealed five menisci with calcification present. Our preliminary findings suggest that imaging chondrocalcinosis using spoiled gradient 4 T MRI is superior and complementary to the other imaging modalities in the detection of crystal deposition in both articular cartilage and menisci. (orig.)

  20. Incidental findings on MRI of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, S.; Jain, N.; Goyal, N.; Mansour, R. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Mukherjee, K. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)], E-mail: kausikmukherjee@doctors.org.uk

    2009-04-15

    MRI is widely used as the imaging of choice for spinal disorders and may reveal either a clinically insignificant incidental abnormality or a significant lesion, unrelated to the spine, which may explain the patient's symptoms. This article attempts to establish the importance of such findings and describes a sensible approach to the reporting of MRI examinations of the spine with special attention to the incidental findings commonly encountered. The MRI characteristics of such findings are briefly described.

  1. MRI angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncelet, B.; Baleriiaux, D.; struyven, J.; Segebarth, C.

    1989-01-01

    In MRI angiography two basis images are measured which only differ by the signal intensity of the flowing blood in the vessels. Subtraction of these two images produces a high contrast-to-noise representation of the vessels. Contrast between stationary tissues and flowing blood is changed, for one image compared to the second one, using a selective modification of the phase of the signal from the flowing blood, and/or using a selective modification of its longitudinal magnetization: The macroscopic spin motions along the selection and the measurement gradient directions affect the phase of the nuclear signal; assuming constant velocity, the phase is proportional to the velocity and to the first moment of the gradient waveforms applied. This work concentrates on the generarion of MRI angiograms, following a phase-based approach, of the carotid bifurcation and of different intracranical regions including the carotid syphon and the circle of Willis. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs

  2. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard...... visually inspected, both in 2D and 3D, and compared with photographs and anatomy atlases found at library and on the internet....

  3. MRI-Compatible Pneumatic Robot for Transperineal Prostate Needle Placement

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Gregory S.; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; DiMaio, Simon P.; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high-quality 3-D visualization of prostate and surrounding tissue, thus granting potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. However, the benefits cannot be readily harnessed for interventional procedures due to difficulties that surround the use of high-field (1.5T or greater) MRI. The inability to use conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challengin...

  4. MRI in Parkinson's disease and vascular Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aotsuka, Akiyo; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Hirayama, Keizo; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the magnetic resonance (MR) image of midbrain and striatum in 30 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 10 patients with vascular Parkinsonism (VP) and 10 age-matched control subjects. Studies were performed on a high field strength (1.5 tesla) MRI unit. T2-weighted spin echo pulse sequence (TR 2500 ms/TE 40 ms) was used. Intensity profiles of a straight line perpendicular to the pars compacta through the center of the red nucleus were made on an image of the midbrain. We measured the width of the valley at half-height between the peaks of intensity representing the red nucleus and the crus cerebri-pars reticulata complex and used this as an index of the width of the pars compacta signal. The mean width of the pars compacta signal was 2.7 mm in the PD group and 4.3 mm in controls. The difference between the means was highly significant (p<0.01). While not significant statistically, there was a trend toward narrowing of the width of pars compacta signal of substantia nigra in the PD group as the Yahr's grade or disease duration progressed. In hemiparkinsonism, MRI revealed significant narrowing of the pars compacta signal on the contra-lateral side to the clinical predominant side. The mean width of the pars compacta signal was 3.9 mm in the VP group, but the decrease was not significant. MRI in VP group showed multiple high intensity area in the basal ganglia and the white matter, and periventricular hyperintensity area (PVHIA). There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of restoration of the signal intensity in the lateral portion of the substantia nigra among PD, VP and control groups. The low signal intensity in the posterolateral putamen was not found in the 3 groups. The narrowing of the pars compacta signal has been attributed either to atrophy of the pars compacta or to increased deposition of iron in this region. The narrowing of the pars compacta signal reflected pathophysiology of PD. (J.P.N.)

  5. Complex Wavelet transform for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junor, P.; Janney, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: There is a perpetual compromise encountered in magnetic resonance (MRl) image reconstruction, between the traditional elements of image quality (noise, spatial resolution and contrast). Additional factors exacerbating this trade-off include various artifacts, computational (and hence time-dependent) overhead, and financial expense. This paper outlines a new approach to the problem of minimizing MRI image acquisition and reconstruction time without compromising resolution and noise reduction. The standard approaches for reconstructing magnetic resonance (MRI) images from raw data (which rely on relatively conventional signal processing) have matured but there are a number of challenges which limit their use. A major one is the 'intrinsic' signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image that depends on the strength of the main field. A typical clinical MRI almost invariably uses a super-cooled magnet in order to achieve a high field strength. The ongoing running cost of these super-cooled magnets prompts consideration of alternative magnet systems for use in MRIs for developing countries and in some remote regional installations. The decrease in image quality from using lower field strength magnets can be addressed by improvements in signal processing strategies. Conversely, improved signal processing will obviously benefit the current conventional field strength MRI machines. Moreover, the 'waiting time' experienced in many MR sequences (due to the relaxation time delays) can be exploited by more rigorous processing of the MR signals. Acquisition often needs to be repeated so that coherent averaging may partially redress the shortfall in SNR, at the expense of further delay. Wavelet transforms have been used in MRI as an alternative for encoding and denoising for over a decade. These have not supplanted the traditional Fourier transform methods that have long been the mainstay of MRI reconstruction, but have some inflexibility. The dual

  6. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ciovati

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q slope, in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low-temperature (100–140°C, 12–48 h baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimed at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high-temperature heat treatments, while secondary ion mass spectroscopy surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  7. Ultra high field magnetic resonance imaging; L'imagerie par resonance magnetique a ultra-haut champ. L'aimant, piece maitresse de l'imageur. Memo C: les principales techniques d'imagerie medicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lethimonnier, F. [CEA Saclay, Institut d' Imagerie Biomedicale - NeuroSpin, Dir. des Sciences du Vivant, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vedrine, P. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Understanding human brain function, brain development and brain dysfunction is one of the great challenges of the twenty first century. Biomedical imaging has now run up against a number of technical constraints that are exposing limits to its potential. In order to overcome the current limits to high-field magnetic resonance cerebral imaging (MRI) and unleash its fullest potential, the Cea has built NeuroSpin, an ultra-high-field neuroimaging facility at its Saclay centre (in the Essonne). NeuroSpin already boasts three fully operational MRI systems. The first is a 3-tesla high-field system and the second is a very-high-field 7-tesla system, both of which are dedicated to clinical studies and investigations in humans, while the third is an ultra-high-field 17.65-tesla system designed for studies on small animals. In 2011, NeuroSpin will be commissioning an 11.7-tesla ultra-high-field system of unprecedented power that is designed for research on human subjects. The level of the magnetic field and the scale required will make this joint French-German project to build the magnet a breakthrough in the international arena. (authors)

  8. Cortical phase changes in Alzheimer's disease at 7T MRI: a novel imaging marker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooden, S.; Versluis, M.J.; Liem, M.K.; Milles, J.; Maier, A.B.; Oleksik, A.M.; Webb, A.G.; van Buchem, M.A.; van der Grond, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Postmortem studies have indicated the potential of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize amyloid depositions in the cerebral cortex. The aim of this study is to test this hypothesis in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: T2*-weighted MRI was performed in

  9. High-field EPR on membrane proteins - crossing the gap to NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, Klaus; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Savitsky, Anton

    2013-11-01

    quantities of sample molecules have become sufficient to characterize stable and transient reaction intermediates of complex molecular systems - offering highly interesting applications for chemists, biochemists and molecular biologists. In three case studies, representative examples of advanced EPR spectroscopy are reviewed: (I) High-field PELDOR and ENDOR structure determination of cation-anion radical pairs in reaction centers from photosynthetic purple bacteria and cyanobacteria (Photosystem I); (II) High-field ENDOR and ELDOR-detected NMR spectroscopy on the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II; and (III) High-field electron dipolar spectroscopy on nitroxide spin-labelled bacteriorhodopsin for structure-function studies. An extended conclusion with an outlook to further developments and applications is also presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Windows on the Human Body – in Vivo High-Field Magnetic Resonance Research and Applications in Medicine and Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin; Fischmeister, Florian Ph. S.; Grabner, Günther; Bauer, Herbert; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in “medical sensor-systems”, i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and metabolic information from the human body with unsurpassed quality. Recent achievements in high and ultra-high field MR (at 3 and 7 Tesla) are described, and representative research applications in Medicine and Psychology in Austria are discussed. Finally, an overview of current and prospective research in multi-modal imaging, potential clinical applications, as well as current limitations and challenges is given. PMID:22219684

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner room and may cause ... MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  13. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  17. Play the MRI Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teachers' Questionnaire MRI Play MRI the Magnetic Miracle Game About the game In the MRI imaging technique, strong magnets and ... last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about ...

  18. Working in the magnetic field of ultrahigh field MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitgeb, N.; Gombotz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device technology continues to increase the static magnetic flux densities applied and consequently leads to considerably increased occupational exposure. This has already made it necessary to review limits of occupational exposure and to postpone European legal regulations for occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields. This raises the question whether and if so which adverse health effects and health risks might be associated with occupational exposure to MRI ultra-high static magnetic fields. Based on a survey on interaction mechanisms recommendations and safety rules are presented to help minimize adverse health effects of emerging ultra-high field MRI. (orig.) [de

  19. Clinical application of functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniwaki, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Described is the present state of clinical application of fMRI in the preoperative assessment of brain tumors, and plasticity in and pathophysiology of central diseases. For the tumor resection, fMRI is useful for risk assessment of postoperative nerve dysfunction, for selection of the patient rather suitable for brain mapping at the invasive surgery than at the pre-operation and for guidance of the operation itself. Preoperative fMRI alone can neither distinguish the regions of the primary and secondary functions nor exhibit the relation between the tumor and white matter fibers but there are compensatory means for these drawbacks. Benefit of preoperative fMRI has not yet been based on the evidence on double blind trials. Combination of fMRI imaging and electroencephalography (EEG) finding has shown that, in generalized epilepsy, extensive and stimulated activation occurs in both frontal/occipital regions and in thalamus area, respectively, and that the concomitant lowered activities are conceivably the reflection of burst discharge in normal brain functions. Plasticity in the human brain has been demonstrated by fMRI in cerebral vascular diseases, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and depression has been better understood by fMRI investigations revealing regions with elevated and reduced activities. Studies of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have shown similar change of activities with functional reductions of the right dorsolateral frontal anterior area and of dorsal frontal cingulate gyrus, together with stimulated wider regions to given tasks. As above, fMRI has greatly contributed to our understanding of diseases of central nervous system and is to be expected to expand wider in this field. (T.T.)

  20. MRI-induced retrocalcaneal bursitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, J. L.; van Dijk, C. N.; Maas, M.

    1999-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with acute retrocalcaneal bursitis, which developed after MRI examination of the ankle. The sagittal T2*-weighted gradient echo sequence revealed an extensive susceptibility artifact in the area surrounding the Achilles tendon near its insertion at the os calcis.

  1. MRI in distal vaginal atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugosson, C.; Jorulf, H.; Bakri, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetric resonance imaging in two young females with abdominal pain revealed vaginal atresia with massive hematocolpos but a normal cervix and uterine body. Information obtained with MRI was superior to ultrasound and CT and is suggested as the examination of choice prior to surgical correction. (orig.)

  2. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  3. Brucellosis of the pituitary region: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftci, E.; Erden, I.; Akyar, S.

    1998-01-01

    We report a rare case of neurobrucellosis in a 25-year-old woman with visual impairment, bilateral hearing loss, hyperprolactinaemia and meningitis. MRI revealed a sellar and suprasellar mass with enlargement of the optic chiasm. (orig.)

  4. Assessment of Myocardial Remodeling Using an Elastin/Tropoelastin Specific Agent with High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Protti, Andrea; Lavin, Begoña; Dong, Xuebin; Lorrio, Silvia; Robinson, Simon; Onthank, David; Shah, Ajay M; Botnar, Rene M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Well-defined inflammation, proliferation, and maturation phases orchestrate the remodeling of the injured myocardium after myocardial infarction (MI) by controlling the formation of new extracellular matrix. The extracellular matrix consists mainly of collagen but also fractions of elastin. It is thought that elastin is responsible for maintaining elastic properties of the myocardium, thus reducing the risk of premature rupture. An elastin/tropoelastin-specific contrast agent (Gd-...

  5. Ex vivo MRI evaluation of prostate cancer: Localization and margin status prediction of prostate cancer in fresh radical prostatectomy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidkamp, Jan; Hoogenboom, Martijn; Kovacs, Iringo E; Veltien, Andor; Maat, Arie; Sedelaar, J P Michiel; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A; Fütterer, Jurgen J

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the ability of high field ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to localize prostate cancer (PCa) and to predict the margin status in fresh radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens using histology as the reference standard. This Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved study had written informed consent. Patients with biopsy-proved PCa and a diagnostic multiparametric 3T MRI examination of the prostate prior to undergoing RP were prospectively included. A custom-made container provided reference between the 7T ex vivo MRI obtained from fresh RP specimens and histological slicing. On ex vivo MRI, PCa was localized and the presence of positive surgical margins was determined in a double-reading session. These findings were compared with histological findings obtained from completely cut, whole-mount embedded, prostate specimens. In 12 RP specimens, histopathology revealed 36 PCa lesions, of which 17 (47%) and 20 (56%) were correlated with the ex vivo MRI in the first and second reading session, respectively. Nine of 12 (75%) index lesions were localized in the first session, in the second 10 of 12 (83%). Seven and 8 lesions of 11 lesions with Gleason score >6 and >0.5 cc were localized in the first and second session, respectively. In the first session none of the four histologically positive surgical margins (sensitivity 0%) and 9 of 13 negative margins (specificity 69%) were detected. In second session the sensitivity and specificity were 25% and 88%, respectively. Ex vivo MRI enabled accurate localization of PCa in fresh RP specimens, and the technique provided information on the margin status with high specificity. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:439-448. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. The usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo

    1994-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies was evaluated. Pelvic MRI was carried out on 29 cases suspected of abnormal pregnancy by ultrasonography and clinical examinations. The abnormal pregnancies were classified into three categories: (1) maternal abnormalities, (2) fetal abnormalities and (3) placental abnormalities. MRI was of great value for the diagnosis of maternal abnormalities, particularly in cases of coexistent pelvic tumor. MRI allowed diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and dermoid cyst through its excellent tissue characterization and broad range of vision. MRI was useful in making diagnoses of fetal central nervous anomalies and fetal death, since the lack of fetal movement and the lesions were clear enough to be detected by MRI. However, anomalies in the fetal trunk or extremities could only be demonstrated, but not diagnosed, by MRI owing to its inferior spatial and time resolution. MRI showed placenta accreta and placental hematoma. Although accurate diagnosis was difficult because of their rarity, MRI revealed the hemorrhagic component of the lesions, which was not shown by ultrasonography. The author believes MRI has potential usefulness in making diagnoses of placental abnormalities through its tissue characterization. MRI was superior to ultrasonography in the soft tissue characterization, field of view, while MRI was inferior in time and spatial resolution. In summary, MRI hould be used in case of abnormal pregnancies such as pelvic tumors, fetal nervous anomalies and placental hemorrhagic lesions. MRI will become useful for the diagnosis of other abnormalities as its spatial resolution and fast scan technology advances. (author)

  7. The usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-02-01

    The clinical usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies was evaluated. Pelvic MRI was carried out on 29 cases suspected of abnormal pregnancy by ultrasonography and clinical examinations. The abnormal pregnancies were classified into three categories: (1) maternal abnormalities, (2) fetal abnormalities and (3) placental abnormalities. MRI was of great value for the diagnosis of maternal abnormalities, particularly in cases of coexistent pelvic tumor. MRI allowed diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and dermoid cyst through its excellent tissue characterization and broad range of vision. MRI was useful in making diagnoses of fetal central nervous anomalies and fetal death, since the lack of fetal movement and the lesions were clear enough to be detected by MRI. However, anomalies in the fetal trunk or extremities could only be demonstrated, but not diagnosed, by MRI owing to its inferior spatial and time resolution. MRI showed placenta accreta and placental hematoma. Although accurate diagnosis was difficult because of their rarity, MRI revealed the hemorrhagic component of the lesions, which was not shown by ultrasonography. The author believes MRI has potential usefulness in making diagnoses of placental abnormalities through its tissue characterization. MRI was superior to ultrasonography in the soft tissue characterization, field of view, while MRI was inferior in time and spatial resolution. In summary, MRI hould be used in case of abnormal pregnancies such as pelvic tumors, fetal nervous anomalies and placental hemorrhagic lesions. MRI will become useful for the diagnosis of other abnormalities as its spatial resolution and fast scan technology advances. (author).

  8. MRI diagnosis of eyeball diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Xiaofeng; Shi Zengru; Xiao Xiangsheng; Yu Hong; Wei Ruili

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To review the MR imaging of eyeball mass in 75 patients with the intention to enhance the acknowledgement to eyeball diseases. Methods: Seventy-five patients, 45 males and 30 females, were examined with MRI before treatment. Most MRI studies were performed with head coil and a few with orbit surface coil. Sagittal, coronal, and axial images were attained. Enhanced MRI studies were performed in 37 cases. High magnetic field MRI studies were performed with additional fat saturation technique. Results: Retinoblastoma (20 cases) showed isointensity in 11 and low signal intensity in 9 on T 1 WI, and isointensity in 5 and slight high signal in 15 on T 2 WI. Coats' disease (5 cases) involved single eyeball in all cases without calcification or eyeball enlargement, and presented as slight high signal on T 1 WI and high signal on T 2 WI. Choroidal angioma (3 cases) showed slight high signal on T 1 WI and high signal on T 2 WI. Metastasis (20 cases) was located in the posterior wall of the eyeball. Extra-global invasion occurred in 8 cases and intra-global invasion in 20. Marked thickening of the global wall with isointensity (8 cases) or low signal intensity (12 cases) was detected on T 1 WI, and isointensity (6 cases) or slight high signal intensity (14 cases) was demonstrated on T 2 WI. Marked enhancement was revealed in all 15 cases. Melanoma (7 cases) showed high signal intensity (5) and isointensity (2) on T 1 WI, and low signal (7) on T 2 WI. Retinal detachment (19 cases) showed high signal on both T 1 and T 2 WI, etc. In the diagnosis of eyeball diseases with MRI, the total sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 86.7%. Conclusions: MRI imaging is an important examination method to eyeball diseases, and most diagnosis and differential diagnosis of eyeball diseases can be made correctly with MRI

  9. The Travelling-Wave Primate System: A New Solution for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macaque Monkeys at 7 Tesla Ultra-High Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Tim; Mallow, Johannes; Plaumann, Markus; Luchtmann, Michael; Stadler, Jörg; Mylius, Judith; Brosch, Michael; Bernarding, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging of macaques at ultra-high field (UHF) is usually conducted by combining a volume coil for transmit (Tx) and a phased array coil for receive (Rx) tightly enclosing the monkey's head. Good results have been achieved using vertical or horizontal magnets with implanted or near-surface coils. An alternative and less costly approach, the travelling-wave (TW) excitation concept, may offer more flexible experimental setups on human whole-body UHF magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, which are now more widely available. Goal of the study was developing and validating the TW concept for in vivo primate MRI. The TW Primate System (TWPS) uses the radio frequency shield of the gradient system of a human whole-body 7 T MRI system as a waveguide to propagate a circularly polarized B1 field represented by the TE11 mode. This mode is excited by a specifically designed 2-port patch antenna. For receive, a customized neuroimaging monkey head receive-only coil was designed. Field simulation was used for development and evaluation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was compared with data acquired with a conventional monkey volume head coil consisting of a homogeneous transmit coil and a 12-element receive coil. The TWPS offered good image homogeneity in the volume-of-interest Turbo spin echo images exhibited a high contrast, allowing a clear depiction of the cerebral anatomy. As a prerequisite for functional MRI, whole brain ultrafast echo planar images were successfully acquired. The TWPS presents a promising new approach to fMRI of macaques for research groups with access to a horizontal UHF MRI system.

  10. The Travelling-Wave Primate System: A New Solution for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macaque Monkeys at 7 Tesla Ultra-High Field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Herrmann

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging of macaques at ultra-high field (UHF is usually conducted by combining a volume coil for transmit (Tx and a phased array coil for receive (Rx tightly enclosing the monkey's head. Good results have been achieved using vertical or horizontal magnets with implanted or near-surface coils. An alternative and less costly approach, the travelling-wave (TW excitation concept, may offer more flexible experimental setups on human whole-body UHF magnetic resonance imaging (MRI systems, which are now more widely available. Goal of the study was developing and validating the TW concept for in vivo primate MRI.The TW Primate System (TWPS uses the radio frequency shield of the gradient system of a human whole-body 7 T MRI system as a waveguide to propagate a circularly polarized B1 field represented by the TE11 mode. This mode is excited by a specifically designed 2-port patch antenna. For receive, a customized neuroimaging monkey head receive-only coil was designed. Field simulation was used for development and evaluation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was compared with data acquired with a conventional monkey volume head coil consisting of a homogeneous transmit coil and a 12-element receive coil.The TWPS offered good image homogeneity in the volume-of-interest Turbo spin echo images exhibited a high contrast, allowing a clear depiction of the cerebral anatomy. As a prerequisite for functional MRI, whole brain ultrafast echo planar images were successfully acquired.The TWPS presents a promising new approach to fMRI of macaques for research groups with access to a horizontal UHF MRI system.

  11. Extramedullary paraspinal hematopoiesis in thalassemia: CT and MRI evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsitouridis, J.; Stamos, S.; Hassapopoulou, E.; Tsitouridis, K.; Nikolopoulos, P.

    1999-01-01

    We present a comparative CT and MRI study of the paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis in 32 thalassemic patients. The patients were classified into four groups according to the MRI and CT imaging findings. Active recent extramedullary paraspinal hematopoietic masses show soft tissue behavior in both CT and MRI. Older inactive masses reveal iron deposition or fatty replacement. Combined imaging findings of paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis revealed the phase of its evolution and the correct diagnosis

  12. Extramedullary paraspinal hematopoiesis in thalassemia: CT and MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsitouridis, J.; Stamos, S.; Hassapopoulou, E.; Tsitouridis, K.; Nikolopoulos, P

    1999-04-01

    We present a comparative CT and MRI study of the paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis in 32 thalassemic patients. The patients were classified into four groups according to the MRI and CT imaging findings. Active recent extramedullary paraspinal hematopoietic masses show soft tissue behavior in both CT and MRI. Older inactive masses reveal iron deposition or fatty replacement. Combined imaging findings of paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis revealed the phase of its evolution and the correct diagnosis.

  13. Paralytic rabies: MRI findings and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Jayantee Kalita; Sanjeev K Bhoi; Jogendra K Bastia; Sangmitra Lashkar; Anita Mahadevan; Usha K Misra

    2014-01-01

    Paralytic rabies closely simulates Guillain-Barre syndrome or ascending myelitis often causing clinical dilemma. Two such patients were managed in our hospital whose magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed characteristic findings revealing T2 hyper intensity in central spinal cord and in posterior brainstem and hypothalamus. These MRI findings are helpful in the diagnosis of rabies in appropriate setting. We also review the literature on MRI changes in paralytic rabies.

  14. Intra-operative 3-T MRI for paediatric brain tumours: challenges and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abernethy, L.J.; Avula, S.; Hughes, G.M.; Wright, E.J.; Mallucci, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    MRI is the ideal modality for imaging intracranial tumours. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) makes it possible to obtain scans during a neurosurgical operation that can aid complete macroscopic tumour resection - a major prognostic factor in the majority of brain tumours in children. Intra-operative MRI can also help limit damage to normal brain tissue. It therefore has the potential to improve the survival of children with brain tumours and to minimise morbidity, including neurological deficits. The use of ioMRI is also likely to reduce the need for second look surgery, and may reduce the need for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. High-field MRI systems provide better anatomical information and also enable effective utilisation of advanced MRI techniques such as perfusion imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. However, high-field ioMRI facilities require substantial capital investment, and careful planning is required for optimal benefit. Safe ioMRI requires meticulous attention to detail and rigorous application of magnetic field safety precautions. Interpretation of ioMRI can be challenging and requires experience and understanding of artefacts that are common in the intra-operative setting. (orig.)

  15. MRI in intraspinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Gupta, S.; Kumar, S.; Kohli, A.; Misra, U.K.; Gujral, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    We studied 20 patients with intraspinal tuberculosis (TB), to characterise the MRI features of tuberculous meningitis and myelitis. MRI leptomeningitis and intramedullary involvement in 11 patients, intramedullary lesions alone in 5, leptomeningitis alone in 2, and isolated extradural disease in 2. TB leptomeningitis was characterised by loculation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nerve root thickening and clumping (seen only in the lumbar region) or complete obliteration of the subarachnoid space on unenhanced images. Gd-DTPA-enhanced images proved useful in 6 cases, revealing linear enhancement of the surface of the spinal cord and nerve roots or plaque-like enhancement of the dura-arachnoid mater complex. Intramedullary lesions included tuberculomas (8), cord oedema (5) and cavitation (3). In seven cases of intramedullary tuberculoma multiple lesions with skip areas were seen, without significant cord swelling. One patient had an isolated lesion in the conus medullaris. The lesions were iso- or hypointense on T1-weighted images, iso-, hypo- or hyperintense on T2-weighted images and showed rim or nodular enhancement with contrast medium. (orig.)

  16. 3.0-T high-field magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis: preliminary experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morakkabati-Spitz, N.; Gieseke, J.; Kuhl, C.; Lutterbey, G.; Falkenhausen, M. von; Traeber, F.; Zivanovic, O.; Schild, H.H.

    2005-01-01

    with our modified examination protocol. To fully exploit the capability of the high-field technique, and to point out potential advantages, further intraindividual studies are needed, with the adjustment of other imaging parameters to the high-field environment. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic quantum tunneling: key insights from multi-dimensional high-field EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J; Yang, E-C; Hendrickson, D N; Hill, S

    2009-08-21

    Multi-dimensional high-field/frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) spectroscopy is performed on single-crystals of the high-symmetry spin S = 4 tetranuclear single-molecule magnet (SMM) [Ni(hmp)(dmb)Cl](4), where hmp(-) is the anion of 2-hydroxymethylpyridine and dmb is 3,3-dimethyl-1-butanol. Measurements performed as a function of the applied magnetic field strength and its orientation within the hard-plane reveal the four-fold behavior associated with the fourth order transverse zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction, (1/2)B(S + S), within the framework of a rigid spin approximation (with S = 4). This ZFS interaction mixes the m(s) = +/-4 ground states in second order of perturbation, generating a sizeable (12 MHz) tunnel splitting, which explains the fast magnetic quantum tunneling in this SMM. Meanwhile, multi-frequency measurements performed with the field parallel to the easy-axis reveal HFEPR transitions associated with excited spin multiplets (S spin s = 1 Ni(II) ions within the cluster, as well as a characterization of the ZFS within excited states. The combined experimental studies support recent work indicating that the fourth order anisotropy associated with the S = 4 state originates from second order ZFS interactions associated with the individual Ni(II) centers, but only as a result of higher-order processes that occur via S-mixing between the ground state and higher-lying (S spin multiplets. We argue that this S-mixing plays an important role in the low-temperature quantum dynamics associated with many other well known SMMs.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  19. MRI-induced retrocalcaneal bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tol, J.L.; Dijk, C.N. van; Maas, M.

    1999-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with acute retrocalcaneal bursitis, which developed after MRI examination of the ankle. The sagittal T2*-weighted gradient echo sequence revealed an extensive susceptibility artifact in the area surrounding the Achilles tendon near its insertion at the os calcis. This artifact was caused by postsurgical metallic particles. We postulate that these particles were mechanically stimulated by the magnetic field and induced the inflammatory response. (orig.)

  20. MRI-induced retrocalcaneal bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tol, J.L.; Dijk, C.N. van [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, M. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1999-10-01

    This case report describes a patient with acute retrocalcaneal bursitis, which developed after MRI examination of the ankle. The sagittal T2*-weighted gradient echo sequence revealed an extensive susceptibility artifact in the area surrounding the Achilles tendon near its insertion at the os calcis. This artifact was caused by postsurgical metallic particles. We postulate that these particles were mechanically stimulated by the magnetic field and induced the inflammatory response. (orig.)

  1. MRI and hydrocephalus in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, J.; Marsh, H.; Kendall, B.; Kingsley, D.

    1988-01-01

    In six young patients presenting with raised intracranial pressure during the period of a year, CT revealed the presence of hydrocephalus, but not the cause. Magnetic Resonance Imaging not only showed the site and nature of the obstructing lesion, but also detected additional clinically silent spinal cord tumors in five of the patients. The place of MRI in the diagnosis of diseases involving the region of the cranio-cervical junction and in the elucidation of 'unexplained hydrocephalus' is considered. (orig.)

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... patient story here Images × ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... important to assess the health and function of these structures (heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of ... room. In addition to affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... risking the side effects of conventional (catheter) angiography . Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  3. Canalis basilaris medianus: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemin, C.; Bosley, T.M.; Al Saleh, M.; Mullaney, P.

    2000-01-01

    We report the MRI appearances of an developmental anatomical variant of the basiocciput, with neuroimaging findings (CT and MRI). Such variants are commonly asymptomatic, but may be associated with episodes of meningitis. (orig.)

  4. High-resolution vessel wall MRI for the evaluation of intracranial atherosclerotic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Havenon, Adam [University of Utah, Department of Neurology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Mossa-Basha, Mahmud [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Shah, Lubdha; Kim, Seong-Eun; Parker, Dennis; McNally, J.S. [University of Utah, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Park, Min [University of Utah, Department of Neurosurgery, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2017-12-15

    High-resolution vessel wall MRI (vwMRI) of the intracranial arteries is an emerging diagnostic imaging technique with the goal of evaluating vascular pathology. vwMRI sequences have high spatial resolution and directly image the vessel wall by suppressing blood signal. With vwMRI, it is possible to identify distinct morphologic and enhancement patterns of atherosclerosis that can provide important information about stroke etiology and recurrence risk. We present a review of vwMRI research in relation to intracranial atherosclerosis, with a focus on the relationship between ischemic stroke and atherosclerotic plaque T1 post-contrast enhancement or plaque/vessel wall morphology. The goal of this review is to provide readers with the most current understanding of the reliability, incidence, and importance of specific vwMRI findings in intracranial atherosclerosis, to guide their interpretation of vwMRI research, and help inform clinical interpretation of vwMRI. We will also provide a translational perspective on the existing vwMRI literature and insight into future vwMRI research questions and objectives. With increased use of high field strength MRI, powerful gradients, and improved pulse sequences, vwMRI will become standard-of-care in the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with cerebrovascular disease, making a firm grasp of its strengths and weakness important for neuroimagers. (orig.)

  5. High-resolution vessel wall MRI for the evaluation of intracranial atherosclerotic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Havenon, Adam; Mossa-Basha, Mahmud; Shah, Lubdha; Kim, Seong-Eun; Parker, Dennis; McNally, J.S.; Park, Min

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution vessel wall MRI (vwMRI) of the intracranial arteries is an emerging diagnostic imaging technique with the goal of evaluating vascular pathology. vwMRI sequences have high spatial resolution and directly image the vessel wall by suppressing blood signal. With vwMRI, it is possible to identify distinct morphologic and enhancement patterns of atherosclerosis that can provide important information about stroke etiology and recurrence risk. We present a review of vwMRI research in relation to intracranial atherosclerosis, with a focus on the relationship between ischemic stroke and atherosclerotic plaque T1 post-contrast enhancement or plaque/vessel wall morphology. The goal of this review is to provide readers with the most current understanding of the reliability, incidence, and importance of specific vwMRI findings in intracranial atherosclerosis, to guide their interpretation of vwMRI research, and help inform clinical interpretation of vwMRI. We will also provide a translational perspective on the existing vwMRI literature and insight into future vwMRI research questions and objectives. With increased use of high field strength MRI, powerful gradients, and improved pulse sequences, vwMRI will become standard-of-care in the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with cerebrovascular disease, making a firm grasp of its strengths and weakness important for neuroimagers. (orig.)

  6. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  7. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornreich, L.; Dagan, O.; Grunebaum, M.

    1996-01-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig

  8. The role of high-field magnetic resonance imaging in parkinsonian disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehericy, Stéphane; Vaillancourt, David E.; Seppi, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    changes in the substantia nigra. Quantitative MRI markers can be derived from diffusion weighted and iron-sensitive imaging or volumetry. Functional brain alterations at rest or during task performance have been captured with functional and arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI. These markers are useful...

  9. High field Q slope and the effect of low-temperature baking at 3 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, G.; Eremeev, G.; Hannon, F.

    2018-01-01

    A strong degradation of the unloaded quality factor with field, called high field Q slope, is commonly observed above Bp ≅100 mT in elliptical superconducting niobium cavities at 1.3 and 1.5 GHz. In the present experiments several 3 GHz niobium cavities were measured up to and above Bp ≅100 mT . The measurements show that a high field Q slope phenomenon limits the field reach at this frequency, that the high field Q slope onset field depends weakly on the frequency, and that the high field Q slope can be removed by the typical empirical solution of electropolishing followed by heating to 120°C for 48 hrs. In addition, one of the cavities reached a quench field of 174 mT and its field dependence of the quality factor was compared against global heating predicted by a thermal feedback model.

  10. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, Eric S.; Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  11. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulson, Eric S., E-mail: epaulson@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 and Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States); Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  12. Superconducting magnet development capability of the LLNL [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory] High Field Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.; Summers, L.T.

    1990-02-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: High-Field Test Facility Equipment at LLNL; FENIX Magnet Facility; High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) 2-m Solenoid; Cryogenic Mechanical Test Facility; Electro-Mechanical Conductor Test Apparatus; Electro-Mechanical Wire Test Apparatus; FENIX/HFTF Data System and Network Topology; Helium Gas Management System (HGMS); Airco Helium Liquefier/Refrigerator; CTI 2800 Helium Liquefier; and MFTF-B/ITER Magnet Test Facility

  13. Development and manufacture of a Nb3Sn superconductor for the high-field test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanlan, R.M.; Cornish, D.N.; Spencer, C.R.; Gregory, E.; Adam, E.

    1981-01-01

    The High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) project has two primary goals. The first is to establish manufacturing capability for a Nb 3 Sn conductor suitable for use in a mirror fusion coil. The second is to provide a test facility for evaluating other fusion conductor designs at high fields. This paper describes some of the problems encountered and the solutions devised in working toward the first goal. Construction of the test facility coils will be described in a subsequent paper

  14. An Ultra-High Field Study of Cerebellar Pathology in Early Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Using MP2RAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartaria, Mário João; OʼBrien, Kieran; Şorega, Alexandra; Bonnier, Guillaume; Roche, Alexis; Falkovskiy, Pavel; Krueger, Gunnar; Kober, Tobias; Bach Cuadra, Meritxell; Granziera, Cristina

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to study focal cerebellar pathology in early stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) using ultra-high-field magnetization-prepared 2 inversion-contrast rapid gradient-echo (7T MP2RAGE). Twenty early-stage relapsing-remitting MS patients underwent an MP2RAGE acquisition at 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (images acquired at 2 different resolutions: 0.58 × 0.58 × 0.58 mm, 7T_0.58, and 0.75 × 0.75 × 0.90 mm, 7T_0.75) and 3 T MRI (1.0 × 1.0 × 1.2 mm, 3T_1.0). Total cerebellar lesion load and volume and mean cerebellar lesion volume were compared across images using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Mean T1 relaxation times in lesions and normal-appearing tissue as well as contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements were also compared using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. A multivariate analysis was applied to assess the contribution of MRI metrics to clinical performance in MS patients. Both 7T_0.58 and 7T_0.75 MP2RAGE showed significantly higher lesion load compared with 3T_1.0 MP2RAGE (P < 0.001). Plaques that were judged as leukocortical in 7T_0.75 and 3T_1.0 MP2RAGEs were instead identified as WM lesions in 7T_0.58 MP2RAGE. Cortical lesion CNR was significantly higher in MP2RAGEs at 7 T than at 3 T. Total lesion load as well as total and mean lesion volume obtained at both 7 T and 3 T MP2RAGE significantly predicted attention (P < 0.05, adjusted R = 0.5), verbal fluency (P < 0.01, adjusted R = 0.6), and motor performance (P = 0.01, adjusted R = 0.7). This study demonstrates the value of 7 T MP2RAGE to study the cerebellum in early MS patients. 7T_0.58 MP2RAGE provides a more accurate anatomical description of white and gray matter pathology compared with 7T_0.75 and 3T_1.0 MP2RAGE, likely due to the improved spatial resolution, lower partial volume effects, and higher CNR.

  15. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhri, Asim F. [Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Siddiqui, Adeel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); St. Jude Children' s Hospital, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. (orig.)

  16. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhri, Asim F.; Siddiqui, Adeel; Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. (orig.)

  17. MRI-Compatible Pneumatic Robot for Transperineal Prostate Needle Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Gregory S.; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; DiMaio, Simon P.; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high-quality 3-D visualization of prostate and surrounding tissue, thus granting potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. However, the benefits cannot be readily harnessed for interventional procedures due to difficulties that surround the use of high-field (1.5T or greater) MRI. The inability to use conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intraprostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. MRI compatibility of the robot has been evaluated under 3T MRI using standard prostate imaging sequences and average SNR loss is limited to 5%. Needle alignment accuracy of the robot under servo pneumatic control is better than 0.94 mm rms per axis. The complete system workflow has been evaluated in phantom studies with accurate visualization and targeting of five out of five 1 cm targets. The paper explains the robot mechanism and controller design, the system integration, and presents results of preliminary evaluation of the system. PMID:21057608

  18. MRI-Compatible Pneumatic Robot for Transperineal Prostate Needle Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Gregory S; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; Dimaio, Simon P; Tempany, Clare M; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2008-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high-quality 3-D visualization of prostate and surrounding tissue, thus granting potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. However, the benefits cannot be readily harnessed for interventional procedures due to difficulties that surround the use of high-field (1.5T or greater) MRI. The inability to use conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intraprostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. MRI compatibility of the robot has been evaluated under 3T MRI using standard prostate imaging sequences and average SNR loss is limited to 5%. Needle alignment accuracy of the robot under servo pneumatic control is better than 0.94 mm rms per axis. The complete system workflow has been evaluated in phantom studies with accurate visualization and targeting of five out of five 1 cm targets. The paper explains the robot mechanism and controller design, the system integration, and presents results of preliminary evaluation of the system.

  19. High field FT-ICR mass spectrometry for molecular characterization of snow board from Moscow regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Dmitry M; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Polyakova, Olga V; Lebedev, Albert T

    2016-07-01

    High field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry analysis of eight snow samples from Moscow city allowed us to identify more than 2000 various elemental compositions corresponding to regional air pollutants. The hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of the data showed good concordance of three main groups of samples with the main wind directions. The North-West group (A1) is represented by several homologous CHOS series of aliphatic organic aerosols. They may form as a result of enhanced photochemical reactions including oxidation of hydrocarbons with sulfonations due to higher amount of SO2 emissions in the atmosphere in this region. Group A2, corresponding to the South-East part of Moscow, contains large amount of oxidized hydrocarbons of different sources that may form during oxidation in atmosphere. These hydrocarbons appear correlated to emissions from traffic, neighboring oil refinery, and power plants. Another family of compounds specific for this region involves CHNO substances formed during oxidation processes including NOx and NO3 radical since emissions of NOx are higher in this part of the city. Group A3 is rich in CHO type of compounds with high H/C and low O/C ratios, which is characteristic of oxidized hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol. CHNO types of compounds in A3 group are probably nitro derivatives of condensed hydrocarbons such as PAH. This non-targeted profiling revealed site specific distribution of pollutants and gives a chance to develop new strategies in air quality control and further studies of Moscow environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute inversion injury of the ankle without radiological abnormalities: assessment with high-field MR imaging and correlation of findings with clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, Inga; Frank, Matthias; Hinz, Peter; Ekkernkamp, Axel [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Emergency Department, Greifswald (Germany); Kuehn, Jens Peter; Hosten, Norbert; Langner, Soenke [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Acute inversion injuries of the ankle are the most common sports accidents, accounting for approximately 10% of emergency room admissions. In up to 85%, an injury of the lateral collateral ligaments is observed. Classically, the assessment of these injuries has relied on clinical examination and radiographs, including stress views. The aim of our study was to correlate prospectively the findings of high-field 3 T MRI in acute ankle distortion with clinical outcome. During a 6-month period, 38 patients were prospectively included. MRI was performed within 48 h of trauma and clinical examination using a protocol consisting of axial T2-weighted and coronal and sagittal T1-weighted images and a sagittal proton density (PDw) sequence. Each ligament injury was graded on a three-point scale. Functional outcome was evaluated using the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scale. In 24/38 patients (63.12%), ligament injury was observed. In 22/24 cases, this was an injury of the lateral ligaments and in 2/24 cases of the medial ligaments. Injury of the syndesmosis occurred in three patients, a bone bruise in four, and an osteochondral lesion in three cases. Patients with an injury of two or more ligaments or a bone bruise had a lower AOFAS score and returned to sports activities and full weight-bearing later (P < 0.01). MR imaging at 3 Tesla is an independent predictor for clinical outcome. Therefore MRI may be beneficial in those cases where the findings influence further treatment. (orig.)

  1. Acute inversion injury of the ankle without radiological abnormalities: assessment with high-field MR imaging and correlation of findings with clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, Inga; Frank, Matthias; Hinz, Peter; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Kuehn, Jens Peter; Hosten, Norbert; Langner, Soenke

    2011-01-01

    Acute inversion injuries of the ankle are the most common sports accidents, accounting for approximately 10% of emergency room admissions. In up to 85%, an injury of the lateral collateral ligaments is observed. Classically, the assessment of these injuries has relied on clinical examination and radiographs, including stress views. The aim of our study was to correlate prospectively the findings of high-field 3 T MRI in acute ankle distortion with clinical outcome. During a 6-month period, 38 patients were prospectively included. MRI was performed within 48 h of trauma and clinical examination using a protocol consisting of axial T2-weighted and coronal and sagittal T1-weighted images and a sagittal proton density (PDw) sequence. Each ligament injury was graded on a three-point scale. Functional outcome was evaluated using the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scale. In 24/38 patients (63.12%), ligament injury was observed. In 22/24 cases, this was an injury of the lateral ligaments and in 2/24 cases of the medial ligaments. Injury of the syndesmosis occurred in three patients, a bone bruise in four, and an osteochondral lesion in three cases. Patients with an injury of two or more ligaments or a bone bruise had a lower AOFAS score and returned to sports activities and full weight-bearing later (P < 0.01). MR imaging at 3 Tesla is an independent predictor for clinical outcome. Therefore MRI may be beneficial in those cases where the findings influence further treatment. (orig.)

  2. Magnetosomes used as biogenic MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of glioblastoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    This work takes place in the context of molecular imaging, which aims at tailoring medical treatments and therapies to the individual context by revealing molecular or cellular phenomenon of medical interest in the less invasive manner. In particular, it can be achieved with MRI molecular imaging using engineered iron-oxide contrast agent.This PhD thesis focuses on the study of a new class of iron-oxide contrast agent for high field MRI. Indeed, magnetosomes are natural iron-oxide vesicles produced by magneto-tactic bacteria. These bacteria synthesized such magnetic vesicles and ordered them like a nano-compass in order to facilitate their navigation in sediments. This explains why magnetosomes are awarded with tremendous magnetic properties: around 50 nm, mono-crystalline, single magnetic domain and high saturation magnetization. Furthermore, a wide variety of bacterial strains exist in nature and size and shape of magnetosomes are highly stable within strain and can be very different between strains. Finally, magnetosomes are naturally coated with a bi-lipidic membrane whose content is genetically determined. Lately, researchers have unravelled magnetosomes membrane protein contents, opening the way to create functionalized magnetosomes thanks to fusion of the gene coding for a protein of interest with the gene coding for an abundant protein at magnetosomes membrane.A new alternative path using living organisms to tackle the production of engineered high efficiency molecular imaging probes have been investigated with magneto-tactic bacteria in this PhD. The production and engineering of magnetosomes have been carried out by our partner, the Laboratoire de Bio-energetique Cellulaire (LBC, CEA Cadarache), and will be presented and discussed. We then characterized magnetosomes as contrast agent for high field MRI. We showed they present very promising contrasting properties in vitro, and assessed this observation in vivo by establishing they can be used as efficient

  3. MRI of car occupants with whiplash injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyvodic, F [Dept. of Radiology, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, SA (Australia); Dolinis, J [National Injury Surveillance Unit, Bedford Park, SA (Australia); [National Health and Medical Research Council Road Accident Research Unit, Univ. of Adelaide, SA (Australia); Moore, V M [National Health and Medical Research Council Road Accident Research Unit, Univ. of Adelaide, SA (Australia); Ryan, G A [National Health and Medical Research Council Road Accident Research Unit, Univ. of Adelaide, SA (Australia); Slavotinek, J P [Dept. of Radiology, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, SA (Australia); Whyte, A M [Ashford Hospital Specialist Centre, SA (Australia); Hoile, R D [Ashford Hospital Specialist Centre, SA (Australia); Taylor, G W [National Health and Medical Research Council Road Accident Research Unit, Univ. of Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to document and investigate the prognostic significance of features seen on MRI of patients with whiplash injury following relatively minor road traffic crashes. MRI was obtained shortly and at 6 months after the crash using a 0.5 T imager. The images were assessed independently by two radiologists for evidence of fracture or other injury; loss of lordosis and spondylosis were also recorded. Clinical examinations were used to assess the status of patients initially and at 6 months. The results of the independent MRI and clinical investigations were then examined for association using statistical tests. Initial MRI was performed on 29 patients, of whom 19 had repeat studies at 6 months; 48 examinations were thus examined. Apart from spondylosis and loss of lordosis, only one abnormality was detected: an intramedullary lesion consistent with a small cyst or syrinx. There were no statistically significant associations between the outcome of injury and spondylosis or loss of lordosis. No significant changes were found when comparing the initial and follow-up MRI. It appears that MRI of patients with relatively less severe whiplash symptoms reveals a low frequency of abnormalities, apart from spondylosis and loss of lordosis, which have little short-term prognostic value. Routine investigation of such patients with MRI is not justified in view of the infrequency of abnormalities detected, the lack of prognostic value and the high cost of the procedure. (orig.). With 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. MRI of car occupants with whiplash injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voyvodic, F.; Dolinis, J.; Moore, V.M.; Ryan, G.A.; Slavotinek, J.P.; Whyte, A.M.; Hoile, R.D.; Taylor, G.W.

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to document and investigate the prognostic significance of features seen on MRI of patients with whiplash injury following relatively minor road traffic crashes. MRI was obtained shortly and at 6 months after the crash using a 0.5 T imager. The images were assessed independently by two radiologists for evidence of fracture or other injury; loss of lordosis and spondylosis were also recorded. Clinical examinations were used to assess the status of patients initially and at 6 months. The results of the independent MRI and clinical investigations were then examined for association using statistical tests. Initial MRI was performed on 29 patients, of whom 19 had repeat studies at 6 months; 48 examinations were thus examined. Apart from spondylosis and loss of lordosis, only one abnormality was detected: an intramedullary lesion consistent with a small cyst or syrinx. There were no statistically significant associations between the outcome of injury and spondylosis or loss of lordosis. No significant changes were found when comparing the initial and follow-up MRI. It appears that MRI of patients with relatively less severe whiplash symptoms reveals a low frequency of abnormalities, apart from spondylosis and loss of lordosis, which have little short-term prognostic value. Routine investigation of such patients with MRI is not justified in view of the infrequency of abnormalities detected, the lack of prognostic value and the high cost of the procedure. (orig.). With 1 fig., 1 tab

  5. Can Images Obtained With High Field Strength Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reduce Contouring Variability of the Prostate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmani, Nawaid; Sloboda, Ron; Kamal, Wafa; Ghosh, Sunita; Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Danielson, Brita; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John; Monajemi, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine whether there is less contouring variability of the prostate using higher-strength magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared with standard MRI and computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients treated with prostate brachytherapy were accrued to a prospective study that included the acquisition of 1.5-T MR and CT images at specified time points. A subset of 10 patients had additional 3.0-T MR images acquired at the same time as their 1.5-T MR scans. Images from each of these patients were contoured by 5 radiation oncologists, with a random subset of patients repeated to quantify intraobserver contouring variability. To minimize bias in contouring the prostate, the image sets were placed in folders in a random order with all identifiers removed from the images. Results: Although there was less interobserver contouring variability in the overall prostate volumes in 1.5-T MRI compared with 3.0-T MRI (p < 0.01), there was no significant differences in contouring variability in the different regions of the prostate between 1.5-T MRI and 3.0-T MRI. MRI demonstrated significantly less interobserver contouring variability in both 1.5-T and 3.0-T compared with CT in overall prostate volumes (p < 0.01, p = 0.01), with the greatest benefits being appreciated in the base of the prostate. Overall, there was less intraobserver contouring variability than interobserver contouring variability for all of the measurements analyzed. Conclusions: Use of 3.0-T MRI does not demonstrate a significant improvement in contouring variability compared with 1.5-T MRI, although both magnetic strengths demonstrated less contouring variability compared with CT.

  6. Optic nerve injury demonstrated by MRI with STIR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takehara, S.; Tanaka, T.; Uemura, K.; Shinohara, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Tokuyama, T.; Satoh, A.

    1994-01-01

    We studied nine patients with optic nerve injury associated with closed head trauma by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) sequences on 11 occasions from 4 days to 14 years after the injury: three studies were within 17 days and eight over 4 months to 14 years. MRI revealed abnormal high signal in 10 of the 11 injured nerves. MRI 4 days after the injury showed no abnormality. (orig.)

  7. MRI diagnosis of pigmented villonodular synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Zhongpu; Sui Zhengyan; Xue Jianrong; Song Cuizhi; Liu Yuekui; Li Jinwang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the MRI characteristics of pigmented villonodular synovitis. Methods: MRI and clinic data of 14 patients with pigmented villonodular synovitis proved by pathology were reviewed retrospectively. Results: MRI showed diffusible lesions in all 14 cases. 12 cases were located in knee joint, 2 in hip. MRI revealed nodules and masses formed by villis hyperplasia in the joints. MRI demonstrated the nodules with slightly low signal intensity on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI in 13 cases, the destruction of the cartilage in 8 cases, the destruction of the ligament in 5 cases, and the hydropsy in joint cavity in 10 cases, the destruction of the meniscus in 2 cases. Conclusion: The typical features of pigmented villonodular synovitis on MRI revealed the nodules formed by villis hyperplasia in the joint. Hemosiderin in the nodules demonstrated slightly low signal intensity on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI, with the presence of typical features like 'foam rubber cushion' sign and 'lichen' sign. (authors)

  8. Analysis of the acoustic sound in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Tetsuro; Hara, Akira; Kusakari, Jun; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Ase, Yuji

    1999-04-01

    The noise level and power spectra of the acoustic sound exposed during the examination of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) using a MRI scanner (Philips Gyroscan 1.5 T) were measured at the position of the human auricle. The overall noise levels on T1-weighted images and T2-weighted images with Spin Echo were 105 dB and 98 dB, respectively. The overall noise level on T2-weighted images with Turbo Spin Echo was 110 dB. Fourier analysis revealed energy peaks ranging from 225 to 325 Hz and a steep high frequency cutoff for each pulse sequence. The MRI noise was not likely to cause permanent threshold shift. However, because of the inter-subject variation in susceptibility to acoustic trauma and to exclude the anxiety in patients, ear protectors were recommended for all patients during MRI testing. (author)

  9. Spatial Distortion in MRI-Guided Stereotactic Procedures: Evaluation in 1.5-, 3- and 7-Tesla MRI Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Jan-Oliver; Giese, Henrik; Biller, Armin; Nagel, Armin M; Kiening, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is replacing computed tomography (CT) as the main imaging modality for stereotactic transformations. MRI is prone to spatial distortion artifacts, which can lead to inaccuracy in stereotactic procedures. Modern MRI systems provide distortion correction algorithms that may ameliorate this problem. This study investigates the different options of distortion correction using standard 1.5-, 3- and 7-tesla MRI scanners. A phantom was mounted on a stereotactic frame. One CT scan and three MRI scans were performed. At all three field strengths, two 3-dimensional sequences, volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo, were acquired, and automatic distortion correction was performed. Global stereotactic transformation of all 13 datasets was performed and two stereotactic planning workflows (MRI only vs. CT/MR image fusion) were subsequently analysed. Distortion correction on the 1.5- and 3-tesla scanners caused a considerable reduction in positional error. The effect was more pronounced when using the VIBE sequences. By using co-registration (CT/MR image fusion), even a lower positional error could be obtained. In ultra-high-field (7 T) MR imaging, distortion correction introduced even higher errors. However, the accuracy of non-corrected 7-tesla sequences was comparable to CT/MR image fusion 3-tesla imaging. MRI distortion correction algorithms can reduce positional errors by up to 60%. For stereotactic applications of utmost precision, we recommend a co-registration to an additional CT dataset. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Pneumatically Operated MRI-Compatible Needle Placement Robot for Prostate Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Gregory S.; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; Mewes, Philip W.; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. The strong magnetic field prevents the use of conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intra-prostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. The robot perform...

  11. MRI changes of cervical spine in asymptomatic and symptomatic young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Siivola, Sari M.; Levoska, Sinikka; Tervonen, Osmo; Ilkko, Eero; Vanharanta, Heikki; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka

    2002-01-01

    Several work-related, psychosocial and individual factors have been verified as being related to neck and shoulder pain, but the role of pathology visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains unclear. In this study, the relationship between neck and shoulder pain and cervical high-field MRI findings was investigated in a sample of persons in a longitudinal survey. The study aimed to determine whether subjects with persistent or recurrent neck and shoulder pain were more likely to ha...

  12. Combined high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopy increase extent of resection and progression-free survival for pituitary adenomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Peter T.; Evans, John A.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Chole, Richard A.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Haughey, Bruce H.; Getz, Anne E.; Silverstein, Julie; Rich, Keith M.; Kim, Albert H.; Dacey, Ralph G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The clinical benefit of combined intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) and endoscopy for transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma resection has not been completely characterized. This study assessed the impact of microscopy, endoscopy, and/or iMRI on progression-free survival, extent of resection status (gross-, near-, and subtotal resection), and operative complications. Methods Retrospective analyses were performed on 446 transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma surgeries at a single institution between 1998 and 2012. Multivariate analyses were used to control for baseline characteristics, differences during extent of resection status, and progression-free survival analysis. Results Additional surgery was performed after iMRI in 56/156 cases (35.9 %), which led to increased extent of resection status in 15/156 cases (9.6 %). Multivariate ordinal logistic regression revealed no increase in extent of resection status following iMRI or endoscopy alone; however, combining these modalities increased extent of resection status (odds ratio 2.05, 95 % CI 1.21–3.46) compared to conventional transsphenoidal microsurgery. Multivariate Cox regression revealed that reduced extent of resection status shortened progression-free survival for near- versus gross-total resection [hazard ratio (HR) 2.87, 95 % CI 1.24–6.65] and sub- versus near-total resection (HR 2.10; 95 % CI 1.00–4.40). Complication comparisons between microscopy, endoscopy, and iMRI revealed increased perioperative deaths for endoscopy versus microscopy (4/209 and 0/237, respectively), but this difference was non-significant considering multiple post hoc comparisons (Fisher exact, p = 0.24). Conclusions Combined use of endoscopy and iMRI increased pituitary adenoma extent of resection status compared to conventional transsphenoidal microsurgery, and increased extent of resection status was associated with longer progression-free survival. Treatment modality combination did not significantly impact

  13. Nb3Sn High Field Magnets for the High Luminosity LHC Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, Giorgio

    2015-06-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN requires a new generation of high field superconducting magnets. High field large aperture quadrupoles (MQXF) are needed for the low-beta triplets close to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, and high field two-in-one dipoles (11 T dipoles) are needed to make room for additional collimation. The MQXF quadrupoles, with a field gradient of 140 T/m in 150 mm aperture, have a peak coil field of 12.1 T at nominal current. The 11 T dipoles, with an aperture of 60 mm, have a peak coil field of 11.6 T at nominal current. Both magnets require Nb3Sn conductor and are the first applications of this superconductor to actual accelerator magnets.

  14. Understanding and improving the high field orbit in the Fermilab Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Y.; Ketcham, L.; Moore, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    With the implementation of the BPM system in the Fermilab Booster, complete survey data of the main magnets have been employed to determine magnet moving schemes to correct the high field orbit at 8 GeV kinetic energy and to understand the global pattern of the high field orbit in both planes. Considerable success has been achieved in the former task. We also obtained reasonable understanding in the later effort, given the multitude of factors that have to be dealt with. In this paper an account is given of the survey record, the orbit correction exercise, and the effort to reconstruct the high field orbit based on the survey records. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  15. High Field Linear Magnetoresistance Sensors with Perpendicular Anisotropy L10-FePt Reference Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High field linear magnetoresistance is an important feature for magnetic sensors applied in magnetic levitating train and high field positioning measurements. Here, we investigate linear magnetoresistance in Pt/FePt/ZnO/Fe/Pt multilayer magnetic sensor, where FePt and Fe ferromagnetic layers exhibit out-of-plane and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, respectively. Perpendicular anisotropy L10-FePt reference layer with large coercivity and high squareness ratio was obtained by in situ substrate heating. Linear magnetoresistance is observed in this sensor in a large range between +5 kOe and −5 kOe with the current parallel to the film plane. This L10-FePt based sensor is significant for the expansion of linear range and the simplification of preparation for future high field magnetic sensors.

  16. MRI in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulert, Christoph; Shenton, Martha E.

    2014-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  17. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  18. Superconductive MRI system, FLEXARTTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Nishikawa, Mineki; Goro, Takehiko

    1994-01-01

    Since the establishment of TAMI (Toshiba America MRI Inc.) in 1989, it has been jointly working with Toshiba on developing a new infrastructure for computer and software technologies to be applied to new MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) systems. As a result of these efforts, the first product of a new series of MRI systems has been introduced on the market. Known as FLEXART TM (a newly created word combining FLEXible and ART), this MRI system incorporates a new 32-bit RISC computer and a new controller for pulse sequences and data acquisition. The product concepts of FLEXART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, and ease of use, all of which are necessary features for an MRI system in the premium mid-field MRI market segment. (author)

  19. Longitudinal Comparison of Enzyme- and Laser-Treated Intervertebral Disc by MRI, X-Ray, and Histological Analyses Reveals Discrepancies in the Progression of Disc Degeneration: A Rabbit Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Fusellier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine is considered an attractive prospect for the treatment of intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration. To assess the efficacy of the regenerative approach, animal models of IVD degeneration are needed. Among these animal models, chemonucleolysis based on the enzymatic degradation of the Nucleus Pulposus (NP is often used, but this technique remains far from the natural physiopathological process of IVD degeneration. Recently, we developed an innovative animal model of IVD degeneration based on the use of a laser beam. In the present study, this laser model was compared with the chemonucleolysis model in a longitudinal study in rabbits. The effects of the treatments were studied by MRI (T2-weighted signal intensity (T2wsi, radiography (IVD height index, and histology (NP area and Boos’ scoring. The results showed that both treatments induced a degeneration of the IVD with a decrease in IVD height and T2wsi as well as NP area and an increase in Boos’ scoring. The enzyme treatment leads to a rapid and acute process of IVD degeneration. Conversely, laser radiation induced more progressive and less pronounced degeneration. It can be concluded that laser treatment provides an instrumental in vivo model of slowly evolving IVD degenerative disease that can be of preclinical relevance for assessing new prophylactic biological treatments of disc degeneration.

  20. MRI of meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshio; Hiraki, Yoshio; Kaji, Mitumasa

    1988-01-01

    MRI has gained a prominent position in the diagnosis of brain tumors. We examined 30 cases of meningiomas and distinguished their subtype according to the criteria of Rubinic histology. We discussed the MRI findings and compared then with X-CT findings so to their intensity, delination of tumors, whether accompanied by peripheral edema, and T 1 values. MRI delinated the tumors as well as CE-CT. No remarkable difference was found between the subtypes. (author)

  1. Tuning of Magnetic Anisotropy in Hexairon(III) Rings by Host-Guest Interactions: An Investigation by High-Field Torque Magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornia; Affronte; Jansen; Abbati; Gatteschi

    1999-08-01

    Full chemical control of magnetic anisotropy in hexairon(III) rings can be achieved by varying the size of the guest alkali metal ion. Dramatically different anisotropies characterize the Li(I) and Na(I) complexes of [Fe(6)(OMe)(12)(L)(6)] (L=1,3-propanedione derivatives; a schematic representation of the Li(I) complex is shown), as revealed by high-field torque magnetometry-Iron: (g), oxygen: o, carbon: o, Li(+): plus sign in circle.

  2. Updated tokamak systems code and applications to high-field ignition devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Selcow, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes revisions made to the Tokamak Systems Code to more accurately model high-field copper ignition devices. The major areas of revision were in the plasma physics model, the toroidal field (TF) coil model, and the poloidal field (PF) coil/MHD model. Also included in this paper are results obtained from applying the revised code to a study for a high-field copper ignition device to determine the impact of magnetic field on axis, (at the major radius), on performance, and on cost

  3. The spheromak as a prototype for ultra-high-field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.; Jardin, S.C.

    1987-08-01

    In view of current progress in the development of superconductor materials, the ultimate high-field limit of superconducting magnets is likely to be set by mechanical stress problems. Maximum field strength should be attainable by means of approximately force-free magnet windings having favorable ''MHD'' stability properties (so that small winding errors will not grow). Since a low-beta finite-flux-hole spheromak configuration qualifies as a suitable prototype, the theoretical and experimental spheromak research effort of the past decade has served to create a substantial technical basis for the design of ultra-high-field superconducting coils. 11 refs

  4. A SIMPLE ANALYSIS OF THE PROPAGATING ACOUSTOELECTRIC HIGH-FIELD DOMAIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik

    1968-01-01

    An analytical treatment of the uniformly propagating acoustoelectric high-field domain is presented in the limit of zero diffusion. Expressions for the electron density and the acoustic energy density as functions of the electric field are given. The domain velocity is determined. ©1968 The Ameri......An analytical treatment of the uniformly propagating acoustoelectric high-field domain is presented in the limit of zero diffusion. Expressions for the electron density and the acoustic energy density as functions of the electric field are given. The domain velocity is determined. ©1968...

  5. Recent developments at the high-field laboratory of Tohoku University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motokawa, M.; Watanabe, K.; Miura, S.; Awaji, S.; Nojiri, H.; Mogi, I.; Mitsudo, S.; Sakon, T.

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments and experiments performed at the high-field laboratory of Tohoku University are described. We have (1) hybrid magnets which produce high fields up to 31.1 T, (2) liquid-helium-free superconducting magnets up to 11 T which are available continuously for more than a year, (3) a 20 T superconducting magnet, (4) pulsed field magnets up to 40 T by a 100 kJ bank and (5) repeating pulsed field systems up to 25 T, synchronized with a pulsed neutron source

  6. MRI assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    Usage, cost and efficacy data from the MRI Assessment Program to 30 March 1988 is presented, as a continuation of an earlier analysis. Analysis has been performed on data from 8565 examinations relating to 7997 patients at 4 hospitals. MRI was used mainly for examination of the head and spine. Some details of the follow up studies being conducted on selected patients and disease categories are given. A consensus statement is included which summaries the view of the Technical Committee on the potential applications of MRI in Australia. The MRI unit quench incident at Royal Adelaide Hospital is described. Refs., 10 figs., tabs

  7. CT and MRI of vertebral haemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braitinger, S.; Weigert, F.; Held, P.; Obletter, N.; Breit, A.

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective comparative study of CT and MRI was carried out involving 38 vertebral haemangiomas; this revealed a typical signal pattern on MRI from benign lesions. It consists of a hyper-intense signal from the bone marrow affecting the T 1 /T 2 sequences; this may be focal or involve the entire vertebral body. These characteristic signals were compared with CT images of the spine. The areas of bone that produce the high intensity signals on MRI appear on CT as spongey patterns with hypertrophic trabeculae surrounding mostly areas with negative absorption values. An analysis of the changes in the spongiosa has revealed three clearly defined types. The signals derived from haemangiomas extending beyond the bone have an intensity of normal spongiosa; this corresponds with an absence of fat, as demonstrated by CT. Extra-osseous components have low intensity T 1 signals that increase in T 2 sequences. (orig.) [de

  8. Value of repeat brain MRI in children with focal epilepsy and negative findings on initial MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Tae Yeon; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Jee Hun; Yoo, So Young; Hwang, Sook Min; Lee, Mun Hyang [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the value of repeat brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying potential epileptogenic lesions in children with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy. Our Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study and waived the requirement for informed consent. During a 15-year period, 257 children (148 boys and 109 girls) with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy were included. After re-evaluating both initial and repeat MRIs, positive results at repeat MRI were classified into potential epileptogenic lesions (malformation of cortical development and hippocampal sclerosis) and other abnormalities. Contributing factors for improved lesion conspicuity of the initially overlooked potential epileptogenic lesions were analyzed and classified into lesion factors and imaging factors. Repeat MRI was positive in 21% (55/257) and negative in 79% cases (202/257). Of the positive results, potential epileptogenic lesions comprised 49% (27/55) and other abnormalities comprised 11% of the cases (28/257). Potential epileptogenic lesions included focal cortical dysplasia (n = 11), hippocampal sclerosis (n = 10), polymicrogyria (n = 2), heterotopic gray matter (n = 2), microlissencephaly (n = 1), and cortical tumor (n = 1). Of these, seven patients underwent surgical resection. Contributing factors for new diagnoses were classified as imaging factors alone (n = 6), lesion factors alone (n = 2), both (n = 18), and neither (n = 1). Repeat MRI revealed positive results in 21% of the children with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy, with 50% of the positive results considered as potential epileptogenic lesions. Enhanced MRI techniques or considering the chronological changes of lesions on MRI may improve the diagnostic yield for identification of potential epileptogenic lesions on repeat MRI.

  9. Value of repeat brain MRI in children with focal epilepsy and negative findings on initial MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Tae Yeon; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Jee Hun; Yoo, So Young; Hwang, Sook Min; Lee, Mun Hyang

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the value of repeat brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying potential epileptogenic lesions in children with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy. Our Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study and waived the requirement for informed consent. During a 15-year period, 257 children (148 boys and 109 girls) with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy were included. After re-evaluating both initial and repeat MRIs, positive results at repeat MRI were classified into potential epileptogenic lesions (malformation of cortical development and hippocampal sclerosis) and other abnormalities. Contributing factors for improved lesion conspicuity of the initially overlooked potential epileptogenic lesions were analyzed and classified into lesion factors and imaging factors. Repeat MRI was positive in 21% (55/257) and negative in 79% cases (202/257). Of the positive results, potential epileptogenic lesions comprised 49% (27/55) and other abnormalities comprised 11% of the cases (28/257). Potential epileptogenic lesions included focal cortical dysplasia (n = 11), hippocampal sclerosis (n = 10), polymicrogyria (n = 2), heterotopic gray matter (n = 2), microlissencephaly (n = 1), and cortical tumor (n = 1). Of these, seven patients underwent surgical resection. Contributing factors for new diagnoses were classified as imaging factors alone (n = 6), lesion factors alone (n = 2), both (n = 18), and neither (n = 1). Repeat MRI revealed positive results in 21% of the children with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy, with 50% of the positive results considered as potential epileptogenic lesions. Enhanced MRI techniques or considering the chronological changes of lesions on MRI may improve the diagnostic yield for identification of potential epileptogenic lesions on repeat MRI

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  14. [MRI semiotics features of experimental acute intracerebral hematomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burenchev, D V; Skvortsova, V I; Tvorogova, T V; Guseva, O I; Gubskiĭ, L V; Kupriianov, D A; Pirogov, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of revealing intracerebral hematomas (ICH), using MRI, within the first hours after onset and to determine their MRI semiotics features. Thirty animals with experimental ICH were studied. A method of two-stage introduction of autologous blood was used to develop ICH as human spontaneous intracranial hematomas. Within 3-5h after blood introduction to the rat brain. The control MRI was performed in the 3rd and 7th days after blood injections. ICH were definitely identified in the first MRI scans. The MRI semiotics features of acute ICH and their transformations were assessed. The high sensitivity of MRI to ICH as well as the uniform manifestations in all animals were shown. In conclusion, the method has high specificity for acute ICH detection.

  15. MRI-Guided Percutaneous Biopsy of Mediastinal Masses Using a Large Bore Magnet: Technical Feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnon, J., E-mail: juliengarnon@gmail.com [Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Ramamurthy, N., E-mail: nitin-ramamurthy@hotmail.com [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Caudrelier J, J., E-mail: caudjean@yahoo.fr [Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Erceg, G., E-mail: erceggorislav@yahoo.com; Breton, E., E-mail: ebreton@unistra.fr [ICube, University of Strasbourg, CNRS (France); Tsoumakidou, G., E-mail: gtsoumakidou@yahoo.com; Rao, P., E-mail: pramodrao@me.com; Gangi, A., E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

    2016-05-15

    ObjectiveTo evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided percutaneous biopsy of mediastinal masses performed using a wide-bore high-field scanner.Materials and MethodsThis is a retrospective study of 16 consecutive patients (8 male, 8 female; mean age 74 years) who underwent MRI-guided core needle biopsy of a mediastinal mass between February 2010 and January 2014. Size and location of lesion, approach taken, time for needle placement, overall duration of procedure, and post-procedural complications were evaluated. Technical success rates and correlation with surgical pathology (where available) were assessed.ResultsTarget lesions were located in the anterior (n = 13), middle (n = 2), and posterior mediastinum (n = 1), respectively. Mean size was 7.2 cm (range 3.6–11 cm). Average time for needle placement was 9.4 min (range 3–18 min); average duration of entire procedure was 42 min (range 27–62 min). 2–5 core samples were obtained from each lesion (mean 2.6). Technical success rate was 100 %, with specimens successfully obtained in all 16 patients. There were no immediate complications. Histopathology revealed malignancy in 12 cases (4 of which were surgically confirmed), benign lesions in 3 cases (1 of which was false negative following surgical resection), and one inconclusive specimen (treated as inaccurate since repeat CT-guided biopsy demonstrated thymic hyperplasia). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy in our study were 92.3, 100, 100, 66.7, and 87.5 %, respectively.ConclusionMRI-guided mediastinal biopsy is a safe procedure with high diagnostic accuracy, which may offer a non-ionizing alternative to CT guidance.

  16. Powder-in-Tube (PIT) Nb3Sn conductors for high-field magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindenhovius, J.H.; Hornsveld, E.M.; den Ouden, A.; Wessel, Wilhelm A.J.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    2000-01-01

    New Nb3Sn conductors, based on the powder-in-tube (PIT) process, have been developed for application in accelerator magnets and high-field solenoids. For application in accelerator magnets, SMI has developed a binary 504 filament PIT conductor by optimizing the manufacturing process and adjustment

  17. Final report: High current capacity high temperature superconducting film based tape for high field magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying Xin

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of the program was to establish the process parameters for the continuous deposition of high quality, superconducting YBCO films on one meter lengths of buffered RABiTS tape using MOCVD and to characterize the potential utility of the resulting tapes in high field magnet applications

  18. A new hybrid protection system for high-field superconducting magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravaioli, Emanuele; Datskov, V.I.; Kirby, G.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Verweij, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    The new generation of high-field superconducting accelerator magnets poses a challenge concerning the protection of the magnet coil in the case of a quench. The very high stored energy per unit volume requires a fast and efficient quench heating system in order to avoid damage due to overheating. A

  19. High-field 3He-F interaction at the surface of fluorocarbon spheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuhl, A.; Chapellier, M.; Rasmussen, Finn Berg

    1984-01-01

    High-field experiments on the relaxation betweenF in small Teflon spheres andHe on the surface are reported. WithHe as a monolayer, coupling times are found to be less than 5 sec, in magnetic fields up to 3 T and temperatures down to 50 mK, where electronic centers are completely polarized...

  20. Development of an YBCO coil with SSTC conductors for high field application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y.; Liu, H. J.; Liu, F.; Tan, Y. F.; Jin, H.; Yu, M.; Lei, L.; Guo, L.; Hong, Z. Y.

    2018-07-01

    With the continuous reduction of the production costs and improvement of the transport performance, YBCO coated conductor is the most promising candidate for the high field magnet application due to its high irreversibility field and strong mechanical properties. Presently a stable production capacity of the YBCO conductors has been achieved by Shanghai Superconducting Technology Co., Ltd (SSTC) in China. Therefore, the demand in high field application with YBCO conductors is growing in China. This paper describes the design, fabrication and preliminary experiment of a solenoid coil with YBCO conductors supplied by SSTC to validate the possibility of high field application. Four same double pancakes were manufactured and assembled for the YBCO coil where the outer diameter and height was 54.3 and 48 mm respectively to match the dimensional limitation of the 14 T background magnets. The critical current (Ic) of YBCO conductors was obtained by measuring as a function of the applied field perpendicular to the YBCO conductor surface which provides the necessary input parameters for preliminary performance evaluation of the coil. Finally the preliminary test and discussion at 77 and 4.2 K were carried out. The consistency of four double pancakes Ic was achieved. The measured results indicate that the fabrication technology of HTS coil is reliable which gives the conference for the in-field test in high field application. This YBCO coil is the first demonstration of the SSTC YBCO coated conductors.

  1. A high field optical-pumping spin-exchange polarized deuterium source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, K.P.; Holt, R.J.; Kinney, E.R.; Kowalczyk, R.S.; Poelker, M.; Potterveld, D.H.; Young, L.; Zeidman, B.; Toporkov, D.

    1992-01-01

    Recent results from a prototype high field optical-pumping spin-exchange polarized deuterium source are presented. Atomic polarization as high as 62% have been observed with an intensity of 6.3 x 10 17 atoms-sec -1 and 65% dissociation fraction

  2. High-field Faraday rotation in II-VI-based semimagnetic semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savchuk, AI; Fediv, [No Value; Nikitin, PI; Perrone, A; Tatzenko, OM; Platonov, VV

    The effects of d-d exchange interaction have been studied by measuring high-field Faraday rotation in II-VI-based semimagnetic semiconductors. For Cd1-xMnxTe crystals with x = 0.43 and at room temperature a saturation in magnetic field dependence of the Faraday rotation has been observed. In the

  3. [Microinjection Monitoring System Design Applied to MRI Scanning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongfeng

    2017-09-30

    A microinjection monitoring system applied to the MRI scanning was introduced. The micro camera probe was used to stretch into the main magnet for real-time video injection monitoring of injection tube terminal. The programming based on LabVIEW was created to analysis and process the real-time video information. The feedback signal was used for intelligent controlling of the modified injection pump. The real-time monitoring system can make the best use of injection under the condition that the injection device was away from the sample which inside the magnetic room and unvisible. 9.4 T MRI scanning experiment showed that the system in ultra-high field can work stability and doesn't affect the MRI scans.

  4. Venocentric lesions: an MRI marker of MS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Quinn

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available From the earliest descriptions of MS, the venocentric characteristic of plaques was noted. Recently, numerous MRI studies have proposed this finding as a prospective biomarker for MS, which might aid in differentiating MS from other diseases with similar MRI findings. High field MRI studies have shown that penetrating veins can be detected in most MS lesions using T2* weighted or susceptibility weighted imaging. Future studies must address the feasibility of imaging such veins in a clinically practical context. The specificity of this biomarker has been studied only in a limited capacity. Results in microangiopathic lesions are conflicting, whereas asymptomatic white matter hyperintensities as well as lesions of NMO are less frequently venocentric compared to MS plaques. Prospective studies have shown that the presence of venocentric lesions at an early clinical presentation is highly predictive of future MS diagnosis. This is very promising, but work remains to be done to confirm or exclude lesions of common MS mimics, such as ADEM, as venocentric. A number of technical challenges must be addressed before the introduction of this technique as a complementary tool in current diagnostic procedures.

  5. Pubic insufficiency fracture: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Tae Kyu; Lee, Yeon Soo; Park, Jeong Mi; Kim, Jee Young; Chung, Hong Jun; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Eun Ja; Kang, So Won; Han Tae Il

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristic MRI findings of pubic insufficiency fracture. In nine cases of pubic insufficiency fracture, the findings of plain radiography (n=9), MRI (n=9), and bone scintigraphy (n=8) were reviewed. We retrospectively analyzed, with regard to fracture site, the destructive pattern revealed by plain radiography, and uptake by other pelvic bones, as demonstrated by RI bone scanning. The MR findings evaluated were the fracture gap and its signal intensity, the site and signal intensity of the soft tissue mass, and other pelvic bone fractures. Plain radiography revealed osteolysis and sclerosis of pubic bone in eight of nine cases (89%), and parasymphyseal fractures in seven (78%). RI indicated uptake by the sacrum in six cases (66%), and by the ilium in three (33%). MR findings of fracture gap (seven cases, 78%) were hypo to isointensity on T1WI, hyper intensity on T2WI and the absence of contrast enhancement. Soft tissue masses were found in seven cases (78%); in four of these the location was parasymphyseal, and in three, surrounding muscle was involved. Hypo to isointensity was revealed by T1WI, hyperintensity by T2WI, and there was peripheral enhancement. Other associated pelvic bone fractures involved the sacrum in seven cases and the ilium in four. The characteristic MR findings of pubic insufficiency fracture were parasymphyseal location, fracture gap, peripherally enhanced soft tissue mass formation, and fractures of other pelvic bones, namely the sacrum and ilium

  6. MRI in sarcoglycanopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterise the pattern and spectrum of involvement on muscle MRI in a large cohort of patients with sarcoglycanopathies, which are limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2C-2F) caused by mutations in one of the four genes coding for muscle sarcoglycans. METHODS: Lower limb MRI sca...

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info About Us News Physician ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific exam and with the imaging facility. Unless you are told otherwise, you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  12. MRI of neonatal encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P.L.; Lam, B.C.C.; Tung, H.K.S.; Wong, V.; Chan, F.L.; Ooi, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in neonatal encephalopathy, including hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, perinatal/neonatal stroke, metabolic encephalopathy from inborn errors of metabolism, congenital central nervous system infections and birth trauma. The applications of advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are emphasized

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structure of an organ and how it is working. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone and other soft tissue abnormalities of the chest. MRI is also useful ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  18. Laryngeal amyloidosis with laryngocele: MRI and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, A.; Ceylan, N.; Cetin, A.; Demirci, A.

    1998-01-01

    A case of laryngeal amyloidosis associated with a laryngocele is reported. Preoperative CT showed diffuse thickening of the epiglottis, aryepiglottic folds and false vocal cords with well-defined calcific foci. MRI revealed contrast enhancement and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  19. Brucellosis of the pituitary region: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftci, E.; Erden, I.; Akyar, S. [Department of Radiology, University of Ankara (Turkey)

    1998-06-01

    We report a rare case of neurobrucellosis in a 25-year-old woman with visual impairment, bilateral hearing loss, hyperprolactinaemia and meningitis. MRI revealed a sellar and suprasellar mass with enlargement of the optic chiasm. (orig.) With 1 fig., 6 refs.

  20. MRI in head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Kyo [Shin Wha Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  1. Mobius syndrome: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, Maria F.; Villarroel, Gonzalo M.; Nagel, Jorge R.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Mobius Syndrome or congenital facial diplegia is associated with paralysis of the lateral gaze movements. This syndrome may include other cranial nerve palsies and be associated to musculoskeletal anomalies. Our objective is to show the MRI findings in Mobius Syndrome. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 3 patients with clinic diagnosis of Mobius Syndrome. RMI (1.5T); exams included axial FSE (T1 and T2), FLAIR, SE/EPI, GRE/20, sagittal FSE T2 , coronal T1, diffusion, angio MRI and Spectroscopy sequences. Results: The common features of this syndrome found in MRI were: depression or straightening of the floor of the fourth ventricle, brainstem anteroposterior diameter diminution, morphologic alteration of the pons and medulla oblongata and of the hypoglossal nuclei as well as severe micrognathia. Conclusion: The morphologic alterations of Mobius Syndrome can be clearly identified by MRI; this method has proved to be a useful diagnostic examination. (author)

  2. MRI in head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jin Kyo

    1986-01-01

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  3. 11.74T fMRI of cortical and subcortical visual networks in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Christopher; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Siefert, Alyssa

    Though a predominantly nocturnal animal, the rat has a functional visual system, albeit of low acuity, and has at least a basic form of color vision extending into the UV range. Our aim here was to develop methods to probe this system with both high field fMRI and electrophysiological techniques....

  4. The capabilities of simultaneous use of SPECT and MRI findings at removal of brain tumors using neuronavigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makejev, S.S.; Rozumenko, V.D.; Rozumenko, A.V.; Chuvashova, O.Yu.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the work was to determine the capabilities of SPECT and MRI at intra-operative determining of interrelation of the tumor and FIA. MRI revealed the peculiarities of the tumor structure, SPECT - highly proliferating tumors.

  5. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Compatible Needles and Interactive Sequences for Musculoskeletal Interventions Using an Open High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wonneberger, Uta; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Streitparth, Florian; Walter, Thula; Rump, Jens; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we study in vitro evaluation of needle artefacts and image quality for musculoskeletal laser-interventions in an open high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner at 1.0T with vertical field orientation. Five commercially available MRI-compatible puncture needles were assessed based on artefact characteristics in a CuSO4 phantom (0.1%) and in human cadaveric lumbar spines. First, six different interventional sequences were evaluated with varying needle orientation to the main magnetic field B0 (0 o to 90 o ) in a sequence test. Artefact width, needle-tip error, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Second, a gradient-echo sequence used for thermometric monitoring was assessed and in varying echo times, artefact width, tip error, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured. Artefact width and needle-tip error correlated with needle material, instrument orientation to B0, and sequence type. Fast spin-echo sequences produced the smallest needle artefacts for all needles, except for the carbon fibre needle (width o to B0. Overall, the proton density-weighted spin-echo sequences had the best CNR (CNR Muscle/Needle >16.8). Concerning the thermometric gradient echo sequence, artefacts remained <5 mm, and the SNR reached its maximum at an echo time of 15 ms. If needle materials and sequences are accordingly combined, guidance and monitoring of musculoskeletal laser interventions may be feasible in a vertical magnetic field at 1.0T.

  6. Definition and quantification of acute inflammatory white matter injury in the immature brain by MRI/MRS at high magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodygensky, Gregory A; Kunz, Nicolas; Perroud, Elodie; Somm, Emmanuel; Mlynarik, Vladimir; Hüppi, Petra S; Gruetter, Rolf; Sizonenko, Stéphane V

    2014-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection in the corpus callosum (CC) of rat pups results in diffuse white matter injury similar to the main neuropathology of preterm infants. The aim of this study was to characterize the structural and metabolic markers of acute inflammatory injury by high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in vivo. Twenty-four hours after a 1-mg/kg injection of LPS in postnatal day 3 rat pups, diffusion tensor imaging and proton nuclear magnetic spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) were analyzed in conjunction to determine markers of cell death and inflammation using immunohistochemistry and gene expression. MRI and MRS in the CC revealed an increase in lactate and free lipids and a decrease of the apparent diffusion coefficient. Detailed evaluation of the CC showed a marked apoptotic response assessed by fractin expression. Interestingly, the degree of reduction in the apparent diffusion coefficient correlated strongly with the natural logarithm of fractin expression, in the same region of interest. LPS injection further resulted in increased activated microglia clustered in the cingulum, widespread astrogliosis, and increased expression of genes for interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor. This model was able to reproduce the typical MRI hallmarks of acute diffuse white matter injury seen in preterm infants and allowed the evaluation of in vivo biomarkers of acute neuropathology after inflammatory challenge.

  7. Implanted, inductively-coupled, radiofrequency coils fabricated on flexible polymeric material: Application to in vivo rat brain MRI at 7 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginefri, J.C.; Poirier-Quinot, M.; Darrasse, L.; Rubin, A.; Tatoulian, M.; Woytasik, M.; Boumezbeur, F.; Djemai, B.; Lethimonnier, F.

    2012-01-01

    Combined with high-field MRI scanners, small implanted coils allow for high resolution imaging with locally improved SNR, as compared to external coils. Small flexible implantable coils dedicated to in vivo MRI of the rat brain at 7 T were developed. Based on the Multi-turn Transmission Line Resonator design, they were fabricated with a Teflon substrate using copper micro-molding process and a specific metal-polymer adhesion treatment. The implanted coils were made biocompatible by Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) encapsulation. The use of low loss tangent material achieves low dielectric losses within the substrate and the use of the PDMS layer reduces the parasitic coupling with the surrounding media. An implanted coil was implemented in a 7 T MRI system using inductive coupling and a dedicated external pick-up coil for signal transmission. In vivo images of the rat brain acquired with in plane resolution of (150 μm) 2 thanks to the implanted coil revealed high SNR near the coil, allowing for the visualization of fine cerebral structures. (authors)

  8. Comparison of spontaneous brain activity revealed by regional homogeneity in AQP4-IgG neuromyelitis optica-optic neuritis versus MOG-IgG optic neuritis patients: a resting-state functional MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Junqing Wang,1,* Yuan Tian,2,* Yi Shao,3,* Hui Feng,1 Limin Qin,1 Weiwei Xu,1 Hongjuan Liu,1 Quangang Xu,1 Shihui Wei,1 Lin Ma2 1Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Radiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 3Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Many previous studies have demonstrated that neuromyelitis optica (NMO patients have abnormalities of brain anatomy and function. However, differences in spontaneous brain activity between myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-IgG ON and aquaporin 4(AQP4-neuromyelitis optica-optic neuritis (ON remain unknown. In the current study, we investigated the brain neural homogeneity in MOG-IgG ON versus AQP4-IgG NMO-ON subjects by regional homogeneity (ReHo method using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Patients and methods: A total of 32 NMO-ON and ON subjects (21 with AQP4-IgG+NMO-ON and 11 with MOG-IgG+ON and 34 healthy controls (HCs closely matched for age were recruited, and scans were performed for all subjects. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was performed to determine the regions in which the ReHo was different across the three groups. NMO-ON and ON subjects were distinguished from HCs by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. The relationship between the mean ReHo in many brain regions and clinical features in NMO subjects was calculated by Pearson correlation analysis. Results: Compared with HCs, MOG-IgG+ON subjects had significantly decreased ReHo values in the posterior lobe of the left cerebellum and increased ReHo values in the left inferior frontal gyrus, right prefrontal gyrus, and left precentral/postcentral gyrus. AQP4-IgG+NMO-ON subjects showed higher ReHo values in the left inferior frontal gyrus and right middle temporal/occipital gyrus. Compared with MOG-IgG+ON subjects, AQP4-IgG+NMO-ON subjects had lower Re

  9. Indications for body MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dujardin, M. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, BEFY, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: martine.dujardin@gmail.com; Vandenbroucke, F. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederik.vandenbroucke@az.vub.ac.be; Boulet, C. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: cedric.boulet@az.vub.ac.be; Op de Beeck, B. [Department of Radiology, UZA and Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: bart.op.de.beeck@uza.be; Mey, J. de [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, BEFY, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: johan.demey@az.vub.ac.be

    2008-02-15

    The lack of ionizing radiation use in MRI makes the high spatial resolution technique very appealing. Also, the easy access to multiplanar imaging and the fact that gadolinium-DTPA is well tolerated and not nephrotoxic makes MRI a robust alternative in the healthy as well as the renal compromised patient. Furthermore, MRI adds advanced possibility for tissue characterization and pathology detection and dynamic imaging can be performed. Specific contrast agents specific to the hepatobiliary or the reticuloendothelial system can help with additional information in problem cases. The role of MRI for different organs is discussed and a review of the literature is given. We concluded that MRI is considered a useful and non-invasive diagnostic tool for the detection of hepatic iron concentration, to correct misdiagnosis (pseudolesions) from US and CT in focal steatosis and to help with focal lesion detection and characterization, in the healthy and especially in the cirrhotic liver, where MRI is superior to CT. Moreover, MRCP is excellent for identifying the presence and the level of biliary obstruction in malignant invasion and is considered in the literature as a non-invasive screening tool for common bile duct stones, appropriately selecting candidates for preoperative ERCP and sparing others the need for an endoscopic procedure with its associated complications. MRI is the first choice modality for adrenal evaluation in contemporary medical imaging. It is a useful examination in renal as well as splenic pathology and best assesses loco-regional staging, i.e. arterial involvement in pancreatic cancer.

  10. Gliomatosis cerebri: The diagnostic potential of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.O.; Hufnagl, J.M.; Staedtisches Krankenhaus Muenchen-Bogenhausen

    1991-01-01

    Gliomatosis cerebri is a rare tumor of neuroepithelial origin in middle aged persons. MRI predominantly shows a bilateral and diffuse infiltration of midline adjacent brain structures including medulla. Areas with focal anaplasia occasionally reveal an accumulation of contrast media. The diffuse tumor manifestation requires a differentiation from encephalitis and demyelinating diseases with a similar distribution pattern of lesions. Three cases have been examined. In conclusion the performance of MRI including control and brain biopsy are indicated to establish an in vivo diagnosis. (orig./GDG) [de

  11. Spinal epidural hematomas examined on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejnowski, G.; Poniatowska, R.; Kozlowski, P.

    1995-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematomas are rare pathology, caused by trauma or spontaneous. In clinical examination acute spinal cord compression is observed. MRI designations appear entirely particular. In sagittal projection, biconvex mass in the dorsal, or sometimes ventral part of the spinal canal is clearly visible. This is well delineated by the thecal sac from the cord and cauda equina. MRI investigations in 3 patients revealed corresponding with spinal bone injuries and cord edema epidural hematomas. Differential diagnosis must contain subdural hematoma and epidural neoplasms or abscess. (author)

  12. MRI in tick-borne encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkadhi, H.; Kollias, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    The tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus gives rise to epidemic encephalitis. Mild forms usually manifest as influenza-like episodes or are clinically silent. MRI is usually normal in TBE. We describe severe TBE in a patient who presented with fever and altered mental status after a tick bite and a specific antibody response to TBE. MRI revealed pronounced signal abnormalities in the basal ganglia and thalamus, without contrast enhancement. These findings coincide well with neuropathological studies of severe nerve cell degeneration with inflammatory cell infiltrates, neuronophagia and reactive astrocytosis in the deep grey matter. We review the literature and discuss the relevant differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. Isovaleric acidaemia: cranial CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogut, Ayhan; Acun, Ceyda; Tomsac, Nazan; Demirel, Fatma; Aydin, Kubilay; Aktuglu, Cigdem

    2004-01-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia is an inborn error of leucine metabolism due to deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of isovaleric acid in body fluids. There are acute and chronic-intermittent forms of the disease. We present the cranial CT and MRI findings of a 19-month-old girl with the chronic-intermittent form of isovaleric acidaemia. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hyperglycaemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and acute encephalopathy. Cranial CT revealed bilateral hypodensity of the globi pallidi. MRI showed signal changes in the globi pallidi and corticospinal tracts of the mesencephalon, which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  14. Isovaleric acidaemia: cranial CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogut, Ayhan; Acun, Ceyda; Tomsac, Nazan; Demirel, Fatma [Department of Paediatrics, Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey); Aydin, Kubilay [Department of Radiology, Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Camlikyolu, B. mehmetpasa sokak yavuz apt. No:10/10, Etiler, Istanbul (Turkey); Aktuglu, Cigdem [Department of Paediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-02-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia is an inborn error of leucine metabolism due to deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of isovaleric acid in body fluids. There are acute and chronic-intermittent forms of the disease. We present the cranial CT and MRI findings of a 19-month-old girl with the chronic-intermittent form of isovaleric acidaemia. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hyperglycaemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and acute encephalopathy. Cranial CT revealed bilateral hypodensity of the globi pallidi. MRI showed signal changes in the globi pallidi and corticospinal tracts of the mesencephalon, which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  15. Explaining MRI examinations DVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Komeda, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    When conducting MRI examinations, there are various things to be careful of. There is often stress related to the MRI examinations, so in order to perform an examination safely and smoothly, sufficient explanation must be given. An explanation of what to do and what not to do during an examination should be outlined in a brochure given to patients before the examination. There may be many patients who have misgivings about their MRI examinations, so to reduce their anxiousness and deepen their understanding of MRI examinations and to improve the safety and effiency of MRI examinations,; we created a DVD about MRI examinations. We gathered MRI-related safety information and instructions, and assessed the effect that the information might have on patients. We started a workgroup for a project to plan and record a video according to the Storyboard. When editing, we reviewed the length of each segment, the amount of information on screen, and the overall length of the DVD. We discussed the issue within the workgroup and had hospital approval. It was possible for us to complete it without depending on the supplier and the cost was kept to a minimum. Finally, we decided on a viewing location. We asked a hospital volunteers to see a complete DVD and we evaluated their responses by questionnaires. As the result, their understanding and anxieties related to MRI examinations were alleviated, as expected. Their anxiety seemed to be eased. Patients also seemed to have a deeper understanding of MRI examinations having seen an examination being conducted. (author)

  16. High resolution NMR imaging using a high field yokeless permanent magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    We measured the homogeneity and stability of the magnetic field of a high field (about 1.04 tesla) yokeless permanent magnet with 40-mm gap for high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. Homogeneity was evaluated using a 3-dimensional (3D) lattice phantom and 3D spin-echo imaging sequences. In the central sphere (20-mm diameter), peak-to-peak magnetic field inhomogeneity was about 60 ppm, and the root-mean-square was 8 ppm. We measured room temperature, magnet temperature, and NMR frequency of the magnet simultaneously every minute for about 68 hours with and without the thermal insulator of the magnet. A simple mathematical model described the magnet's thermal property. Based on magnet performance, we performed high resolution (up to [20 µm](2)) imaging with internal NMR lock sequences of several biological samples. Our results demonstrated the usefulness of the high field small yokeless permanent magnet for high resolution NMR imaging.

  17. High resolution NMR imaging using a high field yokeless permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    We measured the homogeneity and stability of the magnetic field of a high field (about 1.04 tesla) yokeless permanent magnet with 40-mm gap for high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. Homogeneity was evaluated using a 3-dimensional (3D) lattice phantom and 3D spin-echo imaging sequences. In the central sphere (20-mm diameter), peak-to-peak magnetic field inhomogeneity was about 60 ppm, and the root-mean-square was 8 ppm. We measured room temperature, magnet temperature, and NMR frequency of the magnet simultaneously every minute for about 68 hours with and without the thermal insulator of the magnet. A simple mathematical model described the magnet's thermal property. Based on magnet performance, we performed high resolution (up to [20 μm] 2 ) imaging with internal NMR lock sequences of several biological samples. Our results demonstrated the usefulness of the high field small yokeless permanent magnet for high resolution NMR imaging. (author)

  18. Novel spin excitation in the high field phase of an S=1 antiferromagnetic chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, M.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kimura, S.; Honda, Z.; Kindo, K.

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of high-field multi-frequency ESR experiment on the S=1 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chain Ni(C 5 H 14 N 2 ) 2 N 3 (PF 6 ) for the fields up to about 55T and the frequencies up to about 2THz. We have found that excitation branches above the critical field (H c ) where the energy gap closes change into one branch around 15T which becomes close to the paramagnetic line at high fields. The branch above 15T fits well the conventional antiferromagnetic resonance mode with easy planar anisotropy. We compare the results with those in a weakly coupled antiferromagnetic dimer compound KCuCl 3 and discuss the origin of the branches observed above H c

  19. Evaluation of intracranial hemorrhage with high field MR Imaging (1. 5T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campodonico, F; Brienza, G; Cotroneo, E; Fabbrini, G

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-two patients were studied with high-field Magnetic Resonance imaging (1.5T), with T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo pulse sequences. The study was aimed at assessing the efficacy of MR imaging in the evaluation of intracranical hematomas. Characteristic intensity patterns were observed in the evolution of the hematomas, were observed. In 35 sub-acute hematomas, peripheral hyperintensity could be observed on T1- and T2. weighted pulse sequences. This hyper intensity eventually fills in the hematoma in the chronic stage. In 17 chronic hematomas, a peripheral hypointense ring due to hemosidering deposits was seen on T1- and T2- weighted scans. The authors conclude that high field MR imaging is a very sensible diagnostic method in the evaluation of sub-acute and chronic hematomas. 18 refs.

  20. Ultra-High Field Magnets for X-Ray and Neutron Scattering using High Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winn, Barry L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Broholm, C. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Bird, M. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Breneman, Bruce C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Coffey, Michael [Cryomagnetics, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cutler, Roy I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Duckworth, Robert C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Erwin, R. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Hahn, Seungyong [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Hernandez, Yamali [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Herwig, Kenneth W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holland, Leo D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lonergan, Kevin M. [Oxford Instruments, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Melhem, Ziad [Oxford Instruments, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Minter, Stephen J. [Cryomagnetics, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nelson, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Paranthaman, M. Parans [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pierce, Josh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ruff, Jacob [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Shen, Tengming [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherline, Todd E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smeibidl, Peter G. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB), (Germany); Tennant, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); van der Laan, Danko [Advanced Conductor Technologies, LLC, Boulder, CO (United States); Wahle, Robert J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB), (Germany); Zhang, Yifei [SuperPower, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2017-01-01

    X-ray and neutron scattering techniques are capable of acquiring information about the structure and dynamics of quantum matter. However, the high-field magnet systems currently available at x-ray and neutron scattering facilities in the United States are limited to fields of 16 tesla (T) at maximum, which precludes applications that require and/or study ultra-high field states of matter. This gap in capability—and the need to address it—is a central conclusion of the 2005 National Academy of Sciences report by the Committee on Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science. To address this gap, we propose a magnet development program that would more than double the field range accessible to scattering experiments. With the development and use of new ultra-high field–magnets, the program would bring into view new worlds of quantum matter with profound impacts on our understanding of advanced electronic materials.

  1. Fabrication and testing of the Nb3Sn superconductor for High-Field Test Facility (HFTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, C.; Adam, E.; Gregory, E.; Marancik, W.; Sanger, P.; Scanlan, R.; Cornish, D.

    1979-01-01

    A 5000 A-12 T fully stable Nb 3 Sn superconductor has to be produced for the insert magnet of the high-field test facility being built at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. A process is described which permits the fabrication of long lengths of large fully transposed monolithic superconductors containing in excess of 100,000 filaments of Nb 3 Sn. Measurements of critical current as a function of magnetic field and longitudinal strain on prototype samples are reported

  2. Change in high field Q-slope by baking and anodizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremeev, G. [LEPP, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Padamsee, H. [LEPP, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Low temperature RF performance of two niobium cavities that underwent different chemical treatments was measured after they were heat treated at 100 deg, C for 48 h. After heat treatment cavities were anodized in ammonia hydroxide solution for sequentially increasing voltage until baking effect was gone. The thickness of niobium finally consumed is estimated to be 20 nm. The results are discussed in view of one of the current models for the baking effect on the high field Q-slope.

  3. MR equipment acquisition strategies: low-field or high-field scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti-Bonmati, L.; Kormano, M.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) field strength is one of the key aspects to consider when purchasing MR equipment. Other aspects include the gradient system, coil design, computer and pulse sequence availability, purchase cost, local reimbursement policies, and current opinion within the medical community. Our objective here is to evaluate the decision-influencing aspects of the MR market, with a focus on some specific areas such as high resolution studies, examination times, special techniques, instrumentation, open design magnets, costs and reimbursement policies, academic and industrial interests, contrast media, clinical efficacy, and finally, clinicians' preferences. Certainly the advantage of high-field is a higher signal-to-noise ratio and improved resolution. With a high-field unit, higher spatial resolution images and higher temporal resolution images can be obtained. Typical imaging times needed to produce clinically diagnostic images are about 3 times longer at 0.1 T than at 1.0 or 1.5 T. High-field-related advanced techniques, such as functional imaging, spectroscopy and microscopy, may become clinically useful in the near future. As long as there is an unlimited demand for MR examinations, it appears financially profitable to run a high-field system, despite the associated higher costs. However, if demand for MR becomes saturated, low-field systems will cause less financial strain on the reimbursement organisation and service provider. Recent emphasis on cost containment, the development of interventional techniques, the increased use of MR for patients in intensive care and operating suites, the deployment of magnets in office suites, and the development of new magnet configurations, all favour the supplementary use of low-field systems. Hence, MR units of all field strengths have a role in radiology. (orig.)

  4. Semiquantitative theory for high-field low-temperature properties of a distorted diamond spin chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Derzhko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a distorted diamond chain and use the localized-magnon picture adapted to a distorted geometry to discuss some of its high-field low-temperature properties. More specifically, in our study we assume that the partition function for a slightly distorted geometry has the same form as for ideal geometry, though with slightly dispersive one-magnon energies. We also discuss the relevance of such a description to azurite.

  5. High field magnetism and magnetoacoustics in UCu.sub.0.95./sub.Ge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvyagin, A.A.; Yasin, S.; Skourski, Y.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Zherlitsyn, S.; Wosnitza, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 528, JUL (2012), s. 51-57 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0150 Grant - others:EuroMagNET(XE) 228043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : uranium intermetallics * single crystals * antiferromagnetism * high fields * acoustics * magnetoelasticity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.390, year: 2012

  6. MRI findings and diagnosis of brain echinococcus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miriguli Shayiti; Jia Wenxiao

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the characteristic findings of brain echinococcosis on MRI. Methods: The MRI findings of 18 patients with pathologically confirmed brain echinococcosis were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Among the patients, there were 9 cases of cystic echinococcosis and 9 cases of alveolar echinococcosis. In cystic echinococcosis, MRI revealed homogeneously hypointensity on T 1 WI and hyperintensity on T 2 WI, while it showed low signal intensity inside the cysts on FLAIR and DWI. In 6 cases of cystic echinococcosis, no edema was detected surrounding the lesions, while edema resulting from cyst rupture was found in 3 cases. The cystic walls were visible in 6 cases, obscure in 3 cases. The ruptured hydatid cysts in 3 cases showed slight ring enhancement. Alveolar echinococcosis appeared as multiple lesions with isointensity on T 1 WI and hypointensity on T 2 WI, surrounded by vasogenic edema. The 'charcoal-like' hypointensity and innumerous hyperintense bubbles of 1-10 mm in diameter inside the lesions on T 2 -weighted MR images were characteristic for lesions of alveolar echinococcosis. The lesions revealed hypointensity on DWI and showed irregular ring enhancement after injection of Gd-DTPA. Perfusion-weighted MR imaging revealed low relative cerebral blood volume. Conclusion: MRI can demonstrate lesions of brain echinococcosis accurately due to its advantages of multiorientation and multiparameter. It is clinically valuable. (authors)

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  9. Evaluation of muscle MRI in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Yuri; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    Various objective measurements can be used to diagnose amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). T2-weighted brain MRI images revealed high signal areas at the posterior limb of the internal capsules in ALS patients. Recently, muscle MRI proved useful to evaluate abnormalities of the muscle in myositis patients. Therefore, in the present study, we examined muscle MRI of leg muscles in ALS patients, and correlated MRI with functional measurements, such as muscle strength, and compound muscle action potential amplitude of the tibialis anterior (TA) after stimulation of the peroneal nerve. The subjects consisted of 10 ALS patients (7 males and 3 females), ranging in age from 49 to 87. Neurologic symptoms at the onset of ALS consisted of bulbar dysfunction in one patient, upper extremity involvement in three patients, and lower extremity involvement in six patients. Muscle MRI of the legs was performed in 9 (ALS patients. A peripheral nerve conduction study was performed on the peroneal nerve, with the recording electrode over the TA. The T2-weighted muscle MRI images revealed high signal aeras in the muscle in six ALS patients, whose muscle weakness existed predominantly in the lower extremities. Extracellular fluid accumulation has been proposed to be responsible for the signal increase of denervated muscles on T2-weighted muscle MRI images. We assume that muscle MRI is useful to demonstrate the distribution of muscle involvement in ALS patients and to assess the disease's stage. (author)

  10. MRI for the detection of calcific features of vertebral haemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Y Y; Böker, S M; Diederichs, G; Walter, T; Wagner, M; Fallenberg, E; Liebig, T; Rickert, M; Hamm, B; Makowski, M R

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted-magnetic-resonance imaging (SW-MRI) for the detection of vertebral haemangiomas (VHs) compared to T1/T2-weighted MRI sequences, radiographs, and computed tomography (CT). The study was approved by the local ethics review board. An SW-MRI sequence was added to the clinical spine imaging protocol. The image-based diagnosis of 56 VHs in 46 patients was established using T1/T2 MRI in combination with radiography/CT as the reference standard. VHs were assessed based on T1/T2-weighted MRI images alone and in combination with SW-MRI, while radiographs/CT images were excluded from the analysis. Fifty-one of 56 VHs could be identified on T1/T2 MRI images alone, if radiographs/CT images were excluded from analysis. In five cases (9.1%), additional radiographs/CT images were required for the imaging-based diagnosis. If T1/T2 and SW-MRI images were used in combination, all VHs could be diagnosed, without the need for radiography/CT. Size measurements revealed a close correlation between CT and SW-MRI (R 2 =0.94; pspine, as the use of additional CT/radiography can be minimized. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Positioning device for MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damianou, Christakis [Frederick Institute of Technology (FIT), Limassol (Cyprus); MEDSONIC, LTD, Limassol (Cyprus); Ioannides, Kleanthis [Polikliniki Igia, Limassol (Cyprus); Milonas, Nicos [Frederick Institute of Technology (FIT), Limassol (Cyprus)

    2008-04-15

    A prototype magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- compatible positioning device was used to move an MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer. The positioning device has three user-controlled degrees of freedom that allow access to various targeted lesions. The positioning device was designed and fabricated using construction materials selected for compatibility with high magnetic fields and fast switching magnetic field gradients encountered inside MRI scanners. The positioning device incorporates only MRI compatible materials such as piezoelectric motors, plastic sheets, brass screws, plastic pulleys and timing belts. The HIFU/MRI system includes the multiple subsystems (a) HIFU system, (b) MR imaging, (c) Positioning device (robot) and associate drivers, (d) temperature measurement, (e) cavitation detection, (f) MRI compatible camera, and (g) Soft ware. The MRI compatibility of the system was successfully demonstrated in a clinical high-field MRI scanner. The ability of the robot to accurately move the transducer thus creating discrete and overlapping lesions in biological tissue was tested successfully. A simple, cost effective, portable positioning device has been developed which can be used in virtually any clinical MRI scanner since it can be sited on the scanner's table. The propagation of HIFU can use either a lateral or superior-inferior approach. Discrete and large lesions were created successfully with reproducible results. (orig.)

  12. MRI manifestations of severe SSPE in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Xiao Enhua; Tan Lihua; Wu Xiaochuan; Fan Songqing

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To improve the understanding of MRI findings in severe SSPE. Methods: The MRI features in 2 cases of severe SSPE confirmed by pathology were reported, and related literature was reviewed. Results: In one case, various degrees of asymmetrical cerebral swelling were seen in bilateral gray matter and white matter under the cortex, and without clear dividing line between gray and white matter, especially in temporal lobe. Abnormal signals were revealed on T 1 and T 2 WI. In another case, lesions in the brain stem, temporal lobe, globus pallidus, putamen, thalamus, and radiate coronet showed hypointense signal on T 1 WI and hyperintense signal on T 2 WI with cerebral swelling, and no obviouse cerebral atrophy was found. The local abnormal lesions had occupying effects and enhancement in both cases. Conclusion: Lasting of various degrees of cerebral swelling may be the characteristic sign on MRI in severe SSPE, differing from cerebral atrophy that might be seen in common SSPE. (authors)

  13. Radiative MRI Coil Design Using Parasitic Scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Avendal, Johan; Bibic, Adnan

    2018-01-01

    allows for antenna design techniques to be adapted to RF coil designs. This study proposes the use of parasitic scatterers to improve the performance of an existing 7T MRI coil called the single-sided adapted dipole (SSAD) antenna. The results reveal that scatterers arranged in a Yagi fashion can......Conventionally, radiofrequency (RF) coils used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are electrically small and designed for nearfield operation. Therefore, existing antenna design techniques are mostly irrelevant for RF coils. However, the use of higher frequencies in ultrahigh field (UHF) MRI...... be applied to reduce local specific absorption rate (SAR) maxima of a reference SSAD by 40% with only a 6% decrease in the propagated B1 + field at the tissue depth of 15 cm. The higher directivity of the proposed design also decreasing the coupling with additional elements, making this antenna...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... has any questions. Some implanted devices require a short period of time after placement (usually six weeks) ... center of the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI ... pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... imaging modalities (typically CT) or which are particularly well-suited to MR imaging. determine tumor size, extent, ... the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ... thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses are activated. Some centers provide earplugs, while ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone and other soft tissue ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether ... A physician or nurse specializing in sedation or anesthesia for children should be available during the exam ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should ... or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an MRI exam contains a ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... six weeks) before being safe for MRI examinations. Examples include but are not limited to: artificial heart ... usually completed within one hour but may occasionally take longer. top of page What will I experience ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam is assumed to outweigh the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of ...

  10. MRI features of chondroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Xiaoguang; Liu Xia; Cheng Kebin; Liu Wei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the MR imaging features of chondroblastoma. Methods: MRI examinations of 20 patients with histological proven chondmblastoma were reviewed retrospectively. The MRI findings of chondroblastoma including the signal intensity, the shape, the growth patterns, and the surrounding bone marrow edema and the adjacent soft tissue edema, the periosteal reaction, the adjacent joint effusion were analyzed. Results: All 20 cases demonstrated heterogeneous MR signal intensity on T 1 WI and T 2 WI images and showed lobular margins. Sixteen cases demonstrated expansive growth patterns. Surrounding bone marrow edema was found in 18 cases and adjacent soft tissue edema in 14 cases. Periosteal reaction was identified in 6 cases. In 7 cases the tumor extended to adjacent soft tissue. Adjacent joint effusion was visible on MRI in 6 cases. Conclusion: Heterogeneous signal intensity, lobular margins and expansive growth pattern, adjacent bone marrow and soft tissue edema were the common features of chondroblastoma on MRI. (authors)

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health ... invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... prior obstruction of blood flow). determine blood flow dynamics in the vessels and heart chambers. display lymph ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... an MRI scan, but this is rare. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures of ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie ... your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

  17. MRI of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in evaluating women at high risk for breast cancer. MRI can successfully image the dense breast tissue common in younger women, and it can successfully image breast implants. Both of these are difficult to image using ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. Unless you ... has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of contrast material into the bloodstream. The radiologist , ... the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... will be removed. MRI exams generally include multiple runs (sequences), some of which may last several minutes. ... top of page Who interprets the results and how do I get them? A radiologist, a physician ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... others nearby harm. These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and hearing aids, all of which can ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ...

  2. Arm MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging: In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  3. Sinus MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT, and MRI. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  4. Leg MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging: In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  5. Knee MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health and ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you should let the radiologist know about them. Parents or family members who accompany patients into the ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... of the chest. assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for good quality images. Jewelry and other accessories should be left ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... will hear and feel loud tapping or thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses ... use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made by the MRI machine. You may be ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an ... Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... are not limited to: artificial heart valves implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of ... for a mild sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... have any devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary ... is loose-fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Most MRI exams are painless. However, some patients find it uncomfortable to remain still during MR imaging. ... anxious, confused or in severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie still during imaging. A ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed on outpatients or inpatients. You will be positioned on the ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...