WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-field magnet applications

  1. High field superconducting magnets (12 T and greater) for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.R.; Summers, L.T.; Kerns, J.A.

    1986-07-09

    The technology for producing high fields in large superconducting magnets has increased greatly in recent years, but must increase still more in the future. In this paper, we examine the present state of the art vis-a-vis the needs of a next-generation fusion machine and outline a program to provide for those needs. We also highlight recent developments that suggest the program goals are within reach.

  2. Survey of Processing Methods for High Strength High Conductivity Wires for High Field Magnet Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-10-01

    This paper will deal with the basic concepts of attaining combination of high strength and high conductivity in pure materials, in-situ composites and macrocomposites. It will survey current attainments, and outline where some future developments may lie in developing wire products that are close to the theoretical strength of future magnet applications.

  3. Windows on the human body--in vivo high-field magnetic resonance research and applications in medicine and psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin; Fischmeister, Florian Ph S; Grabner, Günther; Bauer, Herbert; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in "medical sensor-systems", i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and metabolic information from the human body with unsurpassed quality. Recent achievements in high and ultra-high field MR (at 3 and 7 Tesla) are described, and representative research applications in Medicine and Psychology in Austria are discussed. Finally, an overview of current and prospective research in multi-modal imaging, potential clinical applications, as well as current limitations and challenges is given.

  4. Characterization of a dielectric phantom for high-field magnetic resonance imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Qi, E-mail: Qi.Duan@nih.gov; Duyn, Jeff H.; Gudino, Natalia; Zwart, Jacco A. de; Gelderen, Peter van [Advanced MRI Section, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Sodickson, Daniel K.; Brown, Ryan [The Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: In this work, a generic recipe for an inexpensive and nontoxic phantom was developed within a range of biologically relevant dielectric properties from 150 MHz to 4.5 GHz. Methods: The recipe includes deionized water as the solvent, NaCl to primarily control conductivity, sucrose to primarily control permittivity, agar–agar to gel the solution and reduce heat diffusivity, and benzoic acid to preserve the gel. Two hundred and seventeen samples were prepared to cover the feasible range of NaCl and sucrose concentrations. Their dielectric properties were measured using a commercial dielectric probe and were fitted to a 3D polynomial to generate a recipe describing the properties as a function of NaCl concentration, sucrose concentration, and frequency. Results: Results indicated that the intuitive linear and independent relationships between NaCl and conductivity and between sucrose and permittivity are not valid. A generic polynomial recipe was developed to characterize the complex relationship between the solutes and the resulting dielectric values and has been made publicly available as a web application. In representative mixtures developed to mimic brain and muscle tissue, less than 2% difference was observed between the predicted and measured conductivity and permittivity values. Conclusions: It is expected that the recipe will be useful for generating dielectric phantoms for general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil development at high magnetic field strength, including coil safety evaluation as well as pulse sequence evaluation (including B{sub 1}{sup +} mapping, B{sub 1}{sup +} shimming, and selective excitation pulse design), and other non-MRI applications which require biologically equivalent dielectric properties.

  5. Windows on the Human Body – in Vivo High-Field Magnetic Resonance Research and Applications in Medicine and Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin; Fischmeister, Florian Ph. S.; Grabner, Günther; Bauer, Herbert; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in “medical sensor-systems”, i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and metabolic information from the human body with unsurpassed quality. Recent achievements in high and ultra-high field MR (at 3 and 7 Tesla) are described, and representative research applications in Medicine and Psychology in Austria are discussed. Finally, an overview of current and prospective research in multi-modal imaging, potential clinical applications, as well as current limitations and challenges is given. PMID:22219684

  6. Windows on the Human Body – in Vivo High-Field Magnetic Resonance Research and Applications in Medicine and Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewald Moser

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in “medical sensor-systems”, i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and spectroscopy (MRS, which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and metabolic information from the human body with unsurpassed quality. Recent achievements in high and ultra-high field MR (at 3 and 7 Tesla are described, and representative research applications in Medicine and Psychology in Austria are discussed. Finally, an overview of current and prospective research in multi-modal imaging, potential clinical applications, as well as current limitations and challenges is given.

  7. Application of Nb3Sn superconductors in high-field accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Ouden, A.; Wessel, Wilhelm A.J.; Krooshoop, Hendrikus J.G.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Last year a record central field of 11 T at first excitation at 4.4 K has been achieved with the experimental LHC model dipole magnet MSUT by utilising a high Jc powder-in-tube Nb3Sn conductor. This is the first real breakthrough towards fields well above 10 T at 4 K. The clear influence of

  8. Strain sensors for high field pulse magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Christian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zheng, Yan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Easton, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an investigation into several strain sensing technologies that are being considered to monitor mechanical deformation within the steel reinforcement shells used in high field pulsed magnets. Such systems generally operate at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate heating issues that are inherent in the coils of nondestructive, high field pulsed magnets. The objective of this preliminary study is to characterize the performance of various strain sensing technologies at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 C). Four sensor types are considered in this investigation: fiber Bragg gratings (FBG), resistive foil strain gauges (RFSG), piezoelectric polymers (PVDF), and piezoceramics (PZT). Three operational conditions are considered for each sensor: bond integrity, sensitivity as a function of temperature, and thermal cycling effects. Several experiments were conducted as part of this study, investigating adhesion with various substrate materials (stainless steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber), sensitivity to static (FBG and RFSG) and dynamic (RFSG, PVDF and PZT) load conditions, and sensor diagnostics using PZT sensors. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), and the results of this study will be used to identify the set of sensing technologies that would be best suited for integration within high field pulsed magnets at the NHMFL facility.

  9. Mechanical design of a high field common coil magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, S; Dietderich, D R; Gourlay, S A; Gupta, R; McInturff, A; Millos, G; Scanlan, R M

    1999-01-01

    A common coil design for high field 2-in-1 accelerator magnets has been previously presented as a "conductor-friendly" option for high field magnets applicable for a Very Large Hadron Collider. This paper presents the mechanical design for a 14 tesla 2-in-1 dipole based on the common coil design approach. The magnet will use a high current density Nb/sub 3/Sn conductor. The design addresses mechanical issues particular to the common coil geometry: horizontal support against coil edges, vertical preload on coil faces, end loading and support, and coil stresses and strains. The magnet is the second in a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of the common coil design approach. (9 refs).

  10. Mechanical design of a high field common coil magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspi, S.; Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.; Gourlay, S.; Gupta, R.; McInturff, A.; Millos, G.; Scanlan, R.

    1999-03-18

    A common coil design for high field 2-in-1 accelerator magnets has been previously presented as a 'conductor-friendly' option for high field magnets applicable for a Very Large Hadron Collider. This paper presents the mechanical design for a 14 tesla 2-in-1 dipole based on the common coil design approach. The magnet will use a high current density Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor. The design addresses mechanical issues particular to the common coil geometry: horizontal support against coil edges, vertical preload on coil faces, end loading and support, and coil stresses and strains. The magnet is the second in a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of the common coil design approach.

  11. Homogenous BSCCO-2212 Round Wires for Very High Field Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Scott Campbell

    2012-06-30

    The performance demands on modern particle accelerators generate a relentless push towards higher field magnets. In turn, advanced high field magnet development places increased demands on superconducting materials. Nb3Sn conductors have been used to achieve 16 T in a prototype dipole magnet and are thought to have the capability for {approx}18 T for accelerator magnets (primarily dipoles but also higher order multipole magnets). However there have been suggestions and proposals for such magnets higher than 20 T. The High Energy Physics Community (HEP) has identified important new physics opportunities that are enabled by extremely high field magnets: 20 to 50 T solenoids for muon cooling in a muon collider (impact: understanding of neutrinos and dark matter); and 20+ T dipoles and quadrupoles for high energy hadron colliders (impact: discovery reach far beyond present). This proposal addresses the latest SBIR solicitation that calls for grant applications that seek to develop new or improved superconducting wire technologies for magnets that operate at a minimum of 12 Tesla (T) field, with increases up to 15 to 20 T sought in the near future (three to five years). The long-term development of accelerator magnets with fields greater than 20 T will require superconducting wires having significantly better high-field properties than those possessed by current Nb{sub 3}Sn or other A15 based wires. Given the existing materials science base for Bi-2212 wire processing, we believe that Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212) round wires can be produced in km-long piece lengths with properties suitable to meet both the near term and long term needs of the HEP community. The key advance will be the translation of this materials science base into a robust, high-yield wire technology. While the processing and application of A15 materials have advanced to a much higher level than those of the copper oxide-based, high T{sub c} (HTS) counterparts, the HTS materials have

  12. High Field Pulse Magnets with New Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Lesch, B.; Cochran, V. G.; Eyssa, Y.; Tozer, S.; Mielke, C. H.; Rickel, D.; van Sciver, S. W.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    2004-11-01

    High performance pulse magnets using the combination of CuNb conductor and Zylon fiber composite reinforcement with bore sizes of 24, 15 and 10 mm have been designed, manufactured and tested to destruction. The magnets successfully reached the peak fields of 64, 70 and 77.8 T respectively with no destruction. Failures occurred near the end flanges at the layer. The magnet design, manufacturing and testing, and the mode of the failure are described and analyzed.

  13. High Field Magnetization of Tb Single Crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roeland, L. W.; Cock, G. J.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1975-01-01

    The magnetization of Tb single crystals was measured in magnetic fields to 34T along the hard direction at temperature of 1.8, 4.2, 65.5 and 77K, and along with easy direction at 4.2 and 77K. The data are compared with the results of a self-consistent spin wave calculation using a phenomenologica...... data on Tb. The conduction-electron polarization at zero field and temperature is (0.33+or-0.05) mu B/ion, and the susceptibility is greater than the Pauli susceptibility calculated from the band-structure.......The magnetization of Tb single crystals was measured in magnetic fields to 34T along the hard direction at temperature of 1.8, 4.2, 65.5 and 77K, and along with easy direction at 4.2 and 77K. The data are compared with the results of a self-consistent spin wave calculation using a phenomenological...... Hamiltonian including isotropic exchange interactions, effective single-ion anisotropy and magnetoelastic contributions. The parameters of this Hamiltonian were determined by fitting the theoretical results for the spin wave dispersion and energy gap as a function of temperature and magnetic field to existing...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuberger, Thomas

    2009-06-23

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  15. Radiofrequency solutions in clinical high field magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreychenko, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341697672

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) benefit from the sensitivity gain at high field (≥7T). However, high field brings also certain challenges associated with growing frequency and spectral dispersion. Frequency growth results in degraded performance of large volume radiofrequency

  16. Survey of high field superconducting material for accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scahlan, R.; Greene, A.F.; Suenaga, M.

    1986-05-01

    The high field superconductors which could be used in accelerator dipole magnets are surveyed, ranking these candidates with respect to ease of fabrication and cost as well as superconducting properties. Emphasis is on Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi. 27 refs., 2 figs. (LEW)

  17. National Program on High Field Accelerator Magnet R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Cooley, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zlobin, A. V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Caspi, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gourlay, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Prestemon, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Larbalestier, D. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Gupta, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wanderer, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-09-26

    A National High-Field Magnet (HFM) Program is proposed as a thrust of the updated DOE-HEP General Accelerator R&D Program. The program responds to Recommendation 24 of the 2014 Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5) Report.

  18. Magnetostructural transitions in a frustrated magnet at high fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurkan, V; Zherlitsyn, S; Felea, V; Yasin, S; Skourski, Yu; Deisenhofer, J; von Nidda, H-A Krug; Lemmens, P; Wosnitza, J; Loidl, A

    2011-06-17

    Ultrasound and magnetization studies of bond-frustrated ZnCr(2)S(4) spinel are performed in static magnetic fields up to 18 T and in pulsed fields up to 62 T. At temperatures below the antiferromagnetic transition at T(N1)≈14  K, the sound velocity as a function of the magnetic field reveals a sequence of steps followed by plateaus indicating a succession of crystallographic structures with constant stiffness. At the same time, the magnetization evolves continuously with a field up to full magnetic polarization without any plateaus in contrast to geometrically frustrated chromium oxide spinels. The observed high-field magnetostructural states are discussed within a H-T phase diagram taking into account the field and temperature evolution of three coexisting spin structures and subsequent lattice transformations induced by the magnetic field.

  19. Nb3Sn High Field Magnets for the High Luminosity LHC Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, Giorgio

    2015-06-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN requires a new generation of high field superconducting magnets. High field large aperture quadrupoles (MQXF) are needed for the low-beta triplets close to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, and high field two-in-one dipoles (11 T dipoles) are needed to make room for additional collimation. The MQXF quadrupoles, with a field gradient of 140 T/m in 150 mm aperture, have a peak coil field of 12.1 T at nominal current. The 11 T dipoles, with an aperture of 60 mm, have a peak coil field of 11.6 T at nominal current. Both magnets require Nb3Sn conductor and are the first applications of this superconductor to actual accelerator magnets.

  20. Ultrasound versus high field magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, York Kiat; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advances in the field of musculoskeletal imaging, especially in the application of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both modalities offer significant advantages over the previous...... standards of clinical examination and radiography, and allow direct visualisation of both joint inflammation and structural damage. Although measuring similar pathology, each of these imaging tools has its own benefits and limitations; understanding these will help researchers and clinicians to determine...

  1. High field magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, A; Muratore, J; Parker, B; Sampson, W; Wanderer, P J; Willen, E

    2000-01-01

    The magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focussed on superconducting magnets for particle accelerators. The effort includes magnet production at the laboratory and in industry, magnet R&D, and test facilities for magnets and superconductors. Nearly 2000 magnets-dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles and correctors for the arc and insertion regions-were produced for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which is being commissioned. Currently, production of helical dipoles for the polarized proton program at RHIC, insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and an insertion magnet system for the Hadron-Elektron-Ring- Analage (HERA) collider at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) is underway. The R&D effort is exploring dipoles with fields above 10 T for use in post-LHC colliders. Brittle superconductors-Nb/sub 3/Sn or HTS-are being used for these magnets. The superconductor test facility measures short-sample currents and other characteristics of sample...

  2. High-field magnetic transition in Er sub 2 Fe sub 14 B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwanski, R.J.; Boer, F.R. de (Natuurkundig Lab., Univ. van Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Zhong, X.P.; Yang, F.M.; Li, J.Y. (Magnetism Lab., Inst. of Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing (China)); Kohashi, T.; Ono, M.; Date, M. (Dept. of Physics, Osaka Univ. (Japan)); Yamagishi, A. (Research Center for Extreme Materials, Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1991-10-01

    Field-induced transitions in quasi-ternary Er{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds have been revealed by means of magnetization measurements at high magnetic fields. The high-field studies for Er{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B, in particular the modest differential high-field susceptibility and the formation of a non-collinear magnetic structure at 42 T, do not confirm the substantial canted magnetic structure at low fields. (orig.).

  3. Conceptual Design of the 45 T Hybrid Magnet at the Nijmegen High Field Magnet Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegers, SAJ; Bird, M D; Rook, J; Perenboom, J A A J; Wiegers, S A J; Bonito-Oliva, A; den Ouden, A

    2010-01-01

    A 45 T Hybrid Magnet System is being developed at the Nijmegen High Field Magnet Laboratory as part of the Nijmegen Center for Advanced Spectroscopy. The 45 T Hybrid Magnet System will be used in combination with far-infra-red light produced by a Free Electron Laser under construction directly adjacent to the High Field Magnet Laboratory. The superconducting outsert magnet will consist of three CICC coils wound on a single coil form, using Nb3Sn strands. A test program for strand and cable qualification is underway. The CICC will carry 13 kA and the coils will produce 12 T on axis field in a 600 mm warm bore. The nominal operating temperature will be 4.5 K maintained with forced-flow supercritical helium. The insert magnet will produce 33 T at 40 kA in a 32 mm bore consuming 20 MW, and will consist of four coils. The insert magnet will be galvanically and mechanically isolated from the outsert magnet. Complete system availability for users is expected in 2014. In this paper we will report on the conceptual de...

  4. Powder-in-tube (PIT) $Nb_{3}Sn$ conductors for high-field magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Lindenhovius, J L H; den Ouden, A; Wessel, W A J; ten Kate, H H J

    2000-01-01

    New Nb/sub 3/Sn conductors, based on the powder-in-tube (PIT) process, have been developed for application in accelerator magnets and high-field solenoids. For application in accelerator magnets, SMI has developed a binary 504 filament PIT conductor by optimizing the manufacturing process and adjustment of the conductor lay-out. It uniquely combines a non-copper current density of 2680 A/mm/sup 2/@10 T with an effective filament diameter of about 20 mu m. This binary conductor may be used in a 10 T, wide bore model separator dipole magnet for the LHC, which is being developed by a collaboration of the University of Twente and CERN. A ternary (Nb/7.5wt%Ta)/sub 3/Sn conductor containing 37 filaments is particularly suited for application in extremely high-field superconducting solenoids. This wire features a copper content of 43%, a non-copper current density of 217 A/mm/sup 2/@20 T and a B/sub c2/ of 25.6 T. The main issues and the experimental results of the development program of PIT Nb/sub 3/Sn conductors a...

  5. High-Field Magnetization of Light Rare-Earth Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEwen, K.A.; Cock, G.J.; Roeland, L.W.

    1973-01-01

    The magnetization of single crystals of Eu, Sm, Nd, Pr, and Pr-Nd alloys has been measured in fields up to 37 T (370 kG). The results give new information on the magnetic properties of these metals. Of particular interest is a first-order transition from a nonmagnetic to a metamagnetic phase...

  6. The role of high-field magnetic resonance imaging in parkinsonian disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehericy, Stéphane; Vaillancourt, David E.; Seppi, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Historically, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has contributed little to the study of Parkinson's disease (PD), but modern MRI approaches have unveiled several complementary markers that are useful for research and clinical applications. Iron- and neuromelanin-sensitive MRI detect qualitative...... changes in the substantia nigra. Quantitative MRI markers can be derived from diffusion weighted and iron-sensitive imaging or volumetry. Functional brain alterations at rest or during task performance have been captured with functional and arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI. These markers are useful...... understand neurodegeneration and provide reliable markers for therapeutic trials. This article reviews recent advances in MRI biomarker research at high-field (3T) and ultra high field-imaging (7T) in PD and atypical parkinsonism....

  7. Superconductor Requirements and Characterization for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzi, E.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    The 2014 Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5) strategic plan for U.S. High Energy Physics (HEP) endorses a continued world leadership role in superconducting magnet technology for future Energy Frontier Programs. This includes 10 to 15 T Nb3Sn accelerator magnets for LHC upgrades and a future 100 TeV scale pp collider, and as ultimate goal that of developing magnet technologies above 20 T based on both High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) and Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS) for accelerator magnets. To achieve these objectives, a sound conductor development and characterization program is needed and is herein described. This program is intended to be conducted in close collaboration with U.S. and International labs, Universities and Industry.

  8. THERMAL MODELS FOR THE FRESCA2 HIGH FIELD MAGNET

    CERN Document Server

    Pietrowicz, S

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the thermal studies and measurement that have been realized, at CEA Saclay, for the thermal design of the Fresca 2 magnet under development in EuCARD HFM program. The first part of the report is dedicated to the numerical study of the thermal behaviour of the Fresca 2 magnet in He II. The second part of the report concerns the experimental measurement on two composite insulation systems made of cyanate ester epoxy mix and tri-functional epoxy (TGPAP-DETDA) with S-glass fiber.

  9. Shrink Tube Insulation Apparatus for Rebco Superconducting Tapes for Use in High Field Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Whittington, Andrew

    An increasing number of applications require the use of high temperature superconductors (HTS) such as (RE=Rare Earth) Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO) coated conductors [1]. HTS conductors show particularly great potential for high field magnets applications [1] due to their high upper critical fields [2], But several groups have shown that REBCO coated conductors are prone to delamination failure [3] [4] [5]. Under relatively low transverse stress the HTS film separates from the substrate and the conductor degrades [6]. This is problematic due to high transverse stresses that occur in fully epoxy impregnated solenoids wound with this conductor. Application of thin walled heat shrink tubing introduces a weak plane around the conductor, preventing delamination degradation [7]. However, manual application of the shrink tubing is impractical, requiring three operators limited to insulating 100 m lengths or less of REBCO conductor. The high risk of damage to the conductor, also associated with this process, shows the need for...

  10. A new support structure for high field magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Hafalia, R R; Caspi, S; Dietderich, D R; Gourlay, S A; Hannaford, R; Lietzke, A F; Liggins, N; McInturff, A D; Sabbi, G L; Scanlan, R M; O'Neill, J; Swanson, J H

    2002-01-01

    Pre-stress of superconducting magnets can be applied directly through the magnet yoke structure. We have replaced the collar functionality in our 14 Tesla R&D Nb//3Sn dipole magnets with an assembly procedure based on an aluminum shell and bladders. Bladders, placed between the coil pack and surrounding yoke inside the shell, are pressurized up to 10 ksi left bracket 70 MPa right bracket to create an interference gap. Keys placed into the interference gap replace the bladder functionality. Following the assembly, the bladders are deflated and removed. Strain gauges mounted directly on the shell are used to monitor the stress of the entire magnet structure, thereby providing a high degree of pre-stress control without the need for high tolerances. During assembly, a force of 8.2 multiplied by 10**5 lbs /ft left bracket 12 MN/m right bracket is generated by the bladders and the stress in the 1.57 double prime left bracket 40 mm right bracket aluminum shell reaches 20.3 ksi left bracket 140 MPa right bracket...

  11. High-field magnetization of dilute rare earths in yttrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touborg, P.; Høg, J.; Cock, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetization measurements have been performed on single crystals of Y containing small amounts of Tb, Dy, or Er at 4.2 K in fields up to 295 × 105 A/m (370 kOe). Crystal-field and molecular-field parameters obtained from measurements of the initial susceptibility versus temperature give a satisf...

  12. The new installation at the Nijmegen High Field Magnet Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perenboom, J.A.A.J.; Wiegers, S.A.J.; Christianen, P.C.M.; Zeitler, U.; Maan, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    For research in the highest continuous and pulsed magnetic fields large, complex and powerful installations are needed. A new 20 MW installation has been built at the University of Nijmegen. The ultra-low ripple power converter, delivering 40 kA at up to 500 V, provides the capability to perform

  13. [Survey of risks related to static magnetic fields in ultra high field MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, H E; von Cramon, D Y

    2008-04-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), substantial improvements with respect to sensitivity are expected due to the development of so-called ultra high field scanners, i. e., whole-body scanners with a magnetic field strength of 7 T or above. Users of this technology need to evaluate this benefit for potential risks since commercially available systems are not certified as a medical device for human use. This review provides a detailed survey of static field bioeffects related to the exposure of subjects being scanned, to occupational exposure, and to exposure of the general public under consideration of current standards and directives. According to present knowledge, it is not expected that exposure of human subjects to static magnetic fields of 7 T implies a specific risk of damage or disease provided that known contraindications are observed. The available database does not permit definition of exact thresholds for harmful effects. However, experience from previous application of ultra high field MRI indicates that transient phenomena, such as vertigo, nausea, metallic taste, or magneto-phosphenes, are more frequently observed. In particular, movements in the field or the gradient of the fringe field seem to lead to detectable effects. Besides such observations, there is a strong demand for systematic investigation of potential interaction mechanisms related to static field exposure during MRI examinations.

  14. Crystal field interactions studied by high-field magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwanski, R.J.; Franse, J.J.M. (Van der Waals-Zeeman Lab., Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1992-03-01

    The effect of crystalline electric field (CEF) interactions of the 4f ions on the magnetization process is reviewed for some intermetallic compounds. Special emphasis is given to metamagnetic transitions. The transitions in Ho{sub 2}Co{sub 17} are exchange-driven transitions associated with the formation of a non-collinear magnetic structure in contrast to the transition found in DyCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} that is of a level-crossing type. The transition found in Pr{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B results from a competition between lower and higher order crystal field terms. The formation of the rare earth moment under the action of CEF and exchange interactions as well as of external fields is analyzed. (orig.).

  15. DOUBLE DEGENERATE MERGERS AS PROGENITORS OF HIGH-FIELD MAGNETIC WHITE DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Loren-Aguilar, Pablo; Aznar-Siguan, Gabriela; Torres, Santiago; Camacho, Judit [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, c/Esteve Terrades, 5, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Althaus, Leandro G.; Corsico, Alejandro H. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Kuelebi, Baybars; Isern, Jordi, E-mail: garcia@fa.upc.edu [Institute for Space Studies of Catalonia, c/Gran Capita 2-4, Edif. Nexus 104, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-04-10

    High-field magnetic white dwarfs have been long suspected to be the result of stellar mergers. However, the nature of the coalescing stars and the precise mechanism that produces the magnetic field are still unknown. Here, we show that the hot, convective, differentially rotating corona present in the outer layers of the remnant of the merger of two degenerate cores can produce magnetic fields of the required strength that do not decay for long timescales. Using a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo simulator, we also show that the expected number of high-field magnetic white dwarfs produced in this way is consistent with that found in the solar neighborhood.

  16. A low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secoli, Riccardo; Robinson, Matthew; Brugnoli, Michele; Rodriguez y Baena, Ferdinando

    2015-03-01

    To perform minimally invasive surgical interventions with the aid of robotic systems within a magnetic resonance imaging scanner offers significant advantages compared to conventional surgery. However, despite the numerous exciting potential applications of this technology, the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging-compatible robotics has been hampered by safety, reliability and cost concerns: the robots should not be attracted by the strong magnetic field of the scanner and should operate reliably in the field without causing distortion to the scan data. Development of non-conventional sensors and/or actuators is thus required to meet these strict operational and safety requirements. These demands commonly result in expensive actuators, which mean that cost effectiveness remains a major challenge for such robotic systems. This work presents a low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator: a pneumatic stepper motor which is controllable in open loop or closed loop, along with a rotary encoder, both fully manufactured in plastic, which are shown to perform reliably via a set of in vitro trials while generating negligible artifacts when imaged within a standard clinical scanner. © IMechE 2015.

  17. A new hybrid protection system for high-field superconducting magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravaioli, Emanuele; Datskov, V.I.; Kirby, G.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Verweij, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    The new generation of high-field superconducting accelerator magnets poses a challenge concerning the protection of the magnet coil in the case of a quench. The very high stored energy per unit volume requires a fast and efficient quench heating system in order to avoid damage due to overheating. A

  18. Numerical simulation of screening current distribution in HTS tape of high field magnet

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Ryusei; Oga, Yuki; Noguchi, So; Igarashi, Hajime; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, properties of high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes, especially in-field performance and mechanical strength, have been continuously improved. The HTS tapes have been widely used for high field (>20 T) magnet researches and there are several technical challenges including field attenuation of an HTS magnet by screening currents induced within the HTS tapes. Several publications reported that the screening currents, induced by penetration of self magnetic fields into HT...

  19. The role of high-field magnetic resonance imaging in parkinsonian disorders: Pushing the boundaries forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehericy, Stéphane; Vaillancourt, David E; Seppi, Klaus; Monchi, Oury; Rektorova, Irena; Antonini, Angelo; McKeown, Martin J; Masellis, Mario; Berg, Daniela; Rowe, James B; Lewis, Simon J G; Williams-Gray, Caroline H; Tessitore, Alessandro; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2017-04-01

    Historically, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has contributed little to the study of Parkinson's disease (PD), but modern MRI approaches have unveiled several complementary markers that are useful for research and clinical applications. Iron- and neuromelanin-sensitive MRI detect qualitative changes in the substantia nigra. Quantitative MRI markers can be derived from diffusion weighted and iron-sensitive imaging or volumetry. Functional brain alterations at rest or during task performance have been captured with functional and arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI. These markers are useful for the diagnosis of PD and atypical parkinsonism, to track disease progression from the premotor stages of these diseases and to better understand the neurobiological basis of clinical deficits. A current research goal using MRI is to generate time-dependent models of the evolution of PD biomarkers that can help understand neurodegeneration and provide reliable markers for therapeutic trials. This article reviews recent advances in MRI biomarker research at high-field (3T) and ultra high field-imaging (7T) in PD and atypical parkinsonism. © 2017 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Design of the EuCARD High-Field Model Dipole Magnet FRESCA2

    CERN Document Server

    Milanese, A; Durante, M; Manil, P; Perez, J C; Rifflet, J M; de Rijk, G; Rondeaux, F

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the design of FRESCA2, a dipole magnet model wound with Nb3Sn Rutherford cable. This magnet is one of the deliverables of the High Field Magnets work package of the European FP7-EuCARD project. The nominal magnetic flux density of 13 Tesla in a 100 mm bore will make it suitable for upgrading the FRESCA cable test facility at CERN. The magnetic layout is based on a block coil, with four layers per pole. The mechanical structure is designed to provide adequate pre-stress, through the use of bladders, keys and an aluminum alloy shrinking cylinder.

  1. Design of the EuCARD high field model dipole magnet FRESCA2

    CERN Document Server

    Milanese, A; Durante, M; Manil, P; Perez, J-C; Rifflet, J-M; de Rijk, G; Rondeaux, F

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the design of FRESCA2, a dipole magnet model wound with Nb3Sn Rutherford cable. This magnet is one of the deliverables of the High Field Magnets work package of the European FP7-EuCARD project. The nominal magnetic flux density of 13 Tesla in a 100 mm bore will make it suitable for upgrading the FRESCA cable test facility at CERN. The magnetic layout is based on a block coil, with four layers per pole. The mechanical structure is designed to provide adequate pre-stress, through the use of bladders, keys and an aluminum alloy shrinking cylinder.

  2. High-field magnetization and specific heat of TmNi{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayzel, F.E. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Franse, J.J.M. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Colpa, J.H.P. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Kim-Ngan, N.-H. [Centre for Solid State Physics, Krakow (Poland); Tai, L.T. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Radwanski, R.J. [Centre for Solid State Physics, Krakow (Poland); Gignoux, D. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 -Grenoble (France). Lab. Louis Neel

    1996-05-01

    High-field magnetization on two single-crystalline samples from different batches of TmNi{sub 5} has been measured along the crystallographic a, b and c directions up to 38 T at 1.5 K. A small high-field susceptibility {chi}{sub HF}=6.3.10{sup -3} {mu}{sub B}/T f.u. was observed along the easy c-axis. The magnetization measured alon g both a- and b-axis shows hysteresis and a magnetic transition between 5 and 15 T. Specific heat has been measured from 1.5 to 160 K. A {lambda}-type peak found at about 3.7 K originates from the magnetic system. (orig.).

  3. Development of superconducting magnet for high-field MR systems in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zanming; van Oort, Johannes M.; Zou, Mark X.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we describe the development of superconducting magnets for high-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) by various businesses and institutions in China. As the Chinese MR market rapidly expands, many foreign and domestic companies and research institutions are joining the race to meet the burgeoning demand by developing key MRI components for various magnetic field configurations. After providing a brief introduction to research on MRI superconducting magnets that dates back to the 1980s, the first large-bore 1.5 T superconducting magnet with 50-cm DSV for whole-body MRI - successfully developed and manufactured by AllTech Medical Systems in Chengdu, China-is presented and its specifications are described.

  4. High-field magnetic transitions in the R sub 2 T sub 17 compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franse, J.J.M.; Sinnema, S. (Amsterdam Univ. (NL). Natuurkundig Lab.); Radwanski, R.J. (University of Mining and Metallurgy, Krakow (PL). Solid State Physics Dept.)

    1988-12-01

    In the past few years high-field magnetic transitions have been extensively studied for a number of single crystalline samples of the R{sub 2}T{sub 17} series (R = rare earths, T = Co or Fe). The transitions observed in Ho{sub 2}Co{sub 17} and Dy{sub 2}Co{sub 17} are exchange-driven transitions connected with a breaking of the ferromagnetic structure and only occur in applied fields above 20 T.

  5. A HIGH FIELD PULSED SOLENOID MAGNET FOR LIQUID METAL TARGET STUDIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIRK,H.G.IAROCCI,M.SCADUTO,J.WEGGEL,R.J.MULHOLLAND,G.MCDONALD,K.T.

    2003-05-12

    The target system for a muon collider/neutrino factory requires the conjunction of an intense proton beam, a high-Z liquid target and a high-field solenoid magnet. We describe here the design parameters for a pulsed solenoid, including the magnet cryogenic system and power supply, that can generate transient fields of greater than 10T with a flat-tops on the order of 1 second. It is envisioned to locate this device at the Brookhaven AGS for proof-of-principle testing of a liquid-jet target system with pulses of le13 protons.

  6. A new hybrid protection system for high-field superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Ravaioli, E; Kirby, G; ten Kate, H H J; Verweij, A P

    2014-01-01

    The new generation of high-field superconducting accelerator magnets poses a challenge concerning the protection of the magnet coil in the case of a quench. The very high stored energy per unit volume requires a fast and efficient quench heating system in order to avoid damage due to overheating. A new protection system for superconducting magnets is presented, comprising a combination of a novel coupling-loss induced quench (CLIQ) system and conventional quench heaters. CLIQ can provoke a very fast transition to the normal state in coil windings by introducing coupling loss and thus heat in the coil's conductor. The advantage of the hybrid protection system is a global transition, resulting in a much faster current decay, a significantly lower hot-spot temperature, and a more homogeneous temperature distribution in the magnet's coil.

  7. High field volume coil with unbalance current distribution for MRI applications of rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrufo, O. R.; Hernández, J.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2010-12-01

    The development of transceiver volume coils for high field MRI is still a very dynamic field of investigation and development Temnikov has been recently proposed a new volume coil design, similar to the to the gradiometer coil. It is also claimed that it is possible to individually tune it with a single chip capacitor. This motivated the development of a coil prototype based on this idea for whole-body MRI of rodents at 7 Tesla. Electromagnetic simulations of the RF field generated by this coil design were previously performed to study its properties. Electromagnetic simulations were also conducted for a standard birdcage coil with similar dimensions for fare comparison. In all numerical simulations, an unbalanced currents distribution was assumed by applying half the current intensity to designated legs. This coil design operated in the transceiver mode and was linear-driven. The coil size was manufactured to accommodate small rodents. Numerical simulations showed a field uniformity improvement of our coil over the standard birdcage coil. A popular birdcage coil was also constructed to compare their performances. Phantom and rat images were acquired for both volume coils to prove the viability of this coil design for high field MRI applications and standard spin echo pulse sequences Thus, these preliminary results make this coil design a good candidate for MRI and MRS applications of high magnetic fields.

  8. High field magnetization and specific heat of ErNi{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayzel, F.E.; Franse, J.J.M. [Univ. van Amsterdam (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Lab.; Radwanski, R.J. [Centre for Solid State Physics, Krakow (Poland)

    1994-03-01

    High field magnetization studies of single crystalline ErNi{sub 5} in fields up to 38T at 1.5K along the main crystallographic directions have been performed. Along the easy direction, the hexagonal axis, the spontaneous magnetization, M{sub s}, amounts to 8.62{mu}{sub B}/f.u. The high-field susceptibility is very small and equal to 41 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}{mu}{sub B}/Tf.u. There exists a distinct difference between the curves along the a- and b-axis. The a-axis curve monotonously increases with field up to 38T. The b-axis curve coincides with the a-axis curve up to 12T but starts to deviate from it above this field, resulting in a value for the magnetization at 38T which is almost the full moment value. The specific beat of a newly-grown single-crystalline sample has been measured in zero field and in applied fields along the c-axis (B = 0.3, 1, 2, 5T). The zero-field measurements coincide with previously reported results The specific heat shows a rapid decrease of the ferrimagnetic order with applied field. Already in 1T, the sharp lambda-type of peak at the magnetic transition is decreased by two third and becomes a broad bump that coincides with the la measurement above 30K. Higher fields further suppress the transition.

  9. High field magnetization of R sub 2 T sub 17 compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franse, J.J.M.; Kayzel, F.E.; Marquina, C.; Radwanski, R.J.; Verhoef, R. (Van der Waals-Zeeman Lab., Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1992-04-03

    A summary is presented of high field magnetization studies on the R{sub 2}T{sub 17} compounds (R = rare earth, T = Fe, Co or Ni). The different types of transitions that have been observed in magnetization studies on single-crystal samples along different crystallographic directions are mentioned. By analysing the transition fields, valuable information is obtained either on the strength of the R-T coupling or on the crystal field interactions of the rare earth ions. In addition, experiments are reported on powdered samples that are free to rotate in the applied magnetic field. This experimental technique provides a rather simple experimental approach to the intersublattice coupling in ferrimagnetic R-T compounds. (orig.).

  10. A new hybrid protection system for high-field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaioli, E.; Datskov, V. I.; Kirby, G.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Verweij, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    The new generation of high-field superconducting accelerator magnets poses a challenge concerning the protection of the magnet coil in the case of a quench. The very high stored energy per unit volume requires a fast and efficient quench heating system in order to avoid damage due to overheating. A new protection system for superconducting magnets is presented, comprising a combination of a novel coupling-loss induced quench (CLIQ) system and conventional quench heaters. CLIQ can provoke a very fast transition to the normal state in coil windings by introducing coupling loss and thus heat in the coil’s conductor. The advantage of the hybrid protection system is a global transition, resulting in a much faster current decay, a significantly lower hot-spot temperature, and a more homogeneous temperature distribution in the magnet’s coil.

  11. Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging of the basal ganglia and related structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Renske Plantinga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation is a treatment for Parkinson’s disease and other related disorders, involving the surgical placement of electrodes in the deeply situated basal ganglia or thalamic structures. Good clinical outcome requires accurate targeting. However, due to limited visibility of the target structures on routine clinical MR images, direct targeting of structures can be challenging. Non-clinical MR scanners with ultra-high magnetic field (7T or higher have the potential to improve the quality of these images. This technology report provides an overview of the current possibilities of visualizing deep brain stimulation targets and their related structures with the aid of ultra-high field MRI. Reviewed studies showed improved resolution, contrast- and signal-to-noise ratios at ultra-high field. Sequences sensitive to magnetic susceptibility such as T2* and susceptibility weighted imaging and their maps in general showed the best visualization of target structures, including a separation between the subthalamic nucleus and the substantia nigra, the lamina pallidi medialis and lamina pallidi incompleta within the globus pallidus and substructures of the thalamus, including the ventral intermediate nucleus (Vim. This shows that the visibility, identification and even subdivision of the small deep brain stimulation targets benefit from increased field strength. Although ultra-high field MR imaging is associated with increased risk of geometrical distortions, it has been shown that these distortions can be avoided or corrected to the extent where the effects are limited. The availability of ultra-high field MR scanners for humans seems to provide opportunities for a more accurate targeting for deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson’s disease and related disorders.

  12. Thermal Design of an Nb3Sn High Field Accelerator Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Pietrowicz, S

    2011-01-01

    Within the framework of the European project EuCARD, a Nb3Sn high field accelerator magnet is under design to serve as a test bed for future high field magnets and to upgrade the vertical CERN cable test facility, Fresca. The Fresca 2 block coil type magnet will be operated at 1.9 K or 4.2 K and is designed to produce about 13 T. A 2D numerical thermal model was developed to determinate the temperature margin of the coil in working conditions and the appropriate cool-down scenario. The temperature margin, which is DTmarge=5.8 K at 1.9 K and DTmarge=3.5 K at 4.2 K, was investigated in steady state condition with the AC losses due to field ramp rate as input heat generation. Several cool-down scenarios were examined in order to minimize the temperature difference and therefore reducing the mechanical constraints within the structure. The paper presents the numerical model, the assumptions taken for the calculations and several results of the simulation for the cool-down and temperature distributions due to seve...

  13. New vertical cryostat for the high field superconducting magnet test station at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Craen, A.; Atieh, S.; Bajko, M.; Benda, V.; de Rijk, G.; Favre, G.; Giloux, C.; Hanzelka, P.; Minginette, P.; Parma, V.; Perret, P.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Viret, P.

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the R&D program for new superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator upgrades, CERN is building a new vertical test station to test high field superconducting magnets of unprecedented large size. This facility will allow testing of magnets by vertical insertion in a pressurized liquid helium bath, cooled to a controlled temperature between 4.2 K and 1.9 K. The dimensions of the cryostat will allow testing magnets of up to 2.5 m in length with a maximum diameter of 1.5 m and a mass of 15 tons. To allow for a faster insertion and removal of the magnets and reducing the risk of helium leaks, all cryogenics supply lines are foreseen to remain permanently connected to the cryostat. A specifically designed 100 W heat exchanger is integrated in the cryostat helium vessel for a controlled cooling of the magnet from 4.2 K down to 1.9 K in a 3 m3 helium bath. This paper describes the cryostat and its main functions, focusing on features specifically developed for this project. The status of the construction and the plans for assembly and installation at CERN are also presented.

  14. Comparison of mechanical concepts for $Nb_3Sn$ high field accelerator magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Loffler, Christian Hannes; Peter, Schmolz

    Several magnets using Nb3Sn as conductor are currently developed at CERN; these magnets are either slated for future updates of the LHC or for research purposes relating to future accelerators. The mechanical structure is one of the challenging aspects of superconducting high-field magnets. The main purpose of the mechanical structure is to keep the coils in compression till the emergence of the highest electromagnetic forces that are developed in the ultimate field of the magnet. Any loss of pre-compression during the magnet’s excitation would cause too large deformation of the coil and possibly a quench in the conductor owing to relative movements of strands in contact associated with excessive local heat release. However, too high pre-compression would overstrain the conductor and thereby limit the performance of the magnet. This thesis focuses on the mechanical behaviour of three of these magnets. All of them are based on different mechanical designs, “bladder and key” and “collar-based”, for t...

  15. 2D/3D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn high field magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2002-09-19

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for three-dimensional analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb{sub 3}Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets.

  16. 2-D/3-D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated $Nb_{3}$ Sn high field magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, R; Marscin, E; Rey, J M; Wake, M

    2003-01-01

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for 3-D analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb/sub 3/Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets. (6 refs).

  17. Considerations on a Cost Model for High-Field Dipole Arc Magnets for FCC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078700; Durante, Maria; Lorin, Clement; Martinez, Teresa; Ruuskanen, Janne; Salmi, Tiina; Sorbi, Massimo; Tommasini, Davide; Toral, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    In the frame of the European Circular Collider (EuroCirCol), a conceptual design study for a post-Large Hadron Collider (LHC) research infrastructure based on an energy-frontier 100 TeV circular hadron collider [1]–[3], a cost model for the high-field dipole arc magnets is being developed. The aim of the cost model in the initial design phase is to provide the basis for sound strategic decisions towards cost effective designs, in particular: (A) the technological choice of superconducting material and its cost, (B) the target performance of Nb3Sn superconductor, (C) the choice of operating temperature (D) the relevant design margins and their importance for cost, (E) the nature and extent of grading, and (F) the aperture’s influence on cost. Within the EuroCirCol study three design options for the high field dipole arc magnets are under study: cos − θ [4], block [5], and common-coil [6]. Here, in the advanced design phase, a cost model helps to (1) identify the cost drivers and feed-back this informati...

  18. Magnetic anisotropy and high-field magnetization process of CeCo[sub 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartashevich, M.I. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Solid State Physics (ISSP)); Goto, T. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Solid State Physics (ISSP)); Radwanski, R.J. (Centre for Solid State Physics, Krakow (Poland)); Korolyov, A.V. (Inst. of Metal Physics, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation))

    1994-03-01

    The magnetization process of single-crystalline CeCo[sub 5] has been measured at various temperatures from 4.2 to 300 K in high magnetic fields up to 40 T. The uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant K[sub 1] is found to be about 35% higher than that of YCo[sub 5]. The magnetization anisotropy reaches p = 0.12 at 4.2 K, which is also higher than that of YCo[sub 5]. Both the anisotropies decrease with increasing temperature. These experimental results indicate that Ce in CeCo[sub 5] is in a mixed-valence state. (orig.)

  19. Strength of the rare-earth-transition-metal exchange coupling in hard magnetic materials, an experimental approach based on high-field magnetisation measurements: Application to Er sub 2 Fe sub 14 B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhoef, R.; Radwanski, R.J.; Franse, J.J.M. (Natuurkundig Lab., Univ. van Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1990-09-01

    A new experimental technique is presented to determine the intersublattice molecular-field coefficient, n{sub RT}, in heavy rare-earth-transition-metal intermetallic compounds. The technique is based on high-field magnetisation measurements on finely powdered polycrystalline material that is free to rotate in the sampleholder. Experimental results are reported for a number of Er{sub 2}Fe{sub 14-x}Mn{sub x}B compounds. The strength of the R-T exchange coupling is not affected by the Mn substitution, and a value of 0.445 Tkg/Am{sup 2} has been deduced for the coefficient n{sub RT}. (orig.).

  20. Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennth Marken

    2006-08-11

    the project start and that date a substantial shift in the MRI marketplace occurred, with rapid growth for systems at higher fields (1.5 T and above) and a consequent decline in the low field market (<1.0 T). While the project aim appeared technically attainable at that time, the conclusion was reached that the system and market economics do not warrant additional investment. The program was redirected to develop BSCCO 2212 multifilament wire development for high field superconducting magnets for NMR and other scientific research upon an agreement between DOE and Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology. The work t took place between September, 2004 and the project end in early 2006 was focused on 2212 multifilamentary wire. This report summarizes the technical achievements both in 2212 dip coated for an HTS MRI system and in BSCCO 2212 multifilamentary wire for high field magnets.

  1. Costs of high-field superconducting strands for particle accelerator magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Cooley, L D; Scanlan, R M; 10.1088/0953-2048/18/4/R01

    2005-01-01

    The costs of superconducting magnet strands are compared by calculating a 'production scaling factor' P that relates purchase data to the cost of raw materials. Using a consistent method, we normalize for different conductor geometries and strand diameters to arrive at cost indices in $ kg/sup -1/, $ m/sup -1/, and $ kA/sup -1/ m/sup -1/. Analyses of Nb47Ti conductors taken from the past 25 years of high-field magnet projects reveal that the price of raw materials and, to a lesser extent, finished strands, have tracked the price of niobium pentoxide. Performance gains during the 1980s produced $ kA /sup -1/ m/sup -1/ indices that fell with time ahead of strand cost in $ m/sup -1/, a situation that may reflect the present status of Nb /sub 3/Sn magnet conductors. Analyses of present materials show that P decreases systematically with billet mass. While production strands in 200-500 kg billets have costs ~3 times the cost of raw materials, the 20-50 kg billet size for internal-tin Nb/sub 3/Sn composites drives ...

  2. High field septum magnet using a superconducting shield for the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069375

    2017-01-01

    A zero-field cooled superconducting shield is proposed to realize a high-field (3–4 T) septum magnet for the Future Circular Collider hadron-hadron (FCC-hh) ring. Three planned prototypes using different materials and technical solutions are presented, which will be used to evaluate the feasibility of this idea as a part of the FCC study. The numerical simulation methods are described to calculate the field patterns around such a shield. A specific excitation current configuration is presented that maintains a fairly homogeneous field outside of a rectangular shield in a wide range of field levels from 0 to 3 Tesla. It is shown that a massless septum configuration (with an opening in the shield) is also possible and gives satisfactory field quality with realistic superconducting material properties.

  3. Brain–heart interactions: challenges and opportunities with functional magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Erika P.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (UHF) strengths (7 T and above) offers unique opportunities for studying the human brain with increased spatial resolution, contrast and sensitivity. However, its reliability can be compromised by factors such as head motion, image distortion and non-neural fluctuations of the functional MRI signal. The objective of this review is to provide a critical discussion of the advantages and trade-offs associated with UHF imaging, focusing on the application to studying brain–heart interactions. We describe how UHF MRI may provide contrast and resolution benefits for measuring neural activity of regions involved in the control and mediation of autonomic processes, and in delineating such regions based on anatomical MRI contrast. Limitations arising from confounding signals are discussed, including challenges with distinguishing non-neural physiological effects from the neural signals of interest that reflect cardiorespiratory function. We also consider how recently developed data analysis techniques may be applied to high-field imaging data to uncover novel information about brain–heart interactions. PMID:27044994

  4. Iron-chalcogenide FeSe(0.5)Te(0.5) Coated Superconducting Tapes for High Field Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, W.; Johnson, P.; Zhou, J.; Jie, Q.; Dimitrov, I.; Solovyov, V.; Jaroszynski, J.; Matias, V.; Sheehan, C.; Li, Q.

    2011-07-01

    The high upper critical field characteristic of the recently discovered iron-based superconducting chalcogenides opens the possibility of developing a new type of non-oxide high-field superconducting wires. In this work, we utilize a buffered metal template on which we grow a textured FeSe{sub 0.5}Te{sub 0.5} layer, an approach developed originally for high temperature superconducting coated conductors. These tapes carry high critical current densities (> 1 x 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2}) at about 4.2 K under magnetic field as high as 25 T, which are nearly isotropic to the field direction. This demonstrates a very promising future for iron chalcogenides for high field applications at liquid helium temperatures. Flux pinning force analysis indicates a point defect pinning mechanism, creating prospects for a straightforward approach to conductor optimization.

  5. The role of high-field magnetic resonance imaging in parkinsonian disorders: Pushing the boundaries forward

    OpenAIRE

    S. Lehericy; Vaillancourt, DE; Seppi, K.; Monchi, O; Rektorova, I; Antonini, A; McKeown, MJ; Masellis, M.; Berg, D.; Rowe, James Benedict; Lewis, SJG; Williams-Gray, Caroline Helen; Tessitore, A; Siebner, HR; International, Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society (IPMDS)-Neuroimaging Study Group

    2017-01-01

    Historically, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has contributed little to the study of Parkinson's disease (PD), but modern MRI approaches have unveiled several complementary markers that are useful for research and clinical applications. Iron- and neuromelanin-sensitive MRI detect qualitative changes in the substantia nigra. Quantitative MRI markers can be derived from diffusion weighted and iron-sensitive imaging or volumetry. Functional brain alterations at rest or during task performance h...

  6. 3.0-T high-field magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis: preliminary experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morakkabati-Spitz, N.; Gieseke, J.; Kuhl, C.; Lutterbey, G.; Falkenhausen, M. von; Traeber, F.; Zivanovic, O.; Schild, H.H. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    with our modified examination protocol. To fully exploit the capability of the high-field technique, and to point out potential advantages, further intraindividual studies are needed, with the adjustment of other imaging parameters to the high-field environment. (orig.)

  7. Analysis of Uncertainties in Protection Heater Delay Time Measurements and Simulations in Nb$_{3}$Sn High-Field Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Salmi, Tiina; Marchevsky, Maxim; Bajas, Hugo; Felice, Helene; Stenvall, Antti

    2015-01-01

    The quench protection of superconducting high-field accelerator magnets is presently based on protection heaters, which are activated upon quench detection to accelerate the quench propagation within the winding. Estimations of the heater delay to initiate a normal zone in the coil are essential for the protection design. During the development of Nb3Sn magnets for the LHC luminosity upgrade, protection heater delays have been measured in several experiments, and a new computational tool CoHDA (Code for Heater Delay Analysis) has been developed for heater design. Several computational quench analyses suggest that the efficiency of the present heater technology is on the borderline of protecting the magnets. Quantifying the inevitable uncertainties related to the measured and simulated delays is therefore of pivotal importance. In this paper, we analyze the uncertainties in the heater delay measurements and simulations using data from five impregnated high-field Nb3Sn magnets with different heater geometries. ...

  8. One-thousand-fold enhancement of high field liquid nuclear magnetic resonance signals at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoquan; Levien, Marcel; Karschin, Niels; Parigi, Giacomo; Luchinat, Claudio; Bennati, Marina

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental spectroscopic technique for the study of biological systems and materials, molecular imaging and the analysis of small molecules. It detects interactions at very low energies and is thus non-invasive and applicable to a variety of targets, including animals and humans. However, one of its most severe limitations is its low sensitivity, which stems from the small interaction energies involved. Here, we report that dynamic nuclear polarization in liquid solution and at room temperature can enhance the NMR signal of 13C nuclei by up to three orders of magnitude at magnetic fields of ∼3 T. The experiment can be repeated within seconds for signal averaging, without interfering with the sample magnetic homogeneity. The method is therefore compatible with the conditions required for high-resolution NMR. Enhancement of 13C signals on various organic compounds opens up new perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization as a general tool to increase the sensitivity of liquid NMR.

  9. Spin-orbital nature of the high-field magnetic state in the Sr4Ru3O10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Veronica; Capogna, Lucia; Forte, Filomena; Lepetit, Marie-Bernadette; Fittipaldi, Rosalba; Stunault, Anne; Cuoco, Mario; Vecchione, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    We perform a spin-polarized neutron-diffraction study to investigate the nature of the high-field magnetic state of the trilayered Sr4Ru3O10 . The analysis indicates that a high field applied within the a b plane leads to an unbalance of the spin and orbital moments with a spatial profile that is strongly tied to the layers where the electrons are located in the unit cell. We provide evidence of a layer dependent magnetic anisotropy with the inner layers having larger spin and orbital magnetic moments than the outer ones and show that such behavior is robust to temperature variation being persistent above the Curie temperature. By means of an effective model that includes the coupling between the spin-orbital degrees of freedom at inequivalent Ru sites we ascribe the origin of the layer anisotropy to the cooperative effects between octahedral distortions, spin orbit, and Coulomb interactions.

  10. Magnetism Materials and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Trémolet de Lacheisserie, Étienne; Schlenker, Michel

    2005-01-01

    This book treats permanent magnet (hard) materials, magnetically soft materials for low-frequency applications and for high-frequency electronics, magnetostrictive materials, superconductors, magnetic-thin films and multilayers, and ferrofluids. Chapters are dedicated to magnetic recording, the role of magnetism in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and instrumentation for magnetic measurements.   

  11. Vol. 34 - Optimization of quench protection heater performance in high-field accelerator magnets through computational and experimental analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Salmi, Tiina

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting accelerator magnets with increasingly hi gh magnetic fields are being designed to improve the performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. One of the technical challenges is the magnet quench p rotection, i.e., preventing damage in the case of an unexpected loss of superc onductivity and the heat generation related to that. Traditionally this is d one by disconnecting the magnet current supply and using so-called protection he aters. The heaters suppress the superconducting state across a large fraction of the winding thus leading to a uniform dissipation of the stored energy. Preli minary studies suggested that the high-field Nb 3 Sn magnets under development for the LHC luminosity upgrade (HiLumi) could not be reliably protected using the existing heaters. In this thesis work I analyzed in detail the present state-of-the-art protection heater technology, aiming to optimize its perfo rmance and evaluate the prospects in high-field magnet protection. The heater efficiency analyses ...

  12. Safety implications of high-field MRI: actuation of endogenous magnetic iron oxides in the human body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Dobson

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging scanners have become ubiquitous in hospitals and high-field systems (greater than 3 Tesla are becoming increasingly common. In light of recent European Union moves to limit high-field exposure for those working with MRI scanners, we have evaluated the potential for detrimental cellular effects via nanomagnetic actuation of endogenous iron oxides in the body.Theoretical models and experimental data on the composition and magnetic properties of endogenous iron oxides in human tissue were used to analyze the forces on iron oxide particles.Results show that, even at 9.4 Tesla, forces on these particles are unlikely to disrupt normal cellular function via nanomagnetic actuation.

  13. High field magnetic behavior in Boron doped Fe{sub 2}VAl Heusler alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesh, Ch., E-mail: venkyphysicsiitm@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India); DCMP & MS, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Vasundhara, M., E-mail: vasu.mutta@gmail.com [Materials Science and Technology Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, CSIR, Trivandrum 695019 (India); Srinivas, V. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai (India); Rao, V.V. [Cryogenic Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India)

    2016-11-15

    We have investigated the magnetic behavior of Fe{sub 2}VAl{sub 1−x}B{sub x} (x=0, 0.03, 0.06 and 0.1) alloys under high temperature and high magnetic field conditions separately. Although, the low temperature DC magnetization data for the alloys above x>0 show clear magnetic transitions, the zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) curves indicate the presence of spin cluster like features. Further, critical exponent (γ) deduced from the initial susceptibility above the T{sub c}, does not agree with standard models derived for 3 dimensional long range magnetic systems. The deviation in γ values are consistent with the short range magnetic nature of these alloys. We further extend the analysis of magnetic behavior by carrying the magnetization measurements at high temperatures and high magnetic fields distinctly. We mainly emphasize the following observations; (i) The magnetic hysteresis loops show sharp upturns at lower fields even at 900 K for all the alloys. (ii) High temperature inverse susceptibility do not overlap until T=900 K, indicating the persistent short range magnetic correlations even at high temperatures. (iii) The Arrott's plot of magnetization data shows spontaneous moment (M{sub S}) for the x=0 alloy at higher magnetic fields which is absent at lower fields (<50 kOe), while the Boron doped samples show feeble M{sub S} at lower fields. The origin of this short range correlation is due to presence of dilute magnetic heterogeneous phases which are not detected from the X-ray diffraction method. - Highlights: • Short range magnetic character has been confirmed by the critical exponents analysis. • Magnetoresistace is about −14% with non-saturating tendency even at 150 kOe for Fe{sub 2}VAl alloy. • Boron doped Fe{sub 2}VAl alloys show a weak magnetism even at T=900 K.

  14. High field magnetization process in Er sub 2 (Fe, Al) sub 14 B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohashi, T.; Kindo, K.; Date, M. (Dept. of Physics, Osaka Univ. (Japan)); Boer, F.R. de; Radwanski, R.J.; Zhong, X.P. (Natuurkundig Lab., Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Yamagishi, A. (Research Center for Extreme Materials, Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1992-03-01

    A magnetization study in pulsed high magnetic fields up to 50 T has been performed on magnetically aligned powder samples of ferrimagnetic Er{sub 2}Fe{sub 14-x}Al{sub x}B (x = 0, 1, 2) compounds and field-induced transitions have been observed. Free-energy calculations with one Fe and four Er sublattices have been performed and the field-induced transitions can satisfactorily be explained. (orig.).

  15. In vivo high field magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of adult zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabli, Samira

    2009-01-01

    This thesis contains the results of imaging of adult zebrafish by using different MR approaches. We present the first high resolution mMR images of adult zebrafish. To achieve high spatial resolution we used a magnetic field of 9.4T, in combination with strong magnetic field gradients (1000 mT/m)

  16. High-field magnetic resonance imaging of the human temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Colon-Perez

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Fresh ex vivo MR imaging, along with tractography, revealed complex intra-temporal structural variation corresponding to neuronal cell body layers, dendritic fields, and axonal projection systems evident histologically. This is the first study to describe in detail the human temporal lobe structural organization using high-field MR imaging and tractography. By preserving the 3-dimensional structures of the hippocampus and surrounding structures, specific changes in anatomy may inform us about the changes that occur in TLE in relation to the disease process and structural underpinnings in epilepsy-related memory dysfunction.

  17. High-field magnetization studies of NdNi{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim-Ngan, N.-T.H. [Center for Solid State Phys., Krakow (Poland)]|[Pedagogical Univ., Krakow (Poland). Inst. of Physics and Informatics; Radwanski, R.J. [Center for Solid State Phys., Krakow (Poland)]|[Pedagogical Univ., Krakow (Poland). Inst. of Physics and Informatics; Kayzel, F.E. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Franse, J.J.M. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.

    1996-05-01

    Magnetization studies on single-crystalline NdNi{sub 5} in external fields up to 35 T are reported. NdNi{sub 5} is a ferromagnet with a T{sub C} of 7.2 K and the easy magnetic direction is along the a direction. The spontaneous magnetic moment is 2.1{mu}{sub B}/f.u. Along the c-axis, the magnetization amounts to 1.65{mu}{sub B}/f.u. at 35 T. The magnetization process is analyzed within the crystalline electric field approach in combination with exchange interactions, taking into account the contribution of the Ni sublattice. The studies confirm that the charge-formed ground state of the f{sup 3} (Nd{sup 3+}) subsystem is the state {Gamma}{sub 8} with a dominant vertical stroke {+-}5/2 right angle contribution. The full magnetization curves, up to 300 T, have been calculated. The magnetization curve along the c-axis proceeds to saturation with a metamagnetic-like transition at 150 T. (orig.).

  18. Progress with High-Field Superconducting Magnets for High-Energy Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ˜10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nb3Sn superconductors. Nb3Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ˜15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. This review discusses the status and main results of Nb3Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.

  19. Pelvic endometriosis: a comparison between low-field (0.2 T) and high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minaif, Karine; Ajzen, Sergio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis]. E-mail: kminaif@uol.com.br; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Minami, Cintia Cristina Satie; Sales, Danilo Moulin; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis. Unit of Abdomen; Ruano, Jose Maria Cordeiro [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of General Gynecology. Sector of Videlaparoscopy; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of General Gynecology

    2008-11-15

    Objective: to compare low-field (0.2 T) with high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pelvic endometriosis and adenomyosis. Materials and methods: twenty-seven female patients with clinically suspected endometriosis were prospectively evaluated by means of high-field and low-field magnetic resonance imaging. The reading of the images was performed by a single radiologist, initiating by the low-field, followed by the high-field images. High-field magnetic resonance imaging was utilized as the golden-standard. Results: among the 27 patients included in the present study, 18 (66.7%) had some type of lesion suggesting the presence of endometriosis demonstrated at high-field images. In 14 of these patients the diagnosis was correctly established by low-field magnetic resonance imaging. Endometriomas, tubal lesions, and endometriotic foci > 7 mm identified at the high-field images were also identified at low-field images with 100% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Among the nine patients diagnosed with adenomyosis by high-field images, eight were correctly diagnosed by low-field images with 88.9% accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: low-field magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a low sensitivity in the detection of small endometriotic foci, high sensitivity in the detection of endometriomas and large endometriotic foci, and high accuracy in the detection of adenomyosis when compared with high-field magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  20. Low and High Field Magnetic Resonance for in Vivo Analysis of Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Neuberger

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Low field NMR has been successfully used for the evaluation of seed composition and quality, but largely only in crop species. We show here that 1.5T NMR provides a reliable means for analysing the seed lipid fraction present in a wide range of species, where both the seed size and lipid concentration differed by >10 fold. Little use of high field NMR has been made in seed research to date, even though it potentially offers many opportunities for studying seed development, metabolism and storage. Here we demonstrate how 17.5T and 20T NMR can be applied to image seed structure, and analyse lipid and metabolite distribution. We suggest that further technical developments in NMR/MRI will facilitate significant advances in our understanding of seed biology.

  1. Research and Development of Wires and Cables for High-Field Accelerator Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-04-01

    The latest strategic plans for High Energy Physics endorse steadfast superconducting magnet technology R&D for future Energy Frontier Facilities. This includes 10 to 16 T Nb3Sn accelerator magnets for the luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider and eventually for a future 100 TeV scale proton-proton (pp) collider. This paper describes the multi-decade R&D investment in the Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which was crucial to produce the first reproducible 10 to 12 T accelerator-quality dipoles and quadrupoles, as well as their scale-up. We also indicate prospective research areas in superconducting Nb3Sn wires and cables to achieve the next goals for superconducting accelerator magnets. Emphasis is on increasing performance and decreasing costs while pushing the Nb3Sn technology to its limits for future pp colliders.

  2. Fiber optic quench detection via optimized Rayleigh Scattering in high-field YBCO accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, Gene [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-02-17

    Yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) coated conductors are known for their ability to operate in the superconducting state at relatively high temperatures, even above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K). When these same conductors are operated at lower temperatures, they are able to operate in much higher magnetic fields than traditional superconductors like NiTi or Nb3Sn. Thus, YBCO superconducting magnets are one of the primary options for generating the high magnetic fields needed for future high energy physics devices. Due to slow quench propagation, quench detection remains one of the primary limitations to YBCO magnets. Fiber optic sensing, based upon Rayleigh scattering, has the potential for spatial resolution approaching the wavelength of light, or very fast temporal resolution at low spatial resolution, and a continuum of combinations in between. This project has studied, theoretically and experimentally, YBCO magnets and Rayleigh scattering quench detection systems to demonstrate feasibility of the systems for YBCO quench protection systems. Under this grant an experimentally validated 3D quench propagation model was used to accurately define the acceptable range of spatial and temporal resolutions for effective quench detection in YBCO magnets and to evaluate present-day and potentially improved YBCO conductors. The data volume and speed requirements for quench detection via Rayleigh scattering required the development of a high performance fiber optic based quench detection/data acquisition system and its integration with an existing voltage tap/thermo-couple based system. In this project, optical fibers are tightly co-wound into YBCO magnet coils, with the fiber on top of the conductor as turn-to-turn insulation. Local changes in the temperature or strain of the conductor are sensed by the optical fiber, which is in close thermal and mechanical contact with the conductor. Intrinsic imperfections in the fiber reflect Rayleigh

  3. The use of high-field intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging combined with language functional neuronavigation in glioma surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Yan ZHAO; Xiao-lei CHEN; Fei WANG; Guo-chen SUN; Yu-bo WANG; Zhi-jun SONG; Bai-nan XU

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of high-field intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging(iMRI) combined with language functional neuronavigation in resection of glioma in language area of dominant hemisphere of the brain.Methods Twenty right handed patients(12 males and 8 females,aged from 20 to 61 years with mean of 43.6 years) with glioma close to arcuate fasciculus were involved in present study,and they were stratified into normal group(n=9) and aphasia group(n=11) according to the preope...

  4. High-field magnetic studies of pseudoternary Nd sub 2 Fe sub 14 B-based compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayzel, F.E.; Verhoef, R.; Ji, S.Q.; Franse, J.J.M.; Radwanski, R.J. (Natuurkundig Lab., Univ. van Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Hoch, S.; Kronmueller, H. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Metallforschung, Inst. fuer Physik, Stuttgart (Germany))

    1991-10-01

    The intrinsic properties of some pseudoternary Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds (Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 13.6}Al{sub 0.4}B, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 13.2}Al{sub 0.8}B, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 11.2}Co{sub 2.8}B, Nd{sub 1.8}Dy{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 14}B) have been studied by performing high field magnetization measurements at 4.2 K. The magneto-crystalline anisotropy coefficients have been derived. (orig.).

  5. NANOSCOPIC MOLECULAR CLUSTER V15: HIGH-FIELD EPR AND MAGNETIZATION AT ULTRA-LOW TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Tsukerblat

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available n this paper we give a short overview of our efforts in the understanding of the magnetic properties of the fascinating nanoscopic cluster K6[VIV15As6O42(H2O]·8H2O (hereafter V15 exhibiting layers of magnetization. We analyze EPR and adiabatic magnetization of the V15 cluster with a triangular VIV3 array causing spin frustration. A model for V15 includes isotropic and antisymmetric (AS exchange interactions in the general form compatible with the trigonal symmetry. Orientation of the AS vector (but not only its absolute value is shown to play an important physical role in spin-frustrated systems. We were able to reach perfect fit to the experimental data on the stepwise dependence of magnetization vs. field at ultra-low temperatures. Furthermore, it was possible for the first time to estimate precisely two components of the AS vector coupling constant, namely, in-plane component and the perpendicular part. We show that only intramultiplet transitions in EPR are allowed when the vector of AS exchange is normal to the plane of vanadium triangle, meanwhile the in-plane part of AS exchange gives rise to a series of weak intermultiplet transitions. Experimental data on high-frequency EPR of V15 at low temperatures are discussed. The spin-vibronic effects in trimeric spin frustrated clusters are also studied and an important role of the interplay between the AS exchange and Jahn-Teller interaction is revealed. The results clarify the concept of spin-frustration in view of its magnetic and spectroscopic manifestations in metal clusters.

  6. High-field magnetic phase transitions and spin excitations in magnetoelectric LiNiPO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Petersen, Rasmus; Jensen, Jens; Jensen, Thomas Bagger Stibius

    2011-01-01

    The magnetically ordered phases and spin dynamics of magnetoelectric LiNiPO4 have been studied in fields up to 17.3 T along the c axis. Using neutron diffraction, we show that a previously proposed linearly polarized incommensurate (IC) structure exists only for temperatures just below the Neel...... temperature T-N. The ordered IC structure at the lowest temperatures is shown instead to be an elliptically polarized canted spiral for fields larger than 12 T. The transition between the two IC phases is of second order and takes place about 2 K below T-N. For mu H-0 > 16 T and temperatures below 10 K......, the spiral structure is found to lock in to a period of five crystallographic unit cells along the b axis. Based on the neutron-diffraction data, combined with detailed magnetization measurements along all three crystallographic axes, we establish the magnetic phase diagrams for fields up to 17.3 T along c...

  7. Retears of postoperative knee meniscus: findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) by using low and high field magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardello, Paolo; Gigli, Carlo; Ricci, Alessandra; Chiatti, Leonardo; Voglino, Nicola; Pofi, Enrico

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) obtained with intra-articular contrast medium in the evaluation of recurrent meniscal tears using low-field extremity-only and high-field whole-body magnets. Postoperative standard MR examinations and MR arthrographies of 95 knees were reviewed. Patients experiencing pain and disability after meniscal repair underwent standard MR and MR arthrography (Gadoterate meglumine 0.0025 mmol/ml) on both a 0.2-T and 1.5-T magnet. In 52 of 95 patients, second-look arthroscopy was performed; in the remaining 43 of 95 patients, clinical follow-up was used as the standard of reference. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values as well as accuracy of MRI/MR arthrographic signs as meniscal morphologic changes and the presence of contrast medium tracking into the tear at T1- and T2-weighted sequences in the detection of recurrent meniscal tears were determined. All MR and MR arthrograpic signs were sensitive in the detection of recurrent tears (range 80-91%). Abnormal meniscal morphology had low specificity [26% (13/50)] for both the 0.2-T and 1.5-T scanner, whereas accuracy was 55% (52/95) and 57% (54/95), respectively. The presence of contrast medium within the meniscus substance on T2-weighted images had higher value of specificity [84% (42/50)] and accuracy [84% (80/95)] by using low field strength magnet than by using high field strength magnet [74% (37/50) and 81% (77/95), respectively]. Whereas, the increased intrameniscal signal intensity extending to the meniscal surface at T1-weighted sequences after intra-articular contrast medium administration had lower specificity and accuracy on 0.2-T images [84% (42/50) and 82% (78/95), respectively] than on 1.5-T images [90% (45/50) and 88% (84/95), respectively]. A diagnosis of recurrent meniscal tear in a previously arthroscopically repaired meniscus can be made both on 0.2-T and 1.5-T magnets on the basis of

  8. Functional magnetic resonance imaging with ultra-high fields; Funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie bei ultrahohen Feldern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windischberger, C.; Schoepf, V.; Sladky, R.; Moser, E. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Exzellenzzentrum Hochfeld-MR, Wien (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Zentrum fuer Medizinische Physik und Biomedizinische Technik, Wien (Austria); Fischmeister, F.P.S. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Exzellenzzentrum Hochfeld-MR, Wien (Austria); Universitaet Wien, Fakultaet fuer Psychologie, Wien (Austria)

    2010-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is currently the primary method for non-invasive functional localization in the brain. With the emergence of MR systems with field strengths of 4 Tesla and above, neuronal activation may be studied with unprecedented accuracy. In this article we present different approaches to use the improved sensitivity and specificity for expanding current fMRT resolution limits in space and time based on several 7 Tesla studies. In addition to the challenges that arise with ultra-high magnetic fields possible solutions will be discussed. (orig.) [German] Die funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT) stellt zurzeit die wichtigste Methode zur nichtinvasiven Funktionslokalisation im Gehirn dar. Mit der Verfuegbarkeit von MRT-Geraeten mit Magnetfeldstaerken von 4 Tesla (T) und darueber ergeben sich neue Moeglichkeiten, mittels fMRT die neuronale Aktivitaet in bislang unerreichter Genauigkeit zu untersuchen. In diesem Artikel zeigen wir anhand mehrerer Studien bei 7 T, in wieweit die Zugewinne an Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet verwendet werden koennen, um die bisherigen Grenzen der fMRT-Aufloesung in raeumlicher und zeitlicher Hinsicht auszuweiten. Die neuen Herausforderungen, die mit dem Schritt zu ultrahohen Magnetfeldern einhergehen, werden dabei ebenso diskutiert wie moegliche Ansaetze zu deren Loesung. (orig.)

  9. [Orbital vasculonervous network and orbital surgical compartments by high field magnetic resonance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández González, L C; Suárez Suárez, E; Dos Santos Bernardo, V; Junceda Moreno, J; Recio Rodríguez, M; Martínez De Vega, V; Viaño López, J

    2003-10-01

    To elucidate the possibilities and indications of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the study of the orbit and its contents. Orbital anatomy was studied in sliced specimens of fifteen fresh frozen cadavers and the results were compared with those obtained in thirty asymptomatic subjects who underwent a magnetic resonance with 1.5 Tesla equipment. The information obtained was used to interpret the findings in twenty-two patients with various orbital diseases. High-resolution MRI allows visualization of structures difficult to assess previously, like the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the optic nerve, the complete intraorbital route and the exit of the third cranial nerve, the ophthalmic artery and the intraorbital relationships of the sixth cranial nerve, which can be clearly differentiated from the lateral rectus muscle. High-resolution MRI is a very useful tool for the study of the orbit and its content. It provides accurate diagnoses through non-invasive procedures and facilitates the planning of the surgical approaches by improving the visualization of pathologic orbital structures. lcarlos@correo.uniovi.es

  10. Coupled microstrip line transverse electromagnetic resonator model for high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, G; Ludwig, R

    2002-03-01

    The performance modeling of RF resonators at high magnetic fields of 4.7 T and more requires a physical approach that goes beyond conventional lumped circuit concepts. The treatment of voltages and currents as variables in time and space leads to a coupled transmission line model, whereby the electric and magnetic fields are assumed static in planes orthogonal to the length of the resonator, but wave-like along its longitudinal axis. In this work a multiconductor transmission line (MTL) model is developed and successfully applied to analyze a 12-element unloaded and loaded microstrip line transverse electromagnetic (TEM) resonator coil for animal studies. The loading involves a homogeneous cylindrical dielectric insert of variable radius and length. This model formulation is capable of estimating the resonance spectrum, field distributions, and certain types of losses in the coil, while requiring only modest computational resources. The boundary element method is adopted to compute all relevant transmission line parameters needed to set up the transmission line matrices. Both the theoretical basis and its engineering implementation are discussed and the resulting model predictions are placed in context with measurements. A comparison between a conventional lumped circuit model and this distributed formulation is conducted, showing significant departures in the resonance response at higher frequencies. This MTL model is applied to simulate two small-bore animal systems: one of 7.5-cm inner diameter, tuned to 200 MHz (4.7 T for proton imaging), and one of 13.36-cm inner diameter, tuned to both 200 and 300 MHz (7 T). Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Generation and evaluation of an ultra-high-field atlas with applications in DBS planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Brian T.; Poirier, Stefan; Guo, Ting; Parrent, Andrew G.; Peters, Terry M.; Khan, Ali R.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a common treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) and involves the use of brain atlases or intrinsic landmarks to estimate the location of target deep brain structures, such as the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi). However, these structures can be difficult to localize with conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and thus targeting can be prone to error. Ultra-high-field imaging at 7T has the ability to clearly resolve these structures and thus atlases built with these data have the potential to improve targeting accuracy. Methods T1 and T2-weighted images of 12 healthy control subjects were acquired using a 7T MR scanner. These images were then used with groupwise registration to generate an unbiased average template with T1w and T2w contrast. Deep brain structures were manually labelled in each subject by two raters and rater reliability was assessed. We compared the use of this unbiased atlas with two other methods of atlas-based segmentation (single-template and multi-template) for subthalamic nucleus (STN) segmentation on 7T MRI data. We also applied this atlas to clinical DBS data acquired at 1.5T to evaluate its efficacy for DBS target localization as compared to using a standard atlas. Results The unbiased templates provide superb detail of subcortical structures. Through one-way ANOVA tests, the unbiased template is significantly (p brain nuclei and an increase in accuracy over single-template and lower field strength atlases.

  12. The use of high-field intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging combined with language functional neuronavigation in glioma surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan ZHAO

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effect of high-field intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging(iMRI combined with language functional neuronavigation in resection of glioma in language area of dominant hemisphere of the brain.Methods Twenty right handed patients(12 males and 8 females,aged from 20 to 61 years with mean of 43.6 years with glioma close to arcuate fasciculus were involved in present study,and they were stratified into normal group(n=9 and aphasia group(n=11 according to the preoperative aphasia quotient(AQ.All the patients underwent surgical operation assisted by arcuate fasciculus navigator,and the high-field iMRI was performed with a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner.The 3D reconstructed arcuate fasciculus images were integrated into neuronavigation system before the operation,and used by combining with functional neuronavigation under microscope during the surgical procedure.Pre-operatirely,and 2-4 weeks,3-6 months postoperative,the patients were examined with magnetic resonance scanning and aphasia quotients examination.Results Pre-operative and intra-operative arcuate fasciculus reconstruction was completed in all the 20 patients,and neuronavigation under microscope were performed after the 3D images integrated into neuronavigation system.Patients of normal AQ(94.5±5.5 retained the normal level,except one patients who developed new conduction aphasia syndrome(AQ=81.8 2-4 weeks after operation.The AQ of aphasia group(89.4±5.8 was significantly improved than that before operation(84.9±8.7,P < 0.05,except 2 patients whose language deficit was exacerbated due to tumor recurrence.The AQ of normal group(98.3±0.5 remained at normal level,while that of aphasia group(95.2±2.6 was significantly improved 3-6 months after operation compared with that at 2-4 weeks after operation(P < 0.05.There were no other new neurologic deficits and death in both groups.Conclusion High-field iMRI combined with functional neuronavigation is a safe and

  13. Advanced MR methods at ultra-high field (7 Tesla) for clinical musculoskeletal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna/Vienna General Hospital, MR Centre - High Field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Zbyn, Stefan; Schmitt, Benjamin; Friedrich, Klaus; Bogner, Wolfgang [Medical University of Vienna/Vienna General Hospital, MR Centre - High Field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna/Vienna General Hospital, MR Centre - High Field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-11-15

    This article provides an overview of the initial clinical results of musculoskeletal studies performed at 7 Tesla, with special focus on sodium imaging, new techniques such as chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and T2* imaging, and multinuclear MR spectroscopy. Sodium imaging was clinically used at 7 T in the evaluation of patients after cartilage repair procedures because it enables the GAG content to be monitored over time. Sodium imaging and T2* mapping allow insights into the ultra-structural composition of the Achilles tendon and help detect early disease. Chemical exchange saturation transfer was, for the first time, successfully applied in the clinical set-up at 7 T in patients after cartilage repair surgery. The potential of phosphorus MR spectroscopy in muscle was demonstrated in a comparison study between 3 and 7 T, with higher spectral resolution and significantly shorter data acquisition times at 7 T. These initial clinical studies demonstrate the potential of ultra-high field MR at 7 T, with the advantage of significantly improved sensitivity for other nuclei, such as {sup 23}Na (sodium) and {sup 31}P (phosphorus). The application of non-proton imaging and spectroscopy provides new insights into normal and abnormal physiology of musculoskeletal tissues, particularly cartilage, tendons, and muscles. (orig.)

  14. High-field magnetization in Ho{sub 1-x}Er{sub x}Ga{sub 2} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, A.V. [Permanent Magnets Laboratory, Ural State University, 620083, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Baranov, N.V. [Permanent Magnets Laboratory, Ural State University, 620083, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Markin, P.E. [Permanent Magnets Laboratory, Ural State University, 620083, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Aruga Katori, H. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Roppongi 7-22-1, Tokoyo 106 (Japan); Goto, T. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Roppongi 7-22-1, Tokoyo 106 (Japan); Nakotte, H. [Van der Waals-Zeeman Laboratorium, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Radwanski, R.J. [Center for Solid State Physics, Sw. Filip 5, 31-150, Krakow (Poland)]|[Institute for Physics and Informatics, Pedagogical University, 30-084, Krakow (Poland); Kim-Ngan, N.H. [Center for Solid State Physics, Sw. Filip 5, 31-150, Krakow (Poland)

    1995-02-09

    The hexagonal antiferromagnetic compounds HoGa{sub 2} and ErGa{sub 2} exhibit large anisotropy with two metamagnetic-like transitions in external magnetic fields applied along the easy direction: at 1.7 and 2.4 T along the a-axis for HoGa{sub 2}, and at 0.7 and 2.0 T along the c-axis for ErGa{sub 2}. Magnetization measurements in high fields up to 40 T have been performed on single crystals of the substituted compounds Ho{sub 1-x}Er{sub x}Ga{sub 2} (x=0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6). In HoGa{sub 2}, above the metamagnetic-transition fields, the a-axis magnetic moment increases slowly and reaches the value of 9.75{mu}{sub B} at 40 T, whereas along the c-axis it sharply rises but to a much lower value, of 7{mu}{sub B} only. In substituted compounds, besides the c-axis transition around 6 T, an additional transition appears at 18-19 T along the a-axis. The transition-field values were found to decrease slightly with increasing Er content for both transitions. ((orig.)).

  15. The high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments at ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, K.; Fondacaro, A.; Jimenez, E.; Velez-Fort, E.; Amorese, A.; Aspbury, M.; Yakhou-Harris, F.; van der Linden, P.; Brookes, N. B.

    2016-01-01

    A new high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments has been installed and commissioned at the ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32. The magnet consists of two split-pairs of superconducting coils which can generate up to 9 T along the beam and up to 4 T orthogonal to the beam. It is connected to a cluster of ultra-high-vacuum chambers that offer a comprehensive set of surface preparation and characterization techniques. The endstation and the beam properties have been designed to provide optimum experimental conditions for X-ray magnetic linear and circular dichroism experiments in the soft X-ray range between 400 and 1600 eV photon energy. User operation started in November 2014. PMID:26917134

  16. Prospects for the use of HTS in high field magnets for future accelerator facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    2014-01-01

    The enthusiasm that followed discovery of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) and the initial genuine hope of a replacement technology that could have taken over from conventional Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS) was damped during the years by difficulties in reaching performance levels of competing materials: insufficient current-carrying performance, short piece lengths, and fragility of the brittle oxide superconductors made development of applications slow and limited to demonstrators or devices less demanding from the point of view of conductor performance. However, thanks to a continuous R&D effort, significant progress was made in the past years on the development of cuprate superconductors. Today long lengths of BSCCO 2223 (km range) and REBCO (a more general acronym for YBCO, where RE = Rare Earth) tape (hundreds of meters range) conductor with controlled and homogeneous characteristics are commercially available, and tremendous progress has been made in the development of BSSCO 2212 roun...

  17. Endometrium evaluation with high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging in patients submitted to uterine leiomyoma embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Monica Amadio Piazza [Post-graduation Program in Abdominal Imaging, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nasser, Felipe [Intervention Radiology Department, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zlotnik, Eduardo; Messina, Marcos de Lorenzo [Gynecology and Obstetrics Department, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Imaging Department, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the endometrial alterations related to embolization of uterine arteries for the treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis (pelvic pain and/or uterine bleeding) by means of high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance. This is a longitudinal and prospective study that included 94 patients with a clinical and imaging diagnosis of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis, all of them treated by embolization of the uterine arteries. The patients were submitted to evaluations by high-field magnetic resonance of the pelvis before and 6 months after the procedure. Specific evaluations were made of the endometrium on the T2-weighted sequences, and on the T1-weighted sequences before and after the intravenous dynamic infusion of the paramagnetic contrast. In face of these measures, statistical analyses were performed using Student's t test for comparison of the results obtained before and after the procedure. An average increase of 20.9% was noted in the endometrial signal on T2-weighted images obtained after the uterine artery embolization procedure when compared to the pre-procedure evaluation (p=0.0004). In the images obtained with the intravenous infusion of paramagnetic contrast, an average increase of 18.7% was noted in the post-embolization intensity of the endometrial signal, compared to the pre-embolization measure (p<0.035). After embolization of the uterine arteries, there was a significant increase of the endometrial signal on the T2-weighted images and on the post-contrast images, inferring possible edema and increased endometrial flow. Future studies are needed to assess the clinical impact of these findings.

  18. Restricted lithium ion dynamics in PEO-based block copolymer electrolytes measured by high-field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Tan Vu; Messinger, Robert J.; Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Fayon, Franck; Bouchet, Renaud; Deschamps, Michaël

    2017-10-01

    The intrinsic ionic conductivity of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based block copolymer electrolytes is often assumed to be identical to the conductivity of the PEO homopolymer. Here, we use high-field 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion measurements to probe lithium ion dynamics over nanosecond and millisecond time scales in PEO and polystyrene (PS)-b-PEO-b-PS electrolytes containing the lithium salt LiTFSI. Variable-temperature longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) 7Li NMR relaxation rates were acquired at three magnetic field strengths and quantitatively analyzed for the first time at such fields, enabling us to distinguish two characteristic time scales that describe fluctuations of the 7Li nuclear electric quadrupolar interaction. Fast lithium motions [up to O (ns)] are essentially identical between the two polymer electrolytes, including sub-nanosecond vibrations and local fluctuations of the coordination polyhedra between lithium and nearby oxygen atoms. However, lithium dynamics over longer time scales [O (10 ns) and greater] are slower in the block copolymer compared to the homopolymer, as manifested experimentally by their different transverse 7Li NMR relaxation rates. Restricted dynamics and altered thermodynamic behavior of PEO chains anchored near PS domains likely explain these results.

  19. Multicomponent analysis of radiolytic products in human body fluids using high field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grootveld, M.C.; Herz, H.; Naughton, D.; Perera, A.; Knappitt, J.; Blake, D.R.; Claxson, A.W.D. [London Hospital Medical College (United Kingdom). The Inflammation Research Group; Haywood, R.; Hawkes, G.E. [Queen Mary and Westfield College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-05-01

    High field proton Hahn spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate radiolytic damage to biomolecules present in intact human body fluids. {gamma}-Radiolysis of healthy or rheumatoid human serum (5.00 kGy) in the presence of atmospheric O{sub 2} gave rise to reproducible elevations in the concentration of NMR-detectable acetate which are predominantly ascribable to the prior oxidation of lactate to pyruvate by hydroxyl radical ({sup .}OH) followed by oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate by radiolytically-generated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and/or further {sup .}OH radical. Increases in the serum levels of non-protein-bound, low-molecular-mass components such as citrate and glutamine were also observed subsequent to {gamma}-radiolysis, an observation which may reflect their mobilisation from protein binding-sites by {sup .}OH radical, superoxide anion and/or HO{sub 2}. Moreover, substantial radiolytically-mediated elevations in the concentration of serum formate were also detectable. In addition to the above modifications, {gamma}-radiolysis of inflammatory knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) generated a low-molecular-mass oligosaccharide species derived from the radiolytic fragmentation of hyaluronate. The radiolytically-mediated production of acetate in SF samples was markedly greater than that observed in serum samples, a consequence of the much higher levels of {sup .}OH radical-scavenging lactate present. Indeed, increases in SF acetate concentration were detectable at doses as low as 48 Gy. We conclude that high field proton NMR analysis provides much useful information regarding the relative radioprotectant abilities of endogenous components and the nature, status and levels of radiolytic products generated in intact biofluids. (author).

  20. Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  1. Development of the Nb3Sn Rutherford Cable for the EuCARD High Field Dipole Magnet FRESCA2

    CERN Document Server

    Oberli, l

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of the Nb3Sn Rutherford cable for the EuCARD high field dipole magnet FRESCA2 designed to achieve a central field of 13 T at 4.2 K in a 100 mm bore. The FRESCA2 cable is rectangular and made of 40 strands of 1.0 mm diameter. The cable shall be able to carry a current of 15.7 kA at 4.2 K in a field of 15 T. In the first stage of cable development, focus was put on the cable parameters (cable width, cable mid-thickness and pitch length) to provide a cable made with Nb3Sn PIT strands achieving both a minimal critical current reduction of the strand during cabling and a good mechanical stability of the cable for coil winding. In the second stage of cable development, the cable was produced with Nb3Sn RRP strands. The cables, which were produced following an iterative process, were characterized and the results of the critical current measurements of extracted strands are discussed together with the cabling parameters and the type of strand.

  2. Ultra-High Field NMR and MRI—The Role of Magnet Technology to Increase Sensitivity and Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewald Moser

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available “History, of course, is difficult to write, if for no other reason, than that it has so many players and so many authors.” – P. J. Keating (former Australian Prime MinisterStarting with post-war developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR a race for stronger and stronger magnetic fields has begun in the 1950s to overcome the inherently low sensitivity of this promising method. Further challenges were larger magnet bores to accommodate small animals and eventually humans. Initially, resistive electromagnets with small pole distances, or sample volumes, and field strengths up to 2.35 T (or 100 MHz 1H frequency were used in applications in physics, chemistry, and material science. This was followed by stronger and more stable (Nb-Ti based superconducting magnet technology typically implemented first for small-bore systems in analytical chemistry, biochemistry and structural biology, and eventually allowing larger horizontal-bore magnets with diameters large enough to fit small laboratory animals. By the end of the 1970s, first low-field resistive magnets big enough to accommodate humans were developed and superconducting whole-body systems followed. Currently, cutting-edge analytical NMR systems are available at proton frequencies up to 1 GHz (23.5 T based on Nb3Sn at 1.9 K. A new 1.2 GHz system (28 T at 1.9 K, operating in persistent mode but using a combination of low and high temperature multi-filament superconductors is to be released. Preclinical instruments range from small-bore animal systems with typically 600–800 MHz (14.1–18.8 T up to 900 MHz (21 T at 1.9 K. Human whole-body MRI systems currently operate up to 10.5 T. Hybrid combined superconducting and resistive electromagnets with even higher field strength of 45 T dc and 100 T pulsed, are available for material research, of course with smaller free bore diameters. This rather costly development toward higher and higher field strength is a consequence of the inherently low

  3. Synchrotron Applications of High Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This workshop aims at discussing the scientific potential of X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy in magnetic fields above 30 T. Pulsed magnetic fields in the range of 30 to 40 T have recently become available at Spring-8 and the ESRF (European synchrotron radiation facility). This document gathers the transparencies of the 6 following presentations: 1) pulsed magnetic fields at ESRF: first results; 2) X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction experiments by using mini-coils: applications to valence state transition and frustrated magnet; 3) R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}: an ideal system to be studied in X-ray under high magnetic field?; 4) high field studies at the Advanced Photon Source: present status and future plans; 5) synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies under extreme conditions; and 6) projects for pulsed and steady high magnetic fields at the ESRF.

  4. Implementation and Application of PSF-Based EPI Distortion Correction to High Field Animal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Paul

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the functionality and performance of a PSF-based geometric distortion correction for high-field functional animal EPI. The EPI method was extended to measure the PSF and a postprocessing chain was implemented in Matlab for offline distortion correction. The correction procedure was applied to phantom and in vivo imaging of mice and rats at 9.4T using different SE-EPI and DWI-EPI protocols. Results show the significant improvement in image quality for single- and multishot EPI. Using a reduced FOV in the PSF encoding direction clearly reduced the acquisition time for PSF data by an acceleration factor of 2 or 4, without affecting the correction quality.

  5. Ultra-high field NMR and MRI - the role of magnet technology to increase sensitivity and specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Ewald; Laistler, Elmar; Schmitt, Franz; Kontaxis, Georg

    2017-08-01

    "History, of course, is difficult to write, if for no other reason, than that it has so many players and so many authors." - P. J. Keating (former Australian Prime Minister) Starting with post-war developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) a race for stronger and stronger magnetic fields has begun in the 1950s to overcome the inherently low sensitivity of this promising method. Further challenges were larger magnet bores to accommodate small animals and eventually humans. Initially, resistive electromagnets with small pole distances, or sample volumes, and field strengths up to 2.35 T (or 100 MHz 1H frequency) were used in applications in physics, chemistry, and material science. This was followed by stronger and more stable (NbTi based) superconducting magnet technology typically implemented first for small-bore systems in analytical chemistry, biochemistry and structural biology, and eventually allowing larger horizontal-bore magnets with diameters large enough to fit small laboratory animals. By the end of the 1970s, first low-field resistive magnets big enough to accommodate humans were developed and superconducting whole-body systems followed. Currently, cutting-edge analytical NMR systems are available at proton frequencies up to 1 GHz (23.5 T) based on Nb3Sn at 1.9 K. A new 1.2 GHz system (28 T) at 1.9 K, operating in persistent mode but using a combination of low and high temperature multi-filament superconductors is to be released. Preclinical instruments range from small-bore animal systems with typically 600 - 800 MHz (14.1 - 18.8 T) up to 900 MHz (21 T) at 1.9 K. Human whole-body MRI systems currently operate up to 10.5 T. Hybrid combined superconducting and resistive electromagnets with even higher field strength of 45 T dc and 100 T pulsed, are available for material research, of course with smaller free bore diameters. This rather costly development towards higher and higher field strength is a consequence of the inherently low and, thus

  6. THE ROLE OF HIGH FIELD MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE BRAIN IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF EARLY-STAGE PARKINSON’S DISEASE: A CLINICAL CASE

    OpenAIRE

    N. A. Shnayder; M. R. Sapronova; Petrova, M. M.; I.P. Artyukhov

    2017-01-01

    Objective: to demonstrate the role of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of early-stage Parkinson’s disease on a clinical case.Materials and methods. Patient S., 1962 (53 years), referred to the Neurological Center of Epileptology, Neurogenetic and Brain Research of University Clinic of the Krasnoyarsk State Medical University named after prof. V.F. Voyno-Yasenetskiy with of the early stages of Parkinson’s disease. The patient received the recommendation of a neurolo...

  7. Ultra-robust high-field magnetization plateau and supersolidity in bond-frustrated MnCr2S4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurkan, Vladimir; Zherlitsyn, Sergei; Prodan, Lilian; Felea, Viorel; Cong, Pham Thanh; Skourski, Yurii; Wang, Zhe; Deisenhofer, Joachim; von Nidda, Hans-Albrecht Krug; Wosnitza, Joahim; Loidl, Alois

    2017-01-01

    Frustrated magnets provide a promising avenue for realizing exotic quantum states of matter, such as spin liquids and spin ice or complex spin molecules. Under an external magnetic field, frustrated magnets can exhibit fractional magnetization plateaus related to definite spin patterns stabilized by field-induced lattice distortions. Magnetization and ultrasound experiments in MnCr2S4 up to 60 T reveal two fascinating features: (i) an extremely robust magnetization plateau with an unusual spin structure and (ii) two intermediate phases, indicating possible realizations of supersolid phases. The magnetization plateau characterizes fully polarized chromium moments, without any contributions from manganese spins. At 40 T, the middle of the plateau, a regime evolves, where sound waves propagate almost without dissipation. The external magnetic field exactly compensates the Cr–Mn exchange field and decouples Mn and Cr sublattices. In analogy to predictions of quantum lattice-gas models, the changes of the spin order of the manganese ions at the phase boundaries of the magnetization plateau are interpreted as transitions to supersolid phases. PMID:28345038

  8. Biosynthetic Approaches to Isotope Enrichment for Applications in Neutron Scattering and High Field NMR Spectroscopy: Methylotrophic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary E. lidstrom

    2004-09-15

    Limitations in current isotopic labeling methods present a substantial bottleneck for the application of advanced structural techniques to many important biochemical problems. New tools are required to efficiently produce the necessary labeling patterns in biochemical precursors and incorporate them into protein molecules for structural studies. This project proposed involved one aspect of this problem, the development of expression vectors for a methylotrophic bacterium, Methylobacterium extorquens AM1. If high-level, efficient expression could be obtained in such a bacterium, it would be possible to use low-cost {sup 2}H- and/or {sup 13}C-labeled substrates such as methanol to label proteins. The Lidstrom laboratory at the University of Washington worked closely with the collaborators at Los Alamos National Laboratories in the development and use of these vectors. (1) Overexpression of a target gene, bacterial dehalogenase--This enzyme was expressed in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 using a high level methanol-inducible promoter, the mxaF promoter. High expression was achieved, but most was in an insoluble form. They expressed this protein in a mutant lacking polybetahydroxybutyrate granules, and high expression was achieved, up to 10% of the total soluble protein. The recombinant protein was purified and shown to be active, with characteristics similar to the enzyme produced in E. coli. (2) Development of regulated expression systems--A number of regulated promoters were tested in M. extorquens AM1, the most promising of which appeared to be the E. coli lac promoter coupled to the Laciq regulator. The repressor was shown to be active and a chromosomal insertion construct was generated that repressed the low-level lac promoter activity in M. extorquens AM1. However, IPTG induced this system only poorly. A number of studies were carried out leading to the conclusion that IPTG entered the cell but was exported by one or more export pumps. Target genes for such

  9. Medical applications of magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, C; Jurgons, R; Seliger, C; Iro, H

    2006-01-01

    In recent years biomedical research indicated, that magnetic nanoparticles can be a promising tool for several applications in vitro and in vivo. In medicine many approaches were investigated for diagnosis and therapy and offered a great variety of applications. Magnetic cell separation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic targeted delivery of therapeutics or magnetically induced hyperthermia are approaches of particular clinical relevance. For medical use, especially for in vivo application it is of great importance that these particles do not have any toxic effects or incompatibility with biological organism. Investigations on applicable particles induced a variability of micro- and nanostructures with different materials, sizes, and specific surface chemistry.

  10. Use of movable high-field-strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging with awake craniotomies for resection of gliomas: preliminary experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leuthardt, Eric C

    2011-07-01

    Awake craniotomy with electrocortical mapping and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) are established techniques for maximizing tumor resection and preserving function, but there has been little experience combining these methodologies.

  11. Ground state of Er sup 3+ ions in ErNi sub 5 as studied by high field magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwanski, R.J.; Franse, J.J.M.; Kayzel, F.E.; Marquina, C. (Van der Waals-Zeeman Lab., Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Gignoux, D. (Lab. Louis Neel, CNRS, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Szewczyk, A. (Inst. of Physics of Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszaw (Poland))

    1992-03-01

    By magnetization studies of single crystalline ErNi{sub 5} in magnetic fields up to 35 T, the crystal field and exchange interactions have been evaluated. The ground state of the Er{sup 3+} ion is found to be a {Gamma}{sub 9} doublet with a dominant vertical stroke{+-}15/2> contribution. The derived parameters describe the inelastic neutron scattering and specific heat results available in the literature very well. (orig.).

  12. [Comparative assessment of MR-semiotics of acutest intracerebral hematomas in low- and extra high-field frequency magnetic resonance tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsova, V I; Burenchev, D V; Tvorogova, T V; Guseva, O I; Prokhorov, A V; Smirnov, A M; Kupriianov, D A; Pirogov, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    An objective of the study was to compare sensitivity of low- and extra high-field frequency magnetic resonance (MR) tomography of acutest intracerebral hematomas (ICH) and to assess differences between symptoms in obtained images. A study was conducted using experimental ICH in rats (n=6). Hematomas were formed by two injections of autologic blood into the brain. MR-devices "Bio Spec 70/30" with magnetic field strength of 7 T and "Ellipse-150" with magnetic field strength of 0,15 T were used in the study. MR-tomography was carried out 3-5 h after the injections. Both MR-devices revealed the presence of pathological lesion in all animals. Extra highfield frequency MR-tomography showed the specific signs of ICH caused by the paramagnetic effect of deoxyhemoglobin in T2 and T2*-weighted images (WI) and low frequency MR-tomography - in T2*-WI only. The comparable sensitivity of low- and extra high-field frequency MR-devices in acutest ICH was established.

  13. Neutron diffraction study of anomalous high-field magnetic phases in TmNi2B2C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, K.N.; Abrahamsen, A.B.; Eskildsen, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    We present a (B,T)-phase diagram of the magnetic superconductor TmNi2B2C obtained by neutron scattering. The measurements were performed in magnetic fields up to 6 T applied along the crystalline a axis. The observed phases are characterized by three ordering vectors, Q(F)=(0.094,0.094,0),Q(AI)=(0.......90Yb0.10)Ni2B2C the Q(F)-->Q(AI) phase transition is also observed but at a larger transition field compared to the undoped compound. In (Tm0.85Yb0.15)Ni2B2C the Q(F) phase persists up to at least 1.8 T. The magnetic correlation length of the Q(AI) phase in TmNi2B2C measured parallel and perpendicular...

  14. Biomedical applications of magnetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Mefford, Thompson

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic particles are increasingly being used in a wide variety of biomedical applications. Written by a team of internationally respected experts, this book provides an up-to-date authoritative reference for scientists and engineers. The first section presents the fundamentals of the field by explaining the theory of magnetism, describing techniques to synthesize magnetic particles, and detailing methods to characterize magnetic particles. The second section describes biomedical applications, including chemical sensors and cellular actuators, and diagnostic applications such as drug delivery, hyperthermia cancer treatment, and magnetic resonance imaging contrast.

  15. ARC: A compact, high-field, fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant with demountable magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorbom, B.N., E-mail: bsorbom@mit.edu; Ball, J.; Palmer, T.R.; Mangiarotti, F.J.; Sierchio, J.M.; Bonoli, P.; Kasten, C.; Sutherland, D.A.; Barnard, H.S.; Haakonsen, C.B.; Goh, J.; Sung, C.; Whyte, D.G.

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • ARC reactor designed to have 500 MW fusion power at 3.3 m major radius. • Compact, simplified design allowed by high magnetic fields and jointed magnets. • ARC has innovative plasma physics solutions such as inboardside RF launch. • High temperature superconductors allow high magnetic fields and jointed magnets. • Liquid immersion blanket and jointed magnets greatly simplify tokamak reactor design. - Abstract: The affordable, robust, compact (ARC) reactor is the product of a conceptual design study aimed at reducing the size, cost, and complexity of a combined fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion Pilot power plant. ARC is a ∼200–250 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has rare earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils, which have joints to enable disassembly. This allows the vacuum vessel to be replaced quickly, mitigating first wall survivability concerns, and permits a single device to test many vacuum vessel designs and divertor materials. The design point has a plasma fusion gain of Q{sub p} ≈ 13.6, yet is fully non-inductive, with a modest bootstrap fraction of only ∼63%. Thus ARC offers a high power gain with relatively large external control of the current profile. This highly attractive combination is enabled by the ∼23 T peak field on coil achievable with newly available REBCO superconductor technology. External current drive is provided by two innovative inboard RF launchers using 25 MW of lower hybrid and 13.6 MW of ion cyclotron fast wave power. The resulting efficient current drive provides a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing fluorine lithium beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket is low-risk technology and provides effective neutron moderation and shielding, excellent

  16. Cost of high-field Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi accelerator dipole magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1982-11-01

    Future high-energy proton accelerators will likely require very high magnetic fields if the size of the accelerator and associated experimental areas are to be limited to dimensions that can be accomodated by the terrain at convenient sites. Two commercially available superconductors can be used to produce magnetic fields of 10T or more. The first is Nb/sub 3/Sn, which can operate in pool boiling helium at 4.4 K. The second is NbTi, which must be cooled to about 1.9 K in superfluid helium. In this paper the costs of 5-cm-bore, 6-m-long magnets made of these materials and operating at fields from 5 to 11 T are compared. At 10 T the capital cost of a NbTi coil operating in superfluid helium is 35% less than the cost of a Nb/sub 3/Sn coil. The cost of the NbTi coil is still 10% less after the differential operating costs that will be incurred over the life of the accelerator are included. The results presented here are a summary of a detailed analysis of these costs given in a separate report.

  17. Direct synthesis, crystal structures, high-field EPR, and magnetic studies of heterometallic polymers containing manganese(II) carboxylates interconnected by [Cu(en)2]2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhankova, Valeriya G; Beznischenko, Asya O; Kokozay, Vladimir N; Zubatyuk, Roman I; Shishkin, Oleg V; Jezierska, Julia; Ozarowski, Andrew

    2008-06-02

    Two heterometallic polymers containing cations [Cu(en)2]2+ and either the [Mn(mal)2(H2O)2]2- (1) or [Mn2(succ)2Cl2]n2n- (2) anions (mal=malonate and succ=succinate) were investigated by X-ray crystallography, high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Magnetic susceptibility and EPR spectra characteristic of antiferromagnetically coupled Mn2+-Mn2+ pairs were observed in 2, and the exchange integral J=31 cm(-1) (H=JS1S2) as well as the zero-field-splitting parameter D=-3.046 cm(-1) in the triplet state of the dimanganese entity was determined.

  18. The strength of the R - T exchange coupling in R sub 2 Fe sub 14 B compounds; an approach based on high-field magnetization measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhoef, R.; Quang, P.H.; Franse, J.J.M.; Radwanski, R.J. (Natuurkundig Laboratorium der Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam, The Netherlands (NL))

    1990-05-01

    By performing high-field magnetization measurements on Gd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14{minus}{ital x}}Mn{sub {ital x}}B and Tb{sub 2}Fe{sub 14{minus}{ital x}}Mn{sub {ital x}}B powdered samples that are oriented in the sample holder by the applied field it is possible to improve the accuracy of earlier reported values for the {ital R}-{ital T} exchange-coupling constant of these R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds. In addition, the two-sublattice model that has been applied previously has been extended to a three-sublattice model with two magnetic rare-earth sublattices for the Er and Tm compounds in an attempt to describe the experimentally observed low-field susceptibility. It turns out however, that mainly the iron-manganese sublattice is responsible for this susceptibility.

  19. Hybrid Magnetics and Power Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mo, Wai Keung; Paasch, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    A hybrid magnetic approach, merging two different magnetic core properites such as ferrite and iron powder cores, is an effective solution for power converter applications. It can offer similar magnetic properties to that of magnetic powder cores but showing less copper loss than powder cores. In...... operation and energy saving. Index Terms—magnetic devices, passive components, boost inductor....... In order to prevent ferrite core saturation, placing an effective air gap within the ferrite core is a key method to obtain optimum hybrid magnetic performance. Furthermore, a relatively large inductance at low loading current is an excellent way to minimze power loss in order to achieve high efficiency...

  20. Design of a triple resonance magic angle sample spinning probe for high field solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rachel W.; Paulson, Eric K.; Zilm, Kurt W.

    2003-06-01

    Standard design and construction practices used in building nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probes for the study of solid state samples become difficult if not entirely impractical to implement as the 1H resonance frequency approaches the self resonance frequency of commercial capacitors. We describe an approach that utilizes short variable transmission line segments as tunable reactances. Such an approach effectively controls stray reactances and provides a higher Q alternative to ceramic chip capacitors. The particular probe described is built to accommodate a 2.5 mm magic angle spinning rotor system, and is triply tuned to 13C, 15N, and 1H frequencies for use at 18.8 T (200, 80, and 800 MHz, respectively). Isolation of the three radio frequency (rf) channels is achieved using both a rejection trap and a transmission line notch filter. The compact geometry of this design allows three channels with high power handling capability to fit in a medium bore (63 mm) magnet. Extended time variable temperature operation is integral to the mechanical design, enabling the temperature control necessary for investigation of biological macromolecules. Accurate measurement of the air temperature near the sample rotor is achieved using a fiber optic thermometer, which does not interfere with the rf electronics. We also demonstrate that acceptable line shapes are only readily achieved using zero magnetic susceptibility wire in construction of the sample coil. Computer simulation of the circuit aided in the physical design of the probe. Representative data illustrating the efficiency, rf homogeneity, and signal to noise factor of the probe are presented.

  1. High Field In Vivo 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Brain by Random Radiofrequency Heteronuclear Decoupling and Data Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ningzhi; Li, Shizhe; Shen, Jun

    2017-06-01

    In vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a unique and effective tool for studying dynamic human brain metabolism and the cycling of neurotransmitters. One of the major technical challenges for in vivo 13C-MRS is the high radio frequency (RF) power necessary for heteronuclear decoupling. In the common practice of in vivo 13C-MRS, alkanyl carbons are detected in the spectra range of 10-65ppm. The amplitude of decoupling pulses has to be significantly greater than the large one-bond 1H-13C scalar coupling (1JCH=125-145 Hz). Two main proton decoupling methods have been developed: broadband stochastic decoupling and coherent composite or adiabatic pulse decoupling (e.g., WALTZ); the latter is widely used because of its efficiency and superb performance under inhomogeneous B1 field. Because the RF power required for proton decoupling increases quadratically with field strength, in vivo 13C-MRS using coherent decoupling is often limited to low magnetic fields (Drug Administration (FDA). Alternately, carboxylic/amide carbons are coupled to protons via weak long-range 1H-13C scalar couplings, which can be decoupled using low RF power broadband stochastic decoupling. Recently, the carboxylic/amide 13C-MRS technique using low power random RF heteronuclear decoupling was safely applied to human brain studies at 7T. Here, we review the two major decoupling methods and the carboxylic/amide 13C-MRS with low power decoupling strategy. Further decreases in RF power deposition by frequency-domain windowing and time-domain random under-sampling are also discussed. Low RF power decoupling opens the possibility of performing in vivo 13C experiments of human brain at very high magnetic fields (such as 11.7T), where signal-to-noise ratio as well as spatial and temporal spectral resolution are more favorable than lower fields.

  2. Aerospace applications of magnetic bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hockney, Richard

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic bearings have traditionally been considered for use in aerospace applications only where performance advantages have been the primary, if not only, consideration. Conventional wisdom has been that magnetic bearings have certain performance advantages which must be traded off against increased weight, volume, electric power consumption, and system complexity. These perceptions have hampered the use of magnetic bearings in many aerospace applications because weight, volume, and power are almost always primary considerations. This paper will review progress on several active aerospace magnetic bearings programs at SatCon Technology Corporation. The magnetic bearing programs at SatCon cover a broad spectrum of applications including: a magnetically-suspended spacecraft integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS), a magnetically-suspended momentum wheel, magnetic bearings for the gas generator rotor of a turboshaft engine, a vibration-attenuating magnetic bearing system for an airborne telescope, and magnetic bearings for the compressor of a space-rated heat pump system. The emphasis of these programs is to develop magnetic bearing technologies to the point where magnetic bearings can be truly useful, reliable, and well tested components for the aerospace community.

  3. High Field In vivo13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Brain by Random Radiofrequency Heteronuclear Decoupling and Data Undersampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningzhi Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In vivo13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS is a unique and effective tool for studying dynamic human brain metabolism and the cycling of neurotransmitters. One of the major technical challenges for in vivo13C-MRS is the high radio frequency (RF power necessary for heteronuclear decoupling. In the common practice of in vivo13C-MRS, alkanyl carbons are detected in the spectra range of 10–65 ppm. The amplitude of decoupling pulses has to be significantly greater than the large one-bond 1H-13C scalar coupling (1JCH = 125–145 Hz. Two main proton decoupling methods have been developed: broadband stochastic decoupling and coherent composite or adiabatic pulse decoupling (e.g., WALTZ; the latter is widely used because of its efficiency and superb performance under inhomogeneous B1 field. Because the RF power required for proton decoupling increases quadratically with field strength, in vivo13C-MRS using coherent decoupling is often limited to low magnetic fields [<=4 Tesla (T] to keep the local and averaged specific absorption rate (SAR under the safety guidelines established by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Alternately, carboxylic/amide carbons are coupled to protons via weak long-range 1H-13C scalar couplings, which can be decoupled using low RF power broadband stochastic decoupling. Recently, the carboxylic/amide 13C-MRS technique using low power random RF heteronuclear decoupling was safely applied to human brain studies at 7T. Here, we review the two major decoupling methods and the carboxylic/amide 13C-MRS with low power decoupling strategy. Further decreases in RF power deposition by frequency-domain windowing and time-domain random under-sampling are also discussed. Low RF power decoupling opens the possibility of performing in vivo13C experiments of human brain at very high magnetic fields (such as 11.7T, where signal-to-noise ratio as well as spatial and temporal

  4. ARC: A compact, high-field, fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant with demountable magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Sorbom, B N; Palmer, T R; Mangiarotti, F J; Sierchio, J M; Bonoli, P; Kasten, C; Sutherland, D A; Barnard, H S; Haakonsen, C B; Goh, J; Sung, C; Whyte, D G

    2014-01-01

    The affordable, robust, compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design study aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion Pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has rare earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils, which have joints to enable disassembly. This allows the vacuum vessel to be replaced quickly, mitigating first wall survivability concerns, and permits a single device to test many vacuum vessel designs and divertor materials. The design point has a plasma fusion gain of Q_p~13.6, yet is fully non-inductive, with a modest bootstrap fraction of only ~63%. Thus ARC offers a high power gain with relatively large external control of the current profile. This highly attractive combination is enabled by the ~23 T peak field on coil with newly available REBCO superconductor technology. External cu...

  5. Lung disease assessment in primary ciliary dyskinesia: a comparison between chest high-field magnetic resonance imaging and high-resolution computed tomography findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacotucci Paola

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is associated with pulmonary involvement that requires periodical assessment. Chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT has become the method of choice to evaluate chronic lung disease, but entails exposure to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been proposed as a potential radiation-free technique in several chest disorders. Aim of our study is to evaluate whether high-field MRI is as effective as HRCT in identifying PCD pulmonary abnormalities. We also analyzed the relationships between the severity and extension of lung disease, and functional data. Methods Thirteen PCD patients (8 children/5 adults; median age, 15.2 yrs underwent chest HRCT and high-field 3T MRI, spirometry, and deep throat or sputum culture. Images were scored using a modified version of the Helbich system. Results HRCT and MRI total scores were 12 (range, 6–20 and 12 (range, 5–17, respectively. Agreement between HRCT and MRI scores was good or excellent (r > 0.8. HRCT and MRI total scores were significantly related to forced vital capacity (r = -0.5, p = 0.05; and r = -0.7, p = 0.009, respectively and forced expiratory volume at 1 second (r = -0.6, p = 0.03; and r = -0.7, p = 0.009, respectively. Conclusion Chest high-field 3T MRI appears to be as effective as HRCT in assessing the extent and severity of lung abnormalities in PCD. MRI scores might be used for longitudinal assessment and be an outcome surrogate in future studies.

  6. Randomized trial for superiority of high field strength intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging guided resection in pituitary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Vivek; Raheja, Amol; Suri, Ashish; Chandra, P Sarat; Kale, Shashank S; Kumar, Rajinder; Garg, Ajay; Kalaivani, Mani; Pandey, Ravindra M; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2017-03-01

    Till date there are no randomized trials to suggest the superiority of intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (IOMRI) guided trans-sphenoidal pituitary resection over two dimensional fluoroscopic (2D-F) guided resections. We conducted this trial to establish the superiority of IOMRI in pituitary surgery. Primary objective was to compare extent of tumor resection between the two study arms. It was a prospective, randomized, outcome assessor and statistician blinded, two arm (A: IOMRI, n=25 and B: 2D-F, n=25), parallel group clinical trial. 4 patients from IOMRI group cross-over to 2D-F group and were consequently analyzed in latter group, based on modified intent to treat method. A total of 50 patients were enrolled till completion of trial (n=25 in each study arm). Demographic profile and baseline parameters were comparable among the two arms (p>0.05) except for higher number of endoscopic procedures and experienced neurosurgeons (>10years) in arm B (p=0.02, 0.002 respectively). Extent of resection was similar in both study arms (A, 94.9% vs B, 93.6%; p=0.78), despite adjusting for experience of operating surgeon and use of microscope/endoscope for surgical resection. We observed that use of IOMRI helped optimize the extent of resection in 5/20 patients (25%) for pituitary tumor resection in-group A. Present study failed to observe superiorty of IOMRI over conventional 2D-F guided resection in pituitary macroadenoma surgery. By use of this technology, younger surgeons could validate their results intra-operatively and hence could increase EOR without causing any increase in complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of female ballet dancers' ankles in the en pointe position using high field strength magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    The en pointe position of the ankle in ballet is extreme. Previously, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of ballet dancers' ankles en pointe was confined to a low field, open MR device. To develop a reproducible ankle MRI protocol for ballet dancers en pointe and to assess the positions of the key structures in the dancers ankles. Six female ballet dancers participated; each was randomly assigned to stand en pointe while one of her feet and ankles was splinted with wooden rods affixed with straps or to begin with the ankle in neutral position. She lay in an MR scanner with the ankle inside a knee coil for en pointe imaging and inside an ankle/foot coil for neutral position imaging. Proton density weighted images with and without fat suppression and 3D water excitation gradient recalled echo images were obtained en pointe and in neutral position in sagittal, axial, and coronal planes. We compared the bones, cartilage, and soft tissues within and between positions. No difficulties using the protocol were encountered. En pointe the posterior articular surface of the tibial plafond was incongruent with the talar dome and rested on the posterior talus. The posterior edge of the plafond impinged Kager's fat pad. All participants exhibited one or more small ganglion cysts about the ankle and proximal foot, as well as fluid accumulation in the flexor and fibularis tendon sheaths. Our MRI protocol allows assessment of female ballet dancers' ankles in the extreme plantar flexion position in which the dancers perform. We consistently noted incongruence of the talocrural joint and convergence of the tibia, talus, and calcaneus posteriorly. This protocol may be useful for clinicians who evaluate dancers. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  8. Terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy of an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure using a high-field pulsed magnet and an asynchronous optical sampling technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B. F., E-mail: Ben.Spencer@manchester.ac.uk; Smith, W. F.; Hibberd, M. T.; Dawson, P.; Graham, D. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy and the Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Beck, M.; Bartels, A. [Laser Quantum GmbH, Max-Stromeyer-Str. 116, 78467 Konstanz (Germany); Guiney, I.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-23

    The effective mass, sheet carrier concentration, and mobility of electrons within a two-dimensional electron gas in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure were determined using a laboratory-based terahertz cyclotron resonance spectrometer. The ability to perform terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy with magnetic fields of up to 31 T was enabled by combining a high-field pulsed magnet with a modified asynchronous optical sampling terahertz detection scheme. This scheme allowed around 100 transmitted terahertz waveforms to be recorded over the 14 ms magnetic field pulse duration. The sheet density and mobility were measured to be 8.0 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} and 9000 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} at 77 K. The in-plane electron effective mass at the band edge was determined to be 0.228 ± 0.002m{sub 0}.

  9. High field induced magnetic transitions in the Y0.7E r0.3F e2D4.2 deuteride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul-Boncour, V.; Guillot, M.; Isnard, O.; Hoser, A.

    2017-09-01

    The influence of the partial Er for Y substitution on the crystal structure and magnetic properties of YF e2D4.2 has been investigated by high field magnetization and neutron diffraction experiments. Y0.7E r0.3F e2D4.2 compound crystallizes in the same monoclinic structure as YF e2D4.2 described in P c (P1c1) space group with D atoms located in 18 different tetrahedral interstitial sites. A cell volume contraction of 0.6% is observed upon Er substitution, inducing large modification of the magnetic properties. Electronic effect of D insertion as well as lowering of crystal symmetry are important factors determining the magnetic properties of Fe sublattice, which evolves towards more delocalized behavior and modifying the Er-Fe exchange interactions. In the ground state, the Er and Fe moments are arranged ferrimagnetically within the plane perpendicular to the monoclinic b axis and with average moments mEr=6.4 (3 ) μBEr-1 and mFe=2.0 (1 ) μBFe-1 at 10 K. Upon heating, mEr decreases progressively until TEr=55 K . Between 55 K and 75 K, the Fe sublattice undergoes a first-order ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic (FM-AFM) transition with a cell volume contraction due to the itinerant metamagnetic behavior of one Fe site. In the AFM structure, mFe decreases until the Néel temperature TN=125 K . At high field, two different types of field induced transitions are observed. The Er moments become parallel to the Fe one and saturates to the E r3 + free ion value, leading to an unusual field induced FM arrangement at a transition field BTrans of only 78 kG below 30 K. Then above TM0=66 K , an AFM-FM transition of the Fe sublattice, accompanied by a cell volume increase is observed. BTrans increases linearly versus temperature and with a larger d BTrans/d T slope than for YF e2D4.2 . This has been explained by the additional contribution of Er induced moments above BTrans.

  10. Magnetic Nanomaterials and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurii K. Gun'ko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue of Nanomaterials is dedicated to the development of new magnetic nanomaterials and their applications in biomedicine, catalysis, spintronics and other areas. The publications in this Issue demonstrate that the interest in magnetic nanomaterials is continuously growing and their realm is expanding rapidly. Some highlights of the publications in this issue are discussed below. [...

  11. YbNi{sub 4}P{sub 2}. Single crystal growth by the Czochralski method and high-field magnetization measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliemt, Kristin; Krellner, Cornelius [Goethe-University, Frankfurt (Germany); Foerster, Tobias [HLD, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Brando, Manuel [MPI for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated a new generation of YbNi{sub 4}P{sub 2} single crystals that were grown from a levitating melt by the Czochralski method. With T{sub C}= 0.17 K, this ferromagnetic material has the lowest Curie temperature ever observed among stoichiometric compounds. A quantum critical point occurs in the substitution series YbNi{sub 4}(P{sub 1-x}As{sub x}){sub 2} at x ∼ 0.1. The hybridization between localized f-electrons and the conduction electrons leads to a Fermi-liquid ground state with narrow bands and strongly enhanced effective electronic masses (heavy fermion system, Kondo temperature 8 K). An external magnetic field can split the bands, deform the Fermi surface and simultaneously suppress the Kondo interaction. If such a deformation changes the topology, it is called a Lifshitz transition. Previous thermodynamic and electrical transport studies have found indications for Lifshitz transitions in this Kondo lattice system. We report on results of high-field magnetization measurements at low temperature to further investigate the putative Lifshitz transitions in YbNi{sub 4}P{sub 2}.

  12. Downhole Applications of Magnetic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P; Li, Bodong; Moellendick, Timothy E

    2017-10-19

    In this paper we present a review of the application of two types of magnetic sensors-fluxgate magnetometers and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors-in the oil/gas industry. These magnetic sensors play a critical role in drilling wells safely, accurately and efficiently into a target reservoir zone by providing directional data of the well and acquiring information about the surrounding geological formations. Research into magnetic sensors for oil/gas drilling has not been explored by researchers to the same extent as other applications, such as biomedical, magnetic storage and automotive/aerospace applications. Therefore, this paper aims to serve as an opportunity for researchers to truly understand how magnetic sensors can be used in a downhole environment and to provide fertile ground for research and development in this area. A look ahead, discussing other magnetic sensor technologies that can potentially be used in the oil/gas industry is presented, and what is still needed in order deploy them in the field is also addressed.

  13. Downhole Applications of Magnetic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthaka P. Gooneratne

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a review of the application of two types of magnetic sensors—fluxgate magnetometers and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR sensors—in the oil/gas industry. These magnetic sensors play a critical role in drilling wells safely, accurately and efficiently into a target reservoir zone by providing directional data of the well and acquiring information about the surrounding geological formations. Research into magnetic sensors for oil/gas drilling has not been explored by researchers to the same extent as other applications, such as biomedical, magnetic storage and automotive/aerospace applications. Therefore, this paper aims to serve as an opportunity for researchers to truly understand how magnetic sensors can be used in a downhole environment and to provide fertile ground for research and development in this area. A look ahead, discussing other magnetic sensor technologies that can potentially be used in the oil/gas industry is presented, and what is still needed in order deploy them in the field is also addressed.

  14. Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) - evaluation of a miniaturised applicator and implementation in a 1.0-T high-field open MRI applying a porcine liver model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitparth, Florian; Knobloch, Gesine; Rump, J.; Wonneberger, Uta; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, Ulf [Charite, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Balmert, Dirk [Somatex Medical Technologies GmbH, Teltow (Germany); Chopra, Sascha [Charite, Humboldt-University, Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Philipp, Carsten [Elisabeth Klinik, Department of Laser Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and safety of a novel LITT applicator for thermal ablation of liver malignancies in 1.0-T high-field open MRI. A miniaturised 6-F double-tubed protective catheter with a closed cooling circuit was used with a flexible laser fibre, connected to a 1,064-nm Nd:YAG laser and evaluated in non-perfused porcine livers (18-30 W for 10-20 min, 2-W and 2-min increments; n = 210/applicator) in reference to an established 9-F system. As a proof of concept, MR-guided LITT was performed in two healthy domestic pigs in high-field open MRI. Ex-vivo, the coagulation volumes induced by the 6-F system with maximum applicable power of 24 W for 20 min (33.0 {+-} 4.4 cm{sup 3}) did not differ significantly from those set with the 9-F system at 30 W for 20 min (35.8 {+-} 4.9 cm{sup 3}) (p = 0.73). A flow-rate of 15 ml/min of the cooling saline solution was sufficient. MR navigation and thermometry were feasible. The miniaturised 6-F applicator can create comparable coagulation sizes to those of the 9-F system. Applicator guidance and online-thermometry in high-field open MRI are feasible. (orig.)

  15. High field MRI in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis: high field-high yield?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattjes, Mike P.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center, MS Center Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15

    Following the approval of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly incorporated into the clinical setting. Especially in the field of neuroimaging, the number of high field MRI applications has been increased dramatically. Taking advantage on increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and chemical shift, higher magnetic field strengths offer new perspectives particularly in brain imaging and also challenges in terms of several technical and physical consequences. Over the past few years, many applications of high field MRI in patients with suspected and definite multiple sclerosis (MS) have been reported including conventional and quantitative MRI methods. Conventional pulse sequences at 3 T offers higher lesion detection rates when compared to 1.5 T, particularly in anatomic regions which are important for the diagnosis of patients with MS. MR spectroscopy at 3 T is characterized by an improved spectral resolution due to increased chemical shift allowing a better quantification of metabolites. It detects significant axonal damage already in patients presenting with clinically isolated syndromes and can quantify metabolites of special interest such as glutamate which is technically difficult to quantify at lower field strengths. Furthermore, the higher susceptibility and SNR offer advantages in the field of functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. The recently introduced new generation of ultra-high field systems beyond 3 T allows scanning in submillimeter resolution and gives new insights into in vivo MS pathology on MRI. The objectives of this article are to review the current knowledge and level of evidence concerning the application of high field MRI in MS and to give some ideas of research perspectives in the future. (orig.)

  16. The Travelling-Wave Primate System: A New Solution for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macaque Monkeys at 7 Tesla Ultra-High Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Tim; Mallow, Johannes; Plaumann, Markus; Luchtmann, Michael; Stadler, Jörg; Mylius, Judith; Brosch, Michael; Bernarding, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging of macaques at ultra-high field (UHF) is usually conducted by combining a volume coil for transmit (Tx) and a phased array coil for receive (Rx) tightly enclosing the monkey's head. Good results have been achieved using vertical or horizontal magnets with implanted or near-surface coils. An alternative and less costly approach, the travelling-wave (TW) excitation concept, may offer more flexible experimental setups on human whole-body UHF magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, which are now more widely available. Goal of the study was developing and validating the TW concept for in vivo primate MRI. The TW Primate System (TWPS) uses the radio frequency shield of the gradient system of a human whole-body 7 T MRI system as a waveguide to propagate a circularly polarized B1 field represented by the TE11 mode. This mode is excited by a specifically designed 2-port patch antenna. For receive, a customized neuroimaging monkey head receive-only coil was designed. Field simulation was used for development and evaluation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was compared with data acquired with a conventional monkey volume head coil consisting of a homogeneous transmit coil and a 12-element receive coil. The TWPS offered good image homogeneity in the volume-of-interest Turbo spin echo images exhibited a high contrast, allowing a clear depiction of the cerebral anatomy. As a prerequisite for functional MRI, whole brain ultrafast echo planar images were successfully acquired. The TWPS presents a promising new approach to fMRI of macaques for research groups with access to a horizontal UHF MRI system.

  17. The Travelling-Wave Primate System: A New Solution for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macaque Monkeys at 7 Tesla Ultra-High Field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Herrmann

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging of macaques at ultra-high field (UHF is usually conducted by combining a volume coil for transmit (Tx and a phased array coil for receive (Rx tightly enclosing the monkey's head. Good results have been achieved using vertical or horizontal magnets with implanted or near-surface coils. An alternative and less costly approach, the travelling-wave (TW excitation concept, may offer more flexible experimental setups on human whole-body UHF magnetic resonance imaging (MRI systems, which are now more widely available. Goal of the study was developing and validating the TW concept for in vivo primate MRI.The TW Primate System (TWPS uses the radio frequency shield of the gradient system of a human whole-body 7 T MRI system as a waveguide to propagate a circularly polarized B1 field represented by the TE11 mode. This mode is excited by a specifically designed 2-port patch antenna. For receive, a customized neuroimaging monkey head receive-only coil was designed. Field simulation was used for development and evaluation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was compared with data acquired with a conventional monkey volume head coil consisting of a homogeneous transmit coil and a 12-element receive coil.The TWPS offered good image homogeneity in the volume-of-interest Turbo spin echo images exhibited a high contrast, allowing a clear depiction of the cerebral anatomy. As a prerequisite for functional MRI, whole brain ultrafast echo planar images were successfully acquired.The TWPS presents a promising new approach to fMRI of macaques for research groups with access to a horizontal UHF MRI system.

  18. A high-field magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using an oven-controlled crystal oscillator as the local oscillator of its radio frequency transceiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Tang, Xin; Tang, Weinan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-09-01

    A home-made high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrometer with multiple receiving channels is described. The radio frequency (RF) transceiver of the spectrometer consists of digital intermediate frequency (IF) circuits and corresponding mixing circuits. A direct digital synthesis device is employed to generate the IF pulse; the IF signal from a down-conversion circuit is sampled and followed by digital quadrature detection. Both the IF generation and the IF sampling use a 50 MHz clock. An oven-controlled crystal oscillator, which has outstanding spectral purity and a compact circuit, is used as the local oscillator of the RF transceiver. A digital signal processor works as the pulse programmer of the spectrometer, as a result, 32 control lines can be generated simultaneously while an event is triggered. Field programmable gate array devices are utilized as the auxiliary controllers of the IF generation, IF receiving, and gradient control. High performance, including 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, 1 MHz receiving bandwidth, and 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, is achieved. High-quality images on a 1.5 T MRI system using the spectrometer are obtained.

  19. Novel functional magnetic materials fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book presents current research on advanced magnetic materials and multifunctional composites. Recent advances in technology and engineering have resulted from the development of advanced magnetic materials with improved functional magnetic and magneto-transport properties. Certain industrial sectors, such as magnetic sensors, microelectronics, and security, demand cost-effective materials with reduced dimensionality and desirable magnetic properties such as enhanced magnetic softness, giant magnetic field sensitivity, and large magnetocaloric effect.  Expert chapters present the most up-to-date information on the fabrication process, processing, tailoring of properties, and applications of different families of modern functional materials for advanced smart applications. Topics covered include novel magnetic materials and applications; amorphous and nanocrystalline magnetic materials and applications; hard magnetic materials; magnetic shape memory alloys; and magnetic oxides. The book's highly interdis...

  20. Inhomogeneity of rat vertebrae trabecular architecture by high-field 3D mu-magnetic resonance imaging and variable threshold image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombarini, Marcella; Gombia, Mirko; Fantazzini, Paola; Giardino, Roberto; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Parrilli, Annapaola; Vittur, Franco; Guillot, Genevieve

    2009-10-01

    To analyze the 3D microarchitecture of rat lumbar vertebrae by micro-magnetic resonance imaging (micro-MRI). micro-MR images (20 x 20 x 20 microm(3) apparent voxel size) were acquired with a three-dimensional spin-echo pulse sequence on four lumbar vertebrae of two rats. Apparent microarchitectural parameters like trabecular bone fraction (BV/TV), specific bone surface (BS/TV), mean intercept length (MIL), and Euler number per unit volume (Euler density, E(V)) were calculated using a novel semiquantitative variable threshold segmentation technique. The threshold value T was obtained as a point of minimum or maximum of the function E(V) = E(V)(T). Quantitative 3D analysis of micro-MRI images revealed a higher connectivity in the peripheral regions (E(V) = -570 +/- 70 mm(-3)) than in the central regions (E(V) = -130 +/- 50 mm(-3)) of the analyzed rat lumbar vertebrae. Smaller intertrabecular cavities and larger bone volume fractions were observed in peripheral regions as compared to central ones (MIL = 0.18 +/- 0.01 mm and 0.26 +/- 0.01 mm; BV/TV = 34 +/- 3% and 29 +/- 3%, respectively). The quantitative 3D study of MIL showed a structural anisotropy of the trabeculae along the longitudinal axis seen on the images. The inhomogeneity of the bone architecture was validated by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images at the same spatial resolution. 3D high-field micro-MRI is a suitable technique for the assessment of bone quality in experimental animal models. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Fundamentals and applications of magnetic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnan, Kannan M

    2016-01-01

    Students and researchers looking for a comprehensive textbook on magnetism, magnetic materials and related applications will find in this book an excellent explanation of the field. Chapters progress logically from the physics of magnetism, to magnetic phenomena in materials, to size and dimensionality effects, to applications. Beginning with a description of magnetic phenomena and measurements on a macroscopic scale, the book then presents discussions of intrinsic and phenomenological concepts of magnetism such as electronic magnetic moments and classical, quantum, and band theories of magnetic behavior. It then covers ordered magnetic materials (emphasizing their structure-sensitive properties) and magnetic phenomena, including magnetic anisotropy, magnetostriction, and magnetic domain structures and dynamics. What follows is a comprehensive description of imaging methods to resolve magnetic microstructures (domains) along with an introduction to micromagnetic modeling. The book then explores in detail size...

  2. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  3. Magnetic Gearboxes for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Diaz, Jose Luis; Diez-Jimenez, Efren; Alvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A.; Sanchez-Garcia-Casarrubios, Juan; Cristache, Christian; Valiente-Blanco, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic gearboxes are contactless mechanisms for torque-speed conversion. They present no wear, no friction and no fatigue. They need no lubricant and can be customized for other mechanical properties as stiffness or damping. Additionally, they can protect structures and mechanisms against overloads, limitting the transmitted torque. In this work, spur, planetary and "magdrive" or "harmonic drive" configurations are compared considering their use in aerospace applications. The most recent test data are summarized to provide some useful help for the design engineer.

  4. The effects of the use of piezoelectric motors in a 1.5-Tesla high-field magnetic resonance imaging system (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, O; Oellinger, J; Lüth, T C; Felix, R; Boenick, U

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation with two different rotatory piezomotors in a closed 1.5 Tesla high-field MRI. The focus of the investigation was on testing the functionality of these motors within the MRI and to determining the image interference they caused. To obtain a differentiated estimate of the interference the motors were tested in both the passive (turned off, i.e. without current flow) and active (turned on, i.e. with current flow) state during MRI scanning. Three different types of sequences were used for the test: Spin-Echo (SE), Gradient-Echo (GE) and Echo-Planar Imaging (EPI). A plastic container filled with a gadolinium-manganese solution was used for representation of the artefacts. The motors investigated were placed parallel to the container at predetermined distances during the experiment. The results show that the motors investigated suffered no functional limitations in the magnetic field of the MRI but, depending on the type of motor, the measurement distance and the state of the motor, the motors had different effects on the sequence images. A motor in the off-state placed immediately next to the object to be measured mainly causes artefacts because of its material properties. If, on the other hand, the piezomotor is in the on-state images with strong noise result when the motor is immediately next to the object being measured. The images regain their normal quality when the motor is approximately at a distance of 1 m from the object being investigated. Driving the motor inside the MRI, therefore, is only to be recommended during the pauses in scanning: this delivers artefact-free images if minimal, motor-specific distances are kept to. With regard to the three different types of sequences it was determined that the SE sequence was the least sensitive and the EPI sequence the most sensitive to disturbance. The GE sequence showed only minimal differences to the SE sequence with regard to signal-to-noise ratios

  5. Magnetic materials fundamentals, products, properties, applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hilzinger, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    At a practical level, this compendium reviews the basics of soft and hard magnetic materials, discusses the advantages of the different processing routes for the exploitation of the magnetic properties and hence assists in proper, fail-safe and economic application of magnetic materials. Essential guidelines and formulas for the calculation of the magnetic and electrical properties, temperature and long-term stability of permanent magnets, of inductive components and magnetic shielding are compiled. Selected fields of application and case studies illustrate the large diversity of technical applications. Application engineers will appreciate the comprehensive compilation of the properties and detailed characteristic curves of modern soft and hard magnetic materials. Materials scientists will enjoy the presentation of the different processing routes and their impact on the magnetic properties and students will profit from the survey from the basics of magnetism down to the applications in inductive components, ...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot involvement in patients with spondyloarthritides: Comparison of low-field and high-field strength units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshed, Iris; Althoff, Christian E. [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Feist, Eugen [Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Minden, Kirsten [Helios Clinics, 2nd Children' s Hospital Berlin-Buch, Rheumatology Unit, Berlin (Germany); German Rheumatology Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Schink, Tania [Department of Medical Biometry, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Hermann, Kay-Geert A. [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: kgh@charite.de

    2008-01-15

    Objective: To compare MRI evaluation of a painful hindfoot of patients with spondyloarthritides (SpA) on low-field (0.2 T) versus high-field (1.5 T) MRI. Materials and methods: Patients with SpA and hindfoot pain were randomly referred to either high-field or low-field MRI. Twenty-seven patients were evaluated (male/female: 17:10; mean age: 39 {+-} 1.4 years). Fifteen patients were examined by low-field and 12 by high-field MRI. Two patients (evaluated by high-field MRI) were excluded. Images were separately read by two radiologists who later reached a consensus. In each patient the prevalence of erosions, fluid, synovitis or bone marrow edema of the hindfoot joints, tendinosis or tenosynovitis of tendons, enthesitis of the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon and retrocalcaneal bursitis were recorded. Clinical and demographic parameters were comparable between both groups. Results: MRI evaluation of joints and tendons of the hindfoot revealed no significant differences in patients with SpA groups for all parameters. Analyzing all joints or tendons together, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Low-field and high-field MRI provide comparable information for evaluation of inflammatory hindfoot involvement. Thus, low-field MRI can be considered as a reliable diagnostic tool for the detection of hindfoot abnormalities in SpA patients.

  7. Apparatus and method for magnetically processing a specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A

    2013-09-03

    An apparatus for magnetically processing a specimen that couples high field strength magnetic fields with the magnetocaloric effect includes a high field strength magnet capable of generating a magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla and a magnetocaloric insert disposed within a bore of the high field strength magnet. A method for magnetically processing a specimen includes positioning a specimen adjacent to a magnetocaloric insert within a bore of a magnet and applying a high field strength magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla to the specimen and to the magnetocaloric insert. The temperature of the specimen changes during the application of the high field strength magnetic field due to the magnetocaloric effect.

  8. Quantitative study of signal intensity in hepatic hemangioma: a new parameter in high field magnetic resonance; Estudo quantitativo da intensidade de sinal do hemangioma hepatico: um novo parametro utilizado em ressonancia magnetica de alto campo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Ippolito, Giuseppe; Tiferes, Dario Ariel [Escola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1995-05-01

    Prospective study of morphologic and quantitative parameters of hepatic hemangiomas in high field magnetic resonance, establishing their isolated efficacy and the best sequence for high diagnostic accuracy. Sixteen hepatic hemangiomas were examined in spin-echo and multiecho sequences. The morphologic aspects of the lesion were analyzed and lesion /liver signal intensity ratio was computed. Results showed that, although high field magnetic resonance is highly sensible in the detection of hepatic hemangiomas (94%), the great variety of appearances may cause diagnostic doubts (66.7% of atypic hemangiomas) when morphologic parameters are used only. On the other hand, the exclusive use of lesion/liver intensity ratio suggested the diagnosis of hemangioma in all cases. (author). 30 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. High-field magnetization study of R.sub.2./sub.Fe.sub.17./sub.N.sub.2./sub. (R = Ho and Er) nitrides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tereshina, I. S.; Tereshina, Evgeniya; Pelevin, I.A.; Doerr, M.; Law, J.M.; Verbetski, V.N.; Salamova, A.A.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 190, č. 5-6 (2018), s. 236-243 ISSN 0022-2291 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : rare earth intermetallics * high magnetic fields * permanent magnet materials * nitrides Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.300, year: 2016

  10. Shielded ADR Magnets For Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II program will concentrate on manufacturing of qualified low-current, light-weight, 10K ADR magnets for space application. Shielded ADR solenoidal magnets...

  11. Magnetic nanomaterials undamentals, synthesis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David J

    2017-01-01

    Timely and comprehensive, this book presents recent advances in magnetic nanomaterials research, covering the latest developments, including the design and preparation of magnetic nanoparticles, their physical and chemical properties as well as their applications in different fields, including biomedicine, magnetic energy storage, wave–absorbing and water remediation. By allowing researchers to get to the forefront developments related to magnetic nanomaterials in various disciplines, this is invaluable reading for the nano, magnetic, energy, medical, and environmental communities.

  12. Design Studies and Optimization of High-Field Nb$_3$Sn Dipole Magnets for a Future Very High Energy PP Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V. V. [Fermilab; Novitski, I. [Fermilab; Zlobin, A. V. [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    High filed accelerator magnets with operating fields of 15-16 T based on the $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor are being considered for the LHC energy upgrade or a future Very High Energy pp Collider. Magnet design studies are being conducted in the U.S., Europe and Asia to explore the limits of the $Nb_3Sn$ accelerator magnet technology while optimizing the magnet design and performance parame-ters, and reducing magnet cost. The first results of these studies performed at Fermilab in the framework of the US-MDP are reported in this paper.

  13. Exotic spin phases in the one-dimensional spin-1/2 quantum magnet LiCuSbO{sub 4} as seen by high-field NMR and ESR spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iakovleva, Margarita [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Zavoisky Physical Technical Institute, Kazan (Russian Federation); Grafe, Hans-Joachim; Kataev, Vladislav; Alfonsov, Alexey; Sturza, Mihai I.; Wurmehl, Sabine [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Vavilova, Evgeniia [Zavoisky Physical Technical Institute, Kazan (Russian Federation); Nojiri, Hiroyuki [Institute of Materials Research, Sendai (Japan); Buechner, Bernd [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We will present our recent results of high-field NMR and sub-THz ESR studies of the quantum magnet LiCuSbO{sub 4} (LCSO) that presents an excellent model system of a one-dimensional spin-1/2 quantum magnet with frustrated exchange interactions. Such networks are predicted to exhibit a plethora of novel ground states beyond classical ferro- or antiferromagnetic phases. In LCSO the absence of a long-range magnetic order down to sub-Kelvin temperatures is suggestive of the realization of a quantum spin liquid state. Our NMR and ESR measurements in strong magnetic fields up to 16 Tesla reveal clear indications for the occurrence of an exotic field-induced hidden phase which we will discuss in terms of multipolar physics.

  14. Magnetic Nanoparticles From Fabrication to Clinical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Thanh, Nguyen TK

    2012-01-01

    Offering the latest information in magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) research, Magnetic Nanoparticles: From Fabrication to Clinical Applications provides a comprehensive review, from synthesis, characterization, and biofunctionalization to clinical applications of MNPs, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. This book, written by some of the most qualified experts in the field, not only fills a hole in the literature, but also bridges the gaps between all the different areas in this field. Translational research on tailored magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications spans a variet

  15. The EuCARD2 Future Magnets Program for Particle Accelerator High-Field Dipoles : Review of Results and Next Steps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, Lucio; Badel, Arnaud; Bajas, Hugues; Bajko, Marta; Ballarino, Amalia; Barth, Christian; Betz, Ulrich; Bottura, Luca; Broggi, Francesco; Chiuchiolo, Antonella; Dhalle, Marc; Durante, Maria; Fazilleau, Philippe; Fleiter, Jerome; Gao, Peng; Goldacker, Wilfried; Kario, Anna; Kirby, Glyn; Haro, E.; Himbele, J.; Lorin, C.; Murtomaki, J.; Van Nugteren, Jeroen; Petrone, Carlo; De Rijk, Gijs; Ruuskanen, J.; Senatore, Carmine; Statera, Marco; Stenvall, Antti; Tixador, Pascal; Yang, Yifeng; Usoskin, Alexander; Zangenberg, Nikolaj

    The EuCARD2 collaboration aims at the development of a 10 kA-class superconducting, high current density cable suitable for accelerator magnets, to be tested in small coils and magnets capable to deliver 3-5 T when energized in stand-alone mode, and 15-18 T when inserted in a 12-13 T background

  16. Magnetic imaging and its applications to materials

    CERN Document Server

    De Graef, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Volume 36 provides an extensive introduction to magnetic imaging,including theory and practice, utilizing a wide range of magnetic sensitive imaging methods. It also illustrates the applications of these modern experimental techniques together with imaging calculations to today's advanced magnetic materials. This book is geared towards the upper-level undergraduate students and entry-level graduate students majoring in physics or materials science who are interested in magnetic structure and magnetic imaging. Researchers involved in studying magnetic materials should alsofind the book usef

  17. Applications of Bacterial Magnetic Nanoparticles in Nanobiotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuanfang; Wang, Pingping; Li, Linlin

    2016-03-01

    The bacterial magnetic nanoparticle (BMP) has been well researched in nanobiotechnology as a new magnetic crystal. The BMPs are extracted from magnetotactic bacteria and under precise biological control. Compared with engineered magnetic nanoparticles synthesized by chemical approaches, BMPs have the properties of large production, monodispersity, high crystallinity, and close-to-bulk magnetization, which enable BMPs to be the highly promising magnetic nanoparticles for nanobiotechnology. In this paper, we review the biomedical applications of BMPs in magnetic hyperthermia, drug treatment with tumour and bioseparation. In addition, the biodistribution and toxicity are also reviewed.

  18. Accelerated mapping of magnetic susceptibility using 3D planes-on-a-paddlewheel (POP) EPI at ultra-high field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stäb, Daniel; Bollmann, Steffen; Langkammer, Christian; Bredies, Kristian; Barth, Markus

    2017-04-01

    With the advent of ultra-high field MRI scanners in clinical research, susceptibility based MRI has recently gained increasing interest because of its potential to assess subtle tissue changes underlying neurological pathologies/disorders. Conventional, but rather slow, three-dimensional (3D) spoiled gradient-echo (GRE) sequences are typically employed to assess the susceptibility of tissue. 3D echo-planar imaging (EPI) represents a fast alternative but generally comes with echo-time restrictions, geometrical distortions and signal dropouts that can become severe at ultra-high fields. In this work we assess quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) at 7 T using non-Cartesian 3D EPI with a planes-on-a-paddlewheel (POP) trajectory, which is created by rotating a standard EPI readout train around its own phase encoding axis. We show that the threefold accelerated non-Cartesian 3D POP EPI sequence enables very fast, whole brain susceptibility mapping at an isotropic resolution of 1 mm and that the high image quality has sufficient signal-to-noise ratio in the phase data for reliable QSM processing. The susceptibility maps obtained were comparable with regard to QSM values and geometric distortions to those calculated from a conventional 4 min 3D GRE scan using the same QSM processing pipeline. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Passive Magnetic Latching Mechanisms For Robotic Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Fiaz, Usman

    2017-04-01

    This thesis investigates the passive magnetic latching mechanism designs for autonomous aerial grasping and programmable self-assembly. The enormous latching potential of neodymium magnets is a well-established fact when it comes to their ability to interact with ferrous surfaces in particular. The force of attraction or repulsion among the magnets is strong enough to keep the levitation trains, and high speed transportation pods off the rails. But such utilization of these desirable magnetic properties in commercial applications, comes at a cost of high power consumption since the magnets used are usually electromagnets. On the other hand, we explore some useful robotic applications of passive (and hence low cost) magnetic latching; which are of vital importance in autonomous aerial transportation, automated drone-based package deliveries, and programmable self-assembly and self-reconfigurable systems. We propose, and implement a novel, attach/detach mechatronic mechanism, based on passive magnetic latching of permanent magnets for usBots; our indige- nously built programmable self-assembly robots, and show that it validates the game theoretic self-assembly algorithms. Another application addressed in this thesis is the utilization of permanent magnets in autonomous aerial grasping for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). We present a novel gripper design for ferrous objects with a passive magnetic pick up and an impulse based drop. For both the applications, we highlight the importance, simplicity and effectiveness of the proposed designs while providing a brief comparison with the other technologies out there.

  20. Fundamentals and applications of magnetic particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgert, Jörn; Schmidt, Joachim D; Schmale, Ingo; Rahmer, Jürgen; Bontus, Claas; Gleich, Bernhard; David, Bernd; Eckart, Rainer; Woywode, Oliver; Weizenecker, Jürgen; Schnorr, Jörg; Taupitz, Matthias; Haegele, Julian; Vogt, Florian M; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging technique which performs a direct measurement of magnetic nanoparticles, also known as superparamagnetic iron oxide. MPI can acquire quantitative images of the local distribution of the magnetic material with high spatial and temporal resolution. Its sensitivity is well above that of other methods used for the detection and quantification of magnetic materials, for example, magnetic resonance imaging. On the basis of an intravenous injection of magnetic particles, MPI has the potential to play an important role in medical application areas such as cardiovascular, oncology, and also in exploratory fields such as cell labeling and tracking. Here, we present an introduction to the basic function principle of MPI, together with an estimation of the spatial resolution and the detection limit. Furthermore, the above-mentioned medical applications are discussed with respect to an applicability of MPI. Copyright © 2012 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetic nanoparticles for application in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, J. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Banobre-Lopez, M. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pineiro-Redondo, Y. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Rivas, B., E-mail: jose.rivas@usc.es [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lopez-Quintela, M.A. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Magnetic particles play nowadays an important role in different technological areas with potential applications in fields such as electronics, energy and biomedicine. In this report we will focus on the hyperthermia properties of magnetite nanoparticles and the effect of several chemical/physical parameters on their heating properties. We will discuss about the need of searching new smaller magnetic systems in order to fulfill the required physical properties which allow treating tumoral tissues more efficiently by means of magnetically induced heat. Preliminary results will be shown about the effect of a biocompatible shell of core-shell magnetite NPs on the heating properties by application of a RF magnetic field.

  2. Molecular magnets physics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolomé, Juan; Fernández, Julio F

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the physical phenomena discovered in magnetic molecular materials over the last 20 years. It is written by leading scientists having made the most important contributions to this active area of research. The main topics of this book are the principles of quantum tunneling and quantum coherence of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), phenomena which go beyond the physics of individual molecules, such as the collective behavior of arrays of SMMs, the physics of one-dimensional singleâ€"chain magnets and magnetism of SMMs grafted on substrates.

  3. Band-Structure Effects in the High-Field Magnetization of Pd and Dilute Pd-Rh and Pd-Ag Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O. Krogh

    1970-01-01

    From Stoner theory we show that the magnetic field-vs-spin magnetization has the form B(sigma)=sigma/chi(0)+DeltaB(sigma). The low-field susceptibility chi(0) is exchange-enhanced but, if the effective exchange potential does not depend on magnetization, the deviation from linearity DeltaB may...... be derived solely from the band density of states N(E). The previously reported Pd band-structure calculations, which were in excellent agreement with the de Haas-van Alphen data, have been extended to yield DeltaB(sigma) for Pd and, using the rigid band model, also for dilute Pd[Single Bond]Rh and Pd......[Single Bond]Ag alloys. A van Hove singularity near the Fermi level of the 7% Rh[Single Bond]Pd alloy has a profound effect on DeltaB. Our results are consistent with the measurements of Foner and McNiff, but detailed comparison is difficult since DeltaB is of the same order as the experimental uncertainty...

  4. Shielded ADR Magnets For Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An important consideration of the use of superconducting magnets in ADR applications is shielding of the other instruments in the vicinity of the superconducting...

  5. Prospective observations of 100 high-risk neonates by high-field (1.5 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system. II. Lesions associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, S E; Adcock, E W; McArdle, C B

    1991-04-01

    One hundred neonates determined prospectively to be at risk for neurologic handicap underwent magnetic resonance imaging with a high-field (1.5 T) imager. Thirty-three demonstrated a total of 37 lesions consistent with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, including periventricular leukomalacia (n = 12), basal ganglia hemorrhage (n = 5), multicystic encephalomalacia (n = 5), and focal parenchymal hemorrhage (n = 15). Diagnoses by ultrasonography and computed tomography were compared with those by magnetic resonance imaging in 29 and 17 infants, respectively. Ultrasonography agreed more frequently with magnetic resonance imaging than did computed tomography. Ultrasonography detected 79% of lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging whereas computed tomography detected only 41%. Periventricular leukomalacia was seen most often in preterm infants, basal ganglia hemorrhage and multicystic encephalomalacia primarily occurred in term infants, and focal parenchymal hemorrhage occurred at all gestational ages. Basal ganglia hemorrhage and multicystic encephalomalacia were strongly associated with histories of perinatal asphyxia, seizures, and early abnormal neurological status. All infants with basal ganglia hemorrhage (5/5) and multicystic encephalomalacia (5/5) and the majority with periventricular leukomalacia (9/12) and focal parenchymal hemorrhages (9/15) had developmental abnormalities at discharge.

  6. Specific proof of various stages of Osler's disease of the brain via high field magnetic resonance tomography (1. 5 Tesla)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billet, F.; Bluemm, R.G.; Beyer, H.K.

    1988-08-01

    MR is a sensitive noninvasive examination method for diagnosing parenchymatous cryptic arteriovenous malformations and sequels of cerebral haemorrhage. In a patient with recurring nosebleed and brain stem syndrome eleven so-called cryptic arteriovenous malformations or their haemorrhage sequels were diagnosed via magnetic resonance tomography. Basing on these specific findings, nosebleeding, and a positive family anamnesis, the findings could be classified as belonging to manifestations of Osler's disease (hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia). This rare disease is characterised by a triad of signs: telangiectasias, recurring bleeding, and heredity. In this article the specific MR image is compared with the CT pattern and the results are discussed against the background of literature on Osler's disease which is also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease.

  7. Advances in Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vanessa Fernandes; Francesko, António; Ribeiro, Clarisse; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Martins, Pedro; Lanceros-Mendez, Senentxu

    2017-12-27

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are emerging as an important class of biomedical functional nanomaterials in areas such as hyperthermia, drug release, tissue engineering, theranostic, and lab-on-a-chip, due to their exclusive chemical and physical properties. Although some works can be found reviewing the main application of magnetic NPs in the area of biomedical engineering, recent and intense progress on magnetic nanoparticle research, from synthesis to surface functionalization strategies, demands for a work that includes, summarizes, and debates current directions and ongoing advancements in this research field. Thus, the present work addresses the structure, synthesis, properties, and the incorporation of magnetic NPs in nanocomposites, highlighting the most relevant effects of the synthesis on the magnetic and structural properties of the magnetic NPs and how these effects limit their utilization in the biomedical area. Furthermore, this review next focuses on the application of magnetic NPs on the biomedical field. Finally, a discussion of the main challenges and an outlook of the future developments in the use of magnetic NPs for advanced biomedical applications are critically provided. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Magnetic nanoparticles for applications in oscillating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeraphatdit, Chorthip [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Enzymatic and thermochemical catalysis are both important industrial processes. However, the thermal requirements for each process often render them mutually exclusive: thermochemical catalysis requires high temperature that denatures enzymes. One of the long-term goals of this project is to design a thermocatalytic system that could be used with enzymatic systems in situ to catalyze reaction sequences in one pot; this system would be useful for numerous applications e.g. conversion of biomass to biofuel and other commodity products. The desired thermocatalytic system would need to supply enough thermal energy to catalyze thermochemical reactions, while keeping the enzymes from high temperature denaturation. Magnetic nanoparticles are known to generate heat in an oscillating magnetic field through mechanisms including hysteresis and relaxational losses. We envisioned using these magnetic nanoparticles as the local heat source embedded in sub-micron size mesoporous support to spatially separate the particles from the enzymes. In this study, we set out to find the magnetic materials and instrumental conditions that are sufficient for this purpose. Magnetite was chosen as the first model magnetic material in this study because of its high magnetization values, synthetic control over particle size, shape, functionalization and proven biocompatibility. Our experimental designs were guided by a series of theoretical calculations, which provided clues to the effects of particle size, size distribution, magnetic field, frequency and reaction medium. Materials of theoretically optimal size were synthesized, functionalized, and their effects in the oscillating magnetic field were subsequently investigated. Under our conditions, the materials that clustered e.g. silica-coated and PNIPAM-coated iron oxides exhibited the highest heat generation, while iron oxides embedded in MSNs and mesoporous iron oxides exhibited the least bulk heating. It is worth noting that the specific

  9. Can we use subchondral bone thickness on high-field magnetic resonance images to identify Thoroughbred racehorses at risk of catastrophic lateral condylar fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquille, C A; Murray, R C; Parkin, T D H

    2017-03-01

    Fractures of the lateral condyle of the third metacarpus (MC3) are a significant welfare concern in horseracing worldwide. The primary aim of this work was to identify magnetic resonance (MR) image-detectable prefracture markers that have the potential for use as a screening tool to identify horses at significant risk of catastrophic fracture. Case-control study of bone-level risk factors for fracture in racehorses. A total of 191 MC3s from horses, with and without lateral condylar fracture of MC3, were subjected to MR imaging. The depth of dense subchondral/trabecular bone was measured at several sites around the distal end of the bone and regression analyses were conducted to identify differences in this depth between horses with and without lateral condylar fracture. Greater depth of dense subchondral/trabecular bone in the palmar half of the lateral parasagittal groove of distal MC3 was associated with an increased likelihood of being from a horse that had sustained a fracture. Receiver operator characteristic analysis was used to identify the optimal cut-off in the depth of dense subchondral/trabecular bone at this site to best discriminate fracture status. Positive and negative predictive values were calculated using the prevalence of fracture within the current study and also a prevalence estimate for the wider racehorse population. There is a requirement to identify suitable prescreening test(s) to eliminate many true negative horses and increase the prevalence of prefracture pathology in the sub population that would be screened using MR imaging, in turn maximising the positive predictive value of this test. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  10. Intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging combined with fiber tract neuronavigation-guided resection of cerebral lesions involving optic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guo-chen; Chen, Xiao-lei; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Hou, Bao-ke; Wang, Yu-bo; Song, Zhi-jun; Wang, Dong; Xu, Bai-nan

    2011-11-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) combined with optic radiation neuronavigation may be safer for resection of cerebral lesions involving the optic radiation. To investigate whether iMRI combined with optic radiation neuronavigation can help maximize tumor resection while protecting the patient's visual field. Forty-four patients with cerebral tumors adjacent to the optic radiation were enrolled in the study. The reconstructed optic radiations were observed so that a reasonable surgical plan could be developed. During the surgery, microscope-based fiber tract neuronavigation was routinely implemented. The lesion location (lateral or not to the optic radiation) and course of the optic radiation (stretched or not) were categorized, and their relationships to the visual field defect were determined. Analysis of the visible relationship between the optic radiation and the lesion led to a change in surgical approach in 6 patients (14%). The mean tumor residual rate for glioma patients was 5.3% (n = 36) and 0% for patients with nonglioma lesions (n = 8). Intraoperative MRI and fiber tract neuronavigation increased the average size of resection (first and last iMRI scanning, 88.3% vs 95.7%; P < .01). Visual fields after surgery improved in 5 cases (11.4%), exhibited no change in 36 cases (81.8%), and were aggravated in 3 cases (6.8%). Diffusion tensor imaging information was helpful in surgical planning. When iMRI was combined with fiber tract neuronavigation, the resection rate of brain lesions involving the optic radiation was increased in most patients without harming the patients' visual fields.

  11. Electron delocalisation in a trinuclear copper(II) complex: high-field EPR characterization and magnetic properties of Na3[Cu3(mal)3(H2O)] x 8H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier-Luneau, Isabelle; Phanon, Delphine; Duboc, Carole; Luneau, Dominique; Pierre, Jean-Louis

    2005-12-07

    The complex Na3[Cu3(mal)3(H2O)] x 8H2O was obtained from evaporation of an aqueous solution containing Cu(OAc)2, malic acid (HO2CCH2CHOHCO2H) and NaOH and was characterised by X-ray diffraction on single crystal, X-band and high-field EPR spectroscopy (HF-EPR) and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The trinuclear complex [Cu3(mal)3(H2O)]3- is trapped in a three-dimensional network with sodium cations. The three copper atoms are connected by alkoxo bridges and form an almost isosceles triangle with Cu...Cu distances of 3.076(1), 3.504(1) and 3.513(1) A. Two of the copper ions are also bridged by an extra aquo ligand. EPR spectroscopy combined with magnetic susceptibility measurements provide a powerful tool to resolve the electronic structure of the complex. The overall magnetic behaviour corresponds to an antiferromagnetically coupled triangular system. The 285 GHz-EPR spectrum (g = 2; 10.18 T) is characteristic of a spin state S = 1/2, with a rhombic anisotropy of [g]. This rhombic pattern allows us to propose that the electronic spin density is delocalised on the three copper ions.

  12. High temperature superconductors for magnetic suspension applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmichael, C. K.; Cooley, R. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Ma, K. B.; Lamb, M. A.; Meng, R. L.; Chu, C. W.; Chu, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature superconductors (HTS) hold the promise for applications in magnetic levitation bearings, vibration damping, and torque coupling. Traditional magnetic suspension systems require active feedback and vibration controls in which power consumption and low frequency vibration are among the major engineering concerns. HTS materials have been demonstrated to be an enabling approach towards such problems due to their flux trapping properties. In our laboratory at TCSUH, we have been conducting a series of experiments to explore various mechanical applications using HTS. We have constructed a 30 lb. model flywheel levitated by a hybrid superconducting magnetic bearing (HSMB). We are also developing a levitated and vibration-dampled platform for high precision instrumentation. These applications would be ideal for space usages where ambient temperature is adequate for HTS to operate properly under greatly reduced cryogenic requirements. We will give a general overview of these potential applications and discuss the operating principles of the HTS devices we have developed.

  13. Magnetic nanobeads: Synthesis and application in biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Shahid Waseem; Zain Ali; Mehmooda Bibi; Zahir Usman

    2016-01-01

    Nanobiotechnology appears to be an emerging science which leads to new developments in the field of medicine. Importance of the magnetic nanomaterials in biomedical science cannot be overlooked. The most commonly used chemical methods to synthesize drugable magnetic nanobeads are co-precipitation, thermal decomposition and microemulsion. However monodispersion, selection of an appropriate coating material for in vivo application, stability and unique physical properties like size, shape and c...

  14. Application of atomic magnetometry in magnetic particledetection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shoujun; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Pines, Alexander; Rochester,Simon M.; Budker, Dmitry; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2006-09-17

    We demonstrate the detection of magnetic particles carriedby water in a continuous flow using an atomic magnetic gradiometer.Studies on three types of magnetic particles are presented: a singlecobalt particle (diameter ~;150 mum, multi-domain), a suspension ofsuperparamagnetic magnetite particles (diameter ~;1 mum), andferromagnetic cobalt nanoparticles (diameter ~;10 nm, 120 kA/mmagnetization). Estimated detection limits are 20 mum diameter for asingle cobalt particle at a water flow rate 30 ml/min, 5x103 magnetiteparticles at 160 ml/min, and 50 pl for the specific ferromagnetic fluidat 130 ml/min. Possible applications of our method arediscussed.

  15. High-field thermal transport properties of REBCO coated conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonura, Marco; Senatore, Carmine

    2015-02-01

    The use of REBCO coated conductors (CCs) is envisaged for many applications, extending from power cables to high-field magnets. Whatever the case, thermal properties of REBCO tapes play a key role for the stability of superconducting devices. In this work, we present the first study on the longitudinal thermal conductivity (κ) of REBCO CCs in magnetic fields up to 19 T applied both parallel and perpendicularly to the thermal-current direction. Copper-stabilized tapes from six industrial manufacturers have been investigated. We show that zero-field κ of CCs can be calculated with an accuracy of +/- 15% from the residual resistivity ratio of the stabilizer and the Cu/non-Cu ratio. Measurements performed at high fields have allowed us to evaluate the consistency of the procedures generally used for estimating in-field κ in the framework of the Wiedemann-Franz law from an electrical characterization of the materials. In-field data are intended to provide primary ingredients for the thermal stability analysis of high-temperature superconductor-based magnets.

  16. Magnetic nanobeads: Synthesis and application in biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Waseem

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanobiotechnology appears to be an emerging science which leads to new developments in the field of medicine. Importance of the magnetic nanomaterials in biomedical science cannot be overlooked. The most commonly used chemical methods to synthesize drugable magnetic nanobeads are co-precipitation, thermal decomposition and microemulsion. However monodispersion, selection of an appropriate coating material for in vivo application, stability and unique physical properties like size, shape and composition of nanobeads remain unsettled challenge. The use of hazardous reagents during chemical synthesis is another impediment for in vivo application of the magnetic nanobeads. The current minireview put forth the pros and cons of chemical and biological synthesis of magnetic nanobeads. We critically focus on chemical and biological methods of synthesis of the magnetic nanobeads along with their biomedical applications and subsequently suggest a suitable synthetic approach for potential biocompatible nanobeads. Biogenic synthesis is proposed to be the best option which generates biocompatible nanobeads. Reducing enzymes present in plants, plant materials or microbes reduce precursor inorganic salts to nano sized materials. These nanomaterials exhibit biomolecules on their surface. The use of biologically synthesized magnetic nanobeads in diagnostics and therapeutics would be safe for human and ecosystem.

  17. Sintered soft magnetic materials. Properties and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, J. A.; Calero, J. A.; Dougan, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    A comparison is presented of the characteristics and production requirements of a variety of materials used to produce sintered soft magnetic parts. These include pure iron, phosphorous-iron, silicon-iron, nickel-iron, and cobalt-iron, together with new coated materials based on encapsulated iron powders. In these bonded materials an organic and/or inorganic insulator is used to coat the metallic powder particles giving a magnetic composite. The suitability of the different materials for use in both direct and alternating current applications is reviewed, and examples are provided of their application in both the automotive and other sectors. The results of a comparative study of motors using stators and rotors based on both conventional laminated materials and the insulated iron powders are presented, in which the new materials show advantages of reduced hysteresis losses at high frequencies, and isotropy of magnetic properties. Nevertheless, the applications of these materials in electrical motors requires the modification of existing designs.

  18. Magnetic polymer nanocomposites for sensing applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of magnetic polymer nanocomposites for a wide range of sensing applications. The composites are made of magnetic nanowires (NWs) incorporated into polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or UV sensitive SU-S. The developed composites utilize the permanent magnetic behavior of the NWs, allowing remote operation without an additional magnetic field to magnetize the NWs, which simplifies miniaturization and integration in microsystems. In addition, the nanocomposite benefits from the easy patterning of the polymer leading to a corrosion resistant, highly elastic, and permanent magnetic material that can be used to develop highly sensitive systems. Nanocomposite pillars are realized and integrated on magnetic sensor elements to achieve highly sensitive and power efficient flow and tactile sensors. The developed flow sensor can detect air and water flow at a power consumption as little as SO nW and a resolution up to 15 μm/s with easily modifiable performance. A tactile sensor element prototype is realized using the same concept, where a pressure range of 0-169 kPa is detected with a resolution of up to 1.3 kPa. © 2014 IEEE.

  19. EDITORIAL: Biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, K.

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic materials have been used with grain sizes down to the nanoscale for longer than any other type of material. This is because of a fundamental change in the magnetic structure of ferro- and ferrimagnetic materials when grain sizes are reduced. In these circumstances, the normal macroscopic domain structure transforms into a single domain state at a critical size which typically lies below 100 nm. Once this transformation occurs the mechanism of magnetisation reversal can only be via the rotation of the magnetisation vector from one magnetic easy axis to another via a magnetically hard direction. This change of reversal mechanism has led to a new class of magnetic materials whose properties and the basic underlying physical mechanism governing them were defined in a seminal work first published by E C Stoner and E P Wolhfarth in 1949. As a consequence of this rotation mechanism, magnetic nanoparticles exist having coercivities which are highly controllable and lie between soft materials and normal permanent magnet materials. This ability to control coercivity in such particles has led to a number of significant technological advances, particularly in the field of information storage. The high value of information storage technology has meant that since the 1950s an enormous research and development effort has gone into techniques for the preparation of magnetic particles and thin films having well defined properties. Hence, certainly since the 1960s, a wide range of techniques to produce both metallic and oxide magnetic nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 4-100 nm has been developed. The availability of this wide range of materials led to speculation from the 1960s onwards that they may have applications in biology and medicine. The fact that a magnetic field gradient can be used to either remotely position or selectively filter biological materials leads to a number of obvious applications. These applications fall broadly into two categories: those

  20. Magnetic nanoparticles adapted for specific biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutz, Silvio; Müller, Robert; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Hilger, Ingrid; Zeisberger, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are used in different biomedical applications, whereby each application requires specific particle properties. To fulfill these requirements, particle properties have to be optimized by means of variation of crystal structure, particle size, and size distribution. To this aim, improved aqueous precipitation procedures for magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis were developed. One procedure focused on the cyclic growth of MNPs without nucleation of new particle cores during precipitation. The second novel particle type are magnetic multicore nanoparticles, which consist of single cores of approximately 10 nm forming dense clusters in the size range from 40 to 80 nm. Their highest potential features these multicore particles in hyperthermia application. In our in vivo experiments, therapeutically suitable temperatures were reached after 20 s of heating for a particle concentration in the tumor of 1% and field parameters of H=24 kA/m and f=410 kHz. This review on our recent investigations for particle optimization demonstrates that tuning magnetic properties of MNPs can be obtained by the alteration of their structure, size, and size distribution. This can be realized by means of control of particle size during synthesis or subsequent size-dependent fractionation. The here-developed particles show high potential for biomedical applications.

  1. Iron Oxide Nanocrystals for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale L. Huber

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanocrystals have been investigated extensively in the past several years for several potential applications, such as information technology, MRI contrast agents, and for drug conjugation and delivery. A specific property of interest in biomedicine is magnetic hyperthermia—an increase in temperature resulting from the thermal energy released by magnetic nanocrystals in an external alternating magnetic field. Iron oxide nanocrystals of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power using frequencies of 111.1 kHz and 629.2 kHz, and corresponding magnetic field strengths of 9 and 25 mT. Polymorphous nanocrystals as well as spherical nanocrystals and nanowires in paramagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited good heating power. A remarkable 30 °C temperature increase was observed in a nanowire sample at 111 kHz and magnetic field of 25 mT (19.6 kA/m, which is very close to the typical values of 100 kHz and 20 mT used in medical treatments.

  2. [The progress of magnetic nanomaterials in application of biomedicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ailan; Mi, Denghai

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic nanomaterials is widely used in medical diagnosis, drug delivery, biomedical and other fields due to their unique structure and excellent properties. The magnetic nanometer material in biomedical applications, such as biological separation and purification, application of controlled drug release and magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed in the present paper, and the development trend of magnetic nanomaterials is also forecasted.

  3. Superconductivity and magnetism in the oxypnictides: high field ESR and {mu}SR studies of (La,Gd)FeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muranyi, Ferenc [Physics Institute, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); IFW Dresden (Germany); Alfonsov, Alexey; Kataev, Vladislav; Koehler, Anke; Werner, Jochen; Behr, Guenter; Leps, Norman; Klingeler, Ruediger; Kondrat, Agnieszka; Hess, Christian; Buechner, Bernd [IFW Dresden (Germany); Khasanov, Rustem; Luetkens, Hubertus [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Klaus, Hans-Henning [IFP, TU Dresden (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The discovery of a new class of superconducting materials, ReFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x}, stirred up the scientific community. Here we report the Gd{sup 3+} high field ESR study of differently doped (La,Gd)FeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} compounds. In lightly Gd-doped LaFeAsO samples the SDW transition yields line-broadening at the transition temperature, the SDW transition is then suppressed upon F-doping. In the dense compound, GdFeAsO, with SDW transition around 140 K, the Gd-ESR was also studied. With 15% F-doping superconductivity appears at {proportional_to} 21 K. The SDW and SC transitions are clearly seen in ESR and in {mu} SR as well. Surprisingly the reminiscence of the SDW transition of the undoped material (GdFeAsO) was identified in the doped (15% F) compound at lower temperature ({proportional_to} 80 K). This indicates the importance of the the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism in oxypnictides.

  4. Magnetic wires in MEMS and bio-medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbic, Mladen E-mail: mladen@caltech.edu

    2002-08-01

    Magnetic wires of appropriate design have special features making them useful to micro-electromechanical systems and bio-medical applications. Several applications that exploit the properties of magnetic wires are reviewed including: (a) a magnetic micro-manipulation technique that utilizes integrated micro-coils and magnetic micro-wires for localized positioning of micron-sized magnetic objects, (b) integrated micro-coil/micro-wire system operating as a micro-fluidic micro-motor, (c) mechanical tweezers using magneto-static interaction between two magnetic micro-wires, and (d) ultra-high gradient magnetic separation system based on porous membranes partially filled with magnetic wires.

  5. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellens, N [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Farahani, K [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  6. Magnetic levitation Maglev technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Hyung-Suk

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of magnetic levitation (Maglev) technologies, from fundamental principles through to the state-of-the-art, and describes applications both realised and under development. It includes a history of Maglev science and technology showing the various milestones in its advancement. The core concepts, operating principles and main challenges of Maglev applications attempted across various fields are introduced and discussed. The principle difficulties encountered when applying Maglev technology to different systems, namely air gap control and stabilization, are addressed in detail. The book describes how major advancements in linear motor and magnet technologies have enabled the development of the linear-motor-powered Maglev train, which has a high speed advantage over conventional wheeled trains and has the potential to reach speed levels achieved by aircraft. However, many expect that Maglev technology to be a green technology that is applied not only in rail transportat...

  7. High-field EPR spectroscopy of thermal donors in silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, R.; Rasmussen, F.B.; Gregorkiewicz, T.

    1997-01-01

    Thermal donors generated in p-type boron-doped Czochralski-grown silicon by a 450 degrees C heat treatment have been studied by high-field magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In the experiments conducted at a microwave frequency of 140 GHz and in a magnetic field of approximately 5 T four individual...

  8. Recent analytical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Analytical chemistry has experienced, as well as other areas of science, a big change due to the needs and opportunities provided by analytical nanoscience and nanotechnology. Now, nanotechnology is increasingly proving to be a powerful ally of analytical chemistry to achieve its objectives, and to simplify analytical processes. Moreover, the information needs arising from the growing nanotechnological activity are opening an exciting new field of action for analytical chemists. Magnetic nanoparticles have been used in various fields owing to their unique properties including large specific surface area and simple separation with magnetic fields. For Analytical applications, they have been used mainly for sample preparation techniques (magnetic solid phase extraction with different advanced functional groups (layered double hydroxide, β-cyclodextrin, carbon nanotube, graphen, polymer, octadecylsilane and automation of it, microextraction techniques enantioseparation and chemosensors. This review summarizes the basic principles and achievements of magnetic nanoparticles in sample preparation techniques, enantioseparation and chemosensors. Also, some selected articles recently published (2010-2016 have been reviewed and discussed.

  9. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C. [Hospital of Saint Raphael, Cardiac Diagnostic Unit, New Haven, CT (United States)], E-mail: bogmarcu@pol.net

    2006-10-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  10. Application of Magnetic Markers for Precise Measurement of Magnetic Fields in Ramped Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael; Lindroos, M

    1999-01-01

    For precise measurements of the magnetic field in ramped machines, different magnetic markers are in use. The best known are peaking strips, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) probes and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) probes. Their operational principles and limitations are explained and some examples of recent and new applications are given. A fuller theoretical description is given of the lesser-known Ferrimagnetic Resonance (FMR) probe and its practical application. The essential purpose of these magnetic markers is the in situ calibration of either on-line magnetic field measurements (e.g. via a magnetic pick-up coil) or field predictions (e.g. using a magnet model).

  11. SURFACE MODIFITED MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    G. Yu. Vasyukov; I. V. Mitrofanova; Ivanova, V.V.; V. D. Prokopiyeva

    2014-01-01

    Unique physicochemical properties of nanomaterials arouse a great interest of specialists of various fields. Materials based on nanostructures purchase new mechanical, optical, and electrical properties. Great practical importance is the magnetic properties of materials, structural elements which lie at the nanoscale. Nanomaterials with magnetic properties have been used in drug delivery, magnetic hyperthermia, magnetic separation, and magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic properties of nanopa...

  12. Nanomedicine: magnetic nanoparticles and their biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Reshmi; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel; McIintosh, M; Zhang, Xueji; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    During this past decade, science and engineering have seen a rapid increase in interest for nanoscale materials with dimensions less than 100 nm, which lie in the intermediate state between atoms and bulk (solid) materials. Their attributes are significantly altered relative to the corresponding bulk materials as they exhibit size dependent behavior such as quantum size effects (depending on bulk Bohr radius), optical absorption and emission, coulomb staircase behavior (electrical transport), superparamagnetism and various unique properties. They are active components of ferrofluids, recording tape, flexible disk recording media along with potential future applications in spintronics: a new paradigm of electronics utilizing intrinsic charge and spin of electrons for ultra-high-density data storage and quantum computing. They are used in a gamut of biomedical applications: bioseparation of biological entities, therapeutic drugs and gene delivery, radiofrequency-induced destruction of cells and tumors (hyperthermia), and contrast-enhancement agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The magnetic nanoparticles have optimizable, controllable sizes enabling their comparison to cells (10-100 µm), viruses (20-250 nm), proteins (3-50 nm), and genes (10-100 nm). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provide necessary characterization methods that enable accurate structural and functional analysis of interaction of the biofunctional particles with the target bioentities. The goal of the present discussion is to provide a broad review of magnetic nanoparticle research with a special focus on the synthesis, functionalization and medical applications of these particles, which have been carried out during the past decade, and to examine several prospective directions.

  13. Magnetic microfluidic platform for biomedical applications using magnetic nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Stipsitz, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Microfluidic platforms are well-suited for biomedical analysis and usually consist of a set of units which guarantee the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalyte in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for perfoming the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gainining interest. This is due to the fact that magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the diagnostic system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are used. In this paper, we present some of our most recent results in research towards a) microfluidic diagnostics using MR sensors and magnetic particles and b) single cell analysis using magnetic particles. We have successfully manipulated magnetically labeled bacteria and measured their response with integrated GMR sensors and we have also managed to separate magnetically labeled jurkat cells for single cell analysis. © 2015 Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  14. Biomedical Applications of Advanced Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Yang, Yong; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Thi, Cao Minh; Cao, Yanqin; Nogami, Masayuki

    2015-12-01

    In this review, we have presented the latest results and highlights on biomedical applications of a class of noble metal nanoparticles, such as gold, silver and platinum, and a class of magnetic nanoparticles, such as cobalt, nickel and iron. Their most important related compounds are also discussed for biomedical applications for treating various diseases, typically as cancers. At present, both physical and chemical methods have been proved very successful to synthesize, shape, control, and produce metal- and oxide-based homogeneous particle systems, e.g., nanoparticles and microparticles. Therefore, we have mainly focused on functional magnetic nanoparticles for nanomedicine because of their high bioadaptability to the organs inside human body. Here, bioconjugation techniques are very crucial to link nanoparticles with conventional drugs, nanodrugs, biomolecules or polymers for biomedical applications. Biofunctionalization of engineered nanoparticles for biomedicine is shown respective to in vitro and in vivo analysis protocols that typically include drug delivery, hyperthermia therapy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and recent outstanding progress in sweep imaging technique with Fourier transformation (SWIFT) MRI. The latter can be especially applied using magnetic nanoparticles, such as Co-, Fe-, Ni-based nanoparticles, α-Fe2O3, and Fe3O4 oxide nanoparticles for analysis and treatment of malignancies. Therefore, this review focuses on recent results of scientists, and related research on diagnosis and treatment methods of common and dangerous diseases by biomedical engineered nanoparticles. Importantly, nanosysems (nanoparticles) or microsystems (microparticles) or hybrid micronano systems are shortly introduced into nanomedicine. Here, Fe oxide nanoparticles ultimately enable potential and applicable technologies for tumor-targeted imaging and therapy. Finally, we have shown the latest aspects of the most important Fe-based particle systems, such as Fe,

  15. Brazing vacuum ceramic tubes for magnets applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagnato, O.R.; Francisco, R.F. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), SP (Brazil); Gobbi, A.L. [Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecbologia (LNNano), SP (Brazil); Falvo, T. [Engecer Ltda, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Full text: The Sirius Project is an initiative of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory - LNLS (CNPEM - MCTI ), for the design, construction and operation of a new synchrotron radiation source 3rd generation, with high brightness and energy of the electrons of 3. 0 GeV. Among many other components, will be built 80 ceramic cameras embedded in specials magnets, whose function is to act to correct the orbit of the electron beam in the storage ring. The ceramic chamber is crucial for this application because this material is transparent to the magnetic field generated in the electro magnet and thus acts directly on the electron beam. The difficulty of these constructive components lies in the fact that, the ceramic components must be attached to metal components will join vacuum chambers that make up the ring, and then must present excellent mechanical and vacuum tight. The process of chemical bonding between the ceramic and metal components is performed by brazing in high vacuum. After brazing, is deposited a film of copper with 7 micrometers thickness. The objective of this paper is to describe the process of film deposition and brazing of copper and the excellent results obtained in the production, mechanical characterization, microstructural and tightness. The results obtained with the process indicate an homogeneous film with high adhesion and electrical resistance near the estimated values??. Tests are being carried out by XPS and SEM techniques for chemical and structural characterization. (author)

  16. Structural and magnetic properties of Mn(III) and Cu(II) tetranuclear azido polyoxometalate complexes: multifrequency high-field EPR spectroscopy of Cu4 clusters with S = 1 and S = 2 ground states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mialane, Pierre; Duboc, Carole; Marrot, Jérôme; Rivière, Eric; Dolbecq, Anne; Sécheresse, Francis

    2006-02-20

    Two new azido-bridged polyoxometalate compounds were synthesized in acetonitrile/methanol media and their molecular structures have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The [[(gamma-SiW10O36)Mn2(OH)2(N3)(0.5)(H2O)(0.5)]2(mu-1,3-N3)](10-) (1 a) tetranuclear Mn(III) complex, in which an end-to-end N3- ligand acts as a linker between two [(gamma-SiW10O36)Mn2(OH)2]4- units, represents the first manganese-azido polyoxometalate. The magnetic properties have been studied considering the spin Hamiltonian H = -J1(S1S2+S1*S2*)-J2(S1S1*), showing that antiferromagnetic interactions between the paramagnetic centers (g = 1.98) occur both through the di-(mu-OH) bridge (J1 = -25.5 cm(-1)) and the mu-1,3-azido bridge (J2 = -19.6 cm(-1)). The [(gamma-SiW10O36)2Cu4(mu-1,1,1-N3)2(mu-1,1-N3)2]12- (2 a) tetranuclear Cu(II) complex consists of two [gamma-SiW10O36Cu2(N3)2]6- subunits connected through the two mu-1,1,1-azido ligands, the four paramagnetic centers forming a lozenge. The magnetic susceptibility data have been fitted. This reveals ferromagnetic interactions between the four Cu(II) centers, leading to an S=2 ground state (H = -J1(S1S2+S1*S2*)-J2(S2S2*), J1 = +294.5 cm(-1), J2 = +1.6 cm(-1), g = 2.085). The ferromagnetic coupling between the Cu(II) centers in each subunit is the strongest ever observed either in a polyoxometalate compound or in a diazido-bridged Cu(II) complex. Considering complex 2 a and the previously reported basal-basal di-(mu-1,1-N3)-bridged Cu(II) complexes in which the metallic centers are not connected by other magnetically coupling ligands, the linear correlation J1 = 2639.5-24.95*theta(av) between the theta(av) bridging angle and the J1 coupling parameter has been proposed. The electronic structure of complex 2 a has also been investigated by using multifrequency high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (HF-EPR) spectroscopy between 95 and 285 GHz. The spin Hamiltonian parameters of the S = 2 ground state (D = -0.135(2) cm(-1), E = -0

  17. Assessment of magnetic cooling for domestic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Borbolla, Ivan Montenegro

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic cooling is an emerging refrigeration technology with potential to surpass the performance of vapour compression devices. It has been successfully applied in the cryogenic temperature ranges, where magnetic cooling gas liquefiers surpass the performance of conventional liquefaction systems. Magnetic refrigeration technology is based on the magnetocaloric effect, a characteristic present in all magnetic materials and alloys. In magnetic thermodynamic cycles, magnetization of a magnetoc...

  18. Oxypnictide SmFeAs(O,F) superconductor: a candidate for high–field magnet applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Kazumasa; Hänisch, Jens; Tarantini, Chiara; Kurth, Fritz; Jaroszynski, Jan; Ueda, Shinya; Naito, Michio; Ichinose, Ataru; Tsukada, Ichiro; Reich, Elke; Grinenko, Vadim; Schultz, Ludwig; Holzapfel, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The recently discovered oxypnictide superconductor SmFeAs(O,F) is the most attractive material among the Fe-based superconductors due to its highest transition temperature of 56 K and potential for high-field performance. In order to exploit this new material for superconducting applications, the knowledge and understanding of its electro-magnetic properties are needed. Recent success in fabricating epitaxial SmFeAs(O,F) thin films opens a great opportunity to explore their transport properties. Here we report on a high critical current density of over 105 A/cm2 at 45 T and 4.2 K for both main field orientations, feature favourable for high-field magnet applications. Additionally, by investigating the pinning properties, we observed a dimensional crossover between the superconducting coherence length and the FeAs interlayer distance at 30–40 K, indicative of a possible intrinsic Josephson junction in SmFeAs(O,F) at low temperatures that can be employed in electronics applications such as a terahertz radiation source and a superconducting Qubit. PMID:23823976

  19. Present and future applications of magnetic nanostructures grown by FEBID

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Teresa, J. M.; Fernández-Pacheco, A.

    2014-12-01

    Currently, magnetic nanostructures are routinely grown by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). In the present article, we review the milestones produced in the topic in the past as well as the future applications of this technology. Regarding past milestones, we highlight the achievement of high-purity cobalt and iron deposits, the high lateral resolution obtained, the growth of 3D magnetic deposits, the exploration of magnetic alloys and the application of magnetic deposits for Hall sensing and in domain-wall conduit and magnetologic devices. With respect to future perspectives of the topic, we emphasize the potential role of magnetic nanostructures grown by FEBID for applications related to highly integrated 2D arrays, 3D nanowires devices, fabrication of advanced scanning-probe systems, basic studies of magnetic structures and their dynamics, small sensors (including biosensors) and new applications brought by magnetic alloys and even exchange biased systems.

  20. Present and future applications of magnetic nanostructures grown by FEBID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresa, J.M. de [CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (ICMA), Saragossa (Spain); Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Saragossa (Spain); Fernandez-Pacheco, A. [University of Cambridge, TFM Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Currently, magnetic nanostructures are routinely grown by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). In the present article, we review the milestones produced in the topic in the past as well as the future applications of this technology. Regarding past milestones, we highlight the achievement of high-purity cobalt and iron deposits, the high lateral resolution obtained, the growth of 3D magnetic deposits, the exploration of magnetic alloys and the application of magnetic deposits for Hall sensing and in domain-wall conduit and magnetologic devices. With respect to future perspectives of the topic, we emphasize the potential role of magnetic nanostructures grown by FEBID for applications related to highly integrated 2D arrays, 3D nanowires devices, fabrication of advanced scanning-probe systems, basic studies of magnetic structures and their dynamics, small sensors (including biosensors) and new applications brought by magnetic alloys and even exchange biased systems. (orig.)

  1. The Magnetic Reconnection Code: Framework and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaschewski, K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Linde, T.; Rosner, R.; Siegel, A.

    2002-11-01

    One of the primary goals of the Center for Magnetic Reconnection Studies (CMRS) is the development of a fully three-dimensional compressible Hall-MHD Magnetic Reconnection Code (MRC) with options to run in slab, cylindrical and toroidal geometry. We detail the techniques used to make this code perform well in a number of massively parallel environments. One major ingredient is the use of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), which enables us to employ high resolution where locally necessary while at the same time being able to resort to well-proven numerical algorithms on regularly spaced grids. One particular challenge in this project is to develop a computational framework that separates the actual numerical methods and the treatment of the adaptive grids in a way that allows for flexibility in the choice of the AMR package. This framework, which is built on significant extensions of the FLASH framework, will enable automated testing on a large number of platforms, parallel I/O, visualization, and the distribution of the code in the public domain. We will also present results on the application of the MRC to the m=1 collisionless tearing mode (in two dimensions) that exhibits nonlinear near-explosive behavior, relevant to the physics of the sawtooth crash.

  2. Application of Magnetic Nanoparticles to Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Gojo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticle technology is being incorporated into many areas of molecular science and biomedicine. Because nanoparticles are small enough to enter almost all areas of the body, including the circulatory system and cells, they have been and continue to be exploited for basic biomedical research as well as clinical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. For example, nanoparticles hold great promise for enabling gene therapy to reach its full potential by facilitating targeted delivery of DNA into tissues and cells. Substantial progress has been made in binding DNA to nanoparticles and controlling the behavior of these complexes. In this article, we review research on binding DNAs to nanoparticles as well as our latest study on non-viral gene delivery using polyethylenimine-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  3. High performance hybrid magnetic structure for biotechnology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, David E [El Cerrito, CA; Pollard, Martin J [El Cerrito, CA; Elkin, Christopher J [San Ramon, CA

    2009-02-03

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetic or magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are further improvements to aspects of the hybrid magnetic structure, including additional elements and for adapting the use of the hybrid magnetic structure for use in biotechnology and high throughput processes.

  4. The Mechanical Design Optimization of a High Field HTS Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalitha, SL; Gupta, RC

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design optimization of a large aperture, high field (24 T at 4 K) solenoid for a 1.7 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage device. The magnet is designed to be built entirely of second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor tape with excellent electrical and mechanical properties at the cryogenic temperatures. The critical parameters that govern the magnet performance are examined in detail through a multiphysics approach using ANSYS software. The analysis results formed the basis for the performance specification as well as the construction of the magnet.

  5. Dielectric shimming : exploiting dielectric interactions in High Field MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Wyger Maurits

    2016-01-01

    This thesis reports on the utility of high permittivity dielectric materials for adjusting the radiofrequency (RF) field in high field MR. The performance-driven trend towards higher static magnetic field strengths drives MR operation into the regime where the dimensions of the body section being

  6. Magnet operating experience review for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents a review of magnet operating experiences for normal-conducting and superconducting magnets from fusion, particle accelerator, medical technology, and magnetohydrodynamics research areas. Safety relevant magnet operating experiences are presented to provide feedback on field performance of existing designs and to point out the operational safety concerns. Quantitative estimates of magnet component failure rates and accident event frequencies are also presented, based on field experience and on performance of similar components in other industries.

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles as potential candidates for biomedical and biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinali Sehrig, Fatemeh; Majidi, Sima; Nikzamir, Nasrin; Nikzamir, Nasim; Nikzamir, Mohammad; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have become the main candidates for biomedical and biological applications, and the application of small iron oxide nanoparticles in in vitro diagnostics has been practiced for about half a century. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), in combination with an external magnetic field and/or magnetizable grafts, allow the delivery of particles to the chosen target area, fix them at the local site while the medication is released, and act locally. In this review, we focus mostly on the potential use of MNPs for biomedical and biotechnological applications, and the improvements made in using these nanoparticles (NPs) in biological applications.

  8. Multifunctional Magnetic-fluorescent Nanocomposites for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakovich Yury

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractNanotechnology is a fast-growing area, involving the fabrication and use of nano-sized materials and devices. Various nanocomposite materials play a number of important roles in modern science and technology. Magnetic and fluorescent inorganic nanoparticles are of particular importance due to their broad range of potential applications. It is expected that the combination of magnetic and fluorescent properties in one nanocomposite would enable the engineering of unique multifunctional nanoscale devices, which could be manipulated using external magnetic fields. The aim of this review is to present an overview of bimodal “two-in-one” magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposite materials which combine both magnetic and fluorescent properties in one entity, in particular those with potential applications in biotechnology and nanomedicine. There is a great necessity for the development of these multifunctional nanocomposites, but there are some difficulties and challenges to overcome in their fabrication such as quenching of the fluorescent entity by the magnetic core. Fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites include a variety of materials including silica-based, dye-functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and quantum dots-magnetic nanoparticle composites. The classification and main synthesis strategies, along with approaches for the fabrication of fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites, are considered. The current and potential biomedical uses, including biological imaging, cell tracking, magnetic bioseparation, nanomedicine and bio- and chemo-sensoring, of magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposites are also discussed.

  9. Endometriose pélvica: comparação entre imagens por ressonância magnética de baixo campo (0,2 T e alto campo (1,5 T Pelvic endometriosis: a comparison between low-field (0.2 T and high-field (1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Minaif

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar a ressonância de baixo campo (0,2 T com a de alto campo (1,5 T na avaliação da endometriose pélvica e adenomiose. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram estudadas, prospectivamente, 27 pacientes do sexo feminino com suspeita clínica de endometriose, realizando-se exames de ressonância magnética de alto campo e baixo campo. Um mesmo radiologista realizou a leitura dos exames, iniciando pelo baixo campo, seguido pelo alto campo, usando como padrão-ouro o alto campo. RESULTADOS: Das 27 pacientes estudadas, 18 (66,7% apresentaram alguma lesão indicativa de endometriose nos exames realizados no alto campo. Foram corretamente diagnosticados pelo baixo campo 14 destas pacientes. Endometriomas, lesões tubárias e focos de endometriose maiores do que 7 mm identificados pelo alto campo foram também identificados no baixo campo, com acurácia, sensibilidade e especificidade de 100%. Das nove pacientes com adenomiose caracterizadas pelo alto campo, oito foram corretamente identificadas pelo baixo campo, com acurácia, sensibilidade e especificidade de 88,9%. CONCLUSÃO: A ressonância de baixo campo apresentou baixa sensibilidade na detecção de pequenos focos de endometriose, alta sensibilidade na detecção de endometriomas e focos de endometriose grandes, e boa acurácia na detecção da adenomiose quando comparada com a ressonância de alto campo.OBJECTIVE: To compare low-field (0.2 T with high-field (1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pelvic endometriosis and adenomyosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-seven female patients with clinically suspected endometriosis were prospectively evaluated by means of high-field and low-field magnetic resonance imaging. The reading of the images was performed by a single radiologist, initiating by the low-field, followed by the high-field images. High-field magnetic resonance imaging was utilized as the golden-standard. RESULTS: Among the 27 patients included in the present study

  10. High field superconductor development and understanding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larbalestier, David C. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Lee, Peter J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Tarantini, Chiara [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2014-09-28

    All present circular accelerators use superconducting magnets to bend and to focus the particle beams. The most powerful of these machines is the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN. The main ring dipole magnets of the LHC are made from Nb-Ti but, as the machine is upgraded to higher luminosity, more powerful magnets made of Nb3Sn will be required. Our work addresses how to make the Nb3Sn conductors more effective and more suitable for use in the LHC. The most important property of the superconducting conductor used for an accelerator magnet is that it must have very high critical current density, the property that allows the generation of high magnetic fields in small spaces. Nb3Sn is the original high field superconductor, the material which was discovered in 1960 to allow a high current density in the field of about 9 T. For the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC, much higher current densities in fields of about 12 Tesla will be required. The critical value of the current density is of order 2600 A/mm2 in a field of 12 Tesla. But there are very important secondary factors that complicate the attainment of this critical current density. The first is that the effective filament diameter must be no larger than about 40 µm. The second factor is that 50% of the cross-section of the Nb3Sn conductor that is pure copper must be protected from any poisoning by any Sn leakage through the diffusion barrier that protects the package of niobium and tin from which the Nb3Sn is formed by a high temperature reaction. These three, somewhat conflicting requirements, mean that optimization of the conductor is complex. The work described in this contract report addresses these conflicting requirements. They show that very sophisticated characterizations can uncover the way to satisfy all 3 requirements and they also suggest that the ultimate optimization of Nb3Sn is still not yet in sight

  11. Synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles and their application to bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Tetsuya; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Nakanishi, Takuya; Arakaki, Atsushi; Niwa, Daisuke; Iida, Hironori

    2006-02-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been attracting much interest as a labeling material in the fields of advanced biological and medical applications such as drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging, and array-based assaying. In this review, synthesis of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles via a reverse micelle system and modification of their surface by an organosilane agent are discussed. Furthermore, as a practical biological assay system, the magnetic detection of biomolecular interactions is demonstrated by using the combination of a patterned substrate modified with a self-assembled monolayer and the magnetic nanoparticles.

  12. Magnetic Nanoparticles: From Design and Synthesis to Real World Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Kudr

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of scientific publications focusing on magnetic materials indicates growing interest in the broader scientific community. Substantial progress was made in the synthesis of magnetic materials of desired size, morphology, chemical composition, and surface chemistry. Physical and chemical stability of magnetic materials is acquired by the coating. Moreover, surface layers of polymers, silica, biomolecules, etc. can be designed to obtain affinity to target molecules. The combination of the ability to respond to the external magnetic field and the rich possibilities of coatings makes magnetic materials universal tool for magnetic separations of small molecules, biomolecules and cells. In the biomedical field, magnetic particles and magnetic composites are utilized as the drug carriers, as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and in magnetic hyperthermia. However, the multifunctional magnetic particles enabling the diagnosis and therapy at the same time are emerging. The presented review article summarizes the findings regarding the design and synthesis of magnetic materials focused on biomedical applications. We highlight the utilization of magnetic materials in separation/preconcentration of various molecules and cells, and their use in diagnosis and therapy.

  13. Magnetic Nanoparticles: From Design and Synthesis to Real World Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudr, Jiri; Heger, Zbynek; Cernak, Mirko; Adam, Vojtech; Zitka, Ondrej

    2017-01-01

    The increasing number of scientific publications focusing on magnetic materials indicates growing interest in the broader scientific community. Substantial progress was made in the synthesis of magnetic materials of desired size, morphology, chemical composition, and surface chemistry. Physical and chemical stability of magnetic materials is acquired by the coating. Moreover, surface layers of polymers, silica, biomolecules, etc. can be designed to obtain affinity to target molecules. The combination of the ability to respond to the external magnetic field and the rich possibilities of coatings makes magnetic materials universal tool for magnetic separations of small molecules, biomolecules and cells. In the biomedical field, magnetic particles and magnetic composites are utilized as the drug carriers, as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and in magnetic hyperthermia. However, the multifunctional magnetic particles enabling the diagnosis and therapy at the same time are emerging. The presented review article summarizes the findings regarding the design and synthesis of magnetic materials focused on biomedical applications. We highlight the utilization of magnetic materials in separation/preconcentration of various molecules and cells, and their use in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:28850089

  14. Ultrathin magnetic structures IV applications of nanomagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Heinrich, Bretislav

    2004-01-01

    The ability to understand and control the unique properties of interfaces has created an entirely new field of magnetism which already has a profound impact in technology and is providing the basis for a revolution in electronics. The last decade has seen dramatic progress in the development of magnetic devices for information technology but also in the basic understanding of the physics of magnetic nanostructures. Volume III describes thin film magnetic properties and methods for characterising thin film structure topics that underpin the present 'spintronics' revolution in which devices are based on combined magnetic materials and semiconductors. The present volume (IV) deals with the fundamentals of spintronics: magnetoelectronic materials, spin injection and detection, micromagnetics and the development of magnetic random access memory based on GMR and tunnel junction devices. Together these books provide readers with a comprehensive account of an exciting and rapidly developing field. The treatment is de...

  15. Biochemical and biomedical applications of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Hung; Juang, Ruey-Shin

    2011-10-01

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for future medical diagnosis and therapy. Various types of nanoparticles have been extensively studied for numerous biochemical and biomedical applications. Magnetic nanoparticles are well-established nanomaterials that offer controlled size, ability to be manipulated by an external magnetic field, and enhancement of contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. As a result, these nanoparticles could have many applications including bacterial detection, protein purification, enzyme immobilization, contamination decorporation, drug delivery, hyperthermia, etc. All these biochemical and biomedical applications require that these nanoparticles should satisfy some prerequisites including high magnetization, good stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Because of the potential benefits of multimodal functionality in biomedical applications, in this account highlights some general strategies to generate magnetic nanoparticle-based multifunctional nanostructures. After these magnetic nanoparticles are conjugated with proper ligands (e.g., nitrilotriacetate), polymers (e.g., polyacrylic acid, chitosan, temperature- and pH-sensitive polymers), antibodies, enzymes, and inorganic metals (e.g., gold), such biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles exhibit many advantages in biomedical applications. In addition, the multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles have been widely applied in biochemical fields including enzyme immobilization and protein purification.

  16. Fundamentals and Applications of Magnetic Particle Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgert, J.; Schmidt, J.D.; Schmale, I.; Rahmer, J.; Bontus, C.; Gleich, B.; David, B.; Eckart, R.; Woywode, O.; Juergen Weizenecker; Schnorr, J.; Taupitz, M.; Haegele, J.; Vogt, F.; Barkhausen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging technique that performs a direct measurement of the magnetization of ferromagnetic nanoparticles to quantify their local concentration. These particles are usually called SPIOs, i.e. superparamagnetic iron oxides. Specific formulations of

  17. SURFACE MODIFITED MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yu. Vasyukov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unique physicochemical properties of nanomaterials arouse a great interest of specialists of various fields. Materials based on nanostructures purchase new mechanical, optical, and electrical properties. Great practical importance is the magnetic properties of materials, structural elements which lie at the nanoscale. Nanomaterials with magnetic properties have been used in drug delivery, magnetic hyperthermia, magnetic separation, and magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic properties of nanoparticles depend on many factors, such as particle size and shape, chemical properties and lattice type. Magnetic characteristics can be changed by the interaction of particles with the surrounding matrix and neighboring particles.Unfortunately, many studies show that a great disadvantage of the unmodified nanoparticles is their non-specific interaction with the cells, which leads to their accumulation outside the target organs, also to­xicity of nanomaterials and their low colloidal stability. Surface modification of nanoparticles can solve this problem. Development of nanostructures based on magnetic nanoparticles and functionalized by biocompatible agents is one of the main targets of nanobiotechnology.

  18. Magnetic Gearing Versus Conventional Gearing in Actuators for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchhammer, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic geared actuators (MGA) are designed to perform highly reliable, robust and precise motion on satellite platforms or aerospace vehicles. The design allows MGA to be used for various tasks in space applications. In contrast to conventional geared drives, the contact and lubrication free force transmitting elements lead to a considerable lifetime and range extension of drive systems. This paper describes the fundamentals of magnetic wobbling gears (MWG) and the deduced inherent characteristics, and compares conventional and magnetic gearing.

  19. "Molecular" MR imaging at high fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, John C; Zu, Zhongliang; Wang, Ping; Li, Hua; Xu, Junzhong; Dortch, Richard; Gochberg, Daniel F

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) have contributed considerably to clinical radiology, and a variety of MR techniques have been developed to evaluate pathological processes as well as normal tissue biology at the cellular and molecular level. However, in comparison to nuclear imaging, MRI has relatively poor sensitivity for detecting true molecular changes or for detecting the presence of targeted contrast agents, though these remain under active development. In recent years very high field (7T and above) MRI systems have been developed for human studies and these provide new opportunities and technical challenges for molecular imaging. We identify 5 types of intrinsic contrast mechanisms that do not require the use of exogenous agents but which can provide molecular and cellular information. We can derive information on tissue composition by (i) imaging different nuclei, especially sodium (ii) exploiting chemical shift differences as in MRS (iii) exploiting specific relaxation mechanisms (iv) exploiting tissue differences in the exchange rates of molecular species such as amides or hydroxyls and (v) differences in susceptibility. The increased signal strength at higher fields enables higher resolution images to be acquired, along with increased sensitivity to detecting subtle effects caused by molecular changes in tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Processing, properties and some novel applications of magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The bare or surface-modified particles find applications in areas such as hyperthermia treatment of cancer and magnetic field-assisted radioactive chemical separation. We present here some of the salient features of processing of nanostructured magnetic materials of different sizes and shapes, their properties and some ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Spatially Resolved NMR Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    This handbook and ready reference covers materials science applications as well as microfluidic, biomedical and dental applications and the monitoring of physicochemical processes. It includes the latest in hardware, methodology and applications of spatially resolved magnetic resonance, such as portable imaging and single-sided spectroscopy. For materials scientists, spectroscopists, chemists, physicists, and medicinal chemists.

  2. Novel Lightweight Magnets for Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Tai-Yang Research Company (TYRC) of Tallahassee, Florida, will design, build and test a superconducting magnet system optimized for low current space based...

  3. Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles: design, synthesis, and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinhao; Gu, Hongwei; Xu, Bing

    2009-08-18

    The combination of nanotechnology and molecular biology has developed into an emerging research area: nanobiotechnology. Magnetic nanoparticles are well-established nanomaterials that offer controlled size, ability to be manipulated externally, and enhancement of contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). As a result, these nanoparticles could have many applications in biology and medicine, including protein purification, drug delivery, and medical imaging. Because of the potential benefits of multimodal functionality in biomedical applications, researchers would like to design and fabricate multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles. Currently, there are two strategies to fabricate magnetic nanoparticle-based multifunctional nanostructures. The first, molecular functionalization, involves attaching antibodies, proteins, and dyes to the magnetic nanoparticles. The other method integrates the magnetic nanoparticles with other functional nanocomponents, such as quantum dots (QDs) or metallic nanoparticles. Because they can exhibit several features synergistically and deliver more than one function simultaneously, such multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles could have unique advantages in biomedical applications. In this Account, we review examples of the design and biomedical application of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles. After their conjugation with proper ligands, antibodies, or proteins, the biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles exhibit highly selective binding. These results indicate that such nanoparticles could be applied to biological medical problems such as protein purification, bacterial detection, and toxin decorporation. The hybrid nanostructures, which combine magnetic nanoparticles with other nanocomponents, exhibit paramagnetism alongside features such as fluorescence or enhanced optical contrast. Such structures could provide a platform for enhanced medical imaging and controlled drug delivery. We expect that the combination of unique structural

  4. Nanostructured magnetic alginate composites for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Marins Bedê

    Full Text Available Abstract This is a study of the preparation and characterization of polymeric-magnetic nanoparticles. The nanoparticles used were magnetite (Fe3O4 and the chosen polymers were alginate and chitosan. Two types of samples were prepared: uncoated magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in polymeric matrix. The samples were analyzed by XRD, light scattering techniques, TEM, and magnetic SQUID. The XRD patterns identified magnetite (Fe3O4 as the only crystalline phase. TEM analyses showed particle sizes between 10 and 20nm for magnetite, and 15 and 30nm for the encapsulated magnetite. The values of magnetization ranged from 75 to 100emu/g for magnetite nanoparticles, and 8 to 12emu/g for coated with chitosan, at different temperatures of 20K and 300K. The saturation of both samples was in the range of 49 to 50KOe. Variations of results between the two kinds of samples were attributed to the encapsulation of magnetic nanoparticles by the polymers.

  5. Multiferroics application - Magnetic controlled piezoelectric transformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucjan Kozielski

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dense lead zirconate titanate (PZT ceramics is typically used for fabrications of high power piezoelectric devices. In case of lanthanum and iron ions doping into PZT solid solution (PLFZT, material exhibiting both piezoelectric and magnetic properties can be obtained. Among many investigated compositions particularly the Pb0.91(La0.5Fe0.50.09(Zr0,65Ti0,350,9775O3, located near the morphotropic boundary, exhibits the highest magnetoelectric effect. This coupling between magnetization and polarization is achieved by the Fe3+ ions addition that sufficiently rise sensitivity to magnetic field without decreasing the dielectric loss coefficient at the same time. Taking advantageof this specific material the piezoelectric transformer (PT with magnetic feedback was fabricated, which converts an electrical AC input voltage into ultrasonic vibrations and reconverts back to an output as AC voltage proportionally to the magnetic field intensity. In the present study the unipoled radial mode piezoelectric transformers based on PLFZT-type ceramics prepared by hot-press sintering have been investigated. The effect of the magnetic field on the operating properties was measured for piezoelectric transformer operating at the first resonance frequency.

  6. Application of magnetic nanoparticles in smart enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghari, Hamideh; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda; Mohammadlou, Mojgan; Berenjian, Aydin; Anarjan, Navideh; Jafari, Nahideh; Nasiri, Shahin

    2016-02-01

    Immobilization of enzymes enhances their properties for efficient utilization in industrial processes. Magnetic nanoparticles, due to their high surface area, large surface-to-volume ratio and easy separation under external magnetic fields, are highly valued. Significant progress has been made to develop new catalytic systems that are immobilized onto magnetic nanocarriers. This review provides an overview of recent developments in enzyme immobilization and stabilization protocols using this technology. The current applications of immobilized enzymes based on magnetic nanoparticles are summarized and future growth prospects are discussed. Recommendations are also given for areas of future research.

  7. Conduction cooled high temperature superconducting dipole magnet for accelerator applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenberg, N.; Nielsen, G.; Hauge, N.

    2012-01-01

    A 3T proof-of-principle dipole magnet for accelerator applications, based on 2nd generation high temperature superconducting tape was designed, built, and tested by a consortium under the lead of Danfysik. The magnet was designed to have a straight, circular bore with a good field region of radius...... = 25 mm, and a magnetic length of 250 mm. A total length of 2.5 km YBCO-based copper stabilized conductor supplied by SuperPower Inc., NY, USA, was isolated with 0.025 mm of epoxy and subsequently wound into 14 saddle coils and 4 racetrack coils with a cosine theta like configuration. The coils were......-liquid free operation of an HTS accelerator magnet was demonstrated. The cold mass support design permits magnet orientation under arbitrary angles. Careful choice of materials in terms of magnetic, heat conducting and mechanical properties resulted in a robust and compact solution which opens up...

  8. Industrial applications of superconducting magnet technology in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    Krischel, D

    2000-01-01

    The title provides the opportunity and task to both look at specific industrial applications in Europe as well as at specific abilities in Europe for industrial applications in the field of superconducting magnets. For the first aspect we will review the fields outside of MRI and spectroscopy where superconducting magnets are being used either because of their unrivaled technical performance or for economic reasons. Applications of superconducting magnet technology will then be categorized according to their type, estimated volumes, and perspectives also including HTS options. For the second aspect we look at European players in that field noticing that some big companies had stepped out whereas others, stimulated by the LHC project, extend their activity from resistive into superconducting magnet technology. Among the potential customers are big research labs which ambiguously belong to the group of potential suppliers, too. This last fact also indicates the tight relationship between research and industrial...

  9. The Application of Carbon Nanotubes in Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Raniszewski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the results of the investigation into the applications of carbon nanotubes with ferromagnetic nanoparticles as nanoheaters for targeted thermal ablation of cancer cells. Relevant nanoparticles’ characteristics were exploited in terms of their functionality for biomedical applications and their magnetic properties were examined to determine heat generation efficiency induced by the exposure of the particles to an alternating magnetic field. The influence of the electromagnetic field on the human body tissues was assessed, providing quantitative measures of the interaction. The behavior of a liquid containing magnetic particles, during the exposure to the alternating magnetic field, was verified. As for the application for the ferromagnetic carbon nanotubes, the authors investigated temperature distribution in human liver tumor together with Arrhenius tissue damage model and the thermal dose concept.

  10. In-depth magnetic characterization of a [2 × 2] Mn(III) square grid using SQUID magnetometry, inelastic neutron scattering, and high-field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konstantatos, Andreas; Bewley, Robert; Barra, Anne Laure

    2016-01-01

    . Combined inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments provided the necessary information in order to successfully model the magnetic properties of Mn4. The resulting model takes into account both the magnitude and the relative orientations of the single...

  11. The application of magnetic carriers in wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hredzák Slavomír

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Ferromagnetic fluid is a kind of polyphase liquid, which is a stable colloid system of sufficiently small mono-domain magnetic particles covered by a film of surfactant and dispersed in a base liquid. Ferrofluids can be prepared in various base liquids such as water, hydrocarbons, mercury, etc., according to them utilisation. The basic properties of ferrofluids, i.e. the high magnetic polarisation of saturation and zero remanence predestine their application in various industrial branches including mineral processing and wastewater treatment.Wastewater treatment by the application of ferrofluids under magnetic field resides in the action of the field on the ferrofluid added to the oil substance. Strongly magnetically polarisable fluids enable to increase the magnetic susceptibility of oil substances to suitable level for their removal from water by a magnetic way. It was observed that the oil drop with the weight of 3.10 -3g and the ferrofluid concentration of 3% starts to move in the direction of the magnetic intensity growth at the minimal value of 105 A.m-1. It means that ordinary permanent magnet with the magnetic induction of 0.1 T causes the movement of the oil drops with a relatively small admixture of ferrofluid on the water level. This knowledge is very important for the design of magnetic filtration device which will be able to separate oil substances from water.Modification of magnetic properties of weakly magnetic materials by ferrofluids was also carried out in the case of magnetic filtration of water contaminated by fine grains of copper concentrate created by chalcopyrite. After admixing the ferrofluid into the suspension the recovery of mineral to the magnetic filter product ranges from 75 % to 98 % depending on the kind of ferrofluid and pH values. It was observed that in the case of water-based ferrofluid the recovery decreases with the increasing of pH value. But, on the other hand the increasing of pH value under the

  12. Underground application of magnetic resonance soundings

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greben, JM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available operations. In the usual surface based measurements, with horizontal loop and water layer, the geometry of the problem can be summarized by the value of the inclination of the Earth magnetic field. For MRS measurements under the geometric conditions...

  13. Permanent magnet motor technology design and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gieras, Jacek F

    2009-01-01

    Demonstrates the construction of permanent magnet (PM) motor drives and supplies ready-to-implement solutions to common roadblocks along the way. This book also supplies fundamental equations and calculations for determining and evaluating system performance, efficiency, reliability, and cost. It explores modern computer-aided design of PM motors.

  14. Electrical resistivity tomography and magnetic surveys: applications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study aimed at evaluating the competence of the near surface formations as foundation materials has been undertaken at the site of the newly established Wolkite University Campus. Integrated geophysical surveys involving 2D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ert), Vertical Electrical Sounding (ves) and magnetic ...

  15. High-field spin dynamics of antiferromagnetic quantum spin chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enderle, M.; Regnault, L.P.; Broholm, C.

    2000-01-01

    The characteristic internal order of macroscopic quantum ground states in one-dimensional spin systems is usually not directly accessible, but reflected in the spin dynamics and the field dependence of the magnetic excitations. In high magnetic fields quantum phase transitions are expected. We...... present recent work on the high-field spin dynamics of the S = I antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains NENP (Haldane ground state) and CsNiCl3 (quasi-1D HAF close to the quantum critical point), the uniform S = 1/2 chain CTS, and the spin-Peierls system CuGeO3. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B,V. All rights...

  16. Recent progress in biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been proposed for biomedical applications for several years. Various research groups worldwide have focused on improving their synthesis, their characterization techniques and the specific tailoring of their properties. Yet, it is the recent, impressive advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology which caused the breakthrough in their successful application in biomedicine. This paper aims at reviewing some current biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles as well as some recent patents in this field. Special emphasis is placed on i) hyperthermia, ii) therapeutics iii) diagnostics. Future prospects are also discussed. © 2010 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

  17. Development and applications of NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) in low fields and zero field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielecki, A.

    1987-05-01

    This dissertation is about nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the absence of applied magnetic fields. NMR is usually done in large magnetic fields, often as large as can be practically attained. The motivation for going the opposite way, toward zero field, is that for certain types of materials, particularly powdered or polycrystalline solids, the NMR spectra in zero field are easier to interpret than those obtained in high field. 92 refs., 60 figs., 1 tab.

  18. High-field magnetization and other physical properties of Ce{sub 2}T{sub 3}X{sub 5} compounds (T=Pd, Rh and Cu; X=Si and A1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Yasuyuki; Kosaka, Masashi; Abe, Hideki; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Kido, Giyuu; Uwatoko, Yoshiya E-mail: uwato@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2004-06-01

    We have synthesized the new ternary compounds Ce{sub 2}Pd{sub 3}Si{sub 5}, Ce{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}Si{sub 5} and Ce{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}A1{sub 5} that have the orthorhombic U{sub 2}Co{sub 3}Si{sub 5}-type of structure. Measurements of the magnetization and other physical properties have been performed on Ce{sub 2}T{sub 3}X{sub 5} compounds up to 30 T at 1.5 K and in the temperature range from 2.0 to 300 K. Ce{sub 2}Pd{sub 3}Si{sub 5} and Ce{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}Si{sub 5} undergo a transition to the antiferromagnetic state at T{sub N} = 7.8 and 4.4 K, respectively. On the other hand, in Ce{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}A1{sub 5} no magnetic transition occurs down to 1.8 K. The highest magnetization values per Ce atom of Ce{sub 2}Pd{sub 3}Si{sub 5}, Ce{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}Si{sub 5} and Ce{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}A1{sub 5} are 0.96, 0.92 and 0.50 {mu}{sub B} at B=30 T, respectively.

  19. The value of high-field MRI (3 T) in the assessment of sellar lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, K. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Ba-Ssalamah, A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Wolfsberger, S. [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna (Austria); Mlynarik, V. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Knosp, E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: siegfried.trattnig@univie.ac.at

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of the normal sellar anatomy in vitro and in vivo with high-field MRI and its application in the diagnosis of sellar pathologies in comparison to standard MRI. All high-field MR images were obtained using a 3 T Bruker Medspec 30/80 Scanner with a head birdcage transmit/receive coil and an actively shielded gradient system with a maximum gradient strength of 45 mT/m. Firstly an in vitro study of the sella turcica was performed to depict normal pituitary and sellar anatomy at high field. After a pilot-study this sequence-protocol was established: A RARE sequence (TR/TE = 7790/19 ms; matrix size, 512 x 512; RARE factor = 8, FOV, 200 mm) was used for T2-weighted coronal, axial and sagittal images. A 3D gradient echo sequence with magnetization-preparation (MP-RAGE, TR/TE/TI 33.5/7.6/800 ms, matrix size, 512 x 512; FOV, 200 mm, effective slice thickness, 1.88 mm; 3 averages) was used for acquisition of T1-weighted pre- and post-contrast images. Between January 2002 and March 200458 patients were enrolled in this study. Seven patients were examined for suspected microadenoma and in 51 patients 3T MRI was used to obtain additional information about the sellar lesion already known to be present from standard MRI. In 21 cases the accuracy of the imaging findings was assessed afterwards by comparison with intraoperative findings. The infiltration of the medial cavernous sinus wall was suspected on standard MRI on 15 sides (47%), on high-field MRI on 9 sides (28%) and could be verified by intraoperative findings on 6 sides (19%). Accordingly, sensitivity to infiltration was 83% for 3 T and 67% for standard MRI. Specificity was 84% for 3 T and 58% for standard MRI. Moreover, high-field MRI revealed microadenomas in 7 patients with a median diameter of 4 mm (range 2-9 mm). The segments of the cranial nerves were seen as mean 4 hypointense spots (range 2-5 spots) on high-field MRI in contrast to 3 spots (range 0-4 spots) on standard MRI

  20. Treatment Pulse Application for Magnetic Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Seob Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment and diagnosis can be made in difficult areas simply by changing the output pulse form of the magnetic stimulation device. However, there is a limitation in the range of treatments and diagnoses of a conventional sinusoidal stimulation treatment pulse because the intensity, width, and form of the pulse must be changed according to the lesion type. This paper reports a multidischarge method, where the stimulation coils were driven in sequence via multiple switching control. The limitation of the existing simple sinusoidal pulse form could be overcome by changing the intensity, width, and form of the pulse. In this study, a new sequential discharge method was proposed to freely alter the pulse width. The output characteristics of the stimulation treatment pulse were examined according to the trigger signal delay applied to the switch at each stage by applying a range of superposition pulses to the magnetic simulation device, which is widely used in industry and medicine.

  1. MAGNETIC GRADIOMETRY: Instrumentation, Calibration and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, Jose Maria Garcia

    independent Compact Spherical Coil (CSC) sensors are set up on an optical bench at a distance of 60cm. Each of the magnetometers is calibrated separately and has an absolute accuracy better than 0.2nT. The controlling electronics has been designed with space specifications and the same instrumentation....... GRADSAT, two 20km separated magnetic instrumented satellites, combines state-of-the-art technology with advanced instrumentation to produce world class science....

  2. Agglomeration, colloidal stability, and magnetic separation of magnetic nanoparticles: collective influences on environmental engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, Swee Pin; Lim, JitKang; Ooi, Boon Seng; Ahmad, Abdul Latif

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) which exhibit magnetic and catalytic bifunctionalities have been widely accepted as one of the most promising nanoagents used in water purification processes. However, due to the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, MNPs can easily lose their colloidal stability and tend to agglomerate. Thus, it is necessary to enhance their colloidal stability in order to maintain the desired high specific surface area. Meanwhile, in order to successfully utilize MNPs for environmental engineering applications, an effective magnetic separation technology has to be developed. This step is to ensure the MNPs that have been used for pollutant removal can be fully reharvested back. Unfortunately, it was recently highlighted that there exists a conflicting role between colloidal stability and magnetic separability of the MNPs, whereby the more colloidally stable the particle is, the harder for it to be magnetically separated. In other words, attaining a win-win scenario in which the MNPs possess both good colloidal stability and fast magnetic separation rate becomes challenging. Such phenomenon has to be thoroughly understood as the colloidal stability and the magnetic separability of MNPs play a pivotal role on affecting their effective implementation in water purification processes. Accordingly, it is the aim of this paper to provide reviews on (i) the colloidal stability and (ii) the magnetic separation of MNPs, as well as to provide insights on (iii) their conflicting relationship based on recent research findings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Guided self-assembly of magnetic beads for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gusenbauer, Markus; Reichel, Franz; Exl, Lukas; Bance, Simon; Fischbacher, Johann; Özelt, Harald; Kovacs, Alexander; Brandl, Martin; Schrefl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Micromagnetic beads are widely used in biomedical applications for cell separation, drug delivery, and hypothermia cancer treatment. Here we propose to use self-organized magnetic bead structures which accumulate on fixed magnetic seeding points to isolate circulating tumor cells. The analysis of circulating tumor cells is an emerging tool for cancer biology research and clinical cancer management including the detection, diagnosis and monitoring of cancer. Microfluidic chips for isolating circulating tumor cells use either affinity, size or density capturing methods. We combine multiphysics simulation techniques to understand the microscopic behavior of magnetic beads interacting with Nickel accumulation points used in lab-on-chip technologies. Our proposed chip technology offers the possibility to combine affinity and size capturing with special antibody-coated bead arrangements using a magnetic gradient field created by Neodymium Iron Boron permanent magnets. The multiscale simulation environment combines ...

  4. Magnetic quantum dots in biotechnology--synthesis and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Kalpesh D; Fan, Qirui; Dorcéna, Jenny; Ruan, Gang; Winter, Jessica O

    2013-12-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have great promise in biological imaging, and as this promise is realized, there has been increasing interest in combining the benefits of QDs with those of other materials to yield composites with multifunctional properties. One of the most common materials combined with QDs is magnetic materials, either as ions (e.g. gadolinium) or as nanoparticles (e.g. superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, SPIONs). The fluorescent property of the QDs permits visualization, whereas the magnetic property of the composite enables imaging, magnetic separation, and may even have therapeutic benefit. In this review, the synthesis of fluorescent-magnetic nanoparticles, including magnetic QDs is explored; and the applications of these materials in imaging, separations, and theranostics are discussed. As the properties of these materials continue to improve, QDs have the potential to greatly impact biological imaging, diagnostics, and treatment. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Application of magnetic refrigeration and its assessment - Annual report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitanovski, A.; Vuarnoz, D.; Diebold, M.; Gonin, C.; Egolf, P. W.

    2007-07-01

    This annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the work done in 2007 at the University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland on a project involving refrigeration based on magnetic effects. Possible refrigeration technologies and the evaluation of the potential of magnetic refrigeration are discussed. A calculation tool developed to determine the coefficient of performance (COP) values and the exergy efficiency as a function of magnetic field strength and rotational frequency for rotary types of magnetic refrigerators is introduced. Two applications that are considered to be very interesting for initial research, namely a household refrigerator without a freezing compartment and a large-size central chilling unit are discussed. The COP values of such large-scale systems are commented on. The study of the use of even superconducting magnets is considered as being an economic solution.

  6. Biomedical Applications of Magnetically Functionalized Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa-Jeong Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanofibers are one-dimensional nanomaterial in fiber form with diameter less than 1 µm and an aspect ratio (length/diameter larger than 100:1. Among the different types of nanoparticle-loaded nanofiber systems, nanofibers loaded with magnetic nanoparticles have gained much attention from biomedical scientists due to a synergistic effect obtained from the unique properties of both the nanofibers and magnetic nanoparticles. These magnetic nanoparticle-encapsulated or -embedded nanofiber systems can be used not only for imaging purposes but also for therapy. In this review, we focused on recent advances in nanofibers loaded with magnetic nanoparticles, their biomedical applications, and future trends in the application of these nanofibers.

  7. Magnetically Biased Graphene Based Switches for Microwave Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bukvic, B.; Budimir, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a magnetically biased graphene based switch for CPW resonator applications. Graphene patches are set in the gap between signal and ground lines, thus obtaining the whole structures act as switchable elements. Graphene was modeled as a general material with appropriate surface conductivity. The presented CPW resonator structure acts like a switch in ON state even for magnetic bias field of around 0.5 T. The simulated S parameters of the CPW resonator structure with differen...

  8. Multifunctional Magnetic-fluorescent Nanocomposites for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Corr, S A; Rakovich, Y.P.; Gun'ko, Y.K.

    2008-01-01

    AbstractNanotechnology is a fast-growing area, involving the fabrication and use of nano-sized materials and devices. Various nanocomposite materials play a number of important roles in modern science and technology. Magnetic and fluorescent inorganic nanoparticles are of particular importance due to their broad range of potential applications. It is expected that the combination of magnetic and fluorescent properties in one nanocomposite would enable the engineering of unique multifunctional...

  9. Magnetic Nanoparticles: Surface Effects and Properties Related to Biomedicine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M.; Albiss, Borhan A.; Haik, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Due to finite size effects, such as the high surface-to-volume ratio and different crystal structures, magnetic nanoparticles are found to exhibit interesting and considerably different magnetic properties than those found in their corresponding bulk materials. These nanoparticles can be synthesized in several ways (e.g., chemical and physical) with controllable sizes enabling their comparison to biological organisms from cells (10–100 μm), viruses, genes, down to proteins (3–50 nm). The optimization of the nanoparticles’ size, size distribution, agglomeration, coating, and shapes along with their unique magnetic properties prompted the application of nanoparticles of this type in diverse fields. Biomedicine is one of these fields where intensive research is currently being conducted. In this review, we will discuss the magnetic properties of nanoparticles which are directly related to their applications in biomedicine. We will focus mainly on surface effects and ferrite nanoparticles, and on one diagnostic application of magnetic nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. PMID:24232575

  10. Does high field MRI allow an earlier diagnosis of multiple sclerosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattjes, M.P.; Harzheim, M.; Lutterbey, G.G.; Hojati, F.; Simon, B.; Schmidt, S.; Schild, H.H.; Barkhof, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background :High field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides higher lesion load measurements in patients presenting with clinically isolated syndromes (CIS) suggestive of demyelination and has impact upon the classification of these syndromes and potentially, the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

  11. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z.W

    2002-07-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  12. Peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Anastasia Kruse

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the United States. Radiation and chemotherapy are conventional treatments, but they result in serious side effects and the probability of tumor recurrence remains high. Therefore, there is an increasing need to enhance the efficacy of conventional treatments. Magnetic nanoparticles have been previously studied for a variety of applications such as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, anemia treatment, magnetic cell sorting and magnetically mediated hyperthermia (MMH). In this work, dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles were developed and functionalized with peptides to target the nanoparticles to either the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tumor tissue or to localize the nanoparticles in subcellular regions after cell uptake. The magnetic nanoparticles were utilized for a variety of applications. First, heating properties of the nanoparticles were utilized to administer hyperthermia treatments combined with chemotherapy. The nanoparticles were functionalized with peptides to target fibrinogen in the ECM and extensively characterized for their physicochemical properties, and MMH combined with chemotherapy was able to enhance the toxicity of chemotherapy. The second application of the nanoparticles was magnetically mediated energy delivery. This treatment does not result in a bulk temperature rise upon actuation of the nanoparticles by an alternating magnetic field (AMF) but rather results in intracellular damage via friction from Brownian rotation or nanoscale heating effects from Neel relaxations. The nanoparticles were functionalized with a cell penetrating peptide to facilitate cell uptake and lysosomal escape. The intracellular effects of the internalized nanoparticles alone and with activation by an AMF were evaluated. Iron concentrations in vivo are highly regulated as excess iron can catalyze the formation of the hydroxyl radical through Fenton chemistry. Although often a concern of using iron

  13. Large-scale HTS bulks for magnetic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werfel, Frank N., E-mail: werfel@t-online.de [Adelwitz Technologiezentrum GmbH (ATZ), Rittergut Adelwitz 16, 04886 Arzberg-Adelwitz (Germany); Floegel-Delor, Uta; Riedel, Thomas; Goebel, Bernd; Rothfeld, Rolf; Schirrmeister, Peter; Wippich, Dieter [Adelwitz Technologiezentrum GmbH (ATZ), Rittergut Adelwitz 16, 04886 Arzberg-Adelwitz (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► ATZ Company has constructed about 130 HTS magnet systems. ► Multi-seeded YBCO bulks joint the way for large-scale application. ► Levitation platforms demonstrate “superconductivity” to a great public audience (100 years anniversary). ► HTS magnetic bearings show forces up to 1 t. ► Modular HTS maglev vacuum cryostats are tested for train demonstrators in Brazil, China and Germany. -- Abstract: ATZ Company has constructed about 130 HTS magnet systems using high-Tc bulk magnets. A key feature in scaling-up is the fabrication of YBCO melts textured multi-seeded large bulks with three to eight seeds. Except of levitation, magnetization, trapped field and hysteresis, we review system engineering parameters of HTS magnetic linear and rotational bearings like compactness, cryogenics, power density, efficiency and robust construction. We examine mobile compact YBCO bulk magnet platforms cooled with LN{sub 2} and Stirling cryo-cooler for demonstrator use. Compact cryostats for Maglev train operation contain 24 pieces of 3-seed bulks and can levitate 2500–3000 N at 10 mm above a permanent magnet (PM) track. The effective magnetic distance of the thermally insulated bulks is 2 mm only; the stored 2.5 l LN{sub 2} allows more than 24 h operation without refilling. 34 HTS Maglev vacuum cryostats are manufactured tested and operate in Germany, China and Brazil. The magnetic levitation load to weight ratio is more than 15, and by group assembling the HTS cryostats under vehicles up to 5 t total loads levitated above a magnetic track is achieved.

  14. 2nd Latin American Workshop on Magnetism, Magnetic Materials, and Their Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, J

    1994-01-01

    During August 24-27, 1993, approximately 60 scientists from the Americas, Europe and Japan, gathered in the city of Guanajuato, in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico, at the II Latin American Workshop on Magnetism, Magnetic Materials and their Applications. The group of scientists converging into the beautiful city of Guanajuato had come from Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Venezuela, Cuba, several places in Mexico, U. S. A. , Japan, Spain, France, Italy, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Denmark. The event attested to the success of the previous Workshop on Magnetism, Magnetic Materials and their Applications, held in Havana, Cuba, in 1991, as well as to the interest, level of activity and quality of the work being carried out in Latin America in the area of magnetism and magnetic materials. Equally important to everyone present was the fact that we had come to honor a friend, Professor L. M. Falicov, on his sixtieth birthday. The choice of a Latin American Workshop on magnetism as a Festschrift for Leo Falicov was,...

  15. A guide to magnetic tweezers and their applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupa Sarkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic force spectroscopy is a rapidly developing single molecule technique that found numerous applications at the interface of physics and biology. Since the invention of the first magnetic tweezers, a number of modifications were incorporated into the approach that helped relieve the limitations of the original design and amplified its strengths. Inventive molecular biology solutions further advanced the technique by expanding its possible applications. In its present form, the method can be applied to single molecules and live cells without resorting to intense sample irradiation, can be easily multiplexed, accommodates multiple DNAs, displays impressive resolution, and allows a remarkable ease in stretching and twisting macromolecules. In this review, we describe the architecture of magnetic tweezers, key requirements to the experimental design and analysis of data, and outline several applications of the method that illustrate its versatility.

  16. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Alwatban, A Z W

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a ...

  17. The heating effect of iron-cobalt magnetic nanofluids in an alternating magnetic field: application in magnetic hyperthermia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokuhfar, Ali; Seyyed Afghahi, Seyyed Salman

    2013-12-20

    In this research, FeCo alloy magnetic nanofluids were prepared by reducing iron(III) chloride hexahydrate and cobalt(II) sulfate heptahydrate with sodium borohydride in a water/CTAB/hexanol reverse micelle system for application in magnetic hyperthermia treatment. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and energy-dispersive analysis indicate the formation of bcc-structured iron-cobalt alloy. Magnetic property assessment of nanoparticles reveals that some samples are single-domain superparamagnetic, while others are single- or multi-domain ferromagnetic. The stability of the magnetic fluids was achieved by using a CTAB/1-butanol surfactant bilayer. Results of Gouy magnetic susceptibility balance experiments indicate good stability of FeCo nanoparticles even after dilution. The inductive properties of corresponding magnetic fluids including temperature rise and specific absorption rate were determined. Results show that with increasing of the nanoparticle size in the single-domain size regime, the generated heat increases, indicating the significant effect of the hysteresis loss. Finally, the central parameter controlling the specific absorption rate of nanoparticles was introduced, the experimental results were compared with those of the Stoner-Wohlfarth model and linear response theory, and the best sample for magnetic hyperthermia treatment was specified.

  18. Application of advanced composites in tokamak magnet systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, C. J.

    1977-11-01

    The use of advanced (high-modulus) composites in superconducting magnets for tokamak fusion reactors is discussed. The most prominent potential application is as the structure in the pulsed poloidal-field coil system, where a significant reduction in eddy currents could be achieved. Present low-temperature data on the advanced composites are reviewed briefly; they are too meager to do more than suggest a broad class of composites for a particular application.

  19. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, R.J. (Glasgow Western Infirmary (UK))

    1984-09-01

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin.

  20. Magnetized jet creation using a ring laser and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Edison; Gao, Ian; Lu, Yingchao; Ji, Hantao; Follett, Russ; Froula, Dustin; Tzeferacos, Petros; Lamb, Donald; Bickel, Andrew; Sio, Hong; Li, Chi Kiang; Petrasso, Richard; Wei, Mingsheng; Fu, Wen; Han, Lily

    2017-10-01

    We have recently demonstrated a new robust platform of magnetized jet creation using 20 OMEGA beams to form a hollow ring. We will present the latest experimental results and their theoretical interpretation, and explore potential applications to laboratory astrophysics, fundamental plasma physics and other areas. We will also discuss the scaling of this platform to future NIF experiments.

  1. Nanotechnology : emerging applications of cellulose-based green magnetic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao Wang; Zhiyong Cai; Lei Liu; Ilker S. Bayer; Abhijit Biswas

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, a new type of nanocomposite – cellulose based hybrid nanocomposites, which adopts cellulose nanofibers as matrices, has been intensively developed. Among these materials, hybrid nanocomposites consisting of cellulosic fibers and magnetic nanoparticles have recently attracted much attention due to their potential novel applications in biomedicine,...

  2. High Field Linear Magnetoresistance Sensors with Perpendicular Anisotropy L10-FePt Reference Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High field linear magnetoresistance is an important feature for magnetic sensors applied in magnetic levitating train and high field positioning measurements. Here, we investigate linear magnetoresistance in Pt/FePt/ZnO/Fe/Pt multilayer magnetic sensor, where FePt and Fe ferromagnetic layers exhibit out-of-plane and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, respectively. Perpendicular anisotropy L10-FePt reference layer with large coercivity and high squareness ratio was obtained by in situ substrate heating. Linear magnetoresistance is observed in this sensor in a large range between +5 kOe and −5 kOe with the current parallel to the film plane. This L10-FePt based sensor is significant for the expansion of linear range and the simplification of preparation for future high field magnetic sensors.

  3. Introduction of CORC® wires: highly flexible, round high-temperature superconducting wires for magnet and power transmission applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jeremy D.; Mulder, Tim; ten Kate, Herman J.; van der Laan, Danko C.

    2017-01-01

    Conductor on Round Core (CORC®) technology has achieved a long sought-after benchmark by enabling the production of round, multifilament, (RE)Ba2Ca3O7-x coated conductors with practical current densities for use in magnets and power applications. Recent progress, including the demonstration of engineering current density beyond 300 Amm-2 at 4.2 K and 20 T, indicates that CORC® cables are a viable conductor for next generation high field magnets. Tapes with 30 μm substrate thickness and tape widths down to 2 mm have improved the capabilities of CORC® technology by allowing the production of CORC® wires as thin as 3 mm in diameter with the potential to enhance the engineering current density further. An important benefit of the thin CORC® wires is their improved flexibility compared to thicker (7-8 mm diameter) CORC® cables. Critical current measurements were carried out on tapes extracted from CORC® wires made using 2 and 3 mm wide tape after bending the wires to various diameters from 10 to 3.5 cm. These thin wires are highly flexible and retain close to 90% of their original critical current even after bending to a diameter of 3.5 cm. A small 5-turn solenoid was constructed and measured as a function of applied magnetic field, exhibiting an engineering current density of 233 Amm-2 at 4.2 K and 10 T. CORC® wires thus form an attractive solution for applications between 4.2 and 77 K, including high-field magnets that require high current densities with small bending diameters, benefiting from a ready-to-use form (similar to NbTi and contrary to Nb3Sn wires) that does not require additional processing following coil construction.

  4. MAGNETIC BACTERIA AND THEIR POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS: A REVIEW ARTICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rajab Eljmeli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This outline explores the scientific discovery concerning the magnetotactic bacteria (MTB. The results of the discovery are used in microbiology, mineralogy, limnology, physics, biophysics, chemistry, biochemistry, geology, crystallography, and astrobiology. Magnetosomes of the MTB are organized in linear chains and orient the cell body along geomagnetic field lines while flagella actively propel the cells, resulting in so-called magnetotaxis. Materials and Methods: The review article about the magnetotactic bacteria is a collection of many research papers from different institutes. The emerging important points about this review lie in: (1 any biological system is capable of producing magnetic biomaterials such as magnetite (Fe3O4 and gregite (Fe3S4; (2 the navigation of these nano-crystals in the biological system is interconnected with the Earth’s magnetic field. Results: The researchers involved in the study have shown that the magnetotactic bacteria do respond to a magnetic field. This makes them attractive for biomedical and industrial applications because of the availability of superior electromagnets, superconducting magnets and permanent magnet. Magnetic bacteria can also be used as a diagnostic tool in the detection of imperfections even at the nanoscale. Discussion and Conclusions: Although the importance of this issue is still limitedly used in medical area, more performance is necessary to explore the world of these bacteria that are candidate for new industry and new therapy strategies in biotechnology and medical fields.

  5. Circularly polarized attosecond pulse generation and applications to ultrafast magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Guo, Jing; Yuan, Kai-Jun

    2017-12-01

    Attosecond science is a growing new field of research and potential applications which relies on the development of attosecond light sources. Achievements in the generation and application of attosecond pulses enable to investigate electron dynamics in the nonlinear nonperturbative regime of laser-matter interactions on the electron’s natural time scale, the attosecond. In this review, we describe the generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses and their applications to induce attosecond magnetic fields, new tools for ultrafast magnetism. Simulations are performed on aligned one-electron molecular ions by using nonperturbative nonlinear solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We discuss how bichromatic circularly polarized laser pulses with co-rotating or counter-rotating components induce electron-parent ion recollisions, thus producing circularly polarized high-order harmonic generation, the source of circularly polarized attosecond pulses. Ultrafast quantum electron currents created by the generated attosecond pulses give rise to attosecond magnetic field pulses. The results provide a guiding principle for producing circularly polarized attosecond pulses and ultrafast magnetic fields in complex molecular systems for future research in ultrafast magneto-optics.

  6. [Application of magnetic materials in analysis on Chinese herb medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Wei; Wang, Jiu-Rong; Han, Xue-Feng

    2012-12-01

    China is the cradle of Chinese herb medicines,with rich plant resources. However, traditional processing methods have many disadvantages, such as high comsumption of organic solvent, long extraction time and high loss of effective constituents. For the purpose of rational use of Chinese herb medicines and accurate analysis on their constituents,the sample pre-treatment method with magnetic nanoparticles as the carrier brought new opportunities in recent years. after consulting literatures,the essay summarizes traditional extraction methods of Chinese herb medicines, characteristics of magnetic materials and their application in the analysis on Chinese herb medicines.

  7. Magnetic domain wall conduits for single cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Torti, A.; Kostesha, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    The ability to trap, manipulate and release single cells on a surface is important both for fundamental studies of cellular processes and for the development of novel lab-on-chip miniaturized tools for biological and medical applications. In this paper we demonstrate how magnetic domain walls...... generated in micro- and nano-structures fabricated on a chip surface can be used to handle single yeast cells labeled with magnetic beads. In detail, first we show that the proposed approach maintains the microorganism viable, as proven by monitoring the division of labeled yeast cells trapped by domain...

  8. Problem solving in magnetic field: Animation in mobile application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, A. S. M.; Othman, A. P.; Ibarahim, Z.

    2014-09-01

    This paper is focused on the development of mobile application for smart phone, Android, tablet, iPhone, and iPad as a problem solving tool in magnetic field. Mobile application designs consist of animations that were created by using Flash8 software which could be imported and compiled to prezi.com software slide. The Prezi slide then had been duplicated in Power Point format and instead question bank with complete answer scheme was also additionally generated as a menu in the application. Results of the published mobile application can be viewed and downloaded at Infinite Monkey website or at Google Play Store from your gadgets. Statistics of the application from Google Play Developer Console shows the high impact of the application usage in all over the world.

  9. Permanent magnet design methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leupold, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Design techniques developed for the exploitation of high energy magnetically rigid materials such as Sm-Co and Nd-Fe-B have resulted in a revolution in kind rather than in degree in the design of a variety of electron guidance structures for ballistic and aerospace applications. Salient examples are listed. Several prototype models were developed. These structures are discussed in some detail: permanent magnet solenoids, transverse field sources, periodic structures, and very high field structures.

  10. B0 mapping with multi-channel RF coils at high field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Simon; Jovicich, Jorge

    2011-10-01

    Mapping the static magnetic field via the phase evolution over gradient echo scans acquired at two or more echo times is an established method. A number of possibilities exist, however, for combining phase data from multi-channel coils, denoising and thresholding field maps for high field applications. Three methods for combining phase images when no body/volume coil is available are tested: (i) Hermitian product, (ii) phase-matching over channels, and (iii) a new approach based on calculating separate field maps for each channel. The separate channel method is shown to yield field maps with higher signal-to-noise ratio than the Hermitian product and phase-matching methods and fewer unwrapping errors at low signal-to-noise ratio. Separate channel combination also allows unreliable voxels to be identified via the standard deviation over channels, which is found to be the most effective means of denoising field maps. Tests were performed using multichannel coils with between 8 and 32 channels at 3 T, 4 T, and 7 T. For application in the correction of distortions in echo-planar images, a formulation is proposed for reducing the local gradient of field maps to eliminate signal pile-up or swapping artifacts. Field maps calculated using these techniques, implemented in a freely available MATLAB toolbox, provide the basis for an effective correction for echo-planar imaging distortions at high fields. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Fast calculation of magnetic field distribution in magnetic gear for high torque application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Xiao; Song, Zhanfeng

    2016-01-01

    For applications demanding high torque and high reliability transmission, coaxial magnetic gear (CMG) may be a promising substitute of the mechanical gearbox. However, with the increasing of unit capacity, CMG tends to have a big size with large pole number, which would lead to heavy computation...... burden if finite element method (FEM) is employed. Analytical methods are therefore expected. To date, only the exact subdomain model is capable of precisely predicting the magnetic field behaviors in an analytical manner through solving a matrix equation. However, as pole number of the CMG increases...

  12. Methods of high current magnetic field generator for transcranial magnetic stimulation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouda, N. R., E-mail: nybouda@iastate.edu; Pritchard, J.; Weber, R. J.; Mina, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    This paper describes the design procedures and underlying concepts of a novel High Current Magnetic Field Generator (HCMFG) with adjustable pulse width for transcranial magnetic stimulation applications. This is achieved by utilizing two different switching devices, the MOSFET and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Results indicate that currents as high as ±1200 A can be generated with inputs of +/−20 V. Special attention to tradeoffs between field generators utilizing IGBT circuits (HCMFG{sub 1}) and MOSFET circuits (HCMFG{sub 2}) was considered. The theory of operation, design, experimental results, and electronic setup are presented and analyzed.

  13. A magnetic nano-particle ink for tunable microwave applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffar, Farhan A.

    2016-12-19

    Inkjet printing or printing for realization of inexpensive and large area electronics has unearthed as an attractive fabrication technique. Though at present, mostly the metallic inks are printed on regular microwave substrates. In this paper, a fully printed multilayer fabrication process is demonstrated where the substrate is also realized through printing. A novel Fe2O3 based magnetic ink is used as a substrate while an in-house silver organo complex (SOC) ink is developed for metallic layers. Complete magnetostatic and microwave characterization of the ink is presented. At the end, a tunable patch antenna is shown as an application using the magnetic ink as the substrate. The antenna shows a tuning range of 12.5 % for a magnetic field strength of 3 kOe.

  14. Cardiac magnetic resonance spectroscopy: potential clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, S. [Dept. of Cardiovascular Medicine, Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2000-06-01

    MR spectroscopy is the only method for non-invasive detection of various aspects of cardiac metabolism in humans. While the {sup 1}H nucleus of water and fat molecules is the signal source for MR imaging, the MR spectroscopic technique allows for the study of a number of other nuclei, such as {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F, {sup 23}Na, {sup 31}P, {sup 39}K and {sup 87}Rb. Clinical applications presently are confined to the {sup 31}P nucleus. {sup 31}P-MR spectroscopy allows the non-invasive study of cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolites ATP and phosphocreatine. The phosphocreatine/ATP ratio is considered an index of the energetic state of the heart. Possible clinical indications include heart failure, valve disease and coronary artery disease. In heart failure, the phosphocreatine/ATP ratio is reduced and correlates with clinical severity, ejection fraction and prognosis. In mitral and aortic valve disease, a reduced phosphocreatine/ATP ratio may indicate the optimum timing for valve replacement. In coronary artery disease, a regional decrease of phosphocreatine during stress (''biochemical ergometry'') may indicate local ischemia. Furthermore, absolute quantification of high-energy phosphates may allow diagnosis of myocardial viability. Major technical developments, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution will be necessary to establish MR spectroscopy as a routine clinical tool. (orig.) [German] Die MR-Spektroskopie ist die einzige Methode, die es erlaubt, am Patienten verschiedene Aspekte des Myokardstoffwechsels nichtinvasiv zu untersuchen. Waehrend der {sup 1}H-Kern der Wasser- und Fettmolekuele die Signalquelle fuer die MR-Bildgebung darstellt, kann man mit der Spektroskopie eine Vielzahl anderer Kerne wie {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F, {sup 23}Na, {sup 31}P, {sup 39}K und {sup 87}Rb untersuchen. Klinische Anwendungen sind bisher auf die {sup 31}P-MR Spektroskopie beschraenkt. Mit dieser Methode lassen sich die energiereichen Phosphate ATP und

  15. Magnetic Nanoparticles: A Subject for Both Fundamental Research and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bedanta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Single domain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs have been a vivid subject of intense research for the last fifty years. Preparation of magnetic nanoparticles and nanostructures has been achieved by both bottom-up and top-down approaches. Single domain MNPs show Néel-Brown-like relaxation. The Stoner-Wohlfarth model describes the angular dependence of the switching of the magnetization of a single domain particle in applied magnetic fields. By varying the spacing between the particles, the inter-particle interactions can be tuned. This leads to various supermagnetic states such as superparamagnetism, superspin glass, and superferromagnetism. Recently, the study of the magnetization dynamics of such single domain MNPs has attracted particular attention, and observations of various collective spin wave modes in patterned nanomagnet arrays have opened new avenues for on-chip microwave communications. MNPs have the potential for various other applications such as future recording media and in medicine. We will discuss the various aspects involved in the research on MNPs.

  16. Magnetic skyrmions: advances in physics and potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fert, Albert; Reyren, Nicolas; Cros, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are small swirling topological defects in the magnetization texture. Their stabilization and dynamics depend strongly on their topological properties. In most cases, they are induced by chiral interactions between atomic spins in non-centrosymmetric magnetic compounds or in thin films with broken inversion symmetry. Skyrmions can be extremely small, with diameters in the nanometre range, and behave as particles that can be moved, created and annihilated, which makes them suitable for 'abacus'-type applications in information storage and logic technologies. Until recently, skyrmions had been observed only at low temperature and, in most cases, under large applied magnetic fields. An intense research effort has led to the identification of thin-film and multilayer structures in which skyrmions are now stable at room temperature and can be manipulated by electrical currents. The development of skyrmion-based topological spintronics holds promise for applications in the mid-term furure, even though many challenges, such as the achievement of writing, processing and reading functionalities at room temperature and in all-electrical manipulation schemes, still lie ahead.

  17. Tunable magnetic nanowires for biomedical and harsh environment applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2016-04-13

    We have synthesized nanowires with an iron core and an iron oxide (magnetite) shell by a facile low-cost fabrication process. The magnetic properties of the nanowires can be tuned by changing shell thicknesses to yield remarkable new properties and multi-functionality. A multi-domain state at remanence can be obtained, which is an attractive feature for biomedical applications, where a low remanence is desirable. The nanowires can also be encoded with different remanence values. Notably, the oxidation process of single-crystal iron nanowires halts at a shell thickness of 10 nm. The oxide shell of these nanowires acts as a passivation layer, retaining the magnetic properties of the iron core even during high-temperature operations. This property renders these core-shell nanowires attractive materials for application to harsh environments. A cell viability study reveals a high degree of biocompatibility of the core-shell nanowires.

  18. Magnetic particle imaging: from proof of principle to preclinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, T.; Gdaniec, N.; Möddel, M.

    2017-07-01

    Tomographic imaging has become a mandatory tool for the diagnosis of a majority of diseases in clinical routine. Since each method has its pros and cons, a variety of them is regularly used in clinics to satisfy all application needs. Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a relatively new tomographic imaging technique that images magnetic nanoparticles with a high spatiotemporal resolution in a quantitative way, and in turn is highly suited for vascular and targeted imaging. MPI was introduced in 2005 and now enters the preclinical research phase, where medical researchers get access to this new technology and exploit its potential under physiological conditions. Within this paper, we review the development of MPI since its introduction in 2005. Besides an in-depth description of the basic principles, we provide detailed discussions on imaging sequences, reconstruction algorithms, scanner instrumentation and potential medical applications.

  19. Crystal and magnetic properties of 57Fe doped MnAs for magnetic refrigeration application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung Tae; Cho, Hyun Tae; Kim, Sam Jin; Kim, Chul Sung; Lee, Young Bae

    2017-11-01

    The Mn1- x 57Fe x As ( x = 0.001, 0.003, 0.005) compounds for magnetic refrigeration application were synthesized by using a solid-vapor reaction method. We have investigated the crystallographic and magnetic properties of Mn1- x 57Fe x As ( x = 0.001, 0.003, 0.005) samples by using x-ray diffractometer (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), and Mössbauer spectrometer. The XRD patterns, revealed that all samples exhibited hexagonal space group P63/ mmc below Curie temperature ( T C ), while above T C they belong to the orthorhombic space group Pnma. The temperature-dependent magnetization curves under 200 Oe between 4.2 and 320 K showed a large hysteresis in the magnetization as a function of the temperature. To analyze the meagnetocaloric effect, the value of magnetic entropy (-Δ S M ) was calculated from the isothermal initial curves up to 5 T at various temperatures. Mössbauer spectra of Mn0.997 57Fe0.003As sample were taken at various temperatures ranging from 4.2 to 315 K.

  20. High-field magnetization and ESR in the triangular-lattice antiferromagnets Ba{sub 3}MnSb{sub 2}O{sub 9} and Ba{sub 3}TNb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (T=Ni, Co)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y.C. [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Ouyang, Z.W., E-mail: zwouyang@mail.hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Ruan, M.Y.; Guo, Y.M.; Cheng, J.J. [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tian, Z.M. [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xia, Z.C. [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Rao, G.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2015-11-01

    We report high-field magnetization and electronic spin resonance (ESR) study on the triangular-lattice antiferromagnets Ba{sub 3}MnSb{sub 2}O{sub 9} and Ba{sub 3}TNb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (T=Ni, Co). The antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering at T{sub N} is clearly characterized by the temperature dependent ESR spectra. In Ba{sub 3}CoNb{sub 2}O{sub 9}, the complicated ESR peaks are observed above T{sub N}. No obvious frequency–field relationship could be deduced. In Ba{sub 3}NiNb{sub 2}O{sub 9}, the AFM resonance with easy-plane anisotropy is observed, and accordingly, the magnetic exchange interactions are estimated. For Ba{sub 3}MnSb{sub 2}O{sub 9}, the remarkable finding is that single resonance peak at paramagnetic state splits into double peaks below the ordering temperature. Possible interpretations for these unusual AFM resonance modes have been proposed. - Highlights: • In Ba{sub 3}NiNb{sub 2}O{sub 9}, anisotropy is observed, exchange interactions are estimated. • In Ba{sub 3}MnSb{sub 2}O{sub 9}, single resonance peaksplits into double peaks below T{sub N}. • Complicated ESR spectra have been observed in Ba{sub 3}CoNb{sub 2}O{sub 9} above T{sub N}.

  1. Synthesis of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Cidália; Veiga, Luís; Drazic, Goran; Silva, Adrián; Gomes, Helder

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized by an hydrothermal method using three different iron precursors. The yield of synthesis was determined for all samples and found to be dependent on the iron precursor, solution pH and reaction time. The synthesized nanoparticles will be characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis and their suitability for biomedical applications, with particular focus on the hyperthermia method, will be studied.

  2. Preparation, characteristics, convection and applications of magnetic nanofluids: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aditya; Subudhi, Sudhakar

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic nanofluids (MNfs), the colloidal suspension of ferromagnetic nanomaterial, have been taken into research fascinatingly. After contemplating its distinctive interesting properties and unique eximious features it offers innumerous application not only in heat transfer field but also immensely prevalent in medical, biological, aerospace, electronics and solar sciences. This review paper epitomizes and perusing the research work done on heat transfer application of MNfs and encapsulate it for the future research support. Moreover, numerical and experimental, both the approaches has been included for the insightful analysis of phenomenon to apprehend augmentation in heat transfer by MNfs. This article first underlines the importance of appropriate methods of preparation of MNfs as well as its effects on the thermophysical properties of MNfs. Subsequently, the paper comprehended the descriptive analysis of augmentation of convection heat transfer and the effect of magnetic field on the behavior MNfs. Additionally, the effect of magnetic field intensity has been taken as a pertinent parameter and correlations have been developed for thermal conductivity, viscosity and heat transfer coefficient based on the reviewed data. The paper concluded with the tremendous applications of the MNfs and the futuristic plan to support the potential areas for future research.

  3. Preparation, characteristics, convection and applications of magnetic nanofluids: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aditya; Subudhi, Sudhakar

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic nanofluids (MNfs), the colloidal suspension of ferromagnetic nanomaterial, have been taken into research fascinatingly. After contemplating its distinctive interesting properties and unique eximious features it offers innumerous application not only in heat transfer field but also immensely prevalent in medical, biological, aerospace, electronics and solar sciences. This review paper epitomizes and perusing the research work done on heat transfer application of MNfs and encapsulate it for the future research support. Moreover, numerical and experimental, both the approaches has been included for the insightful analysis of phenomenon to apprehend augmentation in heat transfer by MNfs. This article first underlines the importance of appropriate methods of preparation of MNfs as well as its effects on the thermophysical properties of MNfs. Subsequently, the paper comprehended the descriptive analysis of augmentation of convection heat transfer and the effect of magnetic field on the behavior MNfs. Additionally, the effect of magnetic field intensity has been taken as a pertinent parameter and correlations have been developed for thermal conductivity, viscosity and heat transfer coefficient based on the reviewed data. The paper concluded with the tremendous applications of the MNfs and the futuristic plan to support the potential areas for future research.

  4. Current investigations into magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Wei, Jianrong; Aifantis, Katerina E; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2016-05-01

    It is generally recognized that nanoparticles possess unique physicochemical properties that are largely different from those of conventional materials, specifically the electromagnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). These properties have attracted many researchers to launch investigations into their potential biomedical applications, which have been reviewed in this article. First, common types of MNPs were briefly introduced. Then, the biomedical applications of MNPs were reviewed in seven parts: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cancer therapy, the delivery of drugs and genes, bone and dental repair, tissue engineering, biosensors, and in other aspects, which indicated that MNPs possess great potentials for many kinds of biomedical applications due to their unique properties. Although lots of achievements have been obtained, there is still a lot of work to do. New synthesis techniques and methods are still needed to develop the MNPs with satisfactory biocompatibility. More effective methods need to be exploited to prepare MNPs-based composites with fine microstructures and high biomedical performances. Other promising research points include the development of more appropriate techniques of experiments both in vitro and in vivo to detect and analyze the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of MNPs and understand the possible influencing mechanism of the two properties. More comprehensive investigations into the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of composites containing MNPs with "core-shell" structure and deeper understanding and further study into the properties of MNPs to reveal their new biomedical applications, are also described in the conclusion and perspectives part. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Application of high temperature superconductors to high-gradient magnetic separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, M.A.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Worl, L.W.; Schake, A.R.; Padilla, D.D.

    1994-06-01

    High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) is a powerful technique which can be used to separate widely dispersed contaminants from a host material, This technology can separate magnetic solids from other solids, liquids or gases. As the name implies HGMS uses large magnetic field gradients to separate ferromagnetic and paramagnetic particles. HGMS separators usually consist of a high-field solenoid magnet, the bore of which contains a fine-structured, ferromagnetic matrix material. The matrix material locally distorts the magnetic field and creates large field gradients in the vicinity of the matrix elements. These elements then become trapping sites for magnetic particles and are the basis for the magnetic separation. In this paper we discuss the design and construction of a prototype HGMS unit using a magnet made with high temperature superconductors (HTS). The prototype consists of an outer vacuum vessel which contains the HTS solenoid magnet The magnet is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield and multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets. The magnet, thermal shield and current leads all operate in a vacuum and are cooled by a cryocooler. High temperature superconducting current leads are used to reduce the heat leak from the ambient environment to the HTS magnet.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Velocity Mapping in Chemical Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Lynn F; Sederman, Andrew J

    2017-06-07

    This review aims to illustrate the diversity of measurements that can be made using magnetic resonance techniques, which have the potential to provide insights into chemical engineering systems that cannot readily be achieved using any other method. Perhaps the most notable advantage in using magnetic resonance methods is that both chemistry and transport can be followed in three dimensions, in optically opaque systems, and without the need for tracers to be introduced into the system. Here we focus on hydrodynamics and, in particular, applications to rheology, pipe flow, and fixed-bed and gas-solid fluidized bed reactors. With increasing development of industrially relevant sample environments and undersampling data acquisition strategies that can reduce acquisition times to chemical engineering research.

  7. High-field/high-pressure ESR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, T; Okubo, S; Ohta, H

    2017-07-01

    We present a historical review of high-pressure ESR systems with emphasis on our recent development of a high-pressure, high-field, multi-frequency ESR system. Until 2000, the X-band system was almost established using a resonator filled with dielectric materials or a combination of the anvil cell and dielectric resonators. Recent developments have shifted from that in the low-frequency region, such as X-band, to that in multi-frequency region. High-pressure, high-field, multi-frequency ESR systems are classified into two types. First are the systems that use a vector network analyzer or a quasi-optical bridge, which have high sensitivity but a limited frequency region; the second are like our system, which has a very broad frequency region covering the THz region, but lower sensitivity. We will demonstrate the usefulness of our high-pressure ESR system, in addition to its experimental limitations. We also discuss the recent progress of our system and future plans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, Cameron Russell [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    Many nuclear safeguards applications could benefit from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy achievable with metallic magnetic calorimeters. This dissertation covers the development of a system for these applications based on gamma-ray detectors developed at the University of Heidelberg. It demonstrates new calorimeters of this type, which achieved an energy resolution of 45.5 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV, roughly ten times better than current state of the art high purity germanium detectors. This is the best energy resolution achieved with a gamma-ray metallic magnetic calorimeter at this energy to date. In addition to demonstrating a new benchmark in energy resolution, an experimental system for measuring samples with metallic magnetic calorimeters was constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system achieved an energy resolution of 91.3 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV under optimal conditions. Using this system it was possible to characterize the linearity of the response, the count-rate limitations, and the energy resolution as a function of temperature of the new calorimeter. With this characterization it was determined that it would be feasible to measure 242Pu in a mixed isotope plutonium sample. A measurement of a mixed isotope plutonium sample was performed over the course of 12 days with a single two-pixel metallic magnetic calorimeter. The relative concentration of 242Pu in comparison to other plutonium isotopes was determined by direct measurement to less than half a percent accuracy. This is comparable with the accuracy of the best-case scenario using traditional indirect methods. The ability to directly measure the relative concentration of 242Pu in a sample could enable more accurate accounting and detection of indications of undeclared activities in nuclear safeguards, a better constraint on source material in forensic samples containing plutonium, and improvements in verification in a future plutonium

  9. Antimicrobial applications of water-dispersible magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Keng-Shiang; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Yeh, Chen-Sheng; Wu, Ping-Ching; Cheng, Fong-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The increasing morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases is an increasing concern. Despite the continuous development and synthesis of new antimicrobial drugs, microbial pathogens are exhibiting increased multi-drug resistance. Nanomaterials display unique and well-defined physical and chemical properties including a very high surface area to volume ratio, and new approaches for antimicrobial therapies have attempted to combine nanomaterials and current antimicrobial drugs. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are characterized by biocompatibility, biodegradation, and safety for human ingestion. Iron oxide nanoparticles have been approved for human use by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For biomedicine applications, MNPs require surface modification to become water-soluble and be stable enough to resist the effects of proteins and salts in the physiological environment. MNPs can combine various substrata, such as biomolecules and nanomaterials to generate new antimicrobial agents which combine antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties. This can be accomplished through a series of surface modification methods. Because MNPs have unique superparamagnetic characteristics, they can be controlled and recycled by an external magnetic field.In addition, the antimicrobial activity of MNPs-based nanocomposites is superior to that of metallic nanoparticles. This paper reviews the recent literature on the use of MNP-based nanomaterials in antimicrobial applications in biomedicine. Antimicrobial applications mainly focus on inhibiting and killing bacteria and fungi and viruses inactivation. The synthesis, surface modification, and characteristics related to MNPs will also be briefly addressed.

  10. High magnetic field science and its application in the United States current status and future directions

    CERN Document Server

    National Research Council of the National Academies

    2013-01-01

    The Committee to Assess the Current Status and Future Direction of High Magnetic Field Science in the United States was convened by the National Research Council in response to a request by the National Science Foundation. This report answers three questions: (1) What is the current state of high-field magnet science, engineering, and technology in the United States, and are there any conspicuous needs to be addressed? (2) What are the current science drivers and which scientific opportunities and challenges can be anticipated over the next ten years? (3) What are the principal existing and planned high magnetic field facilities outside of the United States, what roles have U.S. high field magnet development efforts played in developing those facilities, and what potentials exist for further international collaboration in this area? A magnetic field is produced by an electrical current in a metal coil. This current exerts an expansive force on the coil, and a magnetic field is "high" if it challenges the str...

  11. Fe-based magnetic nanomaterials: Wet chemical synthesis, magnetic properties and exploration on applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoliang, Hong

    Even though the start of research based on Fe-based magnetic nanomaterials could be dated back to hundreds years ago, the considerably large amount of emerging fields for their applications, including spintronic structures in information storage, biomedical and environmental applications, magnetic sensors, magnetic energy harvesters, has spurred renewed interest on the application-related properties of Fe-based nanomaterial in both the nanoparticle and film forms. Besides, an exploration of a simple, wide, effective technique that can be used for growth of high-quality Fe-based magnetic nanoparticles and films is of great importance for better materialization of these potential Fe-based devices. This thesis mainly focuses on fabricating different magnetic Fe-based materials (ferrites and ferrous alloys, nanoparticle and film) with wet chemical method, investigating their growth mechanism and magnetic and electrical properties. In addition, the possible applications of as-fabricated Fe-based nanoparticles and films are studied. The contribution of the work is summarized as below: (1) Investigation indicated that the external magnetic field plays an important role in determining the microstructure, magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The magnetic field can promote the change of Fe3O4 nanocuboctahedrons to nanocubes. Compared the hyperthermia property of as-fabricated nanocuboctahedrons and nanocubes Fe3O4, the intrinsic loss power (ILP) of the Fe3O4 nanocubes was much higher than that of nanocuboctahedrons due to the surface magnetic effect. (2) A general and facile method for broadly deposition of thick Fe 3O4 film and other ferrites has been demonstrated. It had been found that the epitaxial high-quality Fe3O4 film could be deposited either on MgO substrates directly or Si substrates with Fe3O4 seed layer deposited by PLD. As-deposited Fe 3O4 film could be easily patterned and shows potential applications for microwave and MEMS supercapacitor. Besides

  12. A Feasibility Study of High-Strength Bi-2223 Conductor for High-Field Solenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godeke, A; Abraimov, D V; Arroyo, E; Barret, N; Bird, M D; Francis, A; Jaroszynski, J; Kurteva, D V; Markiewicz, W D; Marks, E L; Marshall, W S; McRae, D M; Noyes, P D; Pereira, R C P; Viouchkov, Y L; Walsh, R P; White, J M

    2017-03-01

    We performed a feasibility study on a high-strength Bi2-x Pb x Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x (Bi-2223) tape conductor for high-field solenoid applications. The investigated conductor, DI-BSCCO Type HT-XX, is a pre-production version of Type HT-NX, which has recently become available from Sumitomo Electric Industries (SEI). It is based on their DI-BSCCO Type H tape, but laminated with a high-strength Ni-alloy. We used stress-strain characterizations, single- and double-bend tests, easy- and hard-way bent coil-turns at various radii, straight and helical samples in up to 31.2 T background field, and small 20-turn coils in up to 17 T background field to systematically determine the electro-mechanical limits in magnet-relevant conditions. In longitudinal tensile tests at 77 K, we found critical stress- and strain-levels of 516 MPa and 0.57%, respectively. In three decidedly different experiments we detected an amplification of the allowable strain with a combination of pure bending and Lorentz loading to ≥ 0.92% (calculated elastically at the outer tape edge). This significant strain level, and the fact that it is multi-filamentary conductor and available in the reacted and insulated state, makes DI-BSCCO HT-NX highly suitable for very high-field solenoids, for which high current densities and therefore high loads are required to retain manageable magnet dimensions.

  13. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance sensors to cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Noemi; Capitani, Donatella; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2014-04-21

    In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported.

  14. The High Field Path to Practical Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumgaard, Robert; Whyte, D.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z.; Brunner, D.; Sorbom, B.; Marmar, E.; Minervini, J.; Bonoli, P.; Irby, J.; Labombard, B.; Terry, J.; Vieira, R.; Wukitch, S.

    2017-10-01

    We propose a faster, lower cost development path for fusion energy enabled by high temperature superconductors, devices at high magnetic field, innovative technologies and modern approaches to technology development. Timeliness, scale, and economic-viability are the drivers for fusion energy to combat climate change and aid economic development. The opportunities provided by high-temperature superconductors, innovative engineering and physics, and new organizational structures identified over the last few years open new possibilities for realizing practical fusion energy that could meet mid-century de-carbonization needs. We discuss re-factoring the fusion energy development path with an emphasis on concrete risk retirement strategies utilizing a modular approach based on the high-field tokamak that leverages the broader tokamak physics understanding of confinement, stability, and operational limits. Elements of this plan include development of high-temperature superconductor magnets, simplified immersion blankets, advanced long-leg divertors, a compact divertor test tokamak, efficient current drive, modular construction, and demountable magnet joints. An R&D plan culminating in the construction of an integrated pilot plant and test facility modeled on the ARC concept is presented.

  15. Processing and Protection of Rare Earth Permanent Magnet Particulate for Bonded Magnet Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolowski, Peter Kelly [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Rapid solidification of novel mixed rare earth-iron-boron, MRE2Fe14B (MRE = Nd, Y, Dy; currently), magnet alloys via high pressure gas atomization (HPGA) have produced similar properties and structures as closely related alloys produced by melt spinning (MS) at low wheel speeds. Recent additions of titanium carbide and zirconium to the permanent magnet (PM) alloy design in HPGA powder (using He atomization gas) have made it possible to achieve highly refined microstructures with magnetic properties approaching melt spun particulate at cooling rates of 105-106K/s. By producing HPGA powders with the desirable qualities of melt spun ribbon, the need for crushing ribbon was eliminated in bonded magnet fabrication. The spherical geometry of HPGA powders is more ideal for processing of bonded permanent magnets since higher loading fractions can be obtained during compression and injection molding. This increased volume loading of spherical PM powder can be predicted to yield a higher maximum energy product (BH)max for bonded magnets in high performance applications. Passivation of RE-containing powder is warranted for the large-scale manufacturing of bonded magnets in applications with increased temperature and exposure to humidity. Irreversible magnetic losses due to oxidation and corrosion of particulates is a known drawback of RE-Fe-B based alloys during further processing, e.g. injection molding, as well as during use as a bonded magnet. To counteract these effects, a modified gas atomization chamber allowed for a novel approach to in situ passivation of solidified particle surfaces through injection of a reactive gas, nitrogen trifluoride (NF3). The ability to control surface chemistry during atomization processing of fine spherical RE-Fe-B powders produced advantages over current processing methodologies. In particular, the capability to coat particles while 'in flight' may eliminate the

  16. REVIEW OF HIGH FIELD Q SLOPE, CAVITY MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2008-01-23

    One of the most interesting phenomenon occurring in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk niobium is represented by a sharp decrease of the quality factor above peak surface magnetic field of about 90 mT and is referred to as "high field Q-slope" or "Q-drop". This phenomenon was observed first in 1997 and since then some effort was devoted to the understanding of the causes behind it. Still, no clear physical interpretation of the Q-drop has emerged, despite several attempts. In this contribution, I will review the experimental results for various cavities measured in many laboratories and I will try to identify common features and differences related to the Q-drop.

  17. Single Step Synthesis, Characterization and Applications of Curcumin Functionalized Iron Oxide Magnetic Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Bhandari, Rohit; Gupta, Prachi; Dziubla, Thomas; Hilt, J. Zach

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been well known for their applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia, targeted drug delivery, etc. The surface modification of these magnetic nanoparticles has been explored extensively to achieve functionalized materials with potential application in biomedical, environmental and catalysis field. Herein, we report a novel and versatile single step methodology for developing curcumin functionalized magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles without...

  18. High-field (high-frequency) EPR spectroscopy and structural characterization of a novel manganese(III) corrole

    OpenAIRE

    Bendix, Jesper; Gray, Harry B.; Golubkov, Galina; Gross, Zeev

    2000-01-01

    The X-ray structure, magnetic susceptibility, and high-field (high-frequency) EPR spectrum of manganese 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl) corrole unambiguously establish that the complex contains an isolated, slightly rhombic, manganese(III) center.

  19. Generation of strong magnetic field using 60 mm∅ superconducting bulk magnet and its application to magnetron sputtering device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Hazama, H.; Yokouchi, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Itoh, Y.; Oka, T.; Ikuta, H.; Mizutani, U.

    2005-10-01

    To make a practical application of a superconducting bulk magnet (SBM), it is necessary that the SBM generates a strong and stable magnetic field in a working space and the magnet can be handled without any special care that would be needed because of the use of a superconductor. To satisfy these requirements, we have designed a portable and user-friendly magnet system consisting of a small air-cooled type refrigerator and a bulk superconductor. By using the stress-controlling magnetization technique, we could achieve a magnetic flux density of 8.0 T on the bulk surface and 6.5 T over the vacuum chamber surface of the refrigerator, when a 60 mm∅ Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductor reinforced with a 5 mm thick stainless steel ring was magnetized by field cooling in 8.5 T to 27 K. We have confirmed that the bulk magnet system coupled with a battery is quite portable and can be delivered to any location by using a car with an electric power outlet in the cabin. We have constructed a magnetron sputtering device that employs a bulk magnet system delivered from the place of magnetization by this method. This sputtering device exhibits several unique features such as deposition at a very low Ar gas pressure because the magnetic field is 20 times stronger than that obtained by a conventional device in the working space.

  20. Magnetic Testing, and Modeling, Simulation and Analysis for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghosian, Mary; Narvaez, Pablo; Herman, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The Aerospace Corporation (Aerospace) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems (LMSS) participated with Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the implementation of a magnetic cleanliness program of the NASA/JPL JUNO mission. The magnetic cleanliness program was applied from early flight system development up through system level environmental testing. The JUNO magnetic cleanliness program required setting-up a specialized magnetic test facility at Lockheed Martin Space Systems for testing the flight system and a testing program with facility for testing system parts and subsystems at JPL. The magnetic modeling, simulation and analysis capability was set up and performed by Aerospace to provide qualitative and quantitative magnetic assessments of the magnetic parts, components, and subsystems prior to or in lieu of magnetic tests. Because of the sensitive nature of the fields and particles scientific measurements being conducted by the JUNO space mission to Jupiter, the imposition of stringent magnetic control specifications required a magnetic control program to ensure that the spacecraft's science magnetometers and plasma wave search coil were not magnetically contaminated by flight system magnetic interferences. With Aerospace's magnetic modeling, simulation and analysis and JPL's system modeling and testing approach, and LMSS's test support, the project achieved a cost effective approach to achieving a magnetically clean spacecraft. This paper presents lessons learned from the JUNO magnetic testing approach and Aerospace's modeling, simulation and analysis activities used to solve problems such as remnant magnetization, performance of hard and soft magnetic materials within the targeted space system in applied external magnetic fields.

  1. Studies on the reliability of high-field intra-operative MRI in brain glioma resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-jun SONG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the reliability of high-field intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging(iMRI in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.Method One hundred and thirty-one cases of brain glioma(69 males and 62 females,aged from 7 to 79 years with mean of 39.6 years hospitalized from Nov.2009 to Aug.2010 were involved in present study.All the patients were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging(MRI before the operation.The tumors were resected under conventional navigation microscope,and the high-field iMRI was used for all the patients when the operators considered the tumor was satisfactorily resected,while the residual tumor was difficult to detect under the microscope,but resected after being revealed by high-field iMRI.Histopathological examination was performed.The patients without residual tumors recieved high-field MRI scan at day 4 or 5 after operation to evaluate the accuracy of high-field iMRI during operation.Results High quality intra-operative images were obtained by using high-field iMRI.Twenty-eight cases were excluded because their residual tumors were not resected due to their location too close to functional area.Combined with the results of intra-operative histopathological examination and post-operative MRI at the early recovery stage,the sensitivity of high-field iMRI in residual tumor diagnosis was 98.0%(49/50,the specificity was 94.3%(50/53,and the accuracy was 96.1%(99/103.Conclusion High-quality intra-operative imaging could be acquired by high-field iMRI,which maybe used as a safe and reliable method in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.

  2. An integrated platform for small-animal hyperthermia investigations under ultra-high-field MRI guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto, Sergio; Faridi, Pegah; Shrestha, Tej B; Pyle, Marla; Maurmann, Leila; Troyer, Deryl; Bossmann, Stefan H; Prakash, Punit

    2017-07-21

    Integrating small-animal experimental hyperthermia instrumentation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affords real-time monitoring of spatial temperature profiles. This study reports on the development and preliminary in vivo characterisation of a 2.45 GHz microwave hyperthermia system for pre-clinical small animal investigations, integrated within a 14 T ultra-high-field MRI scanner. The presented system incorporates a 3.5 mm (OD) directional microwave hyperthermia antenna, positioned adjacent to the small-animal target, radiating microwave energy for localised heating of subcutaneous tumours. The applicator is integrated within the 30 mm bore of the MRI system. 3D electromagnetic and biothermal simulations were implemented to characterise hyperthermia profiles from the directional microwave antenna. Experiments in tissue mimicking phantoms were performed to assess hyperthermia profiles and validate MR thermometry against fibre-optic temperature measurements. The feasibility of delivering in vivo hyperthermia exposures to subcutaneous 4T1 tumours in experimental mice under simultaneous MR thermometry guidance was assessed. Simulations and experiments in tissue mimicking phantoms demonstrated the feasibility of heating 21-982 mm3 targets with 8-12 W input power. Minimal susceptibility and electrical artefacts introduced by the hyperthermia applicator were observed on MR imaging. MR thermometry was in excellent agreement with fibre-optic temperatures measurements (max. discrepancy ≤0.6 °C). Heating experiments with the reported system demonstrated the feasibility of heating subcutaneous tumours in vivo with simultaneous MR thermometry. A platform for small-animal hyperthermia investigations under ultra-high-field MR thermometry was developed and applied to heating subcutaneous tumours in vivo.

  3. Scoping study for compact high-field superconducting net energy tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumgaard, R. T.; Greenwald, M.; Freidberg, J. P.; Wolfe, S. M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Brunner, D.; Sorbom, B. N.; Whyte, D. G.

    2016-10-01

    The continued development and commercialization of high temperature superconductors (HTS) may enable the construction of compact, net-energy tokamaks. HTS, in contrast to present generation low temperature superconductors, offers improved performance in high magnetic fields, higher current density, stronger materials, higher temperature operation, and simplified assembly. Using HTS along with community-consensus confinement physics (H98 =1) may make it possible to achieve net-energy (Q>1) or burning plasma conditions (Q>5) in DIII-D or ASDEX-U sized, conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. It is shown that, by operating at high plasma current and density enabled by the high magnetic field (B>10T), the required triple products may be achieved at plasma volumes under 20m3, major radii under 2m, with external heating powers under 40MW. This is at the scale of existing devices operated by laboratories, universities and companies. The trade-offs in the core heating, divertor heat exhaust, sustainment, stability, and proximity to known plasma physics limits are discussed in the context of the present tokamak experience base and the requirements for future devices. The resulting HTS-based design space is compared and contrasted to previous studies on high-field copper experiments with similar missions. The physics exploration conducted with such HTS devices could decrease the real and perceived risks of ITER exploitation, and aid in quickly developing commercially-applicable tokamak pilot plants and reactors.

  4. Cryo magnetic separation adaptation to environment technologies: application to industrial effluents; Adaptation de la separation cryomagnetique aux technologies de l`environnement: application a l`epuration d`effluents liquides industriels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau, V.

    1993-12-20

    Cryomagnetic separation adaptation to environment technologies application to industrial liquid effluents. The performance, obtained by superconducting high filed - high gradient magnetic separation, permitted to foresee the magnetic treatment of heavy metals in rinse waters, derived from the surface finishing industry. The paramagnetic ions, precipitated in basic media as hydroxides, present a very hydrated amorphous structure, which masks their subjacent magnetic properties. Coprecipitation of a `magnetic carrier`, jointly with the heavy metals, has been studied: ferric chloride forms in basic media, an hydrated iron oxide. Its structure is of the goethite type, and it stabilizes as hematite. The magnetic susceptibility of the obtained product is still weak and its crystalline structure is not enough affirmative to utilize magnetic filtration with efficiency. Mixture of ferrous sulphate and ferric chloride forms, in a basic media, an hydrated magnetite. Initial ideal ratio between divalent iron and trivalent iron, varies between 0,5 and 1,2. This mixture, coprecipitated with the heavy metals, permits to optimize the magnetic cleaning of the fluids in a high field - high gradient filter. (author)

  5. High Field Side MHD Activity During Local Helicity Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachicano, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Perry, J. M.; Reusch, J. A.; Richner, N. J.

    2017-10-01

    MHD is an essential part of understanding the mechanism for local helicity injection (LHI) current drive. The new high field side (HFS) LHI system on the Pegasus ST permits new tests of recent NIMROD simulations. In that model, LHI current streams in the plasma edge undergo large-scale reconnection events, leading to current drive. This produces bursty n = 1 activity around 30 kHz on low field side (LFS) Mirnov coils, consistent with experiment. The simulations also feature coherent injector streams winding down the center column. Improvements to the core high-resolution poloidal Mirnov array with Cat7A Ethernet cabling and differentially driven signal processing eliminated EMI-driven switching noise, enabling detailed spectral analysis. Preliminary results from the recovered HFS poloidal Mirnov coils suggest n = 1 activity is present at the top of the vessel core, but does not persist down the centerstack. HFS LHI experiments can exhibit an operating regime where the high amplitude MHD is abruptly reduced by more than an order of magnitude on LFS Mirnov coils, leading to higher plasma current and improved particle confinement. This reduction is not observed on the HFS midplane magnetics. Instead, they show broadband turbulence-like magnetic features with near consistent amplitude in a frequency range of 90-200 kHz. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  6. High-field 3He-F interaction at the surface of fluorocarbon spheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuhl, A.; Chapellier, M.; Rasmussen, Finn Berg

    1984-01-01

    High-field experiments on the relaxation betweenF in small Teflon spheres andHe on the surface are reported. WithHe as a monolayer, coupling times are found to be less than 5 sec, in magnetic fields up to 3 T and temperatures down to 50 mK, where electronic centers are completely polarized...

  7. Ultra-high field MRI: Advancing systems neuroscience towards mesoscopic human brain function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumoulin, Serge O; Fracasso, A.; Van der Zwaag, W.; Siero, Jeroen C W; Petridou, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    Human MRI scanners at ultra-high magnetic field strengths of 7 T and higher are increasingly available to the neuroscience community. A key advantage brought by ultra-high field MRI is the possibility to increase the spatial resolution at which data is acquired, with little reduction in image

  8. High-field Faraday rotation in II-VI-based semimagnetic semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savchuk, AI; Fediv, [No Value; Nikitin, PI; Perrone, A; Tatzenko, OM; Platonov, VV

    The effects of d-d exchange interaction have been studied by measuring high-field Faraday rotation in II-VI-based semimagnetic semiconductors. For Cd1-xMnxTe crystals with x = 0.43 and at room temperature a saturation in magnetic field dependence of the Faraday rotation has been observed. In the

  9. Applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy to chitin from insect cuticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonil, Pattarapond; Sajomsang, Warayuth

    2012-11-01

    Chitin is the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature after cellulose. At the present time, the main commercial sources of chitin are the crab and shrimp shells which are major waste products from the seafood industry. However, current chitin resources have some inherent problems including seasonal availability, limited supplies, and environmental pollution. As an alternative, insect cuticle is proposed as an unconventional but viable source of chitin. This review focuses on the recent sources of insect chitin and the application of various magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques to native insect cuticles, particularly cicada sloughs and chitin extracted from insect sloughs. In addition, the physicochemical properties, isolation process, and degree of N-acetylation (DA) is reviewed and discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic Transport in Spin Antiferromagnets for Spintronics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Azzouz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Had magnetic monopoles been ubiquitous as electrons are, we would probably have had a different form of matter, and power plants based on currents of these magnetic charges would have been a familiar scene of modern technology. Magnetic dipoles do exist, however, and in principle one could wonder if we can use them to generate magnetic currents. In the present work, we address the issue of generating magnetic currents and magnetic thermal currents in electrically-insulating low-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnets by invoking the (broken electricity-magnetism duality symmetry. The ground state of these materials is a spin-liquid state that can be described well via the Jordan–Wigner fermions, which permit an easy definition of the magnetic particle and thermal currents. The magnetic and magnetic thermal conductivities are calculated in the present work using the bond–mean field theory. The spin-liquid states in these antiferromagnets are either gapless or gapped liquids of spinless fermions whose flow defines a current just as the one defined for electrons in a Fermi liquid. The driving force for the magnetic current is a magnetic field with a gradient along the magnetic conductor. We predict the generation of a magneto-motive force and realization of magnetic circuits using low-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnets. The present work is also about claiming that what the experiments in spintronics attempt to do is trying to treat the magnetic degrees of freedoms on the same footing as the electronic ones.

  11. Threats to ultra-high-field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Denis

    2009-08-01

    In 2004 the European Commission (EC) adopted a directive restricting occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields. This directive (2004/40/CE), which examines the possible health risks of the electromagnetic fields from mobile phones, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and other devices, concluded that upper limits on radiation and applied electromagnetic fields are necessary to prevent workers from suffering any undue acute health effects. But although not initially intended, the biggest impact of the directive could be on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is used in hospitals worldwide to produce images of unrivalled quality of the brain and other soft tissues.

  12. Resin-bonded permanent magnetic films with out-of-plane magnetization for MEMS applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozenberg, Yu.I. [Department of Electrical Engineering-Physical Electronics, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Rosenberg, Yuri [Wolfson Applied Materials Research Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)]. E-mail: yurir@post.tau.ac.il; Krylov, V. [Department of Solid Mechanics, Materials and Systems, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Belitsky, G. [Department of Electrical Engineering-Physical Electronics, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Solid Mechanics, Materials and Systems, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Shacham-Diamand, Yosi [Department of Electrical Engineering-Physical Electronics, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2006-10-15

    Resin-bonded permanent magnets with out-of-plain direction of magnetization and improved magnetic properties for magnetic MEMS actuator have been created. The material investigated consists of magnetically anisotropic strontium ferrite particles embedded into epoxy resin matrix upto a volume loading of 80%. Intrinsic coercivity H {sub ci} of 6000 Oe (480 kA/m), residual magnetic flux density B {sub r} up to 4000 G (0.4 T) and maximum energy product (BH){sub max} of 3.0 MG Oe (23.6 kJ/m{sup 3}) have been attained due to magnetic-field-induced alignment of the ferrite particles during curing process.

  13. Surface functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wydra, Robert John

    Despite recent advances, cancer remains the second leading cause of deaths in the United States. Magnetic nanoparticles have found various applications in cancer research as drug delivery platforms, enhanced contrast agents for improved diagnostic imaging, and the delivery of thermal energy as standalone therapy. Iron oxide nanoparticles absorb the energy from an alternating magnetic field and convert it into heat through Brownian and Neel relaxations. To better utilize magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy, surface functionalization is essential for such factors as decreasing cytotoxicity of healthy tissue, extending circulation time, specific targeting of cancer cells, and manage the controlled delivery of therapeutics. In the first study, iron oxide nanoparticles were coated with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based polymer shell. The PEG coating was selected to prevent protein adsorption and thus improve circulation time and minimize host response to the nanoparticles. Thermal therapy application feasibility was demonstrated in vitro with a thermoablation study on lung carcinoma cells. Building on the thermal therapy demonstration with iron oxide nanoparticles, the second area of work focused on intracellular delivery. Nanoparticles can be appropriately tailored to enter the cell and deliver energy on the nanoscale eliminating individual cancer cells. The underlying mechanism of action is still under study, and we were interested in determining the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) catalytically generated from the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles in this measured cytotoxicity. When exposed to an AMF, the nanoscale heating effects are capable of enhancing the Fenton-like generation of ROS determined through a methylene blue degradation assay. To deliver this enhanced ROS effect to cells, monosaccharide coated nanoparticles were developed and successfully internalized by colon cancer cell lines. Upon AMF exposure, there was a measured increase in

  14. Assessment of corrosion resistance of Nd–Fe–B magnets by silanization for orthodontic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabiano, F., E-mail: ffabiano@unime.it [Department of Electronic Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Engineering, University of Messina, Contrada di Dio, 98166 Messina (Italy); Department of Experimental, Specialized Medical-Surgical and Odontostomatological Sciences, Messina (Italy); Celegato, F. [INRIM Electromagnetism Division, Torino (Italy); Giordano, A. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Engineering, University of Messina, Contrada di Dio, 98166 Messina (Italy); Borsellino, C. [Department of Civil Engineering, Computing, Construction, Environmental and Applied Mathematics, Messina (Italy); Bonaccorsi, L.; Calabrese, L. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Engineering, University of Messina, Contrada di Dio, 98166 Messina (Italy); Tiberto, P. [INRIM Electromagnetism Division, Torino (Italy); Cordasco, G.; Matarese, G. [Department of Experimental, Specialized Medical-Surgical and Odontostomatological Sciences, Messina (Italy); Fabiano, V. [Department of Civil Engineering, Computing, Construction, Environmental and Applied Mathematics, Messina (Italy); Department of Experimental, Specialized Medical-Surgical and Odontostomatological Sciences, Messina (Italy); Azzerboni, B. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Engineering, University of Messina, Contrada di Dio, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Nd–Fe–B permanent magnets are characterised by excellent magnetic properties. However, being extremely vulnerable to the attack of both climate and corrosive environments, their applications are limited. This paper describes how, at different thicknesses of N-propyl-trimetoxy-silane, the coating affects the magnetic force of nickel plated magnets. We also investigate if the corrosion resistance of silanized Nd–Fe–B magnets increases in mildly corrosive environments by immersing them in a synthetic saliva solution. It was found that the silanization treatment does not affect the strength of the magnetic force and provide an enhancement of the corrosion resistance of the substrate.

  15. The synthesis, characterization, and application of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Ronald J.

    that they make up such a small percentage of the overall material. However, in nanoscale systems, the surface layers become much more involved in the determination of the overall behavior of the system as they are no longer a small percentage of the overall system, and cannot be ignored. A third investigation looks at magnetodielectric coupling that occurs in bulk Mn3O4 as a result of spin-lattice coupling with the lattice and the long-range magnetic order that develops in the system at low temperature. The motivation to study this bulk system becomes evident to the general theme of this dissertation when one asks the question, can this long-range order (extending over many unit cells of the lattice) occur in nanoscale systems (where only a few unit cells of material are present)? Preliminary data suggests that these long-range orders that occur in the bulk are not feasible in the nanoscale material. Finally, as consumer driven technology grows, the need for a single material that can be altered for use in a wide variety of applications becomes increasingly more evident. It is with this motivation that the author investigates the ability to tune the blocking temperature of an Fe3O4 nanoparticle system through cobalt doping, effectively changing the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the system. The author finds that up to small cobalt concentrations, the magnetocrystalline anisotropy was able to be linearly increased by increasing the amount of cobalt in the system, thus providing a nanoparticle system whose blocking temperature is effectively tunable. In addition to this tuning using the cobalt doping to change the anisotropy, it was found that altering the size of the nanoparticles was also an effective way to controllably tune the blocking temperature of a nanoparticle system. In addition to the author's main research aimed at this dissertation, the author provides a small outline of some work that was done outside of the scope of his dissertation research. It is

  16. High-field measurements on YBCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.L.; Fowler, C.M.; Freeman, B.L.; Goettee, J.D.; Hults, W.L.; King, J.C.; Rickel, D.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Brooks, J.S.; Mankiewich, P.M.; De Obaldia, E.I.; Skocpol, W.J. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); O`Malley, M.L. [AT& T Bell Labs., Holmdel, NJ (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The authors have performed resistance measurements on thin films of the high-temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) in applied magnetic fields to above 200 T (2 MegaOersted) at temperatures as low as 2.5 K. The fields are produced by an explosively driven flux-compression system. The authors can see a particularly clear onset, without replotting the data, of the {open_quotes}hydrodynamic{close_quotes} flow of vortices probably because of the very fast increasing field. The low-temperature {open_quotes}critical field{close_quotes} for the field parallel to the c-axis of the sample is 135 T. The data in the other direction are still preliminary. The authors discuss possible interpretation of the results.

  17. Design Features of a Planar Hybrid/Permanent Magnet Strong Focusing Undulator for Free Electron Laser (FEL) And Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    Insertion devices for Angstrom-wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by multi-GeV electron beams generally require distributed focusing substantially stronger than their own natural focusing fields. Over the last several years a wide variety of focusing schemes and configurations have been proposed for undulators of this class, ranging from conventional current-driven quadrupoles external to the undulator magnets to permanent magnet (PM) lattices inserted into the insertion device gap. In this paper we present design studies of a flexible high-field hybrid/PM undulator with strong superimposed planar PM focusing proposed for a 1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) driven by an electron beam with a 1 mm-mr normalized emittance. Attainable field parameters, tuning modes, and potential applications of the proposed structure are discussed.

  18. Diagnostic Applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance–Based Urinary Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capati, Ana; Ijare, Omkar B; Bezabeh, Tedros

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly growing field with potential applications in various disciplines. In particular, metabolomics has received special attention in the discovery of biomarkers and diagnostics. This is largely due to the fact that metabolomics provides critical information related to the downstream products of many cellular and metabolic processes which could provide a snapshot of the health/disease status of a particular tissue or organ. Many of these cellular products eventually find their way to urine; hence, analysis of urine via metabolomics has the potential to yield useful diagnostic and prognostic information. Although there are a number of analytical platforms that can be used for this purpose, this review article will focus on nuclear magnetic resonance–based metabolomics. Furthermore, although there have been many studies addressing different diseases and metabolic disorders, the focus of this review article will be in the following specific applications: urinary tract infection, kidney transplant rejection, diabetes, some types of cancer, and inborn errors of metabolism. A number of methodological considerations that need to be taken into account for the development of a clinically useful optimal test are discussed briefly. PMID:28579794

  19. A possible application of magnetic resonance imaging for pharmaceutical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczuk, Joanna; Tritt-Goc, Jadwiga

    2011-03-18

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive method, the experiment can be conducted in situ and allows the studying of the sample and the different processes in vitro or in vivo. 1D, 2D or 3D imaging can be undertaken. MRI is nowadays most widely used in medicine as a clinical diagnostic tool, but has still seen limited application in the food and pharmaceutical sciences. The different imaging pulse sequences of MRI allow to image the processes that take place in a wide scale range from ms (dissolution of compact tablets) to hours (hydration of drug delivery systems) for mobile as well as for rigid spins, usually protons. The paper gives examples of MRI application of in vitro imaging of pharmaceutical dosage based on hydroxypropyl methylcellulose which have focused on water-penetration, diffusion, polymer swelling, and drug release, characterized with respect to other physical parameters such as pH and the molecular weight of polymer. Tetracycline hydrochloride was used as a model drug. NMR imaging of density distributions and fast kinetics of the dissolution behavior of compact tablets is presented for paracetamol tablets. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic manipulation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in a microfluidic system for drug delivery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agiotis, L.; Theodorakos, I.; Samothrakitis, S.; Papazoglou, S.; Zergioti, I.; Raptis, Y.S.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), such as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS), have attracted major interest, due to their small size and unique magnetic properties, for drug delivery applications. In this context, iron oxide nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) (150 nm magnetic core diameter), were used as drug carriers, aiming to form a magnetically controlled nano-platform. The navigation capabilities of the iron oxide nanoparticles in a microfluidic channel were investigated by simulating the magnetic field and the magnetic force applied on the magnetic nanoparticles inside a microfluidic chip. The simulations have been performed using finite element method (ANSY’S software). The optimum setup which intends to simulate the magnetic navigation of the nanoparticles, by the use of MRI-type fields, in the human circulatory system, consists of two parallel permanent magnets to produce a homogeneous magnetic field, in order to ensure the maximum magnetization of the magnetic nanoparticles, an electromagnet for the induction of the magnetic gradients and the creation of the magnetic force and a microfluidic setup so as to simulate the blood flow inside the human blood vessels. The magnetization of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and the consequent magnetic torque developed by the two permanent magnets, together with the mutual interactions between the magnetized nanoparticles lead to the creation of rhabdoid aggregates in the direction of the homogeneous field. Additionally, the magnetic gradients introduced by the operation of the electromagnet are capable of directing the aggregates, as a whole, to the desired direction. By removing the magnetic fields, the aggregates are disrupted, due to the super paramagnetic nature of the nanoparticles, avoiding thus the formation of undesired thrombosis. - Highlights: • Homogeneous field yields an aggregation of particles along the lines of the field. • Additional electromagnet field rotates the

  1. Application of inversion techniques on marine magnetic data: Andaman shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Ramana, M.V.; Murty, G.P.S.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Krishna, K.S.; Chaubey, A.K.; Rao, M.M.M.; Narayana, S.L.

    Analysis of the total intensity magnetic data over the western Andaman shelf has been carried out for determination of depth to magnetic basement using the Analytical Signal and Wemer Deconvolution methods. The basement depths are refined...

  2. Superconducting levitation applications to bearings and magnetic transportation

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Francis C

    1994-01-01

    Presents the fundamental principles governing levitation of material bodies by magnetic fields without too much formal theory. Defines the technology of magnetic bearings, especially those based on superconductivity, and demonstrates the key roles that magnetics, mechanics and dynamics play in the complete understanding of magnetic levitation and its bearings. Features extensive figures and photos of Mag-Lev devices and summarizes recent U.S. research studies in an effort to regain the lead in Mag-Lev technologies

  3. A review of the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and applications of maghemite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir

    2017-03-15

    It must be pointed out that maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) with a cubic spinel structure is a crucial material for various applications, including spin electronic devices, high-density magnetic recording, nano-medicines and biosensors. This paper has to do with a review study on the synthesis methods, magnetic properties and application of maghemite in the form of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructured materials, such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, nano-rods, and nanowires, as well as two-dimensional (2D) thin films. The results revealed that maghemite is widely used in the biomedical applications (hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery) and magnetic recording devices. The unmodified and Co/Mn modified maghemite thin films prepared by the dc-reactive magnetron sputtering show the excellent values of coercivity 2100 Oe and 3900 Oe, respectively, for the magnetic storage application. The super-paramagnetic particles with 7 nm size and the saturation magnetization of 80 emu/g prepared by the established thermolysis method are good candidates for bio-medical applications. - Highlights: • Among iron oxides, maghemite is one of the most important magnetic ceramics. • Maghemite is widely sued in magnetic recording and biomedicine. • This paper attempts to give an overview on the some important areas. • They contain synthetic methods, magnetic study, structural study and applications.

  4. Trial Application of Pulse-Field Magnetization to Magnetically Levitated Conveyor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihito Miyatake

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically levitated conveyor system using superconductors is discussed. The system is composed of a levitated conveyor, magnetic rails, a linear induction motor, and some power supplies. In the paper, pulse-field magnetization is applied to the system. Then, the levitation height and the dynamics of the conveyor are controlled. The static and dynamic characteristics of the levitated conveyor are discussed.

  5. Trial Application of Pulse-Field Magnetization to Magnetically Levitated Conveyor System

    OpenAIRE

    Miyatake, Yoshihito; Komori, Mochimitsu; Asami, Ken-ichi; Sakai, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    Magnetically levitated conveyor system using superconductors is discussed. The system is composed of a levitated conveyor, magnetic rails, a linear induction motor, and some power supplies. In the paper, pulse-field magnetization is applied to the system. Then, the levitation height and the dynamics of the conveyor are controlled. The static and dynamic characteristics of the levitated conveyor are discussed.

  6. Recent Advances of Graphene-based Hybrids with Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegret, Nuria; Criado, Alejandro; Prato, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of graphene-based nanomaterials combined with magnetic nanoparticles offers key benefits in the modern biomedicine. In this minireview, we focus on the most recent advances in hybrids of magnetic graphene derivatives for biomedical applications. We initially analyze the several methodologies employed for the preparation of graphene-based composites with magnetic nanoparticles, more specifically the kind of linkage between the two components. In the last section, we focus on the biomedical applications where these magnetic-graphene hybrids are essential and pay special attention on how the addition of graphene improves the resulting devices in magnetic resonance imaging, controlled drug delivery, magnetic photothermal therapy and cellular separation and isolation. Finally, we highlight the use of these magnetic hybrids as multifunctional material that will lead to a next generation of theranostics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Magnetism in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, John

    2000-03-01

    For centuries physicians, scientists and others have postulated an important role, either as a cause of disease or as a mode of therapy, for magnetism in medicine. Although there is a straightforward role in the removal of magnetic foreign bodies, the majority of the proposed magnetic applications have been controversial and have often been attributed by mainstream practitioners to fraud, quackery or self-deception. Calculations indicate that many of the proposed methods of action, e.g., the field-induced alignment of water molecules or alterations in blood flow, are of negligible magnitude. Nonetheless, even at the present time, the use of small surface magnets (magnetotherapy) to treat arthritis and similar diseases is a widespread form of folk medicine and is said to involve sales of approximately one billion dollars per year. Another medical application of magnetism associated with Mesmer and others (eventually known as animal magnetism) has been discredited, but has had a culturally significant role in the development of hypnotism and as one of the sources of modern psychotherapy. Over the last two decades, in marked contrast to previous applications of magnetism to medicine, magnetic resonance imaging or MRI, has become firmly established as a clinical diagnostic tool. MRI permits the non-invasive study of subtle biological processes in intact, living organisms and approximately 150,000,000 diagnostic studies have been performed since its clinical introduction in the early 1980s. The dramatically swift and widespread acceptance of MRI was made possible by scientific and engineering advances - including nuclear magnetic resonance, computer technology and whole-body-sized, high field superconducting magnets - in the decades following World War Two. Although presently used much less than MRI, additional applications, including nerve and muscle stimulation by pulsed magnetic fields, the use of magnetic forces to guide surgical instruments, and imaging utilizing

  8. Endowing carbon nanotubes with superparamagnetic properties: applications for cell labeling, MRI cell tracking and magnetic manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanna, Giuseppe; Garofalo, Antonio; Popa, Gabriela; Wilhelm, Claire; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Felder-Flesch, Delphine; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2013-05-21

    Coating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) imparts novel magnetic, optical, and thermal properties with potential applications in the biomedical domain. Multi-walled CNTs have been decorated with iron oxide superparamagnetic NPs. Two different approaches have been investigated based on ligand exchange or "click chemistry". The presence of the NPs on the nanotube surface allows conferring magnetic properties to CNTs. We have evaluated the potential of the NP/CNT hybrids as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their interactions with cells. The capacity of the hybrids to magnetically monitor and manipulate cells has also been investigated. The NP/CNTs can be manipulated by a remote magnetic field with enhanced contrast in MRI. They are internalized into tumor cells without showing cytotoxicity. The labeled cells can be magnetically manipulated as they display magnetic mobility and are detected at a single cell level through high resolution MRI.

  9. Development of large bore superconducting magnet for wastewater treatment application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui Ming; Xu, Dong; Shen, Fuzhi; Zhang, Hengcheng; Li, Lafeng [State Key Laboratory of Technologies in Space Cryogenic Propellants, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2017-03-15

    Water issue, especially water pollution, is a serious issue of 21st century. Being an significant technique for securing water resources, superconducting magnetic separation wastewater system was indispensable. A large bore conduction-cooled magnet was custom-tailored for wastewater treatment. The superconducting magnet has been designed, fabricated and tested. The superconducting magnet was composed of NbTi solenoid coils with an effective horizontal warm bore of 400 mm and a maximum central field of 2.56T. The superconducting magnet system was cooled by a two-stage 1.5W 4K GM cryocooler. The NbTi solenoid coils were wound around an aluminum former that is thermally connected to the second stage cold head of the cryocooler through a conductive copper link. The temperature distribution along the conductive link was measured during the cool-down process as well as at steady state. The magnet was cooled down to 4.8K in approximately 65 hours. The test of the magnetic field and quench analysis has been performed to verify the safe operation for the magnet system. Experimental results show that the superconducting magnet reached the designed magnetic performance.

  10. Magnetically based sensorless switched reluctance drive for general purpose applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahadly, Ibrahim H.

    2000-05-01

    Shaft position transducers are commonly used to provide rotor position information for commutation of the switched reluctance (SR) motor and for excitation control. However, in low cost applications such as fans and pumps, particularly at low power levels, the shaft position sensor is too costly. Therefore, a simple sensorless position drive system is preferred. It is the aim of this article to present a simple sensorless rotor position measurement for a SR using the magnetization data of the motor windings. The proposed method is based on estimating a particular rotor position on a phase by phase basis and measuring flux linkage and current when the estimated position is reached. By comparing the measured flux linkage with the prestored flux linkage corresponding to the particular position for the measured current, the angular difference between the estimated position and the particular position can be calculated. The proposed sensorless SR drive system has been tested in the laboratory and its output performance was compared to the output of commercial system based on an optical sensor.

  11. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P. [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: centro@cerebroecoluna.com.br; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Neurologicas; Andrade, Almir F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Neurocirurgia da Emergencia

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  12. Percussive drilling application of translational motion permanent magnet machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shujun

    2012-07-01

    It is clear that percussive drills are very promising since they can increase the rate of penetration in hard rock formations. Any small improvements on the percussive drills can make a big contribution to lowering the drilling costs since drilling a well for the oil and gas industry is very costly. This thesis presents a percussive drilling system mainly driven by a tubular reciprocating translational motion permanent magnet synchronous motor (RTPMSM), which efficiently converts electric energy to kinetic energy for crushing the hard rock since there is no mechanical media. The thesis starts from state-of-the-art of percussive drilling techniques, reciprocating translational motion motors, and self-sensing control of electric motors and its implementation issues. The following chapters present modeling the hard rock, modeling the drill, the design issues of the drill, the RTPMSM and its control. A single-phase RTPMSM prototype is tested for the hard rock drilling. The presented variable voltage variable frequency control is also validated on it. The space vector control and self-sensing control are also explored on a three-phase RTPMSM prototype. The results show that the percussive drill can be implemented to the hard rock drilling applications. A detailed summarisation of contributions and future work is presented at the end of the thesis.(Author)

  13. Hybrid Magnetic Core-Shell Nanophotocatalysts for Environmental Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaulden, Patrick [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murph, Simona Hunyadi [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2016-07-29

    This research study describes a facile sol-gel method to creating hybrid iron (III) oxide/silica/titania nanomaterials decorated with gold nanoparticles for use in environmental applications. The multi-functional composition of the nanomaterials allows for photocatalyzed reactions to occur in both the visible and the UV range. The morphologies, elemental composition, and surface charge of the nanoparticles were determined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), and Phase Analysis Light Scattering (PALS), respectively. The photocatalytic activity of the synthesized hybrid nanoparticles for breaking down a model analyte, methyl orange (MO), was then evaluated using UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The efficiency of the photocatalyst under UV light irradiation was measured and compared to other well-studied nanophotocatalysts, namely titanium oxide and iron oxide nanoparticles. The concentration dependence of both the photocatalyst and the analyte was also investigated. By utilizing the known UV-active properties of TiO2, the magnetic properties of Fe2O3, the optical properties of gold in the visible range of the spectrum, and the high stability of silica, a novel, highly efficient photocatalyst that is active on a broad range of the spectrum (UV-Vis) can be created to destroy organic pollutants in wastewater streams.

  14. Superconductivity for Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Flükiger, R

    2014-01-01

    The present state of development of a series of industrial superconductors is reviewed in consideration of their future applications in high field accelerator magnets, with particular attention on the material aspect. The discussion is centred on Nb3Sn and MgB2, which are industrially available in a round wire configuration in kilometre lengths and are already envisaged for use in the LHC Upgrade (HL-LHC). The two systems Bi-2212 and R.E.123 may be used in magnets with even higher fields in future accelerators: they are briefly described.

  15. Magnetization and actuation of polymeric microstructures with magnetic nanoparticles for application in microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrni, F. [Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI), P.O. Box 902, 5600 AX Eindhoven (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)], E-mail: f.fahrni@tue.nl; Prins, M.W.J. [Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Philips Research, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Ijzendoorn, L.J. van [Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    An increasing number of lab-on-a-chip devices require advanced fluid manipulations. We intend to address this requirement by incorporating polymeric responsive materials on the walls of the microfluidic channels of such devices. In this paper we present a magnetic polymer made from commercially available functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and PDMS. Loadings of this polymer up to 5% volume of magnetic material were achieved. We report on the Young's modulus of this material and describe its magnetization behavior with a combination of inter-particle interaction and particle cluster demagnetization effects. The magnetic polymer can have a magnetic susceptibility up to 0.5 and by curing in a magnetic field, a magnetic anisotropy of a factor 2 in susceptibility can be created. Finally, a finite element model simulation is performed to quantify the amplitude of motion of a microstructure made of this magnetic polymer, and the local magnetic actuation with a current running in a micro-fabricated wire is discussed.

  16. Condromalácia de patela: comparação entre os achados em aparelhos de RM de alto e baixo campo magnético Chondromalacia patellae: comparison of high-field strength versus low-field strength magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Figueiredo de Oliveira Freire

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar os aparelhos de ressonância magnética de baixo campo e de alto campo para estudo da cartilagem articular da patela. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foi realizado estudo usando as seqüências GRE 2D, GRE 3D, FSE T2 e STIR (baixo campo e TSE T2 SPIR. Cada seqüência foi analisada separadamente para o estudo da cartilagem, sem o conhecimento dos dados do paciente e do resultado das outras seqüências, sendo atribuído grau de lesão de 0 a 3 e descrita a sua localização. Os resultados de concordância e discordância foram analisados pelos testes de Kappa e McNemar. RESULTADOS: Na faceta medial houve baixas concordâncias e as discordâncias mostraram significativa superestimação. Na faceta lateral houve boas concordâncias e as discordâncias não foram significativas. No ápice houve boas concordâncias e as discordâncias mostraram significativa subestimação. CONCLUSÃO: A seqüência STIR teve a melhor concordância com a seqüência TSE T2 SPIR. Lesões de alto grau são mais bem caracterizadas pelas seqüências do aparelho de baixo campo. Áreas de aumento de sinal dificultam o estudo da cartilagem da faceta medial da patela no aparelho de baixo campo.OBJECTIVE: To compare the performance of low-field-strength and high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging equipments for evaluation of the patella articular cartilage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was developed using GRE 2D, GRE 3D, FSE T2, STIR sequences (low-field and TSE T2 SPIR sequence. Each sequence has been separately analyzed for evaluation of the cartilage without knowledge of other sequences results or any patients data; the lesion was assigned a grade from 0 to 3 and had its location defined. Agreement and disagreement results were analyzed by Kappa and McNemar tests. RESULTS: Medial facet has presented low agreement index and disagreements showed to be significantly overestimated. Lateral facet has presented a reasonable agreement index and disagreement

  17. Magnetic Field Applications in Semiconductor Crystal Growth and Metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Grugel, Richard; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Traveling Magnetic Field (TMF) technique, recently proposed to control meridional flow in electrically conducting melts, is reviewed. In particular, the natural convection damping capability of this technique has been numerically demonstrated with the implication of significantly improving crystal quality. Advantages of the traveling magnetic field, in comparison to the more mature rotating magnetic field method, are discussed. Finally, results of experiments with mixing metallic alloys in long ampoules using TMF is presented

  18. Non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: techniques and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography has gained renewed interest since the discovery of the association between gadolinium-based contrast agents and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The following article is an overview of the different magnetic resonance angiography sequences, the technical possibilities and new developments. Clinical options and recent advancements will be highlighted, and recommendations for non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography techniques in different anatomical regions will be given. Furthermore, the authors seek to predict the future of non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography, with special focus on patients at risk.

  19. Single step synthesis, characterization and applications of curcumin functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandari, Rohit; Gupta, Prachi; Dziubla, Thomas; Hilt, J. Zach, E-mail: zach.hilt@uky.edu

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been well known for their applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia, targeted drug delivery, etc. The surface modification of these magnetic nanoparticles has been explored extensively to achieve functionalized materials with potential application in biomedical, environmental and catalysis field. Herein, we report a novel and versatile single step methodology for developing curcumin functionalized magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles without any additional linkers, using a simple coprecipitation technique. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The developed MNPs were employed in a cellular application for protection against an inflammatory agent, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) molecule. - Graphical abstract: Novel single step curcumin coated magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles without any additional linkers for medical, environmental, and other applications. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A novel and versatile single step methodology for developing curcumin functionalized magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is reported. • The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were characterized using TEM, XRD, FTIR and TGA. • The developed MNPs were employed in a cellular application for protection against an inflammatory agent, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB).

  20. 3-dimensional modeling of transcranial magnetic stimulation: Design and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Felipe Santiago

    Over the past three decades, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has emerged as an effective tool for many research, diagnostic and therapeutic applications in humans. TMS delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this dissertation, we present a thorough examination of the total electric field induced by TMS in air and a realistic head model with clinically relevant coil poses. In the first chapter, a detailed account of TMS coil wiring geometry was shown to provide significant improvements in the accuracy of primary E-field calculations. Three-dimensional models which accounted for the TMS coil's wire width, height, shape and number of turns clearly improved the fit of calculated-to-measured E-fields near the coil body. Detailed primary E-field models were accurate up to the surface of the coil body (within 0.5% of measured values) whereas simple models were often inadequate (up to 32% different from measured). In the second chapter, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3-D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistic head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. We found that secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes were predominantly between 25% and 45% of the primary E-fields magnitude. The direction of the secondary E

  1. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy: basic methodology and clinical applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, M. van der

    2010-01-01

    The clinical use of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been limited for a long time, mainly due to its low sensitivity. However, with the advent of clinical MR systems with higher magnetic field strengths such as 3 Tesla, the development of better coils, and the design of optimized

  2. Measuring Viscosity with a Levitating Magnet: Application to Complex Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, C.; Bouquet, F.; Remond, J.; Deloche, B.

    2009-01-01

    As an experimental project proposed to students in fourth year of university, a viscometer was developed, consisting of a small magnet levitating in a viscous fluid. The viscous force acting on the magnet is directly measured: viscosities in the range 10-10[superscript 6] mPa s are obtained. This experiment is used as an introduction to complex…

  3. Magnetic separation: its application in mining, waste purification, medicine, biochemistry and chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmanesh, M; Hulliger, J

    2017-10-02

    The use of strong magnetic field gradients and high magnetic fields generated by permanent magnets or superconducting coils has found applications in many fields such as mining, solid state chemistry, biochemistry and medical research. Lab scale or industrial implementations involve separation of macro- and nanoparticles, cells, proteins, and macromolecules down to small molecules and ions. Most promising are those attempts where the object to be separated is attached to a strong magnetic nanoparticle. Here, all kinds of specific affinity interactions are used to attach magnetic carrier particles to mainly objects of biological interest. Other attempts use a strong paramagnetic suspension for the separation of purely diamagnetic objects, such as bio-macromolecules or heavy metals. The application of magnetic separation to superconducting inorganic phases is of particular interest in combination with ceramic combinatorial chemistry to generate a library of e.g. cuprate superconductors.

  4. Self-organizing magnetic beads for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gusenbauer, Markus; Reichel, Franz; Exl, Lukas; Bance, Simon; Ozelt, Harald; Schrefl, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In the field of biomedicine magnetic beads are used for drug delivery and to treat hyperthermia. Here we propose to use self-organized bead structures to isolate circulating tumor cells using lab-on-chip technologies. Typically blood flows past microposts functionalized with antibodies for circulating tumor cells. Creating these microposts with interacting magnetic beads makes it possible to tune the geometry in size, position and shape. We developed a simulation tool that combines micromagnetics and discrete particle dynamics, in order to design micropost arrays made of interacting beads. The simulation takes into account the viscous drag of the blood flow, magnetostatic interactions between the magnetic beads and gradient forces from external aligned magnets. We developed a particle-particle particle-mesh method for effective computation of the magnetic force and torque acting on the particles.

  5. A printed Yagi-Uda antenna for application in magnetic resonance thermometry guided microwave hyperthermia applicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulides, M. M.; Mestrom, R. M. C.; Salim, G.; Adela, B. B.; Numan, W. C. M.; Drizdal, T.; Yeo, D. T. B.; Smolders, A. B.

    2017-03-01

    Biological studies and clinical trials show that addition of hyperthermia stimulates conventional cancer treatment modalities and significantly improves treatment outcome. This supra-additive stimulation can be optimized by adaptive hyperthermia to counteract strong and dynamic thermoregulation. The only clinically proven method for the 3D non-invasive temperature monitoring required is by magnetic resonance (MR) temperature imaging, but the currently available set of MR compatible hyperthermia applicators lack the degree of heat control required. In this work, we present the design and validation of a high-frequency (433 MHz ISM band) printed circuit board antenna with a very low MR-footprint. This design is ideally suited for use in a range of hyperthermia applicator configurations. Experiments emulating the clinical situation show excellent matching properties of the antenna over a 7.2% bandwidth (S 11  phased-arrays.

  6. Orientation Control of Graphene Flakes by Magnetic Field: Broad Device Applications of Macroscopically Aligned Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng; Zhu, Zhuan; Zhou, Xufeng; Qiu, Wenlan; Niu, Chao; Hu, Jonathan; Dahal, Keshab; Wang, Yanan; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Ren, Zhifeng; Litvinov, Dimitri; Liu, Zhaoping; Wang, Zhiming M; Bao, Jiming

    2017-01-01

    Owing to a large diamagnetism, graphene flakes can respond and be aligned to magnetic field like a ferromagnetic material. Aligned graphene flakes exhibit emergent properties approaching single-layer graphene. Anisotropic optical properties also give rise to a magnetic writing board using graphene suspension and a bar magnet as a pen. This simple alignment technique opens up enormous applications of graphene. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Preparation of Magnetic Carbon Nanotubes (Mag-CNTs) for Biomedical and Biotechnological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masotti, Andrea; Caporali, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied for their potential applications in many fields from nanotechnology to biomedicine. The preparation of magnetic CNTs (Mag-CNTs) opens new avenues in nanobiotechnology and biomedical applications as a consequence of their multiple properties embedded within the same moiety. Several preparation techniques have been developed during the last few years to obtain magnetic CNTs: grafting or filling nanotubes with magnetic ferrofluids or attachment of magnetic nanoparticles to CNTs or their polymeric coating. These strategies allow the generation of novel versatile systems that can be employed in many biotechnological or biomedical fields. Here, we review and discuss the most recent papers dealing with the preparation of magnetic CNTs and their application in biomedical and biotechnological fields. PMID:24351838

  8. Preparation of magnetic carbon nanotubes (Mag-CNTs) for biomedical and biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masotti, Andrea; Caporali, Andrea

    2013-12-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied for their potential applications in many fields from nanotechnology to biomedicine. The preparation of magnetic CNTs (Mag-CNTs) opens new avenues in nanobiotechnology and biomedical applications as a consequence of their multiple properties embedded within the same moiety. Several preparation techniques have been developed during the last few years to obtain magnetic CNTs: grafting or filling nanotubes with magnetic ferrofluids or attachment of magnetic nanoparticles to CNTs or their polymeric coating. These strategies allow the generation of novel versatile systems that can be employed in many biotechnological or biomedical fields. Here, we review and discuss the most recent papers dealing with the preparation of magnetic CNTs and their application in biomedical and biotechnological fields.

  9. Preparation of Magnetic Carbon Nanotubes (Mag-CNTs for Biomedical and Biotechnological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been widely studied for their potential applications in many fields from nanotechnology to biomedicine. The preparation of magnetic CNTs (Mag-CNTs opens new avenues in nanobiotechnology and biomedical applications as a consequence of their multiple properties embedded within the same moiety. Several preparation techniques have been developed during the last few years to obtain magnetic CNTs: grafting or filling nanotubes with magnetic ferrofluids or attachment of magnetic nanoparticles to CNTs or their polymeric coating. These strategies allow the generation of novel versatile systems that can be employed in many biotechnological or biomedical fields. Here, we review and discuss the most recent papers dealing with the preparation of magnetic CNTs and their application in biomedical and biotechnological fields.

  10. Single step synthesis, characterization and applications of curcumin functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Rohit; Gupta, Prachi; Dziubla, Thomas; Hilt, J Zach

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been well known for their applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia, targeted drug delivery, etc. The surface modification of these magnetic nanoparticles has been explored extensively to achieve functionalized materials with potential application in biomedical, environmental and catalysis field. Herein, we report a novel and versatile single step methodology for developing curcumin functionalized magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles without any additional linkers, using a simple coprecipitation technique. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The developed MNPs were employed in a cellular application for protection against an inflammatory agent, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) molecule. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Analysis of ringing due to magnetic core materials used in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu Gaunkar, Neelam; Nlebedim, Cajetan; Hadimani, Ravi; Bulu, Irfan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Mina, Mani; Jiles, David

    Oil-field well logging instruments employ pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and use inductive sensors to detect and evaluate the presence of particular fluids in geological formations. Acting as both signal transmitters and receivers most inductive sensors employ magnetic cores to enhance the quality and amplitude of signals recorded during field measurements. It is observed that the magnetic core also responds to the applied input signal thereby generating a signal (`ringing') that interferes with the measurement of the signals from the target formations. This causes significant noise and receiver dead time and it is beneficial to eliminate/suppress the signals received from the magnetic core. In this work a detailed analysis of the magnetic core response and in particular loading of the sensor due to the presence of the magnetic core is presented. Pulsed NMR measurements over a frequency band of 100 kHz to 1MHz are used to determine the amplitude and linewidth of the signals acquired from different magnetic core materials. A lower signal amplitude and a higher linewidth are vital since these would correspond to minimal contributions from the magnetic core to the inductive sensor response and thus leading to minimized receiver dead time.

  12. High field electrical behaviour in lithium–phospho–vanadate glass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High field electrical behaviour; lithium–phospho–vanadate glass system. 1. Introduction. High field electrical switching behaviour is one of the fascinating properties in oxide glasses, since it exhibits reversible threshold and irreversible memory states. Several investigations have been initiated to study switching in glasses ...

  13. Radiofrequency coils for magnetic resonance applications: theory, design, and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Hartwig, Valentina; Positano, Vincenzo; Vanello, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are noninvasive diagnostic techniques based on the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance. Radiofrequency coils are key components in both the transmission and receiving phases of magnetic resonance systems. Transmitter coils have to produce a highly homogeneous alternating field in a wide field of view, whereas receiver coils have to maximize signal detection while minimizing noise. Development of modern magnetic resonance coils often is based on numerical methods for simulating and predicting coil performance. Numerical methods allows the behavior of the coil in the presence of realistic loads to be simulated and the coil's efficiency at high magnetic fields to be investigated. After being built, coils have to be characterized in the laboratory to optimize their setting and performance by extracting several quality indices. Successively, coils performance has to be evaluated in a scanner using standardized image quality parameters with phantom and human experiments. This article reviews the principles of radiofrequency coils, coil performance parameters, and their estimation methods using simulations, workbench, and magnetic resonance experiments. Finally, an overview of future developments in radiofrequency coils technology is included.

  14. Analysis and Comparison of Magnetic Structures in a Tapped Boost Converter for LED Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mira Albert, Maria del Carmen; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an an alysis and comparison of magnetics structures in a tapped boost converter for LED applications. The magnetic structure is a coupled inductor which is analyzed in a conventional wire-wound core as well as in a planar structure for different interleaving winding arrangements...

  15. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto-Aquino, D. [ERC Incorporated, Air Force Research Laboratory, 10 E. Saturn Blvd., Edwards AFB, CA 93524 (United States); Rinaldi, C., E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, PO Box 116131, Gainesville, FL 32611-6131 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given. - Highlights: • Rosensweig's model for SAR was extended to high fields. • The MRSh relaxation equation was used to predict SAR at high fields. • Rotational Brownian dynamics simulations were used to predict SAR. • The results of these models were compared. • Predictions of effect of size and field conditions on SAR are presented.

  16. Quench in high temperature superconductor magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, J.

    2013-01-01

    High field superconducting magnets using high temperature superconductors are being developed for high energy physics, nuclear magnetic resonance and energy storage applications. Although the conductor technology has progressed to the point where such large magnets can be readily envisioned, quench protection remains a key challenge. It is well-established that quench propagation in HTS magnets is very slow and this brings new challenges that must be addressed. In this paper, these challenges are discussed and potential solutions, driven by new technologies such as optical fiber based sensors and thermally conducting electrical insulators, are reviewed.

  17. Magnetic materials in Japan research, applications and potential

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This, the third report in Elsevier's Materials Technology in Japan series, concentrates on magnetic materials as a topic gaining worldwide attention, and each chapter looks not only at current research, but also describes the technology as it is being applied and its future potential. Magnetic-related research is the second largest field of research in Japan after semiconductors, with the estimated number of researchers and engineers engaged in magnetics-related activities currently at 20,000. This research report serves as both a review of

  18. Magnetic Nanoparticles Immobilization and Functionalization for Biosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mejri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an approach for E. coli bacteria detection using an electrochemical immunosensor. The immunosensor was based on functionalized magnetic nanoparticles immobilized onto bare gold electrode. Cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy was performed before and after magnetic nanoparticles deposition. The magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with anti-E. coli polyclonal antibody were used for bacteria detection. Lytic T4-phage was used to confirm the success recognition of bacteria with the developed immunosensor. The specificity of the immunosensor was tested against Enterococcus faecium bacteria. A limit detection of 103 CFU/mL E. coli bacteria was obtained with a good reproducibility.

  19. Scientific Articles on Magnetic Materials and Applications Research from 2006 - 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    magnetic applications were for power applications. These power applications include inductors, transformers, electric motors , generators, actuators...equation is P = AfαBβ` (1) where P is power los (W/kg), A is the fitting coefficient, f is the frequency (kHz) and B is the flux density ( Tesla ) and α

  20. Nano-micro composite magnetic fluids: Magnetic and magnetorheological evaluation for rotating seal and vibration damper applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinică, Oana; Susan-Resiga, Daniela; Bălănean, Florica; Vizman, Daniel; Socoliuc, Vlad; Vékás, Ladislau

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, static magnetic properties and magnetorheological behavior of a set of 12 nano-micro composite magnetic fluids (CMFs) were studied. The samples with a ferromagnetic particle volume fraction ranging in a large interval φFe = (1 ÷ 44) % were prepared by adding carbonyl iron powder in a highly concentrated transformer oil-based ferrofluid (FF). The ferrofluid has the magnetite volume fraction of φFe3O4 = 22.90 % and saturation magnetization of Ms = 74 kA / m (930 Gs). No further additives were used in order to prevent sedimentation. It was noticed an increase of the static yield stress, of about 3 orders of magnitude, with the increase of the total solid volume fraction of samples and with the increase of the magnetic field, which varied between 0 kA/m and 950 kA/m. The dynamic yield stress (Herschel-Bulkley model) τHB of the samples strongly increases with the magnetic field and shows a slight tendency of saturation for higher intensities of the magnetic field. There is a less pronounced increase of τHB, about an order of magnitude with the increasing volume fraction of the iron particles. The relative viscosity increase induced by the magnetic field reaches a maximum for both considered shear rates: γ ṡ = 7.85s-1 and γ ṡ = 88.41s-1 and it was revealed an optimal volume fraction of Fe particles, φFe = 20 % , corresponding to a total volume fraction of φtot ≈ 38 % , at which the magnetoviscous effect has its maximum value. The magnetic properties and also the magnetorheological and the magnetoviscous behavior of highly concentrated ferrofluid-based CMFs can be controlled by the addition of iron microparticles in order to attain the optimal concentration for the envisaged engineering applications, rotating seals and magnetorheological vibration dampers.

  1. Design and performance evaluation of a hall effect magnetic compass for oceanographic and meteorological applications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desai, R.G.P.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Tengali, T.; Mishra, M.; Fadate, C.; Gomes, L.

    A Hall Effect magnetic compass, suitable for oceanographic and meteorological applications, has been designed and its performance characteristics have been evaluated. Slope of the least-squares-fitted linear graph was found to be close to the ideal...

  2. Transformational leadership: application of magnet's new empiric outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Erin K; Cohen, Elaine; Raia, Lucille V

    2010-03-01

    The many benefits to hospitals throughout the world that achieved Magnet designation is well documented. This status of recognition demands the support of leadership during the Magnet journey. In 2008, the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) announced a new model for the Magnet Recognition Program that translates the original 14 Forces of Magnetism into Five Model Components. Specifically, this new model includes sources of evidence and empiric outcomes that by definition accentuates transformational nursing leadership. The day-to-day impact of this change places an even greater emphasis on demonstrated outcomes and innovation that may potentially transform nursing practice, quality and safety of care, and the population served. This article provides tangible examples and outcomes for reaching nursing excellence through leadership support and engagement. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Application of magnetic carriers to two examples of quantitative cell analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Chen; Qian, Zhixi; Choi, Young Suk; David, Allan E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, 212 Ross Hall, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Todd, Paul, E-mail: pwtodd@hotmail.com [Techshot, Inc., 7200 Highway 150, Greenville, IN 47124 (United States); Hanley, Thomas R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, 212 Ross Hall, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The use of magnetophoretic mobility as a surrogate for fluorescence intensity in quantitative cell analysis was investigated. The objectives of quantitative fluorescence flow cytometry include establishing a level of labeling for the setting of parameters in fluorescence activated cell sorters (FACS) and the determination of levels of uptake of fluorescently labeled substrates by living cells. Likewise, the objectives of quantitative magnetic cytometry include establishing a level of labeling for the setting of parameters in flowing magnetic cell sorters and the determination of levels of uptake of magnetically labeled substrates by living cells. The magnetic counterpart to fluorescence intensity is magnetophoretic mobility, defined as the velocity imparted to a suspended cell per unit of magnetic ponderomotive force. A commercial velocimeter available for making this measurement was used to demonstrate both applications. Cultured Gallus lymphoma cells were immunolabeled with commercial magnetic beads and shown to have adequate magnetophoretic mobility to be separated by a novel flowing magnetic separator. Phagocytosis of starch nanoparticles having magnetic cores by cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, a CHO line, was quantified on the basis of magnetophoretic mobility. - Highlights: • Commercial particle tracking velocimetry measures magnetophoretic mobility of labeled cells. • Magnetically labeled tumor cells were shown to have adequate mobility for capture in a specific sorter. • The kinetics of nonspecific endocytosis of magnetic nanomaterials by CHO cells was characterized. • Magnetic labeling of cells can be used like fluorescence flow cytometry for quantitative cell analysis.

  4. Development of Magnetic Nanomaterials and Devices for Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-30

    ic chips uid backplan the chemica y of dedicate aration, GM in an arbitrar king uses th PMMA an e either seale he gasket als ts and closel a...required. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles are strongly influenced by the presence of organic as well as inorganic protective shells on their...out mainly by the ex-situ method, i.e, by dispersing the synthesized magnetic nanoparticle into organic PMMA solvents or by polymerization of

  5. [Magnetic micro-/nano-materials: functionalization and their applications in pretreatment for food samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiang; Feng, Yuqi

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic solid phase extraction technique, based on functional magnetic materials, is currently a hot topic in the separation and analysis of complex samples. This paper reviews the reported methods for the functionalization of magnetic micro-/nano-materials, such as sur- face grafting organic groups, coating carbon or inorganic oxide, grafting or coating polymer, being loaded to the surface or pores of supports, being introduced into the skeleton of sup- ports, and physically co-mixing methods. Moreover, we briefly introduce the applications of the functional magnetic micro-/nano-materials in pretreatment for food samples.

  6. Studies of ultrathin magnetic films for advanced storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Ryan Paul

    For a thorough understanding of tunneling magneto-resistance (TMR) and exchange anisotropy, the local chemical and magnetic environment near the surface and interfaces of magnetic thin films creeds characterization. This thesis comprises a series of studies that investigate ultra-thin magnetic films using various electron spectroscopy techniques with that necessity in mind. First, we investigate the chemical and magnetic properties of FM/AlO x bilayers. We find that the FM layer polarizes the states of the AlOx layer. The sign of the induced polarization is sensitive to the type of FM material. These findings challenge our understanding of TMR in magnetic tunneling junctions with similar films. It is assumed AlO x only acts as a non-magnetic tunneling barrier and the tunneling current's spin-polarization is an intrinsic property of the FM layers. The existence of magnetism in the AlOx layer suggests new models that include its contribution to this tunneling spin-polarization. Next, we investigate the chemical and magnetic properties of Fe3O4/AlOx bilayers. We find the growth of Fe3O4 is dependent upon the substrate heterostructure, and minority-spin electrons dominate the tunneling current in junctions with similar films. This result is understood from band-structure calculations that suggest Fe3O4 is a half-metallic ferromagnet with only minority-spin states at the Fermi Level. These findings are in contrast to all previous TMR studies of AlOx-based junctions, where the tunneling current is dominated by majority-spin electrons. Finally, we investigate the role of non-interfacial AFM layers in exchange biasing of ferromagnetic (FM) films, which is characterized as a shift in the hysteresis loop along the field axis of the FM film in contact with an AFM film. We demonstrate exchange anisotropy in Fe films exchange biased by NiO/CoO heterostructures is sensitive to the magnetic anisotropy, thickness and depth from the Fe/AFM interface of the CoO layer. These results

  7. Real-space perturbation theory for frustrated magnets: application to magnetization plateaus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitomirsky, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    We present a unified approach to the problem of degeneracy lifting in geometrically frustrated magnets with and without an external field. The method treats fluctuations around a classical spin configuration in terms of a real-space perturbation expansion. We calculate two lowest-order contributions for the Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian and use them to study the magnetization processes of spin-S triangular and kagomé antiferromagnets.

  8. Semi-Analytical Method Based on Magnetic Equivalent Circuit for Synchronous Permanent-Magnet Machines in EV and HEV Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Randi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Concentrated Winding Permanent-Magnet (PM Synchronous Machines (CWPMSM are more and more used to drive electromechanical systems working in variable speed mode, such as Electric Vehicle (EV and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV applications. In order to design and optimize these machines, the authors propose a semi-analytical method based on magnetic equivalent circuit (MEC. The studied structure, 12-slots/8-poles CWPMSM, is an internal rotor topology with surface mounted PMs having radial magnetization. We compare the results obtained with finite-element analysis (FEA with those given by the MEC. In this paper both precision and time computation are evaluated in order to analyse the possible implementation of the model in an optimal design tool.

  9. Hyperthermia in low aspect-ratio magnetic nanotubes for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Guzman, D. F.; Lizardi, L. I.; Otálora, J. A.; Landeros, P.

    2017-03-01

    A simple model for the magnetization reversal process of low aspect-ratio ferromagnetic nanotubes (MNTs) is presented. Because of advantages over other geometries, these structures are interesting for biomedical applications, such as magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy, where the heat released during magnetic reversal is used to destroy tumors. For example, the tubular geometry provides two independent functional surfaces that may be selectively manipulated and also gives a storage cavity. Owing to their large surface to weight ratio and low mass density, MNTs are not decanted by gravity. We calculated magnetic phase diagrams, energy barriers, nucleation fields, and the amount of dissipated heat and specific absorption rate for magnetite nanotubes. The geometrical parameters were varied, and simple formulae were used to optimize the tube response under alternating excitation, as required for magnetic hyperthermia applications.

  10. Application of nonlinear magnetic vibro-impact vibration suppressor and energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharfard, Aref

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, application of a single unit vibro-impact system is improved. For this reason, in the so-called ;magnetic impact damper; the impact mass is replaced by a permanent magnet, which moves in coil of gap enclosure. In the magnetic impact damper, wasting energy during inelastic contacts of masses and converting energy into electrical energy during the mass movement inside the coil, leads to suppress undesired vibrations. In this study it is shown that the magnetic impact dampers are not only good vibration suppressors but also they can harvest electrical energy. Effect of changing the main parameters of this system including gap size, load resistance and electromagnetic coupling coefficient is studied on the vibratory and energy behavior of the magnetic impact dampers. Finally using several user oriented charts, it is shown that energy-based and vibration-based design considerations can effectively improve application of the discussed vibro-impact system.

  11. Quantum theory of the dielectric constant of a magnetized plasma and astrophysical applications. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V.; Ventura, J.

    1972-01-01

    A quantum mechanical treatment of an electron plasma in a constant and homogeneous magnetic field is considered, with the aim of (1) defining the range of validity of the magnetoionic theory (2) studying the deviations from this theory, in applications involving high densities, and intense magnetic field. While treating the magnetic field exactly, a perturbation approach in the photon field is used to derive general expressions for the dielectric tensor. Numerical estimates on the range of applicability of the magnetoionic theory are given for the case of the 'one-dimensional' electron gas, where only the lowest Landau level is occupied.

  12. A new application and experimental validation of moulding technology for ferrite magnet assisted synchronous reluctance machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qian; Lu, Kaiyuan; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a new application of moulding technology to the installation of ferrite magnet material into the rotor flux barriers of Ferrite Magnet Assisted Synchronous Reluctance Machine (FASynRM). The feasibility of this application with respect to manufacturing process and motor...... performance has been demonstrated. In comparison to the conventional ferrite magnet installation approach, moulding technology has obvious advantages of improved mechanical strength of the multi-flux-barrier rotor structure, simplified installation process, reduced processing cost and in the same time...

  13. Beam dynamics performances and applications of a low-energy electron-beam magnetic bunch compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokop, C. R.; Piot, P.; Carlsten, B. E.; Church, M.

    2013-08-01

    Many front-end applications of electron linear accelerators rely on the production of temporally compressed bunches. The shortening of electron bunches is often realized with magnetic bunch compressors located in high-energy sections of accelerators. Magnetic compression is subject to collective effects including space charge and self interaction via coherent synchrotron radiation. In this paper we explore the application of magnetic compression to low-energy (~40MeV), high-charge (nC) electron bunches with low normalized transverse emittances (<5@mm).

  14. Pediatric functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI): issues and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Elizabeth Stief; Berl, Madison M; Moore, Erin N; Gaillard, William D

    2008-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) represents a useful tool for studying brain functions and the neural basis of cognition in healthy children and in those in disease states. Functional magnetic resonance imaging is a relatively new use of existing magnetic resonance imaging technology that allows scientists and practitioners to observe the brain at work. It is based on the observation that local increases in blood flow are related to neural activity. This review considers principles of functional magnetic resonance imaging, issues relevant to imaging children, and research using functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine cognitive processing in pediatric populations. The focus is specifically on language studies to review strengths, limitations, and practical applications of this technology with children. Future directions for functional magnetic resonance imaging are presented.

  15. Structural and morphological investigation of magnetic nanoparticles based on iron oxides for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Paula S. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Caixa Postal 6192, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil)], E-mail: pferreira@lnls.br; Martins, Tatiana M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Caixa Postal 6192, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin (IFGW), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Caixa Postal 6165, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); D' Souza-Li, Lilia [Laboratorio de Endocrinologia Pediatrica da Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas (FCM), UNICAMP, Caixa Postal 6111, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Li, Li M. [Departamento de Neurologia da FCM, UNICAMP, Caixa Postal 6111, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Metze, Konradin; Adam, Randall L. [Grupo interdisciplinar ' Patologia Analitica Celular' , Departamento de Anatomia Patologica da FCM, UNICAMP, Caixa Postal 6111, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Knobel, Marcelo [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin (IFGW), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Caixa Postal 6165, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Zanchet, Daniela [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Caixa Postal 6192, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2008-05-01

    The present work reports the synthesis, characterization and properties of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications, correlating the nanoscale tunabilities in terms of size, structure, and magnetism. Magnetic nanoparticles in different conditions were prepared through thermal decomposition of Fe(acac){sub 3} in the presence of 1,2 hexadecanodiol (reducing agent) and oleic acid and oleylamine (ligands) in a hot organic solvent. The 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was exchanged onto the nanocrystal surface making the particles stable in water. Nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Preliminary tests of incorporation of these nanoparticles in cells and their magnetic resonance image (MRI) were also carried out. The magnetization characterizations were made by isothermal magnetic measurements.

  16. Synthesis and bio-applications of targeted magnetic-fluorescent composite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Hui; Tong, Ruijie [Sichuan University, West China Medical Center (China); Song, Yanling [Shenyang University of Chemical Technology, College of Pharmaceutical and Biological Engineering (China); Xiong, Fang [Sichuan University, West China College of Stomatology (China); Li, Jiman [Sichuan Cancer Hospital, Pathology Department (China); Wang, Shichao; Fu, Huihui; Wen, Jirui; Li, Dongze; Zeng, Ye; Zhao, Zhiwei, E-mail: zzw2002400@126.com; Wu, Jiang, E-mail: jw@scu.edu.cn [Sichuan University, West China Medical Center (China)

    2017-04-15

    Magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles have a tremendous potential in biology. As the benefits of these materials gained recognition, increasing attention has been given to the conjugation of magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles with targeting ligands. The magnetic and fluorescent properties of nanoparticles offer several functionalities, including imaging, separation, and visualization, while the presence of a targeting ligand allows for selective cell and tissue targeting. In this review, methods for the synthesis of targeted magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles are explored, and recent applications of these nanocomposites to the detection and separation of biomolecules, fluorescent and magnetic resonance imaging, and cancer diagnosis and treatment will be summarized. As these materials are further optimized, targeted magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles hold great promise for the diagnosis and treatment of some diseases.

  17. Hybrid magnet devices for molecule manipulation and small scale high gradient-field applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, David E [El Cerrito, CA; Hong, Seok-Cheol [Seoul, KR; Cozzarelli, legal representative, Linda A.; Pollard, Martin J [El Cerrito, CA; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R [Berkeley, CA

    2009-01-06

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are hybrid magnetic tweezers able to exert approximately 1 nN of force to 4.5 .mu.m magnetic bead. The maximum force was experimentally measured to be .about.900 pN which is in good agreement with theoretical estimations and other measurements. In addition, a new analysis scheme that permits fast real-time position measurement in typical geometry of magnetic tweezers has been developed and described in detail.

  18. High-force magnetic tweezers with force feedback for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmannsberger, Philip; Fabry, Ben

    2007-11-01

    Magnetic micromanipulation using magnetic tweezers is a versatile biophysical technique and has been used for single-molecule unfolding, rheology measurements, and studies of force-regulated processes in living cells. This article describes an inexpensive magnetic tweezer setup for the application of precisely controlled forces up to 100 nN onto 5 microm magnetic beads. High precision of the force is achieved by a parametric force calibration method together with a real-time control of the magnetic tweezer position and current. High forces are achieved by bead-magnet distances of only a few micrometers. Applying such high forces can be used to characterize the local viscoelasticity of soft materials in the nonlinear regime, or to study force-regulated processes and mechanochemical signal transduction in living cells. The setup can be easily adapted to any inverted microscope.

  19. Perspectives for high-performance permanent magnets: applications, coercivity, and new materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirosawa, Satoshi; Nishino, Masamichi; Miyashita, Seiji

    2017-03-01

    High-performance permanent magnets are indispensable in the production of high-efficiency motors and generators and ultimately for sustaining the green earth. The central issue of modern permanent magnetism is to realize high coercivity near and above room temperature on marginally hard magnetic materials without relying upon the critical elements such as heavy rare earths by means of nanostructure engineering. Recent investigations based on advanced nanostructure analysis and large-scale first principles calculations have led to significant paradigm shifts in the understandings of coercivity mechanism in Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, which includes the discovery of the ferromagnetism of the thin (2 nm) intergranular phase surrounding the Nd2Fe14B grains, the occurrence of negative (in-plane) magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Nd ions and some Fe atoms at the interface which degrades coercivity, and visualization of the stochastic behaviors of magnetization in the magnetization reversal process at high temperatures. A major change may occur also in the motor topologies, which is currently overwhelmed by the magnetic flux weakening interior permanent magnet motor type, to other types with variable flux permanent magnet type in some applications to open up a niche for new permanent magnet materials. Keynote talk at 8th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology (IWAMSN2016), 8-12 November 2016, Ha Long City, Vietnam.

  20. Application of PDSLin to the magnetic reconnection problem

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Xuefei

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process in a magnetized plasma at both low and high magnetic Lundquist numbers (the ratio of the resistive diffusion time to the Alfvén wave transit time), which occurs in a wide variety of laboratory and space plasmas, e.g. magnetic fusion experiments, the solar corona and the Earth\\'s magnetotail. An implicit time advance for the two-fluid magnetic reconnection problem is known to be difficult because of the large condition number of the associated matrix. This is especially troublesome when the collisionless ion skin depth is large so that the Whistler waves, which cause the fast reconnection, dominate the physics (Yuan et al 2012 J. Comput. Phys. 231 5822-53). For small system sizes, a direct solver such as SuperLU can be employed to obtain an accurate solution as long as the condition number is bounded by the reciprocal of the floating-point machine precision. However, SuperLU scales effectively only to hundreds of processors or less. For larger system sizes, it has been shown that physics-based (Chacón and Knoll 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 188 573-92) or other preconditioners can be applied to provide adequate solver performance. In recent years, we have been developing a new algebraic hybrid linear solver, PDSLin (Parallel Domain decomposition Schur complement-based Linear solver) (Yamazaki and Li 2010 Proc. VECPAR pp 421-34 and Yamazaki et al 2011 Technical Report). In this work, we compare numerical results from a direct solver and the proposed hybrid solver for the magnetic reconnection problem and demonstrate that the new hybrid solver is scalable to thousands of processors while maintaining the same robustness as a direct solver. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. Force-free magnetic fields solutions, topology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, Gerald E

    1996-01-01

    After an introductory chapter concerned with the history of force-free magnetic fields, and the relation of such fields to hydrodynamics and astrophysics, the book examines the limits imposed by the virial theorem for finite force-free configurations. Various techniques are then used to find solutions to the field equations. The fact that the field lines corresponding to these solutions have the common feature of being "twisted", and may be knotted, motivates a discussion of field line topology and the concept of helicity. The topics of field topology, helicity, and magnetic energy in multiply

  2. A review of the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and applications of maghemite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrollahi, H.

    2017-03-01

    It must be pointed out that maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) with a cubic spinel structure is a crucial material for various applications, including spin electronic devices, high-density magnetic recording, nano-medicines and biosensors. This paper has to do with a review study on the synthesis methods, magnetic properties and application of maghemite in the form of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructured materials, such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, nano-rods, and nanowires, as well as two-dimensional (2D) thin films. The results revealed that maghemite is widely used in the biomedical applications (hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery) and magnetic recording devices. The unmodified and Co/Mn modified maghemite thin films prepared by the dc-reactive magnetron sputtering show the excellent values of coercivity 2100 Oe and 3900 Oe, respectively, for the magnetic storage application. The super-paramagnetic particles with 7 nm size and the saturation magnetization of 80 emu/g prepared by the established thermolysis method are good candidates for bio-medical applications.

  3. Acoustic detection in superconducting magnets for performance characterization and diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Marchevsky, M.; Sabbi, G.; Prestemon, S.

    2013-01-01

    Quench diagnostics in superconducting accelerator magnets is essential for understanding performance limitations and improving magnet design. Applicability of the conventional quench diagnostics methods such as voltage taps or quench antennas is limited for long magnets or complex winding geometries, and alternative approaches are desirable. Here, we discuss acoustic sensing technique for detecting mechanical vibrations in superconducting magnets. Using LARP high-field Nb3Sn quadrupole HQ01 [1], we show how acoustic data is connected with voltage instabilities measured simultaneously in the magnet windings during provoked extractions and current ramps to quench. Instrumentation and data analysis techniques for acoustic sensing are reviewed.

  4. Application of orbital strong magnet in the extraction of deep orbital magnetic foreign bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chen Jia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the surgical method and efficacy of extraction of deep orbital magnetic foreign bodies by mean of an orbital strong magnet. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of clinical data of patients with deep orbital magnetic foreign bodies(OMFBin Hebei Eye Hospital from June 2014 to May 2017 was processed. A total of 23 eyes were enrolled, among them, 14 eyes of extraorbital OMFB, 9 eyes of intraorbital OMFB. The rate of extraction of foreign bodies and the postoperative complications were observed. RESULTS: All eyes of intraorbital foreign bodies were successfully extracted with 100% success rate. Twelve of 14 eyes of extraorbital foreign bodies were extracted with 86% success rate. Mild orbital hemorrhage were found in 2 eyes. There was no other obvious complication such as visual loss, orbital massive hemorrhage or limited ocular movement. CONCLUSION: It's an ideal surgical method to extract the deep orbital magnetic foreign bodies by mean of an orbital strong magnet, with mini-injury, high success rate, short duration and few complications.

  5. High Force Magnetic Levitation Using Magnetized Superconducting Bulks as a Field Source for Bearing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A.; Giunchi, G.; Albisetti, A. Figini; Shi, Y.; Hopkins, S. C.; Palka, R.; Cardwell, D. A.; Glowacki, B. A.

    The ability of high temperature superconducting bulks to trap magnetic fields of several tesla allows them to generate very high levitation force. This paper reports the development of a bulk-bulk superconducting rotary bearing design which uses superconducting bulks on both the rotor and the stator. An evaluation is made of the effectiveness of pulsed fields for magnetizing bulks. Modeling of the bulks using the perfectly trapped flux model is also reported to assess the limits of the bearing design. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a (RE)BCO-MgB2 bulk bearing capable of force densities of the order of 100N/cm2. The design and construction of a unique system capable of magnetizing a 25 mm (RE)BCO bulk and measuring levitation force between this bulk and a coaxial MgB2 hollow cylinder is outlined.

  6. Understanding the dynamics of superparamagnetic particles under the influence of high field gradient arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Aron, Miles; Stride, Eleanor

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the behaviour of superparamagnetic particles in magnetic drug targeting (MDT) schemes. A 3-dimensional mathematical model was developed, based on the analytical derivation of the trajectory of a magnetized particle suspended inside a fluid channel carrying laminar flow and in the vicinity of an external source of magnetic force. Semi-analytical expressions to quantify the proportion of captured particles, and their relative accumulation (concentration) as a function of distance along the wall of the channel were also derived. These were expressed in terms of a non-dimensional ratio of the relevant physical and physiological parameters corresponding to a given MDT protocol. The ability of the analytical model to assess magnetic targeting schemes was tested against numerical simulations of particle trajectories. The semi-analytical expressions were found to provide good first-order approximations for the performance of MDT systems in which the magnetic force is relatively constant over a large spatial range. The numerical model was then used to test the suitability of a range of different designs of permanent magnet assemblies for MDT. The results indicated that magnetic arrays that emit a strong magnetic force that varies rapidly over a confined spatial range are the most suitable for concentrating magnetic particles in a localized region. By comparison, commonly used magnet geometries such as button magnets and linear Halbach arrays result in distributions of accumulated particles that are less efficient for delivery. The trajectories predicted by the numerical model were verified experimentally by acoustically focusing magnetic microbeads flowing in a glass capillary channel, and optically tracking their path past a high field gradient Halbach array.

  7. Preparation and application of a magnetic organic-inorganic hybrid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 129; Issue 4 ... Bionanocomposite; magnetic nanocatalyst; chitosan; α-aminonitriles; green chemistry. ... synthesis of α-aminonitriles by using aryl aldehydes, trimethylsilyl cyanide (TMSCN) and aromatic amines at room temperature in ethanol as a green solvent.

  8. Preparation and application of a magnetic organic-inorganic hybrid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chemsci

    Catalysts and Organic Synthesis Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran ... Bionanocomposite; magnetic nanocatalyst; chitosan; α-aminonitriles; green chemistry. 1. Introduction ..... March J 1995 In Advanced Organic Chemistry 4th ed. (New York: Wiley) p. 965. 15.

  9. Development of a Magnetic Attachment Method for Bionic Eye Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kate; Meffin, Hamish; Burns, Owen; Abbott, Carla J; Allen, Penelope J; Opie, Nicholas L; McGowan, Ceara; Yeoh, Jonathan; Ahnood, Arman; Luu, Chi D; Cicione, Rosemary; Saunders, Alexia L; McPhedran, Michelle; Cardamone, Lisa; Villalobos, Joel; Garrett, David J; Nayagam, David A X; Apollo, Nicholas V; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Stacey, Alastair; Escudie, Mathilde; Lichter, Samantha; Shepherd, Robert K; Prawer, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Successful visual prostheses require stable, long-term attachment. Epiretinal prostheses, in particular, require attachment methods to fix the prosthesis onto the retina. The most common method is fixation with a retinal tack; however, tacks cause retinal trauma, and surgical proficiency is important to ensure optimal placement of the prosthesis near the macula. Accordingly, alternate attachment methods are required. In this study, we detail a novel method of magnetic attachment for an epiretinal prosthesis using two prostheses components positioned on opposing sides of the retina. The magnetic attachment technique was piloted in a feline animal model (chronic, nonrecovery implantation). We also detail a new method to reliably control the magnet coupling force using heat. It was found that the force exerted upon the tissue that separates the two components could be minimized as the measured force is proportionately smaller at the working distance. We thus detail, for the first time, a surgical method using customized magnets to position and affix an epiretinal prosthesis on the retina. The position of the epiretinal prosthesis is reliable, and its location on the retina is accurately controlled by the placement of a secondary magnet in the suprachoroidal location. The electrode position above the retina is less than 50 microns at the center of the device, although there were pressure points seen at the two edges due to curvature misalignment. The degree of retinal compression found in this study was unacceptably high; nevertheless, the normal structure of the retina remained intact under the electrodes. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Magnetic polymer beads: Recent trends and developments in synthetic design and applications

    KAUST Repository

    Philippova, Olga

    2011-04-01

    The paper describes the synthesis, properties and applications of magnetic polymer beads. State-of-the-art, future challenges, and promising trends in this field are analyzed. New applications in oil recovery are described. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Magnetic field models and their application in optimal magnetic divertor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blommaert, M.; Reiter, D. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-4), FZ Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Baelmans, M. [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Leuven (Belgium); Heumann, H. [TEAM CASTOR, INRIA Sophia Antipolis (France); Marandet, Y.; Bufferand, H. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM, Marseille (France); Gauger, N.R. [TU Kaiserslautern, Chair for Scientific Computing, Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    In recent automated design studies, optimal design methods were introduced to successfully reduce the often excessive heat loads that threaten the divertor target surface. To this end, divertor coils were controlled to improve the magnetic configuration. The divertor performance was then evaluated using a plasma edge transport code and a ''vacuum approach'' for magnetic field perturbations. Recent integration of a free boundary equilibrium (FBE) solver allows to assess the validity of the vacuum approach. It is found that the absence of plasma response currents significantly limits the accuracy of the vacuum approach. Therefore, the optimal magnetic divertor design procedure is extended to incorporate full FBE solutions. The novel procedure is applied to obtain first results for the new WEST (Tungsten Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) divertor currently under construction in the Tore Supra tokamak at CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, France). The sensitivities and the related divertor optimization paths are strongly affected by the extension of the magnetic model. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Flexible magnetic composite for antenna applications in radio frequency identification (RFID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lara Jean

    2008-10-01

    This work includes formulation of mechanically flexible magnetic composites and application to a quarter-wavelength microstrip patch antenna benchmarking structure operating in the lower UHF spectrum (˜300-500 MHz) to investigate capability for miniaturization. A key challenge is to introduce sufficiently low magnetic loss for successful application. Particles of NiZn ferrite and BaCo ferrite, also known as Co2Z, were characterized. Flexible magnetic composites comprised of 40 vol% NiZn ferrite or BaCo ferrite particles in a silicone matrix were formulated. Effects of treating the particles with silane in the formulation process were not detectable, but larger particle size showed to increase epsilon* and mu*. By comparing epsilon* and mu* of the composites, BaCo ferrite was selected for the antenna application. Antennas on the developed magnetic composite and pure silicone substrates were electromagnetically modeled in a full-wave FEM EM solver. A prototype of the antenna on the magnetic composite was fabricated. Good agreement between the simulated and measured results was found. Comparison of the antennas on the magnetic composite versus the pure silicone substrate showed miniaturization capability of 2.4X and performance differences of increased bandwidth, reduced Q, and reduced gain. A key finding of this study is that a small amount of permeability (mur˜2.5) can provide relatively substantial capability for miniaturization, while sufficiently low magnetic loss can be introduced for successful application at the targeted operating frequency. The magnetic composite showed the capability to fulfill this balance and to be a feasible option for RFID applications in the lower UHF spectrum.

  13. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with a bilayer of oleic acid for magnetic hyperthermia and MRI applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Paula I.P. [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Laia, César A.T. [Laboratório Associado para a Química Verde (LAQV), REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, Alexandra [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Pereira, Laura C.J.; Coutinho, Joana T. [C2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139,7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Ferreira, Isabel M.M., E-mail: imf@fct.unl.pt [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Novo, Carlos M.M. [Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, IHMT/UNL, 1349-008 Lisboa (Portugal); Borges, João Paulo, E-mail: jpb@fct.unl.pt [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were stabilized with oleic acid. • Maximum stabilization was achieved at neutral pH. • Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic hyperthermia applications were tested. • The produced nanoparticles are viable for both biomedical applications. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, IONPs) are promising candidates for several biomedical applications such as magnetic hyperthermia and as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, their colloidal stability in physiological conditions hinders their application requiring the use of biocompatible surfactant agents. The present investigation focuses on obtaining highly stable IONPs, stabilized by the presence of an oleic acid bilayer. Critical aspects such as oleic acid concentration and pH were optimized to ensure maximum stability. NPs composed of an iron oxide core with an average diameter of 9 nm measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) form agglomerates with an hydrodynamic diameter of around 170 nm when dispersed in water in the presence of an oleic acid bilayer, remaining stable (zeta potential of −120 mV). Magnetic hyperthermia and the relaxivities measurements show high efficiency at neutral pH which enables their use for both magnetic hyperthermia and MRI.

  14. Magnetic properties study of iron-oxide nanoparticles/PVA ferrogels with potential biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza Zelis, P., E-mail: pmendoza@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, IFLP-CONICET and Departamento de Fisica (Argentina); Muraca, D., E-mail: dmuraca@ifi.unicamp.br [Gleb Wataghin Physics Institute, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Rua Sergio Buarque de Holanda (Brazil); Gonzalez, J. S. [CoMP-INTEMA-CONICET and Universidad de Mar del Plata (Argentina); Pasquevich, G. A. [IFLP-CONICET and Facultad de Ingenieria (Argentina); Alvarez, V. A. [CoMP-INTEMA-CONICET and Universidad de Mar del Plata (Argentina); Pirota, K. R. [Gleb Wataghin Physics Institute, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Rua Sergio Buarque de Holanda (Brazil); Sanchez, F. H. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, IFLP-CONICET and Departamento de Fisica (Argentina)

    2013-05-15

    A study of the magnetic behavior of maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer matrices prepared by physical cross-linking is reported. The magnetic nanocomposites (ferrogels) were obtained by the in situ co-precipitation of iron salts in the presence of PVA polymer, and subsequently subjected to freezing-thawing cycles. The magnetic behavior of these ferrogels was compared with that of similar systems synthesized using the glutaraldehyde. This type of chemical cross-linking agents presents several disadvantages due to the presence of residual toxic molecules in the gel, which are undesirable for biological applications. Characteristic particle size determined by several techniques are in the range 7.9-9.3 nm. The iron oxidation state in the NPs was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Moessbauer measurements showed that the NP magnetic moments present collective magnetic excitations and superparamagnetic relaxations. The blocking and irreversibility temperatures of the NPs in the ferrogels, and the magnetic anisotropy constant, were obtained from magnetic measurements. An empirical model including two magnetic contributions (large NPs slightly departed from thermodynamic equilibrium below 200 K, and small NPs at thermodynamic equilibrium) was used to fit the experimental magnetization curves. A deviation from the superparamagnetic regime was observed. This deviation was explained on the basis of an interacting superparamagnetic model. From this model, relevant magnetic and structural properties were obtained, such as the magnitude order of the dipolar interaction energy, the NPs magnetic moment, and the number of NPs per ferrogel mass unit. This study contributes to the understanding of the basic physics of a new class of materials that could emerge from the PVA-based magnetic ferrogels.

  15. [Fundamentals and Clinical Applications of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Neuropsychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavera, Mayra; Silva, Federico; García, Ronald; Rueda, Ligia; Carrillo, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive method for stimulation of brain that is based on the ability of a generated magnetic field to penetrate skull and brain meninges, inducing an electric current in the brain tissues that produces neuronal depolarization. TMS can be applied as single pulse of stimulation, pairs of stimuli separated by variable intervals to the same or different brain areas, or as trains of repetitive stimuli at various frequencies. Its mechanism of action is currently unknown. Repetitive TMS can modify the excitability of the cerebral cortex, and has been postulated as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in the area of neuropsychiatry. The aim of this article is to review the knowledge of the TMS as regards its basic principles, pathophysiological mechanism, and its usefulness in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Progress in application of high temperature superconductor in tokamak magnets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryaznevich, M.; Svoboda, V.; Stöckel, Jan; Sykes, A.; Sykes, N.; Kingham, D.; Hammond, G.; Apte, P.; Todd, T.N.; Ball, S.; Chappell, S.; Melhem, D.; Ďuran, Ivan; Kovařík, Karel; Grover, O.; Markovič, T.; Odstrčil, M.; Odstrčil, T.; Šindlery, A.; Vondrášek, G.; Kocman, J.; Lilley, M.K.; de Grouchy, P.; Kim, H.-T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, 9-10 (2013), s. 1593-1596 ISSN 0920-3796. [Symposium on Fusion Technology (SOFT-27)/27./. Liège, 24.09.2012-28.09.2012] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamaks * HTS * magnet s Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.149, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379613001117#

  17. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in cancer: Technique, analysis, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Kay M.; Ehman, Richard L.; McGee, Kiaran P.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue mechanical properties are significantly altered with the development of cancer. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive technique capable of quantifying tissue mechanical properties in vivo. This review describes the basic principles of MRE and introduces some of the many promising MRE methods that have been developed for the detection and characterization of cancer, evaluation of response to therapy, and investigation of the underlying mechanical mechanisms associated with malignancy. PMID:26592944

  18. Satellite magnetic field measurements: Applications in studying the deep Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Catherine G.; Constable, Steven C.

    Following a 20 years hiatus, there are several magnetometry satellites in near-Earth orbit providing a global view of the geomagnetic field and how it changes. The measured magnetic field is an admixture of all field sources, among which one must identify the contributions of interest, namely (1) the field generated in Earth's core, and (2) the fields induced in Earth's mantle by external magnetic variations used in studies of electrical conductivity. Models of the core field can be downward continued to the core surface under the assumption that Earth's mantle is a source free region with zero electrical conductivity. Additional assumptions are invoked to estimate the fluid flow at the core surface. New satellite measurements provide an unprecedented view of changes in the core over the past 20 years; further measurements will clarify the temporal spectrum of the secular variation. Secular changes are coupled to changes in length of day, and recent modeling of torsional oscillations in the core can provide an explanation for the abrupt changes in the field known as geomagnetic jerks. Mantle induction studies require a comprehensive approach to magnetic field modeling. Unwanted internal field contributions are removed to yield time series of external variations and their induced counterparts: improved modeling, combined with the increased data accuracy, and longer term magnetic measurements make conductivity studies feasible. One-dimensional global conductivity responses have been estimated under strong assumptions about the structure of the source field. Ongoing improvements to this work will take account of more complicated source-field structure, three-dimensional Earth structure, and spatio-temporal aliasing due to satellite motion. Modeling of three-dimensional near surface conductivity structure, and the use of time-domain rather than frequency-domain techniques to estimate the 3-D Earth response are needed. Progress could be furthered by future magnetometer

  19. [Clinical application of implant supported magnet-retained overdenture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Ping; Lin, Ye; Li, Jian-hui; Qiu, Li-xin; Chen, Bo; Wang, Xing

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical effects of implants supported magnet-retained overdenture. From November 1999 to March 2005, 25 cases with edentulous jaws underwent implant-supported magnet-retained overdenture. Among them, 14 patients were male, 11 patients were female. The average age of the patients was 67.6 years. (Range 45 - 79 years). Ninety-five implants used included Komet (18), IMZ (11), Frialit-2 (12), Ankylos (10), Camlog (44). The fellow-up time was from 6 months to 70 months. Clinical examination and radiographs were conducted. No infections, nerve or sinus damage or other sequelae occurred. The overdentures were stable and functioned effectively. From November 1999 to March 2005, One Komet abutment was fracture and 1 Frialit-2 implant was lost because of overloading during follow-up. The remaining implants achieved successful osseointegration. Patients were satisfied with the treatment. Implant-supported magnet-retained overdenture was a predictable and reliable method, especially for old patients with edentulous jaws.

  20. Synthesis and Evaluation of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nydeia W. Bolden

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, iron oxide (IO nanoparticles from various precursors have been synthesized using sonochemical method and characterized for their structural variability and toxicity. The iron oxide (IO precursor solutions were prepared from iron acetate (IA, iron pentacarbonyl (IP, decalin, PEG (poly(ethylene glycol, EG (ethylene glycol, PVA (poly(vinyl alcohol, β-cyclodextrin (CD, and distilled water. These precursor solutions were irradiated with high power ultrasound for 3 hours and heat treated as needed. These as-prepared iron oxide nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and magnetization measurements. XRD results show that all the particles are highly crystalline in nature and the particles sizes measured from TEM are approximately 5–20 nm. The maximum magnetization was observed for IO-IP at approximately 60.17 emu/g and the minimum was approximately 30.56 emu/g for IO-IA. These results confirm that the particles are superparamagnetic (SPM in nature. Mössbauer spectroscopy verified the magnetic nanoparticles are purely Fe3O4 and particles sizes varied by the nature of the precursor and coatings.

  1. An application of high-temperature superconductors YBCO to magnetic separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiudong; Zhang, Peng; Bo, Lin; Zeng, Guibin; Li, Dengqian; Fan, J. D.; Liu, Huajun

    2017-10-01

    With the rapid development of manufacturing technology of high temperature superconductive YBa2Cu3O7‑x YBCO materials and decreasing in cost of production, YBCO is marching into industrial areas with its good performances as source of high-magnetic field and rather low cost in reaching superconductivity. Based on analysis of the performance of high temperature superconductors YBCO and development of technology in superconductive magnetic separation both home and abroad, we propose a new approach of taking YBCO tape to make a solenoid as the source of a high magnetic field of magnetic separatior of ores. The paper also looks into the future of the YBCO high temperature superconductive magnetic separation from the perspective of technology and cost, as well as its applications in other industries.

  2. Improved magnetic encoding device and method for making the same. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R.J.

    A magnetic encoding device and method for making the same are provided for use as magnetic storage media in identification control applications that give output signals from a reader that are of shorter duration and substantially greater magnitude than those of the prior art. Magnetic encoding elements are produced by uniformly bending wire or strip stock of a magnetic material longitudinally about a common radius to exceed the elastic limit of the material and subsequently mounting the material so that it is restrained in an unbent position on a substrate of nonmagnetic material. The elements are spot weld attached to a substrate to form a binary coded array of elements according to a desired binary code. The coded substrate may be enclosed in a plastic laminate structure. Such devices may be used for security badges, key cards, and the like and may have many other applications. 7 figures.

  3. Recent Progress in Synthesis and Functionalization of Multimodal Fluorescent-Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Serrano García

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a great interest in the development of new nanomaterials for multimodal imaging applications in biology and medicine. Multimodal fluorescent-magnetic based nanomaterials deserve particular attention as they can be used as diagnostic and drug delivery tools, which could facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and many other diseases. This review focuses on the recent developments of magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposites and their biomedical applications. The recent advances in synthetic strategies and approaches for the preparation of fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites are presented. The main biomedical uses of multimodal fluorescent-magnetic nanomaterials, including biological imaging, cancer therapy and drug delivery, are discussed, and prospects of this field are outlined.

  4. Open Science CBS Neuroimaging Repository: Sharing ultra-high-field MR images of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Christine Lucas; Schäfer, Andreas; Trampel, Robert; Villringer, Arno; Turner, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra high field opens the door to quantitative brain imaging at sub-millimeter isotropic resolutions. However, novel image processing tools to analyze these new rich datasets are lacking. In this article, we introduce the Open Science CBS Neuroimaging Repository: a unique repository of high-resolution and quantitative images acquired at 7 T. The motivation for this project is to increase interest for high-resolution and quantitative imaging and stimulate the development of image processing tools developed specifically for high-field data. Our growing repository currently includes datasets from MP2RAGE and multi-echo FLASH sequences from 28 and 20 healthy subjects respectively. These datasets represent the current state-of-the-art in in-vivo relaxometry at 7 T, and are now fully available to the entire neuroimaging community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Heat treatment study of $Nb_{3}Sn$ strands for the Fermilab's high field dipole model

    CERN Document Server

    Barzi, E; Limon, P J; Ozelis, J P; Yamada, R; Zlobin, A V; Gregory, E; Pyon, T; Wake, M

    2000-01-01

    Fermilab is developing high field superconducting dipole magnets based on Nb/sub 3/Sn for a post-LHC very large hadron collider (VLHC) . The first prototype is a 1 meter long two-layer shell-type (cos- theta) coil with a nominal field of 11 T. A keystoned Rutherford-type cable made of 28 Nb/sub 3/Sn strands of 1 mm in diameter is used. The development of high J/sub c/ multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn strands with low magnetization is an important step of this program. To achieve this goal, strand R&D is actively pursued by Fermilab and IGC using the internal tin process. Conductor designs, heat treatment studies, and results of measurements, including I/sub c/, n-value, RRR, magnetization, and chemical analyses, are presented. (4 refs).

  6. High-field recovery of the undistorted triangular lattice in the frustrated metamagnet CuFeO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lummen, T. T. A.; Strohm, C.; Rakoto, H.; Nugroho, A. A.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.

    Pulsed-field magnetization experiments extend the typical metamagnetic staircase of CuFeO2 up to 58 T to reveal an additional first-order phase transition at high field for both the parallel and perpendicular field configuration. Virtually complete isotropic behavior is retrieved only above this

  7. Diagnostic relevance of high field MRI in clinical neuroradiology: the advantages and challenges of driving a sports car

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattjes, M.P.; Barkhof, F.

    2012-01-01

    High field MRI operating at 3 T is increasingly being used in the field of neuroradiology on the grounds that higher magnetic field strength should theoretically lead to a higher diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis of several disease entities. This Editorial discusses the exhaustive review by

  8. Magnetic levitation and its application for education devices based on YBCO bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, W.M., E-mail: yangwm@snnu.edu.cn; Chao, X.X.; Guo, F.X.; Li, J.W.; Chen, S.L.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • A small superconducting maglev propeller system has been designed and constructed based on YBCO bulk superconductors. • Several small maglev vehicle models have been designed and constructed based on YBCO bulk superconductors. • The models can be used as experimental or demonstration devices for the magnetic levitation applications. -- Abstract: A small superconducting maglev propeller system, a small spacecraft model suspending and moving around a terrestrial globe, several small maglev vehicle models and a magnetic circuit converter have been designed and constructed. The track was paved by NdFeB magnets, the arrangement of the magnets made us easy to get a uniform distribution of magnetic field along the length direction of the track and a high magnetic field gradient in the lateral direction. When the YBCO bulks mounted inside the vehicle models or spacecraft model was field cooled to LN{sub 2} temperature at a certain distance away from the track, they could be automatically floating over and moving along the track without any obvious friction. The models can be used as experimental or demonstration devices for the magnetic levitation applications.

  9. Analysis on electromagnetic characteristics and military application of non-magnetized discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiachun; Miao, Lei; Li, Zhigang

    2015-11-01

    Firstly, the dispersion equation of a plane electromagnetic wave in homogeneous and non-magnetized discharge plasma was established. According to the different frequency of electromagnetic wave and plasma parameters, the characteristics were discussed when the plasma interacted with electromagnetic waves. Then the gas discharge approach was put forward according to characteristics of plasma generated by different methods and their advantages and disadvantages. The possibility of using non-magnetized discharge plasma for the military purpose was analyzed. In the end, the principle and characteristics of the application of the non-magnetized discharge plasma were studied in the fields of stealth and protection against strong electromagnetic pulse.

  10. The value of conventional high-field MRI in MS in the light of the McDonald criteria: a literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Line Sofie Lunde; Larsson, H B W; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini

    2010-01-01

    multiple sclerosis. Further larger studies of patients with clinically isolated syndromes are needed to settle the question of a diagnostic consequence of high-field imaging in MS. We suggest that the next revision of the McDonald diagnostic criteria include a recommendation of field strength.......The diagnosis of MS is based on the revised McDonald criteria and is multidisciplinary. Both clinical and paraclinical measures are included. High-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming increasingly available and it is therefore necessary to clarify possible advantages of high-field MRI...... of lesions to be better at high field. Of the seven studies, six found more and bigger lesions at high-field MRI. In the present paper, the relevant MRI sequences are evaluated in detail. The detection of more lesions at high-field strength did not seem to lead to earlier diagnosis of clinically definite...

  11. Advances in High-Field BOLD fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Barth

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This review article examines the current state of BOLD fMRI at a high magnetic field strength of 7 Tesla. The following aspects are covered: a short description of the BOLD contrast, spatial and temporal resolution, BOLD sensitivity, localization and spatial specificity, technical challenges as well as an outlook on future developments are given. It is shown that the main technical challenges of performing BOLD fMRI at high magnetic field strengths—namely development of array coils, imaging sequences and parallel imaging reconstruction—have been solved successfully. The combination of these developments has lead to the availability of high-resolution BOLD fMRI protocols that are able to cover the whole brain with a repetition time (TR shorter than 3 s. The structural information available from these high-resolution fMRI images itself is already very detailed, which helps to co-localize structure and function. Potential future applications include whole-brain connectivity analysis on a laminar resolution and single subject examinations.

  12. High-field thermal transports properties of REBCO coated conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Bonura, M

    2015-01-01

    The use of REBCO coated conductors is envisaged for many applications, extending from power cables to high-field magnets. Whatever the case, thermal properties of REBCO tapes play a key role for the stability of superconducting devices. In this work, we present the first study on the longitudinal thermal conductivity (k) of REBCO coated conductors in magnetic fields up to 19 T applied both parallelly and perpendicularly to the thermal-current direction. Copper-stabilized tapes from six industrial manufacturers have been investigated. We show that zero-field k of coated conductors can be calculated with an accuracy of ‡ 15% from the residual resistivity ratio of the stabilizer and the Cu/non-Cu ratio. Measurements performed at high fields have allowed us to evaluate the consistency of the procedures generally used for estimating in-field k in the framework of the Wiedemann-Franz law from an electrical characterization of the materials. In-field data are intended to provide primary ingredients for the ...

  13. Microdevice for continuous flow magnetic separation for bioengineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashan, Saud A.; Dagher, Sawsan; Alazzam, Anas; Mathew, Bobby; Hilal-Alnaqbi, Ali

    2017-05-01

    A novel continuous flow microfluidic device, integrated with soft-magnetic wire (permalloy), is fabricated and tested for magnetophoresis based separation. The flow-invasive permalloy wire, magnetized using an external bias field, is positioned perpendicular to the external magnetic field and with its length traversing the introduced sample flow. The microfluidic device is realized in PDMS; the mold for PDMS microstructures is cut out of Plexiglas® sheets with controllable dimensions. Microfluidic devices with microchannel height ranging between 0.5 mm and 2 mm are fabricated. Experiments are carried out with and without sheath flow; with sheath flow the microparticles are focused at the center of the microchannel. When focusing is not employed, the microdevice can exhibit a complete separation (or filtration) with the introduction of the sample at rates lower than a maximum threshold. However, this complete separation is attributed to the fact that part of the particles, once they approach the repulsive field of the wire, will find their way into the attractive region of the wire while the remaining will be indefinitely trapped at the channel walls. On the other hand, when the focused sample is flowing at the same rate but alongside an appropriate sheath flow, the complete separation can be achieved with all (initially repelled) particles being captured on the attractive region of the wire itself. This microdevice design is well suited for purification, enrichment, and detection of microparticles in lab-on-a-chip devices due to its ability to handle high throughput without compromising capture efficiency while exhibiting excellent reliability and flexibility.

  14. Iron oxide nanoparticles for neuronal cell applications: uptake study and magnetic manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Michal; Karni, Moshe; Baranes, Koby; Levy, Itay; Alon, Noa; Margel, Shlomo; Shefi, Orit

    2016-05-14

    The ability to direct and manipulate neuronal cells has important potential in therapeutics and neural network studies. An emerging approach for remotely guiding cells is by incorporating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into cells and transferring the cells into magnetic sensitive units. Recent developments offer exciting possibilities of magnetic manipulations of MNPs-loaded cells by external magnetic fields. In the present study, we evaluated and characterized uptake properties for optimal loading of cells by MNPs. We examined the interactions between MNPs of different cores and coatings, with primary neurons and neuron-like cells. We found that uncoated-maghemite iron oxide nanoparticles maximally interact and penetrate into cells with no cytotoxic effect. We observed that the cellular uptake of the MNPs depends on the time of incubation and the concentration of nanoparticles in the medium. The morphology patterns of the neuronal cells were not affected by MNPs uptake and neurons remained electrically active. We theoretically modeled magnetic fluxes and demonstrated experimentally the response of MNP-loaded cells to the magnetic fields affecting cell motility. Furthermore, we successfully directed neurite growth orientation along regeneration. Applying mechanical forces via magnetic mediators is a useful approach for biomedical applications. We have examined several types of MNPs and studied the uptake behavior optimized for magnetic neuronal manipulations.

  15. MAX UnMix: Introducing a new web application for unmixing magnetic coercivity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Maxbauer, D.; Fox, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic minerals are present in a wide variety of natural systems and are often indicative of the natural or anthropogenic processes that led to their deposition, formation, or transformation. Unmixing the contribution of magnetic components to bulk field-dependent magnetization curves has become increasingly common in environmental and rock magnetic studies and has enhanced our ability to fingerprint the magnetic signatures of magnetic minerals with distinct compositions, grain sizes, and origins. A variety of programs have been developed over the past two decades to allow researchers to deconvolve field-dependent magnetization curves for these purposes, however many of these programs are either outdated or have obstacles that inhibit the programs usability. MAX UnMix is a new web application (available online at http://www.irm.umn.edu/maxunmix) built using the `shiny' package for R-studio that can be used to process coercivity distributions derived from magnetization curves (acquisition, demagnetization, or backfield data) via an online user-interface. Here, we use example datasets from lake sediments and paleosols to present details of the MAX UnMix model and the programs functionality. MAX UnMix is designed to be accessible, user friendly, and should serve as a useful resource for future research.

  16. The application of magnetic measurements for the characterization of atmospheric particulate pollution within the airport environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S; Richardson, N; Bennett, M; Hoon, S R

    2015-01-01

    The significant increase in global air travel which has occurred during the last fifty years has generated growing concern regarding the potential impacts associated with increasing emissions of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on health and the environment. PM within the airport environment may be derived from a range of sources. To date, however, the identification of individual sources of airport derived PM has remained elusive but constitutes a research priority for the aviation industry.The aim of this research was to identify distinctive and characteristic fingerprints of atmospheric PM derived from various sources in an airport environment through the use of environmental magnetic measurements. PM samples from aircraft engine emissions, brake wear and tire wear residues have been obtained from a range of different aircraft and engine types. Samples have been analyzed utilizing a range of magnetic mineral properties indicative of magnetic mineralogy and grain size. Results indicate that the dusts from the three 'aircraft' sources, (i.e. engines, brakes and tires) display distinctive magnetic mineral characteristics which may serve as 'magnetic fingerprints' for these sources. Magnetic measurements of runway dusts collected at different locations on the runway surface also show contrasting magnetic characteristics which, when compared with those of the aircraft-derived samples, suggest that they may relate to different sources characteristic of aircraft emissions at various stages of the take-off/landing cycle. The findings suggest that magnetic measurements could have wider applicability for the differentiation and identification of PM within the airport environment.

  17. Application of magnetic carriers to two examples of quantitative cell analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chen; Qian, Zhixi; Choi, Young Suk; David, Allan E.; Todd, Paul; Hanley, Thomas R.

    2017-04-01

    The use of magnetophoretic mobility as a surrogate for fluorescence intensity in quantitative cell analysis was investigated. The objectives of quantitative fluorescence flow cytometry include establishing a level of labeling for the setting of parameters in fluorescence activated cell sorters (FACS) and the determination of levels of uptake of fluorescently labeled substrates by living cells. Likewise, the objectives of quantitative magnetic cytometry include establishing a level of labeling for the setting of parameters in flowing magnetic cell sorters and the determination of levels of uptake of magnetically labeled substrates by living cells. The magnetic counterpart to fluorescence intensity is magnetophoretic mobility, defined as the velocity imparted to a suspended cell per unit of magnetic ponderomotive force. A commercial velocimeter available for making this measurement was used to demonstrate both applications. Cultured Gallus lymphoma cells were immunolabeled with commercial magnetic beads and shown to have adequate magnetophoretic mobility to be separated by a novel flowing magnetic separator. Phagocytosis of starch nanoparticles having magnetic cores by cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, a CHO line, was quantified on the basis of magnetophoretic mobility.

  18. Applications of the directional solidification in magnetic shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y. J.; Liu, J.; Hu, Q. D.; Liu, Q. H.; Karaman, I.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    A zone melting liquid metal cooling (ZMLMC) method of directional solidification was applied to prepare highly-oriented Ni52Fe17Ga27Co4 magnetic shape memory alloys. At high temperature gradient and low growth velocity, the well-developed preferred orientation for coarse columnar crystals was obtained. Such a structure leads to a large complete pseudoelastic recovery of 5% at 348 K. Moreover, the pseudoelastic behaviours and the kinetics of the martensitic transformation (MT) are significantly affected by the intersection angle between the loading direction and the grain boundaries.

  19. Signal processing in magnetic resonance spectroscopy with biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Belkic, Dzevad

    2010-01-01

    ""a useful addition to the fields of both magnetic resonance (MR) as well as signal processing. … immensely useful as a practical resource handbook to dip into from time to time and to find specific advice on issues faced during the course of work in MR techniques for cancer research. … the best feature of this book is how it positions the very practical area of digital signal processing in the contextual framework of a much more esoteric and fundamental field-that of quantum mechanics. The direct link between quantum-mechanical spectral analysis and rational response functions and the gene

  20. Magnetic nanoparticles: reactive oxygen species generation and potential therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Trang; Hilt, J. Zach

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been demonstrated to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play a major role in various cellular pathways, via Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. ROS act as a double-edged sword inside the body. At normal conditions, the generation of ROS is in balance with their elimination by scavenger systems, and they can promote cell proliferation as well as differentiation. However, at an increased level, they can cause damages to protein, lead to cellular apoptosis, and contribute to many diseases including cancer. Many recent studies proposed a variety of strategies to either suppress toxicity of ROS generation or exploit the elevated ROS levels for cancer therapy.

  1. Intense ion beam applications to magnetic confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudan, R N

    1980-08-18

    The ion ring project objective is to trap a ring of high energy, axis-encircling ions in a magnetic mirror. The number of ring ions should be such as to produce deltaB/B on the ring axis of order 10%. The second experiment, LONGSHOT, is directed to producing a long pulse ion beam source so that the total number of protons required for an ion ring can be provided a lower diode power and, hence, at much less cost than that of 100 nsec pulsed power generators like the NRL GAMBLE II. A detailed report of the progress on IREX and LONGSHOT is given. (MOW)

  2. Magnetic Nanoparticles: Material Engineering and Emerging Applications in Lithography and Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuping; Wen, Tianlong; Samia, Anna Cristina S.; Khandhar, Amit; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    We present an interdisciplinary overview of material engineering and emerging applications of iron oxide nanoparticles. We discuss material engineering of nanoparticles in the broadest sense, emphasizing size and shape control, large-area self-assembly, composite/hybrid structures, and surface engineering. This is followed by a discussion of several non-traditional, emerging applications of iron oxide nanoparticles, including nanoparticle lithography, magnetic particle imaging, magnetic guided drug delivery, and positive contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude with a succinct discussion of the pharmacokinetics pathways of iron oxide nanoparticles in the human body –– an important and required practical consideration for any in vivo biomedical application, followed by a brief outlook of the field. PMID:26586919

  3. The Application of Carbon Nanotubes in Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raniszewski, Grzegorz; Miaskowski, Arkadiusz; Wiak, Slawomir

    2015-01-01

      The aim of this paper is to present the results of the investigation into the applications of carbon nanotubes with ferromagnetic nanoparticles as nanoheaters for targeted thermal ablation of cancer cells...

  4. Applications of magnetic refrigeration and its assessment. A feasibility study - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitanovski, A.; Diebold, M.; Vuarnoz, D.; Gonin, C.; Egolf, P. W.

    2008-04-15

    Magnetic refrigeration has the potential to replace conventional refrigeration systems - with often problematic refrigerants - in several niche markets or even some main markets of the refrigeration domain. Based on this insight the Swiss Federal Office of Energy has asked a division of the University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland (HEIG-VD) in Yverdon-les-Bains to list all possible refrigeration technologies and to evaluate the potential of magnetic refrigeration for these specific applications. The HEIG-VD researchers have developed a calculation tool to determine the coefficient of performance (COP) value and the exergy efficiency as a function of the magnetic field strength and the rotation frequency of a rotary type of magnetic refrigerator. The considered machine design is based on a patent, which was deposited by these scientists. Based on this work, it is found that especially two applications are very interesting for a closer investigation: the household refrigerator without a freezing compartment and the central chilling unit, which may be of large size. In the domains of refrigeration, where magnetic refrigeration could be successfully applied, the costs for magnetic refrigeration machines would be a little higher than those of the conventional ones. On the other hand the study shows possibilities how the magnetic refrigeration machines could reach higher COP values than those of the corresponding gas compression/expansion machines. Therefore, for magnetic refrigeration one may assume lower costs of operation. For large systems - as e.g. chiller units - it should be studied, if superconducting magnets could be economically applied. (author)

  5. Study on the application of permanent magnet synchronous motors in underground belt conveyors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, S. H.

    2017-12-01

    This paper analyzes and compares the advantages and disadvantages of several kinds of drive devices of belt conveyors from the angle of energy saving, and summarizes the application advantages and using problems of permanent magnet motor variable frequency drive system in belt conveyors. An example is given to demonstrate the energy saving effect of this system compared with other driving methods. This paper points out the application prospect of permanent magnet motor variable frequency drive system on belt conveyors and other large mining machines in coal mine. This paper is aimed to provide the design direction for the designer and the choice basis for the user on belt conveyor.

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  7. High Magnetic Fields in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, U. E.; Gilch, P.

    Recent applications of large ( 1 T - 30 T) magnetic fields in modern chemical research are reviewed. Magnetic field effects of chemical relevance appear on the levels of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, and oscopic forces. Quantum mechanical magnetic field effects are governed by the Zeeman interaction and are borne out as static and dynamic effects in spectroscopy and in chemical kinetics. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy and magnetic fluorescence quenching in the gas phase serve to illustrate the former, while radical pair spin chemistry is representative of the latter. The principles of the radical pair mechanism are outlined and high-field applications are illustrated in some detail for photo-induced electron transfer reactions of some transition metal complexes. Thermodynamic effects concern the magnetization of chemical samples, which is the focus of magnetochemistry or — more modern — molecular magnetism, and the equilibrium of chemical reactions. Representative examples of both aspects are described. Finally, the exploitation of orientational forces caused by the magnetic anisotropy of larger particles (from omolecules to micro-crystals) is exemplified. Crystal growth in a magnetic field may hold a potential for achieving better control of the quality of protein crystals for structural analysis.

  8. PEG-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallapu, Murali Mohan; Foy, Susan P; Jain, Tapan K; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were tested as a drug carrier system, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent, and ability to conjugate to an antibody. Methods An iron oxide core coated with oleic acid (OA) and then with OA-PEG forms a water dispersible MNP formulation. Hydrophobic doxorubicin partitions into the OA layer for sustained drug delivery. The T1 and T2 MRI contrast properties were determined in vitro and the circulation of the MNPs measured in mouse carotid arteries. An N-hydroxysuccinimide group (NHS) on the OA-PEG-80 was used to conjugate the amine functional group on antibodies for active targeting in the human MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Results The optimized formulation had a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 184 nm with an 8 nm iron-oxide core. The MNPs enhance the T2 MRI contrast, and have a long circulation time in vivo with 30% relative concentration 50 min post-injection. Doxorubicin-loaded MNPs showed sustained drug release and dose-dependent antiproliferative effects in vitro; the drug effect was enhanced with transferrin antibody conjugated MNPs. Conclusion PEG functionalized MNPs could be developed as a targeted drug delivery system and MRI contrast agent. PMID:20845067

  9. The emerging applications of magnetic nanovectors in nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeney, Charles E

    2015-01-01

    The scientific disciplines that encompass medical therapy and diagnostics, in a continuing transition to personalized medicine, have found a valuable tool in the emerging field of nanotechnology. New nanotools are now enabling discoveries and advancements that form the foundation of what has become known collectively as nanomedicine. The global impact of these advancements are being seen in areas of advanced/improved early stage diagnostics, targeted drug delivery systems and imaging methods, all leading to more effective diagnostic/therapeutic strategies and outcomes. This review focuses on recent patent advancements in this transition with emphasis on the emerging role of magnetic nanovectors as enabling tools for the enhanced effectiveness of cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, considering its historical progression and future impact.

  10. Applications of Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, J. Keiko

    Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MEMRI) has proven itself to be a beneficial technique in the field of Neuroscience. This thesis applies MEMRI to studies in neuroscience by first establishing the limitations concerning the use of MEMRI in live rats. Experiment 1 used an osmotic pump for manganese (Mn) delivery to the lateral ventricles for acquisition of anatomical images using MEMRI. From my knowledge, this was the first method demonstrating slow infusion of Mn to the lateral ventricles. In Experiment 2, MEMRI was used for volumetric analysis the whole brain and hippocampus of prenatally stressed rats. To my knowledge, this study was the first to investigate the effect of generational prenatal stress on the structure of a rat's brain using MEMRI and histology. Additionally, Experiment 2 investigated the use of a subcutaneous osmotic pump to deliver Mn for MEMRI. A summary on the use of MEMRI in Neuroscience concludes this thesis, with a discussion on the methods used and related technical considerations.

  11. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

    2012-03-07

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  12. Microstrip Resonator for High Field MRI with Capacitor-Segmented Strip and Ground Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Boer, Vincent; Petersen, Esben Thade

    2017-01-01

    ) segmenting stripe and ground plane of the resonator with series capacitors. The design equations for capacitors providing symmetric current distribution are derived. The performance of two types of segmented resonators are investigated experimentally. To authors’ knowledge, a microstrip resonator, where both......High field MRI coils are often based on transmission line resonators. Due to relatively short wavelength of RF fields, such coils produce uneven field patterns. Here we show, that it is possible to manipulate magnetic field patterns of microstrip resonators in both planes (sagittal and transverse......, strip and ground plane are capacitor-segmented, is shown here for the first time....

  13. Observation of thermoelectric currents in high-field superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolenda, Stefan; Wolf, Michael J.; Beckmann, Detlef [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We report on the experimental observation of thermoelectric currents in superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions in high magnetic fields. The thermoelectric signals are due to a spin-dependent lifting of particle-hole symmetry, and are found to be in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. The maximum Seebeck coefficient inferred from the data is about -100 μ V/K, much larger than commonly found in metalic structures. Our results directly give proof of the coupling of spin and heat transport in high-field superconductors.

  14. Fabrication of magnetic gold nanorod particles for immunomagnetic separation and SERS application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamer, Uğur; Boyacı, İsmail H.; Temur, Erhan; Zengin, Adem; Dincer, İlker; Elerman, Yalçın

    2011-08-01

    The preparation and application of rod-shaped core-shell structured Fe3O4-Au nanoparticles for immunomagnetic separation and sensing were described for the first time with this study. To synthesize magnetic gold nanorod particles, the seed-mediated synthetic method was carried out and the resulting nanoparticles were characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were also examined. Characterization of the magnetic gold nanorod particles has proven that the resulting nanoparticles were composed of Fe3O4 core and the gold shell. The rod-shaped gold-coated iron nanoparticles have an average diameter of 16 ± 2 nm and an average length of about 50 ± 5 nm (corresponding aspect ratio of 3). The saturation magnetization value for the magnetic gold nanorod particles was found to be 37 emu/g at 300 K. Rapid and room temperature reaction synthesis of magnetic gold nanorod particles and subsequent surface modification with E. coli antibodies provide immunomagnetic separation and SERS application. The analytical performance of the SERS-based homogenous sandwich immunoassay system with respect to linear range, detection limit, and response time is also presented.

  15. Magnetorelaxometry procedures for quantitative imaging and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebl, Maik; Wiekhorst, Frank; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Radon, Patricia; Gutkelch, Dirk; Baumgarten, Daniel; Steinhoff, Uwe; Trahms, Lutz

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative knowledge about the spatial distribution and local environment of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) inside an organism is essential for guidance and improvement of biomedical applications such as magnetic hyperthermia and magnetic drug targeting. Magnetorelaxometry (MRX) provides such quantitative information by detecting the magnetic response of MNPs following a fast change in the applied magnetic field. In this article, we review our MRX based procedures that enable both the characterization and the quantitative imaging of MNPs in a biomedical environment. MRX characterization supported the selection of an MNP system with colloidal stability and suitable cellular MNP uptake. Spatially resolved MRX, a procedure employing multi-channel MRX measurements allowed for in-vivo monitoring of the MNP distribution in a pre-clinical carcinoma animal model. Extending spatially resolved MRX by consecutive magnetization of distinct parts of the sample led to a demonstration of MRX tomography. With this tomography, we reconstructed the three dimensional MNP distribution inside animal sized phantoms with a sensitivity of milligrams of MNPs per cm3. In addition, the targeting efficiency of MNPs in whole blood was assessed using a flow phantom and MRX quantification. These MRX based measurement and analysis procedures have substantially supported the development of MNP based biomedical applications.

  16. Study of Train-Side Passive Magnetic Measurements with Applications to Train Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Heirich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive magnetic sensors measure the magnetic field density in three axes and are often integrated on a single chip. These low-cost sensors are widely used in car navigation as well as in battery powered navigation equipment such as smartphones as part of an electronic compass. We focus on a train localization application with multiple, exclusively onboard sensors and a track map. This approach is considered as a base technology for future railway applications such as collision avoidance systems or autonomous train driving. In this paper, we address the following question: how beneficial are passive magnetic measurements for train localization? We present and analyze measurements of two different magnetometers recorded on a regional train at regular passenger service. We show promising correlations of the measurements with the track positions and the traveled switch way. The processed data reveals that the railway environment has repeatable, location-dependent magnetic signatures. This is considered as a novel approach to train localization, as the use of these magnetic signals at first view is not obvious. The proposed methods based on passive magnetic measurements show a high potential to be integrated in new and existing train localization approaches.

  17. International Conference on Scientific and Clinical Applications of Magnetic Carriers

    CERN Document Server

    Schütt, Wolfgang; Teller, Joachim; Zborowski, Maciej

    1997-01-01

    The discovery of uniform latex particles by polymer chemists of the Dow Chemical Company nearly 50 years ago opened up new exciting fields for scientists and physicians and established many new biomedical applications. Many in vitro diagnostic tests such as the latex agglutination tests, analytical cell and phagocytosis tests have since become rou­ tine. They were all developed on the basis of small particles bound to biological active molecules and fluorescent and radioactive markers. Further developments are ongoing, with the focus now shifted to applications of polymer particles in the controlled and di­ rected transport of drugs in living systems. Four important factors make microspheres interesting for in vivo applications: First, biocompatible polymer particles can be used to transport known amounts of drug and re­ lease them in a controlled fashion. Second, particles can be made of materials which bio­ degrade in living organisms without doing any harm. Third, particles with modified surfaces are a...

  18. Eddy current effects in plain and hollow cylinders spinning inside homogeneous magnetic fields: application to magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, G; Jacquinot, J-F; Sakellariou, D

    2012-10-21

    We present a thorough analysis of eddy currents that develop in a rectangular cross section toroid rotating in a uniform magnetic field. The slow rotation regime is assumed. Compact expressions for the current density, the total dissipated power, and the braking torque are given. Examination of the topology of current lines reveals that depending upon the relative dimensions of the side and length of the toroid two different regimes exist. The conditions of existence of the two regimes are analytically established. In view of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications, we derive the angular variation of the magnetic field created by eddy currents and lay down the formalism necessary for calculating the effect of this field on the NMR spectra of the conductor itself or of a sample co-rotating with the conductor, a situation encountered when dealing with rotating detectors. Examples of calculations for cases of practical interest are presented. The theory is confronted with available data, and we give guidelines for the design of optimized rotating micro-coils.

  19. Magnetic microgels for drug targeting applications: Physical–chemical properties and cytotoxicity evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcu, Rodica, E-mail: rodica.turcu@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Street, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Craciunescu, Izabell [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Street, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Garamus, Vasil M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Zentrum für Material- und Küstenforschung GmbH, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Janko, Christina; Lyer, Stefan; Tietze, Rainer; Alexiou, Christoph [ENT-Department, Else Kröner-Fresenius Stiftung-Professorship, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (SEON), University Hospital Erlangen (Germany); Vekas, Ladislau, E-mail: vekas@acad-tim.tm.edu.ro [Romanian Academy-Timisoara Branch, CFATR, Laboratory of Magnetic Fluids, Mihai Viteazul Street 24, 300223 Timisoara (Romania)

    2015-04-15

    Magnetoresponsive microgels with high saturation magnetization values have been obtained by a strategy based on the miniemulsion method using high colloidal stability organic carrier ferrofluid as primary material. Hydrophobic nanoparticles Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/oleic acid are densely packed into well-defined spherical nanoparticle clusters coated with polymers with sizes in the range 40–350 nm. Physical–chemical characteristics of magnetic microgels were investigated by TEM, SAXS, XPS and VSM measurements with the focus on the structure–properties relationship. The impact of magnetic microgels loaded with anticancer drug mitoxantrone (MTO) on the non-adherent human T cell leukemia line Jurkat was investigated in multiparameter flow cytometry. We showed that both MTO and microgel-loaded MTO penetrate into cells and both induce apoptosis and later secondary necrosis in a time- and dose dependent manner. In contrast, microgels without MTO are not cytotoxic in the corresponding concentrations. Our results show that MTO-loaded microgels are promising structures for application in magnetic drug targeting. - Highlights: • Densely packed spherical clusters of magnetic nanoparticles were obtained. • High magnetization microgels with superparamagnetic behavior are reported. • The facile and reproducible synthesis procedure applied is easy to be up-scaled. • The toxicity tests show that magnetic microgels are not cytotoxic. • We show that mitoxantrone loaded microgels induce death of Jurkat cells.

  20. A comparative measurement technique of nanoparticle heating for magnetic hyperthermia applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayton, A.; Zehner, J.; Timmis, J.; Patel, V.; Vallejo-Fernandez, G.; O’Grady, K.

    2017-12-01

    We describe a method for the determination of the heating power of magnetic nanoparticle colloids which have potential for application in the remedial treatment of malignant and non-malignant tumours. The method is based upon a comparison between the heating power observed when the colloid is exposed to a radio frequency magnetic field and that which is observed using a resistive electrical heater. A new design of the measurement cell has been made which has the advantages of reducing or eliminating the effects of convection, ensuring the measurement is made in a magnetic field of known uniformity and that the heat losses in the system are constant and minimized under both magnetic and Joule heating.

  1. A frequency tuner for resonant inverters suitable for magnetic hyperthermia applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazon, E. E.; Sámano, A. H.; Calleja, H.; Quintero, L. H.; Paz, J. A.; Cano, M. E.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a frequency tuner system is developed for generating variable frequency magnetic fields for magnetic hyperthermia applications. The tuning device contains three specially designed phase lock loop devices that drive a resonant inverter working in the frequency band of 180-525 kHz. This tuner system can be adapted for other resonant inverters employed in the studies of ferrofluids with superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The performance of the whole system is also examined. Our findings were in agreement with the theoretical expectations of phase locking and frequency tuning. The system is tested for samples of a solid magnetic material of cylindrical shape and ferrofluids with differing concentrations of powdered magnetite. The observations indicate significant frequency changes of the magnetic field due to heating of the samples. These frequency variations can be a source of errors, which should not be neglected in experiments determining the specific absorption rate or power dissipated density.

  2. Processing and characterization of activated carbon coated magnetic particles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanujan, R.V. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)]. E-mail: ramanujan@ntu.edu.sg; Purushotham, S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Chia, M.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2007-05-16

    Synthesis and characterization of Magnetically Targeted Carrier (MTC) powders consisting of activated carbon coated iron particles were carried out. Powders with activated carbon content of 5% by weight (Fe5C) and 35% by weight (Fe35C) were studied. Powders were synthesized via the high energy ball milling route, and the influence of milling time on the morphology, magnetic properties and drug adsorption and desorption characteristics was investigated. Physical and structural characterization included electron microscopy, size analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The magnetic properties, and theophylline adsorption and desorption characteristics were studied. Fe35C milled for 10 h was found to be a suitable candidate for MTC applications with fine size, stable magnetic properties, and superior drug adsorption and desorption behavior.

  3. An Algorithm for Construction of Dipole Magnets Computer Models with Quality Control and Its Application for the PANDA Forward Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Ritman, J; Yuldasheva, M B

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for creating computer models of spectrometer dipole magnets with required parameters. It contains the following steps: 1) analytical estimates for ampere turns, magnet length and yoke thickness; 2) construction of a computer model for the coil and formation of the magnet yoke; 3) quality control of the computer model; 4) output of obtained magnet characteristics. The following input parameters are used in the proposed algorithm: the magnet bending power, the magnet working region, steel type and conductor material. As an example of its application we consider the problem of creation of the computer dipole model for the PANDA experiment at GSI (Darmstadt).

  4. Neutron Scattering and High Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winn, Barry L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stone, Matthew B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The workshop “Neutron Scattering and High Magnetic Fields” was held September 4-5, 2014 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The workshop was held in response to a recent report by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences entitled “High Magnetic Field Science and Its Application in the United States: Current Status and Future Directions.”1 This report highlights the fact that neutron scattering measurements carried out in high magnetic fields provide important opportunities for new science. The workshop explored the range of the scientific discoveries that could be enabled with neutron scattering measurements at high fields (25 Tesla or larger), the various technologies that might be utilized to build specialized instruments and sample environment equipment to enable this research at ORNL, and possible routes to funding and constructing these facilities and portable high field sample environments.

  5. Iron oxide nanoparticles as magnetic relaxation switching (MRSw) sensors: Current applications in nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, David; Lopez, Soledad; García-Martin, María Luisa; Pozo, David

    2016-07-01

    Since pioneering work in the early 60s on the development of enzyme electrodes the field of sensors has evolved to different sophisticated technological platforms. Still, for biomedical applications, there are key requirements to meet in order to get fast, low-cost, real-time data acquisition, multiplexed and automatic biosensors. Nano-based sensors are one of the most promising healthcare applications of nanotechnology, and prone to be one of the first to become a reality. From all nanosensors strategies developed, Magnetic Relaxation Switches (MRSw) assays combine several features which are attractive for nanomedical applications such as safe biocompatibility of magnetic nanoparticles, increased sensitivity/specificity measurements, possibility to detect analytes in opaque samples (unresponsive to light-based interferences) and the use of homogeneous setting assay. This review aims at presenting the ongoing progress of MRSw technology and its most important applications in clinical medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Microminiature Hall Probes for Applications at Pulsed Magnetic Fields up to 87 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, O. A.; Zherlitsyn, S.; Uhlarz, M.; Skourski, Y.; Palewski, T.; Wosnitza, J.

    2010-04-01

    Microminiature Hall probes (MHP) may be used as magnetic field transducers, with virtually no change of sensitivity with temperature, for applications at room and cryogenic temperatures. The probes have a nominal active sensing area from 90×90 μm down to 20×20 μm and are based on Sn-doped n-InSb/i-GaAs MBE-grown heterostructures. MHPs were intensively tested in static (up to 14 T) and pulsed magnetic fields and shown to be appropriate for various applications in the temperature range 2-300 K and in pulsed magnetic fields up to 87 T. The latest version of these probes, with overall cross-section thickness-width dimensions of 150×750 μm, are the smallest encapsulated Hall probes currently available and can be placed in areas not previously accessible to commercial packaged or unpackaged sensors.

  7. Magnetic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Essam Aboud; Nabil El-Masry; Atef Qaddah; Faisal Alqahtani; Mohammed R.H. Moufti

    2015-01-01

    .... A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth...

  8. Cutting edge clinical applications in cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cecco, Carlo N; Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2017-01-28

    Today, the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is widespread in clinical practice. The increased need to evaluate of subtle myocardial changes, coronary artery anatomy, and hemodynamic assessment has prompted the development of novel CMR techniques including T1 and T2 mapping, non-contrast angiography and four dimensional (4D) flow. T1 mapping is suitable for diagnosing pathologies affecting extracellular volume such as myocarditis, diffuse myocardial fibrosis and amyloidosis, and is a promising diagnostic tool for patients with iron overload and Fabry disease. T2 mapping is useful in depicting acute myocardial edema and estimating the amount of salvageable myocardium following an ischemic event. Novel angiography techniques, such as the self-navigated whole-heart or the quiescent-interval single-shot sequence, enable the visualization of the great vessels and coronary artery anatomy without the use of contrast material. The 4D flow technique overcomes the limitations of standard phase-contrast imaging and allows for the assessment of cardiovascular hemodynamics in the great arteries and flow patterns in the cardiac chambers. In conclusion, the future of CMR is heading toward a more reliable quantitative assessment of the myocardium, an improved non-contrast visualization of the coronary artery anatomy, and a more accurate evaluation of the cardiac hemodynamics.

  9. Application safety evaluation of the radio frequency identification tag under magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Fei, Xiaolu; Li,Shanshan; Gao, Shan; Wei, Lan; Wang, Lihong

    2014-01-01

    Background Radio Frequency Identification(RFID) has been widely used in healthcare facilities, but it has been paid little attention whether RFID applications are safe enough under healthcare environment. The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of RFID tags on Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging in a typical electromagnetic environment in hospitals, and to evaluate the safety of their applications. Methods A Magphan phantom was used to simulate the imaging objects, while active RFID ta...

  10. 77 FR 77056 - Applications for New Awards; Magnet Schools Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... Applications for New Awards; Magnet Schools Assistance Program AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement... decision in Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No 1 et al., 551 U.S. 701... a TIN from the Internal Revenue Service or the Social Security Administration. If you need a new TIN...

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of living systems : Applications in comparative physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanDenThillart, G; VanWaarde, A

    The most attractive feature of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is the noninvasive and nondestructive measurement of chemical compounds in intact tissues. MRS already has many applications in comparative physiology, usually based on observation of P-31, since the levels of phosphorus

  12. Dimensional metrology of cylinders based on digital image processing application to LHC corrector magnets

    CERN Document Server

    García-Tabarés, L; Calero, J; Toral, F; Ijspeert, Albert; Pérez, J C

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a method to measure relative deformations of bodies (basically cylinders) based on the analysis of images taken with a digital camera. The main application is the measurement of the deformation of the shrinking tubes of superconducting corrector magnets, which allows the calculation of the final prestress exerted to the coils. (4 refs).

  13. Magnetic properties of electroplated nano/microgranular NiFe thin films for rf application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuang, Y.; Vroubel, M.; Rejaei, B.; Burghartz, J.N.; Attenborough, K.

    2005-01-01

    A granular NiFe thin film with large in-plane magnetic anisotropy and high ferromagnetic-resonance frequency developed for radio-frequency integrated circuit (IC) applications is presented. During the deposition, three-dimensional (3D) growth occurs, yielding NiFe grains (? ? 1.0??m). Nanonuclei (?

  14. Recent development and application of magnetic nanoparticles for cell labeling and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Tao; Gao, Jining; Su, Yongping; Shi, Chunmeng

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have attracted extensive interest as novel contrast agents for biomedical imaging owing to their capability of deep-tissue imaging, non-invasiveness and low toxicity. This mini-review will provide an overview on the recent synthesis methods, influencing factors and potential applications of magentic nanoparticles for cell labeling and imaging.

  15. [A magnet application for the splinters take out in the mine-explosion woundings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimenko, E P; Glebskiĭ, Iu V; Poliakov, O I; Voĭtov, V V; Shestopaliuk, A A; Kurachenko, I P; Kobza, T I

    2015-01-01

    The methods of successful take out of metallic splinters from soft tissues with the help of magnet were depicted. Experience of the splinters take out, using small operative accesses or the wounding channell passage, was summarized. The method permits to determine precisely the splinter localization. The method application have promoted the reduction of the patient's stationary treatment duration and the comlications rate.

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  19. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at transition metal/oxide interfaces and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieny, B.; Chshiev, M.

    2017-04-01

    Spin electronics is a rapidly expanding field stimulated by a strong synergy between breakthrough basic research discoveries and industrial applications in the fields of magnetic recording, magnetic field sensors, nonvolatile memories [magnetic random access memories (MRAM) and especially spin-transfer-torque MRAM (STT-MRAM)]. In addition to the discovery of several physical phenomena (giant magnetoresistance, tunnel magnetoresistance, spin-transfer torque, spin-orbit torque, spin Hall effect, spin Seebeck effect, etc.), outstanding progress has been made on the growth and nanopatterning of magnetic multilayered films and nanostructures in which these phenomena are observed. Magnetic anisotropy is usually observed in materials that have large spin-orbit interactions. However, in 2002 perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) was discovered to exist at magnetic metal/oxide interfaces [for instance Co (Fe )/alumina ]. Surprisingly, this PMA is observed in systems where spin-orbit interactions are quite weak, but its amplitude is remarkably large—comparable to that measured at Co /Pt interfaces, a reference for large interfacial anisotropy (anisotropy˜1.4 erg /cm2=1.4 mJ /m2 ). Actually, this PMA was found to be very common at magnetic metal/oxide interfaces since it has been observed with a large variety of amorphous or crystalline oxides, including AlOx, MgO, TaOx, HfOx, etc. This PMA is thought to be the result of electronic hybridization between the oxygen and the magnetic transition metal orbit across the interface, a hypothesis supported by ab initio calculations. Interest in this phenomenon was sparked in 2010 when it was demonstrated that the PMA at magnetic transition metal/oxide interfaces could be used to build out-of-plane magnetized magnetic tunnel junctions for STT-MRAM cells. In these systems, the PMA at the CoFeB /MgO interface can be used to simultaneously obtain good memory retention, thanks to the large PMA amplitude, and a low write current

  20. Magnets for Muon 6D Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc.; Flanagan, Gene [Muons, Inc.

    2014-09-10

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), an innovative technique for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams using a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. The implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires high field superconducting magnets that provide superimposed solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole fields. Novel magnet design concepts are required to provide HCC magnet systems with the desired fields for 6D muon beam cooling. New designs feature simple coil configurations that produce these complex fields with the required characteristics, where new high field conductor materials are particularly advantageous. The object of the program was to develop designs and construction methods for HCC magnets and design a magnet system for a 6D muon beam cooling channel. If successful the program would develop the magnet technologies needed to create bright muon beams for many applications ranging from scientific accelerators and storage rings to beams to study material properties and new sources of energy. Examples of these applications include energy frontier muon colliders, Higgs and neutrino factories, stopping muon beams for studies of rare fundamental interactions and muon catalyzed fusion, and muon sources for cargo screening for homeland security.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging with hyperpolarized agents: methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Erin B.; Ludwig, Kai D.; Mummy, David G.; Fain, Sean B.

    2017-07-01

    In the past decade, hyperpolarized (HP) contrast agents have been under active development for MRI applications to address the twin challenges of functional and quantitative imaging. Both HP helium (3He) and xenon (129Xe) gases have reached the stage where they are under study in clinical research. HP 129Xe, in particular, is poised for larger scale clinical research to investigate asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and fibrotic lung diseases. With advances in polarizer technology and unique capabilities for imaging of 129Xe gas exchange into lung tissue and blood, HP 129Xe MRI is attracting new attention. In parallel, HP 13C and 15N MRI methods have steadily advanced in a wide range of pre-clinical research applications for imaging metabolism in various cancers and cardiac disease. The HP [1-13C] pyruvate MRI technique, in particular, has undergone phase I trials in prostate cancer and is poised for investigational new drug trials at multiple institutions in cancer and cardiac applications. This review treats the methodology behind both HP gases and HP 13C and 15N liquid state agents. Gas and liquid phase HP agents share similar technologies for achieving non-equilibrium polarization outside the field of the MRI scanner, strategies for image data acquisition, and translational challenges in moving from pre-clinical to clinical research. To cover the wide array of methods and applications, this review is organized by numerical section into (1) a brief introduction, (2) the physical and biological properties of the most common polarized agents with a brief summary of applications and methods of polarization, (3) methods for image acquisition and reconstruction specific to improving data acquisition efficiency for HP MRI, (4) the main physical properties that enable unique measures of physiology or metabolic pathways, followed by a more detailed review of the literature describing the use of HP agents to study: (5) metabolic pathways in cancer and cardiac

  2. High-field EPR spectroscopy applied to biological systems: characterization of molecular switches for electron and ion transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, K; Savitsky, A; Schnegg, A; Plato, M; Fuchst, M

    2005-01-07

    The last decade witnessed a tremendous growth in combined efforts of biologists, chemists and physicists to understand the dominant factors determining the specificity and directionality of transmembrane transfer processes in proteins. A large variety of experimental techniques is being used including X-ray and neutron diffraction, but also time-resolved optical, infrared and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This is done in conjunction with genetic engineering strategies to construct site-specific mutants for controlled modification of the proteins. As a general perception of these efforts, the substantial influence of weak interactions within the protein and its membrane interfaces is recognized. The weak interactions are subject to subtle changes during the reaction cycle owing to the inherent flexibility of the protein-membrane complex. Specific conformational changes accomplish molecular-switch functions for the transfer process to proceed with optimum efficiency. Characteristic examples of time varying non-bonded interactions are specific H-patterns and/or polarity effects of the microenvironment. The present perception has emerged from the coupling of newly developed spectroscopic techniques - and advanced EPR certainly deserves credit in this respect - with newly developed computational strategies to interpret the experimental data in terms of protein structure and dynamics. By now, the partners of this coupling, particularly high-field EPR spectroscopy and DFT-based quantum theory, have reached a level of sophistication that applications to large biocomplexes are within reach. In this review, a few large paradigm biosystems are surveyed which were explored lately in our laboratory. Taking advantage of the improved spectral and temporal resolution of high-frequency/high-field EPR at 95 GHz/3.4 T and 360 GHz/12.9 T, as compared to conventional X-band EPR (9.5 GHz/0.34 T), three biosystems are characterized with respect to structure and dynamics: (1) Light

  3. Magnetically Oriented Bicelles with Monoalkylphosphocholines: Versatile Membrane Mimetics for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaugrand, Maïwenn; Arnold, Alexandre A; Juneau, Antoine; Gambaro, Aline Balieiro; Warschawski, Dror E; Williamson, Philip T F; Marcotte, Isabelle

    2016-12-13

    Bicelles (bilayered micelles) are model membranes used in the study of peptide structure and membrane interactions. They are traditionally made of long- and short-chain phospholipids, usually dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (D14PC) and dihexanoyl-PC (D6PC). They are attractive membrane mimetics because their composition and planar surface are similar to the native membrane environment. In this work, to improve the solubilization of membrane proteins and allow their study in bicellar systems, D6PC was replaced by detergents from the monoalkylphosphocholine (MAPCHO) family, of which dodecylphosphocholine (12PC) is known for its ability to solubilize membrane proteins. More specifically 12PC, tetradecyl- (14PC), and hexadecyl-PC (16PC) have been employed. To verify the possibility of making bicelles with different hydrophobic thicknesses to better accommodate membrane proteins, D14PC was also replaced by phospholipids with different alkyl chain lengths: dilauroyl-PC (D12PC), dipalmitoyl-PC (D16PC), distearoyl-PC (D18PC), and diarachidoyl-PC (D20PC). Results obtained by 31P solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) at several lipid-to-detergent molar ratios (q) and temperatures indicate that these new MAPCHO bicelles can be formed under a variety of conditions. The quality of their alignment is similar to that of classical bicelles, and the low critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the surfactants and their miscibility with phospholipids are likely to be advantageous for the reconstitution of membrane proteins.

  4. Modelling of Packed Co Nanorods for Hard Magnetic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toson P.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical algorithm based on the bullet physics library to generate densely packed (39% - 41% structures of high-aspect-ratio nanorods for finite element micromagnetic simulations. The coercivities µ0Hc of the corresponding Cobalt nanorod structures vary between 0.50T and 0.67T, depending on the overall orientation of nanorods, which is in good agreement with experimental results. The simulations make it possible to estimate the coercivity loss due to incoherent reversal processes (27% as well as the gain due to shape anisotropy (59%. Our calculations show permanent magnets consisting of packed Co nanorods with an energy density product (BHmax of 83kJ/m3. We estimate that this value can be increased to 103kJ/m3 by increasing the packing density from 40% to 45%. Another way to optimize (BHmax is the usage of novel materials. By varying the anisotropy constant K1 and the saturation polarisation JS we found lower limits for these parameters to reach a certain energy density product. To increase (BHmax to 160 kJ/m3, K1 and JS have to be in the order of 450kJ/m3 and 2.25T, respectively. The thermal stability of this approach was verified by elastic band calculations. Cobalt nanorods with a diameter of 10nm and a height of 50nm are thermally stable at room temperature, but problematic at 900K. Doubling the nanorods' height to 100nm increases that limit considerably.

  5. Large field-of-view transmission line resonator for high field MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johannesson, Kristjan Sundgaard; Boer, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Transmission line resonators is often a preferable choice for coils in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because they provide a number of advantages over traditional loop coils. The size of such resonators, however, is limited to shorter than half a wavelength due to high standing wave...... ratio, which leads to inhomogeneous field distribution along the resonator. In this work, it is demonstrated that the resonator length can be extended to over half a wavelength with the help of series capacitors. The approach allows for reduced standing wave ratio and improved field homogeneity....... Achieved magnetic field distribution is compared to the conventional transmission line resonator. Imaging experiments are performed using 7 Tesla MRI system. The developed resonator is useful for building coils with large field-of-view....

  6. Photo-fluorescent and magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Donglu; Sadat, M E; Dunn, Andrew W; Mast, David B

    2015-05-14

    Iron oxide exhibits fascinating physical properties especially in the nanometer range, not only from the standpoint of basic science, but also for a variety of engineering, particularly biomedical applications. For instance, Fe3O4 behaves as superparamagnetic as the particle size is reduced to a few nanometers in the single-domain region depending on the type of the material. The superparamagnetism is an important property for biomedical applications such as magnetic hyperthermia therapy of cancer. In this review article, we report on some of the most recent experimental and theoretical studies on magnetic heating mechanisms under an alternating (AC) magnetic field. The heating mechanisms are interpreted based on Néel and Brownian relaxations, and hysteresis loss. We also report on the recently discovered photoluminescence of Fe3O4 and explain the emission mechanisms in terms of the electronic band structures. Both optical and magnetic properties are correlated to the materials parameters of particle size, distribution, and physical confinement. By adjusting these parameters, both optical and magnetic properties are optimized. An important motivation to study iron oxide is due to its high potential in biomedical applications. Iron oxide nanoparticles can be used for MRI/optical multimodal imaging as well as the therapeutic mediator in cancer treatment. Both magnetic hyperthermia and photothermal effect has been utilized to kill cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. Once the iron oxide nanoparticles are up taken by the tumor with sufficient concentration, greater localization provides enhanced effects over disseminated delivery while simultaneously requiring less therapeutic mass to elicit an equal response. Multi-modality provides highly beneficial co-localization. For magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles the co-localization of diagnostics and therapeutics is achieved through magnetic based imaging and local hyperthermia generation through magnetic field or photon

  7. Applications of magnetic resonance image segmentation in neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Lahtinen, Antti J.; Dastidar, Prasun; Ryymin, Pertti; Laarne, Paeivi; Malmivuo, Jaakko; Laasonen, Erkki; Frey, Harry; Eskola, Hannu

    1999-05-01

    After the introduction of digital imagin devices in medicine computerized tissue recognition and classification have become important in research and clinical applications. Segmented data can be applied among numerous research fields including volumetric analysis of particular tissues and structures, construction of anatomical modes, 3D visualization, and multimodal visualization, hence making segmentation essential in modern image analysis. In this research project several PC based software were developed in order to segment medical images, to visualize raw and segmented images in 3D, and to produce EEG brain maps in which MR images and EEG signals were integrated. The software package was tested and validated in numerous clinical research projects in hospital environment.

  8. Control of doxorubicin release from magnetic Poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles by application of a non-permanent magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peça, Inês N. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, LAQV, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia (Portugal); Bicho, A.; Gardner, Rui [Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (Portugal); Cardoso, M. Margarida, E-mail: margarida.cardoso@fct.unl.pt [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, LAQV, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia (Portugal)

    2015-11-15

    This work studied the effect of the application time of a non-permanent magnetic field on the rate of drug release from iron oxide polymeric nanoparticles. Magnetically responsive doxorubicin loaded poly(d-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles were synthetized by the o/w solvent extraction/evaporation method and characterized. The produced particles show spherical shapes exhibiting a size between 200 and 400 nm, a drug loading of 3.6 % (w/w) and an iron concentration of 20.7 % (w/w). Cell cytotoxicity tests showed that unloaded magnetic PLGA nanoparticles were nontoxic. Concerning the therapeutic activity, doxorubicin-loaded magnetic particles cause a remarkable enhancement of the cell inhibition rates compared to their non-magnetic counterparts (40 against 7 % of dead cells). In vitro drug release studies performed under a non-permanent magnetic field show that the application time and the on/off cycle duration have a great influence with respect to the final amount and to the rate of drug release. The final amount and the rate of doxorubicin released increase with the time of field application reaching higher values for a higher number of pulses with a lower duration. Doxorubicin release mechanism has shown to be governed by Fickian diffusion in the absence of a magnetic field while in the presence of a magnetic field some controlled relaxation polymer chains might also be present. The results show that the drug release rate from magnetic PLGA nanoparticles can be modulated through the application time and the on/off cycles duration of a non-permanent magnetic field.

  9. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton L.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2013-12-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization' schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than those at 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters.

  10. Developing Glassy Magnets from Simulated Composition of Martian Soil for Exploration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Ray, Chandra; Rogers, Jan

    2004-01-01

    The long-term exploration goals of NASA include developing human habitation on Mars and conducting scientific investigations on Mars and other planetary bodies. In situ resource processing is a key objective in this area We focus OR the possibility of making magnetic glasses in situ for potential applications development. The paper will focus on ongoing work at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on making magnetic glass h m Mars soil simulants and its characterization. Analysis of the glass morphology, strength, chemistry and resulting magnetic properties will provide a fi.mdamenta1 understanding ofthe synthesized materiai that can be used for pomtiai appiications cieveiopment. In an effort to characterize the magnetic properbes of the Mars glasses, a series of tests were performed at NASA MSFC. Preliminary tests indicated that the glasses were attracted to a magnet and also had a small amount of residual magnetism. They were opaque (almost black in color). As the first step, a sample of Mars 1 glass (-lm x lmm x 5 mm length) was machined, weighed and its hysteresis curve was measured using a Vibration Sample Magnetometer 0. Next, a small furnace was designed and built and the sample was baked in a graphite (reducing agent) crucible at 800 C in an Argon atmosphere for 3 hours in the presence of a uniform, transverse (transverse to the 5mm length of the sample) magnetic field of 0.37 Tesla. The treated sample showed reddening on the outside and showed substantially increased residual magnetism. This sample was again analyzed in the VSM. The data clearly showed that some chemical change occurred during the heat treatment (color change) and that both the glasses have useful magnetic properties. Although no orientation effects of the magnetic field were considered, the data showed the following: 1. Both glass samples are primarily soft magnets and display ferromagnetic behavior (hysteresis, saturation, etc.) 2. The treated glass has improved saturation magnetism (order

  11. Multifunctional magnetic nanostructured hardystonite scaffold for hyperthermia, drug delivery and tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, Ali; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Emadi, Rahmatollah

    2017-01-01

    Hyperthermia and local drug delivery have been proposed as potential therapeutic approaches for killing cancer cells. The development of bioactive materials such as Hardystonite (HT) with magnetic and drug delivery properties can potentially meet this target. This new class of magnetic bioceramic can replace the widely used magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, whose long-term biocompatibility is not clear. Magnetic HT can be potentially employed to develop new ceramic scaffolds for bone surgery and anticancer therapies. With this in mind, a synthesis procedure was developed to prepare multifunctional bioactive scaffold for tissue engineering, hyperthermia and drug delivery applications. To this end, iron (Fe(3+))-containing HT scaffolds were prepared. The effect of Fe on biological, magnetic and drug delivery properties of HT scaffolds were investigated. The results showed that obtained Fe-HT is bioactive and magnetic with no magnetite or maghemite as secondary phases. The Fe-HT scaffolds obtained also possessed high specific surface areas and demonstrated sustained drug delivery. These results potentially open new aspects for biomaterials aimed at regeneration of large-bone defects caused by malignant bone tumors through a combination of hyperthermia, local drug delivery and osteoconductivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Green synthetic, multifunctional hybrid micelles with shell embedded magnetic nanoparticles for theranostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongyong; Ma, Junping; Zhu, Haiyan; Gao, Xiaolong; Dong, Haiqing; Shi, Donglu

    2013-08-14

    The objective of this study is to design and develop a green-synthetic, multifunctional hybrid micelles with shell embedded magnetic nanoparticles for theranostic applications. The hybrid micelles were engineered based on complex micelles self-assembled from amphiphilic block copolymers Pluronic F127 and peptide-amphiphile (PA) pal-AAAAHHHD. The reason to choose PA is due to its amphiphilic character and the coordination capability for Fe(3+) and Fe(2+). The PA incorporation allows the in situ growth of the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles onto the complex micelles, to yield the nanostructures with shell embedded magnetic nanoparticles at an ambient condition without any organic solvents. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) can be efficiently loaded into the hybrid micelles. Interestingly, the magnetic nanoparticles anchored on the shell were found to significantly retard the DOX release behavior of the drug loaded hybrid micelles. It was proposed that a cross-linking effect of the shell by magnetic nanoparticles is a key to underlie the above intriguing phenomenon, which could enhance the stability and control the drug diffusion of the hybrid micelles. Importantly, in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the potential of these hybrid micelles to be served as a T2-weighted MR imaging contrast enhancer for clinical diagnosis.

  13. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  17. Synthesis, surface modification and characterisation of biocompatible magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Mahnaz; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Haron, Md Jelas; Namvar, Farideh; Nadi, Behzad; Rahman, Mohamad Zaki Ab; Amin, Jamileh

    2013-06-27

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) with appropriate surface chemistry exhibit many interesting properties that can be exploited in a variety of biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement, tissue repair, hyperthermia, drug delivery and in cell separation. These applications required that the MNPs such as iron oxide Fe₃O₄ magnetic nanoparticles (Fe₃O₄ MNPs) having high magnetization values and particle size smaller than 100 nm. This paper reports the experimental detail for preparation of monodisperse oleic acid (OA)-coated Fe₃O₄ MNPs by chemical co-precipitation method to determine the optimum pH, initial temperature and stirring speed in order to obtain the MNPs with small particle size and size distribution that is needed for biomedical applications. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results show that the particle size as well as the magnetization of the MNPs was very much dependent on pH, initial temperature of Fe²⁺ and Fe³⁺ solutions and steering speed. The monodisperse Fe₃O₄ MNPs coated with oleic acid with size of 7.8 ± 1.9 nm were successfully prepared at optimum pH 11, initial temperature of 45°C and at stirring rate of 800 rpm. FTIR and XRD data reveal that the oleic acid molecules were adsorbed on the magnetic nanoparticles by chemisorption. Analyses of TEM show the oleic acid provided the Fe₃O₄ particles with better dispersibility. The synthesized Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic behavior and the saturation magnetization of the Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles increased with the particle size.

  18. Synthesis, Surface Modification and Characterisation of Biocompatible Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Zaki Ab Rahman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs with appropriate surface chemistry exhibit many interesting properties that can be exploited in a variety of biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement, tissue repair, hyperthermia, drug delivery and in cell separation. These applications required that the MNPs such as iron oxide Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4 MNPs having high magnetization values and particle size smaller than 100 nm. This paper reports the experimental detail for preparation of monodisperse oleic acid (OA-coated Fe3O4 MNPs by chemical co-precipitation method to determine the optimum pH, initial temperature and stirring speed in order to obtain the MNPs with small particle size and size distribution that is needed for biomedical applications. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. The results show that the particle size as well as the magnetization of the MNPs was very much dependent on pH, initial temperature of Fe2+ and Fe3+ solutions and steering speed. The monodisperse Fe3O4 MNPs coated with oleic acid with size of 7.8 ± 1.9 nm were successfully prepared at optimum pH 11, initial temperature of 45 °C and at stirring rate of 800 rpm. FTIR and XRD data reveal that the oleic acid molecules were adsorbed on the magnetic nanoparticles by chemisorption. Analyses of TEM show the oleic acid provided the Fe3O4 particles with better dispersibility. The synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic behavior and the saturation magnetization of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles increased with the particle size.

  19. Magnetic Field Sensors Based on Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR Technology: Applications in Electrical Current Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Càndid Reig

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics can be understood as a global recognition to the rapid development of the Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR, from both the physics and engineering points of view. Behind the utilization of GMR structures as read heads for massive storage magnetic hard disks, important applications as solid state magnetic sensors have emerged. Low cost, compatibility with standard CMOS technologies and high sensitivity are common advantages of these sensors. This way, they have been successfully applied in a lot different environments. In this work, we are trying to collect the Spanish contributions to the progress of the research related to the GMR based sensors covering, among other subjects, the applications, the sensor design, the modelling and the electronic interfaces, focusing on electrical current sensing applications.

  20. Recent Advances of MEMS Resonators for Lorentz Force Based Magnetic Field Sensors: Design, Applications and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Leobardo Herrera-May

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS resonators have allowed the development of magnetic field sensors with potential applications such as biomedicine, automotive industry, navigation systems, space satellites, telecommunications and non-destructive testing. We present a review of recent magnetic field sensors based on MEMS resonators, which operate with Lorentz force. These sensors have a compact structure, wide measurement range, low energy consumption, high sensitivity and suitable performance. The design methodology, simulation tools, damping sources, sensing techniques and future applications of magnetic field sensors are discussed. The design process is fundamental in achieving correct selection of the operation principle, sensing technique, materials, fabrication process and readout systems of the sensors. In addition, the description of the main sensing systems and challenges of the MEMS sensors are discussed. To develop the best devices, researches of their mechanical reliability, vacuum packaging, design optimization and temperature compensation circuits are needed. Future applications will require multifunctional sensors for monitoring several physical parameters (e.g., magnetic field, acceleration, angular ratio, humidity, temperature and gases.

  1. Standard Practices for Usage of Inductive Magnetic Field Probes with Application to Electric Propulsion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hill, Carrie S.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive magnetic field probes (also known as B-dot probes and sometimes as B-probes or magnetic probes) are useful for performing measurements in electric space thrusters and various plasma accelerator applications where a time-varying magnetic field is present. Magnetic field probes have proven to be a mainstay in diagnosing plasma thrusters where changes occur rapidly with respect to time, providing the means to measure the magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents and even an indirect measure of the plasma current density through the application of Ampère's law. Examples of applications where this measurement technique has been employed include pulsed plasma thrusters and quasi-steady magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. The Electric Propulsion Technical Committee (EPTC) of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) was asked to assemble a Committee on Standards (CoS) for Electric Propulsion Testing. The assembled CoS was tasked with developing Standards and Recommended Practices for various diagnostic techniques used in the evaluation of plasma thrusters. These include measurements that can yield either global information related to a thruster and its performance or detailed, local data related to the specific physical processes occurring in the plasma. This paper presents a summary of the standard, describing the preferred methods for fabrication, calibration, and usage of inductive magnetic field probes for use in diagnosing plasma thrusters. Inductive magnetic field probes (also called B-dot probes throughout this document) are commonly used in electric propulsion (EP) research and testing to measure unsteady magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents. The B-dot probe is relatively simple in construction, and requires minimal cost, making it a low-cost technique that is readily accessible to most researchers. While relatively simple, the design of a B-dot probe is not trivial and there are many opportunities for errors in

  2. The application of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging at diagnostics of the human maxillofacial system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, V.; Karavaeva, E.; Cherepennikov, Yu; Miloichikova, I.

    2016-06-01

    The application of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has entered into wide practice at diagnosis of the maxillofacial system. Computed tomography allows us to obtain information about only bone structures. Magnetic resonance imaging gives information about bone and soft tissue structures of the maxillofacial system. The sagittal and coronal projections should make for complete diagnosis of the temporomandibular joint, because the articular disc is very mobile structure. We suggest that the temporomandibular joint can influences the internal carotid artery at medial displacement of the articular disc. As a result of analysis of the literature and our own studies concluded that changes TMJ affect the internal carotid artery.

  3. Applications of Magnetic Suspension Technology to Large Scale Facilities: Progress, Problems and Promises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, Colin P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper will briefly review previous work in wind tunnel Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS) and will examine the handful of systems around the world currently known to be in operational condition or undergoing recommissioning. Technical developments emerging from research programs at NASA and elsewhere will be reviewed briefly, where there is potential impact on large-scale MSBSS. The likely aerodynamic applications for large MSBSs will be addressed, since these applications should properly drive system designs. A recently proposed application to ultra-high Reynolds number testing will then be addressed in some detail. Finally, some opinions on the technical feasibility and usefulness of a large MSBS will be given.

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  5. Permanent magnet Hall Thrusters development and applications on future brazilian space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Martins, Alexandre A.; Miranda, Rodrigo; Schelling, Adriane; de Souza Alves, Lais; Gonçalves Costa, Ernesto; de Oliveira Coelho Junior, Helbert; Castelo Branco, Artur; de Oliveira Lopes, Felipe Nathan

    2015-10-01

    The Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPLUnB) has been developing a Permanent Magnet Hall Thruster (PHALL) for the Space Research Program for Universities (UNIESPAÇO), part of the Brazilian Space Activities Program (PNAE) since 2004. The PHALL project consists on a plasma source design, construction and characterization of the Hall type that will function as a plasma propulsion engine and characterized by several plasma diagnostics sensors. PHALL is based on a plasma source in which a Hall current is generated inside a cylindrical annular channel with an axial electric field produced by a ring anode and a radial magnetic field produced by permanent magnets. In this work it is shown a brief description of the plasma propulsion engine, its diagnostics instrumentation and possible applications of PHALL on orbit transfer maneuvering for future Brazilian geostationary satellite space missions.

  6. Digital signal processing by virtual instrumentation of a MEMS magnetic field sensor for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Aguirre, Raúl; Domínguez-Nicolás, Saúl M; Manjarrez, Elías; Tapia, Jesús A; Figueras, Eduard; Vázquez-Leal, Héctor; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz A; Herrera-May, Agustín L

    2013-11-05

    We present a signal processing system with virtual instrumentation of a MEMS sensor to detect magnetic flux density for biomedical applications. This system consists of a magnetic field sensor, electronic components implemented on a printed circuit board (PCB), a data acquisition (DAQ) card, and a virtual instrument. It allows the development of a semi-portable prototype with the capacity to filter small electromagnetic interference signals through digital signal processing. The virtual instrument includes an algorithm to implement different configurations of infinite impulse response (IIR) filters. The PCB contains a precision instrumentation amplifier, a demodulator, a low-pass filter (LPF) and a buffer with operational amplifier. The proposed prototype is used for real-time non-invasive monitoring of magnetic flux density in the thoracic cage of rats. The response of the rat respiratory magnetogram displays a similar behavior as the rat electromyogram (EMG).

  7. Magnetic resonance of semiconductors and their nanostructures basic and advanced applications

    CERN Document Server

    Baranov, Pavel G; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    This book explains different magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and uses different combinations of these techniques to analyze defects in semiconductors and nanostructures. It also introduces novelties such as single defects MR and electron-paramagnetic-resonance-based methods: electron spin echo, electrically detected magnetic resonance, optically detected magnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance – the designated tools for investigating the structural and spin properties of condensed systems, living matter, nanostructures and nanobiotechnology objects. Further, the authors address problems existing in semiconductor and nanotechnology sciences that can be resolved using MR, and discuss past, current and future applications of MR, with a focus on advances in MR methods. The book is intended for researchers in MR studies of semiconductors and nanostructures wanting a comprehensive review of what has been done in their own and related fields of study, as well as future perspectives.

  8. Magnetic nanoparticles: an update of application for drug delivery and possible toxic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Shin, Ji-Young; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent a subclass within the overall category of nanomaterials and are widely used in many applications, particularly in the biomedical sciences such as targeted delivery of drugs or genes, in magnetic resonance imaging, and in hyperthermia (treating tumors with heat). Although the potential benefits of MNPs are considerable, there is a distinct need to identify any potential toxicity associated with these MNPs. The potential of MNPs in drug delivery stems from the intrinsic properties of the magnetic core combined with their drug loading capability and the biomedical properties of MNPs generated by different surface coatings. These surface modifications alter the particokinetics and toxicity of MNPs by changing protein-MNP or cell-MNP interactions. This review contains current advances in MNPs for drug delivery and their possible organ toxicities associated with disturbance in body iron homeostasis. The importance of protein-MNP interactions and various safety considerations relating to MNP exposure are also addressed.

  9. Digital Signal Processing by Virtual Instrumentation of a MEMS Magnetic Field Sensor for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Aguirre, Raúl; Domínguez-Nicolás, Saúl M.; Manjarrez, Elías; Tapia, Jesús A.; Figueras, Eduard; Vázquez-Leal, Héctor; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz A.; Herrera-May, Agustín L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a signal processing system with virtual instrumentation of a MEMS sensor to detect magnetic flux density for biomedical applications. This system consists of a magnetic field sensor, electronic components implemented on a printed circuit board (PCB), a data acquisition (DAQ) card, and a virtual instrument. It allows the development of a semi-portable prototype with the capacity to filter small electromagnetic interference signals through digital signal processing. The virtual instrument includes an algorithm to implement different configurations of infinite impulse response (IIR) filters. The PCB contains a precision instrumentation amplifier, a demodulator, a low-pass filter (LPF) and a buffer with operational amplifier. The proposed prototype is used for real-time non-invasive monitoring of magnetic flux density in the thoracic cage of rats. The response of the rat respiratory magnetogram displays a similar behavior as the rat electromyogram (EMG). PMID:24196434

  10. Diagnostic relevance of high field MRI in clinical neuroradiology: the advantages and challenges of driving a sports car.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattjes, Mike P; Barkhof, Frederik

    2012-11-01

    High field MRI operating at 3 T is increasingly being used in the field of neuroradiology on the grounds that higher magnetic field strength should theoretically lead to a higher diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis of several disease entities. This Editorial discusses the exhaustive review by Wardlaw and colleagues of research comparing 3 T MRI with 1.5 T MRI in the field of neuroradiology. Interestingly, the authors found no convincing evidence of improved image quality, diagnostic accuracy, or reduced total examination times using 3 T MRI instead of 1.5 T MRI. These findings are highly relevant since a new generation of high field MRI systems operating at 7 T has recently been introduced. • Higher magnetic field strengths do not necessarily lead to a better diagnostic accuracy. • Disadvantages of high field MR systems have to be considered in clinical practice. • Higher field strengths are needed for functional imaging, spectroscopy, etc. • Disappointingly there are few direct comparisons of 1.5 and 3 T MRI. • Whether the next high field MR generation (7 T) will improve diagnostic accuracy has to be investigated.

  11. Calculation of electric fields induced by body and head motion in high-field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Zhao, Huawei; Crozier, Stuart

    2003-03-01

    In modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), patients are exposed to strong, nonuniform static magnetic fields outside the central imaging region, in which the movement of the body may be able to induce electric currents in tissues which could be possibly harmful. This paper presents theoretical investigations into the spatial distribution of induced electric fields and currents in the patient when moving into the MRI scanner and also for head motion at various positions in the magnet. The numerical calculations are based on an efficient, quasi-static, finite-difference scheme and an anatomically realistic, full-body, male model. 3D field profiles from an actively shielded 4 T magnet system are used and the body model projected through the field profile with a range of velocities. The simulation shows that it possible to induce electric fields/currents near the level of physiological significance under some circumstances and provides insight into the spatial characteristics of the induced fields. The results are extrapolated to very high field strengths and tabulated data shows the expected induced currents and fields with both movement velocity and field strength.

  12. Synthesis and application of magnetic hydrogel for Cr(VI) removal from contaminated water

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Samuel C N

    2010-11-01

    Many magnetic adsorbents reported in the literature, such as iron oxides, for Cr(VI) removal have been found effective only in low pH environments. Moreover, the application of polymeric hydrogels on heavy metal removal has been hindered by difficulties in separation by filtration. In this study, a magnetic cationic hydrogel was synthesized for Cr(VI) removal from contaminated water, making use of the advantages of magnetic adsorbents and polymeric hydrogels. The magnetic hydrogel was produced by imbedding 10-nm γ-Fe2O 3 nanoparticles into the polymeric matrix via radical polymerization. Characterization of the hydrogel was undertaken with Fourier transform infrared and vibrating sample magnetometer; swelling properties were tested and anionic adsorption capacity was evaluated. The magnetic hydrogel showed a superior Cr(VI) removal capacity compared to commercial products such as MIEX®. Cr(VI) removal was independent of solution pH. Results show that Cr(VI) removal kinetics was improved drastically by grinding the bulk hydrogel into powder form. At relevant concentrations, common water anions (e.g., Cl-, SO4 2-, PO4 3-) and natural organic matter did not exhibit significant inhibition of Cr(VI) adsorption onto the hydrogel. Results of vibrating sample magnetometer indicate that the magnetic hydrogel can be easily separated from treatment systems. Regeneration of the magnetic hydrogel can be easily achieved by washing the Cr(VI)-loaded hydrogel with 0.5 M NaCl solution, with a recovery rate of about 90% of Cr(VI). © Copyright 2010, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2010.

  13. Probing High Temperature Superconductors with Magnetometry in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lu [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-07-26

    The objective of this research is to investigate the high-field magnetic properties of high temperature superconductors, materials that conduct electricity without loss. A technique known as high-resolution torque magnetometry that was developed to directly measure the magnetization of high temperature superconductors. This technique was implemented using the 65 Tesla pulsed magnetic field facility that is part of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This research addressed unanswered questions about the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity, determine the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors, and shed light on the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity and on potential applications of these materials in areas such as energy generation and power transmission. Further applications of the technology resolve the novel physical phenomena such as correlated topological insulators, and spin liquid state in quantum magnets.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of Co-Zn ferrite nanoparticles for application to magnetic hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunkyung; Lee, Sangjoon; Kouh, Taejoon; Kim, Sam Jin; Kim, Chul Sung; Hahn, Eunjoo

    2017-01-01

    Co-Zn ferrite nanoparticles have been investigated, aiming at a further improvement of the magnetic hyperthermia properties for bio-medical applications. We precisely tune the magnetic and the thermal properties of Co x Zn1- x Fe2O4 nanoparticles, prepared by using a high-temperature thermal-decomposition method, by chemically controlling the cation. The structure and the magnetic properties as well as the AC-heating characteristics of the synthesized Co x Zn1- x Fe2O4 were measured by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, magneTherm device and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The analysis of the XRD patterns confirmed the spinel phase, the crystalline size, and the lattice parameter. The magnetic behavior of Co-Zn ferrite was studied with M-H hysteresis curve measurements at room temperature. Also, the thermal properties were measured under an external applied field of 250 Oe at 112 kHz. In addition, we plasma-treated the samples with magnetic and thermal excellent characteristics for 30 min at room temperature. The cation distribution was investigated with Mössbauer spectroscopy and further analyzed with one sextet for the tetrahedral A site and four six-lines for the octahedral B1, B2, B3, and B4 sites.

  15. Soft X-ray microscopy to 25 nm with applications to biology and magnetic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Denbeaux, G; Chao, W; Eimueller, T; Johnson, L; Köhler, M; Larabell, C; Legros, M; Fischer, P; Pearson, A; Schuetz, G; Yager, D; Attwood, D

    2001-01-01

    We report both technical advances in soft X-ray microscopy (XRM) and applications furthered by these advances. With new zone plate lenses we record test pattern features with good modulation to 25 nm and smaller. In combination with fast cryofixation, sub-cellular images show very fine detail previously seen only in electron microscopy, but seen here in thick, hydrated, and unstained samples. The magnetic domain structure is studied at high spatial resolution with X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) as a huge element-specific magnetic contrast mechanism, occurring e.g. at the L sub 2 sub , sub 3 edges of transition metals. It can be used to distinguish between in-plane and out-of-plane contributions by tilting the sample. As XRM is a photon based technique, the magnetic images can be obtained in unlimited varying external magnetic fields. The images discussed have been obtained at the XM-1 soft X-ray microscope on beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley.

  16. High Temperature Superconducting Magnets with Active Control for Attraction Levitation Transport Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry; Jenkins, Richard G.; Goodall, Roger M.; Macleod, Colin; ElAbbar, Abdallah A.; Campbell, Archie M.

    1996-01-01

    A research program, involving 3 British universities, directed at quantifying the controllability of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) magnets for use in attraction levitation transport systems will be described. The work includes measurement of loss mechanisms for iron cored HTS magnets which need to produce a flux density of approx. 1 tesla in the airgap between the magnet poles and a ferromagnetic rail. This flux density needs to be maintained and this is done by introducing small variations of the magnet current using a feedback loop, at frequencies up to 10 Hz to compensate for load changes, track variation etc. The test magnet assemblies constructed so far will be described and the studies and modelling of designs for a practical levitation demonstrator (using commercially obtained HTS tape) will be discussed with particular emphasis on how the field distribution and its components, e.g., the component vector normal to the broad face of the tape, can radically affect design philosophy compared to the classical electrical engineering approach. Although specifically aimed at levitation transport the controllability data obtained have implications for a much wider range of applications.

  17. Tunable-frequency high-field electron paramagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzystek, J.; Zvyagin, S. A.; Ozarowski, Andrew; Trofimenko, S.; Telser, Joshua

    2006-02-01

    A tunable-frequency methodology based on backward wave oscillator sources in high-frequency and -field EPR (HFEPR) is described. This methodology is illustrated by an application to three non-Kramers transition metal ion complexes and one Kramers ion complex. The complexes are of: Ni(II) ( S = 1) as found in dichlorobistriphenylphosphanenickel(II), Mn(III) ( S = 2) as found in mesotetrasulfonatoporphyrinatomanganese(III) chloride, Fe(II) ( S = 2) as found in ferrous sulfate tetrahydrate, and Co(II) ( S = 3/2) as found in azido(tris(3- tert-butylpyrazol-1-yl)hydroborate)cobalt(II). The above Ni(II) and Mn(III) complexes have been studied before by HFEPR using the multifrequency methodology based on Gunn oscillator sources, but not by the present method, while the Fe(II) and Co(II) complexes presented here have not been studied by any form of HFEPR. Highly accurate spin Hamiltonian parameters can be obtained by the experimental methodology described here, in combination with automated fitting procedures. This method is particularly successful in determining g-matrix parameters, which are very difficult to extract for high-spin systems from single frequency (or a very limited set of multi-frequency) HFEPR spectra, but is also able to deliver equally accurate values of the zero-field splitting tensor. The experimental methods involve either conventional magnetic field modulation or an optical modulation of the sub-THz wave beam. The relative merits of these and other experimental methods are discussed.

  18. Myocardial T2* Mapping with Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance: Physics and Frontier Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Huelnhagen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR has become an indispensable clinical tool for the assessment of morphology, function and structure of the heart muscle. By exploiting quantification of the effective transverse relaxation time (T2* CMR also affords myocardial tissue characterization and probing of cardiac physiology, both being in the focus of ongoing research. These developments are fueled by the move to ultrahigh magnetic field strengths, which permits enhanced sensitivity and spatial resolution that help to overcome limitations of current clinical MR systems with the goal to contribute to a better understanding of myocardial (pathophysiology in vivo. In this context, the aim of this report is to introduce myocardial T2* mapping at ultrahigh magnetic fields as a promising technique to non-invasively assess myocardial (pathophysiology. For this purpose the basic principles of T2* assessment, the biophysical mechanisms determining T2* and (preclinical applications of myocardial T2* mapping are presented. Technological challenges and solutions for T2* sensitized CMR at ultrahigh magnetic field strengths are discussed followed by a review of acquisition techniques and post-processing approaches. Preliminary results derived from myocardial T2* mapping in healthy subjects and cardiac patients at 7.0 T are presented. A concluding section discusses remaining questions and challenges and provides an outlook on future developments and potential clinical applications.

  19. Magnetic core-shell chitosan nanoparticles: rheological characterization and hyperthermia application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Mora, Vanessa; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Mar; San Román, Julio; Goya, Gerardo; Hernández, Rebeca; Mijangos, Carmen

    2014-02-15

    Stabilized magnetic nanoparticles are the subject of intense research for targeting applications and this work deals with the design, preparation and application of specific core-shell nanoparticles based on ionic crosslinked chitosan. The nanometric size of the materials was demonstrated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) that also proved an increase of the size of chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) with the magnetite content. Steady oscillatory rheology measurements revealed a gel-like behavior of aqueous dispersions of chitosan NPs with concentrations ranging from 0.5% to 2.0% (w/v). The cytotoxicity of all the materials synthesized was analyzed in human fibroblasts cultures using the Alamar Blue and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. The measured specific power absorption under alternating magnetic fields (f = 580 kHz, H = 24 kA/m) indicated that magnetic core-shell chitosan NPs can be useful as remotely driven heaters for magnetic hyperthermia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Design Enhancement and Performance Examination of External Rotor Switched Flux Permanent Magnet Machine for Downhole Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Sulaiman, E.; Soomro, H. A.; Jusoh, L. I.; Bahrim, F. S.; Omar, M. F.

    2017-08-01

    The recent change in innovation and employments of high-temperature magnets, permanent magnet flux switching machine (PMFSM) has turned out to be one of the suitable contenders for seaward boring, however, less intended for downhole because of high atmospheric temperature. Subsequently, this extensive review manages the design enhancement and performance examination of external rotor PMFSM for the downhole application. Preparatory, the essential design parameters required for machine configuration are computed numerically. At that point, the design enhancement strategy is actualized through deterministic technique. At last, preliminary and refined execution of the machine is contrasted and as a consequence, the yield torque is raised from 16.39Nm to 33.57Nm while depreciating the cogging torque and PM weight up to 1.77Nm and 0.79kg, individually. In this manner, it is inferred that purposed enhanced design of 12slot-22pole with external rotor is convenient for the downhole application.