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Sample records for high-field late gadolinium

  1. Endogenous contrast MRI of cardiac fibrosis: beyond late gadolinium enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorschot, Joep W M; Gho, Johannes M I H; van Hout, Gerardus P J; Froeling, Martijn; Jansen Of Lorkeers, Sanne J; Hoefer, Imo E; Doevendans, Pieter A; Luijten, Peter R; Chamuleau, Steven A J; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of detection of cardiac fibrosis with MRI using current standards and novel endogenous MRI techniques. Assessment of cardiac fibrosis is important for diagnosis, prediction of prognosis and follow-up after therapy. During the past years, progress has been made in fibrosis detection using MRI. Cardiac infarct size can be assessed noninvasively with late gadolinium enhancement. Several methods for fibrosis detection using endogenous contrast have been developed, such as native T1 -mapping, T1ρ -mapping, Magnetization transfer imaging, and T2 *-mapping. Each of these methods will be described, providing the basic methodology, showing potential applications from applied studies, and discussing the potential and challenges or pitfalls. We will also identify future steps and developments that are needed for bringing these methods to the clinical practice. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Nanodiamond-Gadolinium(III) Aggregates for Tracking Cancer Growth In Vivo at High Field.

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    Rammohan, Nikhil; MacRenaris, Keith W; Moore, Laura K; Parigi, Giacomo; Mastarone, Daniel J; Manus, Lisa M; Lilley, Laura M; Preslar, Adam T; Waters, Emily A; Filicko, Abigail; Luchinat, Claudio; Ho, Dean; Meade, Thomas J

    2016-12-14

    The ability to track labeled cancer cells in vivo would allow researchers to study their distribution, growth, and metastatic potential within the intact organism. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is invaluable for tracking cancer cells in vivo as it benefits from high spatial resolution and the absence of ionizing radiation. However, many MR contrast agents (CAs) required to label cells either do not significantly accumulate in cells or are not biologically compatible for translational studies. We have developed carbon-based nanodiamond-gadolinium(III) aggregates (NDG) for MR imaging that demonstrated remarkable properties for cell tracking in vivo. First, NDG had high relaxivity independent of field strength, a finding unprecedented for gadolinium(III) [Gd(III)]-nanoparticle conjugates. Second, NDG demonstrated a 300-fold increase in the cellular delivery of Gd(III) compared to that of clinical Gd(III) chelates without sacrificing biocompatibility. Further, we were able to monitor the tumor growth of NDG-labeled flank tumors by T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging for 26 days in vivo, longer than was reported for other MR CAs or nuclear agents. Finally, by utilizing quantitative maps of relaxation times, we were able to describe tumor morphology and heterogeneity (corroborated by histological analysis), which would not be possible with competing molecular imaging modalities.

  3. Structure, stability, dynamics, high-field relaxivity and ternary-complex formation of a new tris(aquo) gadolinium complex.

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    Nonat, Aline; Fries, Pascal H; Pécaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2007-01-01

    The tripodal hexadentate picolinate ligand dpaa3- (H3dpaa=N,N'-bis[(6-carboxypyridin-2-yl)methyl]glycine) has been synthesised. It can form 1:1 and 1:2 lanthanide/ligand complexes. The crystal structure of the bis(aquo) lutetium complex [Lu(dpaa)(H2O)2] has been determined by X-ray diffraction studies. The number of water molecules was determined by luminescence lifetime studies of the terbium and europium complexes. The tris(aquo) terbium complex shows a fairly high luminescence quantum yield (22 %). The [Gd(dpaa)(H2O)3] complex displays a high water solubility and an increased stability (pGd=12.3) with respect to the analogous bis(aquo) complex [Gd(tpaa)(H2O)2] (pGd=11.2). Potentiometric and relaxometric studies show the formation of a soluble GdIII hydroxo complex at high pH values. A unique aquohydroxo gadolinium complex has been isolated and its crystal structure determined. This complex crystallises as a 1D polymeric chain consisting of square-shaped tetrameric units. In heavy water, the [Gd(dpaa)-(D2O)3] complex shows a quite high HOD proton relaxivity at high field (11.93 s(-1) mM(-1) at 200 MHz and 298 K) because of the three inner-sphere water molecules. The formation of ternary complexes with physiological anions has been monitored by relaxometric studies, which indicate that even under conditions favourable to the formation of adducts with oxyanions, the mean relaxivity remains higher than those of most of the currently used commercial contrast agents except for the citrate. However, the measured relaxivity (r1=7.9 s(-1) mM(-1)) in a solution containing equimolar concentrations of [Gd(dpaa)(D2O)3] and citrate is still high. The interaction with albumin has been investigated by relaxometric and luminescence studies. Finally, a new versatile method to unravel the geometric and dynamic molecular factors that explain the high-field relaxivities has been developed. This approach uses a small, uncharged non-coordinating probe solute, the outer

  4. Myocardial Late Gadolinium Enhancement : Accuracy of T1 Mapping-based Synthetic Inversion-Recovery Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varga-Szemes, Akos; van der Geest, Rob J.; Spottiswoode, Bruce S.; Suranyi, Pal; Ruzsics, Balazs; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; Cannao, Paola M.; Fox, Mary A.; Wichmann, Julian L.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of detection and quantification of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) with a synthetic inversion-recovery (IR) approach with that of conventional IR techniques. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and

  5. High sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

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    Tetsuo Konno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myocardial scarring can be assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement and by endomyocardial biopsy. However, accuracy of late gadolinium enhancement for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens remains unknown in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We investigated whether late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart reflects microscopic myocardial scarring in the small biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-one consecutive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who were examined both by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and by endomyocardial biopsy were retrospectively studied. The right interventricular septum was the target site for endomyocardial biopsy in all patients. Late gadolinium enhancement in the ventricular septum had an excellent sensitivity (100% with a low specificity (40% for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens. The sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart remained 100% with a specificity of 27% for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens. Quantitative assessments of fibrosis revealed that the extent of late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart was the only independent variable related to the microscopic collagen fraction in biopsied specimens (β  =  0.59, 95% confident interval: 0.15 - 1.0, p  =  0.012. CONCLUSIONS: Although there was a compromise in the specificity, the sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement was excellent for prediction of microscopic myocardial scarring in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Moreover, the severity of late gadolinium enhancement was independently associated with the quantitative collagen fraction in biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. These findings indicate that late gadolinium enhancement can reflect both the presence and the extent of microscopic myocardial scarring in the small

  6. Appropriateness of anteroseptal myocardial infarction nomenclature evaluated by late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allencherril, Joseph; Fakhri, Yama; Engblom, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In traditional literature, it appears that "anteroseptal" MIs with Q waves in V1-V3 involve basal anteroseptal segments although studies have questioned this belief. METHODS: We studied patients with first acute anterior Q-wave (>30ms) MI. All underwent late gadolinium enhancement (LGE......) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). RESULTS: Those with Q waves in V1-V2 (n=7) evidenced LGE >50% in 0%, 43%, 43%, 57%, and 29% of the basal anteroseptal, mid anteroseptal, apical anterior, apical septal segments, and apex, respectively. Patients with Q waves in V1-V3 (n=14), evidenced involvement...

  7. Late gadolinium-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance identifies patients with standardized definition of ischemic cardiomyopathy: a single centre experience.

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    Soriano, Carlos J; Ridocci, Francisco; Estornell, Jordi; Pérez-Boscá, José L; Pomar, Francisco; Trigo, Alberto; Planas, Ana; Nadal, Mercedes; Jacas, Victoria; Martinez, Vicente; Paya, Rafael

    2007-03-20

    Definition of ischemic cardiomyopathy (IC) is not always obvious, which is why new criteria based on prognosis and the extent of the coronary artery disease (CAD) have been proposed. In the present study, we assess the capability of late gadolinium-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for predicting IC as determined by standardized criteria previously reported. 123 patients with heart failure (HF) and left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction, underwent both late gadolinium-enhanced CMR and coronary angiography 37/123 (30%) of patients were assigned to the IC group and 86/123 (70%) to the non-IC group. Subendocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was found in 35/37 (94%) of patients in the IC group, whereas only 12/86 (14%) had this distribution in the non-IC group (p or = 50% (r=0.76, pdisease. It is therefore appealing as a method for diagnosing IC.

  8. Late Gadolinium Enhancement of the right ventricular myocardium: Is it really different from the left ?

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    Macgowan Christopher K

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been suggested that, in late gadolinium enhancement, the signal of right ventricular myocardium is nulled at a shorter inversion time than the left. While we initially made the same observation, we believe that the difference is not real, but results from artifacts. We present 7 cases as well as computer simulations to describe the nature of these artifacts and explain how they can create the impression of different inversion times for the right and left ventricle. At inversion times that are shorter than ideal for the myocardium a black rim can be seen at the border of the myocardium with blood on the inside and with fat on the outside. This is most likely a partial volume effect. The thin myocardium of the right ventricle is sandwiched between these black rims and, at a low spatial resolution, is no longer visible. In this case, the adjacent black rims may then be misinterpreted as myocardium. While black rims also occur on the left side, the myocardium is thicker and remains discernable as a separate layer. As a consequence, the optimal inversion time for the right ventricle only appears different from that for the left. In fact, in the presence of hypertrophy of the right ventricle or during systolic wall thickening we did not find a difference in inversion times between the left and right ventricle. We conclude that sufficient spatial resolution is important for adequate late gadolinium enhancement of the right ventricle.

  9. Effect of inversion time on the precision of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement quantification evaluated with synthetic inversion recovery MR imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varga-Szemes, Akos; van der Geest, Rob J; Schoepf, U Joseph; Spottiswoode, Bruce S; De Cecco, Carlo N; Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; Wichmann, Julian L; Mangold, Stefanie; Fuller, Stephen R; Maurovich-Horvat, Pal; Merkely, Bela; Litwin, Sheldon E; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Suranyi, Pal

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the influence of inversion time (TI) on the precision of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) quantification using synthetic inversion recovery (IR) imaging in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS: Fifty-three patients with suspected prior MI underwent

  10. Influence of acquired obesity on coronary vessel wall late gadolinium enhancement in discordant monozygote twins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowski, Marcus R. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Wellcome Trust and EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, BHF Centre of Excellence, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Jansen, Christian H.P. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Ebersberger, Ullrich; Spector, Tim D. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Schaeffter, Tobias; Razavi, Reza [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Wellcome Trust and EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, BHF Centre of Excellence, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Mangino, Massimo [King' s College London, Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, London (United Kingdom); National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at Guy' s and St. Thomas' Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Wellcome Trust and EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, BHF Centre of Excellence, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Greil, Gerald F. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Wellcome Trust and EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, BHF Centre of Excellence, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of BMI on late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) of the coronary artery wall in identical monozygous twins discordant for BMI. Coronary LGE represents a useful parameter for the detection and quantification of atherosclerotic coronary vessel wall disease. Thirteen monozygote female twin pairs (n = 26) with significantly different BMIs (>1.6 kg/m2) were recruited out of >10,000 twin pairs (TwinsUK Registry). A coronary 3D-T2prep-TFE MR angiogram and 3D-IR-TFE vessel wall scan were performed prior to and following the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA on a 1.5 T MR scanner. The number of enhancing coronary segments and contrast to noise ratios (CNRs) of the coronary wall were quantified. An increase in BMI was associated with an increased number of enhancing coronary segments (5.3 ± 1.5 vs. 3.5 ± 1.6, p < 0.0001) and increased coronary wall enhancement (6.1 ± 1.1 vs. 4.8 ± 0.9, p = 0.0027) compared to matched twins with lower BMI. This study in monozygous twins indicates that acquired factors predisposing to obesity, including lifestyle and environmental factors, result in increased LGE of the coronary arteries, potentially reflecting an increase in coronary atherosclerosis in this female study population. (orig.)

  11. Extent of Late Gadolinium Enhancement on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Japanese Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients.

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    Hen, Yasuki; Iguchi, Nobuo; Utanohara, Yuko; Takada, Kaori; Machida, Haruhiko; Takara, Ayako; Teraoka, Kunihiko; Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya; Takamisawa, Itaru; Takayama, Morimasa; Yoshikawa, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), the extent of LGE is considered clinically important in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We evaluated the extent of LGE on CMR in a large series of Japanese HCM patients. CMR was performed in 317 HCM patients (147 male). The extent of LGE was scored as the sum of LGE-positive segments in a left ventricle (LV) 17-segment model. LGE was present in 246 patients (77.6%). LGE was detected in 3.5±3.1 segments on average. When the patients were divided according to maximum wall thickness (mild, 65%), median LGE score increased as EF decreased (reduced, 7 vs. low-normal, 4 vs. normal, 2; P=0.000). On multivariate analysis, reduced EF (OR, 0.947, P=0.015), pressure gradient <30 mmHg (OR, 0.359, P=0.000) and increased maximum wall thickness (OR, 1.236, P=0.000) were independent factors associated with extensive LGE. Progression of LGE was related to increased wall thickness, decreased contractility, and reduced intraventricular pressure gradient.

  12. Appropriateness of anteroseptal myocardial infarction nomenclature evaluated by late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allencherril, Joseph; Fakhri, Yama; Engblom, Henrik; Heiberg, Einar; Carlsson, Marcus; Dubois-Rande, Jean-Luc; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Hall, Trygve S; Larsen, Alf-Inge; Jensen, Svend Eggert; Arheden, Hakan; Atar, Dan; Clemmensen, Peter; Shah, Dipan J; Cheong, Benjamin; Sejersten, Maria; Birnbaum, Yochai

    2017-10-06

    In traditional literature, it appears that "anteroseptal" MIs with Q waves in V1-V3 involve basal anteroseptal segments although studies have questioned this belief. We studied patients with first acute anterior Q-wave (>30ms) MI. All underwent late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Those with Q waves in V1-V2 (n=7) evidenced LGE >50% in 0%, 43%, 43%, 57%, and 29% of the basal anteroseptal, mid anteroseptal, apical anterior, apical septal segments, and apex, respectively. Patients with Q waves in V1-V3 (n=14), evidenced involvement was 14%, 43%, 43%, 50%, and 7% of the same respective segments. In those with extensive anterior Q waves (n=7), involvement was 0%, 71%, 57%, 86%, and 86%. Q-wave MI in V1-V2/V3 primarily involves mid- and apical anterior and anteroseptal segments rather than basal segments. Data do not support existence of isolated basal anteroseptal or septal infarction. "Anteroapical infarction" is a more appropriate term than "anteroseptal infarction." Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Studies of three-dimensional cardiac late gadolinium enhancement MRI at 3.0 Tesla].

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    Ishimoto, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masaru; Ikeda, Takayuki; Kawakami, Momoe

    2008-12-20

    Cardiac late Gadolinium enhancement MR imaging has been shown to allow assessment of myocardial viability in patients with ischemic heart disease. The current standard approach is a 3D inversion recovery sequence at 1.5 Tesla. The aims of this study were to evaluate the technique feasibility and clinical utility of MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla in patients with myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy. In phantom and volunteer studies, the inversion time required to suppress the signal of interests and tissues was prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. In the clinical study, the average inversion time to suppress the signal of myocardium at 3.0 Tesla with respect to MR viability imaging at 1.5 Tesla was at 15 min after the administration of contrast agent (304.0+/-29.2 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 283.9+/-20.9 at 1.5 Tesla). The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium was equal at both field strengths (4.06+/-1.30 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 4.42+/-1.85 at 1.5 Tesla). Even at this early stage, MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla provides high quality images in patients with myocardial infarction. The inversion time is significantly prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium at 3.0 Tesla are equal to 1.5 Tesla. Further investigation is needed for this technical improvement, for clinical evaluation, and for limitations.

  14. Clinical predictors for the manifestation of late gadolinium enhancement after acute myocardial infarction.

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    Abanador-Kamper, Nadine; Kamper, Lars; Vorpahl, Marc; Brinkmann, Hilmar; Karamani, Vasiliki; Haage, Patrick; Seyfarth, Melchior

    2017-05-01

    Despite prompt revascularization, some patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) develop myocardial scars, which can be visualized by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Our goal was to identify angiographic findings that were predictive for scar development in patients after reperfused AMI.We examined 136 patients after first ST-elevated myocardial infarction by CMR after a median of 4 days (range: 2-7). Patients with manifestation of LGE were matched to patients without LGE by means of age and gender. Clinical follow-up with a combined primary endpoint including myocardial reinfarction, congestive heart failure, stroke, death and development of left ventricular thrombus was reported after 24 months.Patients with manifestation of LGE had a significant longer time of symptom-to-intervention, a higher prevalence of anterior AMI, and more proximal culprit lesions. Furthermore, left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly decreased, and peak values of infarct markers were significantly higher in these patients. Preinterventional thrombolysis in myocardial infarction-0-flow was significantly more frequent in patients with LGE manifestation. The presence of 3-vessel disease (odds ratio 53.99, 95% confidence interval 8.22-354.63, P manifestation of LGE. The presence of a multivessel disease, a proximal culprit lesion, and high values of CK-MB are strong independent predictors for LGE manifestation.

  15. Late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance predicts clinical worsening in patients with pulmonary hypertension

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    Freed Benjamin H

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE occurs at the right ventricular (RV insertion point (RVIP in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH and has been shown to correlate with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR derived RV indices. However, the prognostic role of RVIP-LGE and other CMR-derived parameters of RV function are not well established. Our aim was to evaluate the predictive value of contrast-enhanced CMR in patients with PH. Methods RV size, ejection fraction (RVEF, and the presence of RVIP-LGE were determined in 58 patients with PH referred for CMR. All patients underwent right heart catheterization, exercise testing, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP evaluation; results of which were included in the final analysis if performed within 4 months of the CMR study. Patients were followed for the primary endpoint of time to clinical worsening (death, decompensated right ventricular heart failure, initiation of prostacyclin, or lung transplantation. Results Overall, 40/58 (69% of patients had RVIP-LGE. Patients with RVIP- LGE had larger right ventricular volume index, lower RVEF, and higher mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP, all p Conclusions The presence of RVIP-LGE in patients with PH is a marker for more advanced disease and poor prognosis. In addition, this study reveals for the first time that CMR-derived RVEF is an independent non-invasive imaging predictor of adverse outcomes in this patient population.

  16. Automated left ventricle segmentation in late gadolinium-enhanced MRI for objective myocardial scar assessment.

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    Tao, Qian; Piers, Sebastiaan R D; Lamb, Hildo J; van der Geest, Rob J

    2015-08-01

    To develop and validate an objective and reproducible left ventricle (LV) segmentation method for late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which can facilitate accurate myocardial scar assessment. A cohort of 25 ischemic patients and 25 nonischemic patients were included. A four-step algorithm was proposed: first, the Cine-MRI and LGE-MRI volume were globally registered; second, the registered Cine-MRI contours were fitted to each LGE-MRI slice via the constructed contour image; third, the fitting was optimized in full LGE-MRI stack; finally, the contours were refined by taking into account patient-specific scar patterns. The automated LV segmentation results were compared with that of manual segmentation from two experienced observers. The accuracy of automated segmentation, expressed as the average contour distances to manual segmentation, was 0.82 ± 0.19 pixels, in the same order as interobserver difference between manual results (0.90 ± 0.26 pixels), but with lower variability (0.60 ± 0.37 pixels, P segmentation further demonstrated higher consistency than that of manual segmentation (Pearson correlation 0.97 vs. 0.84). An automated LV segmentation method for LGE-MRI was developed, providing high segmentation accuracy and lower interobserver variability compared to fully manual image analysis. The method facilitates objective assessment of myocardial scar. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A comprehensive 3-D framework for automatic quantification of late gadolinium enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance images.

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    Wei, Dong; Sun, Ying; Ong, Sim-Heng; Chai, Ping; Teo, Lynette L; Low, Adrian F

    2013-06-01

    Late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) can directly visualize nonviable myocardium with hyperenhanced intensities with respect to normal myocardium. For heart attack patients, it is crucial to facilitate the decision of appropriate therapy by analyzing and quantifying their LGE CMR images. To achieve accurate quantification, LGE CMR images need to be processed in two steps: segmentation of the myocardium followed by classification of infarcts within the segmented myocardium. However, automatic segmentation is difficult usually due to the intensity heterogeneity of the myocardium and intensity similarity between the infarcts and blood pool. Besides, the slices of an LGE CMR dataset often suffer from spatial and intensity distortions, causing further difficulties in segmentation and classification. In this paper, we present a comprehensive 3-D framework for automatic quantification of LGE CMR images. In this framework, myocardium is segmented with a novel method that deforms coupled endocardial and epicardial meshes and combines information in both short- and long-axis slices, while infarcts are classified with a graph-cut algorithm incorporating intensity and spatial information. Moreover, both spatial and intensity distortions are effectively corrected with specially designed countermeasures. Experiments with 20 sets of real patient data show visually good segmentation and classification results that are quantitatively in strong agreement with those manually obtained by experts.

  18. Late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy

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    Peuhkurinen Keijo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to identify early features of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. We characterise myocardial and functional findings in carriers of lamin A/C mutation to facilitate the recognition of these patients using this method. We also investigated the connection between myocardial fibrosis and conduction abnormalities. Methods Seventeen lamin A/C mutation carriers underwent CMR. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE and cine images were performed to evaluate myocardial fibrosis, regional wall motion, longitudinal myocardial function, global function and volumetry of both ventricles. The location, pattern and extent of enhancement in the left ventricle (LV myocardium were visually estimated. Results Patients had LV myocardial fibrosis in 88% of cases. Segmental wall motion abnormalities correlated strongly with the degree of enhancement. Myocardial enhancement was associated with conduction abnormalities. Sixty-nine percent of our asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients showed mild ventricular dilatation, systolic failure or both in global ventricular analysis. Decreased longitudinal systolic LV function was observed in 53% of patients. Conclusions Cardiac conduction abnormalities, mildly dilated LV and depressed systolic dysfunction are common in DCM caused by a lamin A/C gene mutation. However, other cardiac diseases may produce similar symptoms. CMR is an accurate tool to determine the typical cardiac involvement in lamin A/C cardiomyopathy and may help to initiate early treatment in this malignant familiar form of DCM.

  19. Late gadolinium enhancement and subclinical cardiac dysfunction on cardiac MRI in asymptomatic HIV-positive men

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    A Loy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD and related clinical events. While traditional risk factors play an important role in the pathology of cardiovascular disease, HIV infection and its sequelae of immune activation and inflammation may have significant effects on the myocardium before becoming clinically evident. Cardiac MRI (CMR can be used to detect the pattern of these subclinical changes. This will lead to a better understanding of risk factors contributing to cardiovascular disease prior to it becoming clinically significant in HIV-positive patients. Methods: Prospective cohort study of 127 asymptomatic HIV-positive men on ART compared to 35 matched controls. Baseline demographics, HIV parameters, 12-lead ECG, routine biochemistry, and traditional cardiovascular risk factors were recorded. Images were acquired on a 3T Achieva Philips MRI scanner with 5 channel phase array cardiac coil and weight-based IV gadolinium was given at 0.15 mmol/kg dose with post-contrast inversion recovery imaging after 10 minutes. Results: 6/127 (4.7% of asymptomatic HIV-positive men had late gadolinium enhancement (LGE on MRI verses 1/35 (2.9% in the control group. In 3/6 (50% of cases this was in a classical infarction pattern with subendocardial involvement. 3/6 (50% were consistent with prior myocarditis. There was no significant difference in mean LVEF (66.93% vs 65.18%, LVMI (60.05g/m2 vs 55.94g/m2 or posterolateral wall thickness (8.28 mm and 8.16 mm between cases and controls respectively. There was significantly more diastolic dysfunction, E:A ratio < 1, found in the HIV-positive group, 18% vs 7% of controls (p = 0.037. Framingham risk did not predict either of these outcomes. Conclusions: There is an increased incidence of LGE detected on CMR in this asymptomatic HIV-positive cohort. Two distinct pathological processes were identifed as causing these changes, myocardial infarction and myocarditis

  20. Improved respiratory efficiency of 3D late gadolinium enhancement imaging using the continuously adaptive windowing strategy (CLAWS).

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    Keegan, Jennifer; Jhooti, Permi; Babu-Narayan, Sonya V; Drivas, Peter; Ernst, Sabine; Firmin, David N

    2014-03-01

    Acquisition durations of navigator-gated high-resolution three-dimensional late gadolinium enhancement studies may typically be up to 10 min, depending on the respiratory efficiency and heart rate. Implementation of the continuously adaptive windowing strategy (CLAWS) could increase respiratory efficiency, but the resulting non-smooth k-space acquisition order during gadolinium wash-out could result in increased artifact. Navigator-gated three-dimensional late gadolinium enhancement acquisitions were performed in 18 patients using tracking end-expiratory accept/reject (EE-ARA) and CLAWS algorithms in random order. Retrospective analysis of the stored navigator data shows that CLAWS scan times are very close to (within 1%) or equal to the fastest achievable scan times while EE-ARA significantly extends the acquisition duration (P Image quality scores for CLAWS and EE-ARA acquisitions are not significantly different (4.1 ± 0.6 compared to 4.3 ± 0.6, P = ns). Numerical phantom simulations show that the non-uniform k-space ordering introduced by CLAWS results in slight, but not statistically significant, reductions in both blood signal-to-noise ratio (10%) and blood-myocardium contrast-to-noise ratio (12%). CLAWS results in markedly reduced acquisition durations compared to EE-ARA without significant detriment to the image quality. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Dynamic inversion time for improved 3D late gadolinium enhancement imaging in patients with atrial fibrillation.

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    Keegan, Jennifer; Gatehouse, Peter D; Haldar, Shouvik; Wage, Ricardo; Babu-Narayan, Sonya V; Firmin, David N

    2015-02-01

    High resolution three-dimensional (3D) late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging is performed with single R-wave gating to minimize lengthy acquisition durations. In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), heart rate variability results in variable magnetization recovery between sequence repeats, and image quality is often poor. In this study, we implemented and tested a dynamic inversion time (dynamic-TI) scheme designed to reduce sequence sensitivity to heart rate variations. An inversion-prepared 3D segmented gradient echo sequence was modified so that the TI varied automatically from beat-to-beat (dynamic-TI) based on the time since the last sequence repeat. 3D LGE acquisitions were performed in 17 patients prior to radio frequency ablation of persistent AF both with and without dynamic-TI. Qualitative image quality scores, blood signal-to-ghosting ratios (SGRs). and blood-myocardium contrast-to-ghosting ratios (CGRs) were compared. Image quality scores were higher with dynamic-TI than without dynamic-TI (2.2 ± 0.9 vs. 1.8 ± 1.1, P = 0.008), as were blood-myocardium CGRs (13.8 ± 7.6 vs. 8.3 ± 6.1, P = 0.003) and blood SGRs (19.6 ± 8.5 vs. 13.1 ± 8.0, P = 0.003). The dynamic-TI algorithm improves image quality of 3D LGE imaging in this difficult patient population by reducing the sequence sensitivity to RR interval variations © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Low prevalence of fibrosis in thalassemia major assessed by late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart failure remains a major cause of mortality in thalassaemia major. The possible role of cardiac fibrosis in thalassemia major in the genesis of heart failure is not clear. It is also unclear whether cardiac fibrosis might arise as a result of heart failure. Methods We studied 45 patients with thalassaemia major who had a wide range of current cardiac iron loading and included patients with prior and current heart failure. Myocardial iron was measured using T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, and following this, late gadolinium enhancement (LGE was used to determine the presence of macroscopic myocardial fibrosis. Results The median myocardial T2* in all patients was 22.6 ms (range 5.3-58.8 ms. Fibrosis was detected in only one patient, whose myocardial T2* was 20.1 ms and left ventricular ejection fraction 57%. No fibrosis was identified in 5 patients with a history of heart failure with full recovery, in 3 patients with current left ventricular dysfunction undergoing treatment, or in 18 patients with myocardial iron loading with cardiacT2* Conclusion This study shows that macroscopic myocardial fibrosis is uncommon in thalassemia major across a broad spectrum of myocardial iron loading. Importantly, there was no macroscopic fibrosis in patients with current or prior heart failure, or in patients with myocardial iron loading without heart failure. Therefore if myocardial fibrosis indeed contributes to myocardial dysfunction in thalassemia, our data combined with the knowledge that the myocardial dysfunction of iron overload can be reversed, indicates that any such fibrosis would need to be both microscopic and reversible.

  3. Comparison of different quantification methods of late gadolinium enhancement in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

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    Spiewak, Mateusz, E-mail: mspiewak@ikard.p [First Department of Coronary Artery Disease, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, ul. Alpejska 42, 04-628 Warsaw (Poland); Malek, Lukasz A., E-mail: lmalek@ikard.p [First Department of Coronary Artery Disease, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, ul. Alpejska 42, 04-628 Warsaw (Poland); Misko, Jolanta, E-mail: jmisko@wp.p [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, ul. Alpejska 42, 04-628 Warsaw (Poland); Chojnowska, Lidia, E-mail: lchojnowska@ikard.p [First Department of Coronary Artery Disease, Institute of Cardiology, ul. Alpejska 42, 04-628 Warsaw (Poland); Milosz, Barbara, E-mail: barbara-milosz@tlen.p [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, ul. Alpejska 42, 04-628 Warsaw (Poland); Klopotowski, Mariusz, E-mail: mklopotowski@hotmail.co [First Department of Coronary Artery Disease, Institute of Cardiology, ul. Alpejska 42, 04-628 Warsaw (Poland); Petryka, Joanna, E-mail: joannapetryka@hotmail.co [First Department of Coronary Artery Disease, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, ul. Alpejska 42, 04-628 Warsaw (Poland); Dabrowski, Maciej, E-mail: macidabro@yahoo.co [First Department of Coronary Artery Disease, Institute of Cardiology, ul. Alpejska 42, 04-628 Warsaw (Poland); Kepka, Cezary, E-mail: ckepka@ikard.p [First Department of Coronary Artery Disease, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, ul. Alpejska 42, 04-628 Warsaw (Poland); Ruzyllo, Witold, E-mail: w.ruzyllo@ikard.p [First Department of Coronary Artery Disease, Institute of Cardiology, ul. Alpejska 42, 04-628 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-06-15

    Aim: There is no consensus regarding the technique of quantification of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). The aim of the study was to compare different methods of LGE quantification in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Methods: Cardiac magnetic resonance was performed in 33 patients with HCM. First, LGE was quantified by visual assessment by the team of experienced readers and compared with different thresholding techniques: from 1SD to 6SD above mean signal intensity (SI) of remote myocardium, above 50% of maximal SI of the enhanced area (full-width at half maximum, FWHM) and above peak SI of remote myocardium. Results: LGE was present in 25 (78%) of patients. The median mass of LGE varied greatly depending on the quantification method used and was highest with the utilization of 1SD threshold [75.5 g, interquartile range (IQR): 63.3-112.3 g] and lowest for FWHM method (8.4 g, IQR: 4.3-13.3 g). There was no difference in mass of LGE as assessed with 6SD threshold and FWHM when compared to visual assessment (p = 0.19 and p = 0.1, respectively); all other thresholding techniques provided significant differences in the median LGE size when compared to visual analysis. Results for all thresholds, except FWHM were significantly correlated with visual assessment with the strongest correlation for 6SD (rho = 0.956, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: LGE quantification with the use of a threshold of 6SD above the mean SI of the remote myocardium provided the best agreement with visual assessment in patients with HCM.

  4. Distribution of Hypertrophy and Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Children and Adolescents with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

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    Windram, Jonathan D; Benson, Lee N; Dragelescu, Andreea; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Mertens, Luc; Wong, Derek; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    While well characterized in adult patients, the pattern of hypertrophy and the extent of myocardial scarring in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are insufficiently known. The aim of this study was to assess the hypertrophy patterns and the prevalence and clinical significance of scars in the hearts of young patients with HCM. A retrospective analysis of the imaging findings of 38 children (aged 12.83 ± 2 years, 30 males) with HCM who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) was performed. In addition to left ventricular mass and volumes, the examinations were assessed for the pattern of hypertrophy and presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). A myocardial signal intensity ≥6 standard deviations above the mean of normal myocardium defined positive LGE. Left ventricular mass index averaged 110 ± 34 g/m(2) . Nineteen children (50%) had diffuse septal, 13 (34%) diffuse concentric and 6 (16%) isolated basal hypertrophy. Seven children (18%) had LGE. Patients with LGE had a greater left ventricular mass index than those without (136 ± 34 g/m(2) vs. 104 ± 31 g/m(2) , P = .025). The only two patients who presented with an episode of aborted sudden cardiac death had LGE (P = .03). The most common hypertrophy pattern in children with HCM was diffuse septal hypertrophy. The incidence of LGE observed is lower than that reported in adults. The presence of LGE appears to confer a risk for adverse events. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Myocardial Damage Detected by Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Is Uncommon in Peripartum Cardiomyopathy.

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    Schelbert, Erik B; Elkayam, Uri; Cooper, Leslie T; Givertz, Michael M; Alexis, Jeffrey D; Briller, Joan; Felker, G Michael; Chaparro, Sandra; Kealey, Angela; Pisarcik, Jessica; Fett, James D; McNamara, Dennis M

    2017-04-03

    In peripartum cardiomyopathy, the prevalence of focal myocardial damage detected by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance is important to elucidate mechanisms of myocardial injury and cardiac dysfunction. LGE equates irreversible myocardial injury, but LGE prevalence in peripartum cardiomyopathy is uncertain. Among 100 women enrolled within the Investigations of Pregnancy Associated Cardiomyopathy cohort, we recruited 40 women at 13 centers to undergo LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance, enrolled within the first 13 weeks postpartum. Follow-up scans occurred at 6 months postpartum, and death/transplant rates at 12 months. Baseline characteristics did not differ significantly in the parent cohort according to cardiovascular magnetic resonance enrollment except for mechanical circulatory support. LGE was noted only in 2 women (5%) at baseline. While left ventricular dysfunction with enlargement was prevalent at baseline cardiovascular magnetic resonance scans (eg, ejection fraction 38% [Q1-Q3 31-50%], end diastolic volume index=108 mL/m2 [Q1-Q3 83-134 mL/m2]), most women demonstrated significant improvements at 6 months, consistent with a low prevalence of LGE. LGE was not related to baseline clinical variables, ejection fraction, New York Heart Association heart failure class, or mortality. Neither of the 2 women who died exhibited LGE. LGE was inversely associated with persistent left ventricular ejection fraction at 6 months (P=0.006). Factors other than focal myocardial damage detectable by LGE explain the initial transient depressions in baseline left ventricular ejection fraction, yet focal myocardial damage may contribute to persistent myocardial dysfunction and hinder recovery in a small minority. Most women exhibit favorable changes in ventricular function over 6 months. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01085955. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc

  6. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Post-robotic Radiosurgical Pulmonary Vein Isolation (RRPVI): First Case in the World

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    Azpiri, Jose; De La Peña, Cuauhtémoc; Cardona, Carlos; Hinojosa, Miguel; Zamarripa, Rafael; Assad, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation using robotic radiosurgery system CyberKnife is a new non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation, currently in clinical phase. Robotic radiosurgical pulmonary vein isolation (RRPVI) uses stereotactic, non-invasive (painless) pinpoint radiation energy delivery to a small, precise area to accomplish ablation. The purpose of this report is to describe the finding of an increase in the enhancement of the left atrium demonstrated with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE-CMR) as a result of RRPVI in the first case in the world in humans using CyberKnife as a treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). PMID:27660737

  7. Free-breathing motion-corrected late-gadolinium-enhancement imaging improves image quality in children

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    Olivieri, Laura; O' Brien, Kendall J. [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cross, Russell [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); Xue, Hui; Kellman, Peter; Hansen, Michael S. [National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The value of late-gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) imaging in the diagnosis and management of pediatric and congenital heart disease is clear; however current acquisition techniques are susceptible to error and artifacts when performed in children because of children's higher heart rates, higher prevalence of sinus arrhythmia, and inability to breath-hold. Commonly used techniques in pediatric LGE imaging include breath-held segmented FLASH (segFLASH) and steady-state free precession-based (segSSFP) imaging. More recently, single-shot SSFP techniques with respiratory motion-corrected averaging have emerged. This study tested and compared single-shot free-breathing LGE techniques with standard segmented breath-held techniques in children undergoing LGE imaging. Thirty-two consecutive children underwent clinically indicated late-enhancement imaging using intravenous gadobutrol 0.15 mmol/kg. Breath-held segSSFP, breath-held segFLASH, and free-breathing single-shot SSFP LGE sequences were performed in consecutive series in each child. Two blinded reviewers evaluated the quality of the images and rated them on a scale of 1-5 (1 = poor, 5 = superior) based on blood pool-myocardial definition, presence of cardiac motion, presence of respiratory motion artifacts, and image acquisition artifact. We used analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare groups. Patients ranged in age from 9 months to 18 years, with a mean +/- standard deviation (SD) of 13.3 +/- 4.8 years. R-R interval at the time of acquisition ranged 366-1,265 milliseconds (ms) (47-164 beats per minute [bpm]), mean +/- SD of 843+/-231 ms (72+/-21 bpm). Mean +/- SD quality ratings for long-axis imaging for segFLASH, segSSFP and single-shot SSFP were 3.1+/-0.9, 3.4+/-0.9 and 4.0+/-0.9, respectively (P < 0.01 by ANOVA). Mean +/- SD quality ratings for short-axis imaging for segFLASH, segSSFP and single-shot SSFP were 3.4+/-1, 3.8+/-0.9 and 4.3+/-0.7, respectively (P < 0.01 by ANOVA). Single-shot late

  8. Clinical performance of high-resolution late gadolinium enhancement imaging with compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Liew, Charlene; Tsao, Connie W; Delling, Francesca N; Addae, Gifty; Ngo, Long; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate diagnostic image quality of 3D late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) with high isotropic spatial resolution (∼1.4 mm 3 ) images reconstructed from randomly undersampled k-space using LOw-dimensional-structure Self-learning and Thresholding (LOST). We prospectively enrolled 270 patients (181 men; 55 ± 14 years) referred for myocardial viability assessment. 3D LGE with isotropic spatial resolution of 1.4 ± 0.1 mm 3 was acquired at 1.5T using a LOST acceleration rate of 3 to 5. In a subset of 121 patients, 3D LGE or phase-sensitive LGE were acquired with parallel imaging with an acceleration rate of 2 for comparison. Two readers evaluated image quality using a scale of 1 (poor) to 4 (excellent) and assessed for scar presence. The McNemar test statistic was used to compare the proportion of detected scar between the two sequences. We assessed the association between image quality and characteristics (age, gender, torso dimension, weight, heart rate), using generalized linear models. Overall, LGE detection proportions for 3D LGE with LOST were similar between readers 1 and 2 (16.30% vs. 18.15%). For image quality, readers gave 85.9% and 80.0%, respectively, for images categorized as good or excellent. Overall proportion of scar presence was not statistically different from conventional 3D LGE (28% vs. 33% [P = 0.17] for reader 1 and 26% vs. 31% [P = 0.37] for reader 2). Increasing subject heart rate was associated with lower image quality (estimated slope = -0.009 (P = 0.001)). High-resolution 3D LGE with LOST yields good to excellent image quality in >80% of patients and identifies patients with LV scar at the same rate as conventional 3D LGE. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1829-1838. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Myocardial Late Gadolinium Enhancement: Accuracy of T1 Mapping-based Synthetic Inversion-Recovery Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga-Szemes, Akos; van der Geest, Rob J; Spottiswoode, Bruce S; Suranyi, Pal; Ruzsics, Balazs; De Cecco, Carlo N; Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; Cannaò, Paola M; Fox, Mary A; Wichmann, Julian L; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2016-02-01

    To compare the accuracy of detection and quantification of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) with a synthetic inversion-recovery (IR) approach with that of conventional IR techniques. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA. All patients gave written informed consent. Between June and November 2014, 43 patients (25 men; mean age, 54 years ± 16) suspected of having previous myocardial infarction underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, including contrast material-enhanced LGE imaging and T1 mapping. Synthetic magnitude and phase-sensitive IR images were generated on the basis of T1 maps. Images were assessed by two readers. Differences in the per-patient and per-segment LGE detection rates between the synthetic and conventional techniques were analyzed with the McNemar test, and the accuracy of LGE quantification was calculated with the paired t test and Bland-Altman statistics. Interreader agreement for the detection and quantification of LGE was analyzed with κ and Bland-Altman statistics, respectively. Seventeen of the 43 patients (39%) had LGE patterns consistent with myocardial infarction. The sensitivity and specificity of synthetic magnitude and phase-sensitive IR techniques in the detection of LGE were 90% and 95%, respectively, with patient-based analysis and 94% and 99%, respectively, with segment-based analysis. The area of LGE measured with synthetic IR techniques showed excellent agreement with that of conventional techniques (4.35 cm(2) ± 1.88 and 4.14 cm(2)± 1.62 for synthetic magnitude and phase-sensitive IR, respectively, compared with 4.25 cm(2) ± 1.92 and 4.22 cm(2) ± 1.86 for conventional magnitude and phase-sensitive IR, respectively; P > .05). Interreader agreement was excellent for the detection (κ > 0.81) and quantification (bias range, -0.34 to 0.40; P > .05) of LGE. The accuracy of the T1 map-based synthetic IR approach in the detection and quantification of

  10. Late gadolinium enhancement in cardiac amyloidosis: attributable both to interstitial amyloid deposition and subendocardial fibrosis caused by ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimura, Hiromi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Yonemoto, Yumiko; Ohta-Ogo, Keiko; Matsuyama, Taka-Aki; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Morita, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Naoaki; Yasui, Hiroki; Naito, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Gadolinium contrast agents used for late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) distribute in the extracellular space. Global diffuse myocardial LGE pronounced in the subendocardial layers is common in cardiac amyloidosis. However, the pathophysiological basis of these findings has not been sufficiently explained. A 64-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with leg edema and nocturnal dyspnea. Bence Jones protein was positive in the urine, and an endomyocardial and skin biopsy showed light-chain (AL) amyloidosis. He died of ventricular fibrillation 3 months later. 9 days before death, the patient was examined by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging on a 3-T system. We acquired LGE data at 2, 5, 10, and 20 min after the injection of gadolinium contrast agents, with a fixed inversion time of 350 ms. Myocardial LGE developed sequentially. The myocardium was diffusely enhanced at 2 min, except for the subendocardium, but LGE had extended to almost the entire left ventricle at 5 min and predominantly localized to the subendocardial region at 10 and 20 min. An autopsy revealed massive and diffused amyloid deposits in perimyocytes throughout the myocardium. Old and recent ischemic findings, such as replacement fibrosis and coagulative myocyte necrosis, were evident in the subendocardium. In the intramural coronary arteries, mild amyloid deposits were present within the subepicardial to the mid layer of the left ventricle, but no stenotic lesions were evident. However, capillaries were obstructed by amyloid deposits in the subendocardium. In conclusion, the late phase of dynamic LGE (at 10 and 20 min) visualized in the subendocardium corresponded to the interstitial amyloid deposition and subendocardial fibrosis caused by ischemia in our patient.

  11. Early detection of cardiac involvement in Miyoshi myopathy: 2D strain echocardiography and late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance

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    Kim Byoung

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Miyoshi myopathy (MM is an autosomal recessive distal myopathy characterized by early adult onset. Cardiomyopathy is a major clinical manifestation in other muscular dystrophies and an important prognostic factor. Although dysferlin is highly expressed in cardiac muscle, the effect of dysferlin deficiency in cardiac muscle has not been studied. We hypothesized that early myocardial dysfunction could be detected by 2D strain echocardiography and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Method Five consecutive MM patients (3 male in whom we detected the DYSF gene mutation and age-matched healthy control subjects were included. None of the patients had history of cardiac disease or signs and symptoms of overt heart failure. Patients were studied using 2D strain echocardiography and CMR, with 2D strain being obtained using the Automated Function Imaging technique. Results All patients had preserved left ventricular systolic function. However, segmental Peak Systolic Longitudinal Strain (PSLS was decreased in 3 patients. Global PSLS was significantly lower in patients with MM than in control subjects (p = 0.005. Basal anterior septum, basal inferior septum, mid anterior, and mid inferior septum PSLS were significantly lower in patients with MM than in control subjects (P Conclusions Patients with MM showed subclinical involvement of the heart. 2D strain and LGE are sensitive methods for detecting myocardial dysfunction prior to the development of cardiovascular symptoms. The prognostic significance of these findings warrants further longitudinal follow-up.

  12. Distribution of late gadolinium enhancement in various types of cardiomyopathies: Significance in differential diagnosis, clinical features and prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Sano, Makoto; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Saotome, Masao; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques has allowed detailed analyses of cardiac function and tissue characterization with high spatial resolution. We review characteristic CMR features in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies (ICM and NICM), especially in terms of the location and distribution of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). CMR in ICM shows segmental wall motion abnormalities or wall thinning in a particular coronary arterial territory, and the subendocardial or transmural LGE. LGE in NICM generally does not correspond to any particular coronary artery distribution and is located mostly in the mid-wall to subepicardial layer. The analysis of LGE distribution is valuable to differentiate NICM with diffusely impaired systolic function, including dilated cardiomyopathy, end-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cardiac sarcoidosis, and myocarditis, and those with diffuse left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy including HCM, cardiac amyloidosis and Anderson-Fabry disease. A transient low signal intensity LGE in regions of severe LV dysfunction is a particular feature of stress cardiomyopathy. In arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia, an enhancement of right ventricular (RV) wall with functional and morphological changes of RV becomes apparent. Finally, the analyses of LGE distribution have potentials to predict cardiac outcomes and response to treatments. PMID:25068019

  13. Comparison of Image Processing Techniques for Nonviable Tissue Quantification in Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carminati, M Chiara; Boniotti, Cinzia; Fusini, Laura; Andreini, Daniele; Pontone, Gianluca; Pepi, Mauro; Caiani, Enrico G

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of quantitative methods, either semiautomated or automated, for left ventricular (LV) nonviable tissue analysis from cardiac magnetic resonance late gadolinium enhancement (CMR-LGE) images. The investigated segmentation techniques were: (i) n-standard deviations thresholding; (ii) full width at half maximum thresholding; (iii) Gaussian mixture model classification; and (iv) fuzzy c-means clustering. These algorithms were applied either in each short axis slice (single-slice approach) or globally considering the entire short-axis stack covering the LV (global approach). CMR-LGE images from 20 patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy were retrospectively selected, and results from each technique were assessed against manual tracing. All methods provided comparable performance in terms of accuracy in scar detection, computation of local transmurality, and high correlation in scar mass compared with the manual technique. In general, no significant difference between single-slice and global approach was noted. The reproducibility of manual and investigated techniques was confirmed in all cases with slightly lower results for the nSD approach. Automated techniques resulted in accurate and reproducible evaluation of LV scars from CMR-LGE in ischemic patients with performance similar to the manual technique. Their application could minimize user interaction and computational time, even when compared with semiautomated approaches.

  14. A Rare Case of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy with Subendocardial Late Gadolinium Enhancement in an Apical Aneurysm with Thrombus

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    Yusuke Morita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms responsible for the development of apical aneurysms in cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM are currently unclear but likely involve multiple factors. Here, we present a case of HCM with marked subendocardial fibrosis involving the apical and proximal portions of the left ventricle. A 71-year-old man with left ventricular hypertrophy presented with signs and symptoms of heart failure. The presence of asymmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy and bilateral, thickened ventricular walls with an apical aneurysm on transthoracic echocardiography suggested a diagnosis of HCM with ventricular dysfunction. No intraventricular pressure gradients with obstruction were identified. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsies showed subendocardial fibrosis involving the apical aneurysm and proximal portion. Whereas LGE in a transmural pattern is commonly observed in HCM apical aneurysms, subendocardial LGE, as noted in the present case, is a relatively rare occurrence. Thus, the present case may provide unique insights into the adverse remodeling process and formation of apical aneurysms in cases of HCM.

  15. A rare case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with subendocardial late gadolinium enhancement in an apical aneurysm with thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yusuke; Kato, Takao; Okano, Mitsumasa; Su, Kanae; Kimura, Masahiro; Minamino, Eri; Nakane, Eisaku; Izumi, Toshiaki; Miyamoto, Shoichi; Haruna, Tetsuya; Inoko, Moriaki

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the development of apical aneurysms in cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are currently unclear but likely involve multiple factors. Here, we present a case of HCM with marked subendocardial fibrosis involving the apical and proximal portions of the left ventricle. A 71-year-old man with left ventricular hypertrophy presented with signs and symptoms of heart failure. The presence of asymmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy and bilateral, thickened ventricular walls with an apical aneurysm on transthoracic echocardiography suggested a diagnosis of HCM with ventricular dysfunction. No intraventricular pressure gradients with obstruction were identified. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsies showed subendocardial fibrosis involving the apical aneurysm and proximal portion. Whereas LGE in a transmural pattern is commonly observed in HCM apical aneurysms, subendocardial LGE, as noted in the present case, is a relatively rare occurrence. Thus, the present case may provide unique insights into the adverse remodeling process and formation of apical aneurysms in cases of HCM.

  16. The clinical impact of late gadolinium enhancement in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: serial analysis of cardiovascular magnetic resonance images

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    Katoh Hideki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our study aimed to investigate both the clinical implications of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR and the relation of LGE to clinical findings in patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC. Methods We evaluated 20 consecutive patients (2 men, 18 women; median age, 77 years; interquartile range [IQR] 67-82 years who were admitted to our hospital with the diagnosis of TTC. CMR was performed within 1 week after admission, and follow-up studies were conducted 1.5 and 6 months later. Results In 8 patients, CMR imaging during the sub-acute phase revealed LGE in the area matched with wall motion impairment. Cardiogenic shock was more frequently observed in patients with LGE than in those without LGE (38% vs 0%, p = 0.049. The patients with LGE needed a longer duration for ECG normalization and recovery of wall motion than did those without LGE (median 205 days, IQR [152-363] vs 68 days, [43-145], p = 0.005; 15 days, [10-185] vs 7 days, [4-13], p = 0.030, respectively. In 5 of these 8 patients, LGE disappeared within 45-180 days (170, IQR [56-180] of onset. The patients with LGE remaining in the chronic phase had higher peak creatine kinase levels than did those without LGE (median 307 IU/L, IQR [264-460] vs 202 IU/L, [120-218], p = 0.017. Conclusion LGE by CMR in the sub-acute phase may be associated with the severity and prolonged recovery to normal of clinical findings in TTC.

  17. Effect of inversion time on the precision of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement quantification evaluated with synthetic inversion recovery MR imaging.

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    Varga-Szemes, Akos; van der Geest, Rob J; Schoepf, U Joseph; Spottiswoode, Bruce S; De Cecco, Carlo N; Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; Wichmann, Julian L; Mangold, Stefanie; Fuller, Stephen R; Maurovich-Horvat, Pal; Merkely, Bela; Litwin, Sheldon E; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Suranyi, Pal

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of inversion time (TI) on the precision of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) quantification using synthetic inversion recovery (IR) imaging in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). Fifty-three patients with suspected prior MI underwent 1.5-T cardiac MRI with conventional magnitude (MagIR) and phase-sensitive IR (PSIR) LGE imaging and T1 mapping at 15 min post-contrast. T1-based synthetic MagIR and PSIR images were calculated with a TI ranging from -100 to +150 ms at 5-ms intervals relative to the optimal TI (TI0). LGE was quantified using a five standard deviation (5SD) and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) thresholds. Measurements were compared using one-way analysis of variance. The MagIRsy technique provided precise assessment of LGE area at TIs ≥ TI0, while precision was decreased below TI0. The LGE area showed significant differences at ≤ -25 ms compared to TI0 using 5SD (P T1 map-based PSIRsy images provide precise quantification of MI independent of TI at the investigated time point post-contrast. MagIRsy-based MI quantification is precise at TI0 and at longer TIs while showing decreased precision at TI values below TI0. • Synthetic IR imaging retrospectively generates LGE images at any theoretical TI • Synthetic IR imaging can simulate the effect of TI on LGE quantification • Fifteen minutes post-contrast MagIR sy accurately quantifies infarcts from TI 0 to TI 0   + 150 ms • Fifteen minutes post-contrast PSIR sy provides precise infarct size independent of TI • Synthetic IR imaging has further advantages in reducing operator dependence.

  18. Evaluation of state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms for left ventricle infarct from late Gadolinium enhancement MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Rashed; Bhagirath, Pranav; Claus, Piet; James Housden, R; Chen, Zhong; Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Sohn, Hyon-Mok; Lara Rodríguez, Laura; Vera, Sergio; Albà, Xènia; Hennemuth, Anja; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto; Arbel, Tal; Gonzàlez Ballester, Miguel A; Frangi, Alejandro F; Götte, Marco; Razavi, Reza; Schaeffter, Tobias; Rhode, Kawal

    2016-05-01

    Studies have demonstrated the feasibility of late Gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging for guiding the management of patients with sequelae to myocardial infarction, such as ventricular tachycardia and heart failure. Clinical implementation of these developments necessitates a reproducible and reliable segmentation of the infarcted regions. It is challenging to compare new algorithms for infarct segmentation in the left ventricle (LV) with existing algorithms. Benchmarking datasets with evaluation strategies are much needed to facilitate comparison. This manuscript presents a benchmarking evaluation framework for future algorithms that segment infarct from LGE CMR of the LV. The image database consists of 30 LGE CMR images of both humans and pigs that were acquired from two separate imaging centres. A consensus ground truth was obtained for all data using maximum likelihood estimation. Six widely-used fixed-thresholding methods and five recently developed algorithms are tested on the benchmarking framework. Results demonstrate that the algorithms have better overlap with the consensus ground truth than most of the n-SD fixed-thresholding methods, with the exception of the Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum (FWHM) fixed-thresholding method. Some of the pitfalls of fixed thresholding methods are demonstrated in this work. The benchmarking evaluation framework, which is a contribution of this work, can be used to test and benchmark future algorithms that detect and quantify infarct in LGE CMR images of the LV. The datasets, ground truth and evaluation code have been made publicly available through the website: https://www.cardiacatlas.org/web/guest/challenges. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Extent of late gadolinium enhancement at right ventricular insertion points in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: relation with diastolic dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yinsu [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; Chu, Ajung; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Kwan [Seoul National University Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    Our aim was to examine the association between the extent of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) at right ventricular insertion points (RVIP) and left ventricular (LV) functional parameters in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Sixty-one HCM patients underwent echocardiography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) within one week. Mitral annular velocities (E/E') were obtained from echocardiography; LV ejection fraction (EF), LV mass index, LV wall maximal thickness, and left atrial volume index (LAVI) were obtained from MR. LGE extent was quantified (proportion of total LV myocardial mass) according to location: % RVIP-LGE and % non-RVIP-LGE. Although LGE was commonly present in both apical (74 %) and non-apical HCMs (88 %) (p = 0.163), RVIP-LGE was more frequent (86 % vs. 47 %, p = 0.002) in non-apical HCMs in which E/E' was significantly higher (19.23 ± 8.40 vs. 13.13 ± 5.06, p = 0.009). In addition, RVIP-LGE extent was associated with LV diastolic dysfunction (r = 0.45, p < 0.001 for E/E'; r = 0.53, p < 0.001 for LAVI) and lower LVEF (r = -0.42, p = 0.001). There was no correlation between non-RVIP-LGE extent and other parameters. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed RVIP-LGE extent as an independent predictor of E/E' (β = 0.45, p < 0.001) and LAVI in HCM patients (β = 0.53, p < 0.001). The extent of LGE at RVIPs in HCM patients is associated with increased estimated LV filling pressure and chronic diastolic burden. (orig.)

  20. 3D late gadolinium enhancement in a single prolonged breath-hold using supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roujol, Sébastien; Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Foppa, Murilo; Chan, Raymond H; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of three-dimensional (3D) single breath-hold late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) of the left ventricle (LV) using supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation and compressed-sensing acceleration. Breath-hold metrics [breath-hold duration, diaphragmatic/LV position drift, and maximum variation of R wave to R wave (RR) interval] without and with supplemental oxygen and hyperventilation were assessed in healthy adult subjects using a real-time single shot acquisition. Ten healthy subjects and 13 patients then underwent assessment of the proposed 3D breath-hold LGE acquisition (field of view = 320 × 320 × 100 mm(3) , resolution = 1.6 × 1.6 × 5.0 mm(3) , acceleration rate of 4) and a free-breathing acquisition with right hemidiaphragm navigator (NAV) respiratory gating. Semiquantitative grading of overall image quality, motion artifact, myocardial nulling, and diagnostic value was performed by consensus of two blinded observers. Supplemental oxygenation and hyperventilation increased the breath-hold duration (35 ± 11 s to 58 ± 21 s; P  0.01). LGE images were of similar quality when compared with free-breathing acquisitions, but with reduced total scan time (85 ± 22 s to 35 ± 6 s; P hyperventilation allow for prolonged breath-holding and enable single breath-hold 3D accelerated LGE with similar image quality as free breathing with NAV. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Prevalence, pattern, and functional impact of late gadolinium enhancement in left ventricular hypertrophy due to aortic valve stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassenstein, K.; Schlosser, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Bruder, O. [Elisabeth-Krankenhaus Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Kardiologie und Angiologie; Breuckmann, F.; Erbel, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Westdeutsches Herzzentrum Essen; Barkhausen, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2009-05-15

    Purpose: To assess the prevalence and pattern of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and its functional impact on patients with left ventricular hypertrophy caused by aortic valve stenosis. Materials and Methods: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of 40 patients (17 female, 23 male, mean age: 76.6 {+-} 22.5 years) with known aortic valve stenosis (mean aortic valve area: 89.8 {+-} 19.2 mm{sup 2}) and without coronary artery disease was performed at 1.5 T using steady-state free precession sequences for aortic valve planimetry and for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass. Ten to 15 minutes after injection of 0.2 mmol Gd-DTPA per kilogram body weight, inversion-recovery prepared spoiled gradient echo images were acquired in standard long and short axis views to detect areas of LGE. Results: LGE was observed in 32.5 % (13/40) of our patients. LGE was mainly located in the basal septal and inferior LV segments, and showed a non-ischemic pattern with sparing of the subendocardial region. Patients with LGE showed lower LV ejection fractions (55.5 {+-} 13.8 % vs. 69.1 {+-} 10.7 %, p = 0.0014), higher LV end-systolic volumes (59.8 {+-} 33.3 ml vs. 36.6 {+-} 16.0 ml, p = 0.0048), and LV masses (211.0 {+-} 13.8 vs. 157.9 {+-} 37.5 g, p = 0.0002) compared to patients without LGE. (orig.)

  2. Effect of inversion time on the precision of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement quantification evaluated with synthetic inversion recovery MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga-Szemes, Akos; Schoepf, U.J.; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Fuller, Stephen R.; Suranyi, Pal [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Geest, Rob J. van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Spottiswoode, Bruce S. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Chicago, IL (United States); Muscogiuri, Giuseppe [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital IRCCS, Department of Imaging, Rome (Italy); Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Mangold, Stefanie [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Maurovich-Horvat, Pal; Merkely, Bela [Semmelweis University, MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Budapest (Hungary); Litwin, Sheldon E. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging-North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-08-15

    To evaluate the influence of inversion time (TI) on the precision of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) quantification using synthetic inversion recovery (IR) imaging in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). Fifty-three patients with suspected prior MI underwent 1.5-T cardiac MRI with conventional magnitude (MagIR) and phase-sensitive IR (PSIR) LGE imaging and T1 mapping at 15 min post-contrast. T1-based synthetic MagIR and PSIR images were calculated with a TI ranging from -100 to +150 ms at 5-ms intervals relative to the optimal TI (TI{sub 0}). LGE was quantified using a five standard deviation (5SD) and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) thresholds. Measurements were compared using one-way analysis of variance. The MagIR{sub sy} technique provided precise assessment of LGE area at TIs ≥ TI{sub 0}, while precision was decreased below TI{sub 0}. The LGE area showed significant differences at ≤ -25 ms compared to TI{sub 0} using 5SD (P < 0.001) and at ≤ -65 ms using the FWHM approach (P < 0.001). LGE measurements did not show significant difference over the analysed TI range in the PSIR{sub sy} images using either of the quantification methods. T1 map-based PSIR{sub sy} images provide precise quantification of MI independent of TI at the investigated time point post-contrast. MagIR{sub sy}-based MI quantification is precise at TI{sub 0} and at longer TIs while showing decreased precision at TI values below TI{sub 0}. (orig.)

  3. Ultra low-dose of gadobenate dimeglumine for late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging in acute myocardial infarction: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galea, Nicola, E-mail: nicola.galea@uniroma1.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Pathology and Oncology, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 315, 00161 Rome (Italy); Francone, Marco, E-mail: marco.francone@uniroma1.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Pathology and Oncology, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 315, 00161 Rome (Italy); Zaccagna, Fulvio, E-mail: f.zaccagna@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Pathology and Oncology, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 315, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ciolina, Federica, E-mail: federica.ciolina@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Pathology and Oncology, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 315, 00161 Rome (Italy); Cannata, David, E-mail: davidrum@yahoo.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Pathology and Oncology, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 315, 00161 Rome (Italy); Algeri, Emanuela, E-mail: emanuela_algeri@yahoo.com [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Hôpital Cardiologique, Centre Hospitalier Régional et Universitaire de Lille, Avenue Oscar Lambret, 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Agati, Luciano, E-mail: luciano.agati@uniroma1.it [Department of Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Nephrologic, Anestesiologic and Geriatric Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Policlinico Umberto I, Via del Policlinico 165, 00161 Rome, Rome (Italy); and others

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We compared two gadolinium dose for late enhancement imaging in acute infarction. • We evaluated image quality both qualitatively and quantitatively. • Low dose regimen is feasible and provides better image quality at 5–10 min delay. • Standard dose warrants better image quality and should be routinely preferred. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess the feasibility of using an ultra-low dose (0.05 mmol/kg of body weight [BW]) of high relaxivity contrast agent for late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Materials and methods: 17 consecutive patients (mean age, 60.1 ± 10.3 years) with ST-segment elevation AMI underwent two randomized cardiac magnetic resonance studies (exam intervals between 24 and 48 h) on a 1.5 T unit during the first week after the event using gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) at the dose of 0.1 mmol/kg BW (standard dose or SD group) and 0.05 mmol/kg BW (half dose or HD group). Image quality was qualitatively assessed. Quantitative analysis of LGE were performed by measuring signal intensity (SI), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the infarcted myocardium (IM), non-infarcted myocardium (N-IM) and left ventricular cavity (LVC) in images acquired at 1, 3, 5, 10, 15 and 20 min after administration of Gd-BOPTA using both contrast media protocol. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between IM and N-IM (CNR IM/N-IM) and between IM and LVC (CNR IM/LVC) were also quantified for each time point. Moreover the extent of infarcted myocardium was measured. Results: 102 LGE images were evaluated for each dose group. Quality score was significantly higher for SD at 1, 15 and 20 min (0.002 < p < 0.046) and for HD at 5 min (p = 0.013). SNR has been higher in the SD group compared to the HD group even though not statistically significant at any time-point for both IM (SD vs. HD: 87.7 ± 73 vs. 65 ± 66; 0.15 < p < 0.38) and N-IM (SD vs. HD: 22 ± 61 vs. 9.9 ± 6.5; 0.09 < p < 0.43). LVC SNR was

  4. Late gadolinium enhancement in the diagnostics of ischemic heart disease. Technical principles, contrast optimization and clinical application; Late-Gadolinium-Enhancement in der Diagnostik der koronaren Herzerkrankung. Technische Grundlagen, Kontrastoptimierung und klinische Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauner, K.U.; Picciolo, M.; Theisen, D.; Sandner, T.A.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Reiser, M.F.; Wintersperger, B.J. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Biffar, A. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Joseph Lissner Laboratory of Biomedical Imaging, Muenchen (Germany); Greif, M.; Becker, A. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I, Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of the study was to explore a ''dark blood'' technique and to compare it with a standard inversion recovery gradient echo (IR GRE) sequence in the visualization of myocardial infarction. A total of 9 patients were examined with standard IR GRE and a ''dark blood'' sequence 15 mins after contrast medium application (0.2 mmol/kg body weight gadobenate dimeglumine). Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were calculated for each sequence. The CNR{sub inf-lvc} was significantly higher in the ''dark blood'' technique compared to the IR GRE sequence, while the CNR{sub inf-myo} was significantly lower. Small subendocardial infarctions may be easier to detect with the ''dark blood'' technique. However, the standard IR GRE sequence is superior in the demarcation of infarctions in relation to the myocardium and cannot be replaced by the ''dark blood'' technique. (orig.) [German] In der kardialen MRT ist die Methodik des Late-Gadolinium-Enhancements (LGE) zur Darstellung von Myokardinfarkten waehrend des letzten Jahrzehnts zu einem klinischen Routineverfahren geworden. In manchen Faellen kann die Abgrenzung des LGE vom Ventrikellumen in der Standardsequenz (Inversion-recovery-Gradientenecho- [IR-GRE-]Sequenz) jedoch schwierig sein. Ziel unserer Untersuchungen war es daher, eine ''Dark-blood''-Sequenz in der LGE-Bildgebung einzusetzen und mit der Referenztechnik zu vergleichen. Bei 9 Patienten wurden 15 min nach Kontrastmittelapplikation (0,2 mmol/kgKG Gadobenate Dimeglumine) eine IR-GRE-Sequenz (Referenztechnik) und eine ''Dark-blood''-Sequenz durchgefuehrt. Das Kontrast-zu-Rauschen (CNR) beider Sequenzen wurde verglichen. Waehrend das CNR zwischen Infarkt und Myokard in der IR-GRE-Technik signifikant besser als in der ''Dark-blood''-Darstellung ausfiel (p=0,039), war das CNR von Infarkt zum Ventrikellumen in der

  5. Myocardial area at risk after ST-elevation myocardial infarction measured with the late gadolinium enhancement after scar remodeling and T2-weighted cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob; Engstrøm, Thomas; Mathiasen, Anders B

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the myocardial area at risk (AAR) measured by the endocardial surface area (ESA) method on late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) when applied after scar remodeling (3 months after index infarction) compared to T2-weighted CMR imaging. One hundred...... and sixty nine patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention, underwent one CMR within 1 week after index treatment to determine the AAR with T2-weighted imaging and a second scan 3 months after to measure AAR with the ESA method...

  6. Myocardial area at risk after ST-elevation myocardial infarction measured with the late gadolinium enhancement after scar remodeling and T2-weighted cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob; Engstrøm, Thomas; Mathiasen, Anders B

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the myocardial area at risk (AAR) measured by the endocardial surface area (ESA) method on late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) when applied after scar remodeling (3 months after index infarction) compared to T2-weighted CMR imaging. One hundred...... and sixty nine patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention, underwent one CMR within 1 week after index treatment to determine the AAR with T2-weighted imaging and a second scan 3 months after to measure AAR with the ESA method...

  7. Late gadolinium enhancement cardiac imaging on a 3T scanner with parallel RF transmission technique: prospective comparison of 3D-PSIR and 3D-IR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Anthony [Nouvel Hopital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Radiology Department, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Nouvel Hopital Civil, Service de Radiologie, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Caspar, Thibault [Nouvel Hopital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Cardiology Department, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Schaeffer, Mickael [Nouvel Hopital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Public Health and Biostatistics Department, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Labani, Aissam; Jeung, Mi-Young; El Ghannudi, Soraya; Roy, Catherine [Nouvel Hopital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Radiology Department, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Ohana, Mickael [Nouvel Hopital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Radiology Department, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Universite de Strasbourg / CNRS, UMR 7357, iCube Laboratory, Illkirch (France)

    2016-06-15

    To qualitatively and quantitatively compare different late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) sequences acquired at 3T with a parallel RF transmission technique. One hundred and sixty participants prospectively enrolled underwent a 3T cardiac MRI with 3 different LGE sequences: 3D Phase-Sensitive Inversion-Recovery (3D-PSIR) acquired 5 minutes after injection, 3D Inversion-Recovery (3D-IR) at 9 minutes and 3D-PSIR at 13 minutes. All LGE-positive patients were qualitatively evaluated both independently and blindly by two radiologists using a 4-level scale, and quantitatively assessed with measurement of contrast-to-noise ratio and LGE maximal surface. Statistical analyses were calculated under a Bayesian paradigm using MCMC methods. Fifty patients (70 % men, 56yo ± 19) exhibited LGE (62 % were post-ischemic, 30 % related to cardiomyopathy and 8 % post-myocarditis). Early and late 3D-PSIR were superior to 3D-IR sequences (global quality, estimated coefficient IR > early-PSIR: -2.37 CI = [-3.46; -1.38], prob(coef > 0) = 0 % and late-PSIR > IR: 3.12 CI = [0.62; 4.41], prob(coef > 0) = 100 %), LGE surface estimated coefficient IR > early-PSIR: -0.09 CI = [-1.11; -0.74], prob(coef > 0) = 0 % and late-PSIR > IR: 0.96 CI = [0.77; 1.15], prob(coef > 0) = 100 %. Probabilities for late PSIR being superior to early PSIR concerning global quality and CNR were over 90 %, regardless of the aetiological subgroup. In 3T cardiac MRI acquired with parallel RF transmission technique, 3D-PSIR is qualitatively and quantitatively superior to 3D-IR. (orig.)

  8. T(1) mapping for the diagnosis of acute myocarditis using CMR: comparison to T2-weighted and late gadolinium enhanced imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Vanessa M; Piechnik, Stefan K; Dall'Armellina, Erica; Karamitsos, Theodoros D; Francis, Jane M; Ntusi, Ntobeko; Holloway, Cameron; Choudhury, Robin P; Kardos, Attila; Robson, Matthew D; Friedrich, Matthias G; Neubauer, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    This study sought to test the diagnostic performance of native T1 mapping in acute myocarditis compared with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques such as dark-blood T2-weighted (T2W)-CMR, bright-blood T2W-CMR, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging. The diagnosis of acute myocarditis on CMR often requires multiple techniques, including T2W, early gadolinium enhancement, and LGE imaging. Novel techniques such as T1 mapping and bright-blood T2W-CMR are also sensitive to changes in free water content. We hypothesized that these techniques can serve as new and potentially superior diagnostic criteria for myocarditis. We investigated 50 patients with suspected acute myocarditis (age 42 ± 16 years; 22% women) and 45 controls (age 42 ± 14 years; 22% women). CMR at 1.5-T (median 3 days from presentation) included: 1) dark-blood T2W-CMR (short-tau inversion recovery); 2) bright-blood T2W-CMR (acquisition for cardiac unified T2 edema); 3) native T1 mapping (shortened modified look-locker inversion recovery); and 4) LGE. Image analysis included: 1) global T2 signal intensity ratio of myocardium compared with skeletal muscle; 2) myocardial T1 relaxation times; and 3) areas of LGE. Compared with controls, patients had significantly higher global T2 signal intensity ratios by dark-blood T2W-CMR (1.73 ± 0.27 vs. 1.56 ± 0.15, p T1 (1,010 ± 65 ms vs. 941 ± 18 ms, p T1 mapping (0.95), LGE (0.96), dark-blood T2 (0.78), and bright-blood T2 (0.76). A T1 cutoff of 990 ms had a sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of 90%, 91%, and 91%, respectively. Native T1 mapping as a novel criterion for the detection of acute myocarditis showed excellent and superior diagnostic performance compared with T2W-CMR. It also has a higher sensitivity compared with T2W and LGE techniques, which may be especially useful in detecting subtle focal disease and when gadolinium contrast imaging is not feasible. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Appearance of microvascular obstruction on high resolution first-pass perfusion, early and late gadolinium enhancement CMR in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redwood Simon

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence and extent of microvascular obstruction (MO after acute myocardial infarction can be measured by first-pass gadolinium-enhanced perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR or after gadolinium injection with early or late enhancement (EGE/LGE imaging. The volume of MO measured by these three methods may differ because contrast agent diffusion into the MO reduces its apparent extent over time. Theoretically, first-pass perfusion CMR should be the most accurate method to measure MO, but this technique has been limited by lower spatial resolution than EGE and LGE as well as incomplete cardiac coverage. These limitations of perfusion CMR can be overcome using spatio-temporal undersampling methods. The purpose of this study was to compare the extent of MO by high resolution first-pass k-t SENSE accelerated perfusion, EGE and LGE. Methods 34 patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction, treated successfully with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI, underwent CMR within 72 hours of admission. k-t SENSE accelerated first-pass perfusion MR (7 fold acceleration, spatial resolution 1.5 mm × 1.5 mm × 10 mm, 8 slices acquired over 2 RR intervals, 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA, EGE (1–4 minutes after injection with a fixed TI of 440 ms and LGE images (10–12 minutes after injection, TI determined by a Look-Locker scout were acquired. MO volume was determined for each technique by manual planimetry and summation of discs methodology. Results k-t SENSE first-pass perfusion detected more cases of MO than EGE and LGE (22 vs. 20 vs. 14, respectively. The extent of MO imaged by first-pass perfusion (median mass 4.7 g, IQR 6.7 was greater than by EGE (median mass 2.3 g, IQR 7.1, p = 0.002 and LGE (median mass 0.2 g, IQR 2.4, p = 0.0003. The correlation coefficient between MO mass measured by first-pass perfusion and EGE was 0.91 (p Conclusion The extent of MO following acute myocardial infarction appears larger on

  10. Appearance of microvascular obstruction on high resolution first-pass perfusion, early and late gadolinium enhancement CMR in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Adam N; Lockie, Timothy; Nagel, Eike; Marber, Michael; Perera, Divaka; Redwood, Simon; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Saha, Ansuman; Greenwood, John P; Plein, Sven

    2009-08-21

    The presence and extent of microvascular obstruction (MO) after acute myocardial infarction can be measured by first-pass gadolinium-enhanced perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or after gadolinium injection with early or late enhancement (EGE/LGE) imaging. The volume of MO measured by these three methods may differ because contrast agent diffusion into the MO reduces its apparent extent over time. Theoretically, first-pass perfusion CMR should be the most accurate method to measure MO, but this technique has been limited by lower spatial resolution than EGE and LGE as well as incomplete cardiac coverage. These limitations of perfusion CMR can be overcome using spatio-temporal undersampling methods. The purpose of this study was to compare the extent of MO by high resolution first-pass k-t SENSE accelerated perfusion, EGE and LGE. 34 patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction, treated successfully with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), underwent CMR within 72 hours of admission. k-t SENSE accelerated first-pass perfusion MR (7 fold acceleration, spatial resolution 1.5 mm x 1.5 mm x 10 mm, 8 slices acquired over 2 RR intervals, 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA), EGE (14 minutes after injection with a fixed TI of 440 ms) and LGE images (1012 minutes after injection, TI determined by a Look-Locker scout) were acquired. MO volume was determined for each technique by manual planimetry and summation of discs methodology. k-t SENSE first-pass perfusion detected more cases of MO than EGE and LGE (22 vs. 20 vs. 14, respectively). The extent of MO imaged by first-pass perfusion (median mass 4.7 g, IQR 6.7) was greater than by EGE (median mass 2.3 g, IQR 7.1, p = 0.002) and LGE (median mass 0.2 g, IQR 2.4, p = 0.0003). The correlation coefficient between MO mass measured by first-pass perfusion and EGE was 0.91 (p < 0.001). The extent of MO following acute myocardial infarction appears larger on high-resolution first-pass perfusion CMR than on

  11. Science to practice: can the combination of resting first-pass myocardial perfusion and late gadolinium-enhanced cardiovascular MR imaging help identify myocardial infarction resulting from coronary microembolization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Evan; Manning, Warren J

    2009-03-01

    In this issue of Radiology, Carlsson and colleagues report on the use of acute (1 hour, n = 7) and subacute (1 week, n = 6) resting first-pass perfusion and late gadolinium-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to detect myocardial hypoperfusion and microinfarction in a swine model of coronary microembolization. They found resting hypoperfusion at 1 hour that persisted at 1 week. Detection of microinfarction was not reliable at 1 hour, but microinfarction was detected and characterized at 1 week. The pattern on late gadolinium-enhanced images in their model was patchy, with small clusters randomly distributed across a large artery territory. This is distinct from the subendocardially based transmural extension patterns described with clinical myocardial infarction (MI). The degree of left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction did not correlate with the quantity of myonecrosis.

  12. Die Bedeutung des myokardialen Late Gadolinium Enhancements in der Magnetresonanztomographie für das Auftreten von ventrikulären Arrhythmien bei Patienten mit nicht-ischämischer Kardiomyopathie

    OpenAIRE

    Ganßer, Lisa Mareike

    2015-01-01

    In der vorliegenden Studie wurde untersucht, ob Patienten mit nicht-ischämischer Kardiomyopathie, welche in der kardialen Magnetresonanztomographie (Kardio-MRT) ein Late Gadolinium Enhancement zeigen (LGE), häufiger von ventrikulären Arrhythmien betroffen sind, als Patienten ohne LGE und ob diese Arrhythmien ihren Ursprung im Areal des LGE haben. Dazu wurden 40 Patienten mit nicht-ischämischer Kardiomyopathie in die Studie eingeschlossen. Bei allen wurde eine kardiale MRT sowie ein 24-Stunden...

  13. T1 mapping using saturation recovery single-shot acquisition at 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: comparison to late gadolinium enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Ryo; Kido, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Masashi; Kido, Teruhito; Kurata, Akira; Uetani, Teruyoshi; Ogimoto, Akiyoshi; Miyagawa, Masao; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the T1 values of segments and slices and the reproducibility in healthy controls, using saturation recovery single-shot acquisition (SASHA) at 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, we examined the difference in T1 values between hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and healthy controls, and compared those with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Twenty-one HCM patients and 10 healthy controls underwent T1 mapping before and after contrast administration. T1 values were measured in 12 segments. Native T1 values were significantly longer in HCM than in healthy controls [1373 ms (1312-1452 ms) vs. 1279 ms (1229-1326 ms); p T1 values were significantly longer than in healthy control segments [1366 ms (1300-1439 ms) vs. 1279 ms (1229-1326 ms); p T1 values, we differentiated between HCM and healthy controls with 95% sensitivity, 90% specificity, 94% accuracy, and an area under the curve of 0.95. Native T1 values using a SASHA at 3T could differentiate HCM from healthy controls. Moreover, native T1 values have the potential to detect abnormal myocardium that cannot be identified adequately by LGE in HCM.

  14. Quantitative analysis of late gadolinium enhancement in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: comparison of diagnostic performance in myocardial fibrosis between gadobutrol and gadopentetate dimeglumine.

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    Liu, Dongting; Ma, Xiaohai; Liu, Jiayi; Zhao, Lei; Chen, Hui; Xu, Lei; Sun, Zhonghua; Fan, Zhanming

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare different semi-automated late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) quantification techniques using gadobutrol and gadopentetate dimeglumine contrast agents with regard to the diagnosis of fibrotic myocardium in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Thirty patients with HCM underwent two cardiac MRI protocols with use of gadobutrol and gadopentetate dimeglumine. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between LGE area and remote myocardium (CNRremote), between LGE area and left ventricular blood pool (CNRpool), and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in LGE were compared. The presence and quantity of LGE were determined by visual assessment. With signal threshold versus reference mean (STRM) based thresholds of 2 SD, 5 SD, and 6 SD above the mean signal intensity (SI) of reference myocardium, the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) technique was used. The volume and segments of the LGE area were compared between the two types of contrast agents. LGE was present in 26 of 30 (86.6%) patients in both protocols. The CNRremote of fibrotic myocardium in gadobutrol and gadopentetate dimeglumine agents was 26.82 ± 14.24 and 21.46 ± 10.59, respectively (P gadopentetate dimeglumine (P gadopentetate dimeglumine. The 5 SD technique yields the closest approximation of the extent of LGE identified by visual assessment.

  15. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; Macleod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-02-23

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  16. Multi-atlas propagation based left atrium segmentation coupled with super-voxel based pulmonary veins delineation in late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac MRI

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    Yang, Guang; Zhuang, Xiahai; Khan, Habib; Haldar, Shouvik; Nyktari, Eva; Li, Lei; Ye, Xujiong; Slabaugh, Greg; Wong, Tom; Mohiaddin, Raad; Keegan, Jennifer; Firmin, David

    2017-02-01

    Late Gadolinium-Enhanced Cardiac MRI (LGE CMRI) is a non-invasive technique, which has shown promise in detecting native and post-ablation atrial scarring. To visualize the scarring, a precise segmentation of the left atrium (LA) and pulmonary veins (PVs) anatomy is performed as a first step—usually from an ECG gated CMRI roadmap acquisition—and the enhanced scar regions from the LGE CMRI images are superimposed. The anatomy of the LA and PVs in particular is highly variable and manual segmentation is labor intensive and highly subjective. In this paper, we developed a multi-atlas propagation based whole heart segmentation (WHS) to delineate the LA and PVs from ECG gated CMRI roadmap scans. While this captures the anatomy of the atrium well, the PVs anatomy is less easily visualized. The process is therefore augmented by semi-automated manual strokes for PVs identification in the registered LGE CMRI data. This allows us to extract more accurate anatomy than the fully automated WHS. Both qualitative visualization and quantitative assessment with respect to manual segmented ground truth showed that our method is efficient and effective with an overall mean Dice score of 0.91.

  17. Differentiation of pre-ablation and post-ablation late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac MRI scans of longstanding persistent atrial fibrillation patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Zhuang, Xiahai; Khan, Habib; Haldar, Shouvik; Nyktari, Eva; Li, Lei; Ye, Xujiong; Slabaugh, Greg; Wong, Tom; Mohiaddin, Raad; Keegan, Jennifer; Firmin, David

    2017-03-01

    Late Gadolinium-Enhanced Cardiac MRI (LGE CMRI) is an emerging non-invasive technique to image and quantify preablation native and post-ablation atrial scarring. Previous studies have reported that enhanced image intensities of the atrial scarring in the LGE CMRI inversely correlate with the left atrial endocardial voltage invasively obtained by electro-anatomical mapping. However, the reported reproducibility of using LGE CMRI to identify and quantify atrial scarring is variable. This may be due to two reasons: first, delineation of the left atrium (LA) and pulmonary veins (PVs) anatomy generally relies on manual operation that is highly subjective, and this could substantially affect the subsequent atrial scarring segmentation; second, simple intensity based image features may not be good enough to detect subtle changes in atrial scarring. In this study, we hypothesized that texture analysis can provide reliable image features for the LGE CMRI images subject to accurate and objective delineation of the heart anatomy based on a fully-automated whole heart segmentation (WHS) method. We tested the extracted texture features to differentiate between pre-ablation and post-ablation LGE CMRI studies in longstanding persistent atrial fibrillation patients. These patients often have extensive native scarring and differentiation from post-ablation scarring can be difficult. Quantification results showed that our method is capable of solving this classification task, and we can envisage further deployment of this texture analysis based method for other clinical problems using LGE CMRI.

  18. Rapid assessment of myocardial infarct size in rodents using multi-slice inversion recovery late gadolinium enhancement CMR at 9.4T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hausenloy Derek J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial infarction (MI can be readily assessed using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Inversion recovery (IR sequences provide the highest contrast between enhanced infarct areas and healthy myocardium. Applying such methods to small animals is challenging due to rapid respiratory and cardiac rates relative to T1 relaxation. Methods Here we present a fast and robust protocol for assessing LGE in small animals using a multi-slice IR gradient echo sequence for efficient assessment of LGE. An additional Look-Locker sequence was used to assess the optimum inversion point on an individual basis and to determine most appropriate gating points for both rat and mouse. The technique was applied to two preclinical scenarios: i an acute (2 hour reperfused model of MI in rats and ii mice 2 days following non-reperfused MI. Results LGE images from all animals revealed clear areas of enhancement allowing for easy volume segmentation. Typical inversion times required to null healthy myocardium in rats were between 300-450 ms equivalent to 2-3 R-waves and ~330 ms in mice, typically 3 R-waves following inversion. Data from rats was also validated against triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and revealed close agreement for infarct size. Conclusion The LGE protocol presented provides a reliable method for acquiring images of high contrast and quality without excessive scan times, enabling higher throughput in experimental studies requiring reliable assessment of MI.

  19. Differentiation between acute and chronic myocardial infarction by means of texture analysis of late gadolinium enhancement and cine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larroza, Andrés; Materka, Andrzej; López-Lereu, María P; Monmeneu, José V; Bodí, Vicente; Moratal, David

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to differentiate acute from chronic myocardial infarction using machine learning techniques and texture features extracted from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The study group comprised 22 cases with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and 22 cases with chronic myocardial infarction (CMI). Cine and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI were analyzed independently to differentiate AMI from CMI. A total of 279 texture features were extracted from predefined regions of interest (ROIs): the infarcted area on LGE MRI, and the entire myocardium on cine MRI. Classification performance was evaluated by a nested cross-validation approach combining a feature selection technique with three predictive models: random forest, support vector machine (SVM) with Gaussian Kernel, and SVM with polynomial kernel. The polynomial SVM yielded the best classification performance. Receiver operating characteristic curves provided area-under-the-curve (AUC) (mean±standard deviation) of 0.86±0.06 on LGE MRI using 72 features; AMI sensitivity=0.81±0.08 and specificity=0.84±0.09. On cine MRI, AUC=0.82±0.06 using 75 features; AMI sensitivity=0.79±0.10 and specificity=0.80±0.10. We concluded that texture analysis can be used for differentiation of AMI from CMI on cardiac LGE MRI, and also on standard cine sequences in which the infarction is visually imperceptible in most cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mitral annular plane systolic excursion is an easy tool for fibrosis detection by late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doesch, Christina; Sperb, Amelie; Sudarski, Sonja; Lossnitzer, Dirk; Rudic, Boris; Tülümen, Erol; Heggemann, Felix; Schimpf, Rainer; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Borggrefe, Martin; Papavassiliu, Theano

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) causes various degrees of fibrosis resulting in left ventricular function impairment, which can be measured using mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE). To determine the values for septal, lateral and average MAPSE using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in healthy controls and patients with HCM; and to investigate whether MAPSE correlated with the extent of fibrosis. Patients with HCM and healthy controls underwent CMR. In 50 healthy controls, septal and lateral MAPSE were comparable and showed excellent intra- and inter-observer reliability. Patients with HCM had significantly reduced septal, lateral and average MAPSE compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, in patients with HCM, septal MAPSE measurements were significantly reduced compared to lateral ones. Correspondingly, the septal myocardial segments showed significantly more late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) than lateral ones. No significant differences were found between echocardiographic and CMR MAPSE measurements in healthy controls and patients with HCM. Patients who suffered a major adverse cardiac event or stroke revealed a significantly reduced MAPSE and a significantly greater LGE extent compared to event-free patients with HCM. MAPSE measurement using CMR is feasible, reproducible and comparable to echocardiography in healthy controls and patients with HCM. The asymmetric and mainly septal distribution of myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis detected by LGE in patients with HCM was reflected by significantly reduced septal versus lateral MAPSE. Therefore, reduced MAPSE seems to be an easily determinable marker of fibrosis accumulation leading to left ventricular mechanical dysfunction and also seems to have a prognostic implication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Prediction of global left ventricular functional recovery in patients with heart failure undergoing surgical revascularisation, based on late gadolinium enhancement Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamitsos Theodoros D

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The new gold standard for myocardial viability assessment is late gadolinium enhancement-cardiovascular magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR; this technique has demonstrated that the transmural extent of scar predicts segmental functional recovery. We now asked how the number of viable and number of viable+normal, segments predicted recovery of global left ventricular (LV function in patients undergoing CABG. Finally, we examined which segmental transmural threshold of scarring best predicted global LV recovery. Methods and Results Fifty patients with reduced LV ejection fraction (EF referred for CABG were recruited, and 33 included in this analysis. Patients underwent CMR to assess LV function and viability pre-operatively at 6 days and 6 months. Mean LVEF 38% ± 11, which improved to 43% ± 12 after surgery. 21/33 patients improved EF by ≥3% (EF before 38% ± 13, after 47% ± 13, 12/33 did not (EF before 39% ± 6, after 37% ± 8. The only independent predictor for global functional recovery after revascularisation was the number of viable+normal segments: Based on a segmental transmural viability cutoff of Conclusions Based on a 50% transmural viability cutoff, patients with ≥10 viable+normal segments improve global LV function post revascularisation, while patients with fewer such segments do not. LGE-CMR is a simple and powerful tool for identifying which patients with impaired LV function will benefit from CABG. Trial registration Research Ethics Committee Unique Identifier: NRES:05/Q1603/42. The study is listed on the Current Controlled Trials Registry: ISRCTN41388968. URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com

  2. The value of cardiac magnetic resonance and distribution of late gadolinium enhancement for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopotowski, Mariusz; Kukula, Krzysztof; Malek, Lukasz A; Spiewak, Mateusz; Polanska-Skrzypczyk, Magdalena; Jamiolkowski, Jacek; Dabrowski, Maciej; Baranowski, Rafal; Klisiewicz, Anna; Kusmierczyk, Mariusz; Jasinska, Anna; Jarmus, Ewelina; Kruk, Mariusz; Ruzyllo, Witold; Witkowski, Adam; Chojnowska, Lidia

    2016-07-01

    The presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is associated with worse clinical outcome and the extent of LGE predicts the increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Limited data exist regarding the distribution of LGE. We attempted to verify whether the presence of LGE outside the interventricular insertion points carries additional risk for patients with HCM. In this prospective study, 328 patients with HCM, who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) were enrolled. Five major risk factors for SCD were assessed in all patients. The median follow-up was 37 months. LGE was detected in 226 (68.9%) patients. In 70 (21.3%) patients it was present only at the interventricular insertion points - LGE (+) group, while in 156 (47.6%) it was noted in other locations - LGE (++) group. Primary endpoint defined as SCD or appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator intervention occurred in 14 (4.3%) patients, one in LGE (+) and 13 in LGE (++). In multivariable analysis including five traditional risk factors and left ventricular ejection fraction risk model was improved by the addition of LGE (++) to the traditional risk factors (likelihood ratio p=0.005). The Kaplan-Meier curves showed better event-free survival in the LGE (-) and LGE (+) patient groups compared to the LGE (++) group. In HCM patients, presence of LGE outside interventricular insertion points is associated with increased risk of sudden cardiac death or its equivalent as well as overall mortality. Cardiac fibrosis as a substrate for SCD in HCM may be identified on CMR and serve as an imaging biomarker of increased risk. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Accuracy of Late Gadolinium Enhancement - Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Measurement of Left Atrial Substrate Remodeling in Patients With Rheumatic Mitral Valve Disease and Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Da; Wu, Zhong; van der Geest, Rob J; Luo, Yong; Sun, Jiayu; Jiang, Jian; Chen, Yucheng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a histopathological validation of cardiac late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of left atrial (LA) substrate remodeling (SRM) in patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease and persistent atrial fibrillation (AF).Adult patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease and persistent AF undergoing open-heart surgery for mitral valve replacement were enrolled. Both two-dimensional (2D) sections and 3-dimensional (3D) full-volume LGE-MRI with different signal intensities were performed preoperatively to determine the extent of LA-SRM. Tissue samples were obtained intraoperatively from the LA roof and posterior lateral wall for pathological validation with Masson trichrome staining and immunostaining for collagen type I/III deposition. A linear regression model was used to determine the relationship between MRI-derived LA-SRM parameters and pathological results.Between February 2013 and March 2014, we successfully acquired LA tissue samples from 22 patients (13 men), with a mean age of 47 ± 8 years. All patients had rheumatic mitral valve stenosis, with a mean effective orifice area of 0.9 ± 0.2 cm(2) on echocardiography and a mean LA volume of 235 ± 85 mL on 3D-MRI. Multiple moderate linear associations were noted between the pathological results and LGE-MRI-derived LA-SRM parameters, with correlation indices (r(2)) of 0.194-0.385.LA-SRM measured by LGE-MRI showed moderate agreement with LA pathology in patients with rheumatic valve disease and persistent AF.

  4. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance to Predict Appropriate Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy in Ischemic and Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy Patients Using Late Gadolinium Enhancement Border Zone: Comparison of Four Analysis Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, Robert; Chaudhry, Uzma; van der Pals, Jesper; Engblom, Henrik; Arheden, Håkan; Heiberg, Einar; Wu, Katherine C; Borgquist, Rasmus; Carlsson, Marcus

    2017-09-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) border zone on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging has been proposed as an independent predictor of ventricular arrhythmias. The purpose was to determine whether size and heterogeneity of LGE predict appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy in ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) and nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM) patients and to evaluate 4 LGE border-zone algorithms. ICM and NICM patients who underwent LGE cardiac magnetic resonance imaging prior to ICD implantation were retrospectively included. Two semiautomatic algorithms, expectation maximization, weighted intensity, a priori information and a weighted border zone algorithm, were compared with a modified full-width half-maximum and a 2-3SD threshold-based algorithm (2-3SD). Hazard ratios were calculated per 1% increase in LGE. A total of 74 ICM and 34 NICM were followed for 63 months (1-140) and 52 months (0-133), respectively. ICM patients had 27 appropriate ICD events, and NICM patients had 7 ICD events. In ICM patients with primary prophylactic ICD, LGE border zone predicted ICD therapy in univariable and multivariable analysis measured by the expectation maximization, weighted intensity, a priori information, weighted border zone, and modified full-width half-maximum algorithms (hazard ratios 1.23, 1.22, and 1.05, respectively; P<0.05; negative predictive value 92%). For NICM, total LGE by all 4 methods was the strongest predictor (hazard ratios, 1.03-1.04; P<0.05), though the number of events was small. Appropriate ICD therapy can be predicted in ICM patients with primary prevention ICD by quantifying the LGE border zone. In NICM patients, total LGE but not LGE border zone had predictive value for ICD therapy. However, the algorithms used affects the predictive value of these measures. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Late Gadolinium Enhancement on CMR Predicts Adverse Cardiovascular Outcomes in Non-ischemic Cardiomyopathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katwal, Arabindra B; Lipinski, Michael J.; Kramer, Christopher M.; Salerno, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background LGE by CMR is a predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM) patients. However, these findings are limited by single center studies, small sample sizes, and low event rates. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the prognostic role of late-gadolinium enhancement by cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) imaging in NICM patients. Methods and Results PubMed, Cochrane CENTRAL and EMBASE were searched for studies looking at the prognostic value of LGE-CMR in NICM patients. The primary end-points included all-cause mortality, heart failure hospitalization (HFH), and a composite end point of sudden cardiac death (SCD) or aborted SCD. Pooling of odds ratios (OR) was performed using a random-effect model and annualized event rates (AER) were assessed. Data was included from 9 studies with a total of 1,488 patients and a mean follow-up of 30 months. Patients had a mean age of 52 years, 67% were male and the average LVEF was 37% on CMR. LGE was present in 38% of patients. Patients with LGE had increased overall mortality (OR 3.27, p<0.00001), HFH (OR 2.91, p=0.02), and SCD/aborted SCD (OR 5.32, p<0.00001) when compared with those without LGE. The AERs for mortality were 4.7% for LGE+ subjects vs. 1.7% for LGE- subjects (p=0.01), 5.03% vs. 1.8% for HFH (p=0.002), and 6.0% vs. 1.2% for SCD/aborted SCD (p<0.001). Conclusions LGE in NICM patients is associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality, HFH, and SCD. Detection of LGE by CMR has excellent prognostic characteristics and may help guide risk stratification and management in NICM patients. PMID:24363358

  6. MRI-Guided ventricular tachycardia ablation: integration of late gadolinium-enhanced 3D scar in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickfeld, Timm; Tian, Jing; Ahmad, Ghada; Jimenez, Alejandro; Turgeman, Aharon; Kuk, Richard; Peters, Matthew; Saliaris, Anastasios; Saba, Magdi; Shorofsky, Stephen; Jeudy, Jean

    2011-04-01

    Substrate-guided ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT) in patients with implanted cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) relies on voltage mapping to define the scar and border zone. An integrated 3D scar reconstruction from late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI could facilitate VT ablations. Twenty-two patients with ICD underwent contrast-enhanced cardiac MRI with a specific absorption rate of interrogation demonstrated unchanged ICD parameters immediately before, after, or at 68±21 days follow-up (P>0.05). ICD imaging artifacts were most prominent in the anterior wall and allowed full and partial assessment of LGE in 9±4 and 12±3 of 17 segments, respectively. In 14 patients with LGE, a 3D scar model was reconstructed and successfully registered with the clinical mapping system (accuracy, 3.9±1.8 mm). Using receiver operating characteristic curves, bipolar and unipolar voltages of 1.49 and 4.46 mV correlated best with endocardial MRI scar. Scar visualization allowed the elimination of falsely low voltage recordings (suboptimal catheter contact) in 4.1±1.9% of 2 mm resulted in >1.5-mV voltage recordings despite up to 63% transmural midmyocardial scar successfully ablated with MRI guidance. All successful ablation sites demonstrated LGE (transmurality, 68±26%) and were located within 10 mm of transition zones to 0% to 25% scar in 71%. Contrast-enhanced cardiac MRI can be safely performed in selected patients with ICDs and allows the integration of detailed 3D scar maps into clinical mapping systems, providing supplementary anatomic guidance to facilitate substrate-guided VT ablations.

  7. High-resolution three-dimensional late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to identify the underlying substrate of ventricular arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Alexia; Salel, Marjorie; Sacher, Frederic; Camaioni, Claudia; Sridi, Soumaya; Denis, Arnaud; Montaudon, Michel; Laurent, François; Jais, Pierre; Cochet, Hubert

    2017-10-23

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is recommended as a second-line method to diagnose ventricular arrhythmia (VA) substrate. We assessed the diagnostic yield of CMR including high-resolution late gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) imaging. Consecutive patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT), non-sustained VT (NSVT), or ventricular fibrillation/aborted sudden death (VF/SCD) underwent a non-CMR diagnostic workup according to current guidelines, and CMR including LGE imaging with both a conventional breath-held and a free-breathing method enabling higher spatial resolution (HR-LGE). The diagnostic yield of CMR was compared with the non-CMR workup, including the incremental value of HR-LGE. A total of 157 patients were enrolled [age 54 ± 17 years; 75% males; 88 (56%) sustained VT, 52 (33%) NSVT, 17 (11%) VF/SCD]. Of these, 112 (71%) patients had no history of structural heart disease (SHD). All patients underwent electrocardiography and echocardiography, 72% coronary angiography, and 51% exercise testing. Pre-CMR diagnoses were 84 (54%) no SHD, 39 (25%) ischaemic cardiomyopathy (ICM), 11 (7%) non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy (NICM), 3 (2%) arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), 2 (1%) hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and 18 (11%) other. CMR modified these diagnoses in 48 patients (31% of all and 43% of those with no SHD history). New diagnoses were 9 ICM, 28 NICM, 8 ARVC, 1 HCM, and 2 other. CMR modified therapy in 19 (12%) patients. In patients with no SHD after non-CMR tests, SHD was found in 32 of 84 (38%) patients. Eighteen of these patients showed positive HR-LGE and negative conventional LGE. Thus, HR-LGE significantly increased the CMR detection of SHD (17-38%, P < 0.001). CMR including HR-LGE imaging has high diagnostic value in patients with VAs. This has major prognostic and therapeutic implications, particularly in patients with negative pre-CMR workup.

  8. Influence of phase correction of late gadolinium enhancement images on scar signal quantification in patients with ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirrat, John; Joncas, Sebastien Xavier; Salerno, Michael; Drangova, Maria; White, James

    2015-08-07

    Myocardial fibrosis imaging using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has been validated as a quantitative predictive marker for response to medical, surgical, and device therapy. To date, all such studies have examined conventional, non-phase corrected magnitude images.  However, contemporary practice has rapdily adopted phase-corrected image reconstruction. We sought to investigate the existence of any systematic bias between threshold-based scar quantification performed on conventional magnitude inversion recovery (MIR) and matched phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) images. In 80 patients with confirmed ischemic (N = 40), or non-ischemic (n = 40) myocardial fibrosis, and also in a healthy control cohort (N = 40) without fibrosis, myocardial late enhancement was quantified using a Signal Threshold Versus Reference Myocardium technique (STRM) at ≥2, ≥3, and ≥5 SD threshold, and also using the Full Width at Half Maximal (FWHM) technique. This was performed on both MIR and PSIR images and values compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman analyses. Linear regression analysis demonstrated excellent correlation for scar volumes between MIR and PSIR images at all three STRM signal thresholds for the ischemic (N = 40, r = 0.96, 0.95, 0.88 at 2, 3, and 5 SD, p images showing higher values than PSIR for ischemic (3.3 %, 3.9 % and 4.9 % at 2, 3, and 5 SD, respectively), and non-ischemic (9.7 %, 7.4 % and 4.1 % at ≥2, ≥3, and ≥5 SD thresholds, respectively) cohorts. Background myocardial signal measured in the control population demonstrated a similar bias of 4.4 %, 2.6 % and 0.7 % of the LV volume at 2, 3 and 5 SD thresholds, respectively. The bias observed using FWHM analysis was -6.9 %. Scar quantification using phase corrected (PSIR) images achieves values highly correlated to those obtained on non-corrected (MIR) images. However, a systematic bias exists that appears exaggerated

  9. Myocardial fibrosis imaging based on T1-mapping and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) measurement in muscular dystrophy patients: diagnostic value compared with conventional late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Anca; Ludwig, Anna; Rösch, Sabine; Yildiz, Handan; Sechtem, Udo; Yilmaz, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Cardiac involvement with progressive myocardial fibrosis leading to dilated cardiomyopathy is a major cause of death in muscular dystrophy patients. Extracellular volume fraction (ECV) measurement based on T1-mapping pre- and post-contrast promises the detection of early 'diffuse' myocardial fibrosis that cannot be depicted by conventional contrast-imaging based on late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). With this study, we evaluated the presence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in regions of 'normal' (LGE-negative) and 'diseased' (LGE-positive) appearing myocardium as well as its relation to the extent of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and the occurrence of arrhythmias in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) patients. Twenty-seven BMD patients (35 ± 12 years) and 17 matched male healthy controls (33 ± 8 years) underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) studies including ECV measurement and LGE-imaging. Ambulatory monitoring of arrhythmic events was performed by means of an external event loop recorder. Twenty BMD patients (74%) demonstrated cardiac involvement as detected by typical inferolateral presence of LGE. Twelve patients (44%) had an impaired LV ejection fraction-all being LGE-positive. Global myocardial ECV was significantly higher in the BMD group (29 ± 6%) compared with the control group (24 ± 2%, P = 0.001). Patients with cardiac involvement demonstrated higher global ECV (31 ± 6%) as well as significantly increased regional ECV not only in LGE-positive segments (34 ± 6%), but also in LGE-negative segments (28 ± 6%) compared with BMD patients without cardiac involvement and to controls, respectively (24 ± 3 and 24 ± 2%, P = 0.005). Global ECV in patients with cardiac involvement substantially correlated to LV ejection fraction (r = -0.629, P = 0.003) and to the number of LGE-positive segments (r = 0.783, P ECV-but not the categorical presence of LGE per se--was significantly associated with arrhythmic events (OR: 1.97, CI: 32.22-1.21, P = 0

  10. Evaluation of current algorithms for segmentation of scar tissue from late Gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the left atrium: an open-access grand challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Late Gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging can be used to visualise regions of fibrosis and scarring in the left atrium (LA) myocardium. This can be important for treatment stratification of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and for assessment of treatment after radio frequency catheter ablation (RFCA). In this paper we present a standardised evaluation benchmarking framework for algorithms segmenting fibrosis and scar from LGE CMR images. The algorithms reported are the response to an open challenge that was put to the medical imaging community through an ISBI (IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging) workshop. Methods The image database consisted of 60 multicenter, multivendor LGE CMR image datasets from patients with AF, with 30 images taken before and 30 after RFCA for the treatment of AF. A reference standard for scar and fibrosis was established by merging manual segmentations from three observers. Furthermore, scar was also quantified using 2, 3 and 4 standard deviations (SD) and full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) methods. Seven institutions responded to the challenge: Imperial College (IC), Mevis Fraunhofer (MV), Sunnybrook Health Sciences (SY), Harvard/Boston University (HB), Yale School of Medicine (YL), King’s College London (KCL) and Utah CARMA (UTA, UTB). There were 8 different algorithms evaluated in this study. Results Some algorithms were able to perform significantly better than SD and FWHM methods in both pre- and post-ablation imaging. Segmentation in pre-ablation images was challenging and good correlation with the reference standard was found in post-ablation images. Overlap scores (out of 100) with the reference standard were as follows: Pre: IC = 37, MV = 22, SY = 17, YL = 48, KCL = 30, UTA = 42, UTB = 45; Post: IC = 76, MV = 85, SY = 73, HB = 76, YL = 84, KCL = 78, UTA = 78, UTB = 72. Conclusions The study concludes that currently no algorithm is deemed clearly better than

  11. Chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation and papillary muscle infarction detected by late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Wobbe; Willemsen, Hendrik M; Lexis, Chris P H; Prakken, Niek H; Lipsic, Erik; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Mariani, Massimo A; van der Harst, Pim; van der Horst, Iwan C C

    2016-12-01

    Both papillary muscle infarction (PMI) and chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation (CIMR) are associated with reduced survival after myocardial infarction. The influence of PMI on CIMR and factors influencing both entities are incompletely understood. We sought to determine the influence of PMI on CIMR after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and to define independent predictors of PMI and CIMR. Between January 2011 and May 2013, 263 patients (mean age 57.8 ± 11.5 years) underwent late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and transthoracic echocardiography 4 months after PCI for STEMI. Infarct size, PMI, and mitral valve and left ventricular geometric and functional parameters were assessed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of PMI and CIMR (≥grade 2+). PMI was present in 61 patients (23 %) and CIMR was present in 86 patients (33 %). In patients with PMI, 52 % had CIMR, and in patients without PMI, 27 % had CIMR (P < 0.001). In multivariate analyses, infarct size [odds ratio (OR) 1.09 (95 % confidence interval 1.04-1.13), P < 0.001], inferior MI [OR 4.64 (1.04-20.62), P = 0.044], and circumflex infarct-related artery [OR 8.21 (3.80-17.74), P < 0.001] were independent predictors of PMI. Age [OR 1.08 (1.04-1.11), P < 0.001], infarct size [OR 1.09 (1.03-1.16), P = 0.003], tethering height [OR 19.30 (3.28-113.61), P = 0.001], and interpapillary muscle distance [OR 3.32 (1.31-8.42), P = 0.011] were independent predictors of CIMR. The risk of PMI is mainly associated with inferior infarction and infarction in the circumflex coronary artery. Although the prevalence of CIMR is almost doubled in the presence of PMI, PMI is not an independent predictor of CIMR. Tethering height and interpapillary muscle distance are the strongest independent predictors of CIMR.

  12. MultiContrast Delayed Enhancement (MCODE) improves detection of subendocardial myocardial infarction by late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance: a clinical validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandettini, W Patricia; Kellman, Peter; Mancini, Christine; Booker, Oscar Julian; Vasu, Sujethra; Leung, Steve W; Wilson, Joel R; Shanbhag, Sujata M; Chen, Marcus Y; Arai, Andrew E

    2012-11-30

    Myocardial infarction (MI) documented by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) has clinical and prognostic importance, but its detection is sometimes compromised by poor contrast between blood and MI. MultiContrast Delayed Enhancement (MCODE) is a technique that helps discriminate subendocardial MI from blood pool by simultaneously providing a T2-weighted image with a PSIR (phase sensitive inversion recovery) LGE image. In this clinical validation study, our goal was to prospectively compare standard LGE imaging to MCODE in the detection of MI. Imaging was performed on a 1.5 T scanner on patients referred for CMR including a LGE study. Prospective comparisons between MCODE and standard PSIR LGE imaging were done by targeted, repeat imaging of slice locations. Clinical data were used to determine MI status. Images at each of multiple time points were read on separate days and categorized as to whether or not MI was present and whether an infarction was transmural or subendocardial. The extent of infarction was scored on a sector-by-sector basis. Seventy-three patients were imaged with the specified protocol. The majority were referred for vasodilator perfusion exams and viability assessment (37 ischemia assessment, 12 acute MI, 10 chronic MI, 12 other diagnoses). Forty-six patients had a final diagnosis of MI (30 subendocardial and 16 transmural). MCODE had similar specificity compared to LGE at all time points but demonstrated better sensitivity compared to LGE performed early and immediately before and after the MCODE (p = 0.008 and 0.02 respectively). Conventional LGE only missed cases of subendocardial MI. Both LGE and MCODE identified all transmural MI. Based on clinical determination of MI, MCODE had three false positive MI's; LGE had two false positive MI's including two of the three MCODE false positives. On a per sector basis, MCODE identified more infarcted sectors compared to LGE performed immediately prior to MCODE (p subendocardial MI's than LGE and

  13. MultiContrast Delayed Enhancement (MCODE improves detection of subendocardial myocardial infarction by late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance: a clinical validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandettini W Patricia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial infarction (MI documented by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE has clinical and prognostic importance, but its detection is sometimes compromised by poor contrast between blood and MI. MultiContrast Delayed Enhancement (MCODE is a technique that helps discriminate subendocardial MI from blood pool by simultaneously providing a T2-weighted image with a PSIR (phase sensitive inversion recovery LGE image. In this clinical validation study, our goal was to prospectively compare standard LGE imaging to MCODE in the detection of MI. Methods Imaging was performed on a 1.5 T scanner on patients referred for CMR including a LGE study. Prospective comparisons between MCODE and standard PSIR LGE imaging were done by targeted, repeat imaging of slice locations. Clinical data were used to determine MI status. Images at each of multiple time points were read on separate days and categorized as to whether or not MI was present and whether an infarction was transmural or subendocardial. The extent of infarction was scored on a sector-by-sector basis. Results Seventy-three patients were imaged with the specified protocol. The majority were referred for vasodilator perfusion exams and viability assessment (37 ischemia assessment, 12 acute MI, 10 chronic MI, 12 other diagnoses. Forty-six patients had a final diagnosis of MI (30 subendocardial and 16 transmural. MCODE had similar specificity compared to LGE at all time points but demonstrated better sensitivity compared to LGE performed early and immediately before and after the MCODE (p = 0.008 and 0.02 respectively. Conventional LGE only missed cases of subendocardial MI. Both LGE and MCODE identified all transmural MI. Based on clinical determination of MI, MCODE had three false positive MI’s; LGE had two false positive MI’s including two of the three MCODE false positives. On a per sector basis, MCODE identified more infarcted sectors compared to LGE performed immediately prior

  14. Prediction of the estimated 5-year risk of sudden cardiac death and syncope or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using late gadolinium enhancement and extracellular volume CMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanesov, Maxim; Münch, Julia; Weinrich, Julius; Well, Lennart; Säring, Dennis; Stehning, Christian; Tahir, Enver; Bohnen, Sebastian; Radunski, Ulf K; Muellerleile, Kai; Adam, Gerhard; Patten, Monica; Lund, Gunnar

    2017-06-14

    To evaluate the ability of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and mapping cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) including native T1 and global extracellular volume (ECV) to identify hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients at risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) and to predict syncope or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT). A 1.5-T CMR was performed in 73 HCM patients and 16 controls. LGE size was quantified using the 3SD, 5SD and full width at half maximum (FWHM) method. T1 and ECV maps were generated by a 3(3)5 modified Look-Locker inversion recovery sequence. Receiver-operating curve analysis evaluated the best parameter to identify patients with increased SCD risk ≥4% and patients with syncope or non-sustained VT. Global ECV was the best predictor of SCD risk with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.83. LGE size was significantly inferior to global ECV with an AUC of 0.68, 0.70 and 0.70 (all P ECV significantly improved the diagnostic accuracy to identify HCM patients with syncope or non-sustained VT. Combined use of the SCD risk score and global ECV has the potential to improve HCM patient selection, benefiting most implantable cardioverter defibrillators. • Global ECV identified the best HCM patients with increased SCD risk. • Global ECV performed equally well compared to a SCD risk score. • Combined use of the SCD risk score and global ECV improved test accuracy. • Combined use potentially improves selection of HCM patients for ICD implantation.

  15. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the myocardium at risk in acute reperfused myocardial infarction: comparison of T2-weighted imaging versus the circumferential endocardial extent of late gadolinium enhancement with transmural projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubachs, Joey F A; Engblom, Henrik; Erlinge, David; Jovinge, Stefan; Hedström, Erik; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan

    2010-03-29

    In the situation of acute coronary occlusion, the myocardium supplied by the occluded vessel is subject to ischemia and is referred to as the myocardium at risk (MaR). Single photon emission computed tomography has previously been used for quantitative assessment of the MaR. It is, however, associated with considerable logistic challenges for employment in clinical routine. Recently, T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been introduced as a new method for assessing MaR several days after the acute event. Furthermore, it has been suggested that the endocardial extent of infarction as assessed by late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) CMR can also be used to quantify the MaR. Hence, we sought to assess the ability of endocardial extent of infarction by LGE CMR to predict MaR as compared to T2-weighted imaging. Thirty-seven patients with early reperfused first-time ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction underwent CMR imaging within the first week after percutaneous coronary intervention. The ability of endocardial extent of infarction by LGE CMR to assess MaR was evaluated using T2-weighted imaging as the reference method. MaR determined with T2-weighted imaging (34 +/- 10%) was significantly higher (p infarction (23 +/- 12%). There was a weak correlation between the two methods (r2 = 0.17, p = 0.002) with a bias of -11 +/- 12%. Myocardial salvage determined with T2-weighted imaging (58 +/- 22%) was significantly higher (p myocardial salvage determined with endocardial extent of infarction (45 +/- 23%). No MaR could be determined by endocardial extent of infarction in two patients with aborted myocardial infarction. This study demonstrated that the endocardial extent of infarction as assessed by LGE CMR underestimates MaR in comparison to T2-weighted imaging, especially in patients with early reperfusion and aborted myocardial infarction.

  16. Rapid automatic segmentation of abnormal tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance images for improved management of long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakidis, Archontis; Nyktari, Eva; Keegan, Jennifer; Pierce, Iain; Suman Horduna, Irina; Haldar, Shouvik; Pennell, Dudley J; Mohiaddin, Raad; Wong, Tom; Firmin, David N

    2015-10-07

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart rhythm disorder. In order for late Gd enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (LGE CMR) to ameliorate the AF management, the ready availability of the accurate enhancement segmentation is required. However, the computer-aided segmentation of enhancement in LGE CMR of AF is still an open question. Additionally, the number of centres that have reported successful application of LGE CMR to guide clinical AF strategies remains low, while the debate on LGE CMR's diagnostic ability for AF still holds. The aim of this study is to propose a method that reliably distinguishes enhanced (abnormal) from non-enhanced (healthy) tissue within the left atrial wall of (pre-ablation and 3 months post-ablation) LGE CMR data-sets from long-standing persistent AF patients studied at our centre. Enhancement segmentation was achieved by employing thresholds benchmarked against the statistics of the whole left atrial blood-pool (LABP). The test-set cross-validation mechanism was applied to determine the input feature representation and algorithm that best predict enhancement threshold levels. Global normalized intensity threshold levels T PRE  = 1 1/4 and T POST  = 1 5/8 were found to segment enhancement in data-sets acquired pre-ablation and at 3 months post-ablation, respectively. The segmentation results were corroborated by using visual inspection of LGE CMR brightness levels and one endocardial bipolar voltage map. The measured extent of pre-ablation fibrosis fell within the normal range for the specific arrhythmia phenotype. 3D volume renderings of segmented post-ablation enhancement emulated the expected ablation lesion patterns. By comparing our technique with other related approaches that proposed different threshold levels (although they also relied on reference regions from within the LABP) for segmenting enhancement in LGE CMR data-sets of AF patients, we illustrated that the cut-off levels employed by other centres

  17. T1-refBlochi: high resolution 3D post-contrast T1 myocardial mapping based on a single 3D late gadolinium enhancement volume, Bloch equations, and a reference T1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenxi; Sinusas, Albert J; Huber, Steffen; Thorn, Stephanie; Stacy, Mitchel R; Mojibian, Hamid; Peters, Dana C

    2017-08-18

    High resolution 3D T1 mapping is important for assessment of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in left atrium or other thin-walled structures. In this work, we investigated a fast single-TI 3D high resolution T1 mapping method that directly transforms a 3D late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) volume to a 3D T1 map. The proposed method, T1-refBlochi, is based on Bloch equation modeling of the LGE signal, a single-point calibration, and assumptions that proton density and T2* are relatively uniform in the heart. Several sources of error of this method were analyzed mathematically and with simulations. Imaging was performed in phantoms, eight swine and five patients, comparing T1-refBlochi to a standard spin-echo T1 mapping, 3D multi-TI T1 mapping, and 2D ShMOLLI, respectively. The method has a good accuracy and adequate precision, even considering various sources of error. In phantoms, over a range of protocols, heart-rates and T1 s, the bias ±1SD was -3 ms ± 9 ms. The porcine studies showed excellent agreement between T1-refBlochi and the multi-TI method (bias ±1SD = -6 ± 22 ms). The proton density and T2* weightings yielded ratios for scar/blood of 0.94 ± 0.01 and for myocardium/blood of 1.03 ± 0.02 in the eight swine, confirming that sufficient uniformity of proton density and T2* weightings exists among heterogeneous tissues of the heart. In the patients, the mean T1 bias ±1SD in myocardium and blood between T1-refBlochi and ShMOLLI was -9 ms ± 21 ms. T1-refBlochi provides a fast single-TI high resolution 3D T1 map of the heart with good accuracy and adequate precision.

  18. Gadolinium-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance: administered dose in relationship to united states food and drug administration (FDA) guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Myocardial late gadolinium enhancement was originally validated using higher than label-recommended doses of gadolinium chelate. The objective of this study was to evaluate available evidence for various gadolinium dosing regimens used for CMR. The relationship of gadolinium dose warnings (due to nephrogenic systemic fibrosis) announced in 2008 to gadolinium dosing regimens was also examined. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of peer reviewed publications from January, 2004 to December, 2010. Major subject search headings (MeSh) terms from the National Library of Medicine's PubMed were: contrast media, gadolinium, heart, magnetic resonance imaging; searches were limited to human studies with abstracts published in English. Case reports, review articles, editorials, MRA related papers and all reports that did not indicate gadolinium type or weight-based dose were excluded. For all included references, full text was available to determine the total administered gadolinium dose on a per kg basis. Average and median dose values were weighted by the number of subjects in each study. Results 399 publications were identified in PubMed; 233 studies matched the inclusion criteria, encompassing 19,934 patients with mean age 54.2 ± 11.4 (range 9.3 to 76 years). 34 trials were related to perfusion testing and 199 to myocardial late gadolinium enhancement. In 2004, the weighted-median and weighted-mean contrast dose were 0.15 and 0.16 ± 0.06 mmol/kg, respectively. Median contrast doses for 2005-2010 were: 0.2 mmol/kg for all years, respectively. Mean contrast doses for the years 2005-2010 were: 0.19 ± 0.03, 0.18 ± 0.04, 0.18 ± 0.10, 0.18 ± 0.03, 0.18 ± 0.04 and 0.18 ± 0.04 mmol/kg, respectively (p for trend, NS). Gadopentetate dimeglumine was the most frequent gadolinium type [114 (48.9%) studies]. No change in mean gadolinium dose was present before, versus after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) black box warning (p > 0.05). Three multi-center dose

  19. Gadolinium-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance: administered dose in relationship to united states food and drug administration (FDA guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nacif Marcelo S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Myocardial late gadolinium enhancement was originally validated using higher than label-recommended doses of gadolinium chelate. The objective of this study was to evaluate available evidence for various gadolinium dosing regimens used for CMR. The relationship of gadolinium dose warnings (due to nephrogenic systemic fibrosis announced in 2008 to gadolinium dosing regimens was also examined. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of peer reviewed publications from January, 2004 to December, 2010. Major subject search headings (MeSh terms from the National Library of Medicine's PubMed were: contrast media, gadolinium, heart, magnetic resonance imaging; searches were limited to human studies with abstracts published in English. Case reports, review articles, editorials, MRA related papers and all reports that did not indicate gadolinium type or weight-based dose were excluded. For all included references, full text was available to determine the total administered gadolinium dose on a per kg basis. Average and median dose values were weighted by the number of subjects in each study. Results 399 publications were identified in PubMed; 233 studies matched the inclusion criteria, encompassing 19,934 patients with mean age 54.2 ± 11.4 (range 9.3 to 76 years. 34 trials were related to perfusion testing and 199 to myocardial late gadolinium enhancement. In 2004, the weighted-median and weighted-mean contrast dose were 0.15 and 0.16 ± 0.06 mmol/kg, respectively. Median contrast doses for 2005-2010 were: 0.2 mmol/kg for all years, respectively. Mean contrast doses for the years 2005-2010 were: 0.19 ± 0.03, 0.18 ± 0.04, 0.18 ± 0.10, 0.18 ± 0.03, 0.18 ± 0.04 and 0.18 ± 0.04 mmol/kg, respectively (p for trend, NS. Gadopentetate dimeglumine was the most frequent gadolinium type [114 (48.9% studies]. No change in mean gadolinium dose was present before, versus after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA black box warning (p > 0.05. Three

  20. Radiative lifetimes of neutral gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Hartog, E A; Bilty, K A; Lawler, J E, E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.edu, E-mail: biltyka@uwec.edu, E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-03-14

    The current work is part of an ongoing study of radiative properties of rare earth neutral atoms motivated by research needs in several disparate fields including astrophysics, laser chemistry and lighting technology. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic beam has been used to measure radiative lifetimes, accurate to {+-}5%, for 136 levels of neutral gadolinium. Of the 136 levels, 6 are odd parity ranging in energy from 32 929 to 36 654 cm{sup -1}, and the remaining 130 are even parity ranging from 17 750 to 34 175 cm{sup -1}. This set of Gd i lifetimes represents a significant extension to the available published data, with 93 of the 136 level lifetimes measured for the first time. These lifetimes will provide the absolute normalization for a large set of measured Gd i transition probabilities.

  1. Gadolinium sheet converter for neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, C.T.S. [Laboratorio de Neutrongrafia em Tempo Real (LNRTR/PEN/COPPE), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Crispim, V.R. [Laboratorio de Neutrongrafia em Tempo Real (LNRTR/PEN/COPPE), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); PEN/COPPE-DNC/Escola Politecnica CT, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: verginia@con.ufrj.br; Santos, W.M.S. [Laboratorio de Colisao Atomica e Molecular (LACAM/IF), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2007-12-15

    This work describes a methodology developed for the confection of gadolinium sheet converter for neutron radiography using the gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) as material converter. Though manufactured at a relatively low cost, they are as good as the sheet converter on the market. Here, we present neutron radiography of the penetrameter, the edge spread function, the modulation transfer function and characteristic curves for each set sheet-AA400 Kodak film.

  2. Incidental MRI Findings of Acute Gadolinium Hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Amene

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old girl with a remote history of juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma developed acute onset flushing, tachycardia and shortness of breath immediately following administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine during routine brain MRI that subsided following intravenous diphenhydramine. A retrospective review of the MRI results revealed multiple areas of contrast enhancement of the face, consistent with observed urticaria. The patient received pretreatment medications prior to subsequent gadolinium injections without incident. Gadolinium allergy is extremely rare and has been reported in less than 0.1% of injections. However, in patients who undergo anesthesia for MRI studies, similar subtle extracranial MRI findings should alert the neuroradiologist to possible gadolinium allergy that may warrant premedication prior to future injections.

  3. Incidental MRI Findings of Acute Gadolinium Hypersensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amene, C.; Yeh-Nayre, L.A.; Dory, C.E.; Crawford, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    A 13-year-old girl with a remote history of juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma developed acute onset flushing, tachycardia and shortness of breath immediately following administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine during routine brain MRI that subsided following intravenous diphenhydramine. A retrospective review of the MRI results revealed multiple areas of contrast enhancement of the face, consistent with observed urticaria. The patient received pretreatment medications prior to subsequent gadolinium injections without incident. Gadolinium allergy is extremely rare and has been reported in less than 0.1% of injections. However, in patients who undergo anesthesia for MRI studies, similar subtle extracranial MRI findings should alert the neuroradiologist to possible gadolinium allergy that may warrant premedication prior to future injections. PMID:22649344

  4. A novel method of aluminum-gadolinium master alloy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimtsev, Konstantin; Krylosov, Andrey; Polovov, Ilya; Zhilyakov, Arkadiy; Belikov, Sergey; Volkovich, Vladimir; Rebrin, Oleg

    2017-09-01

    A new method for manufacturing aluminum-gadolinium master alloy was designed. It is based on an exchange reaction between metallic aluminum and gadolinium fluoride. The structure on the synthesized alloys with different gadolinium content was investigated. Al and Al3Gd were the main phases present in the alloys. Mechanical and thermophysical properties of the master-alloys obtained were measured.

  5. Growth, characterization and dielectric studies of gadolinium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Gadolinium fumarate heptahydrate single crystals were grown by the single gel diffusion technique using silica gel as a medium of growth. Nucleation rate of these crystals was studied corresponding to the effect of various growth parameters. An attempt was made to relate the experimental results with the classical ...

  6. Strain sensors for high field pulse magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Christian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zheng, Yan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Easton, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an investigation into several strain sensing technologies that are being considered to monitor mechanical deformation within the steel reinforcement shells used in high field pulsed magnets. Such systems generally operate at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate heating issues that are inherent in the coils of nondestructive, high field pulsed magnets. The objective of this preliminary study is to characterize the performance of various strain sensing technologies at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 C). Four sensor types are considered in this investigation: fiber Bragg gratings (FBG), resistive foil strain gauges (RFSG), piezoelectric polymers (PVDF), and piezoceramics (PZT). Three operational conditions are considered for each sensor: bond integrity, sensitivity as a function of temperature, and thermal cycling effects. Several experiments were conducted as part of this study, investigating adhesion with various substrate materials (stainless steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber), sensitivity to static (FBG and RFSG) and dynamic (RFSG, PVDF and PZT) load conditions, and sensor diagnostics using PZT sensors. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), and the results of this study will be used to identify the set of sensing technologies that would be best suited for integration within high field pulsed magnets at the NHMFL facility.

  7. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: late skin manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Marckmann, Peter; Rossen, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious disease that occurs in patients with severe renal disease and is believed to be caused by gadolinium-containing contrast agents. A detailed description of the late skin manifestations of NSF is important to help dermatologists and nephr...

  8. Gadolinium deposition within the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus after repeated administrations of gadolinium-based contrast agents - current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanov, Dragan [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia); Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra [Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia)

    2016-05-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been used clinically since 1988 for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI). Generally, GBCAs are considered to have an excellent safety profile. However, GBCA administration has been associated with increased occurrence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in patients with severely compromised renal function, and several studies have shown evidence of gadolinium deposition in specific brain structures, the globus pallidus and dentate nucleus, in patients with normal renal function. Gadolinium deposition in the brain following repeated CE-MRI scans has been demonstrated in patients using T1-weighted unenhanced MRI and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Additionally, rodent studies with controlled GBCA administration also resulted in neural gadolinium deposits. Repeated GBCA use is associated with gadolinium deposition in the brain. This is especially true with the use of less-stable, linear GBCAs. In spite of increasing evidence of gadolinium deposits in the brains of patients after multiple GBCA administrations, the clinical significance of these deposits continues to be unclear. Here, we discuss the current state of scientific evidence surrounding gadolinium deposition in the brain following GBCA use, and the potential clinical significance of gadolinium deposition. There is considerable need for further research, both to understand the mechanism by which gadolinium deposition in the brain occurs and how it affects the patients in which it occurs. (orig.)

  9. High-field/high-pressure ESR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, T; Okubo, S; Ohta, H

    2017-07-01

    We present a historical review of high-pressure ESR systems with emphasis on our recent development of a high-pressure, high-field, multi-frequency ESR system. Until 2000, the X-band system was almost established using a resonator filled with dielectric materials or a combination of the anvil cell and dielectric resonators. Recent developments have shifted from that in the low-frequency region, such as X-band, to that in multi-frequency region. High-pressure, high-field, multi-frequency ESR systems are classified into two types. First are the systems that use a vector network analyzer or a quasi-optical bridge, which have high sensitivity but a limited frequency region; the second are like our system, which has a very broad frequency region covering the THz region, but lower sensitivity. We will demonstrate the usefulness of our high-pressure ESR system, in addition to its experimental limitations. We also discuss the recent progress of our system and future plans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cost and availability of gadolinium for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepper, O.H.

    1985-06-01

    Gadolinium is currently planned for use as a soluble neutron poison in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants to prevent criticality of solutions of spent fuel. Gadolinium is relatively rare and expensive. The present study was undertaken therefore to estimate whether this material is likely to be available in quantities sufficient for fuel reprocessing and at reasonable prices. It was found that gadolinium, one of 16 rare earth elements, appears in the marketplace as a by-product and that its present supply is a function of the production rate of other more prevalent rare earths. The potential demand for gadolinium in a fuel reprocessing facility serving a future fast reactor industry amounts to only a small fraction of the supply. At the present rate of consumption, domestic supplies of rare earths containing gadolinium are adequate to meet national needs (including fuel reprocessing) for over 100 years. With access to foreign sources, US demands can be met well beyond the 21st century. It is concluded therefore that the supply of gadolinium will quite likely be more than adequate for reprocessing spent fuel for the early generation of fast reactors. The current price of 99.99% pure gadolinium oxide lies in the range $50/lb to $65/lb (1984 dollars). By the year 2020, in time for reprocessing spent fuel from an early generation of large fast reactors, the corresponding values are expected to lie in the $60/lb to $75/lb (1984 dollars) price range. This increase is modest and its economic impact on nuclear fuel reprocessing would be minor. The economic potential for recovering gadolinium from the wastes of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants (which use gadolinium neutron poison) was also investigated. The cost of recycled gadolinium was estimated at over twelve times the cost of fresh gadolinium, and thus recycle using current recovery technology is not economical. 15 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. Energy loss of silver ions in gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribas, R.V.; Medina, N.H.; Rao, M.N.; Cybulska, E.W.; Seale, W.A. (Laboratorio Pelletron, Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1995-03-01

    The energy loss of silver ions in metallic gadolinium foil at low velocities (2.7--4.3)[ital v][sub 0], where [ital v][sub 0] is the Bohr velocity, was measured with the Doppler shift technique. The results are about 20% smaller than the predictions of a semiempirical formulation [J. F. Ziegler, J. P. Biersack, and U. L. Littmark, in [ital The] [ital Stopping] [ital and] [ital Ranges] [ital of] [ital Ions] [ital in] [ital Solids], edited by J. F. Ziegler (Pergamon, New York, 1985), Vol. 1] for the electronic stopping power.

  12. Native T1-mapping detects the location, extent and patterns of acute myocarditis without the need for gadolinium contrast agents

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Vanessa M; Piechnik, Stefan K; Dall’Armellina, Erica; Karamitsos, Theodoros D; Francis, Jane M; Ntusi, Ntobeko; Holloway, Cameron; Choudhury, Robin P.; Kardos, Attila; Robson, Matthew D; Friedrich, Matthias G; Neubauer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute myocarditis can be diagnosed on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) using multiple techniques, including late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging, which requires contrast administration. Native T1-mapping is significantly more sensitive than LGE and conventional T2-weighted (T2W) imaging in detecting myocarditis. The aims of this study were to demonstrate how to display the non-ischemic patterns of injury and to quantify myocardial involvement in acute myocarditis withou...

  13. High field MRI in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis: high field-high yield?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattjes, Mike P.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center, MS Center Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15

    Following the approval of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly incorporated into the clinical setting. Especially in the field of neuroimaging, the number of high field MRI applications has been increased dramatically. Taking advantage on increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and chemical shift, higher magnetic field strengths offer new perspectives particularly in brain imaging and also challenges in terms of several technical and physical consequences. Over the past few years, many applications of high field MRI in patients with suspected and definite multiple sclerosis (MS) have been reported including conventional and quantitative MRI methods. Conventional pulse sequences at 3 T offers higher lesion detection rates when compared to 1.5 T, particularly in anatomic regions which are important for the diagnosis of patients with MS. MR spectroscopy at 3 T is characterized by an improved spectral resolution due to increased chemical shift allowing a better quantification of metabolites. It detects significant axonal damage already in patients presenting with clinically isolated syndromes and can quantify metabolites of special interest such as glutamate which is technically difficult to quantify at lower field strengths. Furthermore, the higher susceptibility and SNR offer advantages in the field of functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. The recently introduced new generation of ultra-high field systems beyond 3 T allows scanning in submillimeter resolution and gives new insights into in vivo MS pathology on MRI. The objectives of this article are to review the current knowledge and level of evidence concerning the application of high field MRI in MS and to give some ideas of research perspectives in the future. (orig.)

  14. "Molecular" MR imaging at high fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, John C; Zu, Zhongliang; Wang, Ping; Li, Hua; Xu, Junzhong; Dortch, Richard; Gochberg, Daniel F

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) have contributed considerably to clinical radiology, and a variety of MR techniques have been developed to evaluate pathological processes as well as normal tissue biology at the cellular and molecular level. However, in comparison to nuclear imaging, MRI has relatively poor sensitivity for detecting true molecular changes or for detecting the presence of targeted contrast agents, though these remain under active development. In recent years very high field (7T and above) MRI systems have been developed for human studies and these provide new opportunities and technical challenges for molecular imaging. We identify 5 types of intrinsic contrast mechanisms that do not require the use of exogenous agents but which can provide molecular and cellular information. We can derive information on tissue composition by (i) imaging different nuclei, especially sodium (ii) exploiting chemical shift differences as in MRS (iii) exploiting specific relaxation mechanisms (iv) exploiting tissue differences in the exchange rates of molecular species such as amides or hydroxyls and (v) differences in susceptibility. The increased signal strength at higher fields enables higher resolution images to be acquired, along with increased sensitivity to detecting subtle effects caused by molecular changes in tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Gadolinium depletion event in a CANDU® moderator - causes and recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, D.W.; Price, J.; Swami, D.; Fracalanza, E.; Brett, M.E.; Puzzuoli, F.V.; Garg, A. [Ontario Power Generation, Pickering, Ontario (Canada); Herrmann, O.; Rudolph, A. [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Stuart, C.; Glowa, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Smee, J. [Niagara Technical Consultants, St. Catharines, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Gadolinium nitrate is added to the moderator of CANDU units to maintain the reactor in a guaranteed shutdown state (GSS). In April 2008, after being in stable GSS for over 30 hours, one of Ontario Power Generation's Pickering-B units showed a gradual depletion of the dissolved gadolinium, despite purification being isolated. Further additions of gadolinium stabilized the moderator gadolinium concentration, however, since the root cause of the depletion was not immediately identified, the unit was placed in the drained shutdown state, per established procedures. The cumulative gadolinium depletion amounted to about 3200 grams, the equivalent of about 12 ppm. Analysis showed the presence of oxalate in the moderator water. It is well-known that gadolinium forms a very insoluble oxalate (log K{sub sp} = -29.1). Although sub-micron filtration of water samples did not show the presence of gadolinium particulate, the measured levels of oxalate, 1.2 to 2 ppm, were sufficient to react with 1.4 to 2.4 ppm of gadolinium. The source of oxalate was traced to radiolysis of dissolved CO{sub 2} species. This unit had been experiencing chronic low-level ingress of CO{sub 2} from the Annulus Gas System. Free oxalate ion is normally susceptible to radiolytic breakdown back to CO{sub 2}, but Gd{sup 3+} provides a stable sink for radiogenic oxalate, 2 Gd{sup 3+} + 3 C{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2-} → Gd{sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}. Subsequent testing confirmed that gadolinium oxalate is quite stable with respect to gamma irradiation. Inspections showed well-crystallized gadolinium oxalate deposited on moderator system surfaces. Estimates indicated that about 1200 grams of gadolinium could have deposited on in-core surfaces, including the outside of the calandria tubes. That amount of negative reactivity was a concern, since it would prevent re-start of the unit. OPG, with support from AECL-Chalk River and Kinectrics, embarked on a two-pronged chemistry recovery program aimed at 1

  16. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  17. Removal of gadolinium nitrate from heavy water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.

    2000-03-22

    Work was conducted to develop a cost-effective process to purify 181 55-gallon drums containing spent heavy water moderator (D2O) contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These drums also contain low level radioactive contamination, including tritium, which complicates treatment options. Presently, the drums of degraded moderator are being stored on site. It was suggested that a process utilizing biological mechanisms could potentially lower the total cost of heavy water purification by allowing the use of smaller equipment with less product loss and a reduction in the quantity of secondary waste materials produced by the current baseline process (ion exchange).

  18. High field superconductor development and understanding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larbalestier, David C. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Lee, Peter J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Tarantini, Chiara [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2014-09-28

    All present circular accelerators use superconducting magnets to bend and to focus the particle beams. The most powerful of these machines is the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN. The main ring dipole magnets of the LHC are made from Nb-Ti but, as the machine is upgraded to higher luminosity, more powerful magnets made of Nb3Sn will be required. Our work addresses how to make the Nb3Sn conductors more effective and more suitable for use in the LHC. The most important property of the superconducting conductor used for an accelerator magnet is that it must have very high critical current density, the property that allows the generation of high magnetic fields in small spaces. Nb3Sn is the original high field superconductor, the material which was discovered in 1960 to allow a high current density in the field of about 9 T. For the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC, much higher current densities in fields of about 12 Tesla will be required. The critical value of the current density is of order 2600 A/mm2 in a field of 12 Tesla. But there are very important secondary factors that complicate the attainment of this critical current density. The first is that the effective filament diameter must be no larger than about 40 µm. The second factor is that 50% of the cross-section of the Nb3Sn conductor that is pure copper must be protected from any poisoning by any Sn leakage through the diffusion barrier that protects the package of niobium and tin from which the Nb3Sn is formed by a high temperature reaction. These three, somewhat conflicting requirements, mean that optimization of the conductor is complex. The work described in this contract report addresses these conflicting requirements. They show that very sophisticated characterizations can uncover the way to satisfy all 3 requirements and they also suggest that the ultimate optimization of Nb3Sn is still not yet in sight

  19. Gadolinium recovery from aqueous pharmaceutical residuals by pulsed electrical discharge; Rueckgewinnung von Gadolinium aus pharmazeutischen Abwaessern mittels gepulster elektrischer Entladung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Tom; Froehlich, Peter [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Seifert, Martin; Jacob-Seifert, Karin [FNE Entsorgungsdienste GmbH, Freiberg (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Advanced oxidation process (AOP) is an oxidation step releasing reactive oxygen species by pulsed electrical discharge in aqueous systems. In contrast to processes generating ozone by external UV radiation this method is feasible for turbid liquids with solid particles. This method is currently used in particular in the field of purification of chemically polluted waste waters. In the present application AOP is applied for partial degradation of the organic ligand system of a gadolinium X-ray contrast agent to separate gadolinium subsequently by adding caustic soda to precipitate > 99% of gadolinium.

  20. Gadolinium EUV Multilayers for Solar Imaging Near 60 nm Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop and commercialize a new class of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayer coatings containing the rare-earth element gadolinium (Gd), designed as...

  1. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and gadolinium-based contrast media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Morcos, Sameh K; Almén, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To update the guidelines of the Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) on nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and gadolinium-based contrast media. AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the history, clinical features and prevalence...... of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and the current understanding of its pathophysiology. The risk factors for NSF are discussed and prophylactic measures are recommended. The stability of the different gadolinium-based contrast media and the potential long-term effects of gadolinium in the body have also been...... reviewed. KEY POINTS : • Clinical features, risk factors and prevention of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis are reviewed • Patients with GFR below 30 ml/min/1.73 m ( 2 ) have increased risk of developing NSF • Low stability gadolinium contrast media show the strongest association with NSF • Following...

  2. Advantages of gadolinium based ultrasmall nanoparticles vs molecular gadolinium chelates for radiotherapy guided by MRI for glioma treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Le Duc, G.; ROUX, S; Paruta-Tuarez, A.; Dufort, S.; Bräuer, E; Marais, A.; Truillet, C.; Sancey, L.; Perriat, P.; Lux, F.; Tillement, O

    2014-01-01

    AGuIX nanoparticles are formed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. They present several characteristics. They are easy to produce, they present very small hydrodynamic diameters (

  3. Femtosecond XUV spectroscopy of gadolinium and terbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carley, Robert; Frietsch, Bjoern; Doebrich, Kristian; Teichmann, Martin; Gahl, Cornelius; Noack, Frank [Max-Born-Institute, Berlin (Germany); Schwarzkopf, Olaf; Wernet, Philippe [Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Materialien und Energie (BESSY II), Berlin (Germany); Weinelt, Martin [Max-Born-Institute, Berlin (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, Freie Universitaet, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We present recent results of time-resolved IR-pump-XUV-probe experiments on the ultrafast demagnetization of thin films of Gadolinium(0001) and Terbium(0001) on Tungsten(110). The experiments are the first to be done using a newly developed high-order harmonics (HHG) XUV beamline at the MBI. The beamline delivers monochromated XUV pulses of approximately 150 fs duration with a photon energy resolution of up to 150 meV. Following excitation by intense femtosecond infrared (IR) pulses, photoemission with 35 eV photons allows us to directly probe the 4f electrons and their interaction with the valence band, both in the bulk and at the surface, to follow the ultrafast magnetization dynamics in the Lanthanide metals. As signatures of ultrafast demagnetization of the metal by the IR pulse, we see for the first time, rapid strong reduction of the exchange splitting in the valence band. This is followed by a slower demagnetization due to the spin-lattice interaction.

  4. High Relaxivity Gadolinium-Polydopamine Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao; Carniato, Fabio; Xie, Yijun; Huang, Yuran; Li, Yiwen; He, Sha; Zang, Nanzhi; Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Botta, Mauro; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2017-10-10

    This study reports the preparation of a series of gadolinium-polydopamine nanoparticles (GdPD-NPs) with tunable metal loadings. GdPD-NPs are analyzed by nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion and with a 7-tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. A relaxivity of 75 and 10.3 mM(-1) s(-1) at 1.4 and 7 T is observed, respectively. Furthermore, superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry is used to study intraparticle magnetic interactions and determine the GdPD-NPs consist of isolated metal ions even at maximum metal loadings. From these data, it is concluded that the observed high relaxivities arise from a high hydration state of the Gd(III) at the particle surface, fast rate of water exchange, and negligible antiferromagnetic coupling between Gd(III) centers throughout the particles. This study highlights design parameters and a robust synthetic approach that aid in the development of this scaffold for T1 -weighted, high relaxivity MRI contrast agents. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. PARTITIONING OF GADOLINIUM IN THE CHEMICAL PROCESSING CELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, S.; Best, D.; Stone, M.; Click, D.

    2011-04-27

    A combination of short-term beaker tests and longer-duration Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) simulations were performed to investigate the relative partitioning behaviors of gadolinium and iron under conditions applicable to the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). The testing was performed utilizing non-radioactive simple Fe-Gd slurries, non-radioactive Sludge Batch 6 simulant slurries, and a radioactive real-waste slurry representative of Sludge Batch 7 material. The testing focused on the following range of conditions: (a) Fe:Gd ratios of 25-100; (b) pH values of 2-6; (c) acidification via addition of nitric, formic, and glycolic acids; (d) temperatures of {approx}93 C and {approx}22 C; and (e) oxalate concentrations of <100 mg/kg and {approx}10,000 mg/kg. The purpose of the testing was to provide data for assessing the potential use of gadolinium as a supplemental neutron poison when dispositioning excess plutonium. Understanding of the partitioning behavior of gadolinium in the CPC was the first step in assessing gadolinium's potential applicability. Significant fractions of gadolinium partitioned to the liquid-phase at pH values of 4.0 and below, regardless of the Fe:Gd ratio. In SRAT simulations targeting nitric and formic acid additions of 150% acid stoichiometry, the pH dropped to a minimum of 3.5-4.0, and the maximum fractions of gadolinium and iron partitioning to solution were both {approx}20%. In contrast, in a SRAT simulation utilizing a nitric and formic acid addition under atypical conditions (due to an anomalously low insoluble solids content), the pH dropped to a minimum of 3.7, and the maximum fractions of gadolinium and iron partitioning to solution were {approx}60% and {approx}70%, respectively. When glycolic acid was used in combination with nitric and formic acids at 100% acid stoichiometry, the pH dropped to a minimum of 3.6-4.0, and the maximum fractions of gadolinium and iron partitioning to solution were 60-80% and 3

  6. Validation of gadolinium burnout using PWR benchmark specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oettingen, Mikołaj, E-mail: moettin@agh.edu.pl; Cetnar, Jerzy, E-mail: cetnar@mail.ftj.agh.edu.pl

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We present methodology for validation of gadolinium burnout in PWR. • We model 17 × 17 PWR fuel assembly using MCB code. • We demonstrate C/E ratios of measured and calculated concentrations of Gd isotopes. • The C/E for Gd154, Gd156, Gd157, Gd158 and Gd160 shows good agreement of ±10%. • The C/E for Gd152 and Gd155 shows poor agreement below ±10%. - Abstract: The paper presents comparative analysis of measured and calculated concentrations of gadolinium isotopes in spent nuclear fuel from the Japanese Ohi-2 PWR. The irradiation of the 17 × 17 fuel assembly containing pure uranium and gadolinia bearing fuel pins was numerically reconstructed using the Monte Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code – MCB. The reference concentrations of gadolinium isotopes were measured in early 1990s at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. It seems that the measured concentrations were never used for validation of gadolinium burnout. In our study we fill this gap and assess quality of both: applied numerical methodology and experimental data. Additionally we show time evolutions of infinite neutron multiplication factor K{sub inf}, FIMA burnup, U235 and Gd155–Gd158. Gadolinium-based materials are commonly used in thermal reactors as burnable absorbers due to large neutron absorption cross-section of Gd155 and Gd157.

  7. Radiofrequency solutions in clinical high field magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreychenko, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341697672

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) benefit from the sensitivity gain at high field (≥7T). However, high field brings also certain challenges associated with growing frequency and spectral dispersion. Frequency growth results in degraded performance of large volume radiofrequency

  8. High field electrical behaviour in lithium–phospho–vanadate glass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High field electrical behaviour; lithium–phospho–vanadate glass system. 1. Introduction. High field electrical switching behaviour is one of the fascinating properties in oxide glasses, since it exhibits reversible threshold and irreversible memory states. Several investigations have been initiated to study switching in glasses ...

  9. Advantages of gadolinium based ultrasmall nanoparticles vs molecular gadolinium chelates for radiotherapy guided by MRI for glioma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Duc, Géraldine; Roux, Stéphane; Paruta-Tuarez, Amandine; Dufort, Sandrine; Brauer, Elke; Marais, Arthur; Truillet, Charles; Sancey, Lucie; Perriat, Pascal; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier

    AGuIX nanoparticles are formed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. They present several characteristics. They are easy to produce, they present very small hydrodynamic diameters (gadolinium based molecular agent: DOTAREM®. An experiment with healthy animals was conducted and the MRI pictures we obtained show a better contrast with the AguIX compared to the DOTAREM® for the same amount of injected gadolinium in the animal. The better contrast obtained after injection of Aguix than DOTAREM® is due to a higher longitudinal relaxivity and a residential time in the blood circulation that is two times higher. A fast and large increase in the contrast is also observed by MRI after an intravenous injection of the AGuIX in 9 L gliosarcoma bearing rats, and a plateau is reached seven minutes after the injection. We established a radiotherapy protocol consisting of an irradiation by microbeam radiation therapy 20 minutes after the injection of a specific quantity of gadolinium. After microbeam radiation therapy, no notable difference in median survival time was observed in the presence or absence of gadolinium chelates (38 and 44 days respectively). In comparison, the median survival time is increased to 102.5 days with AGuIX particles showing their interest in this nanomedicine protocol. This remarkable radiosensitizing effect could be explained by the persistent tumor uptake of the particles, inducing a significant nanoscale dose deposition under irradiation.

  10. Linear Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Are Associated With Brain Gadolinium Retention in Healthy Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Philippe; Violas, Xavier; Grand, Sylvie; Lehericy, Stéphane; Idée, Jean-Marc; Ballet, Sébastien; Corot, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate Gd retention in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) of linear gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) compared with a macrocyclic contrast agent. Materials and Methods The brain tissue retention of Gd of 3 linear GBCAs (gadobenate dimeglumine, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadodiamide) and a macrocyclic GBCA (gadoterate meglumine) was compared in healthy rats (n = 8 per group) that received 20 intravenous injections of 0.6 mmol Gd/kg (4 injections per week for 5 weeks). An additional control group with saline was included. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed before injection and once a week during the 5 weeks of injections and for another 4 additional weeks after contrast period. Total gadolinium concentration was measured with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Blinded qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the T1 signal intensity in DCN were performed, as well as a statistical analysis on quantitative data. Results At completion of the injection period, all the linear contrast agents (gadobenate dimeglumine, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadodiamide) induced a significant increase in signal intensity in DCN, unlike the macrocyclic GBCA (gadoterate meglumine) or saline. The T1 hypersignal enhancement kinetic was fast for gadodiamide. Total Gd concentrations for the 3 linear GBCAs groups at week 10 were significantly higher in the cerebellum (1.21 ± 0.48, 1.67 ± 0.17, and 3.75 ± 0.18 nmol/g for gadobenate dimeglumine, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadodiamide, respectively) than with the gadoterate meglumine (0.27 ± 0.16 nmol/g, P dimeglumine, and gadopentetate dimeglumine to healthy rats were associated with progressive and significant T1 signal hyperintensity in the DCN, along with Gd deposition in the cerebellum. This is in contrast with the macrocyclic GBCA gadoterate meglumine for which no effect was observed. PMID:26606549

  11. Gadolinium-based contrast agents in pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, Eric M.; Caravan, Peter [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, The Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Boston, MA (United States); Rao, Anil G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); McDonald, Robert J. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Winfeld, Matthew [University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Gee, Michael S. [MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Division of Pediatric Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents can increase the accuracy and expediency of an MRI examination. However the benefits of a contrast-enhanced scan must be carefully weighed against the well-documented risks associated with administration of exogenous contrast media. The purpose of this review is to discuss commercially available gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) in the context of pediatric radiology. We discuss the chemistry, regulatory status, safety and clinical applications, with particular emphasis on imaging of the blood vessels, heart, hepatobiliary tree and central nervous system. We also discuss non-GBCA MRI contrast agents that are less frequently used or not commercially available. (orig.)

  12. The effect of demagnetization on the magnetocaloric properties of gadolinium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    2009-01-01

    of gadolinium. The adiabatic temperature change DeltaTad of gadolinium sheets upon application of a magnetic field has been measured at a range of applied magnetic fields and sample orientations. A significant dependence of DeltaTad on the sample orientation is observed. This can be accounted...... for by the demagnetization factor. Also, the temperature dependence of DeltaTad has been measured experimentally and modeled by mean field theory. Corrections to mean field theory modeling due to the demagnetization field are proposed and discussed. ©2009 American Institute of Physics...

  13. Gadolinium accumulation in organs of Sprague-Dawley® rats after implantation of a biodegradable magnesium-gadolinium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrissa, Anastasia; Braeuer, Simone; Martinelli, Elisabeth; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Goessler, Walter; Weinberg, Annelie Martina

    2017-01-15

    Biodegradable magnesium implants are under investigation because of their promising properties as medical devices. For enhancing the mechanical properties and the degradation resistance, rare earth elements are often used as alloying elements. In this study Mg10Gd pins were implanted into Sprague-Dawley® rats. The pin volume loss and a possible accumulation of magnesium and gadolinium in the rats' organs and blood were investigated in a long-term study over 36weeks. The results showed that Mg10Gd is a fast disintegrating material. Already 12weeks after implantation the alloy is fragmented to smaller particles, which can be found within the intramedullary cavity and the cortical bones. They disturbed the bone remodeling until the end of the study. The results concerning the elements' distribution in the animals' bodies were even more striking, since an accumulation of gadolinium could be observed in the investigated organs over the whole time span. The most affected tissue was the spleen, with up to 3240μgGd/kg wet mass, followed by the lung, liver and kidney (up to 1040, 685 and 207μgGd/kg). In the brain, muscle and heart, the gadolinium concentrations were much smaller (less than 20μg/kg), but an accumulation could still be detected. Interestingly, blood serum samples showed no accumulation of magnesium and gadolinium. This is the first time that an accumulation of gadolinium in animal organs was observed after the application of a gadolinium-containing degradable magnesium implant. These findings demonstrate the importance of future investigations concerning the distribution of the constituents of new biodegradable materials in the body, to ensure the patients' safety. In the last years, biodegradable Mg alloys are under investigation due to their promising properties as orthopaedic devices used for bone fracture stabilization. Gadolinium as Rare Earth Element enhances the mechanical properties of Mg-Gd alloys but its toxicity in humans is still questionable

  14. Use of gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents and awareness of brain gadolinium deposition among pediatric providers in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mithal, Leena B. [Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Patel, Payal S. [University of Arizona College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Mithal, Divakar [Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Chicago, IL (United States); Palac, Hannah L. [Northwestern University, Biostatistics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rozenfeld, Michael N. [University of Arizona College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Numerous recent articles have reported brain gadolinium deposition when using linear but not macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). To determine the current landscape of gadolinium use among pediatric institutions and the knowledge base of radiologists and referring providers with regard to GBCAs and brain gadolinium deposition. We e-mailed voluntary closed surveys to 5,390 physicians in various pediatric professional societies between January 2016 and March 2016. We used chi-square and Fisher exact tests to compare response distributions among specialties. We found that 80% of surveyed pediatric hospitals use macrocyclic contrast agents. In the last year, 58% switched their agent, most commonly to gadoterate meglumine, with the most common reason being brain gadolinium deposition. Furthermore, surveys indicated that 23% of hospitals are considering switching, and, of these, 83% would switch to gadoterate meglumine; the most common reasons were brain gadolinium deposition and safety. Radiologists were more aware of brain gadolinium deposition than non-radiologist physicians (87% vs. 26%; P<0.0001). Radiologists and referring providers expressed similar levels of concern (95% and 89%). Twelve percent of radiologists and 2% of referring providers reported patients asking about brain gadolinium deposition. Radiologists were significantly more comfortable addressing patient inquiries than referring pediatric physicians (48% vs. 6%; P<0.0001). The number of MRIs requested by referring pediatric physicians correlated with their knowledge of brain gadolinium deposition, contrast agent used by their hospital, and comfort discussing brain gadolinium deposition with patients (P<0.0001). Since the discovery of brain gadolinium deposition, many pediatric hospitals have switched to or plan to switch to a more stable macrocyclic MR contrast agent, most commonly gadoterate meglumine. Despite this, there is need for substantial further education of radiologists and

  15. Joint electroreduction of lanthanum, gadolinium and boron in halide melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushkhov KH.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The joint electroreduction of La, Gd and B from chloride-fluoride melts has been studied by cyclic voltametry. Based on the analysis of voltamograms the possibility of electrosynthesis of lanthanum-gadolinium borides from chloride-fluoride melts has been shown.

  16. Standard specification for sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This specification is for finished sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets for use in light-water reactors. It applies to gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets containing uranium of any 235U concentration and any concentration of gadolinium oxide. 1.2 This specification recognizes the presence of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle and consequently defines isotopic limits for gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets made from commercial grade UO2. Such commercial grade UO2 is defined so that, regarding fuel design and manufacture, the product is essentially equivalent to that made from unirradiated uranium. UO2 falling outside these limits cannot necessarily be regarded as equivalent and may thus need special provisions at the fuel fabrication plant or in the fuel design. 1.3 This specification does not include (1) provisions for preventing criticality accidents or (2) requirements for health and safety. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aw...

  17. Development of gadolinium based nanoparticles having an affinity towards melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlieras, Jessica; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Roux, Amandine; Heinrich-Balard, Laurence; Cohen, Richard; Tarrit, Sébastien; Truillet, Charles; Mignot, Anna; Hachani, Roxanne; Kryza, David; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Perriat, Pascal; Janier, Marc; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Small Rigid Platforms (SRPs) are sub-5 nanometre gadolinium based nanoparticles that have been developed for multimodal imaging and theranostic applications. They are composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. A covalent coupling with quinoxaline derivatives has been performed. Such derivatives have proven their affinity for melanin frequently expressed in primary melanoma cases. Three different quinoxaline derivatives have been synthesised and coupled to the nanoparticles. The affinity of the grafted nanoparticles for melanin has then been shown in vitro by surface plasmon resonance on a homemade melanin grafted gold chip.Small Rigid Platforms (SRPs) are sub-5 nanometre gadolinium based nanoparticles that have been developed for multimodal imaging and theranostic applications. They are composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. A covalent coupling with quinoxaline derivatives has been performed. Such derivatives have proven their affinity for melanin frequently expressed in primary melanoma cases. Three different quinoxaline derivatives have been synthesised and coupled to the nanoparticles. The affinity of the grafted nanoparticles for melanin has then been shown in vitro by surface plasmon resonance on a homemade melanin grafted gold chip. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33457g

  18. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) and gadolinium-based contrast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), unknown before March 1997 and first described in 2000, is a systemic disorder characterised by widespread tissue fibrosis. The first known case occurred in 1997, after the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) at high doses in patients with renal failure had become routine.

  19. Purification of cerium, neodymium and gadolinium for low background experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boiko R.S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium, neodymium and gadolinium contain double beta active isotopes. The most interesting are 150Nd and 160Gd (promising for 0ν2β search, 136Ce (2β+ candidate with one of the highest Q2β. The main problem of compounds containing lanthanide elements is their high radioactive contamination by uranium, radium, actinium and thorium. The new generation 2β experiments require development of methods for a deep purification of lanthanides from the radioactive elements. A combination of physical and chemical methods was applied to purify cerium, neodymium and gadolinium. Liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of Th and U from neodymium, gadolinium and for purification of cerium from Th, U, Ra and K. Co-precipitation and recrystallization methods were utilized for further reduction of the impurities. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe gamma spectrometry. As a result of the purification procedure the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide (a similar purification efficiency was reached also with cerium and neodymium oxides was decreased from 0.12 Bq/kg to 0.007 Bq/kg in 228Th, from 0.04 Bq/kg to <0.006 Bq/kg in 226Ra, and from 0.9 Bq/kg to 0.04 Bq/kg in 40K. The purification methods are much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like actinium, lanthanum and lutetium.

  20. MR imaging of musculoskeletal tumors and tumor mimickers with intravenous gadolinium: experience with 242 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, D.A. [Department of Radiology, Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)]|[WHMC/PSRD, Lackland AFB, TX (United States); Good, R.B. [Department of Radiology, Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Smith, D.K. [Department of Radiology, Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Parsons, T.W. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. This pictorial essay reviews our experience with MR scans with gadolinium in patients with musculoskeletal tumors and tumor mimickers. Design. Review of 242 MR scans obtained in the initial evaluation of a possible primary musculoskeletal neoplasm. All scans included a T1-weighted, fat-suppressed sequence following intravenous administration of gadolinium. Results. MR scans with gadolinium did not contribute to differential diagnosis or patient management in 89% of the patients in this series. However, intravenous gadolinium did assist in guiding the biopsy of bulky lesions and evaluating treated tumor beds for possible recurrence. MR scans with gadolinium were sometimes helpful when the differential diagnosis included synovitis, Morton`s neuroma or intramuscular myxoma, and when it was important to differentiate cystic from solid lesions. Conclusions. Routine use of gadolinium in every initial MR examination of a possible musculoskeletal mass is not warranted. However, there are appropriate selected indications for gadolinium administration as outlined above. (orig.). With 19 figs., 1 tab.

  1. High field ESR spectroscopy on (Gd,La)OFeAs superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonsov, A.; Kataev, V.; Leps, N.; Klingeler, R.; Kondrat, A.; Hess, C.; Wurmehl, S.; Werner, J.; Behr, G.; Buechner, B. [IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Muranyi, F. [Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    In the present work we have studied polycrystalline samples of the (Gd,La)O{sub 1-x}F{sub x}FeAs superconductor with different levels of fluorine and gadolinium doping by means of high field/high frequency electron spin resonance (HF-ESR) spectroscopy. The Gd ESR signal is found to be sensitive to the magnetic phase transition from the paramagnetic to the spin density wave (SDW) state occurring in the parent (Gd,La)OFeAs compounds at temperatures T{sub SDW}{proportional_to}130-150 K. In addition, in case of LaO{sub 1-x}F{sub x}FeAs with 5% Gd doping there is a clear indication of the suppression of the magnetic order in the samples with the superconducting ground state. The GdOFeAs samples reveal an antiferromagnetic coupling between Gd and Fe planes which reflects in the splitting and shift of Gd ESR line below T{sub SDW}{proportional_to}130 K. Surprisingly, the 15% and 17% fluorine doped GdOFeAs samples, with T{sub c}=20 K and T{sub c}=45 K respectively, show the low-T ESR response similar to the undoped sample which indicates that the SDW is not completely suppressed in the SC samples. We compare HF-ESR data with results of transport measurements on these samples and discuss a possible contribution of magnetic rare-earths to the interplay between magnetism of the FeAs planes and superconductivity which evolves upon the fluorine doping.

  2. Behavior of gadolinium-based diagnostics in water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyris, Maike

    2013-04-25

    Wastewater treatment plants throughout Europe are retrofitted for a sufficient removal of micropollutants. Most target compounds are eliminated efficiently at reasonable costs by oxidation. Sorption processes, on the other hand, are favored as no transformation products are formed. For oxidation, ozone is preferred presently. Its action is divided in two main reaction pathways: Via ozone and via hydroxyl radicals formed by ozone-matrix reactions. Oxidation efficiency strongly depends on reaction rate constants. Sorption processes are usually characterized, including sorption strength, by determination of isotherms. Also, for description of filtration processes isotherm data are necessary. So far, gadolinium chelates, used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging, have not been investigated in both advanced wastewater treatment processes. The stable chelates are excreted without metabolization. Conventional wastewater treatment does not remove them substantially. They remain intact and no free Gd(III) is released. This may be changed due to oxidative treatment which potentially destroys the chelates, and Gd(III) ions which are toxic, contrary to the chelated form, may be liberated. Monitoring campaigns in wastewater and drinking water have been performed to demonstrate the relevance of gadolinium in such treatment steps. In a European monitoring campaign an average concentration of 118 ng L{sup -1} gadolinium has been determined for 75 wastewater treatment plants effluents, corresponding to a non-geogenic gadolinium concentration of 116 ng L{sup -1}. In drinking water in the Ruhr area, a densely populated region in Germany, gadolinium and the anomaly were measurable by a factor of five lower than the average in the investigated wastewater samples. The determined concentrations in drinking water are lower than acute toxic effect concentration. The speciation of gadolinium in the investigated samples is unknown, as only total element concentration has been

  3. Survey of high field superconducting material for accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scahlan, R.; Greene, A.F.; Suenaga, M.

    1986-05-01

    The high field superconductors which could be used in accelerator dipole magnets are surveyed, ranking these candidates with respect to ease of fabrication and cost as well as superconducting properties. Emphasis is on Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi. 27 refs., 2 figs. (LEW)

  4. High-field EPR spectroscopy of thermal donors in silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, R.; Rasmussen, F.B.; Gregorkiewicz, T.

    1997-01-01

    Thermal donors generated in p-type boron-doped Czochralski-grown silicon by a 450 degrees C heat treatment have been studied by high-field magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In the experiments conducted at a microwave frequency of 140 GHz and in a magnetic field of approximately 5 T four individual...

  5. National Program on High Field Accelerator Magnet R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Cooley, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zlobin, A. V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Caspi, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gourlay, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Prestemon, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Larbalestier, D. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Gupta, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wanderer, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-09-26

    A National High-Field Magnet (HFM) Program is proposed as a thrust of the updated DOE-HEP General Accelerator R&D Program. The program responds to Recommendation 24 of the 2014 Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5) Report.

  6. Dielectric shimming : exploiting dielectric interactions in High Field MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Wyger Maurits

    2016-01-01

    This thesis reports on the utility of high permittivity dielectric materials for adjusting the radiofrequency (RF) field in high field MR. The performance-driven trend towards higher static magnetic field strengths drives MR operation into the regime where the dimensions of the body section being

  7. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in brain death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchtmann, M.; Beuing, O.; Skalej, M.; Kohl, J.; Serowy, S.; Bernarding, J.; Firsching, R.

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory tests for the diagnosis of brain death in addition to clinical findings may shorten observation time required in some countries and may add certainty to the diagnosis under specific circumstances. The practicability of Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to confirm cerebral circulatory arrest was assessed after the diagnosis of brain death in 15 patients using a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. In all 15 patients extracranial blood flow distal to the external carotid arteries was undisturbed. In 14 patients no contrast medium was noted within intracerebral vessels above the proximal level of the intracerebral arteries. In one patient more distal segments of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (A3 and M3) were filled with contrast medium. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA may be considered conclusive evidence of cerebral circulatory arrest, when major intracranial vessels fail to fill with contrast medium while extracranial vessels show normal blood flow.

  8. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles for theranostic MRI-radiosensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Lux, François; Sancey, Lucie; Bianchi, Andrea; Crémillieux, Yannick; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    International audience; A rapid development of gadolinium-based nanoparticles is observed due to their attractive properties as MRI-positive contrast agents. Indeed, they display high relaxivity, adapted biodistribution and passive uptake in the tumor thanks to enhanced permeability and retention effect. In addition to these imaging properties, it has been recently shown that they can act as effective radiosensitizers under different types of irradiation (radiotherapy, neutron therapy or hadr...

  9. Microwave and optical diagnostics in a gadolinium plasma; Diagnostics hyperfrequence et optique dans un plasma magnetise de gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larousse, B. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Procedes d`Enrichissement]|[Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    The optimization of the separation process of the gadolinium isotopes by Ion Cyclotron Resonance requires a precise knowledge of the physical characteristics of the plasma. Thus, two kinds of diagnostics have been developed: the first one to estimate the microwave power inside the source and the second one to measure the density of atomic and ionic of the gadolinium inside the plasma source and in front of the collector. Microwave diagnostic: A microstrip antenna has been designed and developed in order to characterize the microwave at 36 GHz frequency in the plasma source. The experimental results for different plasma regimes are presented. The measurements inside the plasma source show a maximum of microwave absorption for an argon pressure of 10{sup -4} mb (93% of absorption of the incident wave in the conditions of isotope separation). Laser absorption diagnostic: The theory of laser absorption in presence of a magnetic field is recalled and the first results are presented. In the spectral range between 560 and 620 nm, corresponding to high energy levels of gadolinium, no signal is obtained so that the density is below the detection limit 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. In the spectral range between 380 and 400 nm, two lines are observed, issue from the fundamental and metastable (633 cm{sup -1}) levels. The density of metastable level of gadolinium ions is about 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} with a relative precision of 15 % and its variation is studied as a function of argon pressure, at different sections of the plasma column (source, collector). The achieved set of measurements has been performed in order to check the theoretical models. (author) 32 refs.

  10. Mechanical design of a high field common coil magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, S; Dietderich, D R; Gourlay, S A; Gupta, R; McInturff, A; Millos, G; Scanlan, R M

    1999-01-01

    A common coil design for high field 2-in-1 accelerator magnets has been previously presented as a "conductor-friendly" option for high field magnets applicable for a Very Large Hadron Collider. This paper presents the mechanical design for a 14 tesla 2-in-1 dipole based on the common coil design approach. The magnet will use a high current density Nb/sub 3/Sn conductor. The design addresses mechanical issues particular to the common coil geometry: horizontal support against coil edges, vertical preload on coil faces, end loading and support, and coil stresses and strains. The magnet is the second in a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of the common coil design approach. (9 refs).

  11. Mechanical design of a high field common coil magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspi, S.; Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.; Gourlay, S.; Gupta, R.; McInturff, A.; Millos, G.; Scanlan, R.

    1999-03-18

    A common coil design for high field 2-in-1 accelerator magnets has been previously presented as a 'conductor-friendly' option for high field magnets applicable for a Very Large Hadron Collider. This paper presents the mechanical design for a 14 tesla 2-in-1 dipole based on the common coil design approach. The magnet will use a high current density Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor. The design addresses mechanical issues particular to the common coil geometry: horizontal support against coil edges, vertical preload on coil faces, end loading and support, and coil stresses and strains. The magnet is the second in a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of the common coil design approach.

  12. Homogenous BSCCO-2212 Round Wires for Very High Field Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Scott Campbell

    2012-06-30

    The performance demands on modern particle accelerators generate a relentless push towards higher field magnets. In turn, advanced high field magnet development places increased demands on superconducting materials. Nb3Sn conductors have been used to achieve 16 T in a prototype dipole magnet and are thought to have the capability for {approx}18 T for accelerator magnets (primarily dipoles but also higher order multipole magnets). However there have been suggestions and proposals for such magnets higher than 20 T. The High Energy Physics Community (HEP) has identified important new physics opportunities that are enabled by extremely high field magnets: 20 to 50 T solenoids for muon cooling in a muon collider (impact: understanding of neutrinos and dark matter); and 20+ T dipoles and quadrupoles for high energy hadron colliders (impact: discovery reach far beyond present). This proposal addresses the latest SBIR solicitation that calls for grant applications that seek to develop new or improved superconducting wire technologies for magnets that operate at a minimum of 12 Tesla (T) field, with increases up to 15 to 20 T sought in the near future (three to five years). The long-term development of accelerator magnets with fields greater than 20 T will require superconducting wires having significantly better high-field properties than those possessed by current Nb{sub 3}Sn or other A15 based wires. Given the existing materials science base for Bi-2212 wire processing, we believe that Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212) round wires can be produced in km-long piece lengths with properties suitable to meet both the near term and long term needs of the HEP community. The key advance will be the translation of this materials science base into a robust, high-yield wire technology. While the processing and application of A15 materials have advanced to a much higher level than those of the copper oxide-based, high T{sub c} (HTS) counterparts, the HTS materials have

  13. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles to improve the hadrontherapy performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, Erika; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, François; Mowat, Pierre; Usami, Noriko; Kobayashi, Katsumi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Le Sech, Claude; Li, Sha; Lacombe, Sandrine

    2014-11-01

    Nanomedicine is proposed as a novel strategy to improve the performance of radiotherapy. High-Z nanoparticles are known to enhance the effects of ionizing radiation. Recently, multimodal nanoparticles such as gadolinium-based nanoagents were proposed to amplify the effects of x-rays and g-rays and to improve MRI diagnosis. For tumors sited in sensitive tissues, childhood cases and radioresistant cancers, hadrontherapy is considered superior to x-rays and g-rays. Hadrontherapy, based on fast ion radiation, has the advantage of avoiding damage to the tissues behind the tumor; however, the damage caused in front of the tumor is its major limitation. Here, we demonstrate that multimodal gadolinium-based nanoparticles amplify cell death with fast ions used as radiation. Molecular scale experiments give insights into the mechanisms underlying the amplification of radiation effects. This proof-of-concept opens up novel perspectives for multimodal nanomedicine in hadrontherapy, ultimately reducing negative radiation effects in healthy tissues in front of the tumor. Gadolinium-chelating polysiloxane nanoparticles were previously reported to amplify the anti-tumor effects of x-rays and g-rays and to serve as MRI contrast agents. Fast ion radiation-based hadrontherapy avoids damage to the tissues behind the tumor, with a major limitation of tissue damage in front of the tumor. This study demonstrates a potential role for the above nanoagents in optimizing hadrontherapy with preventive effects in healthy tissue and amplified cell death in the tumor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance urography for upper urinary tract malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Naoki; Glockner, James F; Hartman, Robert P; King, Bernard F; Leibovich, Bradley C; Stanley, David W; Fitz-Gibbon, Patrick D; Kawashima, Akira

    2010-04-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the accuracy of gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance urography to detect upper urinary tract tumors. A total of 91 magnetic resonance urography studies for suspected upper tract malignancy were done in 70 males and 18 females with a mean age of 71.7 years. Breath hold coronal T2-weighted single shot fast spin-echo and breath-hold coronal 3-dimensional T1-weighted spoiled gradient-recalled echo images with fat suppression were obtained during the nephrographic and excretory phases after intravenous injection of gadolinium based contrast material. Two radiologists independently reviewed magnetic resonance images for a tumor by 4 regions (right/left and renal collecting system/ureter). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated. A total of 35 urinary tract regions in 18 males and 7 females with a mean age of 70.4 years were confirmed to have an upper tract malignant tumor and 219 urinary tract regions were confirmed to be tumor-free. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to detect upper urinary tract malignancy were 74.3%, 96.8% and 93.7% for reviewer 1, and 62.9%, 96.3% and 91.7% for reviewer 2, respectively. When patients with a ureteral stent or nephrostomy tube were excluded from analysis, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 86.2%, 99.5% and 97.7% for reviewer 1, and 72.4%, 97.9% and 94.6% for reviewer 2, respectively. Gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance urography is accurate to detect upper urinary tract malignant tumors. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles for theranostic MRI-radiosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, François; Sancey, Lucie; Bianchi, Andrea; Crémillieux, Yannick; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    A rapid development of gadolinium-based nanoparticles is observed due to their attractive properties as MRI-positive contrast agents. Indeed, they display high relaxivity, adapted biodistribution and passive uptake in the tumor thanks to enhanced permeability and retention effect. In addition to these imaging properties, it has been recently shown that they can act as effective radiosensitizers under different types of irradiation (radiotherapy, neutron therapy or hadron therapy). These new therapeutic modalities pave the way to therapy guided by imaging and to personalized medicine.

  16. On the coherent scattering length of natural gadolinium

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, A I; Kulin, G V; Kulina, O V

    2002-01-01

    Using the reflection of thermal neutrons from the surface of plane sample the coherent scattering length of natural gadolinium was measured. Due to the closeness of resonances in radiation capture cross section the imaginary part of coherent scattering length strongly depends on neutron wavelength. Its real part can be expressed as a sum of Re(b)=b sub 0 + b(lambda). For the constant component of the real part we experimentally obtained the value b sub 0 =(11.5+-0.7)Fm. This result should be considered as a preliminary.

  17. Legg-Perthes-Calve disease: staging by MRI using gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducou le Pointe, H. (Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, 75 - Paris (France)); Haddad, S. (Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, 75 - Paris (France)); Silberman, B. (Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, 75 - Paris (France)); Filipe, G. (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, 75 - Paris (France)); Monroc, M. (Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, 75 - Paris (France)); Montagne, J.P. (Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, 75 - Paris (France))

    1994-04-01

    Twenty-one patients (26 hips) with typical signs of Legg-Perthes-Calve (LPC) disease on plain radiographs were explored by MRI. Patients were imaged with a 0.5 T MR unit. Gadolinium-enhanced spinecho MR images were obtained after nonenhanced T1-weighted (spin-echo) and T2[sup *]-weighted (gradient-echo) images. Four different areas were identified in the femoral epiphysis (necrosis, regenerative, cartilaginous and normal fatty bone tissue). The histological evolution of LPC is well described by Catterall and others. Comparing their descriptions with out MR findings, we suggest classification ofLPC into five phases: necrosis: regeneration, reconstruction, reossification and sequelae. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuberger, Thomas

    2009-06-23

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  19. High-field spin dynamics of antiferromagnetic quantum spin chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enderle, M.; Regnault, L.P.; Broholm, C.

    2000-01-01

    The characteristic internal order of macroscopic quantum ground states in one-dimensional spin systems is usually not directly accessible, but reflected in the spin dynamics and the field dependence of the magnetic excitations. In high magnetic fields quantum phase transitions are expected. We...... present recent work on the high-field spin dynamics of the S = I antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains NENP (Haldane ground state) and CsNiCl3 (quasi-1D HAF close to the quantum critical point), the uniform S = 1/2 chain CTS, and the spin-Peierls system CuGeO3. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B,V. All rights...

  20. The Mechanical Design Optimization of a High Field HTS Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalitha, SL; Gupta, RC

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design optimization of a large aperture, high field (24 T at 4 K) solenoid for a 1.7 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage device. The magnet is designed to be built entirely of second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor tape with excellent electrical and mechanical properties at the cryogenic temperatures. The critical parameters that govern the magnet performance are examined in detail through a multiphysics approach using ANSYS software. The analysis results formed the basis for the performance specification as well as the construction of the magnet.

  1. High-field electrical and thermal transport in suspended graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgan, Vincent E; Behnam, Ashkan; Conley, Hiram J; Bolotin, Kirill I; Pop, Eric

    2013-10-09

    We study the intrinsic transport properties of suspended graphene devices at high fields (≥1 V/μm) and high temperatures (≥1000 K). Across 15 samples, we find peak (average) saturation velocity of 3.6 × 10(7) cm/s (1.7 × 10(7) cm/s) and peak (average) thermal conductivity of 530 W m(-1) K(-1) (310 W m(-1) K(-1)) at 1000 K. The saturation velocity is 2-4 times and the thermal conductivity 10-17 times greater than in silicon at such elevated temperatures. However, the thermal conductivity shows a steeper decrease at high temperature than in graphite, consistent with stronger effects of second-order three-phonon scattering. Our analysis of sample-to-sample variation suggests the behavior of "cleaner" devices most closely approaches the intrinsic high-field properties of graphene. This study reveals key features of charge and heat flow in graphene up to device breakdown at ~2230 K in vacuum, highlighting remaining unknowns under extreme operating conditions.

  2. High-field thermal transport properties of REBCO coated conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonura, Marco; Senatore, Carmine

    2015-02-01

    The use of REBCO coated conductors (CCs) is envisaged for many applications, extending from power cables to high-field magnets. Whatever the case, thermal properties of REBCO tapes play a key role for the stability of superconducting devices. In this work, we present the first study on the longitudinal thermal conductivity (κ) of REBCO CCs in magnetic fields up to 19 T applied both parallel and perpendicularly to the thermal-current direction. Copper-stabilized tapes from six industrial manufacturers have been investigated. We show that zero-field κ of CCs can be calculated with an accuracy of +/- 15% from the residual resistivity ratio of the stabilizer and the Cu/non-Cu ratio. Measurements performed at high fields have allowed us to evaluate the consistency of the procedures generally used for estimating in-field κ in the framework of the Wiedemann-Franz law from an electrical characterization of the materials. In-field data are intended to provide primary ingredients for the thermal stability analysis of high-temperature superconductor-based magnets.

  3. Safety of gadolinium contrast agent in hemodialysis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, S. [Nippon Medical School, Chiba-Hokuso Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Katagiri, K.; Kumazaki, T. [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Yokoyama, H. [Ishinkai Clinic, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Urology

    2001-05-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the safety of a gadolinium (Gd) contrast agent in hemodialysis patients. Material and Methods: Seventy hemodialysis patients underwent contrast-enhanced MR examination. After the examination, the patients were hemodialyzed on a usual schedule, i.e., 3 times per week at 4 h each session. The hemodialysis was performed on the same day in 16 patients, the next day in 34, 2 days later in 14 and 3 days later in 6 patients. Serum Gd concentrations before and after the first to fourth hemodialysis sessions were analyzed in 11 patients. Cardiovascular, cutaneous, respiratory, psycho-neurological and digestive side effects were evaluated in all patients. Changes in liver and kidney functions, blood counts, and electrolytes were also checked. Results and Conclusion: Neither side effects nor blood changes were noted in any of the patients. Average excretory rates were 78.2%, 95.6%, 98.7% and 99.5% in the first to fourth hemodialysis sessions, respectively. These results suggest that Gd contrast agents can be used in hemodialysis patients if hemodialysis is carried out promptly after the examination. Key words: Renal failure, hemodialysis; contrast agent, gadolinium.

  4. REVIEW OF HIGH FIELD Q SLOPE, CAVITY MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2008-01-23

    One of the most interesting phenomenon occurring in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk niobium is represented by a sharp decrease of the quality factor above peak surface magnetic field of about 90 mT and is referred to as "high field Q-slope" or "Q-drop". This phenomenon was observed first in 1997 and since then some effort was devoted to the understanding of the causes behind it. Still, no clear physical interpretation of the Q-drop has emerged, despite several attempts. In this contribution, I will review the experimental results for various cavities measured in many laboratories and I will try to identify common features and differences related to the Q-drop.

  5. Whole-globe biomechanics using high-field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhees, Andrew P; Ho, Leon C; Jan, Ning-Jiun; Tran, Huong; van der Merwe, Yolandi; Chan, Kevin; Sigal, Ian A

    2017-07-01

    The eye is a complex structure composed of several interconnected tissues acting together, across the whole globe, to resist deformation due to intraocular pressure (IOP). However, most work in the ocular biomechanics field only examines the response to IOP over smaller regions of the eye. We used high-field MRI to measure IOP induced ocular displacements and deformations over the whole globe. Seven sheep eyes were obtained from a local abattoir and imaged within 48 h using MRI at multiple levels of IOP. IOP was controlled with a gravity perfusion system and a cannula inserted into the anterior chamber. T2-weighted imaging was performed to the eyes serially at 0 mmHg, 10 mmHg, 20 mmHg and 40 mmHg of IOP using a 9.4 T MRI scanner. Manual morphometry was conducted using 3D visualization software to quantify IOP-induced effects at the globe scale (e.g. axial length and equatorial diameters) or optic nerve head scale (e.g. canal diameter, peripapillary sclera bowing). Measurement sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine measurement precision. High-field MRI revealed an outward bowing of the posterior sclera and anterior bulging of the cornea due to IOP elevation. Increments in IOP from 10 to 40 mmHg caused measurable increases in axial length in 6 of 7 eyes of 7.9 ± 5.7% (mean ± SD). Changes in equatorial diameter were minimal, 0.4 ± 1.2% between 10 and 40 mmHg, and in all cases less than the measurement sensitivity. The effects were nonlinear, with larger deformations at normal IOPs (10-20 mmHg) than at elevated IOPs (20-40 mmHg). IOP also caused measurable increases in the nasal-temporal scleral canal diameter of 13.4 ± 9.7% between 0 and 20 mmHg, but not in the superior-inferior diameter. This study demonstrates that high-field MRI can be used to visualize and measure simultaneously the effects of IOP over the whole globe, including the effects on axial length and equatorial diameter, posterior sclera displacement and bowing, and even

  6. Magnetostructural transitions in a frustrated magnet at high fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurkan, V; Zherlitsyn, S; Felea, V; Yasin, S; Skourski, Yu; Deisenhofer, J; von Nidda, H-A Krug; Lemmens, P; Wosnitza, J; Loidl, A

    2011-06-17

    Ultrasound and magnetization studies of bond-frustrated ZnCr(2)S(4) spinel are performed in static magnetic fields up to 18 T and in pulsed fields up to 62 T. At temperatures below the antiferromagnetic transition at T(N1)≈14  K, the sound velocity as a function of the magnetic field reveals a sequence of steps followed by plateaus indicating a succession of crystallographic structures with constant stiffness. At the same time, the magnetization evolves continuously with a field up to full magnetic polarization without any plateaus in contrast to geometrically frustrated chromium oxide spinels. The observed high-field magnetostructural states are discussed within a H-T phase diagram taking into account the field and temperature evolution of three coexisting spin structures and subsequent lattice transformations induced by the magnetic field.

  7. Long-term retention of gadolinium in the skin of rodents following the administration of gadolinium-based contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietsch, Hubertus; Jost, Gregor; Frenzel, Thomas; Huetter, Joachim; Sieber, Martin A. [Media Research, Bayer Schering Pharma AG Contrast, Berlin (Germany); Lengsfeld, Philipp [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Global Medical Affairs Diagnostic Imaging, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Several publications suggest a potential association between the administration of Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) and the onset of a rare but serious disease, Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF). The aim of this study was to determine the elimination time-course of Gadolinium (Gd) from skin tissue after application of GBCAs in rats. Seven different marketed GBCAs were injected on five consecutive days at a dose of 2.5 mmol/kg bodyweight into the tail vein of Han-Wistar rats and the Gd concentrations were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) in skin biopsies taken at various time-points up to a year after the last injection. Most of the administered Gd was eliminated from the skin within a time-period of about 2 months. However, the repeated administration of linear GBCAs resulted in long-term retention of a small portion of the administered Gd in the skin tissue of rats, with substantially higher values observed in animals treated with non-ionic linear agents than in those that received ionic linear GBCAs. Following treatment with macrocyclic GBCAs, Gd values in the skin were in the same range as observed in the controls from day 24 post-injection onwards. In summary, we observed a correlation between the complex stability of GBCAs and the amount of residual Gd in the skin up to a year after application of GBCAs. (orig.)

  8. Hepatocellular carcinoma: detection with gadolinium- and ferumoxides-enhanced MR imaging of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauleit, Dirk; Textor, Jochen; Bachmann, Reinald; Conrad, Rudi; Flacke, Sebastian; Layer, Günter; Kreft, Burkhard; Schild, Hans

    2002-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the accuracy of gadolinium- and ferumoxides-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is different in small (1.5-cm) hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Forty-three consecutive patients with chronic liver disease were enrolled in this study. The imaging protocol included unenhanced breath-hold T1-weighted fast field-echo sequences, unenhanced respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (SE) sequences, dynamic gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted three-dimensional turbo field-echo sequences, and ferumoxides-enhanced T2-weighted turbo SE sequences. Images of each sequence and two sets of sequences (ferumoxides set and gadolinium set) were reviewed by four observers. The ferumoxides set included unenhanced T1- and T2-weighted images and ferumoxides-enhanced T2-weighted turbo SE MR images. The gadolinium set included unenhanced T1- and T2-weighted images and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced three-dimensional turbo field-echo MR images. In receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the sensitivity and accuracy of the sequences were compared in regard to the detection of all, small, and large HCCs. Imaging performance was different with gadolinium- and ferumoxides-enhanced images in the detection of small and large HCCs. For detection of small HCCs, the sensitivity and accuracy with unenhanced and gadolinium-enhanced imaging (gadolinium set) were significantly (P =.017) superior to those with unenhanced and ferumoxides-enhanced imaging (ferumoxides set). The area under the composite ROC curves, or A(z), for the gadolinium set and the ferumoxides set was 0.97 and 0.81, respectively. For large HCC, the ferumoxides set was superior compared with the gadolinium set, but this difference was not statistically significant. Analysis of all HCCs demonstrated no significant differences for gadolinium- and ferumoxides-enhanced imaging. For the detection of early HCC, gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is preferred to ferumoxides-enhanced MR imaging

  9. Magnetically Active and Coated Gadolinium-Filled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Fidiani, Elok

    2013-08-15

    Gd-filled carbon nanotubes (which include the so-called gadonanotubes(1)) have been attracting much interest due to their potential use in medical diagnostic applications. In the present work, a vacuum filling method was performed to confine gadolinium(III) iodide in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Filling yields in excess of 50% were obtained. Cleaning and dosing of the external walls was undertaken, as well as the study of the filled CNT magnetic properties. Overall, we found that the encapsulating procedure can lead to reduction of the lanthanide metal and induce disorder in the initial GdI3-type structure. Notwithstanding, the magnetic response of the material is not compromised, retaining a strong paramagnetic response and an effective magnetic moment of similar to 6 mu B. Our results may entice further investigation into whether an analogous Gd3+ to Gd2+ reduction takes place in other Gd-filled CNT systems.

  10. Gadolinium ring enhancement and mass effect in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyden, C.H. van der (Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa)); Villiers, J.F.K. de (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa)); Middlecote, B.D. (Dept. of Anatomical Pathology, Univ. of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa)); Terblanche, J. (Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa))

    1994-04-01

    A 9-year-old boy presented with a subacute history of optic neuritis followed by brainstem involvement, with fever and a lymphocytic pleocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid. Gadolinium-enhancing ring lesions were demonstrated in the white matter of the cerebrum, brainstem and cerebellum on day 17 of the illness, all appearing simultaneously as part of a monophasic illmess. A parietal lesion exerted mass effect. Needling and biopsy yielded no evidence of a pyogenic lesion, tumour or tuberculosis and showed vasculitis. There was insufficient material for myelin staining. Dexamethasone therapy lead to rapid improvement of the radiological lesions: MRI and CT on day 34 of the illness showed complete clearing of the lesions except for residual abnormality at the biopsy site. (orig.)

  11. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ge

    2015-01-01

    A Faraday wheel (FW)—an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents—could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST. PMID:26507314

  12. The High Field Path to Practical Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumgaard, Robert; Whyte, D.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z.; Brunner, D.; Sorbom, B.; Marmar, E.; Minervini, J.; Bonoli, P.; Irby, J.; Labombard, B.; Terry, J.; Vieira, R.; Wukitch, S.

    2017-10-01

    We propose a faster, lower cost development path for fusion energy enabled by high temperature superconductors, devices at high magnetic field, innovative technologies and modern approaches to technology development. Timeliness, scale, and economic-viability are the drivers for fusion energy to combat climate change and aid economic development. The opportunities provided by high-temperature superconductors, innovative engineering and physics, and new organizational structures identified over the last few years open new possibilities for realizing practical fusion energy that could meet mid-century de-carbonization needs. We discuss re-factoring the fusion energy development path with an emphasis on concrete risk retirement strategies utilizing a modular approach based on the high-field tokamak that leverages the broader tokamak physics understanding of confinement, stability, and operational limits. Elements of this plan include development of high-temperature superconductor magnets, simplified immersion blankets, advanced long-leg divertors, a compact divertor test tokamak, efficient current drive, modular construction, and demountable magnet joints. An R&D plan culminating in the construction of an integrated pilot plant and test facility modeled on the ARC concept is presented.

  13. High Field Side MHD Activity During Local Helicity Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachicano, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Perry, J. M.; Reusch, J. A.; Richner, N. J.

    2017-10-01

    MHD is an essential part of understanding the mechanism for local helicity injection (LHI) current drive. The new high field side (HFS) LHI system on the Pegasus ST permits new tests of recent NIMROD simulations. In that model, LHI current streams in the plasma edge undergo large-scale reconnection events, leading to current drive. This produces bursty n = 1 activity around 30 kHz on low field side (LFS) Mirnov coils, consistent with experiment. The simulations also feature coherent injector streams winding down the center column. Improvements to the core high-resolution poloidal Mirnov array with Cat7A Ethernet cabling and differentially driven signal processing eliminated EMI-driven switching noise, enabling detailed spectral analysis. Preliminary results from the recovered HFS poloidal Mirnov coils suggest n = 1 activity is present at the top of the vessel core, but does not persist down the centerstack. HFS LHI experiments can exhibit an operating regime where the high amplitude MHD is abruptly reduced by more than an order of magnitude on LFS Mirnov coils, leading to higher plasma current and improved particle confinement. This reduction is not observed on the HFS midplane magnetics. Instead, they show broadband turbulence-like magnetic features with near consistent amplitude in a frequency range of 90-200 kHz. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  14. Gadolinium-containing endohedral fullerenes: structures and function as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiassi, Kamran B; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Balch, Alan L

    2014-05-28

    Gadolinium-containing endohedral fullerenes represent a new class of effective relaxation agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The range of different structures possible for this class of molecules and their properties as MRI agents are reviewed here.

  15. Optimization of micro-strip gas chamber as two-dimensional neutron detector using gadolinium converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaoka, Sei; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Hideshi; Soyama, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-02-01

    A micro-strip gas chamber (MSGC) has been developing as a two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector for neutron scattering experiments using high-intensity pulsed-neutron source in a high-intensity proton accelerator facility. MSGC is required for the high count rate, high detective efficiency, high positional resolution, stabilization and covering large area. Our purpose in this paper is to verify the proper of Gadolinium as MSGC converter. First, the basic property of Gadolinium converter was examined by simple experiments using a zero-dimensional neutron detector on the purpose of deriving the detective efficiency. Second, the optimization of the arrangement of a capillary plate in MSGC has been done by simulation on the MSGC using Gadolinium converter. As a result of that, it has been proved that Gadolinium can be theoretically used as a converter of MSGC. (author)

  16. Standard test methods for analysis of sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the analysis of sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Section Carbon (Total) by Direct CombustionThermal Conductivity Method C1408 Test Method for Carbon (Total) in Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets By Direct Combustion-Infrared Detection Method Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis Ion-Selective Electrode Method C1502 Test Method for Determination of Total Chlorine and Fluorine in Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinium Oxide Gadolinia Content by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry C1456 Test Method for Determination of Uranium or Gadolinium, or Both, in Gadolinium Oxide-Uranium Oxide Pellets or by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Hydrogen by Inert Gas Fusion C1457 Test Method for Determination of Total Hydrogen Content of Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets by Carrier Gas Extraction Isotopic Uranium Composition by Multiple-Filament Surface-Ioni...

  17. Native T1-mapping detects the location, extent and patterns of acute myocarditis without the need for gadolinium contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Vanessa M; Piechnik, Stefan K; Dall'Armellina, Erica; Karamitsos, Theodoros D; Francis, Jane M; Ntusi, Ntobeko; Holloway, Cameron; Choudhury, Robin P; Kardos, Attila; Robson, Matthew D; Friedrich, Matthias G; Neubauer, Stefan

    2014-05-23

    Acute myocarditis can be diagnosed on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) using multiple techniques, including late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging, which requires contrast administration. Native T1-mapping is significantly more sensitive than LGE and conventional T2-weighted (T2W) imaging in detecting myocarditis. The aims of this study were to demonstrate how to display the non-ischemic patterns of injury and to quantify myocardial involvement in acute myocarditis without the need for contrast agents, using topographic T1-maps and incremental T1 thresholds. We studied 60 patients with suspected acute myocarditis (median 3 days from presentation) and 50 controls using CMR (1.5 T), including: (1) dark-blood T2W imaging; >(2) native T1-mapping (ShMOLLI); (3) LGE. Analysis included: (1) global myocardial T2 signal intensity (SI) ratio compared to skeletal muscle; (2) myocardial T1 times; (3) areas of injury by T2W, T1-mapping and LGE. Compared to controls, patients had more edema (global myocardial T2 SI ratio 1.71 ± 0.27 vs.1.56 ± 0.15), higher mean myocardial T1 (1011 ± 64 ms vs. 946 ± 23 ms) and more areas of injury as detected by T2W (median 5% vs. 0%), T1 (median 32% vs. 0.7%) and LGE (median 11% vs. 0%); all p T1 > 990 ms (sensitivity 90%, specificity 88%) detected significantly larger areas of involvement than T2W and LGE imaging in patients, and additional areas of injury when T2W and LGE were negative. T1-mapping significantly improved the diagnostic confidence in an additional 30% of cases when at least one of the conventional methods (T2W, LGE) failed to identify any areas of abnormality. Using incremental thresholds, T1-mapping can display the non-ischemic patterns of injury typical of myocarditis. Native T1-mapping can display the typical non-ischemic patterns in acute myocarditis, similar to LGE imaging but without the need for contrast agents. In addition, T1-mapping offers significant incremental diagnostic value

  18. Anisotropic high field superconductinng behavior in MgB_2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alexander

    2004-03-01

    I will discuss new effects resulting from the two-gap superconductivity in MgB_2, focusing on: 1. Current-induced interband breakdown and dynamic interband phase textures caused by nonequilibrium charge imbalance [1], 2. Anomalous enhancement of the upper critical field H_c2(T) by nonmagnetic impurities in dirty two-gap superconductors. A theory of H_c2 based on generalized two-gap Usadel equations, which include both intra and interband scattering channels and paramagnetic pairbreaking is presented. Solutions of these equations show that H_c2(T) can exhibit a strong upward curvature and an unusual temperature dependence of the anisotropy parameter H_c2^||/H_c2^⊥, which can both increase and decrease with T depending on the ratio of the intraband electron diffusivities D_π/D_σ [2]. The theory explains recent high-field transport experiments on resistive MgB2 films in which the upper critical field was increased by 3-10 times as compared to single crystals [3], H_c2 exceeding 50 Tesla for H||ab and 35T for H⊥ ab. The results suggest that nonmagnetic impurities due to selective atomic substitution on Mg and B sites can increase H_c2 of MgB2 to a much greater extend than in one-gap superconductors. [1]. A. Gurevich and V.M. Vinokur, PRL 90, 047004 (2003). [2]. A. Gurevich, PRB 67, 1845151 (2003) and unpublished. [3]. A. Gurevich et al. Supercond. Sci. Technol. (2003, to appear). *In collaboration with V.M. Vinokur, V. Braccini, S. Patnaik, X. Song, D.C. Larbalestier, C.B. Eom, X. Pan, X. Xi, V. Ferrando, C. Ferdighini, A. Siri, K.H. Kim and C. Mielke. Work supported by NSF Nanostructured Materials and Interfaces MRSEC at the University of Wisconsin.

  19. Diffuse axonal injury at ultra-high field MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Moenninghoff

    Full Text Available Diffuse axonal injury (DAI is a specific type of traumatic brain injury caused by shearing forces leading to widespread tearing of axons and small vessels. Traumatic microbleeds (TMBs are regarded as a radiological marker for DAI. This study aims to compare DAI-associated TMBs at 3 Tesla (T and 7 T susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI to evaluate possible diagnostic benefits of ultra-high field (UHF MRI.10 study participants (4 male, 6 female, age range 20-74 years with known DAI were included. All MR exams were performed with a 3 T MR system (Magnetom Skyra and a 7 T MR research system (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen, Germany each in combination with a 32-channel-receive coil. The average time interval between trauma and imaging was 22 months. Location and count of TMBs were independently evaluated by two neuroradiologists on 3 T and 7 T SWI images with similar and additionally increased spatial resolution at 7 T. Inter- and intraobserver reliability was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Count and diameter of TMB were evaluated with Wilcoxon signed rank test.Susceptibility weighted imaging revealed a total of 485 TMBs (range 1-190, median 25 at 3 T, 584 TMBs (plus 20%, range 1-262, median 30.5 at 7 T with similar spatial resolution, and 684 TMBs (plus 41%, range 1-288, median 39.5 at 7 T with 10-times higher spatial resolution. Hemorrhagic DAI appeared significantly larger at 7 T compared to 3 T (p = 0.005. Inter- and intraobserver correlation regarding the counted TMB was high and almost equal 3 T and 7 T.7 T SWI improves the depiction of small hemorrhagic DAI compared to 3 T and may be supplementary to lower field strengths for diagnostic in inconclusive or medicolegal cases.

  20. Toward an image-guided microbeam radiation therapy using gadolinium-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Duc, Géraldine; Miladi, Imen; Alric, Christophe; Mowat, Pierre; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Bouchet, Audrey; Khalil, Enam; Billotey, Claire; Janier, Marc; Lux, François; Epicier, Thierry; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2011-12-27

    Ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBNs) induce both a positive contrast for magnetic resonance imaging and a radiosentizing effect. The exploitation of these characteristics leads to a greater increase in lifespan of rats bearing brain tumors since the radiosensitizing effect of GBNs can be activated by X-ray microbeams when the gadolinium content is, at the same time, sufficiently high in the tumor and low in the surrounding healthy tissue. GBNs exhibit therefore an interesting potential for image-guided radiotherapy.

  1. Monte Carlo Study of Radiation Dose Enhancement by Gadolinium in Megavoltage and High Dose Rate Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel G Zhang; Vladimir Feygelman; Moros, Eduardo G.; Kujtim Latifi; Zhang, Geoffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon ...

  2. The use of theranostic gadolinium-based nanoprobes to improve radiotherapy efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Sancey, L.; Lux, F.; Kotb, S; ROUX, S; Dufort, S.; Bianchi, A.; Crémillieux, Y; Fries, P.; Coll, J-L; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C.; M. Janier; Dutreix, M; Barberi-Heyob, M; Boschetti, F.; Denat, F

    2014-01-01

    A new efficient type of gadolinium-based theranostic agent (AGuIX®) has recently been developed for MRI-guided radiotherapy (RT). These new particles consist of a polysiloxane network surrounded by a number of gadolinium chelates, usually 10. Owing to their small size (<5 nm), AGuIX typically exhibit biodistributions that are almost ideal for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. For example, although a significant proportion of these particles accumulate in tumours, the remainder is rapidl...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging for abnormally invasive placenta: the added value of intravenous gadolinium injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millischer, A-E; Salomon, L J; Porcher, R; Brasseur-Daudruy, M; Gourdier, A-L; Hornoy, P; Silvera, S; Loisel, D; Tsatsaris, V; Delorme, B; Boddaert, N; Ville, Y; Sentilhes, L

    2017-01-01

    To assess the added value of intravenous gadolinium injection to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) -based diagnosis of abnormally invasive placenta (AIP) and to examine this in relation to the radiologist's experience. Retrospective study. Between March 2009 and October 2012, 31 pregnant women who had previous caesarean delivery together with a placenta praevia and suspected placenta accreta on ultrasound in the third trimester of pregnancy. All were offered MRI examination, and made aware of the limited (but so far reassuring) data regarding fetal safety of gadolinium. Twenty pregnant women agreed to undergo prenatal MRI (1.5 T), with and without gadolinium injection. Two sets of MRI examinations without and with gadolinium were reviewed independently 2 months apart by two senior and two junior radiologists; all were blinded to the outcome (known in all cases). Histopathological findings and clinical signs of AIP were considered as the defining criteria of diagnosis. accuracy of MRI with and without gadolinium was assessed. Eight of the 20 women had confirmed abnormal placental invasion. The overall performance of both sets of readers in detecting AIP increased with gadolinium-sensitivity and specificity of 75.0% (42.0-100%) and 47.9% (19.9-75.9%) increasing to 87.5% (57.1-100%) and 60.4% (33.9-86.9%), respectively (P = 0.04). The added value of gadolinium remained irrespective of radiologist's experience, although senior radiologists performed better overall (sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and 62.5% versus 62.5% and 33.3%, respectively, increasing with injection to 93.8% and 70.8% versus 81.3% and 50%, respectively; P improvement in MRI-based diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of AIP, for both junior and senior radiologists. Gadolinium injection improves MRI performance of radiologists for the diagnosis of placenta accreta. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  4. Technical aspects of MRI signal change quantification after gadolinium-based contrast agents' administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Joana; Ramalho, Miguel; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Semelka, Richard C

    2016-12-01

    Over the last 2years several studies have been published regarding gadolinium deposition in brain structures in patients with normal renal function after repeated administrations of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). Most of the publications are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based retrospective studies, where gadolinium deposition may be indirectly measured by evaluating changes in T1 signal intensity (SI) in brain tissue, particularly in the dentate nucleus (DN) and/or globus pallidi (GP). The direct correlation between T1 signal changes and gadolinium deposition was validated by human pathology studies. However, the variability of the MR equipment and parameters used across different publications, along with the inherent limitations of MRI to assess gadolinium in human tissues should be acknowledged when interpreting those studies. Nevertheless, MRI studies remain essential regarding gadolinium bio-distribution knowledge. The aim of this paper is to overview current knowledge of technical aspects of T1 signal intensity evaluation by MRI and describe confounding factors, with the intention to achieve higher accuracy and maximize reproducibility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reproducibility of Gadolinium Enhancement Patterns and Wall Thickness in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Granillo, Gaston A., E-mail: grodriguezgranillo@gmail.com; Deviggiano, Alejandro; Capunay, Carlos; Zan, Macarena C. De; Carrascosa, Patricia [Department of Cardiovascular Imaging - Diagnóstico Maipú, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-07-15

    Reproducibility data of the extent and patterns of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is limited. To explore the reproducibility of regional wall thickness (WT), LGE extent, and LGE patterns in patients with HCM assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). The extent of LGE was assessed by the number of segments with LGE, and by the total LV mass with LGE (% LGE); and the pattern of LGE-CMR was defined for each segment. A total of 42 patients (672 segments) with HCM constituted the study population. The mean WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.62 ± 1.0 mm (6.1%), with limits of agreement of 1.36 mm; -2.60 mm and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.95 (95% CI 0.93-0.96). Maximum WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.19 ± 0.8 mm (0.9%), with limits of agreement of 1.32 mm; -1.70 mm, and an ICC of 0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.98). The % LGE showed a mean difference between observers of -1.17 ± 1.2 % (21%), with limits of agreement of 1.16%; -3.49%, and an ICC of 0.94 (95% CI 0.88-0.97). The mean difference between observers regarding the number of segments with LGE was -0.40 ± 0.45 segments (11%), with limits of agreement of 0.50 segments; -1.31 segments, and an ICC of 0.97 (95% CI 0.94-0.99). The number of segments with LGE might be more reproducible than the percent of the LV mass with LGE.

  6. Combining ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles with photon irradiation overcomes radioresistance of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Imen; Aloy, Marie-Thérèse; Armandy, Emma; Mowat, Pierre; Kryza, David; Magné, Nicolas; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, François; Billotey, Claire; Janier, Marc; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Gadolinium based nanoparticles (GBNs, diameter 2.9±0.2nm), have promising biodistribution properties for theranostic use in-vivo. We aimed at demonstrating the radiosensitizing effect of these GBNs in experimental radioresistant human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SQ20B, FaDu and Cal33 cell lines). Combining 0.6mM GBNs with 250kV photon irradiation significantly decreased SQ20B cell survival, associated with an increase in non-reparable DNA double-strand breaks, the shortening of G2/M phase blockage, and the inhibition of cell proliferation, each contributing to the commitment of late apoptosis. Similarly, radiation resistance was overcome for SQ20B stem-like cells, as well as for FaDu and Cal33 cell lines. Using a SQ20B tumor-bearing mouse model, combination of GBNs with 10Gy irradiation significantly delayed tumor growth with an increase in late apoptosis and a decrease in cell proliferation. These results suggest that GBNs could be envisioned as adjuvant to radiotherapy for HNSCC tumors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanisms for overestimating acute myocardial infarct size with gadolinium-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in humans: a quantitative and kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer-Hansen, Sophia; Bandettini, W Patricia; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Leung, Steve W; Shanbhag, Sujata; Mancini, Christine; Greve, Anders M; Køber, Lars; Thune, Jens Jakob; Kellman, Peter; Arai, Andrew E

    2016-01-01

    It remains controversial whether cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium only enhances acutely infarcted or also salvaged myocardium. We hypothesized that enhancement of salvaged myocardium may be due to altered extracellular volume (ECV) and contrast kinetics compared with normal and infarcted myocardium. If so, these mechanisms could contribute to overestimation of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) size. Imaging was performed at 1.5T ≤ 7 days after AMI with serial T1 mapping and volumetric early (5 min post-contrast) and late (20 min post-contrast) gadolinium enhancement imaging. Infarcts were classified as transmural (>75% transmural extent) or non-transmural. Patients with non-transmural infarctions (n = 15) had shorter duration of symptoms before reperfusion (P = 0.02), lower peak troponin (P = 0.008), and less microvascular obstruction (P infarcts (n = 22). The size of enhancement at 5 min was greater than at 20 min (18.7 ± 12.7 vs. 12.1 ± 7.0%, P = 0.003) in non-transmural infarctions, but similar in transmural infarctions (23.0 ± 10.0 vs. 21.9 ± 9.9%, P = 0.21). ECV of salvaged myocardium was greater than normal (39.5 ± 5.8 vs. 24.1 ± 3.1%) but less than infarcted myocardium (50.5 ± 6.0%, both P infarctions, salvaged and infarcted myocardium had similar T1 at 4 min but different T1 at 8-20 min post-contrast. The extent of gadolinium enhancement in AMI is modulated by ECV and contrast kinetics. Image acquisition too early after contrast administration resulted in overestimation of infarct size in non-transmural infarctions due to enhancement of salvaged myocardium. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  8. Magnetocaloric effect at cryogenic temperature in gadolinium oxide nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Rima, E-mail: rima.paul@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Paramanik, Tapas; Das, Kalipada [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sen, Pintu [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Satpati, B.; Das, I. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2016-11-01

    We have synthesized fascinating nano-structure of Gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) using controlled template-assisted electrochemical deposition technique which showed interesting anisotropic magnetic behavior. The nanotubes of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} with average diameter 200 nm, length 10 µm and wall thickness 20 nm are constituted of nanoclusters with average diameter 7.5 nm. The tubes are aligned and are almost uniform throughout their length. Detailed magnetic measurements of aligned Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes have been performed for both parallel and perpendicular magnetic field orientations with respect to the axis of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotube array. Significant differences in magnetization values have been observed between the parallel and perpendicular orientations. Experimental results indicate the superparamagnetic nature of the nanomaterial. Large magnetocaloric effect, associated with the sharp change in magnetization of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes, has been observed in the cryogenic temperature regime that shows anisotropic behavior. - Highlights: • Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes of diameter ~200 nm synthesized through electrochemical technique. • The nanotubes are superparamagnetic in nature. • At cryogenic temperature, the nanotubes exhibit large magnetocaloric anisotropic effect.

  9. Gadolinium-loaded gel scintillators for neutron and antineutrino detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, Catherine Lynn; Akers, Douglas William; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Paviet, Patricia Denise; Drigert, Mark William

    2016-11-29

    A gadolinium (Gd) loaded scintillation gel (Gd-ScintGel) compound allows for neutron and gamma-ray detection. The unique gel scintillator encompasses some of the best features of both liquid and solid scintillators, yet without many of the disadvantages associated therewith. Preferably, the gel scintillator is a water soluble Gd-DTPA compound and water soluble fluorophores such as: CdSe/ZnS (or ZnS) quantum dot (Q-dot) nanoparticles, coumarin derivatives 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin-3-acetic acid, 7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid, and Alexa Fluor 350 as well as a carbostyril compound, carbostyril 124 in a stable water-based gel, such as methylcellulose or polyacrylamide polymers. The Gd-loaded ScintGel allows for a homogenious distribution of the Gd-DTPA and the fluorophores, and yields clean fluorescent emission peaks. A moderator, such as deuterium or a water-based clear polymer, can be incorporated in the Gd-ScintGel. The gel scintillators can be used in compact detectors, including neutron and antineutrino detectors.

  10. Serum netrin-1 in relation to gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in early multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voortman, M M; Pekar, T; Bachmayer, D; Archelos, J-J; Stojakovic, T; Scharnagl, H; Ropele, S; Pichler, A; Enzinger, C; Fuchs, S; Fazekas, F; Seifert-Held, T; Khalil, M

    2017-01-01

    Netrin-1, a secreted laminin-related protein, is known to regulate not only axonal guidance and neuronal cell migration, but also blood-brain barrier integrity and inflammation. Two preliminary studies reported altered serum netrin-1 levels in multiple sclerosis; however, associations with longitudinal clinical and magnetic resonance imaging activity have not been investigated. We aimed to assess serum netrin-1 in multiple sclerosis and controls with respect to disease activity and its temporal dynamics. Serum netrin-1 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 79 patients with clinically isolated syndrome or multiple sclerosis, and 30 non-inflammatory neurological disease controls. In patients, serum samples were collected immediately prior to gadolinium-enhanced 3 T magnetic resonance imaging at two time points (initial contrast-enhancing gadolinium+ n = 47, non-enhancing gadolinium- n = 32; reference gadolinium- n = 70; median time-lag 1.4, interquartile range 1.0-2.3 years). Serum netrin-1 levels were similar in clinically isolated syndrome, multiple sclerosis and controls, and gadolinium+ and gadolinium- patients. Among gadolinium+ patients, serum netrin-1 was decreased in clinically active (n = 8) vs non-active patients (n = 39; p = 0.041). Serum netrin-1 showed no temporal dynamics in multiple sclerosis and was unrelated to clinical data. Serum netrin-1 levels show no multiple sclerosis specific changes and are not sensitive for detection of subclinical disease activity. Netrin-1 changes during relapses may deserve further examination.

  11. Central nervous system gadolinium accumulation in patients undergoing periodical contrast MRI screening for hereditary tumor syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergauwen, Evelynn; Vanbinst, Anne-Marie; Brussaard, Carola; Janssens, Peter; De Clerck, Dieter; Van Lint, Michel; Houtman, Anne C; Michel, Olaf; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Lefevere, Bieke; Bohler, Susanne; Michielsen, Dirk; Jansen, Anna C; Van Velthoven, Vera; Gläsker, Sven

    2018-01-01

    Patients with hereditary tumor syndromes undergo periodical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening with Gadolinium contrast. Gadolinium accumulation has recently been described in the central nervous system after repeated administrations. The prevalence and rate of accumulation in different subgroups of patients are unknown. Neither are the mechanism nor clinical impact. This may cause uncertainty about the screening. To explore the prevalence and rate of Gadolinium accumulation in different subgroups, we retrospectively analyzed MRIs of patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) and Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC). We determined the prevalence and rate of accumulation in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MRI from VHL and TSC patients. We compared the signal intensities of these regions to the signal intensity of the pons. We evaluated the impact of number of MRIs, kidney function and liver function on Gadolinium accumulation. Twenty eight VHL patients and 24 TSC patients were included. The prevalence of accumulation in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus increased linearly according to number of Gadolinium enhanced MRIs and was higher in the VHL group (100%). A significant linear correlation between number of MRIs and increased signal intensity was observed in the VHL group. Gadolinium accumulation occurs in almost all patients undergoing contrast MRI screening after >5 MRIs. We advocate a screening protocol for patients with hereditary tumor syndromes that minimizes the Gadolinium dose. This can be accomplished by using a single administration to simultaneously screen for brain, spine and/or abdominal lesions, using an MRI protocol focused on either VHL- or TSC-specific lesions. Higher prevalence and rate of accumulation in VHL patients may be explained by the typical vascular leakage accompanying central nervous system hemangioblastomas.

  12. Compensated gadolinium-loaded plastic scintillators for thermal neutron detection (and counting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Bertrand, Guillaume H. V.; Hamel, Matthieu; Sguerra, Fabien; Dehe-Pittance, Chrystele; Normand, Stephane [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs Architectures Electroniques, 99 Gif-sur-Yvette, (France); Mechin, Laurence [CNRS, UCBN, Groupe de Recherche en Informatique, Image, Automatique et Instrumentation de Caen, 4050 Caen, (France)

    2015-07-01

    Plastic scintillator loading with gadolinium-rich organometallic complexes shows a high potential for the deployment of efficient and cost-effective neutron detectors. Due to the low-energy photon and electron signature of thermal neutron capture by gadolinium-155 and gadolinium-157, alternative treatment to Pulse Shape Discrimination has to be proposed in order to display a trustable count rate. This paper discloses the principle of a compensation method applied to a two-scintillator system: a detection scintillator interacts with photon radiation and is loaded with gadolinium organometallic compound to become a thermal neutron absorber, while a non-gadolinium loaded compensation scintillator solely interacts with the photon part of the incident radiation. Posterior to the nonlinear smoothing of the counting signals, a hypothesis test determines whether the resulting count rate after photon response compensation falls into statistical fluctuations or provides a robust image of a neutron activity. A laboratory prototype is tested under both photon and neutron irradiations, allowing us to investigate the performance of the overall compensation system in terms of neutron detection, especially with regards to a commercial helium-3 counter. The study reveals satisfactory results in terms of sensitivity and orientates future investigation toward promising axes. (authors)

  13. The dosimetric impact of gadolinium-based contrast media in GBM brain patient plans for a MRI-Linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal Ahmad, Syed; Paudel, Moti Raj; Sarfehnia, Arman; Kim, Anthony; Pang, Geordi; Ruschin, Mark; Sahgal, Arjun; Keller, Brian M.

    2017-08-01

    Dosimetric effects of gadolinium based contrast media (Gadovist) were evaluated for the Elekta MRI linear accelerator using the research version of the Monaco treatment planning system (TPS). In order to represent a gadolinium uptake, the contrast was manually assigned to a phantom as well as to the gross tumour volume (GTV) of 6 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. A preliminary estimate of the dose enhancement, due to gadolinium, was performed using the phantom irradiated with a single beam. A more complicated assessment was performed for the GBM patients using a 7 field IMRT technique. The material table in Monaco was modified in order to identify the presence of a non-biological material. The dose distribution was modelled using GPUMCD (MC algorithm in Monaco) for an unmodified (or default) material table (DMT) as well as for a modified (or custom) material table (CMT) for both the phantom and patients. Various concentrations ranging between 8 and 157 mg ml-1 were used to represent the gadolinium uptake in the patient’s GTV. It was assumed that the gadolinium concentration remained the same for the entire course of radiation treatment. Results showed that at the tissue-Gadovist interface, inside the phantom, dose scored using the DMT was 7% lower compared to that using the CMT for 157 mg ml-1 concentration of gadolinium. Dosimetric differences in the case of the patient study were measured using the DVH parameters. D 50% was higher by 6% when the DMT was used compared to the CMT for dose modelling for a gadolinium concentration of 157 mg ml-1. This difference decreased gradually with decreasing concentration of gadolinium. It was concluded that dosimetric differences can be quantified in Monaco if the tumour-gadolinium concentration is more than 23 mg ml-1. If the gadolinium concentration is lower than 23 mg ml-1, then a correction for the presence of gadolinium may not be necessary in the TPS.

  14. Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography for Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Paul D.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Fowler, Sarah E.; Goodman, Lawrence R.; Gottschalk, Alexander; Hales, Charles A.; Hull, Russell D.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Leeper, Kenneth V.; Naidich, David P.; Sak, Daniel J.; Sostman, H. Dirk; Tapson, Victor F.; Weg, John G.; Woodard, Pamela K.

    2011-01-01

    Background The accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography and magnetic resonance venography for diagnosing pulmonary embolism has not been determined conclusively. Objective To investigate performance characteristics of magnetic resonance angiography, with or without magnetic resonance venography, for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Design Prospective, multicenter study from 10 April 2006 to 30 September 2008. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00241826) Setting 7 hospitals and their emergency services. Patients 371 adults with diagnosed or excluded pulmonary embolism. Measurements Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were measured by comparing independently read magnetic resonance imaging with the reference standard for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Reference standard diagnosis or exclusion was made by using various tests, including computed tomographic angiography and venography, ventilation–perfusion lung scan, venous ultra-sonography, D-dimer assay, and clinical assessment. Results Magnetic resonance angiography, averaged across centers, was technically inadequate in 25% of patients (92 of 371). The proportion of technically inadequate images ranged from 11% to 52% at various centers. Including patients with technically inadequate images, magnetic resonance angiography identified 57% (59 of 104) with pulmonary embolism. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography had a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 99%. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography and venography had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 96%, but 52% of patients (194 of 370) had technically inadequate results. Limitation A high proportion of patients with suspected embolism was not eligible or declined to participate. Conclusion Magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography should be considered only at centers that routinely perform it well and only for patients for whom standard tests are contraindicated. Magnetic

  15. Gadolinium-based contrast media may be nephrotoxic even at approved doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, Henrik S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Herlev Ringvej 75, 2730, Herlev (Denmark)

    2004-09-01

    It is generally believed that gadolinium-based contrast media are not nephrotoxic at the approved doses for MR (<0.3 mmol/kg body weight). Recently, a patient with diabetic nephropathy required dialysis because of anuria 6-7 days after MR angiography with 0.14 mmol/kg body weight gadolinium-DTPA-BMA to assess renal artery stenosis. No special precautions (e.g., hydration) had been taken. The serum creatinine levels had been within 200 and 300 {mu}mol/l for the last 3 years with a very slow increase. This case highlights that gadolinium-based contrast media can cause contrast medium-induced nephropathy even at doses below 0.2 mmol/kg body weight in patients with multiple risk factors. (orig.)

  16. Quantifying Gamma/Neutron Discrimination in Gadolinium-Rich Real-Time Neutron Detection Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Quantifying Gamma/Neutron Discrimination in Gadolinium- Rich Real-time Neutron Detection Materials and Devices Distribution Statement A. Approved...gadolinium- rich semiconducting materials by quantifying the responses to neutrons of these materials, alone and in simple device configurations. Both

  17. Actual clinical use of gadolinium-chelates for non-MRI applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strunk, Holger M.; Schild, H. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105, Bonn (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    For many years, alternatives to iodinated X-ray contrast media have been sought. Of the contrast media investigated to date, only CO{sub 2} and the gadolinium-chelates have been shown to be viable alternatives for selected X-ray examinations. Therefore, we have reviewed the general literature and that specific for gadopentetate (Magnevist) in particular, since this agent has been studied the most. This review indicates that diagnostic CT examinations can be achieved following the intravenous administration of gadolinium-containing contrast media (CM) for evaluation of aortic abnormalities. Gadolinium-containing CM at the dose approved for MR imaging are not useful for CT evaluation of the abdominal parenchymal organs. Intravenous/intraarterial injections have also been used in a variety of angiographic and interventional procedures. Image quality, however, is generally inferior to iodinated contrast media. Gadolinium-containing CM require no special handling and can be administered by hand injection or via conventional angiographic automated injectors with the same flow rates and pressures as are used with iodinated contrast media. For CT, a peripheral bolus injection of a diluted gadolinium agent (1:1 with saline) of 60-90 ml at 3-5 ml/s is usually performed. Similar to all other gadolinium-chelates, the non-MRI use of gadopentetate (Magnevist) is not approved by regulatory agencies. However, the literature suggests that a dose of 0.3-0.4 mmol/kg b.w. has been safely administered for CT as well as for angiography and interventional procedures intravenously and intraarterially. Even at this dose, though, this results in a relatively small overall volume to be injected, which limits utility somewhat. (orig.)

  18. A case report on a severe anaphylaxis reaction to Gadolinium-based MR contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Juil; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Chang Min; Yoon, Soon Ho; Lee, Whal; Kang, Hye Ryun; Choi, Young Hun [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Acute hypersensitivity reactions to gadolinium-based magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media have been shown to have a much lower incidence and they are generally milder in terms of severity than acute adverse reactions associated with the use of iodinated contrast media for computed tomography scans. However, even though it is rare, a severe hypersensitivity reaction to MR contrast media can occur. Here we present the case of a 66-year-old woman who experienced a severe hypersensitivity reaction after administration of gadolinium-based contrast media without a previous history of allergies.

  19. In vivo measurement of gadolinium concentration in a rat glioma model by monochromatic quantitative computed tomography: comparison between gadopentetate dimeglumine and gadobutrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Duc, Géraldine; Corde, Stéphanie; Charvet, Anne-Marie; Elleaume, Hélène; Farion, Régine; Le Bas, Jean-François; Estève, François

    2004-07-01

    Monochromatic quantitative computed tomography allows a nondestructive and quantitative measurement of gadolinium (Gd) concentration. This technique was used in the C6 rat glioma model to compare gadopentetate dimeglumine and gadobutrol. Rats bearing late-stage gliomas received 2.5 mmol/kg (392.5 mg Gd/kg) of gadopentetate dimeglumine (n = 5) and gadobutrol (n = 6) intravenously before the imaging session performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Monochromatic quantitative computed tomography enabled in vivo follow-up of Gd concentration as a function of time in specified regions of interest. Surprisingly, after gadobutrol injection, Gd concentrations in the center and periphery of the tumor were higher than those after gadopentetate injection, although identical in normal and contralateral area of the brain. The in vivo assessment of absolute Gd concentrations revealed differences in gadobutrol and gadopentetate dimeglumine behaviors in tumoral tissues despite injections in the same conditions. These differences might be attributed to different characteristics of the contrast agents.

  20. Gadolinium decreases inflammation related to myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolosi Alfred C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lanthanide cation, gadolinium (GdCl3 protects the myocardium against infarction following ischemia and reperfusion. Neutrophils and macrophages are the main leukocytes responsible for infarct expansion after reperfusion. GdCl3 interferes with macrophage and neutrophil function in the liver by decreasing macrophage secretion of inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration. We hypothesized that GdCl3 protects against ischemia and reperfusion injury by decreasing inflammation. We determined the impact of GdCl3 treatment for reperfusion injury on 1 circulating monoctye and neutrophil counts, 2 secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and 3 influx of monocytes and neutrophils into the myocardium. Methods Rats (n = 3-6/gp were treated with saline or GdCl3 (20 μmol/kg 15 min prior to a 30 min period of regional ischemia and 120 min reperfusion. Sham rats were not subject to ischemia. Blood was collected either after 30 min ischemia or 120 min reperfusion and hearts were harvested at 120 min reperfusion for tissue analysis. Blood was analyzed for leukocytes counts and cytokines. Tissue was analyzed for cytokines and markers of neutrophil and monocyte infiltration by measuring myeloperoxidase (MPO and α-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE. Results GdCl3 did not affect the number of circulating neutrophils prior to ischemia. Two hours reperfusion resulted in a 2- and 3- fold increase in circulating monocytes and neutrophils, respectively. GdCl3 decreased the number of circulating monocytes and neutrophils during reperfusion to levels below those present prior to ischemia. Furthermore, after 120 min of reperfusion, GdCl3 decreased ANAE and MPO activity in the myocardium by 1.9-fold and 6.5-fold respectively. GdCl3 decreased MPO activity to levels below those measured in the Sham group. Serum levels of the major neutrophil chemoattractant cytokine, IL-8 were increased from pre-ischemic levels during ischemia and reperfusion in both

  1. Hyperfine coupling in gadolinium-praseodymium alloys by specific heat measurements; Etude du couplage hyperfin dans les alliages gadolinium-praseodyme par mesures de chaleur specifique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-12-01

    We have studied the hyperfine coupling in gadolinium-praseodymium alloys by specific heat measurements down to 0.3 K. In the first part we describe the apparatus used to perform our measurements. The second part is devoted to some theoretical considerations. We have studied in detail the case of praseodymium which is an exception in the rare earth series. The third part shows the results we have obtained. (author) [French] Nous avons etudie le couplage hyperfin d'alliages de gadolinium-praseodyme par des mesures de chaleur specifique jusqu'a 0.3 K. Dans la premiere partie de cette etude nous decrivons le dispositif experimental. La deuxieme partie est consacree a des considerations theoriques. Nous avons etudie en detail le cas du praseodyme qui est une exception dans la serie des terres rares. La troisieme partie est consacree aux resultats experimentaux. (auteur)

  2. Gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography (Gd-MRA) of thoracic vasculature in an animal model using double-dose gadolinium and quiet breathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, R.J.; Strouse, P.J. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor (United States); Londy, F.J. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wakefield, T.W. [Dept. of Surgery, Section of Vascular Surgery, University of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Objective. To evaluate a gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography (Gd-MRA) imaging protocol for the assessment of thoracic vessels using double-dose gadolinium and quiet breathing. An animal model was used to simulate imaging in infants and young children. Material and methods. Six baboons (Papio anubis), mean weight 5.7 kg, were sedated and intubated. After the injection of double-dose Gd-DTPA (0.2 mmol/kg) through a peripheral vein, a coronal spoiled 3D gradient-echo volume acquisition was obtained during quiet breathing. Two radiologists reviewed the images for visualization of aortic arch, brachiocephalic vessel origins, pulmonary arteries (central, upper lobe and descending branches), and pulmonary veins (upper and lower). Results. Visualization was excellent for the aortic arch, brachiocephalic vessel origins, and pulmonary arteries, including the hilar branches. Visualization was excellent for the lower and right upper pulmonary veins and fair for the left upper pulmonary vein. There was excellent agreement between radiologists. Conclusion. Imaging of thoracic vessels with Gd-MRA using double gadolinium during quiet breathing was effective in our animal model. The advantages of this technique include a short imaging time and depiction of vascular segments - branches of pulmonary arteries and intraparenchymal segments of pulmonary veins - not optimally visualized with other non-invasive imaging techniques. (orig.)

  3. Solid solutions of gadolinium doped zinc oxide nanorods by combined microwave-ultrasonic irradiation assisted crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Armin; Dastafkan, Kamran; Obeydavi, Ali; Rahimi, Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    Nanocrystalline solid solutions consisting of un-doped and gadolinium doped zinc oxide nanorods were fabricated by a modified sol-gel process utilizing combined ultrasonic-microwave irradiations. Polyvinylpyrrolidone, diethylene glycol, and triethylenetetramine respectively as capping, structure directing, and complexing agents were used under ultrasound dynamic aging and microwave heating to obtain crystalline nanorods. Crystalline phase monitoring, lattice parameters and variation, morphology and shape, elemental analysis, functional groups, reducibility, and the oxidation state of emerged species were examined by PXRD, FESEM, TEM, EDX, FTIR, micro Raman, H2-TPR, and EPR techniques. Results have verified that irradiation mechanism of gelation and crystallization reduces the reaction time, augments the crystal quality, and formation of hexagonal close pack structure of Wurtzite morphology. Besides, dissolution of gadolinium within host lattice involves lattice deformation, unit cell distortion, and angular position variation. Structure related shape and growth along with compositional purity were observed through microscopic and spectroscopic surveys. Furthermore, TPR and EPR studies elucidated more detailed behavior upon exposure to the exerted irradiations and subsequent air-annealing including the formed oxidation states and electron trapping centers, presence of gadolinium, zinc, and oxygen disarrays and defects, as well as alteration in the host unit cell via gadolinium addition.

  4. Ionic Association and Electron Spin Relaxation Rates in Aquo Gadolinium(III) Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Sandip K.; Bryant, Robert G.

    1996-05-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance linewidth of aquo gadolinium(III) ion changes with the counter-ion identity and concentration in aqueous solutions. The EPR linewidth of 2 mMgadolinium(III) chloride increases from 49.2 to 89.0 mT when carbonate ion is added and decreases to 17.3 mT when nitrite ion is added. These observations suggest association reactions between aquo gadolinium(III) ion and anions that change the electron spin relaxation rates of the aquo ion. The concentration dependence of the gadolinium(III) EPR linewidth is consistent with binding constants for nitrite and nitrate ion with the aquo gadolinium(III) ion of 37 ± 6 and 2.3 ± 0.3 L mol-1respectively. The decreases in the EPR linewidth factors with these association reactions are difficult to understand unless the anion reactions increase the symmetry of the metal center. Although first-coordination reactions may not be ruled out, the decrease in EPR linewidth is more consistent with an outer-sphere association reaction that also reduces the coordination number of the metal center from 9 to 8.

  5. Gadolinium chloride as a contrast agent for imaging wood composite components by magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Chi-Leung So; Andrea Protti; Po-Wah So

    2009-01-01

    Although paramagnetic contrast agents have an established track record in medical uses of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), only recently has a contrast agent been used for enhancing MRI images of solid wood specimens. Expanding on this concept, wood veneers were treated with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and used in a model system comprising three-ply plywood...

  6. In vitro radiosensitizing effects of ultrasmall gadolinium based particles on tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowat, P; Mignot, A; Rima, W; Lux, F; Tillement, O; Roulin, C; Dutreix, M; Bechet, D; Huger, S; Humbert, L; Barberi-Heyob, M; Aloy, M T; Armandy, E; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C; Le Duc, G; Roux, S; Perriat, P

    2011-09-01

    Since radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment, it is essential to develop strategies which lower the irradiation burden while increasing efficacy and become efficient even in radio resistant tumors. Our new strategy is relying on the development of solid hybrid nanoparticles based on rare-earth such as gadolinium. In this paper, we then evidenced that gadolinium-based particles can be designed to enter efficiently into the human glioblastoma cell line U87 in quantities that can be tuned by modifying the incubation conditions. These sub-5 nm particles consist in a core of gadolinium oxide, a shell of polysiloxane and are functionalized by diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Although photoelectric effect is maximal in the [10-100 keV] range, such particles were found to possess efficient in-vitro radiosensitizing properties at an energy of 660 keV by using the "single-cell gel electrophoresis comet assay," an assay that measures the number of DNA damage that occurs during irradiation. Even more interesting, the particles have been evidenced by MTT assays to be also efficient radiosensitizers at an energy of 6 MeV for doses comprised between 2 and 8 Gy. The properties of the gadolinium-based particles give promising opening to a particle-assisted radio-therapy by using irradiation systems already installed in the majority of hospitals.

  7. Complications from the use of intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias Junior, Jorge; Santos, Antonio Carlos dos; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica]. E-mail: jejunior@fmrp.usp.br

    2008-07-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are much safer than the iodinated ones; however complications may occur and should be recognized for appropriate orientation and management. The total incidence of adverse reactions to contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging ranges between 2% and 4%. Cases of severe acute reactions to gadolinium, such as laryngospasm and anaphylactic shock, are rare. Chronic complications secondary to the use of gadolinium also can occur and, recently an association between its use and a rare dermatologic disease occurring in patients with renal failure has been reported. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was the subject of an official health notification issued by the American Food and Drug Administration. This progressive disease is characterized by hardened skin with fibrotic nodules and plaques which may involve other parts of the body. Patients who have been affected by this disorder presented chronic renal failure, with metabolic acidosis and had been submitted to magnetic resonance angiography, probably involving exposure to large amounts of intravenous paramagnetic contrast. This review is aimed at presenting a succinct description of the gadolinium-based contrast agent types, possible secondary complications, their preventive measures and management. (author)

  8. Automatic detection of gadolinium-enhancing multiple sclerosis lesions in brain MRI using conditional random fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Shah, Mohak; Francis, Simon J; Arnold, Douglas L; Collins, D Louis; Arbel, Tal

    2012-06-01

    Gadolinium-enhancing lesions in brain magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are of great interest since they are markers of disease activity. Identification of gadolinium-enhancing lesions is particularly challenging because the vast majority of enhancing voxels are associated with normal structures, particularly blood vessels. Furthermore, these lesions are typically small and in close proximity to vessels. In this paper, we present an automatic, probabilistic framework for segmentation of gadolinium-enhancing lesions in MS using conditional random fields. Our approach, through the integration of different components, encodes different information such as correspondence between the intensities and tissue labels, patterns in the labels, or patterns in the intensities. The proposed algorithm is evaluated on 80 multimodal clinical datasets acquired from relapsing-remitting MS patients in the context of multicenter clinical trials. The experimental results exhibit a sensitivity of 98% with a low false positive lesion count. The performance of the proposed algorithm is also compared to a logistic regression classifier, a support vector machine and a Markov random field approach. The results demonstrate superior performance of the proposed algorithm at successfully detecting all of the gadolinium-enhancing lesions while maintaining a low false positive lesion count.

  9. Effects of barium, lanthanum and gadolinium on endogenous chloride and potassium currents in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokimasa, T; North, R A

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of multivalent cations on membrane currents recorded from Xenopus oocytes were studied. 2. The hyperpolarization-activated chloride current was reversibly blocked by lanthanum; half-maximal block occurred at a concentration of 8 microM. Zinc, cadmium, cobalt and nickel were less potent than lanthanum, and gadolinium, manganese, barium and strontium had no effect at a concentration of 100 microM. 3. The calcium-activated chloride current was blocked by gadolinium (50 microM), and lanthanum, cadmium, cobalt, nickel and manganese were equally effective. The actions of gadolinium and lanthanum were almost irreversible, while partial (30-80%) recovery was observed with the other cations. Zinc (100 microM) had no effect. 4. In lanthanum (100 microM), membrane depolarizations from -70 mV activated an outward potassium current that was partially blocked by barium (0.1-2 mM). The barium-sensitive current was confined to potentials less negative than -70 mV. The current consisted of a time-independent as well as a time-dependent component, the latter of which had voltage dependence similar to the M-current. 5. It is proposed that lanthanum, gadolinium and barium can usefully separate these endogenous membrane currents in Xenopus oocytes. PMID:8930835

  10. Low Temperature Synthesis and Properties of Gadolinium-Doped Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Marina F. S.; P. R. Moraes, Leticia; Monteiro, Natalia K.

    2017-01-01

    Gadolinium-doped cerium oxide (GDC) is an attractive ceramic material for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) both as the electrolyte or in composite electrodes. The Ni/GDC cermet can be tuned as a catalytic layer, added to the conventional Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), for the internal steam r...

  11. Low Temperature Synthesis and Properties of Gadolinium-Doped Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, M. F. S.; Moraes, L. P. R.; Monteiro, N. K.

    2017-01-01

    Gadolinium-doped cerium oxide (GDC) is an attractive ceramic material for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) both as the electrolyte and in composite electrodes operating at low and intermediate temperatures. GDC exhibits high oxygen ion conductivity at a wide range of temperatures and displays a hig...

  12. Gadolinium retention in the body: what we know and what we can do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Enrico; Caranci, Ferdinando; Giordano, Flavio; Angelini, Valentina; Cocozza, Sirio; Brunetti, Arturo

    2017-08-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA), widely used in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for almost 30 years, were recently shown to be deposited in the brain and to induce persistent T1 shortening in deep gray matter structures in subjects with normal renal function. The aim of the present study is to summarize the evidence derived from the rapidly growing scientific literature on Gadolinium retention in the brain and in the rest of the body. To this end, the original articles that described imaging and pathology findings in humans and animals exposed to GBCA were reviewed. The main aspects that emerged were the different effects of linear and macrocyclic GBCA on brain MRI appearance, the evidence of Gadolinium tissue retention in multiple organs, and the debated issue of the possible clinical consequences. Although no adverse health effects have been documented so far, updated information about GBCA build-up in the body is necessary for health professionals, also in view of the increasing concern in the general population. To date, our knowledge about the mechanisms of Gadolinium tissue deposition and, above all, its long-term consequences is still largely incomplete. However, while official guidelines are eagerly awaited, some advices may already be given, to help our radiological daily practice.

  13. Clinical impact of gadolinium in the MRI diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H.; Young, Robert S.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2010-07-15

    The incremental value of gadolinium in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection by MRI is controversial. To compare diagnostic utility of noncontrast with contrast MRI in the evaluation of pediatric musculoskeletal infections. We reviewed 90 gadolinium-enhanced MRIs in children with suspected musculoskeletal infection. Noncontrast and contrast MRI scans were evaluated to determine sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection and identification of abscesses. Pre- and post-contrast diagnosis of osteomyelitis sensitivity was 89% and 91% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 96% and 96% (P = 1.00), respectively; septic arthritis sensitivity was 50% and 67% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 98% and 98% (P = 1.00), respectively; cellulitis/myositis sensitivity was 100% and 100% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 84% and 88% (P = 0.59), respectively; abscess for the total group was 22 (24.4%) and 42 (46.6%), respectively (P < 0.0001). Abscesses identified only on contrast sequences led to intervention in eight additional children. No child with a final diagnosis of infection had a normal pre-contrast study. Intravenous gadolinium should not be routinely administered in the imaging work-up of nonspinal musculoskeletal infections, particularly when pre-contrast images are normal. However, gadolinium contrast significantly increases the detection of abscesses, particularly small ones that might not require surgical intervention. (orig.)

  14. Gamma-ray rejection, or detection, with gadolinium as a converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandlakunta, Praneeth; Cao, Lei

    2012-09-01

    Gadolinium is a competent neutron conversion material for neutron detection due to its extremely high neutron capture cross section. It differs from the other neutron reactive materials by emitting large amounts of low-energy electrons for the consequent signal generation in a detector. Such low-energy electrons, though abundant, are prone to be contaminated by internal and/or external gamma rays, such as the activated 43.0 keV K-X rays, given the high atomic number of gadolinium. While the 43.0 keV K-X ray ought to be rejected as it originates in part from the external gamma rays when neutron detection is concerned, the ability to separate this energy line from other signals points to a practical mode of gamma-ray detection by a thin-film semiconductor with gadolinium as a converter. In this paper, a gamma-ray discrimination scheme for neutron detection is studied, which also provides insight into gamma-ray detection with a small semiconductor device with gadolinium as a converter, in line with the same principle of isolating the K-X rays activated by high- or medium-energy gamma rays.

  15. Relative Conspicuity of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents in Interventional Pain Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Timothy P; Schueler, Beth A; Magnuson, Dixon J; Magnuson, Dayne

    2017-04-01

    To assess the relative radiographic conspicuity of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) that may be used in spinal injection procedures when iodine-based contrast agents are contraindicated. Eight GBCAs and three iodinated agents of varying iodine concentrations were radiographed under conditions representative of lumbar spinal injections at four kilovoltage peak (kVp) values. Radiographic contrast of each agent was measured as the percent pixel value difference with respect to background. Gadobutrol (Gadovist, 1 mM/mL) had the highest radiographic contrast among the gadolinium agents tested. Measured radiographic contrast correlated with the molar concentration of gadolinium. Gadobutrol radiographic contrast lies between the contrast of iohexol concentrations of 240 and 140 mgI/mL. All agents have decreasing contrast as kVp increases, but GBCAs decrease less than iodine-based agents. Gadobutrol is the GBCA with the greatest conspicuity for use in spinal injection procedures. It also has the highest molar concentration of gadolinium, and potential neural toxicity from intrathecal delivery must be considered.

  16. Efficacy of gadolinium enhanced MR imaging for the diagnosis of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jee Eun; Kim, Hyung Sik [Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hye [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of gadolinium enhanced MR imaging for making the diagnosis of Legg-Calve-Perthes (LCP) disease. We studied the gadolinium enhanced MR images of 14 hips in 12 children who had the diagnosis of LCP disease. We retrospectively analyzed the extent of necrosis, the epiphyseal revascularization pathways and the metaphyseal changes. The absence of enhancement on gadolinium enhanced MRI was noted in all cases of LCP disease. Diffuse absence of enhancement was observed in 9 femoral epiphyses. Two of them showed normal bone marrow signal intensity on the T1 and T1-weighted images. Focal absence of enhancement was observed in 5 femoral epiphyses. Enhanced MRI showed better epiphyseal revascularization in the lateral column (five cases), in the lateral and medial columns (four cases) and in the transphyseal pathway (three cases). Metaphyseal change was observed in two cases. Gadolinium enhanced MRI allows detection of LCP disease and an accurate analysis of the different revascularization patterns, and this helpful for predicting the prognosis.

  17. Criticality experiments with low enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierman, S.R.; Murphy, E.S.; Clayton, E.D.; Keay, R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The results obtained in a criticality experiments program performed for British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. (BNFL) under contract with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved low enriched UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium, and are in direct support of BNFL plans to use soluble compounds of the neutron poison gadolinium as a primary criticality safeguard in the reprocessing of low enriched nuclear fuels. The experiments were designed primarily to provide data for validating a calculation method being developed for BNFL design and safety assessments, and to obtain data for the use of gadolinium as a neutron poison in nuclear chemical plant operations - particularly fuel dissolution. The experiments program covers a wide range of neutron moderation (near optimum to very under-moderated) and a wide range of gadolinium concentration (zero to about 2.5 g Gd/l). The measurements provide critical and subcritical k/sub eff/ data (1 greater than or equal to k/sub eff/ greater than or equal to 0.87) on fuel-water assemblies of UO/sub 2/ rods at two enrichments (2.35 wt % and 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U) and on mixed fuel-water assemblies of UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ rods containing 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U and 2 wt % PuO/sub 2/ in natural UO/sub 2/ respectively. Critical size of the lattices was determined with water containing no gadolinium and with water containing dissolved gadolinium nitrate. Pulsed neutron source measurements were performed to determine subcritical k/sub eff/ values as additional amounts of gadolinium were successively dissolved in the water of each critical assembly. Fission rate measurements in /sup 235/U using solid state track recorders were made in each of the three unpoisoned critical assemblies, and in the near-optimum moderated and the close-packed poisoned assemblies of this fuel.

  18. Gadolinium retention after administration of contrast agents based on linear chelators and the recommendations of the European Medicines Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Ilona A; Roos, Rick; van der Molen, Aart J

    2018-04-01

    The Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) earlier this year recommended to suspend some marketing authorisations for Gadolinium Containing Contrast Agents (GCCAs) based on linear chelators due to the potential risk of gadolinium retention in the human body. These recommendations have recently been re-evaluated by EMA's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP), and confirmed the final opinion of the European Medicines Agency. This editorial provides an overview of the available GCCAs and summarises the recent evidence of gadolinium retention. Moreover, a critical appraisal of the strengths and limitations of the scientific evidence currently available on gadolinium retention is given. • EMA recommended suspension of some EU marketing authorisations of four linear GCCAs. • Brain MRI findings indicating gadolinium retention have been confirmed by mass spectrometry. • Current scientific evidence for gadolinium retention has several methodological limitations. • No clear clinical evidence exists indicating that gadolinium retention causes neurotoxicity. • Long-term safety of GCCAs, however, remains unclear.

  19. MR imaging of hydrogel filament embolic devices loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide or gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killer, Monika; Schmitt, Anne [Paracelsus Medical University, Neuroscience Institute, Christian Doppler Clinic, Salzburg (Austria); Keeley, Edward M.; Cruise, Gregory M. [MicroVention Terumo, Tustin, CA (United States); McCoy, Mark R. [Paracelsus Medical University, Departments of Radiology and MRI, Christian Doppler Clinic, Salzburg (Austria)

    2011-06-15

    We evaluated hydrogel filaments loaded with barium sulphate and either gadolinium or superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) in an effort to develop an embolic material that is visible with fluoroscopic and magnetic resonance imaging. Hydrogel filaments were prepared with gadolinium and iron concentrations ranging from 1,500 to 7,500 and 500 to 2,500 ppm, respectively. The filaments were encased in agar and imaged using an MR scanner. Embolisation of eight aneurysms (seven bifurcation, one sidewall) in seven rabbits was performed using hydrogel filaments loaded with gadolinium (n = 4) or SPIO (n = 4). Angiographic evaluations occurred immediately post-treatment and at 13 weeks. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) evaluations occurred immediately post-treatment or 13 weeks post-treatment. Based on the in vitro results, we selected 4,500 and 2,000 ppm for gadolinium and iron loadings, respectively, for the in vivo experiments. Loading the filaments with gadolinium or SPIO did not affect the angiographic results, as embolic masses were readily evident with some distinguishing of individual filaments. In MRA, the hydrogel filaments loaded with SPIO were hypointense, and the hydrogel filaments loaded with Gd were hyperintense. The hyperintensity of the Gd-loaded filaments confounded the ability to distinguish between flow and the embolic devices. The hypointensity of the hydrogel filaments loaded with SPIO provided sufficient contrast between the embolic devices and the blood flow to allow of aneurysm occlusion evaluation using MRA. Based on these results, we are focusing on loading hydrogel filaments with SPIO in an effort to provide adequate visualisation for use in MR-guided interventions. (orig.)

  20. Exploring Late Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this viewpoint paper is to motivate a program of research on late globalization, a program that could eventually lead to one or more significant theories of late globalization. The paper explores the phenomenon of late globalization as well as the idea of “late” by drawing on sparse...... literature on late globalization from sociocultural and economic perspectives. It illustrates in a vignette the character and features of late globalization observable in the withdrawal from foreign locations or deinternationalization of universities, as late globalizing entitis. The paper discusses...... the range of constructs around the core idea of late globalization, generating questions for future work in a late globalization research program....

  1. Does high field MRI allow an earlier diagnosis of multiple sclerosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattjes, M.P.; Harzheim, M.; Lutterbey, G.G.; Hojati, F.; Simon, B.; Schmidt, S.; Schild, H.H.; Barkhof, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background :High field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides higher lesion load measurements in patients presenting with clinically isolated syndromes (CIS) suggestive of demyelination and has impact upon the classification of these syndromes and potentially, the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

  2. High-field magnetisation measurements on R sub 2 Fe sub 14 B single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhoef, R.; Franse, J.J.M.; Menovsky, A.A.; Radwanski, R.J. (Amsterdam Univ. (NL). Natuurkundig Lab.); Song-quan, J.; Fu-ming, Y. (Academia Sinica, Beijing (CN). Inst. of Physics); Li, H.S.; Gavigan, J.P. (Trinity Coll. Dublin (IE). Dept. of Pure and Applied Physics)

    1988-12-01

    High-field magnetisation measurements on single crystalline samples of Pr{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and Dy{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B are presented and discussed within a two-sublattice model. Special attention is given to the high-field part of the curves (B{sub o} > 20 T).

  3. High-field magnetic transition in Er sub 2 Fe sub 14 B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwanski, R.J.; Boer, F.R. de (Natuurkundig Lab., Univ. van Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Zhong, X.P.; Yang, F.M.; Li, J.Y. (Magnetism Lab., Inst. of Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing (China)); Kohashi, T.; Ono, M.; Date, M. (Dept. of Physics, Osaka Univ. (Japan)); Yamagishi, A. (Research Center for Extreme Materials, Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1991-10-01

    Field-induced transitions in quasi-ternary Er{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds have been revealed by means of magnetization measurements at high magnetic fields. The high-field studies for Er{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B, in particular the modest differential high-field susceptibility and the formation of a non-collinear magnetic structure at 42 T, do not confirm the substantial canted magnetic structure at low fields. (orig.).

  4. Studies on the reliability of high-field intra-operative MRI in brain glioma resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-jun SONG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the reliability of high-field intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging(iMRI in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.Method One hundred and thirty-one cases of brain glioma(69 males and 62 females,aged from 7 to 79 years with mean of 39.6 years hospitalized from Nov.2009 to Aug.2010 were involved in present study.All the patients were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging(MRI before the operation.The tumors were resected under conventional navigation microscope,and the high-field iMRI was used for all the patients when the operators considered the tumor was satisfactorily resected,while the residual tumor was difficult to detect under the microscope,but resected after being revealed by high-field iMRI.Histopathological examination was performed.The patients without residual tumors recieved high-field MRI scan at day 4 or 5 after operation to evaluate the accuracy of high-field iMRI during operation.Results High quality intra-operative images were obtained by using high-field iMRI.Twenty-eight cases were excluded because their residual tumors were not resected due to their location too close to functional area.Combined with the results of intra-operative histopathological examination and post-operative MRI at the early recovery stage,the sensitivity of high-field iMRI in residual tumor diagnosis was 98.0%(49/50,the specificity was 94.3%(50/53,and the accuracy was 96.1%(99/103.Conclusion High-quality intra-operative imaging could be acquired by high-field iMRI,which maybe used as a safe and reliable method in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.

  5. Gadolinium-based Contrast Media, Cerebrospinal Fluid and the Glymphatic System: Possible Mechanisms for the Deposition of Gadolinium in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoka, Toshiaki; Naganawa, Shinji

    2018-01-25

    After Kanda's first report in 2014 on gadolinium (Gd) deposition in brain tissue, a considerable number of studies have investigated the explanation for the observation. Gd deposition in brain tissue after repeated administration of gadolinium-based contrast medium (GBCM) has been histologically proven, and chelate stability has been shown to affect the deposition. However, the mechanism for this deposition has not been fully elucidated. Recently, a hypothesis was introduced that involves the 'glymphatic system', which is a coined word that combines 'gl' for glia cell and 'lymphatic' system. According to this hypothesis, the perivascular space functions as a conduit for cerebrospinal fluid to flow into the brain parenchyma. The perivascular space around the arteries allows cerebrospinal fluid to enter the interstitial space of the brain tissue through water channels controlled by aquaporin 4. The cerebrospinal fluid entering the interstitial space clears waste proteins from the tissue. It then flows into the perivascular space around the vein and is discharged outside the brain. In addition to the hypothesis regarding the glymphatic system, some reports have described that after GBCM administration, some of the GBCM distributes through systemic blood circulation and remains in other compartments including the cerebrospinal fluid. It is thought that the GBCM distributed into the cerebrospinal fluid cavity via the glymphatic system may remain in brain tissue for a longer duration compared to the GBCM in systemic circulation. Glymphatic system may of course act as a clearance system for GBCM from brain tissue. Based on these findings, the mechanism for Gd deposition in the brain will be discussed in this review. The authors speculate that the glymphatic system may be the major contributory factor to the deposition and clearance of gadolinium in brain tissue.

  6. Modular Carbon and Gold Nanoparticles for High Field MR Imaging and Theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammohan, Nikhil

    The ability to track labeled cancer cells in vivo would allow researchers to study their distribution, growth and metastatic potential within the intact organism. Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging is invaluable for tracking cancer cells in vivo as it benefits from high spatial resolution and absence of ionizing radiation. However, many MR contrast agents (CAs) required to label cells either do not significantly accumulate in cells or are not biologically compatible for translational studies. Accordingly, we have developed carbon- and gold-nanoparticles coupled to gadolinium(III) [Gd(III)] chelates for T1-weighted MR imaging that demonstrated remarkable properties for cell tracking in vitro and in vivo.. We created nanodiamond-Gd(III) aggregates (NDG) by peptide coupling Gd(III) chelates to aminated nanodiamonds. NDG had high relaxivity independent of field strength (unprecedented for Gd(III)-nanoparticle conjugates), and demonstrated a 300-fold increase in cellular delivery of Gd(III) compared to clinical Gd(III) chelates. Further, we were able to monitor the tumor growth of NDG-labeled flank tumors by T1-weighted MRI for 26 days in vivo, longer than reported for other MR CAs or nuclear agents. Further, theranostic nanodiamond-gadolinium(III)-doxorubicin (ND-Gd-Dox) aggregates were generated by conjugating doxorubicin (ND-Gd-Dox), which enabled efficient cancer chemotherapy in breast cancer cells. Further, we synthesized Gd(III)-gold nanoconjugates (Gd AuNPs) with varied chelate structure and nanoparticle-chelate linker length. Significantly enhanced cell labeling was demonstrated compared to previous gadolinium-gold-DNA nanoconstructs. Differences in Gd(III) loading, surface packing and cell uptake were observed between four different Gd AuNP formulations suggesting that linker length and surface charge play an important role in cell labeling. The best performing Gd AuNPs afforded 23.6 +/- 3.6 fmol of Gd(III) per cell at an incubation concentration of 27.5 micro

  7. Age-Related Vascular Changes in the Epiphysis, Physis, and Metaphysis: Normal Findings on Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI of Piglets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jaramillo, Diego; Villegas-Medina, Olga L; Doty, David K; Rivas, Roberto; Strife, Katherine; Dwek, Jerry R; Mulkern, Robert V; Shapiro, Frederic

    2004-01-01

    .... We sought to study the normal enhancement patterns seen on MRIs of the epiphysis, physis, and metaphysis and age-related vascular changes in piglets using gadoteridol, a nonionic gadolinium chelate...

  8. Standard test methods for chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) powder

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide powders to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Carbon by Direct CombustionThermal Conductivity C1408 Test Method for Carbon (Total) in Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets By Direct Combustion-Infrared Detection Method Total Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis Ion Selective Electrode C1502 Test Method for Determination of Total Chlorine and Fluorine in Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinium Oxide Loss of Weight on Ignition 7-13 Sulfur by CombustionIodometric Titration Impurity Elements by a Spark-Source Mass Spectrographic C761 Test Methods for Chemical, Mass Spectrometric, Spectrochemical,Nuclear, and Radiochemical Analysis of Uranium Hexafluoride C1287 Test Method for Determination of Impurities In Uranium Dioxide By Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Gadolinium Content in Gadolinium Oxid...

  9. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dGEMRIC) of Hip Joint Cartilage: Better Cartilage Delineation after Intra-Articular than Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M.; Jensen, K.E.; Quistgaard, E.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate and compare delayed gadolinium (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the hip joint using intravenous (i.v.) or ultrasound-guided intra-articular (i.a.) Gd-DTPA injection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 10 patients (50% males, mean age 58......: The dGEMRIC MRI method markedly improved delineation of hip joint cartilage compared to non-enhanced MRI. The i.a. Gd-DTPA provided the best cartilage delineation. dGEMRIC is a clinically applicable MRI method that may improve identification of early subtle cartilage damage and the accuracy of volume...... measurements of hip joint cartilage....

  10. Adenosine Stress and Rest T1 Mapping Can Differentiate Between Ischemic, Infarcted, Remote, and Normal Myocardium Without the Need for Gadolinium Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Alexander; Wijesurendra, Rohan S; Francis, Jane M; Robson, Matthew D; Neubauer, Stefan; Piechnik, Stefan K; Ferreira, Vanessa M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of T1 mapping at rest and during adenosine stress as a novel method for ischemia detection without the use of gadolinium contrast. In chronic coronary artery disease (CAD), accurate detection of ischemia is important because targeted revascularization improves clinical outcomes. Myocardial blood volume (MBV) may be a more comprehensive marker of ischemia than myocardial blood flow. T1 mapping using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is highly sensitive to changes in myocardial water content, including MBV. We propose that T1 mapping at rest and during adenosine vasodilatory stress can detect MBV changes in normal and diseased myocardium in CAD. Twenty normal controls (10 at 1.5-T; 10 at 3.0-T) and 10 CAD patients (1.5-T) underwent conventional CMR to assess for left ventricular function (cine), infarction (late gadolinium enhancement [LGE]) and ischemia (myocardial perfusion reserve index [MPRI] on first-pass perfusion imaging during adenosine stress). These were compared to novel pre-contrast stress/rest T1 mapping using the Shortened Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery technique, which is heart rate independent. T1 values were derived for normal myocardium in controls and for infarcted, ischemic, and remote myocardium in CAD patients. Normal myocardium in controls (normal wall motion, MPRI, no LGE) showed normal resting T1 (954 ± 19 ms at 1.5-T; 1,189 ± 34 ms at 3.0-T) and significant positive T1 reactivity during adenosine stress compared to baseline (6.2 ± 0.5% at 1.5-T; 6.3 ± 1.1% at 3.0-T; all p Infarcted myocardium showed the highest resting T1 of all tissue classes (1,442 ± 84 ms), without significant T1 reactivity (0.2 ± 1.5%). Ischemic myocardium showed elevated resting T1 compared to normal (987 ± 17 ms; p T1 reactivity (0.2 ± 0.8%). Remote myocardium, although having comparable resting T1 to normal (955 ± 17 ms; p = 0.92), showed blunted T1 reactivity (3.9 ± 0.6%; p T1 mapping at rest and

  11. High-field EPR spectroscopy applied to biological systems: characterization of molecular switches for electron and ion transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, K; Savitsky, A; Schnegg, A; Plato, M; Fuchst, M

    2005-01-07

    The last decade witnessed a tremendous growth in combined efforts of biologists, chemists and physicists to understand the dominant factors determining the specificity and directionality of transmembrane transfer processes in proteins. A large variety of experimental techniques is being used including X-ray and neutron diffraction, but also time-resolved optical, infrared and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This is done in conjunction with genetic engineering strategies to construct site-specific mutants for controlled modification of the proteins. As a general perception of these efforts, the substantial influence of weak interactions within the protein and its membrane interfaces is recognized. The weak interactions are subject to subtle changes during the reaction cycle owing to the inherent flexibility of the protein-membrane complex. Specific conformational changes accomplish molecular-switch functions for the transfer process to proceed with optimum efficiency. Characteristic examples of time varying non-bonded interactions are specific H-patterns and/or polarity effects of the microenvironment. The present perception has emerged from the coupling of newly developed spectroscopic techniques - and advanced EPR certainly deserves credit in this respect - with newly developed computational strategies to interpret the experimental data in terms of protein structure and dynamics. By now, the partners of this coupling, particularly high-field EPR spectroscopy and DFT-based quantum theory, have reached a level of sophistication that applications to large biocomplexes are within reach. In this review, a few large paradigm biosystems are surveyed which were explored lately in our laboratory. Taking advantage of the improved spectral and temporal resolution of high-frequency/high-field EPR at 95 GHz/3.4 T and 360 GHz/12.9 T, as compared to conventional X-band EPR (9.5 GHz/0.34 T), three biosystems are characterized with respect to structure and dynamics: (1) Light

  12. Study of Gadolinium-doped cerium oxide by XRD, TG-DTA, impedance analysis, and positron lifetime spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, S; Kosaka, T [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Gakugei University, Nukuikita 4-1-1, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Sato, K, E-mail: tkosaka@u-gakugei.ac.j [Department of Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Nukuikita 4-1-1, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan)

    2010-04-01

    X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry differential thermal analysis, impedance analysis, and positron lifetime spectroscopy were conducted for Gadolinium-doped cerium oxides (GDC) prepared using oxalate coprecipitation method. XRD revealed the fluorite structure indicating that gadolinium is successfully doped into cerium oxide. Prior to sintering, the vacancy-sized free volume and nanovoid were observed at grain boundaries. The vacancy-sized free volumes shrank with increasing sintering temperatures and finally got dominant.

  13. Feasibility and accuracy of dual-layer spectral detector computed tomography for quantification of gadolinium: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamersvelt, Robbert W. van; Willemink, Martin J.; Jong, Pim A. de; Schilham, Arnold M.R.; Leiner, Tim [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Milles, Julien [CT Clinical Science, Philips HealthCare, Best (Netherlands); Vlassenbroek, Alain [CT Clinical Science, Philips HealthCare, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-09-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of dual-layer spectral detector CT (SDCT) for the quantification of clinically encountered gadolinium concentrations. The cardiac chamber of an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom was equipped with 14 tubular inserts containing different gadolinium concentrations, ranging from 0 to 26.3 mg/mL (0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.1, 10.6, 15.7, 20.7 and 26.3 mg/mL). Images were acquired using a novel 64-detector row SDCT system at 120 and 140 kVp. Acquisitions were repeated five times to assess reproducibility. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on three slices per insert. A spectral plot was extracted for every ROI and mean attenuation profiles were fitted to known attenuation profiles of water and pure gadolinium using in-house-developed software to calculate gadolinium concentrations. At both 120 and 140 kVp, excellent correlations between scan repetitions and true and measured gadolinium concentrations were found (R > 0.99, P < 0.001; ICCs > 0.99, CI 0.99-1.00). Relative mean measurement errors stayed below 10% down to 2.0 mg/mL true gadolinium concentration at 120 kVp and below 5% down to 1.0 mg/mL true gadolinium concentration at 140 kVp. SDCT allows for accurate quantification of gadolinium at both 120 and 140 kVp. Lowest measurement errors were found for 140 kVp acquisitions. (orig.)

  14. Biocompatible Polyhydroxyethylaspartamide-based Micelles with Gadolinium for MRI Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hyo Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biocompatible poly-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl-d,l-aspartamide]-methoxypoly(ethyleneglycol-hexadecylamine (PHEA-mPEG-C16 conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecan-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-gadolinium (DOTA-Gd via ethylenediamine (ED was synthesized as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. Amphiphilic PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd forms micelle in aqueous solution. All the synthesized materials were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR. Micelle size and shape were examined by dynamic light scattering (DLS and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Micelles with PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd showed higher relaxivities than the commercially available gadolinium contrast agent. Moreover, the signal intensity of a rabbit liver was effectively increased after intravenous injection of PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd.

  15. Gadolinium-DOTA enhanced MRI of painful osseous crises in children with sickle cell anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnerot, V. (Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital des Enfants Malades, 75 - Paris (France)); Sebag, G. (Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital des Enfants Malades, 75 - Paris (France)); Montalembert, M. de (Dept. of Pediatric Hematology, Hopital des Enfants Malades, 75 - Paris (France)); Wioland, M. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hopital Saint-Antoine, 75 - Paris (France)); Glorion, C. (Dept. of Orthopedics, Hopital des Enfants Malades, 75 - Paris (France)); Girot, R. (Dept. of Pediatric Hematology, Hopital des Enfants Malades, 75 - Paris (France)); Lallemand, D. (Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital des Enfants Malades, 75 - Paris (France))

    1994-04-01

    In order to evaluate the role of gadolinium-DOTA enhanced MRI in the management of painful osseous crises in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA), nine children with SCA underwent MRI, bone scans and ultrasonographic studies during 11 osseous crises. Imaging findings were compared with the final diagnosis: three acute osteomyelitis (AO) and 16 acute infarcts (AI). MRI could not differentiate AO from AI. The appearance of severe AI was very misleading and was similar to the usual appearance of AO, including soft tissue changes, periosteal reaction and patterns of enhancement. Gadolinium-DOTA enhanced MRI was useful for determining the anatomic site and extent of AO or AI and for distinguishing between necrotic material, fluid collection and vascularized inflammatory tissue. It can also help to guide the aspiration of intraosseous, subperiosteal and soft tissue fluid collections. (orig.)

  16. 4f hybridization and band dispersion in gadolinium thin films and compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komesu, Takashi; Jeong, H.K.; Dowben, P.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States); Wooton, David; Petrosky, J. [Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States); Losovyj, Ya.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States); Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Crain, J.N.; Himpse, F.J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Bissen, M. [Synchrotron Radiation Center, Stoughton, WI (United States); Tang, Jinke; Wang, Wendong [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Yakovkin, I.N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Institute of Physics, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2009-05-15

    There is interplay between intra-atomic orbital hybridization and extra-atomic hybridization in various gadolinium systems, which affects magnetic coupling and electron itinerancy (localization). The results do not always follow expectation. The experimental band structure of thin Gd(0001) films, grown on the Mo(112) surface, along the anti {gamma}- anti M does not agree with expectations even qualitatively. In particular, the dispersion of the gadolinium band, with strong 5d weight near 2 eV binding energy provides considerable evidence to support the case for 4f-5d hybridization, with increasing 5d localization. On the other hand, there is also evidence of extra-atomic Gd 4f hybridization leading band dispersion in the occupied 4f levels in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Renal function, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and other adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canga, Ana; Kislikova, Maria; Martínez-Gálvez, María; Arias, Mercedes; Fraga-Rivas, Patricia; Poyatos, Cecilio; de Francisco, Angel L M

    2014-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder that affects patients with impaired renal function and is associated with the administration of gadolinium-based contrast media used in MRI. Despite being in a group of drugs that were considered safe, report about this potentially serious adverse reaction was a turning point in the administration guidelines of these contrast media. There has been an attempt to establish safety parameters to identify patients with risk factors of renal failure. The close pharmacovigilance and strict observation of current regulations, with special attention being paid to the value of glomerular filtration, have reduced the published cases involving the use of gadolinium-based contrast media. In a meeting between radiologists and nephrologists we reviewed the most relevant aspects currently and recommendations for its prevention.

  18. Free Volumes Associated with Sintering in Gadolinium Doped Ceria Solid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Kosaka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC solid solution prepared by the oxalate coprecipitation method is investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, complex impedance analysis, and positron lifetime spectroscopy. XRD reveals an expansion of GDC lattice constant by doping gadolinium into a ceria host crystal, in agreement with an oxygen vacancy model. The ionic conductivity of GDC measured at 773 K in air is two orders of magnitude higher than that of undoped ceria. Positron lifetime spectroscopy reveals the presence of vacancy-sized free volumes and nanovoids in interfaces among crystallites. It is found that the vacancy-sized free volumes shrink with increasing sintering temperatures. In the present paper, recent advances in the studies of GDC by XRD, complex impedance measurement, and positron lifetime spectroscopy are reviewed to gain an insight into the sintering mechanism.

  19. Thermodynamic property evaluation and magnetic refrigeration cycle analysis for gadolinium gallium garnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, R.W.

    1994-12-01

    Based on relevant material property data and previous model formulations, a magnetothermodynamic property map for gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}) was adapted for refrigeration cycle analysis in the temperature range 4-40 K and the magnetic field range 0-6 T. Employing methods similar to those previously developed for other materials and temperature ranges, assessments of limitations and relative performance were made for Carnot, ideal regenerative, and pseudo-constant field regenerative cycles. It was found that although Carnot cycle limitations on available temperature lift for gadolinium gallium garnet are not as severe as the limitations for materials previously examined, considerable improvement in cooling capacity and temperature lift combinations can be achieved by using regenerative cycles if serious loss mechanisms are avoided.

  20. First measurements with new high-resolution gadolinium-GEM neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Birch, Jens; Etxegarai, Maddi; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Höglund, Carina; Hultman, Lars; Llamas-Jansa, Isabel; Oliveri, Eraldo; Oksanen, Esko; Robinson, Linda; Ropelewski, Leszek; Schmidt, Susann; Streli, Christina; Thuiner, Patrik

    2016-05-17

    European Spallation Source instruments like the macromolecular diffractometer, NMX, require an excellent neutron detection efficiency, high-rate capabilities, time resolution, and an unprecedented spatial resolution in the order of a few hundred micrometers over a wide angular range of the incoming neutrons. For these instruments solid converters in combination with Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) are a promising option. A GEM detector with gadolinium converter was tested on a cold neutron beam at the IFE research reactor in Norway. The {\\mu}TPC analysis, proven to improve the spatial resolution in the case of $^{10}$B converters, is extended to gadolinium based detectors. For the first time, a Gd-GEM was successfully operated to detect neutrons with an estimated efficiency of 10% at a wavelength of 2 {\\AA} and a position resolution better than 350 {\\mu}m.

  1. Gadolinium-DTPA: value in MR imaging of extraspinal musculoskeletal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, M.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Sharif, H.S. [Dept. of Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Aabed, M.Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al Shahed, M.S. [Dept. of Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Sammak, B.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Clark, D.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1993-12-01

    To determine if paramagnetic contrast agents can improve the detection, delineation, and characterization of extraspinal musculoskeletal infections (MSI) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, 42 patients with clinical suspicion of MSI underwent MR imaging before and after intravenous administration of gadolinium-DTPA. The lesions consisted of 27 proven infections and 15 noninfective conditions. Specificity and accuracy in identifying infective lesions averaged 80% and 84%, respectively, on precontrast studies and 80% and 89% on the enhanced examinations, with no statistically significant difference. Rim enhancement around abscess loculi was the only pathognomonic sign of infection seen in ten patients with chronic osteomyelitis and pyogenic or tuberculous infections. In 17 patients with acute osteomyelitis, brucellosis, or mycetoma, detection and delineation of the lesions were best on precontrast studies, while postcontrast examinations resulted in underestimation of the extent of abnormalities in all cases. We conclude that intravenous gadolinium-DTPA has limited usefulness in the MR evaluation of extraspinal MSI. (orig.)

  2. Trimodal Gadolinium-Gold Microcapsules Containing Pancreatic Islet Cells Restore Normoglycemia in Diabetic Mice and Can Be Tracked by Using US, CT, and Positive-Contrast MR Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Dian R.; Long, Christopher M.; Gilad, Assaf A.; Alric, Christophe; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier; Link, Thomas W.; Arepally, Aravind; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop microcapsules that immunoprotect pancreatic islet cells for treatment of type I diabetes and enable multimodal cellular imaging of transplanted islet cells. Materials and Methods: All animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with DTDTPA (dithiolated diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid):gadolinium chelates (GG) were coencapsulated with pancreatic islet cells by using protamine sulfate as a clinical-grade alginate cross linker. Conventional poly-l-lysine–cross-linked microcapsules and unencapsulated islets were included as controls. The viability and glucose responsiveness of islet cells were assessed in vitro, and in vivo insulin (C-peptide) secretion was monitored for 6 weeks in (streptozotocin-induced) diabetic mice with (n = 7) or without (n = 8) intraabdominally engrafted islet cells. Five nondiabetic mice were included as controls. Differences between samples were calculated by using a nonparametric Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney method. To adjust for multiple comparisons, a significance level of P microcapsules could be readily visualized with positive-contrast high-field-strength MR imaging, micro-CT, and US both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: Cell encapsulation with GG provides a means of trimodal noninvasive tracking of engrafted cells. © RSNA, 2011 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11101608/-/DC1 PMID:21734156

  3. Sensitive and transportable gadolinium-core plastic scintillator sphere for neutron detection and counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Carrel, Frédérick; Corre, Gwenolé; Normand, Stéphane [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs Architectures Electroniques, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Méchin, Laurence [CNRS, UCBN, Groupe de Recherche en Informatique, Image, Automatique et Instrumentation de Caen, 14050 Caen (France); Hamel, Matthieu [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs Architectures Electroniques, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-08-21

    Neutron detection forms a critical branch of nuclear-related issues, currently driven by the search for competitive alternative technologies to neutron counters based on the helium-3 isotope. The deployment of plastic scintillators shows a high potential for efficient detectors, safer and more reliable than liquids, more easily scalable and cost-effective than inorganic. In the meantime, natural gadolinium, through its 155 and mostly 157 isotopes, presents an exceptionally high interaction probability with thermal neutrons. This paper introduces a dual system including a metal gadolinium core inserted at the center of a high-scale plastic scintillator sphere. Incident fast neutrons are thermalized by the scintillator shell and then may be captured with a significant probability by gadolinium 155 and 157 nuclei in the core. The deposition of a sufficient fraction of the capture high-energy prompt gamma signature inside the scintillator shell will then allow discrimination from background radiations by energy threshold, and therefore neutron detection. The scaling of the system with the Monte Carlo MCNPX2.7 code was carried out according to a tradeoff between the moderation of incident fast neutrons and the probability of slow neutron capture by a moderate-cost metal gadolinium core. Based on the parameters extracted from simulation, a first laboratory prototype for the assessment of the detection method principle has been synthetized. The robustness and sensitivity of the neutron detection principle are then assessed by counting measurement experiments. Experimental results confirm the potential for a stable, highly sensitive, transportable and cost-efficient neutron detector and orientate future investigation toward promising axes.

  4. Magnetic moments in a gadolinium iron garnet studied by soft-X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudolf, P.; Sette, F.; Tjeng, L.H.; Meigs, G.; Chen, C.T.

    1992-01-01

    The magnetic moments of Gd and Fe in gadolinium iron garnet (Gd3Fe5O12) were probed at 77 and 300 K by soft-X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (SXMCD) measurements at the GdMa4,5 and at the FeL2,3 absorption edges. The SXMCD signal at each edge allows one to independently determine the magnetic

  5. Macroscopic and Microscopic Investigation of Densification Behavior for Gadolinium-doped Ceria upon Sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosaka, T [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Gakugei University, Nukuikita 4-1-1, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Sato, K, E-mail: tkosaka@u-gakugei.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Nukuikita 4-1-1, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    The densification behaviour of Gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) upon sintering is investigated from macroscopic and microscopic points of view. The time-resolved length-change measurement with high-resolution dilatometry and positron lifetime spectroscopy are conducted. Positron lifetime spectroscopy reveals the presence of nanovoids at grain boundaries in GDC. Time-dependent length-change measurement reveals that particle rearrangement occurs at the initial stage of sintering. Densifications at the sintering neck and inside the particle grain are discussed.

  6. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging in active and inactive immunoinflammatory gonarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Lorenzen, I; Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic T1-weighted FLASH MR imaging, obtained just after i.v. gadopentetate dimeglumine injection, and pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted spin-echo (T1-SE) MR imaging were performed to compare their information value with respect to inflammatory activity in immunoinflammatory gonarthritis. We exa...... of synovium could differentiate between healthy and arthritic knees. Gadolinium-enhanced dynamic FLASH imaging may provide clinically useful information about the actual inflammatory activity of arthritic joints....

  7. Gadolinium thin films as benchmark for magneto-caloric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Lars; Bartke, Marianne; Teichert, Niclas; Schleicher, Benjamin; Fähler, Sebastian; Hütten, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    We report on the preparation of Gadolinium thin films by means of sputter deposition on Silicon Oxide wafers. A series of samples with different buffer layers and various substrate temperatures has been produced. The film on an amorphous Tantalum buffer deposited at 773 K shows the highest increase of magnetization during the phase transition at the Curie temperature. Further detailed analysis of the magnetic properties has been conducted by VSM.

  8. Quantitative assessment of gadolinium deposition in dentate nucleus using quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinoda, Takuya; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Okada, Tomohisa; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Liu, Chunlei; Yamamoto, Akira; Okada, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2017-05-01

    Gadolinium deposition in dentate nucleus (DN) has been reported after serial administration of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). Gadolinium complexes have paramagnetic properties; therefore, we evaluated susceptibility changes of gadolinium deposition in DN using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) for patients after serial administration of GBCAs. In all, 48 patients with brain tumors, who had had serial GBCA administrations (GBCA group), and 48 healthy volunteers without any history of GBCA administrations (non-GBCA group) were enrolled in this study. Susceptibility values in DN on QSM and DN-to-cerebellum signal intensity ratios on unenhanced T1 -weighted images (T1 ratios) on 3T were analyzed. The relationship between the number of times of GBCA administrations and susceptibility values or T1 ratios were evaluated in the GBCA group. Susceptibility values at DN in the GBCA group were 0.107 ± 0.029 ppm, and significantly higher than those of the non-GBCA group (0.079 ± 0.025 ppm) (P T1 ratios in DN of the GBCA group were 1.059 ± 0.070, and also significantly higher than that of the non-GBCA group (0.993 ± 0.016) (P T1 ratios and the number of times of linear GBCA administration, as reported previously (ρ = 0.76, P < 0.0001). Susceptibility values on QSM in DN of the GBCA group, after serial administration of GBCAs, were significantly higher than those of the non-GBCA group. Evidence Level: 3 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;45:1352-1358. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Gadolinium in pediatric cardiovascular magnetic resonance: what we know and how we practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Howard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF has led to a heightened awareness towards patients’ renal function. Whereas detailed guidelines exist for the use of GBCAs in adult patients, best practice is less well defined in children, especially in the very young. We aimed at identifying current practice with regards to the use of GBCAs in children who undergo Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance. Methods We conducted a worldwide survey among cardiac imagers with pediatric expertise. The questionnaire contained 21 questions covering the imagers’ work environments, GBCAs used, monitoring of renal function, and a special emphasis was placed on the practice in neonates. Results The survey yielded 70 replies. The single most commonly used GBCA was gadopentetate dimeglumine 34/70 (49%. Among the respondents, the choice of GBCA was more importantly based on availability 26/70 (37% and approval by a pharmaceutical licensing body that most closely reflects the indication 16/70 (23% than image quality 7/70 (10% and side effect profile 8/70 (11%. 55/70 (79% of respondents performed scans in neonates 2 62/70 (89% of respondents do not administer gadolinium at all. The single most common side effect of gadolinium was noted to be nausea/emesis 34/57 (60% followed by discomfort at injection site 17/57 (30%. Conclusions Cardiac imagers are aware of the immature renal function and physiological differences of their pediatric patients that place them at risk for NSF. Epidemiological data is needed for pediatric cardiovascular licensure of gadolinium compounds and for the creation of practice guidelines which will replace current-day practice based on individual clinical judgment.

  10. Electron spin resonance absorption spectrum of trivalent gadolinium in the oxide YAIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, S.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Marshall, T.; Serway, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    The electron spin resonance absorption spectrum of trivalent gadolinium in single crystals of yttrium-aluminium garnet is re-investigated at X-band and Q-band wavelengths. Fine structure spectral parameters deduced from Q-band wavelength measurements are found to predict satisfactorily spectral observations at both wavelengths. A list of spectral parameters deduced from data taken at 77/sup 0/K is given.

  11. Study on the thermodynamics of the gadolinium-hydrogen binary system (H/Gd = 0.0–2.0) and implications to metallic gadolinium purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Kai; Li, Guoling [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, NO. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Jigang [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Yang [Department of Food Science, College of Arts and Science, Beijing Union University, Beijing, 100101 (China); Tian, Wenhuai, E-mail: wenhuaitian@ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, NO. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Zheng, Jie [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Xingguo, E-mail: xgli@pku.edu.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-07-15

    The thermodynamics of the gadolinium-hydrogen (Gd–H) binary system (H/Gd = 0.0–2.0) between 650 and 900 °C is studied by pressure composition isotherm measurement. Significant H dissolution in Gd is observed, up to H/Gd = 0.34 at 650 °C and 0.55 at 900 °C. The metal-rich phase boundary of nonstoichiometric gadolinium dihydride was found to occur with nominal composition of GdH{sub 1.80} at 650 °C and GdH{sub 1.53} at 900 °C. The results are in fairly good agreement with previous experimental work but with improved accuracy. The binary phase diagram is obtained using the CALPHAD method. The thermodynamic study here assists the understanding on the efficient deoxygenation effect by the H in Gd for Gd purification. - Highlights: • PCI measurements with high accuracy has been carried out. • A first assessment of Gd–H system has been carried out by the CALPHAD method. • A set of self-consistent thermodynamic parameters was derived for this system.

  12. High Field Linear Magnetoresistance Sensors with Perpendicular Anisotropy L10-FePt Reference Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High field linear magnetoresistance is an important feature for magnetic sensors applied in magnetic levitating train and high field positioning measurements. Here, we investigate linear magnetoresistance in Pt/FePt/ZnO/Fe/Pt multilayer magnetic sensor, where FePt and Fe ferromagnetic layers exhibit out-of-plane and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, respectively. Perpendicular anisotropy L10-FePt reference layer with large coercivity and high squareness ratio was obtained by in situ substrate heating. Linear magnetoresistance is observed in this sensor in a large range between +5 kOe and −5 kOe with the current parallel to the film plane. This L10-FePt based sensor is significant for the expansion of linear range and the simplification of preparation for future high field magnetic sensors.

  13. Nb3Sn High Field Magnets for the High Luminosity LHC Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, Giorgio

    2015-06-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN requires a new generation of high field superconducting magnets. High field large aperture quadrupoles (MQXF) are needed for the low-beta triplets close to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, and high field two-in-one dipoles (11 T dipoles) are needed to make room for additional collimation. The MQXF quadrupoles, with a field gradient of 140 T/m in 150 mm aperture, have a peak coil field of 12.1 T at nominal current. The 11 T dipoles, with an aperture of 60 mm, have a peak coil field of 11.6 T at nominal current. Both magnets require Nb3Sn conductor and are the first applications of this superconductor to actual accelerator magnets.

  14. Gadolinium prevents high airway pressure-induced permeability increases in isolated rat lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J C; Ivey, C L; Tucker, J A

    1998-04-01

    To determine the initial signaling event in the vascular permeability increase after high airway pressure injury, we compared groups of lungs ventilated at different peak inflation pressures (PIPs) with (gadolinium group) and without (control group) infusion of 20 microM gadolinium chloride, an inhibitor of endothelial stretch-activated cation channels. Microvascular permeability was assessed by using the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), a measure of capillary hydraulic conductivity. Kfc was measured after ventilation for 30-min periods with 7, 20, and 30 cmH2O PIP with 3 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure and with 35 cmH2O PIP with 8 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure. In control lungs, Kfc increased significantly to 1.8 and 3.7 times baseline after 30 and 35 cmH2O PIP, respectively. In the gadolinium group, Kfc was unchanged from baseline (0.060 +/- 0.010 ml . min-1 . cmH2O-1 . 100 g-1) after any PIP ventilation period. Pulmonary vascular resistance increased significantly from baseline in both groups before the last Kfc measurement but was not different between groups. These results suggest that microvascular permeability is actively modulated by a cellular response to mechanical injury and that stretch-activated cation channels may initiate this response through increases in intracellular calcium concentration.

  15. Magnetic Relaxation in Aluminosilicate Structures Containing Manganese(II) and Gadolinium(III) Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, S. K.; Heinsbergen, J. F.; Bryant, R. G.

    Electron-spin-resonance spectra and nuclear-magnetic-relaxation-dispersion measurements are reported for several aluminosilicate structures to which manganese (II) and gadolinium(III) ions have been added in several structurally distinct ways. EPR spectra demonstrate that diffusion of the hexaaquomanganese(II) ion or the aquogadolinium(III) ion into the zeolite structures is facile, apparently displacing sodium ion or protons. The addition of a complexing agent such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid to the metal-loaded zeolite then yields a complex which in the gadolinium case forms inside the zeolite but in the manganese(II) case forms largely outside the zeolite under our preparation conditions. For the intrazeolite complexes, the gadolinium system is stable to both low pH and high sodium concentrations. The field dependence of the water-proton relaxation displays strong paramagnetic effects that increase with increasing temperature, consistent with exchange limitations on the access of the water-proton spin system to the paramagnetic centers. The shape of the relaxation-dispersion curves demonstrates the importance of anisotropy in the metal-ion EPR spectrum, which leads to a considerable distribution of electron-spin Larmor frequencies and a consequent weak dependence of the nuclear-spin-relaxation rate on the magnetic-field strength.

  16. Thermal Excitation of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Using Spin Resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven C Dinger

    Full Text Available Theoretical and experimental investigations into the thermal excitation of liquid paramagnetic contrast agents using the spin resonance relaxation mechanism are presented. The electronic spin-lattice relaxation time τ1e of gadolinium-based contrast agents, which is estimated at 0.1 ns, is ten orders of magnitude faster than the relaxation time of protons in water. The shorter relaxation time is found to significantly increase the rate of thermal energy deposition. To the authors' knowledge this is the first study of gadolinium based contrast agents in a liquid state used as thermal agents. Analysis shows that when τ1e and other experimental parameters are optimally selected, a maximum theoretical heating rate of 29.4 °C.s-1 could be achieved which would suffice for clinical thermal ablation of neoplasms. The experimental results show a statistically significant thermal response for two out of the four contrast agents tested. The results are compared to the simulated estimates via analysis of a detailed model of the system. While these experimentally determined temperature rises are small and thus of no clinical utility, their presence supports the theoretical analysis and strongly suggests that the chemical structure of the selected compounds plays an important role in this mechanism of heat deposition. There exists an opportunity for the development of alternative gadolinium-based compounds with an order of magnitude longer τ1e in a diluted form to be used as an efficient hyperthermia agent for clinical use.

  17. Removal of lanthanum and gadolinium from nitrate medium using Aliquat-336 impregnated onto Amberlite XAD-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sofany, E A

    2008-05-30

    Aliquat-336 in benzene was supported on Amberlite XAD-4 crosslinked polystyrene resin. The use of XAD-4 impregnated with Aliquat-336 resin for removal of lanthanum(III) and gadolinium(III) from nitrate medium was carried out using batch technique. Various parameters affecting the uptake of these metal ions such as contact time, metal ion concentrations, V/m and pH value were separately studied. Effect of temperature on the equilibrium distribution values has been studied to evaluate the changes in standard thermodynamic quantities. A comparison of kinetic models applied to the adsorption rate data was evaluated for Lagergren first order, the pseudo second order and Morris-Weber kinetic models. From the results, both pseudo second order and intraparticle diffusion models were found to best correlate the experimental rate data. The capacity of the impregnated resin for both lanthanum(III) and gadolinium(III) was found to be 4.73 and 4.44 mg/g. From the results, impregnation of Aliquat-336 onto Amberlite XAD-4 provides an efficient impregnated resin for the removal of lanthanum(III) and gadolinium(III) from 0.1M nitrate aqueous solution.

  18. Breakthrough reactions of iodinated and gadolinium contrast media after oral steroid premedication protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingu, Akiko; Fukuda, Junya; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2014-10-06

    Adverse reactions to iodinated and gadolinium contrast media are an important clinical issue. Although some guidelines have proposed oral steroid premedication protocols to prevent adverse reactions, some patients may have reactions to contrast media in spite of premedication (breakthrough reaction; BTR).The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency, type and severity of BTR when following an oral steroid premedication protocol. All iodinated and gadolinium contrast-enhanced radiologic examinations between August 2011 and February 2013 for which the premedication protocol was applied in our institution were assessed for BTRs. The protocol was applied to a total of 252 examinations (153 patients, ages 15-87 years; 63 males, 90 females). Of these, 152 were for prior acute adverse reactions to contrast media, 85 were for a history of bronchial asthma, and 15 were for other reasons. There were 198 contrast enhanced CTs and 54 contrast enhanced MRIs. There were nine BTR (4.5%) for iodinated contrast media, and only one BTR (1.9%) for gadolinium contrast media: eight were mild and one was moderate. No patient who had a mild index reaction (IR) had a severe BTR. Incidence of BTRs when following the premedication protocol was low. This study by no means proves the efficacy of premedication, but provides some support for following a premedication protocol to improve safety of contrast-enhanced examinations when prior adverse reactions are mild, or when there is a history of asthma.

  19. Depletion of gadolinium burnable poison in a PWR assembly with high burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Refeat, Riham Mahmoud [Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA), Cairo (Egypt). Safety Engineering Dept.

    2015-12-15

    A tendency to increase the discharge burnup of nuclear fuel for Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has been a characteristic of its operation for many years. It will be able to burn at very high burnup of about 70 GWd/t with UO{sub 2} fuels. The U-235 enrichment must be higher than 5 %, which leads to the necessity of using an extremely efficient burnable poison like Gadolinium oxide. Using gadolinium isotope is significant due to its particular depletion behavior (''Onion-Skin'' effect). In this paper, the MCNPX2.7 code is used to calculate the important neutronic parameters of the next generation fuels of PWR. K-infinity, local peaking factor and fission rate distributions are calculated for a PWR assembly which burn at very high burnup reaching 70 GWd/t. The calculations are performed using the recently released evaluated Gadolinium cross section data. The results obtained are close to those of a LWR next generation fuel benchmark problem. This demonstrates that the calculation scheme used is able to accurately model a PWR assembly that operates at high burnup values.

  20. Core-Satellite Polydopamine-Gadolinium-Metallofullerene Nanotheranostics for Multimodal Imaging Guided Combination Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Lin, Jing; Wang, Zhantong; Zhou, Zijian; Bai, Ruiliang; Lu, Nan; Liu, Yijing; Fu, Xiao; Jacobson, Orit; Fan, Wenpei; Qu, Junle; Chen, Siping; Wang, Tianfu; Huang, Peng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-09-01

    Integration of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and other imaging modalities is promising to furnish complementary information for accurate cancer diagnosis and imaging-guided therapy. However, most gadolinium (Gd)-chelator MR contrast agents are limited by their relatively low relaxivity and high risk of released-Gd-ions-associated toxicity. Herein, a radionuclide-64 Cu-labeled doxorubicin-loaded polydopamine (PDA)-gadolinium-metallofullerene core-satellite nanotheranostic agent (denoted as CDPGM) is developed for MR/photoacoustic (PA)/positron emission tomography (PET) multimodal imaging-guided combination cancer therapy. In this system, the near-infrared (NIR)-absorbing PDA acts as a platform for the assembly of different moieties; Gd3 N@C80 , a kind of gadolinium metallofullerene with three Gd ions in one carbon cage, acts as a satellite anchoring on the surface of PDA. The as-prepared CDPGM NPs show good biocompatibility, strong NIR absorption, high relaxivity (r 1 = 14.06 mM-1 s-1 ), low risk of release of Gd ions, and NIR-triggered drug release. In vivo MR/PA/PET multimodal imaging confirms effective tumor accumulation of the CDPGM NPs. Moreover, upon NIR laser irradiation, the tumor is completely eliminated with combined chemo-photothermal therapy. These results suggest that the CDPGM NPs hold great promise for cancer theranostics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Selective Filtration of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water Cherenkov Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-04-10

    Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have been investigating the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This focused study of selective water filtration and GdCl{sub 3} extraction techniques, conducted at UC Irvine, followed up on highly promising benchtop-scale and kiloton-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of 2003 and 2005 Advanced Detector Research Program grants.

  2. Large Scale Testing and Development of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Vagine

    2007-09-18

    Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have begun to investigate the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This large-scale investigation, conducted in the one kiloton water Cherenkov detector built for the K2K long-baseline experiment, follows up on highly promising benchtop-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of a 2003 Advanced Detector Research Program grant.

  3. PAMAM Dendrimers as Potential Carriers of Gadolinium Complexes of Iminodiacetic Acid Derivatives for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Markowicz-Piasecka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first study describing the utilization of PAMAM dendrimers as delivery vehicles of novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents. The purpose of this paper was to establish the potential of G4 PAMAM dendrimers as carriers of gadolinium complexes of iminodiacetic acid derivatives and determine imaging properties of synthesized compounds in in vivo studies. Furthermore, we examined the influence of four synthesized complexes on the process of clot formation, stabilization, and lysis and on amidolytic activity of thrombin. Biodistribution studies have shown that the compounds composed of PAMAM G4 dendrimers and gadolinium complexes of iminodiacetic acid derivatives increase signal intensity preferably in liver in range of 59–116% in MRI studies which corresponds with the greatest accumulation of gadolinium after administration of the compounds. Synthesized compounds affect kinetic parameters of the proces of clot formation, its stabilization, and lysis. However, only one synthesized compound at concentration 10-fold higher than potential plasma concentrations contributed to the increase of general parameters such as the overall potential of clot formation and lysis (↑CLAUC and total time of the process (↑T. Results of described studies provide additional insight into delivery properties of PAMAM dendrimers but simultaneously underscore the necessity for further research.

  4. DOUBLE DEGENERATE MERGERS AS PROGENITORS OF HIGH-FIELD MAGNETIC WHITE DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Loren-Aguilar, Pablo; Aznar-Siguan, Gabriela; Torres, Santiago; Camacho, Judit [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, c/Esteve Terrades, 5, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Althaus, Leandro G.; Corsico, Alejandro H. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Kuelebi, Baybars; Isern, Jordi, E-mail: garcia@fa.upc.edu [Institute for Space Studies of Catalonia, c/Gran Capita 2-4, Edif. Nexus 104, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-04-10

    High-field magnetic white dwarfs have been long suspected to be the result of stellar mergers. However, the nature of the coalescing stars and the precise mechanism that produces the magnetic field are still unknown. Here, we show that the hot, convective, differentially rotating corona present in the outer layers of the remnant of the merger of two degenerate cores can produce magnetic fields of the required strength that do not decay for long timescales. Using a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo simulator, we also show that the expected number of high-field magnetic white dwarfs produced in this way is consistent with that found in the solar neighborhood.

  5. Lumbar Modic Changes - A Comparison Between Findings at Low-and High-field MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Tom; Sorensen, Joan S; Henriksson, Gustaf A C

    2012-01-01

    -81), with or without sciatica, seen in a Danish outpatient LBP clinic were included. All patients had MRI scans on both a high-field and a low-field MRI scanner. Two radiologists evaluated all lumbar endplates independently using a standardized evaluation protocol. Kappa statistics were used to analyze the inter...

  6. Widespread inflammation in CLIPPERS syndrome indicated by autopsy and ultra-high-field 7T MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Morten; Ruprecht, Klemens; Sinnecker, Tim

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if there is widespread inflammation in the brain of patients with chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) syndrome by using histology and ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T. METHODS: We performed a detailed neuropath...

  7. Neutron scattering study of the incommensurate high-field phase of CuGeO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnow, H.M.; Enderle, M.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2000-01-01

    CuGeO3 is a good realization of a spin-Peierls system. Using neutron scattering, we have investigated the transition from the dimerized spin-Peierls phase to an incommensurately modulated high-field phase. The incommensurate period has been measured for fields up to 14.5 T and is found...

  8. High-field 3He-F interaction at the surface of fluorocarbon spheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuhl, A.; Chapellier, M.; Rasmussen, Finn Berg

    1984-01-01

    High-field experiments on the relaxation betweenF in small Teflon spheres andHe on the surface are reported. WithHe as a monolayer, coupling times are found to be less than 5 sec, in magnetic fields up to 3 T and temperatures down to 50 mK, where electronic centers are completely polarized...

  9. A SIMPLE ANALYSIS OF THE PROPAGATING ACOUSTOELECTRIC HIGH-FIELD DOMAIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik

    1968-01-01

    An analytical treatment of the uniformly propagating acoustoelectric high-field domain is presented in the limit of zero diffusion. Expressions for the electron density and the acoustic energy density as functions of the electric field are given. The domain velocity is determined. ©1968 The Ameri...... The American Institute of Physics...

  10. High-precision high field strength partitioning between garnet, amphibole, and alkaline melt, Kakanui, New Zealand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fulmer, E.J.; Nebel, O.; van Westrenen, W.

    2010-01-01

    The high field strength elements (HFSE: Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, and W) are an important group of chemical tracers that are increasingly used to investigate magmatic differentiation processes. Successful modeling of these processes requires the availability of accurate mineral-melt partition coefficients

  11. In-situ high field strength testing using a transportable reverberation chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2008-01-01

    A reverberation chamber can create very high field strength with moderate input power. Existing chambers are making use of a paddle wheel to change the resonant modes in the chamber. In the case of a stepper motor, the field is stable for some time, and this type of reverberation chamber is called

  12. A new hybrid protection system for high-field superconducting magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravaioli, Emanuele; Datskov, V.I.; Kirby, G.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Verweij, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    The new generation of high-field superconducting accelerator magnets poses a challenge concerning the protection of the magnet coil in the case of a quench. The very high stored energy per unit volume requires a fast and efficient quench heating system in order to avoid damage due to overheating. A

  13. Photoconductivity and high-field effects in amorphous Se83Te15Zn2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    indium electrodes at the bottom were used for the electri- cal contact. The thickness of the film was ~ 500 nm. The co-planar structure (length ~ 1⋅2 cm and electrode separa- tion ~ 0⋅12 mm for high-field measurements and 0⋅5 mm for photoconductivity measurements) was used for the present measurements. A vacuum ...

  14. Ultra-high field MRI: Advancing systems neuroscience towards mesoscopic human brain function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumoulin, Serge O; Fracasso, A.; Van der Zwaag, W.; Siero, Jeroen C W; Petridou, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    Human MRI scanners at ultra-high magnetic field strengths of 7 T and higher are increasingly available to the neuroscience community. A key advantage brought by ultra-high field MRI is the possibility to increase the spatial resolution at which data is acquired, with little reduction in image

  15. High-field Faraday rotation in II-VI-based semimagnetic semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savchuk, AI; Fediv, [No Value; Nikitin, PI; Perrone, A; Tatzenko, OM; Platonov, VV

    The effects of d-d exchange interaction have been studied by measuring high-field Faraday rotation in II-VI-based semimagnetic semiconductors. For Cd1-xMnxTe crystals with x = 0.43 and at room temperature a saturation in magnetic field dependence of the Faraday rotation has been observed. In the

  16. The value of high-field MRI (3 T) in the assessment of sellar lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, K. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Ba-Ssalamah, A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Wolfsberger, S. [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna (Austria); Mlynarik, V. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Knosp, E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: siegfried.trattnig@univie.ac.at

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of the normal sellar anatomy in vitro and in vivo with high-field MRI and its application in the diagnosis of sellar pathologies in comparison to standard MRI. All high-field MR images were obtained using a 3 T Bruker Medspec 30/80 Scanner with a head birdcage transmit/receive coil and an actively shielded gradient system with a maximum gradient strength of 45 mT/m. Firstly an in vitro study of the sella turcica was performed to depict normal pituitary and sellar anatomy at high field. After a pilot-study this sequence-protocol was established: A RARE sequence (TR/TE = 7790/19 ms; matrix size, 512 x 512; RARE factor = 8, FOV, 200 mm) was used for T2-weighted coronal, axial and sagittal images. A 3D gradient echo sequence with magnetization-preparation (MP-RAGE, TR/TE/TI 33.5/7.6/800 ms, matrix size, 512 x 512; FOV, 200 mm, effective slice thickness, 1.88 mm; 3 averages) was used for acquisition of T1-weighted pre- and post-contrast images. Between January 2002 and March 200458 patients were enrolled in this study. Seven patients were examined for suspected microadenoma and in 51 patients 3T MRI was used to obtain additional information about the sellar lesion already known to be present from standard MRI. In 21 cases the accuracy of the imaging findings was assessed afterwards by comparison with intraoperative findings. The infiltration of the medial cavernous sinus wall was suspected on standard MRI on 15 sides (47%), on high-field MRI on 9 sides (28%) and could be verified by intraoperative findings on 6 sides (19%). Accordingly, sensitivity to infiltration was 83% for 3 T and 67% for standard MRI. Specificity was 84% for 3 T and 58% for standard MRI. Moreover, high-field MRI revealed microadenomas in 7 patients with a median diameter of 4 mm (range 2-9 mm). The segments of the cranial nerves were seen as mean 4 hypointense spots (range 2-5 spots) on high-field MRI in contrast to 3 spots (range 0-4 spots) on standard MRI

  17. Increased Delay Between Gadolinium Chelate Administration and T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Acquisition Increases Contrast-Enhancing Tumor Volumes and T1 Intensities in Brain Tumor Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechotta, Paula L; Bonekamp, David; Sill, Martin; Wick, Antje; Wick, Wolfgang; Bendszus, Martin; Kickingereder, Philipp

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of delayed T1-weighted (T1-w) MRI acquisition after gadolinium chelate administration on brain tumor volumes and T1-w intensities. Fifty-five patients with histologically confirmed, contrast-enhancing intra-axial brain tumors were analyzed in this prospective test-retest study. Patients underwent 2 consecutive 3 T MRI scans (separated by a 1-minute break) during routine follow-up with contrast-enhanced T1 (ceT1-w), T2, and FLAIR acquisition. Macrocyclic gadolinium chelate-based contrast agent was only administered before the first ceT1-w acquisition; median latency to ceT1-w acquisition was 6.72 minutes (IQR, 6.53-6.92) in the first and 16.27 minutes (IQR, 15.49-17.26) in the second scan. Changes in tumor volumes and relative ceT1-w intensities between the 2 acquisitions were quantitatively assessed following semiautomated tumor segmentation (separately for contrast-enhancement [CE], necrosis [NEC], and nonenhancing [NE] tumor). Semiautomatically segmented CE tumor volumes were significantly larger in the second acquisition (median +32% [1.2 cm]; IQR, 16%-62%; P < 0.01), which corresponded to a 10% increase in CE tumor diameter (+0.3 cm). Contrarily, NEC and NE tumor volumes were significantly smaller (median -24% [IQR, -36% to -54%], P < 0.01 for NEC and -2% [IQR, -1% to -3%], P = 0.02 for NE tumor). Bland-Altman plots confirmed a proportional bias toward higher CE and lower NEC volumes for the second ceT1-w acquisition. Relative ceT1-w intensities for both early- (regions already enhancing in the first scan) and late-enhancing (newly enhancing regions in the second scan) tumor were significantly increased in the second acquisition (by 5.8% and 27.3% [P < 0.01, respectively]). Linear-mixed effects modeling confirmed that the increase in CE volumes and CE intensities is a function of the interval between contrast agent injection and ceT1-w acquisition (P < 0.01 each). Our study indicates that the maximum extent of CE

  18. The gadolinium-based contrast agent Omniscan® promotes in vitro fibroblast survival through in situ precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Min; Fan, Yun-Zhou; Ma, Xiao-Jie; Li, Jin-Xia; Yang, Xiao-Gai

    2015-07-01

    The current study aims to explore how the gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent (GBCA) Omniscan® enhanced cell viability of murine fibroblasts. The results of scanning electron microscopy showed that Omniscan® can precipitate in cell culture media and deposit on cell membranes. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrated the presence of Gd and phosphates in the agglomerated particles. By filtering the Omniscan®-containing medium through a 220 nm filter, it can be clearly found that the increased cell viability should be mainly attributed to the insoluble species of gadolinium rather than to chelated gadolinium. Moreover, the effects of other gadolinium-based contrast agents, Magnevist® and Dotarem®, were compared with that of Omniscan®. It is noted that the three contrast agents differed in their ability to induce cell viability, which is possibly ascribed to the different chemical stabilities of gadolinium chelates as demonstrated by the attenuation in cell growth upon the addition of excess ligands to the compounds. The results of flow cytometry analysis also showed that Omniscan® can promote cell growth via an increase in the S-phase cell population as evidenced by the elevated levels of cell cycle associated proteins cyclin D, cyclin A and the phosphorylated Rb protein. Furthermore, our results revealed that integrin-mediated signaling may play an important role in both Omniscan® and Magnevist®-enhanced focal adhesion formation since the blockade of integrins decreased the level of ERK phosphorylation induced by the two GBCAs. Taken together, these data suggested that in situ gadolinium phosphate precipitation formation mediated Omniscan®-promoted fibroblast survival, which is similar to that of gadolinium chloride. It was demonstrated that the application of GBCAs with more stable thermodynamic stability may cause less dissociation of the gadolinium ion and thus resulted in less precipitation, finally

  19. A feasibility study to determine the potential of in vivo detection of gadolinium by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) following gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafaei, F; McNeill, F E; Chettle, D R; Noseworthy, M D

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using a (109)Cd γ-ray induced K x-ray fluorescence (K-XRF) system for the in vivo detection of gadolinium (Gd) in bone has been investigated. The K-XRF bone measurement system employs an array of four detectors, and is normally used for the non-invasive study of bone lead levels. The system was used to measure bone simulating phantoms doped with varying levels of gadolinium and fixed amounts of sodium (Na), chlorine (Cl) and calcium (Ca). The detection limits for bare bone phantoms, using a source of activity 0.17 GBq, were determined to be 3.9 ppm and 6.5 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom) for the Kα1 and Kα2 Gd x-ray peaks, respectively. This leads to an overall detection limit of 3.3 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom). Layers of plastic were used to simulate overlying soft tissue and this permitted prediction of a detection limit, using the current strength of our radioisotope source, of 6.1 ppm to 8.6 ppm (µg Gd per gram phantom) for fingers with 2-4 mm of overlying tissue. With a new source of activity 5 GBq, we predict that this system could achieve a detection limit of 4-5.6 µg Gd g(-1) Ca. This is within the range of levels (2-30 µg Gd g(-1) Ca) previously found in the bone of patients receiving Gd based contrast imaging agents. The technique is promising and warrants further investigation.

  20. Gadolinium Contrast Agent is of Limited Value for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Synovial Hypertrophy in Hemophiliacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, B.; Berntorp, E.; Pettersson, H.; Wirestam, R.; Jonsson, K.; Staahlberg, F.; Ljung, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ Hospital of Lund, Lund (Sweden)

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To examine the influence of different doses of gadolinium contrast agent on synovial enhancement, to compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of synovial hypertrophy and radiographic joint changes in hemophiliacs, and to investigate the value of gadolinium in MRI assessment of synovial hypertrophy in hemophiliacs using dynamic MRI and MRI scoring. Material and Methods: Twenty-one hemophiliacs on prophylactic factor treatment without recent bleeds were subjected to radiography and gadolinium contrast-enhanced dynamic and static MRI of the knee using a standard dose of 0.1 mmol/kg b.w. gadoteridol. In 17 of the patients, the MRI procedure was repeated after a triple dose of gadoteridol. Results: MRI findings of synovial hypertrophy were significantly correlated with Pettersson radiographic scores. In 19 of the 21 MRI investigated joints, administration of contrast agent did not alter the result of the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy. Conclusion: The optimal time interval for volume assessment of synovial hypertrophy after injection of gadolinium contrast agent is dose dependent. Hemophiliacs without recent bleeds have minor to abundant synovial hypertrophy in joints with pronounced radiographic changes. Dynamic MRI is not useful for evaluating hemophilic arthropathy, and gadolinium contrast agent is not routinely indicated for MRI scoring of joints in hemophiliacs.

  1. Does gadolinium-based contrast material improve diagnostic accuracy of local invasion in rectal cancer MRI? A multireader study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollub, Marc J; Lakhman, Yulia; McGinty, Katrina; Weiser, Martin R; Sohn, Michael; Zheng, Junting; Shia, Jinru

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to compare reader accuracy and agreement on rectal MRI with and without gadolinium administration in the detection of T4 rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS. In this study, two radiologists and one fellow independently interpreted all posttreatment MRI studies for patients with locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer using unenhanced images alone or combined with contrast-enhanced images, with a minimum interval of 4 weeks. Readers evaluated involvement of surrounding structures on a 5-point scale and were blinded to pathology and disease stage. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and AUC were calculated and kappa statistics were used to describe interreader agreement. RESULTS. Seventy-two patients (38 men and 34 women) with a mean age of 61 years (range, 32-86 years) were evaluated. Fifteen patients had 32 organs invaded. Global AUCs without and with gadolinium administration were 0.79 and 0.77, 0.91 and 0.86, and 0.83 and 0.78 for readers 1, 2, and 3, respectively. AUCs before and after gadolinium administration were similar. Kappa values before and after gadolinium administration for pairs of readers ranged from 0.5 to 0.7. CONCLUSION. On the basis of pathology as a reference standard, the use of gadolinium during rectal MRI did not significantly improve radiologists' agreement or ability to detect T4 disease.

  2. Gadolinium induced effects on mammalian cell motility, adherence and chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Gabor; Baksa, Viktoria; Kiss, Alexandra; Turani, Melinda; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2017-02-01

    The toxicity of gadolinium is reduced by chelating agents that render this heavy metal into contrast complexes used for medical magnetic resonance imaging. However, the dissociation of gadolinium chelates is known to generate Gd3+ ions, the cellular toxicity of which has not been tested in details. The cytotoxic effects of Gd(III) ions were evaluated by monitoring the proliferation, measuring the cellular motility and following chromatin changes in various cell lines upon Gd3+ treatment. Measurements applied long-term scanning microscopy and a perfusion platform that replaced the medium with test solutions, bypassed physical contact with the cell culture during experiments, and provided uninterrupted high time-resolution time-lapse photomicrography for an extended period of time. Genotoxicity specific chromatin changes characteristic to Gd(III) were distinguished in human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT), human limbal stem cells (HuLi), colorectal adenocarcinoma (CaCO2), murine squamous carcinoma (SCC) and Indian muntjac (IM) cell lines. Characteristic features of Gd(III) toxicity were: loss of cellular motility, irreversible attachment of cells to the growth surface and cell death. Injury-specific chromatin changes manifested at micromolar Gd3+ concentrations as premature chromatin condensation and highly condensed sticky chromatin patches. Gd(III) concentration- and cell type-dependent reduction of normal adherence, as well as premature chromatin condensation confirmed apoptosis. The risk related to the release of toxic Gd3+ ions from gadolinium complexes and their effects on mono- and multi-layer cellular barriers have to be reconsidered when these chelated complexes are used as contrasting agents especially in relation to possible blood-brain barrier damages.

  3. Fat-saturated post gadolinium T1 imaging of the brain in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saeed, Osama; Sheikh, Mehraj (Dept. of Radiology, Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait)), email: osamas@hsc.edu.kw; Ismail, Mohammed (Ibn Sina Hospital (Kuwait)); Athyal, Reji (Amiri Hospital (Kuwait))

    2011-06-15

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is of vital importance in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Imaging sequences better demonstrating enhancing lesions can help in detecting active MS plaques. Purpose To evaluate the role of fat-saturated gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1W) images of the brain in MS and to assess the benefit of performing this additional sequence in the detection of enhancing lesions. Material and Methods In a prospective study over a six-month period, 70 consecutive patients with clinically diagnosed MS were enrolled. These constituted 14 male and 56 female patients between the ages of 21 and 44 years. All the patients underwent brain MRIs on a 1.5 Tesla Magnet. Gadolinium-enhanced T1 images with and without fat saturation were compared and results were recorded and analyzed using a conspicuity score and McNemar test. Results There were a total of 157 lesions detected in 70 patients on post-contrast T1W fat-saturated images compared with 139 lesions seen on the post-contrast T1W fast spin-echo (FSE) images. This was because 18 of the lesions (11.5%) were only seen on the fat-saturated images. In addition, 15 lesions were more conspicuous on the fat saturation sequence (9.5%). The total conspicuity score obtained, including all the lesions, was 2.24 +/-0.60 (SD). Using the two-tailed McNemar test for quantitative analysis, the P value obtained was <0.0001. Conclusion T1W fat-saturated gadolinium-enhanced images show better lesion enhancement than T1W images without fat saturation

  4. Silica nanoparticles containing 159-Gadolinium as potential system for cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Andre Felipe de; Ferreira, Tiago Hilario; Sousa, Edesia Martins Barros de, E-mail: andrefelipe.oliveira88@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SENAN/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Nanotecnologia; Lacerda, Marco Aurelio [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SERAS/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico das Radiacoes Aplicadas a Saude

    2013-07-01

    Ordered silica nanoparticles are compounds highly organized which have very interesting textural characteristics, such as high thermal stability, well defined pore size, narrow size distribution and high area surface. Among the various types of nano materials ordered, the SBA-16 have a meso structure that can be considered very interesting due to the fact of the arrangement of mesoporous (tri dimensional as a cage) and spherical morphology, which make it in a promising material for a range of bioapplications such as incorporation of drugs and radioisotopes. In this study Gadodiamide® (Omniscan-General Electric Healthcare Company), a frequently non-ionic gadolinium complex contrasting used in MRI's was incorporated in the silica matrix SBA-16 as a carrier. From this gadolinium it is possible to obtain the isotope {sup 159}Gd by neutron irradiation, wherein the isotope {sup 158}Gd captures a neutron and becomes {sup 159}Gd [{sup 15}'8Gd(n,c){sup 1}'5{sup 9}Gd]. The {sup 159}Gd is a beta (endpoint energy of 970.6 keV) and gamma (main energy: 363.54 keV) emitter with a half-life of 18.59 hours. These characteristics are similar to that of other isotopes already used in nuclear medicine such as {sup 90}Y. In this work, the {sup 158}Gd incorporated in the Gd-silica was activated by the neutron flux generated by the cyclotron located in the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) during the production of the {sup 18}FDG. Atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to confirm the presence of the gadolinium complex in the silica matrix. The antitumor activity of the complex after the irradiation was evaluated through cytotoxicity assay with T98 cell lines derived from a human glioblastoma multiform tumor. (author)

  5. Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrikossova, Natalia; Skoglund, Caroline; Ahrén, Maria; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2012-07-01

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd2O3 nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd2O3 nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  6. The role of high-field magnetic resonance imaging in parkinsonian disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehericy, Stéphane; Vaillancourt, David E.; Seppi, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Historically, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has contributed little to the study of Parkinson's disease (PD), but modern MRI approaches have unveiled several complementary markers that are useful for research and clinical applications. Iron- and neuromelanin-sensitive MRI detect qualitative...... changes in the substantia nigra. Quantitative MRI markers can be derived from diffusion weighted and iron-sensitive imaging or volumetry. Functional brain alterations at rest or during task performance have been captured with functional and arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI. These markers are useful...... understand neurodegeneration and provide reliable markers for therapeutic trials. This article reviews recent advances in MRI biomarker research at high-field (3T) and ultra high field-imaging (7T) in PD and atypical parkinsonism....

  7. High-field magnetization and specific heat of TmNi{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayzel, F.E. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Franse, J.J.M. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Colpa, J.H.P. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Kim-Ngan, N.-H. [Centre for Solid State Physics, Krakow (Poland); Tai, L.T. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Inst.; Radwanski, R.J. [Centre for Solid State Physics, Krakow (Poland); Gignoux, D. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 -Grenoble (France). Lab. Louis Neel

    1996-05-01

    High-field magnetization on two single-crystalline samples from different batches of TmNi{sub 5} has been measured along the crystallographic a, b and c directions up to 38 T at 1.5 K. A small high-field susceptibility {chi}{sub HF}=6.3.10{sup -3} {mu}{sub B}/T f.u. was observed along the easy c-axis. The magnetization measured alon g both a- and b-axis shows hysteresis and a magnetic transition between 5 and 15 T. Specific heat has been measured from 1.5 to 160 K. A {lambda}-type peak found at about 3.7 K originates from the magnetic system. (orig.).

  8. [Ultra-high-field MRI in the Chicken Embryo in Ovo - a Model for Experimental Ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Ronja; Streckenbach, Felix; Hadlich, Stefan; Stahnke, Thomas; Guthoff, Rudolf; Wree, Andreas; Frank, Marcus; Langner, Sönke; Stachs, Oliver; Lindner, Tobias

    2017-12-01

    Ultra-high-field MRI (UHF-MRI) is an outstanding technique for non-invasive and non-destructive imaging of soft tissues and can provide versatile contrasts and high resolution in the µm range. In vivo imaging of the embryonal chick eye with its filigree anatomical structures imposes these requirements. However, due to the short embryonal development cycle, chicken are a favourite animal model for embryonal research studies. Ultra-high-field MRI allows repeated and longitudinal in ovo investigations on the same embryo. In the present study, the limitations and opportunities of in ovo MR-imaging at 7 T were evaluated and the process of eye growth was described in detail. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Open Science CBS Neuroimaging Repository: Sharing ultra-high-field MR images of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Christine Lucas; Schäfer, Andreas; Trampel, Robert; Villringer, Arno; Turner, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra high field opens the door to quantitative brain imaging at sub-millimeter isotropic resolutions. However, novel image processing tools to analyze these new rich datasets are lacking. In this article, we introduce the Open Science CBS Neuroimaging Repository: a unique repository of high-resolution and quantitative images acquired at 7 T. The motivation for this project is to increase interest for high-resolution and quantitative imaging and stimulate the development of image processing tools developed specifically for high-field data. Our growing repository currently includes datasets from MP2RAGE and multi-echo FLASH sequences from 28 and 20 healthy subjects respectively. These datasets represent the current state-of-the-art in in-vivo relaxometry at 7 T, and are now fully available to the entire neuroimaging community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging of the basal ganglia and related structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Renske Plantinga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation is a treatment for Parkinson’s disease and other related disorders, involving the surgical placement of electrodes in the deeply situated basal ganglia or thalamic structures. Good clinical outcome requires accurate targeting. However, due to limited visibility of the target structures on routine clinical MR images, direct targeting of structures can be challenging. Non-clinical MR scanners with ultra-high magnetic field (7T or higher have the potential to improve the quality of these images. This technology report provides an overview of the current possibilities of visualizing deep brain stimulation targets and their related structures with the aid of ultra-high field MRI. Reviewed studies showed improved resolution, contrast- and signal-to-noise ratios at ultra-high field. Sequences sensitive to magnetic susceptibility such as T2* and susceptibility weighted imaging and their maps in general showed the best visualization of target structures, including a separation between the subthalamic nucleus and the substantia nigra, the lamina pallidi medialis and lamina pallidi incompleta within the globus pallidus and substructures of the thalamus, including the ventral intermediate nucleus (Vim. This shows that the visibility, identification and even subdivision of the small deep brain stimulation targets benefit from increased field strength. Although ultra-high field MR imaging is associated with increased risk of geometrical distortions, it has been shown that these distortions can be avoided or corrected to the extent where the effects are limited. The availability of ultra-high field MR scanners for humans seems to provide opportunities for a more accurate targeting for deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson’s disease and related disorders.

  11. High field superconducting magnets (12 T and greater) for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.R.; Summers, L.T.; Kerns, J.A.

    1986-07-09

    The technology for producing high fields in large superconducting magnets has increased greatly in recent years, but must increase still more in the future. In this paper, we examine the present state of the art vis-a-vis the needs of a next-generation fusion machine and outline a program to provide for those needs. We also highlight recent developments that suggest the program goals are within reach.

  12. High-field magnetic transitions in the R sub 2 T sub 17 compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franse, J.J.M.; Sinnema, S. (Amsterdam Univ. (NL). Natuurkundig Lab.); Radwanski, R.J. (University of Mining and Metallurgy, Krakow (PL). Solid State Physics Dept.)

    1988-12-01

    In the past few years high-field magnetic transitions have been extensively studied for a number of single crystalline samples of the R{sub 2}T{sub 17} series (R = rare earths, T = Co or Fe). The transitions observed in Ho{sub 2}Co{sub 17} and Dy{sub 2}Co{sub 17} are exchange-driven transitions connected with a breaking of the ferromagnetic structure and only occur in applied fields above 20 T.

  13. Numerical simulation of screening current distribution in HTS tape of high field magnet

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Ryusei; Oga, Yuki; Noguchi, So; Igarashi, Hajime; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, properties of high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes, especially in-field performance and mechanical strength, have been continuously improved. The HTS tapes have been widely used for high field (>20 T) magnet researches and there are several technical challenges including field attenuation of an HTS magnet by screening currents induced within the HTS tapes. Several publications reported that the screening currents, induced by penetration of self magnetic fields into HT...

  14. Nematic ordering in pyrochlore antiferromagnets: high-field phase of chromium spinel oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Takata, Emika; Momoi, Tsutomu; Oshikawa, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent observation of a new high field phase near saturation in chromium spinels $A$Cr$_2$O$_4$ ($A=$ Zn, Cd, Hg), we study the $S = 3/2$ pyrochlore Heisenberg antiferromagnet with biquadratic interactions. Magnon instability analysis at the saturation field reveals that a very small biquadratic interaction can induce magnon pairing in pyrochlore antiferromagnets, which leads to the emergence of a ferro-quadrupolar phase, or equivalently a spin nematic phase, below the saturation...

  15. Deep learning enables reduced gadolinium dose for contrast-enhanced brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Enhao; Pauly, John M; Wintermark, Max; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2018-02-13

    There are concerns over gadolinium deposition from gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) administration. To reduce gadolinium dose in contrast-enhanced brain MRI using a deep learning method. Retrospective, crossover. Sixty patients receiving clinically indicated contrast-enhanced brain MRI. 3D T 1 -weighted inversion-recovery prepped fast-spoiled-gradient-echo (IR-FSPGR) imaging was acquired at both 1.5T and 3T. In 60 brain MRI exams, the IR-FSPGR sequence was obtained under three conditions: precontrast, postcontrast images with 10% low-dose (0.01mmol/kg) and 100% full-dose (0.1 mmol/kg) of gadobenate dimeglumine. We trained a deep learning model using the first 10 cases (with mixed indications) to approximate full-dose images from the precontrast and low-dose images. Synthesized full-dose images were created using the trained model in two test sets: 20 patients with mixed indications and 30 patients with glioma. For both test sets, low-dose, true full-dose, and the synthesized full-dose postcontrast image sets were compared quantitatively using peak-signal-to-noise-ratios (PSNR) and structural-similarity-index (SSIM). For the test set comprised of 20 patients with mixed indications, two neuroradiologists scored blindly and independently for the three postcontrast image sets, evaluating image quality, motion-artifact suppression, and contrast enhancement compared with precontrast images. Results were assessed using paired t-tests and noninferiority tests. The proposed deep learning method yielded significant (n = 50, P 5 dB PSNR gains and >11.0% SSIM). Ratings on image quality (n = 20, P = 0.003) and contrast enhancement (n = 20, P deep learning method, gadolinium dose can be reduced 10-fold while preserving contrast information and avoiding significant image quality degradation. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 5 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Combustion synthesis and optical properties of ceria doped gadolinium-oxide nanopowder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrakar, Raunak Kumar; Bisen, D. P.

    2013-06-01

    The Ceria doped Gadolinium (Gd2O3) nanopowder was synthesized by combustion synthesis by using urea as a fuel. The combustion synthesis method which is reported here is advantageous from the perspectives of small size of the nanoparticle. The structural and photoluminescence (PL) property of sample was studies. Gd2O3:Ce3+ nanoparticles exhibit green emission around 543 nm. The result of XRD show that synthesized sample has cubic structure. The average size of particle is found to be 45 nm. The surface morphology of the films is also presented.

  17. Standard specification for nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) powder

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This specification provides the chemical and physical requirements for nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide powder intended for subsequent processing and use in nuclear fuel applications, for example, as an addition to uranium dioxide. 1.2 This specification does not include requirements for health and safety. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aware of and comply with all federal, state, and local regulations pertaining to possessing, shipping, processing, or using this material. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

  18. Multivalent, high-relaxivity MRI contrast agents using rigid cysteine-reactive gadolinium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Praveena D; Datta, Ankona; Romanini, Dante W; Raymond, Kenneth N; Francis, Matthew B

    2011-09-21

    MRI contrast agents providing very high relaxivity values can be obtained through the attachment of multiple gadolinium(III) complexes to the interior surfaces of genome-free viral capsids. In previous studies, the contrast enhancement was predicted to depend on the rigidity of the linker attaching the MRI agents to the protein surface. To test this hypothesis, a new set of Gd-hydroxypyridonate based MRI agents was prepared and attached to genetically introduced cysteine residues through flexible and rigid linkers. Greater contrast enhancements were seen for MRI agents that were attached via rigid linkers, validating the design concept and outlining a path for future improvements of nanoscale MRI contrast agents.

  19. Characterizing ProstivaTM RF Treatments of the Prostate for BPH with Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Huidobro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transurethral needle ablation (TUNA is an accepted and effective therapy for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. ProstivaTM (Medtronic, Shoreview, MN is the newest-generation device, which includes a new needle design and radio frequency (RF generator. This device creates temperatures of 120°C and necrotic lesions in less than 2.5 min. Using previously described techniques, we analyzed dynamic, gadolinium-enhanced MRIs to characterize the ablative properties of the new ProstivaTM RF device.

  20. HPMA Copolymer–Doxorubicin–Gadolinium Conjugates: Synthesis, Characterization, and in vitro Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarabi, Bahar; Nan, Anjan; Zhuo, Jiachen; Gullapalli, Rao; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer–gadolinium (Gd)–doxorubicin (Dox) conjugates. Copolymers of HPMA were derivatized to incorporate side chains for Gd chelation and Dox conjugation. The conjugates were characterized by their side chain contents, T1 relaxivity (r1), stability, and in vitro cytotoxicity. High stability and relaxivity of these conjugates coupled with low toxicity show their potential for monitoring the in vivo fate of HPMA-based drug delivery systems by magnetic resonance imaging techniques. PMID:18484565

  1. Disseminated tuberculomas in spinal cord and brain demonstrated by MRI with gadolinium-DTPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, W.C. (Dept. of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Cheng, T.Y. (Section of Neurology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Lee, S.K. (Dept. of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Ho, Y.J. (Dept. of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Lee, K.R. (Inst. of Life Science, National Tsing-Hua Univ. (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1993-03-01

    Intramedullary tuberculoma is rare, and there has been no report of concurrent intramedullary and intracerebral tuberculomas. We report a 30-year-old man with miliary tuberculosis of the lung. He suffered sudden paraplegia due to tuberculomas in the thoracic spinal cord and MRI showed more tuberculomas in the cervical spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. The tuberculomas were isointense on the T1-weighted images, and hyperintense on the T2-weighted images; there was marked enhancement with intravenous gadolinium-DTPA. All the tuberculomas were very small 1 year after antituberculous chemotherapy. (orig.)

  2. Gadolinium-Based GaN for Neutron Detection with Gamma Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    trapping centers caused by Mg dopant; 2) Gd doped supper-lattice GaN is hindered by its high leakage current due to the large amount of dislocations ...Gadolinium-Based GaN for Neutron Detection with Gamma Discrimination Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release; distribution is...1 × 10 –28 square meter (m 2 ) gallon (gal, U.S. liquid) 3.785 412 × 10 –3 cubic meter (m 3 ) cubic foot (ft 3 ) 2.831 685 × 10 –2 cubic meter

  3. Development of ICP-MS and ICP-OES methods for determination of gadolinium in samples related to hospital waste water treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bendakovská, L.; Krejčovská, A.; Černohorský, T.; Zelenková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 9 (2016), s. 1155-1165 ISSN 0366-6352 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : gadolinium * rare-earth elements * bioaccumulation * gadolinium anomaly * inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) * inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.258, year: 2016

  4. Time-dependent decrement of dermal gadolinium deposits and significant improvement of skin symptoms in a patient with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis after temporary renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäd, Susanne G; Heitland, Peter; Kühn-Velten, W Nikolaus; Gross, Gerd E; Jonas, Ludwig

    2013-11-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) represents a rare fibrosing disorder occurring after administration of gadolinium-containing contrast agents during renal insufficiency. In order to prove the effect of gadolinium elimination on clinical signs, we identified and quantified gadolinium in skin biopsies of a 62-year-old patient with NSF with regard to improving skin lesions after recovery of renal function. Gadolinium deposits were visualized and identified in NSF skin biopsies by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (EM) and by scanning EM. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was used for quantifying gadolinium concentration. Transmission EM studies revealed electron-dense material in connective matrix around blood vessels and inside lysosomes of histiocytes and fibroblasts. A remarkable reduction of gadolinium deposits was observed in transmission EM and scanning EM and confirmed by ICPMS in follow-up biopsies. After spontaneous recovery of renal function, his skin induration improved notably over the next 2 years. The reduction of clinical and histomorphological signs of NSF correlated with decreasing gadolinium concentration in skin biopsies within 3 years. Our study suggests a possible pathogenetic mechanism of NSF including a chance for recovery after elimination of gadolinium and reduced histamine liberation by mast cells. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Ultra-high-field (9.4 T) MRI Analysis of Contrast Agent Transport Across the Blood-Perilymph Barrier and Intrastrial Fluid-Blood Barrier in the Mouse Inner Ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, S Allen; Nikkhou-Aski, Sahar; Damberg, Peter; Berglin, Cecilia Engmér; Laurell, Göran

    2017-08-01

    Effective paramagnetic contrast agent for the penetration of the perilymphatic spaces of the scala tympani, scala vestibuli, and scala media of the mouse inner ear can be determined using intravenous injection of various gadolinium (Gd) complexes and ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 9.4 Tesla. A number of contrast agents have been explored in experimental high-field MRI to determine the most effective Gd complex for ideal signal-to-noise ratio and maximal visualization of the in vivo mammalian inner ear in analyzing the temporal and spatial parameters involved in drug penetration of the blood-perilymph barrier and intrastrial fluid-blood barrier in the mouse model using MRI. Gadoteric acid (Dotarem), Gadobutrol (Gadovist), Gadodiamide (Omniscan), Gadopent acid (Magnevist), and Mangafodipir (Teslascan) were administered intravenously using the tail vein of 60 Balb/C mice. High-resolution T1 images of drug penetration were acquired with a horizontal 9.4 T Agilent magnet after intravenously injection. Signal intensity was used as a metric of temporal and spatial parameters of drug delivery and penetration of the perilymphatic and endolymphatic spaces. ANOVA analysis of the area under the curve of intensity enhancement in perilymph revealed a significant difference (p space of the inner ear. Gadoteric acid (Dotarem) demonstrated efficacy as a contrast agent for enhanced visualization of the perilymphatic spaces of the inner ear labyrinthine in the mouse, including the scala tympani and scala vestibuli of the cochlea, and the semicircular canals of the vestibular apparatus. These findings may inform the clinical application of Gd compounds in patients with inner ear fluid disorders and vertigo.

  6. Preparation of new composite ceramics based on gadolinium-doped ceria and magnesia nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jingying; Schelter, Matthias; Zosel, Jens; Oelssner, Wolfram [Kurt-Schwabe-Institut fuer Mess- und Sensortechnik e.V. Meinsberg, Waldheim (Germany); Mertig, Michael [Kurt-Schwabe-Institut fuer Mess- und Sensortechnik e.V. Meinsberg, Waldheim (Germany); Physikalische Chemie, Mess- und Sensortechnik, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    To achieve solid electrolyte materials for electrochemical energy storage devices with very high oxygen ion conductivity, composites of gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) and magnesia (MgO) are developed in this study. Three different preparation methods are used to prepare nanoparticles from these two components. According to the characterization results, the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis is best suited for the preparation of both nanometer-sized GDC powder as solid electrolyte and MgO powder as insulator. The structures of the prepared nanometer-sized powders have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. They show narrow size distributions in the lower nanometer range. Then, dense composite ceramics are prepared from a MgO-GDC mixture by sintering. The size of the crystallite domains in the sintered ceramic is in the upper nanometer range. TEM and TEM-EDX images of a new composite ceramic based on gadolinium-doped ceria and magnesia nanoparticles. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. In vivo dentate nucleus MRI relaxometry correlates with previous administration of Gadolinium-based contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedeschi, Enrico; Canna, Antonietta; Cocozza, Sirio; Russo, Carmela; Angelini, Valentina; Brunetti, Arturo [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Neuroradiology, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Palma, Giuseppe; Quarantelli, Mario [National Research Council, Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Borrelli, Pasquale; Salvatore, Marco [IRCCS SDN, Naples (Italy); Lanzillo, Roberta; Postiglione, Emanuela; Morra, Vincenzo Brescia [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate changes in T1 and T2* relaxometry of dentate nuclei (DN) with respect to the number of previous administrations of Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA). In 74 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) patients with variable disease duration (9.8±6.8 years) and severity (Expanded Disability Status Scale scores:3.1±0.9), the DN R1 (1/T1) and R2* (1/T2*) relaxation rates were measured using two unenhanced 3D Dual-Echo spoiled Gradient-Echo sequences with different flip angles. Correlations of the number of previous GBCA administrations with DN R1 and R2* relaxation rates were tested, including gender and age effect, in a multivariate regression analysis. The DN R1 (normalized by brainstem) significantly correlated with the number of GBCA administrations (p<0.001), maintaining the same significance even when including MS-related factors. Instead, the DN R2* values correlated only with age (p=0.003), and not with GBCA administrations (p=0.67). In a subgroup of 35 patients for whom the administered GBCA subtype was known, the effect of GBCA on DN R1 appeared mainly related to linear GBCA. In RR-MS patients, the number of previous GBCA administrations correlates with R1 relaxation rates of DN, while R2* values remain unaffected, suggesting that T1-shortening in these patients is related to the amount of Gadolinium given. (orig.)

  8. Differential diagnosis and prognosis of T1-weighted post-gadolinium intralabyrinthine hyperintensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubrulle, F.; Puech, P.; Ernst, O. [University Nord of France, Department of Radiology, CHU Lille, Huriez Hospital INSERM, Lille (France); Kohler, R. [CHU Lille, Huriez Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lille (France); Vincent, C. [CHU Lille, Department of Otology and Oto-neurosurgery, Lille (France)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of this longitudinal study is to describe the different intralabyrinthine lesions yielding high signal intensity on T1-weighted (T1W) images after intravenous gadolinium and then to analyze the follow-up of these patients. Thirty-seven patients were included and followed clinically and radiologically. A precise analysis of MR labyrinthine signals allowed exact depiction of the different lesions. Special interest is focused on the intralabyrinthine fluid signal on 3D high-resolution T2W images. The enhanced T1W labyrinthine hyperintensities correspond to two different categories: intralabyrinthine enhancement (15 intralabyrinthine schwannomas, 13 labyrinthitis, 1 inflammatory granuloma) and spontaneous T1W hyperintensities (8 intralabyrinthine hemorrhages). Hemorrhagic lesions show a substantial decrease of the intralabyrinthine fluid signal on the 3D HRT2 that evolves to ossification. In labyrinthitis, the importance of the initial labyrinthine fluid signal decrease on the 3D HRT2 is well correlated with the hearing prognosis. A meticulous analysis of inner ear lesions allows various intralabyrinthine lesions, in particular schwannomas, to be differentiated from labyrinthitis. T1W imaging without gadolinium is essential for the correct diagnosis of rapidly evolving hearing loss. In labyrinthitis and intralabyrinthine hemorrhage, 3D HRT2 brings an interesting prognostic factor for the chance of hearing recovery. (orig.)

  9. Gadolinium-148 And Other Spallation Production Cross Section Measurements For Accelerator Target Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, K C

    2004-01-01

    At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research facility and the 1L target at the Lujan Center. The Department of Energy requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on certain radionuclide inventories in the targets to avoid characterizing the facilities as “nuclear facilities.” Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten. Allowed isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of Gadolinium-148 is low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total dose burden for the two tungsten targets based on present yield estimates. From a hazard classification standpoint, this severely limits the lifetime of these tungsten targets. The cross section is not well-established experimentally and this is t...

  10. Structural and Chemical Analysis of Gadolinium Halides Encapsulated within WS 2 Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Anumol, E A

    2016-05-18

    The hollow cavities of nanotubes could serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of inorganic nanotubes of WS2 by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is a non-trivial matter due to the presence of multiple high atomic number elements. Therefore, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) tomography was employed revealing the three dimensional chemical composition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the filling procedure shed light into the mechanics behind the formation of the confined gadolinium halide crystals. The quasi-1D system employed here serves as an example of a TEM-based chemical nanotomography method that could be extended to other materials, including beam-sensitive soft materials.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium arthrography to assess acetabular cartilage delamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Edward; Lattanzio, Pierre-Jean; Beaule, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a promising technique in detecting articular cartilage lesions of the hip joint. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of MRI with gadolinium arthrography in detecting acetabular cartilage delamination in patients with pre-arthritic hip pain. 46 patients (48 hips) underwent surgical dislocation of the hip. Mean age was 38.8 (range 17-56). There were 26 males and 20 females. All patients had Magnetic Resonance Imaging with gadolinium arthrography (MRA) before undergoing open hip surgery where the acetabular cartilage was inspected. Acetabular cartilage delamination on MRA was seen on sagittal images as a linear intra-articular filling defect of low signal intensity >1mm in thickness on T1 weighted images and surrounded by contrast. On MRA all hips had a labral tear confirmed at surgery. At surgery 30 hips had evidence of acetabular cartilage delamination, 4 hips had ulceration and 14 had no articular cartilage damage. The majority of labral tears and cartilage damage were located in the antero-superior quadrant. The sensitivity and specificity of MRA detection of cartilage delamination confirmed at surgery were 97% and 84%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values of the MRA finding were 90% and 94%, respectively. The presence of the acetabular cartilage delamination represents an early stage of articular cartilage degeneration. When evaluating a young adult with hip pain, labral tears in association with cartilage delamination should be considered. MRA represents an effective diagnostic tool.

  12. Injection of gadolinium contrast through pediatric central venous catheters: a safety study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, John M.; Ramos, Yanerys; Finn, J.P. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kung, Geoffrey L. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Moghaddam, Abbas N. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ennis, Daniel B. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Program, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Catheter rupture during CT angiography has prompted policies prohibiting the use of electronic injectors with peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) not only for CT but also for MRI. Consequently, many institutions mandate hand injection for MR angiography, limiting precision of infusion rates and durations of delivery. To determine whether electronic injection of gadolinium-based contrast media through a range of small-caliber, single-lumen PICCs would be safe without risk of catheter rupture over the range of clinical protocols and determine whether programmed flow rates and volumes were realized when using PICCs for contrast delivery. Experiments were performed and recorded using the Medrad Spectris Solaris EP MR Injection System. PICC sizes, contrast media and flow rates were based on common institutional protocols. No catheters were damaged during any experiments. Mean difference between programmed and delivered volume was 0.07 {+-} 0.10 mL for all experiments. Reduced flow rates and prolonged injection durations were observed when the injector's pressure-limiting algorithm was triggered, only in protocols outside the clinical range. PICCs commonly used in children can withstand in vitro power injection of gadolinium-based contrast media at protocols significantly above clinical levels. (orig.)

  13. Gadolinium-deferasirox-D-glucosamine: novel anti-tumor and MR molecular (theranostic) imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanlou, Massoud; Mahian, Hossein; Rad, Ahmad Molaei; Delbaz, Seyed Ali; Ebrahimi, Seyed Esmaeil Sadat; Javidi, Amir; Arabzadeh, Ali Jabbari; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2013-09-01

    TARGET AND PURPOSE: Cancer and heart disease are hard maladies in human communities. To recognize these kinds of diseases in primary states can help for remission and decreasing the expenses. One of the best techniques for recognizing is imaging of the tissue. The main reason of this study is to survey the design of molecules Gd3+ -Defrasirox-DG as a type of glucose labeled with gadolinium to capture more specific cancer tissue and heart by MRI instrument as a technique extremely accurate and sensitive not too costly and lack of radioactive half-life compared with radioactive 18FDG as competing compound. In this research, glucose is combined with Deferasirox for making complexes with gadolinium. With replacing the new compound of advanced imaging technology, it transferred from nuclear medicine to Radiology and the results were evaluated in vitro and in vivo that indicated the success in imaging of the heart and cancer in animal tumor model. The mechanism of cancer cells death is through activation of TNF-α system. At present, due to the lack of radiation and radioactive half-life and low production cost and high access to MRI compared with PET, this compound can be considered as 18FDG opponent in the near future as the new MRI successor agent.

  14. High Relaxivity Gadolinium Hydroxypyridonate-Viral Capsid Conjugates: Nano-sized MRI Contrast Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meux, Susan C.; Datta, Ankona; Hooker, Jacob M.; Botta, Mauro; Francis, Matthew B.; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-08-29

    High relaxivity macromolecular contrast agents based on the conjugation of gadolinium chelates to the interior and exterior surfaces of MS2 viral capsids are assessed. The proton nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles of the conjugates show up to a five-fold increase in relaxivity, leading to a peak relaxivity (per Gd{sup 3+} ion) of 41.6 mM{sup -1}s{sup -1} at 30 MHz for the internally modified capsids. Modification of the exterior was achieved through conjugation to flexible lysines, while internal modification was accomplished by conjugation to relatively rigid tyrosines. Higher relaxivities were obtained for the internally modified capsids, showing that (1) there is facile diffusion of water to the interior of capsids and (2) the rigidity of the linker attaching the complex to the macromolecule is important for obtaining high relaxivity enhancements. The viral capsid conjugated gadolinium hydroxypyridonate complexes appear to possess two inner-sphere water molecules (q = 2) and the NMRD fittings highlight the differences in the local motion for the internal ({tau}{sub RI} = 440 ps) and external ({tau}{sub RI} = 310 ps) conjugates. These results indicate that there are significant advantages of using the internal surface of the capsids for contrast agent attachment, leaving the exterior surface available for the installation of tissue targeting groups.

  15. Thermal neutron capture cross section of gadolinium by pile-oscillation measurements in MINERVE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leconte, P.; Di-Salvo, J.; Antony, M.; Pepino, A. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Hentati, A. [International School in Nuclear Engineering, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2012-07-01

    Natural gadolinium is used as a burnable poison in most LWR to account for the excess of reactivity of fresh fuels. For an accurate prediction of the cycle length, its nuclear data and especially its neutron capture cross section needs to be known with a high precision. Recent microscopic measurements at Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) suggest a 11% smaller value for the thermal capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd, compared with most of evaluated nuclear data libraries. To solve this inconsistency, we have analyzed several pile-oscillation experiments, performed in the MINERVE reactor. They consist in the measurement of the reactivity variation involved by the introduction in the reactor of small-samples, containing different mass amounts of natural gadolinium. The analysis of these experiments is done through the exact perturbation theory, using the PIMS calculation tool, in order to link the reactivity effect to the thermal capture cross section. The measurement of reactivity effects is used to deduce the 2200 m.s-1 capture cross section of {sup nat}Gd which is (49360 {+-} 790) b. This result is in good agreement with the JEFF3.1.1 value (48630 b), within 1.6% uncertainty at 1{sigma}, but is strongly inconsistent with the microscopic measurements at RPI which give (44200 {+-} 500) b. (authors)

  16. Gadolinio y fibrosis sistémica nefrogénica Gadolinium and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cejas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Inicialmente llamada dermopatía fibrosante nefrogénica, la fibrosis sistémica nefrogénica (FSN está fuertemente ligada a la inyección endovenosa de medios de contraste -basados en gadolinio- en pacientes con insuficiencia renal. En esta revisión corta se analiza la fisiopatología y la clínica, la responsabilidad del radiólogo en la prevención a través de la puesta en práctica de las reglamentaciones vigentes y, por último, se mencionan algunos conceptos sobre el tratamiento de los pacientes con insuficiencia renal crónica que deben exponerse a la inyección de gadolinio.Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF, initially called nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy, is strongly linked to the intravenous injection of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with renal insufficiency. In this short review, we analyze the pathophysiology and clinical signs and symptoms, the medical responsibility of the radiologist in prevention through the implementation of the existing regulations and, finally, some concepts on the treatment of patients with chronic renal insufficiency who must receive a gadolinium injection.

  17. Tracing the spatial propagation of river inlet water into an agricultural polder area using anthropogenic gadolinium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rozemeijer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Diverting river water into agricultural areas or nature reserves is a frequently applied management strategy to prevent fresh water shortage. However, the river water might have negative consequences for chemical and ecological water quality in the receiving water bodies. This study aimed to obtain a spatial image of the diverted river water propagation into a hydrologically complex polder area, the polder Quarles van Ufford in The Netherlands. We used anthropogenic gadolinium (Gd-anomaly as a tracer for river water that was diverted into the polder. A clear reduction in the river water contribution was found between very dry conditions on 5 August 2010 and very wet conditions on 22 October. Despite the large river water impact on 5 August, the diverted river water did not propagate up into the small agricultural headwater ditches. Gadolinium proved to be an effective tracer for diverted river water in a polder system. We applied our results to upgrade the interpretation of water quality monitoring data and to validate an integrated nutrient transport model.

  18. Investigation of Plutonium and Uranium Precipitation Behavior with Gadolinium as a Neutron Poison

    CERN Document Server

    Visser, A E

    2003-01-01

    The caustic precipitation of plutonium (Pu)-containing solutions has been investigated to determine whether the presence of 3:1 uranium (U):Pu in solutions stored in the H-Canyon Facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) would adversely impact the use of gadolinium nitrate (Gd(NO3)3) as a neutron poison. In the past, this disposition strategy has been successfully used to discard solutions containing approximately 100 kg of Pu to the SRS high level waste (HLW) system. In the current experiments, gadolinium (as Gd(NO3)3) was added to samples of a 3:1 U:Pu solution, a surrogate 3 g/L U solution, and a surrogate 3 g/L U with 1 g/L Pu solution. A series of experiments was then performed to observe and characterize the precipitate at selected pH values. Solids formed at pH 4.5 and were found to contain at least 50 percent of the U and 94 percent of the Pu, but only 6 percent of the Gd. As the pH of the solution increased (e.g., pH greater than 14 with 1.2 or 3.6 M sodium hydroxide...

  19. Personality in Late Midlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Molbo, Drude

    2014-01-01

    To analyze associations in late midlife between sex, age, education and social class, and the Big Five personality traits; to analyze associations between personality traits and cognitive ability in late midlife; and to evaluate how these associations are influenced by demographic factors....

  20. The effects of the use of piezoelectric motors in a 1.5-Tesla high-field magnetic resonance imaging system (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, O; Oellinger, J; Lüth, T C; Felix, R; Boenick, U

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation with two different rotatory piezomotors in a closed 1.5 Tesla high-field MRI. The focus of the investigation was on testing the functionality of these motors within the MRI and to determining the image interference they caused. To obtain a differentiated estimate of the interference the motors were tested in both the passive (turned off, i.e. without current flow) and active (turned on, i.e. with current flow) state during MRI scanning. Three different types of sequences were used for the test: Spin-Echo (SE), Gradient-Echo (GE) and Echo-Planar Imaging (EPI). A plastic container filled with a gadolinium-manganese solution was used for representation of the artefacts. The motors investigated were placed parallel to the container at predetermined distances during the experiment. The results show that the motors investigated suffered no functional limitations in the magnetic field of the MRI but, depending on the type of motor, the measurement distance and the state of the motor, the motors had different effects on the sequence images. A motor in the off-state placed immediately next to the object to be measured mainly causes artefacts because of its material properties. If, on the other hand, the piezomotor is in the on-state images with strong noise result when the motor is immediately next to the object being measured. The images regain their normal quality when the motor is approximately at a distance of 1 m from the object being investigated. Driving the motor inside the MRI, therefore, is only to be recommended during the pauses in scanning: this delivers artefact-free images if minimal, motor-specific distances are kept to. With regard to the three different types of sequences it was determined that the SE sequence was the least sensitive and the EPI sequence the most sensitive to disturbance. The GE sequence showed only minimal differences to the SE sequence with regard to signal-to-noise ratios

  1. Design of the EuCARD High-Field Model Dipole Magnet FRESCA2

    CERN Document Server

    Milanese, A; Durante, M; Manil, P; Perez, J C; Rifflet, J M; de Rijk, G; Rondeaux, F

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the design of FRESCA2, a dipole magnet model wound with Nb3Sn Rutherford cable. This magnet is one of the deliverables of the High Field Magnets work package of the European FP7-EuCARD project. The nominal magnetic flux density of 13 Tesla in a 100 mm bore will make it suitable for upgrading the FRESCA cable test facility at CERN. The magnetic layout is based on a block coil, with four layers per pole. The mechanical structure is designed to provide adequate pre-stress, through the use of bladders, keys and an aluminum alloy shrinking cylinder.

  2. Design of the EuCARD high field model dipole magnet FRESCA2

    CERN Document Server

    Milanese, A; Durante, M; Manil, P; Perez, J-C; Rifflet, J-M; de Rijk, G; Rondeaux, F

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the design of FRESCA2, a dipole magnet model wound with Nb3Sn Rutherford cable. This magnet is one of the deliverables of the High Field Magnets work package of the European FP7-EuCARD project. The nominal magnetic flux density of 13 Tesla in a 100 mm bore will make it suitable for upgrading the FRESCA cable test facility at CERN. The magnetic layout is based on a block coil, with four layers per pole. The mechanical structure is designed to provide adequate pre-stress, through the use of bladders, keys and an aluminum alloy shrinking cylinder.

  3. Microstrip Resonator for High Field MRI with Capacitor-Segmented Strip and Ground Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Boer, Vincent; Petersen, Esben Thade

    2017-01-01

    ) segmenting stripe and ground plane of the resonator with series capacitors. The design equations for capacitors providing symmetric current distribution are derived. The performance of two types of segmented resonators are investigated experimentally. To authors’ knowledge, a microstrip resonator, where both......High field MRI coils are often based on transmission line resonators. Due to relatively short wavelength of RF fields, such coils produce uneven field patterns. Here we show, that it is possible to manipulate magnetic field patterns of microstrip resonators in both planes (sagittal and transverse......, strip and ground plane are capacitor-segmented, is shown here for the first time....

  4. Observation of thermoelectric currents in high-field superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolenda, Stefan; Wolf, Michael J.; Beckmann, Detlef [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We report on the experimental observation of thermoelectric currents in superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions in high magnetic fields. The thermoelectric signals are due to a spin-dependent lifting of particle-hole symmetry, and are found to be in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. The maximum Seebeck coefficient inferred from the data is about -100 μ V/K, much larger than commonly found in metalic structures. Our results directly give proof of the coupling of spin and heat transport in high-field superconductors.

  5. Generation of high-field narrowband terahertz radiation by counterpropagating plasma wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Annenkov, V. V.; Volchok, E. P.

    2017-10-01

    It is found that nonlinear interaction of plasma wakefields driven by counterpropagating laser or particle beams can efficiently generate high-power electromagnetic radiation at the second harmonic of the plasma frequency. Using a simple analytical theory and particle-in-cell simulations, we show that this phenomenon can be attractive for producing high-field ( ˜10 MV/cm) tunable terahertz radiation with a narrow line width. For laser drivers produced by existing petawatt-class systems, this nonlinear process opens the way to the generation of gigawatt, multi-millijoule terahertz pulses which are not presently available for any other generating schemes.

  6. A HIGH FIELD PULSED SOLENOID MAGNET FOR LIQUID METAL TARGET STUDIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIRK,H.G.IAROCCI,M.SCADUTO,J.WEGGEL,R.J.MULHOLLAND,G.MCDONALD,K.T.

    2003-05-12

    The target system for a muon collider/neutrino factory requires the conjunction of an intense proton beam, a high-Z liquid target and a high-field solenoid magnet. We describe here the design parameters for a pulsed solenoid, including the magnet cryogenic system and power supply, that can generate transient fields of greater than 10T with a flat-tops on the order of 1 second. It is envisioned to locate this device at the Brookhaven AGS for proof-of-principle testing of a liquid-jet target system with pulses of le13 protons.

  7. High-field magnetic resonance imaging of the human temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Colon-Perez

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Fresh ex vivo MR imaging, along with tractography, revealed complex intra-temporal structural variation corresponding to neuronal cell body layers, dendritic fields, and axonal projection systems evident histologically. This is the first study to describe in detail the human temporal lobe structural organization using high-field MR imaging and tractography. By preserving the 3-dimensional structures of the hippocampus and surrounding structures, specific changes in anatomy may inform us about the changes that occur in TLE in relation to the disease process and structural underpinnings in epilepsy-related memory dysfunction.

  8. Quantification of cerebral lateral ventricular volume in cats by low- and high-field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyborowska, Paulina; Adamiak, Zbigniew; Zhalniarovich, Yauheni

    2017-10-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate variations in lateral ventricles in the examined feline population with the use of quantitative analysis methods to determine whether sex or body weight influenced the size of the ventricles, and to identify any significant differences in the results of low- and high-field MRI. Methods Twenty healthy European Shorthair cats, aged 1-3 years, with body weights ranging from 2.85-4.35 kg, were studied. MRI of brain structures was performed in a low- and a high-field MRI system. The height of the brain and lateral ventricles at the level of the interthalamic adhesion, and volume of the lateral ventricles were determined in T2-weighted images in the transverse plane. The degree of symmetry of lateral ventricles was analysed based on the ratio of right to left ventricular volume. The measured parameters were processed statistically to determine whether sex and body weight were significantly correlated with variations in ventricular anatomy. The results of low- and high-field MRI were analysed to evaluate for any significant differences. Results The average brain height was determined to be 27.79 mm, and the average height of the left and right ventricles were 2.98 mm and 2.89 mm, respectively. The average ventricle/brain height ratio was 10.61%. The average volume of the left ventricle was 134.12 mm3 and the right ventricle was 130.49 mm3. Moderately enlarged ventricles were observed in two cats. Moderate ventricular asymmetry was described in four cats. Sex and body weight had no significant effect on the evaluated parameters. The differences in the results of low- and high-field MRI were not statistically significant. Conclusions and relevance This study has determined reference intervals for ventricular volume in a population of European Shorthair cats without brain disease, which will facilitate the interpretation of MRI images and the characterisation of brain abnormalities in cats with neurological disease. Further

  9. Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the Region of Samarium, Europium, and Gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, R D; Kelley, K; Dietrich, F S; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2004-11-30

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron and proton induced nuclear reaction cross sections in the mass region of samarium, europium and gadolinium (62 {le} Z {le} 64, 82 {le} N {le} 96).

  10. Image registration improves human knee cartilage T1 mapping with delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.E. Bron (Esther); J. van Tiel (Jasper); H.A. Smit (Henk); D.H.J. Poot; W.J. Niessen (Wiro); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); E.H.G. Oei (Edwin); G. Kotek (Gyula); S. Klein (Stefan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To evaluate the effect of automated registration in delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) of the knee on the occurrence of movement artefacts on the T1 map and the reproducibility of region-of-interest (ROI)-based measurements. Methods: Eleven patients with

  11. Gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography after low-dose diuretic injection: comparison with conventional excretory urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C C; Bücker, A; Adam, G B; Neuerburg, J M; Jung, P; Hunter, D W; Jakse, G; Günther, R W

    1998-10-01

    To evaluate the clinical utility and morphologic accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced excretory magnetic resonance (MR) urography after low-dose diuretic injection and to correlate the results with those of conventional urography. In 71 patients with urologic symptoms, excretory MR urography was performed after intravenous injection of 5-10 mg furosemide and, 30-60 seconds later, 0.1 mmol of gadopentetate dimeglumine per kilogram of body weight. The MR urograms were interpreted by three radiologists, who were blinded to the clinical outcome, and subsequently compared with conventional urograms. Injection of furosemide before contrast material led to rapid, uniform gadolinium distribution inside a sufficiently distended collecting system such that there was no excessive concentration of gadolinium in the urine. In patients with normal or moderately reduced excretory function, this effect allowed complete visualization of the urinary tract within 5-20 minutes of contrast material injection while minimizing gadolinium-related endoluminal T2* effects. The clinical course helped verify almost all MR urographic results. The MR urographic technique was significantly superior to conventional urography in the assessment of the ureters and bladder (P urography (P excretory MR urography performed after low-dose diuretic injection is a promising and accurate alternative to conventional excretory urography for imaging the morphology of the urinary tract.

  12. Differentiation between benign and malignant colon tumors using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR colonography; a feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, M P; Andersen, L P H; Klein, M

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer will present itself as a bowel obstruction in 16-23% of all cases. However, not all obstructing tumors are malignant and the differentiation between a benign and a malignant tumor can be difficult. The purpose of our study was to determine whether fast dynamic gadolinium...

  13. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dGEMRIC) of Hip Joint Cartilage: Better Cartilage Delineation after Intra-Articular than Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M.; Jensen, K.E.; Quistgaard, E.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate and compare delayed gadolinium (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the hip joint using intravenous (i.v.) or ultrasound-guided intra-articular (i.a.) Gd-DTPA injection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 10 patients (50% males, mean age 58...... years) with clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA; Kellgren score II-III), MRI of the hip was performed twice on a clinical 1.5T MR scanner: On day 1, before and 90-180 min after 0.3 mmol/kg body weight i.v. Gd-DTPA and, on day 8, 90-180 min after ultrasound-guided i.a. injection of a 4 mmol....../l Gd-DTPA solution. Coronal STIR, coronal T1 fat-saturated spin-echo, and a cartilage-sensitive gradient-echo sequence (3D T1 SPGR) in the sagittal plane were applied. RESULTS Both the post-i.v. and post-i.a. Gd-DTPA images showed significantly higher signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR...

  14. [Survey of risks related to static magnetic fields in ultra high field MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, H E; von Cramon, D Y

    2008-04-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), substantial improvements with respect to sensitivity are expected due to the development of so-called ultra high field scanners, i. e., whole-body scanners with a magnetic field strength of 7 T or above. Users of this technology need to evaluate this benefit for potential risks since commercially available systems are not certified as a medical device for human use. This review provides a detailed survey of static field bioeffects related to the exposure of subjects being scanned, to occupational exposure, and to exposure of the general public under consideration of current standards and directives. According to present knowledge, it is not expected that exposure of human subjects to static magnetic fields of 7 T implies a specific risk of damage or disease provided that known contraindications are observed. The available database does not permit definition of exact thresholds for harmful effects. However, experience from previous application of ultra high field MRI indicates that transient phenomena, such as vertigo, nausea, metallic taste, or magneto-phosphenes, are more frequently observed. In particular, movements in the field or the gradient of the fringe field seem to lead to detectable effects. Besides such observations, there is a strong demand for systematic investigation of potential interaction mechanisms related to static field exposure during MRI examinations.

  15. Thermal Design of an Nb3Sn High Field Accelerator Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Pietrowicz, S

    2011-01-01

    Within the framework of the European project EuCARD, a Nb3Sn high field accelerator magnet is under design to serve as a test bed for future high field magnets and to upgrade the vertical CERN cable test facility, Fresca. The Fresca 2 block coil type magnet will be operated at 1.9 K or 4.2 K and is designed to produce about 13 T. A 2D numerical thermal model was developed to determinate the temperature margin of the coil in working conditions and the appropriate cool-down scenario. The temperature margin, which is DTmarge=5.8 K at 1.9 K and DTmarge=3.5 K at 4.2 K, was investigated in steady state condition with the AC losses due to field ramp rate as input heat generation. Several cool-down scenarios were examined in order to minimize the temperature difference and therefore reducing the mechanical constraints within the structure. The paper presents the numerical model, the assumptions taken for the calculations and several results of the simulation for the cool-down and temperature distributions due to seve...

  16. Network Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s Disease via MRI based Shape Diffeomorphometry and High Field Atlasing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I Miller

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines MRI analysis of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD in a network of structures within the medial temporal lobe using diffeomorphometry methods coupled with high-field atlasing in which the entorhinal cortex is partitioned into nine subareas. The morphometry markers for three groups of subjects (controls, preclinical AD and symptomatic AD are indexed to template coordinates measured with respect to these nine subareas. The location and timing of changes are examined within the subareas as it pertains to the classic Braak and Braak staging by comparing the three groups. We demonstrate that the earliest preclinical changes in the population occur in the lateral most sulcal extent in the entorhinal cortex (alluded to as trans entorhinal cortex by Braak and Braak, and then proceeds medially which is consistent with the Braak and Braak staging. We use high field 11T atlasing to demonstrate that the network changes are occurring at the junctures of the substructures in this medial temporal lobe network. Temporal progression of the disease through the network is also examined via changepoint analysis demonstrating earliest changes in entorhinal cortex. The differential expression of rate of atrophy with progression signaling the changepoint time across the network is demonstrated to be signaling in the intermediate caudal subarea of the entorhinal cortex, which has been noted to be proximal to the hippocampus. This coupled to the findings of the nearby basolateral involvement in amygdala demonstrates the selectivity of neurodegeneration in early AD.

  17. High field magnetization and specific heat of ErNi{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayzel, F.E.; Franse, J.J.M. [Univ. van Amsterdam (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Lab.; Radwanski, R.J. [Centre for Solid State Physics, Krakow (Poland)

    1994-03-01

    High field magnetization studies of single crystalline ErNi{sub 5} in fields up to 38T at 1.5K along the main crystallographic directions have been performed. Along the easy direction, the hexagonal axis, the spontaneous magnetization, M{sub s}, amounts to 8.62{mu}{sub B}/f.u. The high-field susceptibility is very small and equal to 41 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}{mu}{sub B}/Tf.u. There exists a distinct difference between the curves along the a- and b-axis. The a-axis curve monotonously increases with field up to 38T. The b-axis curve coincides with the a-axis curve up to 12T but starts to deviate from it above this field, resulting in a value for the magnetization at 38T which is almost the full moment value. The specific beat of a newly-grown single-crystalline sample has been measured in zero field and in applied fields along the c-axis (B = 0.3, 1, 2, 5T). The zero-field measurements coincide with previously reported results The specific heat shows a rapid decrease of the ferrimagnetic order with applied field. Already in 1T, the sharp lambda-type of peak at the magnetic transition is decreased by two third and becomes a broad bump that coincides with the la measurement above 30K. Higher fields further suppress the transition.

  18. High field volume coil with unbalance current distribution for MRI applications of rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrufo, O. R.; Hernández, J.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2010-12-01

    The development of transceiver volume coils for high field MRI is still a very dynamic field of investigation and development Temnikov has been recently proposed a new volume coil design, similar to the to the gradiometer coil. It is also claimed that it is possible to individually tune it with a single chip capacitor. This motivated the development of a coil prototype based on this idea for whole-body MRI of rodents at 7 Tesla. Electromagnetic simulations of the RF field generated by this coil design were previously performed to study its properties. Electromagnetic simulations were also conducted for a standard birdcage coil with similar dimensions for fare comparison. In all numerical simulations, an unbalanced currents distribution was assumed by applying half the current intensity to designated legs. This coil design operated in the transceiver mode and was linear-driven. The coil size was manufactured to accommodate small rodents. Numerical simulations showed a field uniformity improvement of our coil over the standard birdcage coil. A popular birdcage coil was also constructed to compare their performances. Phantom and rat images were acquired for both volume coils to prove the viability of this coil design for high field MRI applications and standard spin echo pulse sequences Thus, these preliminary results make this coil design a good candidate for MRI and MRS applications of high magnetic fields.

  19. Powder-in-tube (PIT) $Nb_{3}Sn$ conductors for high-field magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Lindenhovius, J L H; den Ouden, A; Wessel, W A J; ten Kate, H H J

    2000-01-01

    New Nb/sub 3/Sn conductors, based on the powder-in-tube (PIT) process, have been developed for application in accelerator magnets and high-field solenoids. For application in accelerator magnets, SMI has developed a binary 504 filament PIT conductor by optimizing the manufacturing process and adjustment of the conductor lay-out. It uniquely combines a non-copper current density of 2680 A/mm/sup 2/@10 T with an effective filament diameter of about 20 mu m. This binary conductor may be used in a 10 T, wide bore model separator dipole magnet for the LHC, which is being developed by a collaboration of the University of Twente and CERN. A ternary (Nb/7.5wt%Ta)/sub 3/Sn conductor containing 37 filaments is particularly suited for application in extremely high-field superconducting solenoids. This wire features a copper content of 43%, a non-copper current density of 217 A/mm/sup 2/@20 T and a B/sub c2/ of 25.6 T. The main issues and the experimental results of the development program of PIT Nb/sub 3/Sn conductors a...

  20. Considerations on a Cost Model for High-Field Dipole Arc Magnets for FCC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078700; Durante, Maria; Lorin, Clement; Martinez, Teresa; Ruuskanen, Janne; Salmi, Tiina; Sorbi, Massimo; Tommasini, Davide; Toral, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    In the frame of the European Circular Collider (EuroCirCol), a conceptual design study for a post-Large Hadron Collider (LHC) research infrastructure based on an energy-frontier 100 TeV circular hadron collider [1]–[3], a cost model for the high-field dipole arc magnets is being developed. The aim of the cost model in the initial design phase is to provide the basis for sound strategic decisions towards cost effective designs, in particular: (A) the technological choice of superconducting material and its cost, (B) the target performance of Nb3Sn superconductor, (C) the choice of operating temperature (D) the relevant design margins and their importance for cost, (E) the nature and extent of grading, and (F) the aperture’s influence on cost. Within the EuroCirCol study three design options for the high field dipole arc magnets are under study: cos − θ [4], block [5], and common-coil [6]. Here, in the advanced design phase, a cost model helps to (1) identify the cost drivers and feed-back this informati...

  1. The role of high-field magnetic resonance imaging in parkinsonian disorders: Pushing the boundaries forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehericy, Stéphane; Vaillancourt, David E; Seppi, Klaus; Monchi, Oury; Rektorova, Irena; Antonini, Angelo; McKeown, Martin J; Masellis, Mario; Berg, Daniela; Rowe, James B; Lewis, Simon J G; Williams-Gray, Caroline H; Tessitore, Alessandro; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2017-04-01

    Historically, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has contributed little to the study of Parkinson's disease (PD), but modern MRI approaches have unveiled several complementary markers that are useful for research and clinical applications. Iron- and neuromelanin-sensitive MRI detect qualitative changes in the substantia nigra. Quantitative MRI markers can be derived from diffusion weighted and iron-sensitive imaging or volumetry. Functional brain alterations at rest or during task performance have been captured with functional and arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI. These markers are useful for the diagnosis of PD and atypical parkinsonism, to track disease progression from the premotor stages of these diseases and to better understand the neurobiological basis of clinical deficits. A current research goal using MRI is to generate time-dependent models of the evolution of PD biomarkers that can help understand neurodegeneration and provide reliable markers for therapeutic trials. This article reviews recent advances in MRI biomarker research at high-field (3T) and ultra high field-imaging (7T) in PD and atypical parkinsonism. © 2017 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  2. Conceptual Design of the 45 T Hybrid Magnet at the Nijmegen High Field Magnet Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegers, SAJ; Bird, M D; Rook, J; Perenboom, J A A J; Wiegers, S A J; Bonito-Oliva, A; den Ouden, A

    2010-01-01

    A 45 T Hybrid Magnet System is being developed at the Nijmegen High Field Magnet Laboratory as part of the Nijmegen Center for Advanced Spectroscopy. The 45 T Hybrid Magnet System will be used in combination with far-infra-red light produced by a Free Electron Laser under construction directly adjacent to the High Field Magnet Laboratory. The superconducting outsert magnet will consist of three CICC coils wound on a single coil form, using Nb3Sn strands. A test program for strand and cable qualification is underway. The CICC will carry 13 kA and the coils will produce 12 T on axis field in a 600 mm warm bore. The nominal operating temperature will be 4.5 K maintained with forced-flow supercritical helium. The insert magnet will produce 33 T at 40 kA in a 32 mm bore consuming 20 MW, and will consist of four coils. The insert magnet will be galvanically and mechanically isolated from the outsert magnet. Complete system availability for users is expected in 2014. In this paper we will report on the conceptual de...

  3. B0 mapping with multi-channel RF coils at high field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Simon; Jovicich, Jorge

    2011-10-01

    Mapping the static magnetic field via the phase evolution over gradient echo scans acquired at two or more echo times is an established method. A number of possibilities exist, however, for combining phase data from multi-channel coils, denoising and thresholding field maps for high field applications. Three methods for combining phase images when no body/volume coil is available are tested: (i) Hermitian product, (ii) phase-matching over channels, and (iii) a new approach based on calculating separate field maps for each channel. The separate channel method is shown to yield field maps with higher signal-to-noise ratio than the Hermitian product and phase-matching methods and fewer unwrapping errors at low signal-to-noise ratio. Separate channel combination also allows unreliable voxels to be identified via the standard deviation over channels, which is found to be the most effective means of denoising field maps. Tests were performed using multichannel coils with between 8 and 32 channels at 3 T, 4 T, and 7 T. For application in the correction of distortions in echo-planar images, a formulation is proposed for reducing the local gradient of field maps to eliminate signal pile-up or swapping artifacts. Field maps calculated using these techniques, implemented in a freely available MATLAB toolbox, provide the basis for an effective correction for echo-planar imaging distortions at high fields. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Widespread inflammation in CLIPPERS syndrome indicated by autopsy and ultra-high-field 7T MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Morten; Ruprecht, Klemens; Sinnecker, Tim

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if there is widespread inflammation in the brain of patients with chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) syndrome by using histology and ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T. METHODS: We performed a detailed neuropath......OBJECTIVE: To examine if there is widespread inflammation in the brain of patients with chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) syndrome by using histology and ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T. METHODS: We performed a detailed...... neuropathologic examination in 4 cases, including 1 autopsy case, and studied 2 additional patients by MRI at 7.0T to examine (1) extension of inflammation to areas appearing normal on 3.0T MRI, (2) potential advantages of 7.0T MRI compared to 3.0T MRI in reflecting widespread inflammation, perivascular pathology......, and axonal damage, and (3) the possibility of lymphoma. RESULTS: In the autopsy case, perivascular inflammation dominated by CD4+ T cells was not only detected in the brainstem and cerebellum but also in brain areas with normal appearance on 3.0T MRI, including supratentorial regions and cranial nerve roots...

  5. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for hepato mesenteric vascular evaluation: single and double doses comparison in schistosomiasis patients; Estudo da circulacao hepatomesenterica pela angiografia por ressonancia magnetica com gadolinio: comparacao entre doses simples e dupla no estudo de pacientes esquistossomoticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi; Bezerra, Alexandre Sergio de Araujo; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: rogercal@uol.com.br

    2006-07-15

    Objective: to evaluate the visibility of hepatomesenteric vascular segments by 3D gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and to compare the method effectiveness between two different gadolinium doses (single and double doses). Materials and methods: a prospective study was performed with 36 schistosomiasis patients who were submitted to 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography. Scans were performed in a high-field equipment (1.5 T), with body coil and power injector for intravenous contrast administration. Contrast double doses (Gd-DTPA 0.2 mmol/kg) and single doses (0.1 mmol/kg) were randomly used respectively in 21 and 15 patients. Studies were interpreted by consensus between two observers who have rated the visualization degree of 25 proximal vascular segments without knowing the dose used. Results: proximal and calibrous vascular segments have presented higher visualization degree in the greatest part of the sample studied. The celiac trunk, common hepatic artery, splenic artery, proximal and medium third of superior mesenteric artery, portal vein, splenic vein and superior mesenteric vein have presented grade 2 visualization in more than 70% of the sample studied. As regards comparison between different doses, there was no significant difference (p < 0.05) in the visualization degree of several structures evaluated, between double dose and single dose groups, except for an isolate case of evaluation of right hepatic artery (p = 0.008) in which the single dose group has presented a higher frequency of grade 2 visualization with statistical significance. Conclusion: the visualization degree of hepato mesenteric vascular segments by 3D gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography is high, especially in the proximal and calibrous segments. The comparison between groups using single and double contrast doses has demonstrated similar results. (author)

  6. Anatomic distribution of gadolinium contrast medium by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging after peribulbar and retrobulbar injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, David R P; Belliveau, Michel J; Enright, Thomas; Islam, Omar; El-Defrawy, Sherif R; Gale, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    To examine the anatomic distribution of gadolinium contrast medium by high-resolution surface-coil magnetic resonance imaging after peribulbar and retrobulbar injection. Comparative case series in which 4 healthy volunteers were randomized to peribulbar (n = 2) or retrobulbar (n = 2) injection of gadolinium and lidocaine hydrochloride, 2%, without epinephrine. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed before injection and at 5 minutes and 90 minutes after injection. The peribulbar injection technique resulted in contrast medium primarily in the extraconal space, with no gadolinium observed at the orbital apex; surprisingly, a small amount of contrast medium was observed in the pterygopalatine fossa immediately after peribulbar injection. The retrobulbar injection technique resulted in gadolinium signal diffusely enhancing the intraconal space, orbital apex, optic nerve sheath, and optic canal. The signal intensity was clearly observed in the cavernous sinus surrounding the cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery. A small amount of contrast medium was detected in the pterygopalatine fossa. The retrobulbar injection technique localizes to the intraconal space, with access to intracranial and central nervous system structures via the optic canal, superior orbital fissure, and cavernous sinus. In contrast, the peribulbar injection technique produces a mostly extraconal distribution; however, intraconal solution may communicate with the central nervous system via the inferior orbital fissure and pterygopalatine fossa. This novel finding suggests that peribulbar anesthesia has a readily accessible route for central nervous system toxic effects. Magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium contrast medium administration provides an important methodological advantage over previously described techniques and is a safe, reproducible, and superior method of orbital imaging.

  7. Progressing Toward a Cohesive Pediatric 18F-FDG PET/MR Protocol: Is Administration of Gadolinium Chelates Necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Christopher; Gawande, Rakhee; Tran, Vy Thao; Leung, Jennifer Trinh; Chi, Kevin; Owen, Daniel; Luna-Fineman, Sandra; Sakamoto, Kathleen M; McMillan, Alex; Quon, Andy; Daldrup-Link, Heike E

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing availability of integrated PET/MR scanners, the utility and need for MR contrast agents for combined scans is questioned. The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether administration of gadolinium chelates is necessary for evaluation of pediatric tumors on (18)F-FDG PET/MR images. First, in 119 pediatric patients with primary and secondary tumors, we used 14 diagnostic criteria to compare the accuracy of several MR sequences: unenhanced T2-weighted fast spin-echo imaging; unenhanced diffusion-weighted imaging; and-before and after gadolinium chelate contrast enhancement-T1-weighted 3-dimensional spoiled gradient echo LAVA (liver acquisition with volume acquisition) imaging. Next, in a subset of 36 patients who had undergone (18)F-FDG PET within 3 wk of MRI, we fused the PET images with the unenhanced T2-weighted MR images (unenhanced (18)F-FDG PET/MRI) and the enhanced T1-weighted MR images (enhanced (18)F-FDG PET/MRI). Using the McNemar test, we compared the accuracy of the two types of fused images using the 14 diagnostic criteria. We also evaluated the concordance between (18)F-FDG avidity and gadolinium chelate enhancement. The standard of reference was histopathologic results, surgical notes, and follow-up imaging. There was no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between the unenhanced and enhanced MR images. Accordingly, there was no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between the unenhanced and enhanced (18)F-FDG PET/MR images. (18)F-FDG avidity and gadolinium chelate enhancement were concordant in 30 of the 36 patients and 106 of their 123 tumors. Gadolinium chelate administration is not necessary for accurate diagnostic characterization of most solid pediatric malignancies on (18)F-FDG PET/MR images, with the possible exception of focal liver lesions. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  8. Tolerance and long-term MRI imaging of gadolinium-modified meshes used in soft organ repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Letouzey

    Full Text Available Synthetic meshes are frequently used to reinforce soft tissues. The aim of this translational study is to evaluate tolerance and long-term MRI visibility of two recently developed Gadolinium-modified meshes in a rat animal model.Gadolinium-poly-ε-caprolactone (Gd-PCL and Gadolinium-polymethylacrylate (Gd-PMA modified meshes were implanted in Wistar rats and their tolerance was assessed daily. Inflammation and biocompatibility of the implants were assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry after 30 days post implantation. Implants were visualised by 7T and 3T MRI at day 30 and at day 90. Diffusion of Gadolinium in the tissues of the implanted animals was assessed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.Overall Gd-PMA coated implants were better tolerated as compared to those coated with Gd-PCL. In fact, Gd-PMA implants were characterised by a high ratio collagen I/III and good vascularisation of the integration tissues. High resolution images of the coated mesh were obtained in vivo with experimental 7T as well as 3T clinical MRI. Mass spectrometry analyses showed that levels of Gadolinium in animals implanted with coated mesh were similar to those of the control group.Meshes coated with Gd-PMA are better tolerated as compared to those coated with Gd-PCL as no signs of erosion or significant inflammation were detected at 30 days post implantation. Also, Gd-PMA coated meshes were clearly visualised with both 7T and 3T MRI devices. This new technique of mesh optimisation may represent a valuable tool in soft tissue repair and management.

  9. TSPO imaging in glioblastoma multiforme: A direct comparison between 123ICLINDE-SPECT, 18F-FET PET and gadolinium-enhanced MRI.

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Per; Feng, Li; Law, Ian; Svarer, Claus; Knudsen, Gitte M.; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; de Nijs, Robin; Larsen, Vibeke A; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Thomsen, Gerda; Fischer, Walter; Guilloteau, Denis; Pinborg, Lars H.

    2015-01-01

    Here we compare TSPO imaging using 123 I-CLINDE and amino acid transport imaging using 18 F-FET and investigate if 123 I-CLINDE is superior to 18 F-FET in predictingprogression of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) at follow up. Methods  Three patients with WHO grade IV GBM were scanned with 123 I-CLINDE SPECT, 18 F-FET PET and Gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (gadolinium-MRI). Molecular imaging data were compared to follow-up gadolinium-MRI or contrast enhanc...

  10. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-gadolinium (DTPA-Gd)-conjugated polysuccinimide derivatives as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ha Young; Jee, Hye Won; Seo, Sung Mi; Kwak, Byung Kook; Khang, Gilson; Cho, Sun Hang

    2006-01-01

    Biocompatible polysuccinimide (PSI) derivatives conjugated with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium (DTPA-Gd) were prepared as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. In this study, we synthesized PSI derivatives incorporating methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) as hydrophilic ligand, hexadecylamine as hydrophobic ligand, and DTPA-Gd as contrast agent. PSI was synthesized by the polycondensation polymerization of aspartic acid. All the synthesized materials were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). Critical micellization concentrations were determined using fluorescent probes (pyrene). Micelle size and shape were measured by electro-photometer light scattering (ELS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The formed micelle size ranged from 100 to 300 nm. The T1-weighted MR images of the phantom prepared with PSI-mPEG-C16-(DTPA-Gd) were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager, and the conjugates showed a great potential as MRI contrast agents.

  11. General synthesis route to fabricate uniform upconversion luminescent gadolinium oxide hollow spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Guang; Zhang, Cuimiao; Ding, Shiwen; Wang, Liyong

    2011-08-01

    Uniform upconversion luminescent gadolinium oxide hollow spheres were successfully synthesized via a homogeneous precipitation method with carbon spheres as template followed by a calcination process. During the annealing process, the carbon spheres template can be effectively removed and the amorphous precursor has converted to crystalline Gd2O3, which can be confirmed by the XRD and TG-DSC analysis. SEM and TEM images indicate that the Gd2O3 hollow spheres with diameters of 300-400 nm are uniform in size and distribution. The rare earth activator ions Ln3+-doped Gd2O3 hollow spheres exhibit intense upconversion luminescence with different colors under 980 nm light excitation, which may find potential applications in the fields such as drug delivery or biological labeling. Moreover, the upconversion luminescent mechanisms of the hollow spherical phosphors were investigated in detail.

  12. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging in active and inactive immunoinflammatory gonarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Lorenzen, I; Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    intensity increase on early dynamic FLASH images higher by far than the CIG knees, while no significant difference was found on spin-echo images obtained 5 to 15 min after contrast injection. The early signal enhancement probably reflects the perfusion and capillary permeability of the synovium. The area...... of synovium could differentiate between healthy and arthritic knees. Gadolinium-enhanced dynamic FLASH imaging may provide clinically useful information about the actual inflammatory activity of arthritic joints.......Dynamic T1-weighted FLASH MR imaging, obtained just after i.v. gadopentetate dimeglumine injection, and pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted spin-echo (T1-SE) MR imaging were performed to compare their information value with respect to inflammatory activity in immunoinflammatory gonarthritis. We...

  13. Iron implantation in gadolinium gallium garnet studied by conversion-electron Moessbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Szucs, I; Fetzer, C; Langouche, G

    1998-01-01

    Gadolinium gallium garnet single crystals were implanted with doses of sup 5 sup 7 Fe ions in the range 8x10 sup 1 sup 5 - 6x10 sup 1 sup 6 atoms cm sup - sup 2. Depending on the dose, iron with Fe sup 2 sup + or Fe sup 3 sup + charge states was found to have formed after the implantation. After a subsequent annealing in air, the iron oxidized to Fe sup 3 sup +. The Moessbauer and channelling measurements showed lattice recrystallization taking place at 600 deg. C. After recrystallization, the iron was found to have substituted for gallium ions both at the octahedral and at the tetrahedral positions. The relative concentration of the two types of iron at the two sites shifted towards the equilibrium distribution upon high-temperature annealing. (author)

  14. Radicals as EPR probes of magnetization of gadolinium stearate Langmuir-Blodgett film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koksharov, Y.A.; Bykov, I.V.; Malakho, A.P.

    2002-01-01

    the Gd and Y stearate LB films. Placing the small BDPA crystal on the film surface we have found that for the Gd LB sample the effective g-value of the radical's resonance depends on the film orientation in respect to the external magnetic field direction. The relative shift of the EPR signal......In the present work we have applied the method of the EPR spin probes which allows performing simultaneously EPR and magnetization measurements to the investigation of magnetism of the Cid stearate Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films. For this purpose we have prepared and studied by the EPR technique...... corresponded to the magnetization of the film along the field direction. Such effect has not been observed for the Y stearate LB film. The data obtained give an experimental proof for the room temperature. magnetic ordering in the! gadolinium stearate LB film....

  15. Stress-Relaxation Behavior of Magnesium-3Gadolinium-2Calcium-Based Alloys at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Ning; Tan, Qiyang; Jiang, Bin; Pan, Fusheng; Zhang, Ming-Xing

    2017-11-01

    Based on previously published work on binary Mg alloys by Abaspour et al. and on the magnesium (Mg)-6gadolinium (Gd)-2zinc (Zn)-0.6zirconium (Zr) (wt pct) alloy reported by Nie et al., a number of new lower-cost Mg-3Gd-2calcium (Ca) (wt pct)-based creep-resistant magnesium alloys were developed by replacing part of the Gd with Ca. After solution treatment at 793 K (520 °C), the Ca-containing alloys exhibited an increased strength and a reduced stress relaxation at 453 K (180 °C) compared with the Mg-6Gd-2Zn-0.6Zr (wt pct) alloy. This work indicates that the replacement of Gd with Ca is a promising approach to develop lower-cost Mg alloys with an improved creep resistance. The results support the hypothesis that the short-range order of solutes governs the creep behavior of magnesium alloys.

  16. Fatal anaphylactic reaction to intravenous gadobutrol, a gadolinium-based MRI contrast agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Franckenberg, MD

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the rare case of a fatal anaphylactic reaction to gadobutrol, a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent, in a 42-year-old man. The patient underwent elective magnetic resonance imaging for diagnostic clarification of a suspicious finding in the abdomen. The patient had undergone contrast-enhanced computed tomography previously without the occurrence of any adverse effects. Adverse drug reactions in gadobutrol have a very low prevalence of 0.32%-3.5%, with serious adverse drug reactions in <0.1%. There are only a few cases of fatal anaphylactoid reactions to gadolinium-based contrast agents in general. However, if an anaphylactoid reaction occurs, it can present itself with a fulminant course within minutes.

  17. Nanosystem composed with MSNs, gadolinium, liposome and cytotoxic peptides for tumor theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yaqing; Zhang, Nengpan; Li, Chunlin; Pu, Kefeng; Ding, Chen; Zhu, Yimin

    2017-03-01

    A dual-functional delivery system, based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with the integration of Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging and therapeutic peptide delivery, is reported in this paper. A lipid bilayer is attached onto the surface of the nanoparticles, following the doping of Gadolinium (Gd), a paramagnetic lanthanide ion. The liposome-coated GdMSNs exhibit improved colloidal stability, better biocompatibility and more efficient cellular uptake. The Gd renders the nano carrier a potential T1 contrast agent, confirmed by the MR imaging. A pro-apoptotic peptide, KLA (HGGKLAKLAKKLAKLAK), is encapsulated into the GdMSNs-LP and enters into the cells successfully to induce mitochondrial swelling and apoptosis, while it is nontoxic outside the cells. The synthesis procedure is convenient and free of toxic organic reagents. The nanosystem we construct may contribute to a promising theranostic platform for therapeutic peptide delivery in cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dielectric and conducting behavior of gadolinium-terbium fumarate heptahydrate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M. D.; Want, B.

    2015-07-01

    Gadolinium-terbium fumarate heptahydrate crystals were grown in silica gel by using single gel diffusion technique. The crystals were characterized by different physico-chemical techniques of characterization. Powder X-ray diffraction results showed that the grown material is purely crystalline in nature. Elemental analyses suggested the chemical formula of the compound to be Gd Tb (C4H2O4)3ṡ7H2O. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed the presence of Gd and Tb in the title compound. The dielectric and conductivity studies of the grown compound were carried as function of frequency of applied field and the temperature. The grown material showed a dielectric anomaly which was correlated with its thermal behavior. The ac conductivity of the material showed Jonscher's power law behavior: σ(ω)=σo+Aωs, with a temperature-dependent power exponent s(<1). The conductivity was found to be a function of temperature and frequency.

  19. Characteristics of cerium-gadolinium oxide (CGO) suspensions as a function of dispersant and powder properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phair, John; Lönnroth, Nadja; Lundberg, Mats

    2009-01-01

    with the lowest viscosity at 1 wt.% dispersant and was chosen for subsequent suspension preparations. Increasing the surface area (from 7.0 to 35.5 m2/g) of the CGO powder lead to an increase in the viscosity of the suspension prepared with constant dispersant wt.%. The viscosity data obeyed the Herschel......A series of concentrated suspensions ( = 0.18–0.34) of cerium-gadolinium oxide (CGO) in terpineol were prepared as a function of dispersant, powder surface area and solids concentration. The stability of the suspensions was assessed by rheological measurements including viscosity and oscillatory...... measurements. Six dispersants with different molecular weights and terminal groups were compared for their relative efficiency in dispersing the powders by viscosity measurements. A Rhodafac dispersant, a long chain polymer containing phosphoric acid terminal groups, was found to produce suspensions...

  20. Analysis of Blood Gadolinium in an Isotope Geochemist Following Contrast MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylenki, L. E.

    2011-12-01

    Normal brain tissue does not have blood flowing throughout it; instead oxygen diffuses across a blood-brain barrier in order to oxygenate brain cells. Brain tumors, however, do grow blood supplies, so an abnormal distribution of blood in the brain is a key indicator of abnormal cell growth. But how is the distribution of blood in inside the brain observed? The lanthanide ion gadolinium(III) has unpaired 5f-shell electrons and is thus paramagnetic. As such, the presence of Gd causes the nuclei of nearby atoms to relax more quickly when excited to high-energy spin states by pulses of radio-frequency energy than they would without Gd nearby. The signal in magnetic resonance imaging correlates with this nuclear spin relaxation time, so gadolinium's presence in certain body tissues makes those tissues appear as bright areas on MRI images. Gadolinium is therefore commonly injected intravenously just prior to MRI imaging, so that the distribution of blood in and around the brain can be mapped. Gadolinium as a free ion is toxic, so it is injected in a relatively inert form, often as gadoversetamide, in which Gd is tightly bound in nine-fold coordination with N, C, and O. This compound is removed from the blood by the kidneys at a rate that is fast compared to the rate of breakdown of this compound in the blood, thus preventing release of toxic Gd in the bloodstream. But how quickly can the kidneys of an isotope geochemist remove Gd from blood? In this experiment, a single isotope geochemist's wristwatch was synchronized with that of the MRI technician and then left in a dressing room with all other magnetically susceptible objects until after the MRI. The time of intravenous injection of gadoversetamide into the isotopist was recorded by the technician and later transmitted verbally to the isotopist. Following the MRI session, blood samples were collected by self-fingerprick, in a Class 100 trace metal clean lab, from 47 to 281 minutes after intravenous injection. For each

  1. Induction of skeletal abnormalities and autophagy in Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin embryos exposed to gadolinium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Chiara; Chiarelli, Roberto; Bosco, Liana; Roccheri, Maria Carmela

    2017-09-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) concentration is constantly increasing in the aquatic environment, becoming an emergent environmental pollutant. We investigated the effects of Gd on Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin embryos, focusing on skeletogenesis and autophagy. We observed a delay of biomineral deposition at 24 hours post fertilization (hpf), and a strong impairment of skeleton growth at 48 hpf, frequently displayed by an asymmetrical pattern. Skeleton growth was found partially resumed in recovery experiments. The mesodermal cells designated to biomineralization were found correctly migrated at 24 hpf, but not at 48 hpf. Western blot analysis showed an increase of the LC3-II autophagic marker at 24 and 48 hpf. Confocal microscopy studies confirmed the increased number of autophagolysosomes and autophagosomes. Results show the hazard of Gd in the marine environment, indicating that Gd is able to affect different aspects of sea urchin development: morphogenesis, biomineralization, and stress response through autophagy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Gadolinium Enhanced MR Coronary Vessel Wall Imaging at 3.0 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kelle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated the influence of the time between low-dose gadolinium (Gd contrast administration and coronary vessel wall enhancement (LGE detected by 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. Materials and Methods. Four healthy subjects (4 men, mean age 29  ±  3 years and eleven CAD patients (6 women, mean age 61±10 years were studied on a commercial 3.0 Tesla (T whole-body MR imaging system (Achieva 3.0 T; Philips, Best, The Netherlands. T1-weighted inversion-recovery coronary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was repeated up to 75 minutes after administration of low-dose Gadolinium (Gd (0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA. Results. LGE was seen in none of the healthy subjects, however in all of the CAD patients. In CAD patients, fifty-six of 62 (90.3% segments showed LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall at time-interval 1 after contrast. At time-interval 2, 34 of 42 (81.0% and at time-interval 3, 29 of 39 evaluable segments (74.4% were enhanced. Conclusion. In this work, we demonstrate LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall using 3.0 T MRI after a single, low-dose Gd contrast injection in CAD patients but not in healthy subjects. In the majority of the evaluated coronary segments in CAD patients, LGE of the coronary vessel wall was already detectable 30–45 minutes after administration of the contrast agent.

  3. The use of theranostic gadolinium-based nanoprobes to improve radiotherapy efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancey, L; Lux, F; Kotb, S; Roux, S; Dufort, S; Bianchi, A; Crémillieux, Y; Fries, P; Coll, J-L; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C; Janier, M; Dutreix, M; Barberi-Heyob, M; Boschetti, F; Denat, F; Louis, C; Porcel, E; Lacombe, S; Le Duc, G; Deutsch, E; Perfettini, J-L; Detappe, A; Verry, C; Berbeco, R; Butterworth, K T; McMahon, S J; Prise, K M; Perriat, P; Tillement, O

    2014-09-01

    A new efficient type of gadolinium-based theranostic agent (AGuIX®) has recently been developed for MRI-guided radiotherapy (RT). These new particles consist of a polysiloxane network surrounded by a number of gadolinium chelates, usually 10. Owing to their small size (<5 nm), AGuIX typically exhibit biodistributions that are almost ideal for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. For example, although a significant proportion of these particles accumulate in tumours, the remainder is rapidly eliminated by the renal route. In addition, in the absence of irradiation, the nanoparticles are well tolerated even at very high dose (10 times more than the dose used for mouse treatment). AGuIX particles have been proven to act as efficient radiosensitizers in a large variety of experimental in vitro scenarios, including different radioresistant cell lines, irradiation energies and radiation sources (sensitizing enhancement ratio ranging from 1.1 to 2.5). Pre-clinical studies have also demonstrated the impact of these particles on different heterotopic and orthotopic tumours, with both intratumoural or intravenous injection routes. A significant therapeutical effect has been observed in all contexts. Furthermore, MRI monitoring was proven to efficiently aid in determining a RT protocol and assessing tumour evolution following treatment. The usual theoretical models, based on energy attenuation and macroscopic dose enhancement, cannot account for all the results that have been obtained. Only theoretical models, which take into account the Auger electron cascades that occur between the different atoms constituting the particle and the related high radical concentrations in the vicinity of the particle, provide an explanation for the complex cell damage and death observed.

  4. Limited role of gadolinium to detect active sacroiliitis on MRI in juvenile spondyloarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herregods, N.; Leus, A.; Verstraete, K.; Jans, L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent (Belgium); Jaremko, J.L. [University of Alberta Hospital, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Baraliakos, X. [Ruhr-University Bochum, Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne (Germany); Dehoorne, J. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to determine the added diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to routine non contrast-enhanced MRI to detect active sacroiliitis in clinically juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA). A total of 80 children clinically suspected for sacroiliitis prospectively underwent MRI of the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Axial and coronal T1-weighted (T1), Short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) and fat-saturated T1-weighted gadolinium-DTPA (Gd) contrast-enhanced (T1/Gd) sequences were obtained. The presence of bone marrow edema (BME), capsulitis, enthesitis, high intra-articular STIR signal, synovial enhancement and a global diagnostic impression of the MRI for diagnosis of sacroiliitis was recorded. STIR and T1/Gd sequences had 100 % agreement for depiction of BME, capsulitis and enthesitis. High intra-articular STIR signal was seen in 18/80 (22.5 %) patients, 15 (83 %) of whom also showed synovial enhancement in the T1/Gd sequence. Sensitivity (SN) and specificity (SP) for a clinical diagnosis of JSpA were similar for high STIR signal (SN = 33 %, SP = 85 %) and T1/Gd synovial enhancement (SN = 36 %, SP = 92 %). Positive likelihood ratio (LR+) for JSpA was twice as high for synovial enhancement than high STIR signal (4.5 compared to 2.2). Global diagnostic impression was similar (STIR: SN = 55 %, SP = 87 %, LR + =4.2; T1/Gd: SN = 55 %, SP = 92 %, LR + = 6.9). MRI without contrast administration is sufficient to identify bone marrow edema, capsulitis and retroarticular enthesitis as features of active sacroiliitis in juvenile spondyloarthritis. In selected cases when high STIR signal in the joint is the only finding, gadolinium-enhanced images may help to confirm the presence of synovitis. (orig.)

  5. Gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography: comparison with MR urography using HASTE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Gong Yong; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Cheong, Gyung Ho; Oh, Hee Sul; Kim, Chong Soo; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Young Gon [Medical School, Chungbuk National University, Chongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-01-01

    To compare the feasibility of gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography (GEMRU) and conventional MR urography using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence in patients with hydronephrosis or non-visualized kidney. Fifteen patients with hydronephrosis or non-visualized kidney, as demonstrated by ultrasonography or intravenous urography, were enrolled in this study. Nine were men and six were women, and their age ranged from 18 to 77 (mean, 60.6) years. For all MR examinations, a 1.5T MR unit was employed. For breath-hold MR urography, the HASTE technique (MRU) was used, and reconstruction involved the use of a maximum intensity-projection (MIP) algorithm. For gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography, the fast low angle shot (FLASH) 3-D method was used and images were obtained at 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes, and reconstruction again involved the use of MIP algorithm. In some cases, additional GEMRU was obtained 24 hour after contrast material injection, and an MIP algorithm was used for reconstruction. MRU and GEMRU were independently interpreted by two radiologists who for quantitative analysis compared SNR with CNR, and at each anatomic level qualitatively analyzed morphologic accuracy and diagnostic value of the lesions. In quantitative analysis, SNR and CNR differences between the two sequences at the renal pelvis and the level of the ureter were not significant (p greater than 0.05). In qualitative analysis, GEMRU was superior to MRU for the assessment of evaluated ureter at each level (p less than 0.05), anatomic anomaly and intrinsic tumor. Ureteral stones, however, were more easily diagnosed with MRU. For assessment of the ureter GEMRU is superior to MRU and has the advantage of evaluating renal function. We believe that for evaluation of the urinary tract, especially the distal ureter, GEMRU may be a valuable adjunct to routine MR urography. (author)

  6. Neuronavigation using susceptibility-weighted venography: application to deep brain stimulation and comparison with gadolinium contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bériault, Silvain; Sadikot, Abbas F; Alsubaie, Fahd; Drouin, Simon; Collins, D Louis; Pike, G Bruce

    2014-07-01

    Careful trajectory planning on preoperative vascular imaging is an essential step in deep brain stimulation (DBS) to minimize risks of hemorrhagic complications and postoperative neurological deficits. This paper compares 2 MRI methods for visualizing cerebral vasculature and planning DBS probe trajectories: a single data set T1-weighted scan with double-dose gadolinium contrast (T1w-Gd) and a multi-data set protocol consisting of a T1-weighted structural, susceptibility-weighted venography, and time-of-flight angiography (T1w-SWI-TOF). Two neurosurgeons who specialize in neuromodulation surgery planned bilateral STN DBS in 18 patients with Parkinson's disease (36 hemispheres) using each protocol separately. Planned trajectories were then evaluated across all vascular data sets (T1w-Gd, SWI, and TOF) to detect possible intersection with blood vessels along the entire path via an objective vesselness measure. The authors' results show that trajectories planned on T1w-SWI-TOF successfully avoided the cerebral vasculature imaged by conventional T1w-Gd and did not suffer from missing vascular information or imprecise data set registration. Furthermore, with appropriate planning and visualization software, trajectory corridors planned on T1w-SWI-TOF intersected significantly less fine vasculature that was not detected on the T1w-Gd (p < 0.01 within 2 mm and p < 0.001 within 4 mm of the track centerline). The proposed T1w-SWI-TOF protocol comes with minimal effects on the imaging and surgical workflow, improves vessel avoidance, and provides a safe cost-effective alternative to injection of gadolinium contrast.

  7. Gadolinium-enhanced dynamic MRI of the fractured carpal scaphoid: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munk, P.L.; Lee, M.J.; Janzen, D.; Connell, D.G.; Poon, P.Y.; Struk, D. [Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre (Canada). Department of Radiology; Munk, P.L.; Lee, M.; Janzen, D.L.; Connell, D.G.; Poon, P.Y.; Struk, D. [University of British Columbia (Canada). Department of Radiology; Munk, P.L.; Janzen, D.L.; Favero, K.J. [University of British Columbia (Canada). Department of Orthopedic Surgery; Poon, P.Y. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Department of Diagnostic Imaging; Vellet, A.D. [Foothills Hospital and University of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Department of Radiology; Logan, P.M. [Victoria General Hospital and Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Department of Radiology

    1998-02-01

    The aim of the present report was to evaluate the vascularity of fracture fragments of the fractured carpal scaphoid in the acute (< 4 weeks) and chronic (> 3 months) phases using a gadolinium-enhanced dynamic MRI sequence. Eight patients with acute scaphoid fractures, six patients with chronic scaphoid fractures, and three control patients without fractures were evaluated using a T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled acquisition (fSPGR) sequence with gadolinium-DTPA enhancement (0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight). Signal intensity over time plots were obtained using region of interest measurements from both fracture fragments. Enhancement factors (EF) were then calculated from the plots. No enhancement of the scaphoid was seen in control subjects (EF: distal scaphoid pole 1.04 + 0.01, proximal pole 1.07 + 0.08). In acute fracture patients, enhancement of the distal pole was greater than that of the proximal in all cases but one in which the two poles enhanced in a similar fashion (EF: distal 1.99 + 0.77, proximal 1.43 + 0.99). In chronic fracture patients the enhancement pattern was reversed, as the proximal pole enhanced to a greater degree than the distal with the exception of one case where both poles enhanced equally (EF: distal 1.74 + 0.52, proximal 2.64 + 0.50). Using a two-tailed non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test, the difference in enhancement of the proximal poles between the acute and chronic groups was found to be highly significant (P < 0.003). Dynamic contrast- enhanced (fSPGR) MRI demonstrates significant differences in the enhancement patterns of the scaphoid when chronic and acute fractures are compared. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 31 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  8. Heat treatment study of $Nb_{3}Sn$ strands for the Fermilab's high field dipole model

    CERN Document Server

    Barzi, E; Limon, P J; Ozelis, J P; Yamada, R; Zlobin, A V; Gregory, E; Pyon, T; Wake, M

    2000-01-01

    Fermilab is developing high field superconducting dipole magnets based on Nb/sub 3/Sn for a post-LHC very large hadron collider (VLHC) . The first prototype is a 1 meter long two-layer shell-type (cos- theta) coil with a nominal field of 11 T. A keystoned Rutherford-type cable made of 28 Nb/sub 3/Sn strands of 1 mm in diameter is used. The development of high J/sub c/ multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn strands with low magnetization is an important step of this program. To achieve this goal, strand R&D is actively pursued by Fermilab and IGC using the internal tin process. Conductor designs, heat treatment studies, and results of measurements, including I/sub c/, n-value, RRR, magnetization, and chemical analyses, are presented. (4 refs).

  9. High field terahertz emission from relativistic laser-driven plasma wakefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zi-Yu, E-mail: Ziyu.Chen@uni-duesseldorf.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik I, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf 40225 (Germany); LSD, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Pukhov, Alexander [Institut für Theoretische Physik I, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf 40225 (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    We propose a method to generate high field terahertz (THz) radiation with peak strength of GV/cm level in the THz frequency gap range of 1–10 THz using a relativistic laser interaction with a gaseous plasma target. Due to the effect of local pump depletion, an initially Gaussian laser pulse undergoes leading edge erosion and eventually evolves to a state with leading edge being step function. Interacting with such a pulse, electrons gain transverse residual momentum and excite net transverse currents modulated by the relativistic plasma frequency. These currents give rise to the low frequency THz emission. We demonstrate this process with one and two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  10. On the Nature of High Field Charge Transport in Reinforced Silicone Dielectrics: Experiment and Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    The high field charge injection and transport properties in reinforced silicone dielectrics were investigated by measuring the time-dependent space charge distribution and the current under dc conditions up to the breakdown field, and were compared with properties of other dielectric polymers. It is argued that the energy and spatial distribution of localized electronic states are crucial to determining these properties for polymer dielectrics. Tunneling to localized states likely dominates the charge injection process. A transient transport regime arises due to the relaxation of charge carriers into deep traps at the energy band tails, and is successfully verified by a Monte Carlo simulation using the multiple-hopping model. The charge carrier mobility is found to be highly heterogeneous due to non-uniform trapping. The slow moving electron packet exhibits a negative field dependent drift velocity possibly due to the spatial disorder of traps.

  11. High field magnetization of R sub 2 T sub 17 compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franse, J.J.M.; Kayzel, F.E.; Marquina, C.; Radwanski, R.J.; Verhoef, R. (Van der Waals-Zeeman Lab., Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1992-04-03

    A summary is presented of high field magnetization studies on the R{sub 2}T{sub 17} compounds (R = rare earth, T = Fe, Co or Ni). The different types of transitions that have been observed in magnetization studies on single-crystal samples along different crystallographic directions are mentioned. By analysing the transition fields, valuable information is obtained either on the strength of the R-T coupling or on the crystal field interactions of the rare earth ions. In addition, experiments are reported on powdered samples that are free to rotate in the applied magnetic field. This experimental technique provides a rather simple experimental approach to the intersublattice coupling in ferrimagnetic R-T compounds. (orig.).

  12. A new hybrid protection system for high-field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaioli, E.; Datskov, V. I.; Kirby, G.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Verweij, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    The new generation of high-field superconducting accelerator magnets poses a challenge concerning the protection of the magnet coil in the case of a quench. The very high stored energy per unit volume requires a fast and efficient quench heating system in order to avoid damage due to overheating. A new protection system for superconducting magnets is presented, comprising a combination of a novel coupling-loss induced quench (CLIQ) system and conventional quench heaters. CLIQ can provoke a very fast transition to the normal state in coil windings by introducing coupling loss and thus heat in the coil’s conductor. The advantage of the hybrid protection system is a global transition, resulting in a much faster current decay, a significantly lower hot-spot temperature, and a more homogeneous temperature distribution in the magnet’s coil.

  13. A new hybrid protection system for high-field superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Ravaioli, E; Kirby, G; ten Kate, H H J; Verweij, A P

    2014-01-01

    The new generation of high-field superconducting accelerator magnets poses a challenge concerning the protection of the magnet coil in the case of a quench. The very high stored energy per unit volume requires a fast and efficient quench heating system in order to avoid damage due to overheating. A new protection system for superconducting magnets is presented, comprising a combination of a novel coupling-loss induced quench (CLIQ) system and conventional quench heaters. CLIQ can provoke a very fast transition to the normal state in coil windings by introducing coupling loss and thus heat in the coil's conductor. The advantage of the hybrid protection system is a global transition, resulting in a much faster current decay, a significantly lower hot-spot temperature, and a more homogeneous temperature distribution in the magnet's coil.

  14. Widespread inflammation in CLIPPERS syndrome indicated by autopsy and ultra-high-field 7T MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Morten; Ruprecht, Klemens; Sinnecker, Tim

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if there is widespread inflammation in the brain of patients with chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) syndrome by using histology and ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T. METHODS: We performed a detailed...... neuropathologic examination in 4 cases, including 1 autopsy case, and studied 2 additional patients by MRI at 7.0T to examine (1) extension of inflammation to areas appearing normal on 3.0T MRI, (2) potential advantages of 7.0T MRI compared to 3.0T MRI in reflecting widespread inflammation, perivascular pathology......, and axonal damage, and (3) the possibility of lymphoma. RESULTS: In the autopsy case, perivascular inflammation dominated by CD4+ T cells was not only detected in the brainstem and cerebellum but also in brain areas with normal appearance on 3.0T MRI, including supratentorial regions and cranial nerve roots...

  15. Large field-of-view transmission line resonator for high field MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johannesson, Kristjan Sundgaard; Boer, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Transmission line resonators is often a preferable choice for coils in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because they provide a number of advantages over traditional loop coils. The size of such resonators, however, is limited to shorter than half a wavelength due to high standing wave...... ratio, which leads to inhomogeneous field distribution along the resonator. In this work, it is demonstrated that the resonator length can be extended to over half a wavelength with the help of series capacitors. The approach allows for reduced standing wave ratio and improved field homogeneity....... Achieved magnetic field distribution is compared to the conventional transmission line resonator. Imaging experiments are performed using 7 Tesla MRI system. The developed resonator is useful for building coils with large field-of-view....

  16. Low and High Field Magnetic Resonance for in Vivo Analysis of Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Neuberger

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Low field NMR has been successfully used for the evaluation of seed composition and quality, but largely only in crop species. We show here that 1.5T NMR provides a reliable means for analysing the seed lipid fraction present in a wide range of species, where both the seed size and lipid concentration differed by >10 fold. Little use of high field NMR has been made in seed research to date, even though it potentially offers many opportunities for studying seed development, metabolism and storage. Here we demonstrate how 17.5T and 20T NMR can be applied to image seed structure, and analyse lipid and metabolite distribution. We suggest that further technical developments in NMR/MRI will facilitate significant advances in our understanding of seed biology.

  17. High field septum magnet using a superconducting shield for the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069375

    2017-01-01

    A zero-field cooled superconducting shield is proposed to realize a high-field (3–4 T) septum magnet for the Future Circular Collider hadron-hadron (FCC-hh) ring. Three planned prototypes using different materials and technical solutions are presented, which will be used to evaluate the feasibility of this idea as a part of the FCC study. The numerical simulation methods are described to calculate the field patterns around such a shield. A specific excitation current configuration is presented that maintains a fairly homogeneous field outside of a rectangular shield in a wide range of field levels from 0 to 3 Tesla. It is shown that a massless septum configuration (with an opening in the shield) is also possible and gives satisfactory field quality with realistic superconducting material properties.

  18. Development of superconducting magnet for high-field MR systems in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zanming; van Oort, Johannes M.; Zou, Mark X.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we describe the development of superconducting magnets for high-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) by various businesses and institutions in China. As the Chinese MR market rapidly expands, many foreign and domestic companies and research institutions are joining the race to meet the burgeoning demand by developing key MRI components for various magnetic field configurations. After providing a brief introduction to research on MRI superconducting magnets that dates back to the 1980s, the first large-bore 1.5 T superconducting magnet with 50-cm DSV for whole-body MRI - successfully developed and manufactured by AllTech Medical Systems in Chengdu, China-is presented and its specifications are described.

  19. Implementation and Application of PSF-Based EPI Distortion Correction to High Field Animal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Paul

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the functionality and performance of a PSF-based geometric distortion correction for high-field functional animal EPI. The EPI method was extended to measure the PSF and a postprocessing chain was implemented in Matlab for offline distortion correction. The correction procedure was applied to phantom and in vivo imaging of mice and rats at 9.4T using different SE-EPI and DWI-EPI protocols. Results show the significant improvement in image quality for single- and multishot EPI. Using a reduced FOV in the PSF encoding direction clearly reduced the acquisition time for PSF data by an acceleration factor of 2 or 4, without affecting the correction quality.

  20. Superconducting high-field wigglers and wave length shifter in budker INP

    CERN Document Server

    Batrakov, A M; Borovikov, V M

    2001-01-01

    Several high-field superconducting wigglers (SCW) and wavelength shifters (WLS) are fabricated in the Budker INP for generation of synchrotron radiation.Three-pole WLS with the magnetic field of 7.5 T are installed on LSU-CAMD and BESSY-II storage rings for shifting the radiation spectrum.WLS with the field of 10.3 T will be used for generation of slow positrons on SPring-8.Creation of a 13-pole 7 T wiggler for the BESSY-II and 45-pole 3.5 T wiggler for ELETRA now is finished.The main characteristics,design features and synchrotron radiation properties of SCW and WLS created in the Budker INP are presented in this article.

  1. An intelligent detection method for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Yu, Jianwen; Ruan, Zhiming; Chen, Chilai; Chen, Ran; Wang, Han; Liu, Youjiang; Wang, Xiaozhi; Li, Shan

    2017-01-01

    In conventional high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry signal acquisition, multi-cycle detection is time consuming and limits somewhat the technique's scope for rapid field detection. In this study, a novel intelligent detection approach has been developed in which a threshold was set on the relative error of α parameters, which can eliminate unnecessary time spent on detection. In this method, two full-spectrum scans were made in advance to obtain the estimated compensation voltage at different dispersion voltages, resulting in a narrowing down of the whole scan area to just the peak area(s) of interest. This intelligent detection method can reduce the detection time to 5-10% of that of the original full-spectrum scan in a single cycle.

  2. Shrink Tube Insulation Apparatus for Rebco Superconducting Tapes for Use in High Field Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Whittington, Andrew

    An increasing number of applications require the use of high temperature superconductors (HTS) such as (RE=Rare Earth) Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO) coated conductors [1]. HTS conductors show particularly great potential for high field magnets applications [1] due to their high upper critical fields [2], But several groups have shown that REBCO coated conductors are prone to delamination failure [3] [4] [5]. Under relatively low transverse stress the HTS film separates from the substrate and the conductor degrades [6]. This is problematic due to high transverse stresses that occur in fully epoxy impregnated solenoids wound with this conductor. Application of thin walled heat shrink tubing introduces a weak plane around the conductor, preventing delamination degradation [7]. However, manual application of the shrink tubing is impractical, requiring three operators limited to insulating 100 m lengths or less of REBCO conductor. The high risk of damage to the conductor, also associated with this process, shows the need for...

  3. An integrated platform for small-animal hyperthermia investigations under ultra-high-field MRI guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto, Sergio; Faridi, Pegah; Shrestha, Tej B; Pyle, Marla; Maurmann, Leila; Troyer, Deryl; Bossmann, Stefan H; Prakash, Punit

    2017-07-21

    Integrating small-animal experimental hyperthermia instrumentation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affords real-time monitoring of spatial temperature profiles. This study reports on the development and preliminary in vivo characterisation of a 2.45 GHz microwave hyperthermia system for pre-clinical small animal investigations, integrated within a 14 T ultra-high-field MRI scanner. The presented system incorporates a 3.5 mm (OD) directional microwave hyperthermia antenna, positioned adjacent to the small-animal target, radiating microwave energy for localised heating of subcutaneous tumours. The applicator is integrated within the 30 mm bore of the MRI system. 3D electromagnetic and biothermal simulations were implemented to characterise hyperthermia profiles from the directional microwave antenna. Experiments in tissue mimicking phantoms were performed to assess hyperthermia profiles and validate MR thermometry against fibre-optic temperature measurements. The feasibility of delivering in vivo hyperthermia exposures to subcutaneous 4T1 tumours in experimental mice under simultaneous MR thermometry guidance was assessed. Simulations and experiments in tissue mimicking phantoms demonstrated the feasibility of heating 21-982 mm3 targets with 8-12 W input power. Minimal susceptibility and electrical artefacts introduced by the hyperthermia applicator were observed on MR imaging. MR thermometry was in excellent agreement with fibre-optic temperatures measurements (max. discrepancy ≤0.6 °C). Heating experiments with the reported system demonstrated the feasibility of heating subcutaneous tumours in vivo with simultaneous MR thermometry. A platform for small-animal hyperthermia investigations under ultra-high-field MR thermometry was developed and applied to heating subcutaneous tumours in vivo.

  4. Rigid ion model of high field transport in GaN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Shinya; Akis, Richard; Faralli, Nicolas; Saraniti, Marco; Goodnick, Stephen M

    2009-04-29

    Here we report on high field transport in GaN based on the rigid ion model of the electron-phonon interaction within the cellular Monte Carlo (CMC) approach. Using the rigid pseudo-ion method for the cubic zinc-blende and hexagonal wurtzite structures, the anisotropic deformation potentials are derived from the electronic structure, the atomic pseudopotential and the full phonon dispersion and eigenvectors for both acoustic and optical modes. Several different electronic structure and lattice dynamics models are compared, as well as different models for the interpolation of the atomic pseudopotentials required in the rigid pseudo-ion method. Piezoelectric as well as anisotropic polar optical phonon scattering is accounted for as well. In terms of high field transport, the peak velocity is primarily determined by deformation potential scattering described through the rigid pseudo-ion model. The calculated velocity is compared with experimental data from pulsed I-V measurements. Good agreement is found using the rigid ion model to the measured velocity-field characteristics with the inclusion of dislocation and ionized impurity scattering. The crystal orientation of the electric field is investigated, where very little difference is observed in the velocity-field characteristics. We simulate the effects of nonequilibrium hot phonons on the energy relaxation as well, using a detailed balance between emission and absorption during the simulation, and an anharmonic decay of LO phonons to acoustic phonons, as reported previously. Nonequilibrium phonons are shown to result in a significant degradation of the velocity-field characteristics for high carrier densities, such as those encountered at the AlGaN/GaN interface due to polarization effects.

  5. Short period, high field cryogenic undulator for extreme performance x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. H. O’Shea

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Short period, high field undulators can enable short wavelength free electron lasers (FELs at low beam energy, with decreased gain length, thus allowing much more compact and less costly FEL systems. We describe an ongoing initiative to develop such an undulator based on an approach that utilizes novel cryogenic materials. While this effort was begun in the context of extending the photon energy regime of a laser-plasma accelerator based electron source, we consider here implications of its application to sub-fs scenarios in which more conventional injectors are employed. The use of such low-charge, ultrashort beams, which has recently been proposed as a method of obtaining single-spike performance in x-ray FELs, is seen in simulation to give unprecedented beam brightness. This brightness, when considered in tandem with short wavelength, high field undulators, enables extremely high performance FELs. Two examples discussed in this paper illustrate this point well. The first is the use of the SPARX injector at 2.1 GeV with 1 pC of charge to give 8 GW peak power in a single spike at 6.5 Å with a photon beam peak brightness greater than 10^{35}  photons/(s mm^{2} mrad^{2}  0.1%  BW, which will also reach LCLS wavelengths on the 5th harmonic. The second is the exploitation of the LCLS injector with 0.25 pC, 150 as pulses to lase at 1.5 Å using only 4.5 GeV energy; beyond this possibility, we present start-to-end simulations of lasing at unprecedented short wavelength, 0.15 Å, using 13.65 GeV LCLS design energy.

  6. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton L.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2013-12-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization' schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than those at 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters.

  7. A Feasibility Study of High-Strength Bi-2223 Conductor for High-Field Solenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godeke, A; Abraimov, D V; Arroyo, E; Barret, N; Bird, M D; Francis, A; Jaroszynski, J; Kurteva, D V; Markiewicz, W D; Marks, E L; Marshall, W S; McRae, D M; Noyes, P D; Pereira, R C P; Viouchkov, Y L; Walsh, R P; White, J M

    2017-03-01

    We performed a feasibility study on a high-strength Bi2-x Pb x Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x (Bi-2223) tape conductor for high-field solenoid applications. The investigated conductor, DI-BSCCO Type HT-XX, is a pre-production version of Type HT-NX, which has recently become available from Sumitomo Electric Industries (SEI). It is based on their DI-BSCCO Type H tape, but laminated with a high-strength Ni-alloy. We used stress-strain characterizations, single- and double-bend tests, easy- and hard-way bent coil-turns at various radii, straight and helical samples in up to 31.2 T background field, and small 20-turn coils in up to 17 T background field to systematically determine the electro-mechanical limits in magnet-relevant conditions. In longitudinal tensile tests at 77 K, we found critical stress- and strain-levels of 516 MPa and 0.57%, respectively. In three decidedly different experiments we detected an amplification of the allowable strain with a combination of pure bending and Lorentz loading to ≥ 0.92% (calculated elastically at the outer tape edge). This significant strain level, and the fact that it is multi-filamentary conductor and available in the reacted and insulated state, makes DI-BSCCO HT-NX highly suitable for very high-field solenoids, for which high current densities and therefore high loads are required to retain manageable magnet dimensions.

  8. Rigid ion model of high field transport in GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Shinya; Akis, Richard; Faralli, Nicolas; Saraniti, Marco; Goodnick, Stephen M.

    2009-04-01

    Here we report on high field transport in GaN based on the rigid ion model of the electron-phonon interaction within the cellular Monte Carlo (CMC) approach. Using the rigid pseudo-ion method for the cubic zinc-blende and hexagonal wurtzite structures, the anisotropic deformation potentials are derived from the electronic structure, the atomic pseudopotential and the full phonon dispersion and eigenvectors for both acoustic and optical modes. Several different electronic structure and lattice dynamics models are compared, as well as different models for the interpolation of the atomic pseudopotentials required in the rigid pseudo-ion method. Piezoelectric as well as anisotropic polar optical phonon scattering is accounted for as well. In terms of high field transport, the peak velocity is primarily determined by deformation potential scattering described through the rigid pseudo-ion model. The calculated velocity is compared with experimental data from pulsed I-V measurements. Good agreement is found using the rigid ion model to the measured velocity-field characteristics with the inclusion of dislocation and ionized impurity scattering. The crystal orientation of the electric field is investigated, where very little difference is observed in the velocity-field characteristics. We simulate the effects of nonequilibrium hot phonons on the energy relaxation as well, using a detailed balance between emission and absorption during the simulation, and an anharmonic decay of LO phonons to acoustic phonons, as reported previously. Nonequilibrium phonons are shown to result in a significant degradation of the velocity-field characteristics for high carrier densities, such as those encountered at the AlGaN/GaN interface due to polarization effects.

  9. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) of Cadaveric Shoulders: Comparison of Contrast Dynamics in Hyaline and Fibrous Cartilage after Intraarticular Gadolinium Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, E. (Dept. of Radiology, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany)); Hodler, J.; Pfirrmann, C.W.A. (Dept. of Radiology, Orthopedic Univ. Hospital Balgrist, Zuerich (Switzerland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a novel method to investigate cartilaginous and fibrocartilaginous structures. Purpose: To investigate the contrast dynamics in hyaline and fibrous cartilage of the glenohumeral joint after intraarticular injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine. Material and Methods: Transverse T1 maps were acquired on a 1.5T scanner before and after intraarticular injection of 2.0 mmol/l gadopentetate dimeglumine in five cadaveric shoulders using a dual flip angle three-dimensional gradient echo (3D-GRE) sequence. The acquisition time for the T1 maps was 5 min 5 s for the whole shoulder. Measurements were repeated every 15 min over 2.5 hours. Regions of interest (ROIs) covering the glenoid cartilage and the labrum were drawn to assess the temporal evolution of the relaxation parameters. Results: T1 of unenhanced hyaline cartilage of the glenoid was 568+-34 ms. T1 of unenhanced fibrous cartilage of the labrum was 552+-38 ms. Significant differences (P=0.002 and 0.03) in the relaxation parameters were already measurable after 15 min. After 2 to 2.5 hours, hyaline and fibrous cartilage still demonstrated decreasing relaxation parameters, with a larger range of the T1(Gd) values in fibrous cartilage. T1 and ?R1 values of hyaline and fibrous cartilage after 2.5 hours were 351+-16 ms and 1.1+-0.09/s, and 332+-31 ms and 1.2+-0.1/s, respectively. Conclusion: A significant decrease in T1(Gd) was found 15 min after intraarticular contrast injection. Contrast accumulation was faster in hyaline than in fibrous cartilage. After 2.5 hours, contrast accumulation showed a higher rate of decrease in hyaline cartilage, but neither hyaline nor fibrous cartilage had reached equilibrium

  10. High-field (high-frequency) EPR spectroscopy and structural characterization of a novel manganese(III) corrole

    OpenAIRE

    Bendix, Jesper; Gray, Harry B.; Golubkov, Galina; Gross, Zeev

    2000-01-01

    The X-ray structure, magnetic susceptibility, and high-field (high-frequency) EPR spectrum of manganese 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl) corrole unambiguously establish that the complex contains an isolated, slightly rhombic, manganese(III) center.

  11. Late-Onset Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2017-01-01

    , to objectively confirm asthma. If necessary, a trial of oral or inhaled corticosteroid might be necessary. Asthma can be diagnosed when increased airflow variability is identified in a symptomatic patient, and if the patient does not have a history of exposure, primarily smoking, known to cause chronic...... obstructive pulmonary disease, the diagnosis is asthma even if the patient does not have fully reversible airflow obstruction. Pharmacological therapy in patients with late-onset asthma follows international guidelines, including treatment with the lowest effective dose of inhaled corticosteroid to minimize...... the risk of systemic effects. However, most recommendations are based on extrapolation from findings in younger patients. Comorbidities are very common in patients with late-onset asthma and need to be taken into account in the management of the disease. In conclusion, late-onset asthma is poorly...

  12. Importance of timing of post-contrast MRI in rheumatoid arthritis: what happens during the first 60 minutes after IV gadolinium-DTPA?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Klarlund, Mette

    2001-01-01

    threshold. Thereafter, the measured volumes remained practically unchanged. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that MR image acquisition in arthritic knee joints should be performed within the initial approximately 10 minutes after gadolinium contrast injection to achieve the most accurate distinction between...

  13. Late Sovereign Diplomacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    the promotion of national interests with those of the Union. In this late sovereign phase of diplomacy, political and legal authorities overlap, territorial exclusivity is replaced with functional boundaries, and states begin to speak with one voice. The article explores three interlinked aspects of late...... sovereign diplomacy: the teleological interpretation of the EC and EU treaties; the intense socialization of state representatives; and the negotiation process, which promotes national positions as part of a European cause, thereby delocalizing the national interest. While the EU has not rendered national...... diplomacy obsolete, it has profoundly changed its meaning and consequences....

  14. Mengapa Late Childhood Merokok?

    OpenAIRE

    Taryaka, Apriyani; Hurriyati, Evi Afifah

    2011-01-01

    This research is set to determine the cause of late childhood smoking and whether the factor behind late child hood smoking is the same with teenagers. The background of this research are the findings of Tobacco Control Support Center that 3 out of 10 students are found to be smoking before reaching the age of 10. This research uses qualitative case study research through observation and in-depth direct interview towards 3 male subjects aged 11 who smokes every day. Results show that the 3 su...

  15. Early and late motherhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens; Lausten, Mette

    2009-01-01

    The study investigates parental child rearing methods, structural factors relating to the family during adolescence geographic segregation, individual resource deficits and social background of first time late live births among 32 to 37 years old women and compare to teenagers before becoming...... teenage mothers. The purpose is to study if results will be consistent with the hypotheses that poverty, social deprivation during adolescence and low education are causes of teen childbearing but also childlessness among elder women in the age group 32 to 37 years old. Could childlessness as well...... pregnant teenagers who had an induced abortion. Quite the opposite pattern is disclosed for late motherhood....

  16. Evaluation of Novel 64Cu-Labeled Theranostic Gadolinium-Based Nanoprobes in HepG2 Tumor-Bearing Nude Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Pengcheng; Cheng, Dengfeng; Huang, Tao; Banizs, Anna B; Xiao, Jie; Liu,Guobing; Chen, Quan; Wang, Yuenan; He, Jiang; Shi, Hongcheng

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy of liver cancer is limited by low tolerance of the liver to radiation. Radiosensitizers can effectively reduce the required radiation dose. AGuIX nanoparticles are small, multifunctional gadolinium-based nanoparticles that can carry radioisotopes or fluorescent markers for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), fluorescence imaging, and even multimodality imaging. In addition, due to the high atomic number of gadolinium, it ca...

  17. 3.0-T high-field magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis: preliminary experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morakkabati-Spitz, N.; Gieseke, J.; Kuhl, C.; Lutterbey, G.; Falkenhausen, M. von; Traeber, F.; Zivanovic, O.; Schild, H.H. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    with our modified examination protocol. To fully exploit the capability of the high-field technique, and to point out potential advantages, further intraindividual studies are needed, with the adjustment of other imaging parameters to the high-field environment. (orig.)

  18. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI at ultra-high field: artifact prevention and safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, João; Grouiller, Frédéric; Ipek, Özlem; Stoermer, Robert; Michel, Christoph M; Figueiredo, Patrícia; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Gruetter, Rolf

    2015-01-15

    The simultaneous recording of scalp electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can provide unique insights into the dynamics of human brain function, and the increased functional sensitivity offered by ultra-high field fMRI opens exciting perspectives for the future of this multimodal approach. However, simultaneous recordings are susceptible to various types of artifacts, many of which scale with magnetic field strength and can seriously compromise both EEG and fMRI data quality in recordings above 3T. The aim of the present study was to implement and characterize an optimized setup for simultaneous EEG-fMRI in humans at 7 T. The effects of EEG cable length and geometry for signal transmission between the cap and amplifiers were assessed in a phantom model, with specific attention to noise contributions from the MR scanner coldheads. Cable shortening (down to 12 cm from cap to amplifiers) and bundling effectively reduced environment noise by up to 84% in average power and 91% in inter-channel power variability. Subject safety was assessed and confirmed via numerical simulations of RF power distribution and temperature measurements on a phantom model, building on the limited existing literature at ultra-high field. MRI data degradation effects due to the EEG system were characterized via B0 and B1(+) field mapping on a human volunteer, demonstrating important, although not prohibitive, B1 disruption effects. With the optimized setup, simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions were performed on 5 healthy volunteers undergoing two visual paradigms: an eyes-open/eyes-closed task, and a visual evoked potential (VEP) paradigm using reversing-checkerboard stimulation. EEG data exhibited clear occipital alpha modulation and average VEPs, respectively, with concomitant BOLD signal changes. On a single-trial level, alpha power variations could be observed with relative confidence on all trials; VEP detection was more limited, although

  19. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  20. Nitrogen detected TROSY at high field yields high resolution and sensitivity for protein NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Koh; Arthanari, Haribabu; Shimada, Ichio; Wagner, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    Detection of (15)N in multidimensional NMR experiments of proteins has sparsely been utilized because of the low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) of nitrogen and the presumed low sensitivity of such experiments. Here we show that selecting the TROSY components of proton-attached (15)N nuclei (TROSY (15)NH) yields high quality spectra in high field magnets (>600 MHz) by taking advantage of the slow (15)N transverse relaxation and compensating for the inherently low (15)N sensitivity. The (15)N TROSY transverse relaxation rates increase modestly with molecular weight but the TROSY gain in peak heights depends strongly on the magnetic field strength. Theoretical simulations predict that the narrowest line width for the TROSY (15)NH component can be obtained at 900 MHz, but sensitivity reaches its maximum around 1.2 GHz. Based on these considerations, a (15)N-detected 2D (1)H-(15)N TROSY-HSQC ((15)N-detected TROSY-HSQC) experiment was developed and high-quality 2D spectra were recorded at 800 MHz in 2 h for 1 mM maltose-binding protein at 278 K (τc ~ 40 ns). Unlike for (1)H detected TROSY, deuteration is not mandatory to benefit (15)N detected TROSY due to reduced dipolar broadening, which facilitates studies of proteins that cannot be deuterated, especially in cases where production requires eukaryotic expression systems. The option of recording (15)N TROSY of proteins expressed in H2O media also alleviates the problem of incomplete amide proton back exchange, which often hampers the detection of amide groups in the core of large molecular weight proteins that are expressed in D2O culture media and cannot be refolded for amide back exchange. These results illustrate the potential of (15)NH-detected TROSY experiments as a means to exploit the high resolution offered by high field magnets near and above 1 GHz.

  1. Investigation of c-axis-aligned crystalline gadolinium doped aluminum-zinc-oxide films sputtered at room-temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Junchen; Li, Huijin; Han, Dedong; Yu, Wen; Luo, Zhen; Liang, Yi; Zhang, Shengdong; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Yi

    2018-01-01

    The c-axis-aligned crystalline (CAAC) rare earth gadolinium doped aluminum-zinc-oxide (Gd-AZO) thin films sputtered at room temperature are investigated in this work. It is found that the polycrystalline AZO is restructured into CAAC Gd-AZO through gadolinium doping. The X-ray diffraction spectrum and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images indicate the (002) crystalline orientation of the local Gd-AZO grains. The film-formation mechanism of room-temperature sputtered CAAC Gd-AZO thin films is analyzed. Bottom gate oxide thin film transistors with a Gd-AZO active layer are fabricated by low temperature processes. The devices show preferable electrical properties, such as good I-V characteristics, high uniformity, and excellent bias stress stability.

  2. Trial of obtaining a high-grade gadolinium concentrate using the fractional precipitation together with the ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozga, W.; Soltysiak, I. (Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej, Lublin (Poland))

    1980-01-01

    The modified fractional precipitation of lanthanon-potassium double chromate was used for preliminary separation of gadolinium concentrate containing 60% Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 33.3% Sm/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The 1st fraction enriched with samarium (60% Sm/sub 2/O/sub 3/) and 2nd fraction enriched with gadolinium (80% Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with efficiency of 82% recounting on Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/) were obtained. Both fractions were separated by the elution with EDTA solution buffered with ammonium acetate. The good results were obtained by ion exchange separation only of the 1st fraction.

  3. Ultra thin films of gadolinium deposited by evaporation in ultra high vacuum conditions: Composition, growth and morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera-Sancho, O.A.; Castro-Gonzalez, D.; Araya-Pochet, J.A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 San Pedro, San Jose (Costa Rica); Escuela de Fisica, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 San Pedro, San Jose (Costa Rica); Vargas-Castro, W.E., E-mail: william.vargascastro@ucr.ac.cr [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 San Pedro, San Jose (Costa Rica); Escuela de Fisica, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 San Pedro, San Jose (Costa Rica)

    2011-02-01

    Ultra-thin gadolinium films with thicknesses between 8 and 101 A were deposited on AT-cut crystalline quartz substrates under ultra high vacuum conditions, and subsequently subjected to composition and morphologic characterization through X-ray photo-spectroscopy analysis and atomic force microscopy. Oxygen contamination is found on the samples, and its amount is estimated in terms of the thickness of an oxygen layer over the gadolinium films after subtracting the contribution to the XPS spectra of the underlying background. Atomic force microscope pictures provide evidence of having metal island films, with two growing regimes: the Volmer-Weber mode for the thinner films considered and the Stranski-Krastanov growing mode for the thicker ones. From evaluation of the sticking coefficient, the shape of the islands is approximated in terms of oblate spheroid caps and variation of the contact angle with film mass thickness is reported.

  4. Loneliness among Late Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, Bruce; Skomski, Grant G.

    1989-01-01

    Assessed extent of loneliness among late adolescent college students (N=559). Findings suggest that, although moderate loneliness was reported by most participants, number of respondents evidenced high degree of loneliness. Comparison of lonely and nonlonely adolescents yielded relatively few significant differences. Lonely and nonlonely…

  5. Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shih, M.D.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Hsing, Y.I.C.

    2008-01-01

    During the late maturation stage of seed development, water content decreases greatly. One of the most striking characteristics of mature orthodox seeds is their ability to withstand severe desiccation. Mechanisms of plant drought/desiccation tolerance have been studied by numerous groups, and a

  6. Mengapa Late Childhood Merokok?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apriyani Taryaka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This research is set to determine the cause of late childhood smoking and whether the factor behind late child hood smoking is the same with teenagers. The background of this research are the findings of Tobacco Control Support Center that 3 out of 10 students are found to be smoking before reaching the age of 10. This research uses qualitative case study research through observation and in-depth direct interview towards 3 male subjects aged 11 who smokes every day. Results show that the 3 subjects smoke due to personal factor, friends, family and cigarette advertisements. Most of the factor behind the smoking behavior are found to be in the sociogenic motive category. Therefore, it could be concluded that the smoking behavior of the 3 subjects is not purely from the personal factor, but more of the environmental factor having big part in creating smoking behavior in the 3 subjects. Factors behind smoking behavior of the three late childhood subjects and teenagers have a lot in common. Friend factor is the first driving factor of smoking behavior on both late childhood and teenager. 

  7. Late effecten van kankerbehandeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, Nelia E.

    2004-01-01

    In dit artikel wordt ingegaan op de lange termijn effecten van kanker op de kinderleeftijd. Vervolgens wordt een kort overzicht gegeven van de belangrijkste late gevolgen die kunnen optreden na een oncologische behandeling met radio- en/of chemotherapie toegepast in de kinderleeftijd. Er wordt kort

  8. Big Java late objects

    CERN Document Server

    Horstmann, Cay S

    2012-01-01

    Big Java: Late Objects is a comprehensive introduction to Java and computer programming, which focuses on the principles of programming, software engineering, and effective learning. It is designed for a two-semester first course in programming for computer science students.

  9. High-field electrical transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaes, Matthias; Le Gallo, Manuel; Sebastian, Abu; Salinga, Martin; Krebs, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Electrical transport in chalcogenide-based phase change materials is an active area of research owing to the prominent role played by these materials in the field of information technology. Here, we present transport measurements (IV curves) obtained on line-cells of as-deposited amorphous phase change materials (Ge2Sb2Te5, GeTe, Ag4In3Sb66Te27) over a wide voltage and temperature range (300 K to 160 K). The well defined geometry of our devices enables a description of the transport behavior in terms of conductivity vs. electric field. At higher temperatures (300 K ≥ T ≥ 220 K) and low to intermediate fields (F Poole-Frenkel emission from a two-center Coulomb potential. Based on this model, we observe a temperature dependence of the inter-trap distance, which we can relate to a temperature dependence in the occupation of the defect creating the Coulomb potential governing Poole-Frenkel emission. At higher fields and lower temperatures, the dependency of the IV curve on the electric field can be described by ln(I/I0) = (F/Fc)2. By combining this contribution with that of the Poole-Frenkel emission, we can show that the slope at high fields, Fc, is independent of temperature. We argue that models based on direct tunneling or thermally assisted tunneling from a single defect into the valence band cannot explain the observed behavior quantitatively.

  10. High-field MR of syringomyelia associated with Chiari I malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyasaka, Kazuo; Terae, Satoshi; Takahashi, Chihiro; Abe, Satoru; Abe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Kunio (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-12-01

    Forty-seven patients with syringomyelia associated with Chiari-type I malformation were studied by means of high field MRI. A swelling of the spinal cord was observed in 65% of them, with the frequency significantly increasing with the degree of foramen magnum stenosis. A spontaneous regression of the syrinx was recognized in 2 out of the 9 patients whose tonsils were elevated. These observations indicate that stenosis of the foramen magnum plays a key role in the progression of syringomyelia; thus, foramen-magnum decompression can reasonably be accepted as a surgical method of treatment of the disease. The syrinx extended above the C1 in 16% and below the lumbar enlargement in only 5%. Septum formation in the syrinx was found in 24%, while an eccentric location of the syrinx was very frequent (97%). A lack of spinal-cord swelling and septum formation and an eccentric location of the syrinx should be taken into consideration when a syringo-subarachnoid shunt is attempted. (author).

  11. New vertical cryostat for the high field superconducting magnet test station at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Craen, A.; Atieh, S.; Bajko, M.; Benda, V.; de Rijk, G.; Favre, G.; Giloux, C.; Hanzelka, P.; Minginette, P.; Parma, V.; Perret, P.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Viret, P.

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the R&D program for new superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator upgrades, CERN is building a new vertical test station to test high field superconducting magnets of unprecedented large size. This facility will allow testing of magnets by vertical insertion in a pressurized liquid helium bath, cooled to a controlled temperature between 4.2 K and 1.9 K. The dimensions of the cryostat will allow testing magnets of up to 2.5 m in length with a maximum diameter of 1.5 m and a mass of 15 tons. To allow for a faster insertion and removal of the magnets and reducing the risk of helium leaks, all cryogenics supply lines are foreseen to remain permanently connected to the cryostat. A specifically designed 100 W heat exchanger is integrated in the cryostat helium vessel for a controlled cooling of the magnet from 4.2 K down to 1.9 K in a 3 m3 helium bath. This paper describes the cryostat and its main functions, focusing on features specifically developed for this project. The status of the construction and the plans for assembly and installation at CERN are also presented.

  12. Scoping study for compact high-field superconducting net energy tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumgaard, R. T.; Greenwald, M.; Freidberg, J. P.; Wolfe, S. M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Brunner, D.; Sorbom, B. N.; Whyte, D. G.

    2016-10-01

    The continued development and commercialization of high temperature superconductors (HTS) may enable the construction of compact, net-energy tokamaks. HTS, in contrast to present generation low temperature superconductors, offers improved performance in high magnetic fields, higher current density, stronger materials, higher temperature operation, and simplified assembly. Using HTS along with community-consensus confinement physics (H98 =1) may make it possible to achieve net-energy (Q>1) or burning plasma conditions (Q>5) in DIII-D or ASDEX-U sized, conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. It is shown that, by operating at high plasma current and density enabled by the high magnetic field (B>10T), the required triple products may be achieved at plasma volumes under 20m3, major radii under 2m, with external heating powers under 40MW. This is at the scale of existing devices operated by laboratories, universities and companies. The trade-offs in the core heating, divertor heat exhaust, sustainment, stability, and proximity to known plasma physics limits are discussed in the context of the present tokamak experience base and the requirements for future devices. The resulting HTS-based design space is compared and contrasted to previous studies on high-field copper experiments with similar missions. The physics exploration conducted with such HTS devices could decrease the real and perceived risks of ITER exploitation, and aid in quickly developing commercially-applicable tokamak pilot plants and reactors.

  13. Calculation of electric fields induced by body and head motion in high-field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Zhao, Huawei; Crozier, Stuart

    2003-03-01

    In modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), patients are exposed to strong, nonuniform static magnetic fields outside the central imaging region, in which the movement of the body may be able to induce electric currents in tissues which could be possibly harmful. This paper presents theoretical investigations into the spatial distribution of induced electric fields and currents in the patient when moving into the MRI scanner and also for head motion at various positions in the magnet. The numerical calculations are based on an efficient, quasi-static, finite-difference scheme and an anatomically realistic, full-body, male model. 3D field profiles from an actively shielded 4 T magnet system are used and the body model projected through the field profile with a range of velocities. The simulation shows that it possible to induce electric fields/currents near the level of physiological significance under some circumstances and provides insight into the spatial characteristics of the induced fields. The results are extrapolated to very high field strengths and tabulated data shows the expected induced currents and fields with both movement velocity and field strength.

  14. Hippocampal subfields at ultra high field MRI: An overview of segmentation and measurement methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Alessia; Donatelli, Graziella; Cosottini, Mirco; Tosetti, Michela; Fantacci, Maria Evelina

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hippocampus is one of the most interesting and studied brain regions because of its involvement in memory functions and its vulnerability in pathological conditions, such as neurodegenerative processes. In the recent years, the increasing availability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners that operate at ultra‐high field (UHF), that is, with static magnetic field strength ≥7T, has opened new research perspectives. Compared to conventional high‐field scanners, these systems can provide new contrasts, increased signal‐to‐noise ratio and higher spatial resolution, thus they may improve the visualization of very small structures of the brain, such as the hippocampal subfields. Studying the morphometry of the hippocampus is crucial in neuroimaging research because changes in volume and thickness of hippocampal subregions may be relevant in the early assessment of pathological cognitive decline and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The present review provides an overview of the manual, semi‐automated and fully automated methods that allow the assessment of hippocampal subfield morphometry at UHF MRI, focusing on the different hippocampal segmentation produced. © 2017 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:28188659

  15. Effects of anesthetic agents on brain blood oxygenation level revealed with ultra-high field MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Ciobanu

    Full Text Available During general anesthesia it is crucial to control systemic hemodynamics and oxygenation levels. However, anesthetic agents can affect cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in a drug-dependent manner, while systemic hemodynamics is stable. Brain-wide monitoring of this effect remains highly challenging. Because T(2*-weighted imaging at ultra-high magnetic field strengths benefits from a dramatic increase in contrast to noise ratio, we hypothesized that it could monitor anesthesia effects on brain blood oxygenation. We scanned rat brains at 7T and 17.2T under general anesthesia using different anesthetics (isoflurane, ketamine-xylazine, medetomidine. We showed that the brain/vessels contrast in T(2*-weighted images at 17.2T varied directly according to the applied pharmacological anesthetic agent, a phenomenon that was visible, but to a much smaller extent at 7T. This variation is in agreement with the mechanism of action of these agents. These data demonstrate that preclinical ultra-high field MRI can monitor the effects of a given drug on brain blood oxygenation level in the absence of systemic blood oxygenation changes and of any neural stimulation.

  16. Susceptibility correction for improved tractography using high field DT-EPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintjens, W.; Poot, D. H. J.; Verhoye, M.; Van Der Linden, A.; Sijbers, J.

    2008-03-01

    Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DTI) is a well known technique that can provide information about the neuronal fiber structure of the brain. However, since DTI requires a large amount of data, a high speed MRI acquisition technique is needed to acquire these data within a reasonable time. Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is a technique that provides the desired speed. Unfortunately, the advantage of speed is overshadowed by image artifacts, especially at high fields. EPI artifacts originate from susceptibility differences in adjacent tissues and correction techniques are required to obtain reliable images. In this work, the fieldmap method, which tries to measure distortion effects, is optimized by using a non linear least squares estimator for calculating pixel shifts. This method is tested on simulated data and proves to be more robust against noise compared to previously suggested methods. Another advantage of this new method is that other parameters like relaxation and the odd/even phase difference are estimated. This new way of estimating the field map is demonstrated on a hardware phantom, which consists of parallel bundles made of woven strands of Micro Dyneema fibers. Using a modified EPI-sequence, reference data was measured for the calculation of fieldmaps. This allows one to reposition the pixels in order to obtain images with less distortions. The correction is applied to non-diffusion weighted images as well as diffusion weighted images and fiber tracking is performed on this corrected data.

  17. Comparison of mechanical concepts for $Nb_3Sn$ high field accelerator magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Loffler, Christian Hannes; Peter, Schmolz

    Several magnets using Nb3Sn as conductor are currently developed at CERN; these magnets are either slated for future updates of the LHC or for research purposes relating to future accelerators. The mechanical structure is one of the challenging aspects of superconducting high-field magnets. The main purpose of the mechanical structure is to keep the coils in compression till the emergence of the highest electromagnetic forces that are developed in the ultimate field of the magnet. Any loss of pre-compression during the magnet’s excitation would cause too large deformation of the coil and possibly a quench in the conductor owing to relative movements of strands in contact associated with excessive local heat release. However, too high pre-compression would overstrain the conductor and thereby limit the performance of the magnet. This thesis focuses on the mechanical behaviour of three of these magnets. All of them are based on different mechanical designs, “bladder and key” and “collar-based”, for t...

  18. Non-solenoidal Startup with High-Field-Side Local Helicity Injection on the Pegasus ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. M.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Pachicano, J. L.; Pierren, C.; Richner, N. J.; Rodriguez Sanchez, C.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Weberski, J. D.

    2017-10-01

    Local Helicity Injection (LHI) is a non-solenoidal startup technique utilizing electron current injectors at the plasma edge to initiate a tokamak-like plasma at high Ip . Recent experiments on Pegasus explore the inherent tradeoffs between high-field-side (HFS) injection in the lower divertor region and low-field-side (LFS) injection at the outboard midplane. Trade-offs include the relative current drive contributions of HI and poloidal induction, and the magnetic geometry required for relaxation to a tokamak-like state. HFS injection using a set of two increased-area injectors (Ainj = 4 cm2, Vinj 1.5 kV, and Iinj 8 kA) in the lower divertor is demonstrated over the full range of toroidal field available on Pegasus (BT 0 = 10) attainable with LHI and the favorable stability of the ultra-low aspect ratio, low-li LHI-driven plasmas allow access to high βt-up to 100 % , as indicated by kinetically-constrained equilibrium reconstructions. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  19. A low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secoli, Riccardo; Robinson, Matthew; Brugnoli, Michele; Rodriguez y Baena, Ferdinando

    2015-03-01

    To perform minimally invasive surgical interventions with the aid of robotic systems within a magnetic resonance imaging scanner offers significant advantages compared to conventional surgery. However, despite the numerous exciting potential applications of this technology, the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging-compatible robotics has been hampered by safety, reliability and cost concerns: the robots should not be attracted by the strong magnetic field of the scanner and should operate reliably in the field without causing distortion to the scan data. Development of non-conventional sensors and/or actuators is thus required to meet these strict operational and safety requirements. These demands commonly result in expensive actuators, which mean that cost effectiveness remains a major challenge for such robotic systems. This work presents a low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator: a pneumatic stepper motor which is controllable in open loop or closed loop, along with a rotary encoder, both fully manufactured in plastic, which are shown to perform reliably via a set of in vitro trials while generating negligible artifacts when imaged within a standard clinical scanner. © IMechE 2015.

  20. High-field formation and field ion microscopy of monatomic carbon chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenofontov, V A; Mazilova, T I; Mikhailovskij, I M; Sadanov, E V; Velicodnaja, O A; Mazilov, A A [National Scientific Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Academicheskaja, 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2007-11-21

    By methods of field ion microscopy and mass spectrometry, the presence of linear carbon chains at the surface of carbon fibers after high-voltage treatment using a pulse generator with pulse duration of 10 ns was revealed. The carbon chains attached to the specimen tips can be produced in situ in a field ion microscope using low-temperature pulsed evaporation by electric fields of the order of 80 V nm{sup -1}. These nanowires are perfectly resolved in the field ion microscope. An analysis of the cluster images and determination of the field-enhancement factors strongly indicate that the field produced clusters are linear chains of one carbon atom in diameter. The process of field evaporation at the pulse voltage loading is sporadic with an anomalously large instant rate of evaporation corresponding to explosive removal of about 10{sup 11} atomic layers s{sup -1}. Atomic C chains are produced during the high-field unraveling of nanofibers at 4.2 and 77 K.

  1. Costs of high-field superconducting strands for particle accelerator magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Cooley, L D; Scanlan, R M; 10.1088/0953-2048/18/4/R01

    2005-01-01

    The costs of superconducting magnet strands are compared by calculating a 'production scaling factor' P that relates purchase data to the cost of raw materials. Using a consistent method, we normalize for different conductor geometries and strand diameters to arrive at cost indices in $ kg/sup -1/, $ m/sup -1/, and $ kA/sup -1/ m/sup -1/. Analyses of Nb47Ti conductors taken from the past 25 years of high-field magnet projects reveal that the price of raw materials and, to a lesser extent, finished strands, have tracked the price of niobium pentoxide. Performance gains during the 1980s produced $ kA /sup -1/ m/sup -1/ indices that fell with time ahead of strand cost in $ m/sup -1/, a situation that may reflect the present status of Nb /sub 3/Sn magnet conductors. Analyses of present materials show that P decreases systematically with billet mass. While production strands in 200-500 kg billets have costs ~3 times the cost of raw materials, the 20-50 kg billet size for internal-tin Nb/sub 3/Sn composites drives ...

  2. Sintering behavior of doped ZnO powders for high field varistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghirlanda, M.

    1990-08-01

    The sintering of ZnO varistor precursor powders, doped with Co, Mn and different concentrations of Bi and Al, is investigated and discussed in relation with sintering models. One purpose of the present study is to provide information valuable for the fabrication of high field varistors. As the fundamental parameter of these electronic components is the breakdown voltage per unit of thickness, which is determined by the number of grain boundaries per linear dimension, the grain size and the sintered density are crucial variables, and the sintering is a central step in the manufacturing of such varistors. Sintering experiments performed at constant heating rate in a loading dilatometer provide data on the densification and creep of the compacted powders. Another goal of the present study is to provide an experimental basis for the interpretation of the evolution of the ratio between densification rate and creep rate in terms of competition between densification and microstructure coarsening. This is accomplished by taking advantage of the variety of sintering behaviors that takes place in the system ZnO-Bi-Al: the comparison of these behaviors allows us to correlate the macroscopic sintering parameters to the evolution of the microstructure. It results that, while in non-doped powders densification and coarsening develop in a balanced way, resulting in the constancy of the ratio between densification rate and creep rate, the effect of the dopants on the sintering kinetics alters such a balance, leading this ratio to vary. 17 figs.

  3. Slice accelerated diffusion-weighted imaging at ultra-high field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Koopmans, Peter J; Lützkendorf, Ralf; Norris, David G; Turner, Robert; Wald, Lawrence L; Heidemann, Robin M

    2014-04-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data with very high isotropic resolution can be obtained at 7T. However, for extensive brain coverage, a large number of slices is required, resulting in long acquisition times (TAs). Recording multiple slices simultaneously (SMS) promises to reduce the TA. A combination of zoomed and parallel imaging is used to achieve high isotropic resolution dMRI data with a low level of distortions at 7T. The blipped-CAIPI (controlled aliasing in parallel imaging) approach is used to acquire several slices simultaneously. Due to their high radiofrequency (RF) power deposition and ensuing specific absorption rate (SAR) constraints, the commonly used multiband (MB) RF pulses for SMS imaging are inefficient at 7T and entail long repetition times, counteracting the usefulness of SMS acquisitions. To address this issue, low SAR multislice Power Independent of Number of Slices RF pulses are employed. In vivo dMRI results with and without SMS acceleration are presented at different isotropic spatial resolutions at ultra high field strength. The datasets are recorded at a high angular resolution to detect fiber crossings. From the results and compared with earlier studies at these resolutions, it can be seen that scan time is significantly reduced, while image quality is preserved. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Advanced MR methods at ultra-high field (7 Tesla) for clinical musculoskeletal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna/Vienna General Hospital, MR Centre - High Field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Zbyn, Stefan; Schmitt, Benjamin; Friedrich, Klaus; Bogner, Wolfgang [Medical University of Vienna/Vienna General Hospital, MR Centre - High Field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna/Vienna General Hospital, MR Centre - High Field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-11-15

    This article provides an overview of the initial clinical results of musculoskeletal studies performed at 7 Tesla, with special focus on sodium imaging, new techniques such as chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and T2* imaging, and multinuclear MR spectroscopy. Sodium imaging was clinically used at 7 T in the evaluation of patients after cartilage repair procedures because it enables the GAG content to be monitored over time. Sodium imaging and T2* mapping allow insights into the ultra-structural composition of the Achilles tendon and help detect early disease. Chemical exchange saturation transfer was, for the first time, successfully applied in the clinical set-up at 7 T in patients after cartilage repair surgery. The potential of phosphorus MR spectroscopy in muscle was demonstrated in a comparison study between 3 and 7 T, with higher spectral resolution and significantly shorter data acquisition times at 7 T. These initial clinical studies demonstrate the potential of ultra-high field MR at 7 T, with the advantage of significantly improved sensitivity for other nuclei, such as {sup 23}Na (sodium) and {sup 31}P (phosphorus). The application of non-proton imaging and spectroscopy provides new insights into normal and abnormal physiology of musculoskeletal tissues, particularly cartilage, tendons, and muscles. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of gadolinium nanoparticles and molecular contrast agents for radiation therapy-enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Rachel; Taupin, Florence; Flaender, Mélanie; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Champion, Christophe; Agelou, Mathieu; Elleaume, Hélène

    2017-11-01

    Nanoparticles appear as a novel tool to enhance the effectiveness of radiotherapy in cancer treatments. Many parameters influence their efficacy, such as their size, concentration, composition, their cellular localization, as well as the photon source energy. The current Monte Carlo study aims at comparing the dose-enhancement in presence of gadolinium (Gd), either as isolated atoms or atoms clustered in nanoparticles (NPs), by investigating the role played by these physical parameters at the cellular and the nanometer scale. In parallel, in vitro assays were performed in presence of either the gadolinium contrast agent (GdCA) Magnevist(®) or ultrasmall gadolinium NPs (GdNPs, 3 nm) for comparison with the simulations. PENELOPE Monte Carlo Code was used for in silico dose calculations. Monochromatic photon beams were used to calculate dose enhancements in different cell compartments and low-energy secondary electron spectra dependence with energy. Particular attention has been placed on the interplay between the X-ray beam energy, the Gd localization and its distance from cellular targets. Clonogenic assays were used to quantify F98 rat glioma cell survival after irradiation in the presence of GdNPs or GdCA, using monochromatic X-rays with energies in the 30 keV-80 keV range from a synchrotron and 1.25 MeV gamma photons from a cobalt-60 source. The simulations that correspond to the experimental conditions were compared with the experimental results. In silico, a highly heterogeneous and clustered Gd-atom distribution, a massive production of low energy electrons around GdNPs and an optimal X-ray beam energy, above the Gd K-edge, were key factors found to increase microscopic doses, which could potentially induce cell death. The different Gd localizations studied all resulted in a lower dose enhancement for the nucleus component than for cytoplasm or membrane compartments, with a maximum dose-enhancement factor (DEF) found at 65 keV and 58 keV, respectively

  6. Correlation of histological findings with gadolinium enhanced MRI scans during healing of a PHEMA orbital implant in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Hicks, C.; Morris, I.; Vijayasekaran, S.; Fallon, M; McAllister, J; Clayton, A; Chirila, T.; Crawford, G.; Constable, I

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—To investigate a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) orbital implant with a spongy anterior hemisphere and a smooth gel posterior hemisphere, by histology correlated with magnetic resonance images.
METHODS—Following enucleation, eight rabbits received PHEMA implants to which the muscles were directly sutured, and underwent gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from 3 to 52 weeks. After the rabbits were killed, the implants were removed, cut in a plane corr...

  7. Characterization of imaging performances of gadolinium-oxysulfide phosphors made for X-ray imaging by using a sedimentation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Seungman; Han, Jongchul; Joe, Okla; Ko, Jongsoo; Kim, Hokyung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngsoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    The development of a pixel-structured scintillator has recently been exploited to confine optical transport onto a corresponding photodiode pixel. This conceptual design of scintillators may provide high detection efficiency while preserving high spatial resolution in digital X-ray imaging detector systems. The sedimentation approach is one method to fill gadolinium-oxysulfide phosphors into a pixel-structured micro-well array. To fully understand the X-ray imaging characteristics of a pixel-structured design with sedimented gadolinium-oxysulfide phosphors, the imaging performance of gadolinium-oxysulfide phosphor layers made by using sedimentation should be characterized in advance. We have fabricated gadolinium-oxysulfide phosphor screens by using a simple sedimentation method. In order to characterize the imaging performances of the developed phosphor screens, we overlaid them onto a photodiode array with a pixel pitch of 48 microns and thus completed indirect-conversion X-ray imaging detectors. The imaging performance of the detector was investigated in terms of the modulation-transfer function (MTF), the noise-power spectrum, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The results were compared with those of detectors employing commercial phosphor screens. Although the developed screen was about 1.5 times thicker than the commercial one, the X-ray sensitivity was comparable to that of the commercial phosphor. The MTF performance was worse than that of the commercial screen, and that MTF performance also governed the DQE performance of the detector over the entire spatial-frequency band. If the sedimented phosphors are pixel-structured with micro-well arrays, however, the MTF performance can be defined by using only the pixel size. Therefore, a design to enhance the X-ray sensitivity for the sedimentation method should be considered.

  8. Characterization of imaging performances of gadolinium-oxysulfide phosphors made for X-ray imaging by using a sedimentation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seungman; Han, Jong Chul; Joe, Okla; Ko, Jong Soo; Kim, Young Soo; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2012-02-01

    The development of a pixel-structured scintillator has recently been exploited to confine optical transport onto a corresponding photodiode pixel. This conceptual design of scintillators may provide high detection efficiency while preserving high spatial resolution in digital X-ray imaging detector systems. The sedimentation approach is one method to fill gadolinium-oxysulfide phosphors into a pixel-structured micro-well array. To fully understand the X-ray imaging characteristics of a pixel-structured design with sedimented gadolinium-oxysulfide phosphors, the imaging performance of gadolinium-oxysulfide phosphor layers made by using sedimentation should be characterized in advance. We have fabricated gadolinium-oxysulfide phosphor screens by using a simple sedimentation method. In order to characterize the imaging performances of the developed phosphor screens, we overlaid them onto a photodiode array with a pixel pitch of 48 microns and thus completed indirect-conversion X-ray imaging detectors. The imaging performance of the detector was investigated in terms of the modulation-transfer function (MTF), the noise-power spectrum, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The results were compared with those of detectors employing commercial phosphor screens. Although the developed screen was about 1.5 times thicker than the commercial one, the X-ray sensitivity was comparable to that of the commercial phosphor. The MTF performance was worse than that of the commercial screen, and that MTF performance also governed the DQE performance of the detector over the entire spatial-frequency band. If the sedimented phosphors are pixel-structured with micro-well arrays, however, the MTF performance can be defined by using only the pixel size. Therefore, a design to enhance the X-ray sensitivity for the sedimentation method should be considered.

  9. Gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography of arterial occlusive disease in lower extremity : comparison with conventional digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang June; Koh, Young Hwan; Cha, Joo Hee; Kim, Hyu Beom; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-02-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography with that of conventional digital subtraction angiography for the evaluation of lower extremity arterial occlusive diseases. In 26 patients with symptomatic lower extremity arterial occlusive disease, both conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) were performed during the same week. MR angiography was performed using three-dimensional gradient-echo acquisition before, and two sequential acquisitions after, the administration of gadolinium (0.2 mmol/kg). In 23 patients, two separate, contiguous areas were scanned using additional doses. In three patients, only one field with a suspicious lesion was scanned. Three radiologists independently analyzed the CE-MRA and DSA findings of each vascular segment (20 segments per arterial tree) for the presence of obstructive lesions; the grade assigned was either mild or none (less than 50%), stenotic (50%-99%), or occlusion (100%). From among a total of 462 segments, DSA detected 99 which were significantly narrowed (stenosis, 33; occlusion, 66). Using MR angiography, 102 segments (stenosis 39; occlusion, 63) were identified, and 94 lesions (stenosis, 32; occlusion, 62) were graded correctly. Seven lesions were overestimated and four were underestimated. For the detection of hemodynamically significant stenosis or occlusions using MR angiography, sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 95%, 98%, and 98% (G=3D0.995, P less than 0.001), respectively. To prove the absence of lesions, we repeated DSA in two patients with arterial spasm due to puncture. Three occluded segments seen on DSA, which revealed intact segments on MR angiography, suggested slow distal flow after reconstitution. For the evaluation of lower extremity arterial occlusive disease, the diagnostic value of gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography is comparable with that of digital subtraction angiography. The advantages of the

  10. Luminescence properties and electronic structure of Ce{sup 3+}-doped gadolinium aluminum garnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, V.P., E-mail: ssclab@ukr.net [A.V. Bogatsky Physico-Chemical Institute, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 86 Lustdorfskaya doroga, 65080 Odessa (Ukraine); Berezovskaya, I.V. [A.V. Bogatsky Physico-Chemical Institute, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 86 Lustdorfskaya doroga, 65080 Odessa (Ukraine); Voloshinovskii, A.S. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 8 Kirilo i Mefodii, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Zadneprovski, B.I. [Central Research and Development Institute of Chemistry and Mechanics, 115487 Moscow (Russian Federation); Efryushina, N.P. [A.V. Bogatsky Physico-Chemical Institute, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 86 Lustdorfskaya doroga, 65080 Odessa (Ukraine)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The luminescence properties of Ce{sup 3+} ions in (Y, Gd){sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} are analyzed. • The Gd{sup 3+} → Y{sup 3+} substitution leads to increasing of Ce{sup 3+} noncubic crystal field splitting parameter. • The excitation spectra for the Ce{sup 3+} emission in GdAG contain bands at 6.67, 7.75, and 9.76 eV. • These features are due to the Ce{sup 3+}-bound exciton formation and O 2p → Al 3s, 3p transitions. • Contributions from Al atoms to the conduction-band density of states are quite essential. - Abstract: Yttrium-gadolinium aluminum garnets (YGdAG) doped with Ce{sup 3+} ions have been prepared by co-precipitation method. The luminescent properties of Ce{sup 3+} ions in Gd{sub 3(1−x)}Ce{sub 3x}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (x = 0.01) have been studied upon excitation in the 2–20 eV region. The substitution of Gd{sup 3+} for Y{sup 3+} in the garnet structure results in broadening the emission band and shifting its maximum towards the longer wavelengths. It was found that in addition to the 4f → 5d excitation bands of Ce{sup 3+} ions, the excitation spectra for the Ce{sup 3+} emission contain bands at 6.67, 7.75, and 9.76 eV. These bands are attributed to the Ce{sup 3+}-bound exciton formation and O 2p → Al 3s, 3p transitions, respectively. Although gadolinium states dominate near the bottom of the conduction band of Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}, contributions from Al{sub tetr} and Al{sub oct} atoms to the conduction-band density of states are evaluated as quite essential.

  11. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G Zhang

    Full Text Available MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL would be needed.

  12. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daniel G; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed.

  13. Optical properties of pure and Ce{sup 3+} doped gadolinium gallium garnet crystals and epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syvorotka, I.I. [Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202 Stryjska Street, Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Sugak, D. [Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202 Stryjska Street, Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12, S. Bandera Street, Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine); Wierzbicka, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Wittlin, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw, ul. Dewajtis 5, 01-815 Warsaw (Poland); Przybylińska, H. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Barzowska, J. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Gdańsk University, ul. Wita Stwosza 57, Gdańsk (Poland); Barcz, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Electron Technology, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Berkowski, M.; Domagała, J. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Mahlik, S.; Grinberg, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Gdańsk University, ul. Wita Stwosza 57, Gdańsk (Poland); Ma, Chong-Geng [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); and others

    2015-08-15

    Results of X-ray diffraction and low temperature optical absorption measurements of cerium doped gadolinium gallium garnet single crystals and epitaxial layers are reported. In the region of intra-configurational 4f–4f transitions the spectra of the bulk crystals exhibit the signatures of several different Ce{sup 3+} related centers. Apart from the dominant center, associated with Ce substituting gadolinium, at least three other centers are found, some of them attributed to the so-called antisite locations of rare-earth ions in the garnet host, i.e., in the Ga positions. X-ray diffraction data prove lattice expansion of bulk GGG crystals due to the presence of rare-earth antisites. The concentration of the additional Ce-related centers in epitaxial layers is much lower than in the bulk crystals. However, the Ce-doped layers incorporate a large amount of Pb from flux, which is the most probable source of nonradiative quenching of Ce luminescence, not observed in crystals grown by the Czochralski method. - Highlights: • Ce{sup 3+} multicenters found in Gadolinium Gallium Garnet crystals and epitaxial layers. • High quality epitaxial layers of pure and Ce-doped GGG were grown. • Luminescence quenching of Ce{sup 3+} by Pb ions from flux detected in GGG epitaxial layers. • X-ray diffraction allows measuring the amount of the rare-earth antisites in GGG.

  14. Homogeneous dispersion of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles into a non-aqueous-based polymer by two surface treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, Jorice, E-mail: jorice.samuel@gmail.com [AREVA T and D UK Ltd, AREVA T and D Research and Technology Centre (United Kingdom); Raccurt, Olivier [NanoChemistry and Nanosafety Laboratory (DRT/LITEN/DTNM/LCSN), CEA Grenoble, Department of NanoMaterials (France); Mancini, Cedric; Dujardin, Christophe; Amans, David; Ledoux, Gilles [Universite de Lyon, Laboratoire de Physico Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents (LPCML) (France); Poncelet, Olivier [NanoChemistry and Nanosafety Laboratory (DRT/LITEN/DTNM/LCSN), CEA Grenoble, Department of NanoMaterials (France); Tillement, Olivier [Universite de Lyon, Laboratoire de Physico Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents (LPCML) (France)

    2011-06-15

    Gadolinium oxide nanoparticles are more and more used. They can notably provide interesting fluorescence properties. Herein they are incorporated into a non-aqueous-based polymer, the poly(methyl methacrylate). Their dispersion within the polymer matrix is the key to improve the composite properties. As-received gadolinium oxide nanopowders cannot be homogeneously dispersed in such a polymer matrix. Two surface treatments are, therefore, detailed and compared to achieve a good stability of the nanoparticles in a non-aqueous solvent such as the 2-butanone. Then, once the liquid suspensions have been stabilized, they are used to prepare nanocomposites with homogeneous particles dispersion. The two approaches proposed are an hybrid approach based on the growth of a silica shell around the gadolinium oxide nanoparticles, and followed by a suitable silane functionalization; and a non-hybrid approach based on the use of surfactants. The surface treatments and formulations involved in both methods are detailed, adjusted and compared. Thanks to optical methods and in particular to the use of a 'home made' confocal microscope, the dispersion homogeneity within the polymer can be assessed. Both methods provide promising and conclusive results.

  15. Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennth Marken

    2006-08-11

    the project start and that date a substantial shift in the MRI marketplace occurred, with rapid growth for systems at higher fields (1.5 T and above) and a consequent decline in the low field market (<1.0 T). While the project aim appeared technically attainable at that time, the conclusion was reached that the system and market economics do not warrant additional investment. The program was redirected to develop BSCCO 2212 multifilament wire development for high field superconducting magnets for NMR and other scientific research upon an agreement between DOE and Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology. The work t took place between September, 2004 and the project end in early 2006 was focused on 2212 multifilamentary wire. This report summarizes the technical achievements both in 2212 dip coated for an HTS MRI system and in BSCCO 2212 multifilamentary wire for high field magnets.

  16. Integration of ultra-high field MRI and histology for connectome based research of brain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan eYang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI became increasingly relevant for in vivo neuroscientific research because of improved spatial resolutions. However, this is still the unchallenged domain of histological studies, which long played an important role in the investigation of neuropsychiatric disorders. While the field of biological psychiatry strongly advanced on macroscopic levels, current developments are rediscovering the richness of immunohistological information when attempting a multi-level systematic approach to brain function and dysfunction. For most studies, histology sections lost information on three-dimensional reconstructions. Translating histological sections to 3D-volumes would thus not only allow for multi-stain and multi-subject alignment in post mortem data, but also provide a crucial step in big data initiatives involving the network analyses currently performed with in vivo MRI. We therefore investigated potential pitfalls during integration of MR and histological information where no additional blockface information is available. We demonstrated that strengths and requirements from both methods seem to be ideally merged at a spatial resolution of 200 μm. However, the success of this approach is heavily dependent on choices of hardware, sequence and reconstruction. We provide a fully automated pipeline that optimizes histological 3D reconstructions, providing a potentially powerful solution not only for primary human post mortem research institutions in neuropsychiatric research, but also to help alleviate the massive workloads in neuroanatomical atlas initiatives. We further demonstrate (for the first time the feasibility and quality of ultra-high spatial resolution (150 µm isotopic imaging of the entire human brain MRI at 7T, offering new opportunities for analyses on MR-derived information.

  17. Generation and evaluation of an ultra-high-field atlas with applications in DBS planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Brian T.; Poirier, Stefan; Guo, Ting; Parrent, Andrew G.; Peters, Terry M.; Khan, Ali R.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a common treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) and involves the use of brain atlases or intrinsic landmarks to estimate the location of target deep brain structures, such as the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi). However, these structures can be difficult to localize with conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and thus targeting can be prone to error. Ultra-high-field imaging at 7T has the ability to clearly resolve these structures and thus atlases built with these data have the potential to improve targeting accuracy. Methods T1 and T2-weighted images of 12 healthy control subjects were acquired using a 7T MR scanner. These images were then used with groupwise registration to generate an unbiased average template with T1w and T2w contrast. Deep brain structures were manually labelled in each subject by two raters and rater reliability was assessed. We compared the use of this unbiased atlas with two other methods of atlas-based segmentation (single-template and multi-template) for subthalamic nucleus (STN) segmentation on 7T MRI data. We also applied this atlas to clinical DBS data acquired at 1.5T to evaluate its efficacy for DBS target localization as compared to using a standard atlas. Results The unbiased templates provide superb detail of subcortical structures. Through one-way ANOVA tests, the unbiased template is significantly (p brain nuclei and an increase in accuracy over single-template and lower field strength atlases.

  18. High-Field MRI and Mercury Release from Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SMJ Mortazavi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is among the most toxic nonradioactive elements which may cause toxicity even at low doses. Some studies showed release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings in individuals who used mobile phone. This study was conducted to assess the effect of high-field MRI on mercury release from dental amalgam filling. We studied two groups of students with identical tooth decays requiring a similar pattern of restorative dentistry. They were exposed to a magnetic flux density of 1.5 T produced by a MRI machine. 16 otherwise healthy students with identical dental decay participated in this study. They underwent similar restorative dentistry procedures and randomly divided into two groups of MRI-exposed and control arms. Urinary concentrations of mercury in the control subjects were measured before (hour 0 and 48 and 72 hrs after amalgam restoration, using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary concentrations of mercury in exposed individuals were determined before (hour 0, and 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after amalgam restoration. Unlike control subjects, they underwent conventional brain MRI (15 min, 99 slices, 24 hrs after amalgam restoration. The mean±SD urinary mercury levels in MRI-exposed individuals increased linearly from a baseline value of 20.70±17.96 to 24.83±22.91 μg/L 72 hrs after MRI. In the control group, the concentration decreased linearly from 20.70±19.77 to 16.14±20.05 μg/L. The difference between urinary mercury in the exposed and control group, 72 hrs after MRI (96 h after restoration,was significant (p=0.046. These findings provide further support for the noxious effect of MRI (exposure to strong magnetic fieldand release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings.

  19. Understanding the dynamics of superparamagnetic particles under the influence of high field gradient arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Aron, Miles; Stride, Eleanor

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the behaviour of superparamagnetic particles in magnetic drug targeting (MDT) schemes. A 3-dimensional mathematical model was developed, based on the analytical derivation of the trajectory of a magnetized particle suspended inside a fluid channel carrying laminar flow and in the vicinity of an external source of magnetic force. Semi-analytical expressions to quantify the proportion of captured particles, and their relative accumulation (concentration) as a function of distance along the wall of the channel were also derived. These were expressed in terms of a non-dimensional ratio of the relevant physical and physiological parameters corresponding to a given MDT protocol. The ability of the analytical model to assess magnetic targeting schemes was tested against numerical simulations of particle trajectories. The semi-analytical expressions were found to provide good first-order approximations for the performance of MDT systems in which the magnetic force is relatively constant over a large spatial range. The numerical model was then used to test the suitability of a range of different designs of permanent magnet assemblies for MDT. The results indicated that magnetic arrays that emit a strong magnetic force that varies rapidly over a confined spatial range are the most suitable for concentrating magnetic particles in a localized region. By comparison, commonly used magnet geometries such as button magnets and linear Halbach arrays result in distributions of accumulated particles that are less efficient for delivery. The trajectories predicted by the numerical model were verified experimentally by acoustically focusing magnetic microbeads flowing in a glass capillary channel, and optically tracking their path past a high field gradient Halbach array.

  20. Gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of symptomatic nerve roots in MRI of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyrrell, P.N.M.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; McCall, I.W. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Institute of Orthopaedics, The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital NHS Trust, Oswestry, Shropshire SY10 7AG (United Kingdom)

    1998-02-01

    Disc prolapse presenting with sciatica may be associated with enhancement of the symptomatic nerve root following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with intravenous gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA. Previous studies have shown, however, that this does not occur in all cases. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of nerve root enhancement in patients with sciatica and disc prolapse and to try to identify any specific features that might be associated with the phenomenon. A total of 227 patients presenting with low back pain and/or sciatica underwent a MRI study of the lumbar spine with intravenous contrast enhancement. Nineteen of 81 (23.5 %) patients with disc prolapse demonstrated nerve root enhancement. Nerve root enhancement had a highly significant association with sequestrated disc lesions (13/19, 68 %; P < 0.0005), and was primarily seen in the symptomatic ipsilateral nerve root (16/19, 84 %). The sensitivity of nerve root enhancement associated with disc prolapse was 23.5 % with a specificity of 95.9 %, a positive predictive value of 76 % and a negative predictive value of 69.3 %. Nerve root enhancement may be indicative of the symptomatic level but its poor sensitivity negates the routine use of Gd-DTPA in MRI for sciatica. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 37 refs.

  1. The influence of gadolinium and yttrium on biomass production and nutrient balance of maize plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatz, Jessica; Vetterlein, Doris; Mattusch, Jürgen; Otto, Matthias; Daus, Birgit

    2015-09-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are expected to become pollutants by enriching in the environment due to their wide applications nowadays. The uptake and distribution of gadolinium and yttrium and its influence on biomass production and nutrient balance was investigated in hydroponic solution experiments with maize plants using increasing application doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 mg L(-1). It could be shown that concentrations of up to 1 mg L(-1) of Gd and Y did not reduce or enhance the plant growth or alter the nutrient balance. 10 mg L(-1) Gd or Y resulted in REE concentrations of up to 1.2 weight-% in the roots and severe phosphate deficiency symptoms. Transfer rates showed that there was only little transport of Gd and Y from roots to shoots. Significant correlations were found between the concentration of Gd and Y in the nutrient solution and the root tissue concentration of Ca, Mg and P. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Removal of gadolinium-based contrast agents: adsorption on activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde-González, María P; García-Díaz, Esmeralda; González-Perea, Mario; Mattusch, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    Three carbon samples were employed in this work, including commercial (1690 m 2  g -1 ), activated carbon prepared from guava seeds (637 m 2  g -1 ), and activated carbon prepared from avocado kernel (1068 m 2  g -1 ), to study the adsorption of the following gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs): gadoterate meglumine Dotarem®, gadopentetate dimeglumine Magnevist®, and gadoxetate disodium Primovist®. The activation conditions with H 3 PO 4 were optimized using a Taguchi methodology to obtain mesoporous materials. The best removal efficiency by square meter in a batch system in aqueous solution and model urine was achieved by avocado kernel carbon, in which mesoporosity prevails over microporosity. The kinetic adsorption curves were described by a pseudo-second-order equation, and the adsorption isotherms in the concentration range 0.5-6 mM fit the Freundlich equation. The chemical characterization of the surfaces shows that materials with a greater amount of phenolic functional groups adsorb the GBCA better. Adsorption strongly depends on the pH due to the combination of the following factors: contrast agent protonated forms and carbon surface charge. The tested carbon samples were able to adsorb 70-90% of GBCA in aqueous solution and less in model urine. This research proposes a method for the elimination of GBCA from patient urine before its discharge into wastewater.

  3. A case of chronic progressive radiation myelopathy; A diagnostic significance of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michikawa, Makoto; Wada, Yoshiaki; Sano, Motoki; Furukawa, Tetsuo; Tsukagoshi, Hiroshi (Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-01-01

    A 65-year-old man had a biopsy diagnosis of right cervical squamous cell carcinoma. Post operative irradiation (4000 rads) was given to the bilateral cervical areas. Twenty five months after completion of irradiation, the patient developed muscle weakness in the right upper and lower extremities, and sensory disturbance below the C2 level in the left side, which was considered as Brown-Sequard syndrome. MRI of T1 weighted images (T1W1) showed mild swelling of the spinal cord from C1 to C6, while T2 weighted images (T2W1) revealed high intensity area at the same level. Gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA injection revealed ring enhancement in the right side of the spinal cord from C1 to C2 on sagittal and axial images. The neurological symptoms improved after the administration of corticosteroid. Two weeks after the therapy, a follow-up study revealed disappearance of cervical cord swelling on T1W1 and high intensity area was remarkably diminished on T2W1. Gd-DTPA enhancement, however, showed unremarkable change. Gd-DTPA enhancement was suggested to be a sensitive and valuable diagnostic method of chronic progressive radiation myelopathy. (author).

  4. A stylized three dimensional PWR whole-core benchmark problem with Gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglass, Steven, E-mail: douglass.steven@gmail.co [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering/Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405 (United States); Rahnema, Farzad, E-mail: farzad@gatech.ed [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering/Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405 (United States); Margulies, Johann, E-mail: johann.margulies@me.gatech.ed [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering/Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Recent advancements in computer technology have led to an increased ability to solve complicated reactor problems, and as a result, there has been an interest in codes and methods that utilize whole-core transport in three-dimensional, large-scale, highly-heterogeneous configurations. Most current reactor benchmark problems are either small-scale or involve spatial homogenization (pin cell or full-assembly) for diffusion codes; therefore, new whole-core benchmark problems must be designed in order to validate whole-core transport methods. This study focuses on an PWR case, with a low leakage loading pattern and Gadolinium as a burnable absorber. In this paper, a detailed description of a new 3D whole-core numerical benchmark problem based on a 4-loop layout is presented with geometric, material and cross section specifications. A set of 2-group and 4-group region-wise neutron cross section libraries is generated using the lattice depletion code HELIOS, and an MCNP model is described for three configurations (all rods in, all rods out, power-shaping rods inserted). Eigenvalues are presented for the 2-group calculations of all three configurations, and detailed pin fission density results are presented for the power-shaping configuration.

  5. Fabrication of gadolinium hydroxide nanoparticles using ion-exchange resin and their MRI property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kobayashi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method to fabricate gadolinium hydroxide (Gd(OH3 nanoparticles. An opaque solution was prepared by adding basic anion exchange resin (BAER to a Gd(NO33 aqueous solution at room temperature and aging the solution for 12–24 h; the solution became basic because of the exchange of H2O with OH−. The particles in the opaque solution have a needle structure, and their crystal structure was hexagonal Gd(OH3. Their longitudinal and lateral average particle sizes tend to increase in the ranges of 175.0–222.1 and 33.9–52.3 nm when the aging time increases from 12 to 24 h, respectively. The relaxivity value for T1-weighted imaging was 0.79 mM−1 s−1 for the solution that was prepared at the aging time of 18 h, which was ca. 20% of that for a commercial Gd complex contrast agent.

  6. Equilibrium and transient conductivity for gadolinium-doped ceria under large perturbations: I. Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricote, Sandrine; Zhu, Huayang; Coors, W. Grover

    2014-01-01

    This is the first of a two-part paper that is concerned with measuring and interpreting equilibrium and transient conductivity for 10at.% gadolinium-doped ceria (Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95-δ, GDC10). AC impedance spectroscopy is used to measure conductivity of slender extruded GDC10 rods at temperatures...... between 700 and 900°C. From the obtained Brouwer diagrams, the activation energies of the oxide ions and cerium small polarons are estimated to be 0.77 and 2.45eV respectively. Conductivity relaxation measurements from strongly reducing conditions (4% H2, 3% H2O, 93% Ar) to strongly oxidizing conditions...... (97% O2, 3% H2O) and vice versa reveal great asymmetries in relaxation times. Virtually instantaneous relaxations are observed in the first case, while the oxidizing-to-reducing relaxations take as long as 0.5h. This paper reports conductivity relaxations with over 20 orders of magnitude in the gas...

  7. [Increase of X-ray radiotherapy antineoplastic efficacy by use of a gadolinium containing pharmaceutical].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipengol'ts, A A; Cherepanov, A A; Sheĭno, I N; Kulakov, V N; Khokhlov, V F; Klimanov, V A; Grigor'eva, E Iu

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the gadolinium-containing drug Dipentast (0.5 M water solution of sodium gadopentetate) on the antineoplastic efficacy of X-ray radiotherapy has been studied. Dipentast possesses neither intrinsic antitumor effect, nor tumor-seeking capability. Mice C57Bl/6 with transplanted adenocarcinoma Ca755 were used in the study. The mice were irradiated with an X-ray machine with an anode voltage of 200 kV. The absorbed dose in the tumor after irradiation was 10 Gy for both experimental and control groups. The mice in the experimental group were treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of 0.3 ml of Dipentast. The observation of the tumour growth rate has shown that intraperitoneal administration of Dipentast prior to X-ray irradiation results in a significant tumour growth delay (12 ± 1 days for the experimental group versus 2 ± 1 in the control group), increasing the median life span from 36 ± 1 days in the control group to 43 ± 1 days in the experimental group, and leads to complete disappearance of the tumour in 25 ± 1% of the animals in the experimental group, while in the control group, no tumour regression was observed.

  8. Internalization pathways into cancer cells of gadolinium-based radiosensitizing nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rima, Wael; Sancey, Lucie; Aloy, Marie-Thérèse; Armandy, Emma; Alcantara, Gustavo B; Epicier, Thierry; Malchère, Annie; Joly-Pottuz, Lucile; Mowat, Pierre; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier; Burdin, Béatrice; Rivoire, Annie; Boulé, Christelle; Anselme-Bertrand, Isabelle; Pourchez, Jérémie; Cottier, Michèle; Roux, Stéphane; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Perriat, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, nanoparticles have been studied in theranostic field with the objective of exhibiting a long circulation time through the body coupled to major accumulation in tumor tissues, rapid elimination, therapeutic potential and contrast properties. In this context, we developed sub-5 nm gadolinium-based nanoparticles that possess in vitro efficient radiosensitizing effects at moderate concentration when incubated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells (SQ20B). Two main cellular internalization mechanisms were evidenced and quantified: passive diffusion and macropinocytosis. Whereas the amount of particles internalized by passive diffusion is not sufficient to induce in vitro a significant radiosensitizing effect, the cellular uptake by macropinocytosis leads to a successful radiotherapy in a limited range of particles incubation concentration. Macropinocytosis processes in two steps: formation of agglomerates at vicinity of the cell followed by their collect via the lamellipodia (i.e. the "arms") of the cell. The first step is strongly dependent on the physicochemical characteristics of the particles, especially their zeta potential that determines the size of the agglomerates and their distance from the cell. These results should permit to control the quantity of particles internalized in the cell cytoplasm, promising ambitious opportunities towards a particle-assisted radiotherapy using lower radiation doses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Engineered gadolinium-doped carbon dots for magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiotherapy of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fengyi; Zhang, Lirong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Miaomiao; Gong, Aihua; Tan, Youwen; Miao, Jiawen; Gong, Yuhua; Sun, Mingzhong; Ju, Huixiang; Wu, Chaoyang; Zou, Shenqiang

    2017-03-01

    The effectiveness of radiotherapy can decrease due to inaccurate positioning of machinery and inherent radioresistance of tumors. To address this issue, we present a novel theranostic nanoplatform based on gadolinium-doped carbon dots (Gd-doped CDs) designed specifically for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided radiotherapy of tumors. The Gd-doped CDs (∼18 nm) with dispersibility in water and stable photoluminescence were synthesized via a one-step hydrothermal approach. After tail vein injection of the Gd-doped CDs, they exhibited a relatively long circulation time (∼6 h), enabled efficient passive tumor targeting. Gd-doped CDs accumulate in the kidney and could be cleared out of the body from bladder. Importantly, they exhibited favorable biocompatibility with excellent performance in longitudinal relaxivity rate (r1) of 6.45 mM(-1)S(-1) and radiosensitization enhancements. These results show that Gd-doped CDs are excellent T1 contrast agents and radiosensitizers, possessing great promise for MRI-guided radiotherapy of tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Inactivation of kupffer cells by gadolinium chloride protects murine liver from radiation-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shi-Suo; Qiang, Min; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Ke, Ai-Wu; Ji, Yuan; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Zeng, Hai-Ying; Liu, Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nebulized gadolinium-based nanoparticles: a theranostic approach for lung tumor imaging and radiosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufort, Sandrine; Bianchi, Andrea; Henry, Maxime; Lux, François; Le Duc, Géraldine; Josserand, Véronique; Louis, Cédric; Perriat, Pascal; Crémillieux, Yannick; Tillement, Olivier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-14

    Lung cancer is the most common and most fatal cancer worldwide. Thus, improving early diagnosis and therapy is necessary. Previously, gadolinium-based ultra-small rigid platforms (USRPs) were developed to serve as multimodal imaging probes and as radiosensitizing agents. In addition, it was demonstrated that USRPs can be detected in the lungs using ultrashort echo-time magnetic resonance imaging (UTE-MRI) and fluorescence imaging after intrapulmonary administration in healthy animals. The goal of the present study is to evaluate their theranostic properties in mice with bioluminescent orthotopic lung cancer, after intrapulmonary nebulization or conventional intravenous administration. It is found that lung tumors can be detected non-invasively using fluorescence tomography or UTE-MRI after nebulization of USRPs, and this is confirmed by histological analysis of the lung sections. The deposition of USRPs around the tumor nodules is sufficient to generate a radiosensitizing effect when the mice are subjected to a single dose of 10 Gy conventional radiation one day after inhalation (mean survival time of 112 days versus 77 days for irradiated mice without USRPs treatment). No apparent systemic toxicity or induction of inflammation is observed. These results demonstrate the theranostic properties of USRPs for the multimodal detection of lung tumors and improved radiotherapy after nebulization. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. New Transition Probabilities for Neutral Gadolinium from Boltzmann Analysis of Fourier Transform Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitz, David; Ouyang, Chao; Atomic Spectroscopy Team

    2015-05-01

    The recent availability of a large set of absolute transition probabilities for neutral gadolinium (Lawler et al., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 44, 095001 (2011)) makes it possible to investigate the relative populations of a large range of upper levels in radiometrically-calibrated Gd spectra. In cases where these populations follow a Boltzmann distribution, the effective temperature which characterizes the distribution provides a means of obtaining new transition probabilities for observable decay branches of nearby levels. While not as accurate as measurements based on branching fractions and lifetimes, this method can be applied to levels whose lifetimes are not known and does not require accounting for all of the decay branches. We are analyzing Fourier Transform spectra of Gd from the National Solar Observatory data archive at Kitt Peak used by Lawler et al. in their study and have identified two broadband spectra (9000-24000 cm-1) which exhibit Boltzmann behavior for energy levels in the range 17750-36650 cm-1. These analyses and a summary of new transition probabilities obtained from them to date will be presented. Work supported by St. Olaf College Collaborative Undergraduate Research program.

  13. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after the Use of Gadolinium Contrast Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihye; Byun, Il Hwan; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Nam, Eun Ji; Park, Jung-Won

    2015-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a medical emergency that threatens life. To this day, ARDS is very rarely reported by iodine contrast media, and there is no reported case of ARDS induced by gadolinium contrast media. Here, we present a case with ARDS after the use of gadobutrol (Gadovist) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast medium. A 26 years old female without any medical history, including allergic diseases and without current use of drugs, visited the emergency room for abdominal pain. Her abdominopelvic computed tomography with iodine contrast media showed a right ovarian cyst and possible infective colitis. Eighty-three hours later, she underwent pelvis MRI after injection of 7.5 mL (0.1 mL/kg body weight) of gadobutrol (Gadovist) to evaluate the ovarian cyst. She soon presented respiratory difficulty, edema of the lips, nausea, and vomiting, and we could hear wheezing upon auscultation. She was treated with dexamethasone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Her chest X-ray showed bilateral central bat-wing consolidative appearance. Managed with mechanical ventilation, she was extubated 3 days later and discharged without complications.

  14. Gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and functional outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Jun; Shimada, Toshio; Murakami, Yo; Ochiai, Koichi; Inoue, Shin-ichi; Ishibashi, Yutaka; Kinoshita, Yoshihisa; Sano, Kazuya; Murakami, Rinji [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that Gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI) reflect the severity of ischemic injury during the acute and chronic phases of myocardial infarction (MI). Twenty-nine patients with their first acute MI underwent Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI in the first week (4.2{+-}0.3 days) and at 1 month after onset. Pairs of left ventriculograms were compared with Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance images, classified into 3 pattern groups: hyper-enhancement, with and without a central hypo-enhanced region (P1 and P2, respectively), and non-enhancement (P3). In the acute phase of MI, P1 was found in 10, P2 in 11, and P3 in 8 patients. One month later, the image pattern had changed from P1 to P2 in a single patient, from P2 to P3 in 4 patients, and had remained identical in the others. Patients with P3 showed improvement of anterior wall motion in the 1-month follow-up study, and had higher TIMI flow grades and lower peak creatine kinase values than those without recovery. Thus, Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance images, closely reflecting the severity of myocardial injury, are useful in predicting myocardial functional recovery after MI. (author)

  15. [Optical and spectral parameters in Ce3+ -doped gadolinium gallium aluminum garnet glass-ceramics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hua; Zhao, Xin; Yu, Xiao-bo; Setsuhisa, Tanabe; Lin, Hai

    2010-01-01

    The crystalline phases of Ce3+ -doped gadolinium gallium aluminum garnet (GGAG) glass-ceramics were investigated by X-ray diffraction, and the fluorescence spectra were recorded under the pumping of blue light-emitting diode (LED) using an integrating sphere of 10-inch in diameter, which connected to a CCD detector. The spectral power distribution of the glass-ceramics was obtained from the measured spectra first, and then the quantum yield was derived based on the photon distribution. The quantum yield of Ce3+ emission in GGAG glass-ceramics is 29.2%, meanwhile, the color coordinates and the correlated color temperature (CCT) of combined white light were proved to be x = 0.319, y = 0.349 and 6086 K, respectively. Although the quantum yield is a little smaller than the value in Ce3+ -doped YAG glass-ceramics, the CCT of the combined white light is much smaller than that in the latter. The optical behavior of GGAG glass-ceramics provides new vision for developing comfortable LED lighting devices.

  16. Quantitative biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of multimodal gadolinium-based nanoparticles for lungs using ultrashort TE MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Andrea; Dufort, Sandrine; Lux, François; Courtois, Arnaud; Tillement, Olivier; Coll, Jean-Luc; Crémillieux, Yannick

    2014-08-01

    To study the biodistribution and lung pharmacokinetics of tracheally administered gadolinium-based contrast agents [gadoteric acid and multimodal ultra-small rigid platforms (USRPs)], to validate their pharmacokinetics against optical imaging of fluorescent USRPs, and to test their short-term toxicity. Ultrashort echo-time (UTE) lung proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at 4.7-Tesla (T) after the intratracheal instillation of different concentrations of contrast agent solutions in mice. Pharmacokinetic models were implemented on the absolute concentration calculated from the MRI signal enhancement measurements. Fluorescent USRPs were used to obtain optical images with the same protocol. Bronchoalveolar lavage inflammatory cell count and serum creatinine measurement were performed on four groups of instilled mice (sham, saline, USRPs, lipopolysaccharide). MR and optical imaging showed similar kinetics of the USRPs, passing from the airways to the lung tissue and to the kidneys, with negligible hepatic clearance. No significant increase of lung and renal inflammation markers were observed in USRP-instilled animals. A T 1-weighted radial UTE sequence was found to be valuable in quantitatively monitoring the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of nanoparticles in the lungs of mice. The observed favorable pharmacokinetics, which was validated by fluorescence imaging, ensures the negligible toxicity of the nanoprobes, making the USRPs and the developed protocol good candidates for applications on selected lung diseases.

  17. Modelling of the Gadolinium Fuel Test IFA-681 using the BISON Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    In this work, application of Idaho National Laboratory’s fuel performance code BISON to modelling of fuel rods from the Halden IFA-681 gadolinium fuel test is presented. First, an overview is given of BISON models, focusing on UO2/UO2-Gd2O3 fuel and Zircaloy cladding. Then, BISON analyses of selected fuel rods from the IFA-681 test are performed. For the first time in a BISON application to integral fuel rod simulations, the analysis is informed by detailed neutronics calculations in order to accurately capture the radial power profile throughout the fuel, which is strongly affected by the complex evolution of absorber Gd isotopes. In particular, radial power profiles calculated at IFE–Halden Reactor Project with the HELIOS code are used. The work has been carried out in the frame of the collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and Halden Reactor Project. Some slide have been added as an Appendix to present the newly developed PolyPole-1 algorithm for modeling of intra-granular fission gas release.

  18. Gadolinium deposition in the brain: association with various GBCAs using a generalized additive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sohi; Lee, Ho-Joon; Han, Kyunghwa; Park, Yae-Won; Choi, Yoon Seong; Ahn, Sung Soo; Kim, Jinna; Lee, Seung-Koo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To determine the relationship between the number of administrations of various gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) and increased T1 signal intensity in the globus pallidus (GP) and dentate nucleus (DN). This retrospective study included 122 patients who underwent double-dose GBCA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Two radiologists calculated GP-to-thalamus (TH) signal intensity ratio, DN-to-pons signal intensity ratio and relative change (R{sub change}) between the baseline and final examinations. Interobserver agreement was evaluated. The relationships between R{sub change} and several factors, including number of each GBCA administrations, were analysed using a generalized additive model. Six patients (4.9%) received linear GBCAs (mean 20.8 number of administration; range 15-30), 44 patients (36.1%) received macrocyclic GBCAs (mean 26.1; range 14-51) and 72 patients (59.0%) received both types of GBCAs (mean 31.5; range 12-65). Interobserver agreement was almost perfect (0.99; 95% CI: 0.99-0.99). R{sub change} (DN:pons) was associated with gadodiamide (p = 0.006) and gadopentetate dimeglumine (p < 0.001), but not with other GBCAs. R{sub change} (GP:TH) was not associated with GBCA administration. Previous administration of linear agents gadoiamide and gadopentetate dimeglumine is associated with increased T1 signal intensity in the DN, whereas macrocyclic GBCAs do not show an association. (orig.)

  19. Heavy-ion beam induced effects in enriched gadolinium target films prepared by molecular plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorov, D. A.; Tereshatov, E. E.; Werke, T. A.; Frey, M. M.; Folden, C. M.

    2017-09-01

    A series of enriched gadolinium (Gd, Z = 64) targets was prepared using the molecular plating process for nuclear physics experiments at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. After irradiation with 48Ca and 45Sc projectiles at center-of-target energies of Ecot = 3.8-4.7 MeV/u, the molecular films displayed visible discoloration. The morphology of the films was examined and compared to the intact target surface. The thin films underwent a heavy-ion beam-induced density change as identified by scanning electron microscopy and α-particle energy loss measurements. The films became thinner and more homogenous, with the transformation occurring early on in the irradiation. This transformation is best described as a crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition induced by atomic displacement and destruction of structural order of the original film. The chemical composition of the thin films was surveyed using energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, with the results confirming the complex chemistry of the molecular films previously noted in other publications.

  20. Non-invasive evaluation of the myocardial substrate of cardiac amyloidosis by gadolinium cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugini, E; Rapezzi, C; Piva, T; Leone, O; Bacchi-Reggiani, L; Riva, L; Salvi, F; Lovato, L; Branzi, A; Fattori, R

    2006-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence and distribution of gadolinium (Gd) enhancement at cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in patients with cardiac amyloidosis (CA) and to look for associations with clinical, morphological, and functional features. 21 patients with definitely diagnosed CA (nine with immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis and 12 transthyretin related) underwent Gd-CMR. Gd enhancement was detected in 16 of 21 (76%) patients. Sixty six of 357 (18%) segments were enhanced, more often at the mid ventricular level. Transmural extension of enhancement within each patient significantly correlated with left ventricular (LV) end systolic volume (r = 0.58). The number of enhanced segments correlated with LV end diastolic volume (r = 0.76), end systolic volume (r = 0.6), and left atrial size (r = 0.56). Segments with > 50% extensive transmural enhancement more often were severely hypokinetic or akinetic (p = 0.001). Patients with > 2 enhanced segments had significantly lower 12 lead QRS voltage and Sokolow-Lyon index. No relation was apparent with any other clinical, morphological, functional, or histological characteristics. Gd enhancement is common but not universally present in CA, probably due to expansion of infiltrated interstitium. The segmental and transmural distribution of the enhancement is highly variable, and mid-ventricular regions are more often involved. Enhancement appears to be associated with impaired segmental and global contractility and a larger atrium.

  1. Ammonia gas sensing property of gadolinium oxide using fiber optic gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J. Santhosh; Ranganathan, B.; Sastikumar, D.

    2017-05-01

    The design of fiber optic sensor is based on a cladding modification methodology. A fiber-optic chemical sensor is developed by replacing a certain portion of the original cladding with a chemically sensitive material, specifically, calcinated gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3).Both the light absorption co-efficient and refractive index change upon exposure to chemical vapours of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as ammonia (NH3), ethanol (CH3CH2OH), and methanol (CH3OH). The spectral characteristics of the sensor were studied for different concentrations ranging from 0-500 ppm. These changes induced the optical intensity modulation of the transmitted optical signal. During interaction between the sensing material and VOCs, the output intensity is taken into account to detect the toxic VOCs present in the environment. This was systematically investigated by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and SEM. The XRD analysis indicated that the calcinated Gd2O3 was formed in cubic structure with the crystallite size of 13 nm. The Gd2O3 nanorods with thickness ranging from 80 to 120 nm were confirmed from SEM. The ammonia gas response of the Gd2O3 sensor is presented. A model is proposed for understanding the spectral intensity variations.

  2. Gadolinium-doped ceria nanopowders synthesized by urea-based homogeneous co-precipitation (UBHP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accardo, G., E-mail: d16605@kist.re.kr [Fuel Cell Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Spiridigliozzi, L. [Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, INSTM Research Unit, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Via G. Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino, FR (Italy); Cioffi, R.; Ferone, C. [Department of Engineering, INSTM Research Unit, University Parthenope of Naples, Centro Direzionale, Is. C4, 80143 Napoli (Italy); Di Bartolomeo, E. [Department of Chemical Science and Technology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Viale della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy); Yoon, Sung Pil [Fuel Cell Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Dell’Agli, G. [Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, INSTM Research Unit, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Via G. Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino, FR (Italy)

    2017-02-01

    Gadolinium (10%)-doped ceria was successfully synthesized by using an urea-based co-precipitation method (UBHP). A single fluorite phase was obtained after a low temperature (400 °C) calcination treatment. The resulting powders showed grains of nanometric size with some agglomerations and an overall good sinterability. Pellets were sintered at 1300 and 1500 °C for 3 h. The ionic conductivity was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and a correlation between electrical properties and microstructure was revealed. The promising conductivity values showed that the synthesized powders are suitable for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) applications. - Highlights: • Urea-based homogeneous co-precipitation is applied to synthesize nanocrystalline GDC. • Dense GDC samples at different sintering temperatures were characterized. • SEM and TEM revealed a well define microstructure and controlled composition. • Correlation between electrochemical properties by EIS and microstructure was discussed. • UBHP method can be used to prepare high performance GDC electrolytes.

  3. Dynamic gadolinium uptake in thermally treated canine brain tissue and experimental cerebral tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangasniemi, Marko; Stafford, R Jason; Price, Roger E; Jackson, Edward F; Hazle, John D

    2003-02-01

    Thermal coagulation of cerebral tumors induces reactive changes within adjacent brain tissue, which appear as Gd-DTPA enhancement in MR images. This makes assessment of therapeutic success difficult to establish radiographically because the reactive changes can mimic residual tumor. Dynamic Gd-DTPA uptake curves in reactive tissue and tumor were investigated to assess the utility of contrast enhanced (CE)-dynamic MRI to distinguish reactive changes from residual tumor in a canine model. Cerebral thermal necrosis was induced using a 980 nm laser in 11 dogs with intracerebral transmissible venereal tumors (TVTs). A fast spin-echo T1-weighted imaging sequence was used for CE-dynamic MRI. Gd-DTPA uptake data were acquired with 10-second temporal resolution and for untreated TVTs for reactive tissue using a sigmoidal-exponential model. Characteristic gadolinium uptake curves were measured and characterized for reactive brain tissue, and untreated and treated TVTs. Both early and delayed dynamic responses were significantly different in reactive brain tissue compared with TVT. Reactive thermal changes in otherwise normal brain tissue can be distinguished from residual tumor after cerebral thermal therapy using CE-dynamic MRI.

  4. Osteoid osteoma in atypical locations: The added value of dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zampa, Virna [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 56, 56126 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: virnazampa@hotmail.com; Bargellini, Irene; Ortori, Simona; Faggioni, Lorenzo; Cioni, Roberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 56, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: To compare the results of dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), unenhanced MRI and computed tomography (CT), in terms of nidus conspicuity and diagnostic confidence of osteoid osteoma in atypical sites. Materials and methods: CT and MR (nonenhanced T1- and T2-weighted and dynamic MRI) images of 19 patients with histologically proven osteoid osteoma located in atypical sites were retrospectively reviewed. Time-enhancement curves of the nidus and the adjacent bone marrow were generated. Images from each technique were scored for nidus conspicuity by two independent radiologists. Another blinded radiologist was asked to assess final diagnosis of the bone lesion on MR and CT images, independently. Results: In all cases, nidus contrast uptake started in the arterial phase and was higher compared to the surrounding bone marrow. Dynamic MRI significantly increased nidus conspicuity compared to nonenhanced MRI (P < .0001) and CT (P = .04). In 6/19 (31.6%) cases nidus conspicuity was higher at dynamic MRI compared to CT. Confident diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was achieved in all patients with MRI and in 10/19 (52.6%) patients with CT. Conclusion: In patients with osteoid osteoma located in atypical sites, dynamic MRI increases nidus conspicuity, allowing confident diagnosis.

  5. Usefulness of gadolinium in MRI evaluation of non surgically treated herniated disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, E; Boniotti, V; Miserocchi, L; Caudana, R

    2005-01-01

    The rationale for the use of Gadolinium (Gd) in the MRI evaluation of non surgically treated herniated disk is based on the known presence of inflammatory granulation tissue and neoangiogenesis which plays an important role in both pain and the spontaneous resorption of the hernia. of this study was to determine the usefulness of Gd in MRI examination for detecting the inflammatory reaction around the discal hernia. Thirty-eight patients (mean age 45 years; range 20-70 years) with non surgically treated herniated disk were evaluated with MRI between January 2000 and July 2004. T2w-FAST-SE sagittal and T1w-SE transaxial and sagittal images were acquired before and after the administration of Gd. Twenty out of 22 patients with acute sciatic pain (symptoms =/discal hernia in the spinal canal. In the remaining 16 with chronic sciatic pain (symptoms > 6 months) the discal hernia did not show peri-hernial enhancement. In MRI evaluation of the herniated disk, peri-hernial enhancement is correlated with inflammatory reaction around the hernia which is associated with acute symptoms. The absence of peri-hernial enhancement in chronic herniated disk is due to the poorly vascular fibrotic tissue. Therefore, peri-hernial enhancement facilitates the differential diagnosis in uncertain cases and represents a reliable prognostic index of response to non-surgical therapy and of the possible spontaneous resorption of discal hernia.

  6. Late gestational nutrient restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Nielsen, Mette Olaf; Nørgaard, Peder

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 50% nutrient restriction during the last 6 weeks of gestation on twin-pregnant ewes' plasma glucose, non-esterified fatty acid, beta-hydroxybutyrate, insulin, IGF-1 and leptin concentrations and the effects on lamb birth weight and ewes' lactation performance. Plasma...... changes in feed intake and energy balance. It is concluded that severely reduced nutrient availability in late gestation affects fetal growth in utero and has a prolonged negative effect on lactation performance....

  7. Late Babylonian Astrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John M.

    The last five centuries BC saw the development of several new forms of astrology in Babylonia. Key to these new astrological techniques was the invention of the zodiac in about 400 BC. These new forms of astrology include personal horoscopes, astral medicine, and the exploitation of geometrical relationships between the position of heavenly bodies. Several Late Babylonian astrological doctrines were later adopted within Greek astrology.

  8. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellens, N [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Farahani, K [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  9. 2D/3D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn high field magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2002-09-19

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for three-dimensional analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb{sub 3}Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets.

  10. 2-D/3-D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated $Nb_{3}$ Sn high field magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, R; Marscin, E; Rey, J M; Wake, M

    2003-01-01

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for 3-D analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb/sub 3/Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets. (6 refs).

  11. Intense Plasma Waveguide Terahertz Sources for High-Field THz Probe Science with Ultrafast Lasers for Solid State Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0029 Intense Plasma-Waveguide Terahertz Sources for High-Field THz probe science with ultrafast lasers for Solid State Physics ...Plasma-Waveguide Terahertz Sources for High-Field THz probe science with ultrafast lasers for Solid State Physics , 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT... Physics Matter Probe 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17.  LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18.  NUMBER OF PAGES  11  19a.  NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON

  12. Coping – Late Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer treatment can cause late side effects that may not show up for months or years after treatment. These late effects may include heart and lung problems, bone loss, eye and hearing changes, lymphedema, and other problems

  13. Histology and Gadolinium Distribution in the Rodent Brain After the Administration of Cumulative High Doses of Linear and Macrocyclic Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrke, Jessica; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Frenzel, Thomas; Schöckel, Laura; Rosenbruch, Martin; Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin A.; Nischwitz, Volker; Küppers, Astrid; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Retrospective studies in patients with primary brain tumors or other central nervous system pathologies as well as postmortem studies have suggested that gadolinium (Gd) deposition occurs in the dentate nucleus (DN) and globus pallidus (GP) after multiple administrations of primarily linear Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). However, this deposition has not been associated with any adverse effects or histopathological alterations. The aim of this preclinical study was to systematically examine differences between linear and macrocyclic GBCAs in their potential to induce changes in brain and skin histology including Gd distribution in high spatial resolution. Materials and Methods Fifty male Wistar-Han rats were randomly allocated into control (saline, n = 10 rats) and 4 GBCA groups (linear GBCAs: gadodiamide and gadopentetate dimeglumine, macrocyclic GBCAs: gadobutrol and gadoteridol; n = 10 rats per group). The animals received 20 daily intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight. Eight weeks after the last GBCA administration, the animals were killed, and the brain and skin samples were histopathologically assessed (hematoxylin and eosin; cresyl violet [Nissl]) and by immunohistochemistry. The Gd concentration in the skin, bone, brain, and skeletal muscle samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS, n = 4). The spatial Gd distribution in the brain and skin samples was analyzed in cryosections using laser ablation coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS, n = 3). For the ultra-high resolution of Gd distribution, brain sections of rats injected with gadodiamide or saline (n = 1) were assessed by scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Results No histological changes were observed in the brain. In contrast, 4 of 10 animals in the gadodiamide group but none of the animals in other groups showed macroscopic and histological

  14. Quantification and Assessment of the Chemical Form of Residual Gadolinium in the Brain After Repeated Administration of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Thomas; Apte, Chirag; Jost, Gregor; Schöckel, Laura; Lohrke, Jessica; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2017-01-01

    Objective Multiple clinical and preclinical studies have reported a signal intensity increase and the presence of gadolinium (Gd) in the brain after repeated administration of Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). This bioanalytical study in rat brain tissue was initiated to investigate whether the residual Gd is present as intact GBCA or in other chemical forms by using tissue fractionation and chromatography. Materials and Methods Rats were divided randomly in 6 groups of 10 animals each. They received 10 daily injections of 2.5 mmol/kg bodyweight of 1 of 5 different GBCAs: linear GBCAs such as gadodiamide (Omniscan; GE Healthcare), gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA, Magnevist; Bayer), or gadobenate dimeglumine (Multihance; Bracco) and macrocyclic GBCAs such as gadobutrol (Gadovist; Bayer) and gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem; Guerbet) or saline. On days 3 and 24 after the last injection (p.i.), 5 randomly chosen animals of each group were killed by exsanguination, and their brains were excised and divided into cerebrum, pons, and cerebellum. The brain sections were homogenized by sonication in ice-cold buffer at pH 7.4. Soluble and insoluble fractions were separated by centrifugation, and the soluble fractions were further separated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The Gd concentration in all tissue fractions and in the GPC eluate was measured by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry. In a recovery control experiment, all GBCAs were spiked to blank brain tissue and more than 94% recovery of Gd in the tissue fractions was demonstrated. Results Only traces of the administered Gd were found in the rat brain tissue on day 3 and day 24 p.i. In the animals treated with macrocyclic GBCAs, Gd was found only in the soluble brain fraction and was present solely as low molecular weight molecules, most likely the intact GBCA. In the animals treated with linear GBCAs Gd was found to a large extent in the insoluble tissue fraction. The Gd concentration in

  15. Ultra-high field upper extremity peripheral nerve and non-contrast enhanced vascular imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh B Raval

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy of Ultra-high field [UHF] 7 Tesla [T] MRI as compared to 3T MRI in non-contrast enhanced [nCE] imaging of structural anatomy in the elbow, forearm, and hand [upper extremity].A wide range of sequences including T1 weighted [T1] volumetric interpolate breath-hold exam [VIBE], T2 weighted [T2] double-echo steady state [DESS], susceptibility weighted imaging [SWI], time-of-flight [TOF], diffusion tensor imaging [DTI], and diffusion spectrum imaging [DSI] were optimized and incorporated with a radiofrequency [RF] coil system composed of a transverse electromagnetic [TEM] transmit coil combined with an 8-channel receive-only array for 7T upper extremity [UE] imaging. In addition, Siemens optimized protocol/sequences were used on a 3T scanner and the resulting images from T1 VIBE and T2 DESS were compared to that obtained at 7T qualitatively and quantitatively [SWI was only qualitatively compared]. DSI studio was utilized to identify nerves based on analysis of diffusion weighted derived fractional anisotropy images. Images of forearm vasculature were extracted using a paint grow manual segmentation method based on MIPAV [Medical Image Processing, Analysis, and Visualization].High resolution and high quality signal-to-noise ratio [SNR] and contrast-to-noise ratio [CNR]-images of the hand, forearm, and elbow were acquired with nearly homogeneous 7T excitation. Measured [performed on the T1 VIBE and T2 DESS sequences] SNR and CNR values were almost doubled at 7T vs. 3T. Cartilage, synovial fluid and tendon structures could be seen with higher clarity in the 7T T1 and T2 weighted images. SWI allowed high resolution and better quality imaging of large and medium sized arteries and veins, capillary networks and arteriovenous anastomoses at 7T when compared to 3T. 7T diffusion weighted sequence [not performed at 3T] demonstrates that the forearm nerves are clearly delineated by fiber tractography. The

  16. High-field recovery of the undistorted triangular lattice in the frustrated metamagnet CuFeO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lummen, T. T. A.; Strohm, C.; Rakoto, H.; Nugroho, A. A.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.

    Pulsed-field magnetization experiments extend the typical metamagnetic staircase of CuFeO2 up to 58 T to reveal an additional first-order phase transition at high field for both the parallel and perpendicular field configuration. Virtually complete isotropic behavior is retrieved only above this

  17. Diagnostic relevance of high field MRI in clinical neuroradiology: the advantages and challenges of driving a sports car.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattjes, Mike P; Barkhof, Frederik

    2012-11-01

    High field MRI operating at 3 T is increasingly being used in the field of neuroradiology on the grounds that higher magnetic field strength should theoretically lead to a higher diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis of several disease entities. This Editorial discusses the exhaustive review by Wardlaw and colleagues of research comparing 3 T MRI with 1.5 T MRI in the field of neuroradiology. Interestingly, the authors found no convincing evidence of improved image quality, diagnostic accuracy, or reduced total examination times using 3 T MRI instead of 1.5 T MRI. These findings are highly relevant since a new generation of high field MRI systems operating at 7 T has recently been introduced. • Higher magnetic field strengths do not necessarily lead to a better diagnostic accuracy. • Disadvantages of high field MR systems have to be considered in clinical practice. • Higher field strengths are needed for functional imaging, spectroscopy, etc. • Disappointingly there are few direct comparisons of 1.5 and 3 T MRI. • Whether the next high field MR generation (7 T) will improve diagnostic accuracy has to be investigated.

  18. Diagnostic relevance of high field MRI in clinical neuroradiology: the advantages and challenges of driving a sports car

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattjes, M.P.; Barkhof, F.

    2012-01-01

    High field MRI operating at 3 T is increasingly being used in the field of neuroradiology on the grounds that higher magnetic field strength should theoretically lead to a higher diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis of several disease entities. This Editorial discusses the exhaustive review by

  19. In vitro study of novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer for promising tumor targeting and tumor diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Meng-Jie; Li, Kun-Feng; Zhang, Lan-Xin; Wang, Huan; Liu, Li-Si; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao; Han, Nan-Yin; Yang, Zhen-Jun; Fan, Tian-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer were developed and evaluated in vitro to enhance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis of tumor. Nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes were achieved by incorporating amphipathic material, Gd (III) [N,N-bis-stearylamidomethyl-N′-amidomethyl] diethylenetriamine tetraacetic acid, into the liposome membrane using lipid film hydration method. GBI-10, as the targeting ligand, was then conjugated onto the liposome surface to get GBI-10-targeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes (GTLs). Both nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes and GTLs displayed good dispersion stability, optimal size, and zeta potential for tumor targeting, as well as favorable imaging properties with enhanced relaxivity compared with a commercial MRI contrast agent (CA), gadopentetate dimeglumine. The use of GBI-10 aptamer in this liposomal system was intended to result in increased accumulation of gadolinium at the periphery of C6 glioma cells, where the targeting extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C is overexpressed. Increased cellular binding of GTLs to C6 cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and MRI, demonstrating the promise of this novel delivery system as a carrier of MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of tumor. These studies provide a new strategy furthering the development of nanomedicine for both diagnosis and therapy of tumor. PMID:26316749

  20. Applying Amide Proton Transfer MR Imaging to Hybrid Brain PET/MR: Concordance with Gadolinium Enhancement and Added Value to [(18)F]FDG PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongzan; Xin, Jun; Zhou, Jinyuan; Lu, Zaiming; Guo, Qiyong

    2017-10-23

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic concordance and metric correlations of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F-]fluoro-D-glucose ([(18)F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), using hybrid brain PET/MRI. Twenty-one subjects underwent brain gadolinium-enhanced [(18)F]FDG PET/MRI prospectively. Imaging accuracy was compared between unenhanced MRI, MRI with enhancement, APT-weighted (APTW) images, and PET based on six diagnostic criteria. Among tumors, the McNemar test was further used for concordance assessment between gadolinium-enhanced imaging, APT imaging, and [(18)F]FDG PET. As well, the relation of metrics between APT imaging and PET was analyzed by the Pearson correlation analysis. APT imaging and gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed superior and similar diagnostic accuracy. APTW signal intensity and gadolinium enhancement were concordant in 19 tumors (100 %), while high [(18)F]FDG avidity was shown in only 12 (63.2 %). For the metrics from APT imaging and PET, there was significant correlation for 13 hypermetabolic tumors (P PET in the evaluation of tumor metabolic activity during brain PET/MR studies.

  1. Strength and structural phase transitions of gadolinium at high pressure from radial X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Lun, E-mail: xionglun@ihep.ac.cn; Liu, Jing; Bai, Ligang; Li, Xiaodong; Lin, Chuanlong [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Lin, Jung-Fu [Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-12-28

    Lattice strength and structural phase transitions of gadolinium (Gd) were determined under nonhydrostatic compression up to 55 GPa using an angle-dispersive radial x-ray diffraction technique in a diamond-anvil cell at room temperature. Three new phases of fcc structure, dfcc structure, and new monoclinic structure were observed at 25 GPa, 34 GPa, and 53 GPa, respectively. The radial x-ray diffraction data yield a bulk modulus K{sub 0} = 36(1) GPa with its pressure derivate K{sub 0}′ = 3.8(1) at the azimuthal angle between the diamond cell loading axis and the diffraction plane normal and diffraction plane ψ = 54.7°. With K{sub 0}′ fixed at 4, the derived K{sub 0} is 34(1) GPa. In addition, analysis of diffraction data with lattice strain theory indicates that the ratio of differential stress to shear modulus (t/G) ranges from 0.011 to 0.014 at pressures of 12–55 GPa. Together with estimated high-pressure shear moduli, our results show that Gd can support a maximum differential stress of 0.41 GPa, while it starts to yield to plastic deformation at 16 GPa under uniaxial compression. The yield strength of Gd remains approximately a constant with increasing pressure, and reaches 0.46 GPa at 55 GPa.

  2. Gadolinium cation (Gd+) reaction with O2: Potential energy surface mapped experimentally and with theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demireva, Maria; Armentrout, P. B.

    2017-05-01

    Guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry is used to measure the kinetic energy dependent cross sections for reactions of the lanthanide metal gadolinium cation (Gd+) and GdO+ with O2 and for collision-induced dissociation (CID) of GdO2+ with Xe. Gd+ reacts with O2 in an exothermic and barrierless reaction to form GdO+ and O. GdO2+ is also formed in this reaction, but this product ion is formed in a sequential reaction, as verified by pressure dependent measurements and comparison with the results for the reaction of GdO+ with O2. The CID experiments of GdO2+ indicate the presence of two GdO2+ precursor ion populations, assigned to a weakly bound oxygen molecule adduct (Gd+-O2) and an inserted cyclic Gd+ dioxide species (O-Gd+-O). Analysis of the resulting product ion cross sections yields bond dissociation energies (BDEs, D0) for Gd+-O2 and OGd+-O, where the latter BDE is also independently measured in an exchange reaction between GdO+ and O2. The CID experiments also provide the energy of the barrier for the rearrangement of the Gd+-O2 adduct to the inserted O-Gd+-O structure (as identified by loss of a single oxygen atom). The thermochemistry measured here yields D0(OGd+-O) = 2.86 ± 0.08 eV, D0(Gd+-O2) = 0.75 ± 0.11 eV, and a barrier height relative to Gd+-O2 of 0.31 ± 0.07 eV. These data are sufficient to characterize in some detail the potential energy surface of the Gd+ reaction with O2 entirely from experiment. Theoretical calculations are performed for comparison with the experimental energetics and for further insight into the reaction mechanisms.

  3. Impact of agglomeration on the relaxometric properties of paramagnetic ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faucher, Luc; Fortin, Marc-Andre [Axe metabolisme, sante vasculaire et renale, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CRCHUQ-MSVR), Centre de recherche sur les materiaux avances (CERMA), Quebec, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada); Gossuin, Yves; Hocq, Aline, E-mail: marc-andre.fortin@gmn.ulaval.ca [Service de physique experimentale et biologique, Universite de Mons, 24 avenue du Champ-de-Mars, 7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2011-07-22

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (US-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) are used to provide 'positive' contrast effects in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and are being considered for molecular and cellular imaging applications. However, these nanoparticles can aggregate over time in aqueous medium, as well as when internalized into cells. This study is aimed at measuring in vitro, in aqueous medium, the impact of aggregation on the relaxometric properties of paramagnetic US-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. First, the nanoparticle core size as well as aggregation behaviour was assessed by HRTEM. DLS (hydrodynamic diameter) was used to measure the hydrodynamic diameter of nanoparticles and nanoaggregates. The relaxometric properties were measured by NMRD profiling, as well as with {sup 1}H NMR relaxometers. Then, the positive contrast enhancement effect was assessed by using magnetic resonance scanners (at 1.5 and 7 T). At every magnetic field, the longitudinal relaxivity (r{sub 1}) decreased upon agglomeration, while remaining high enough to provide positive contrast. On the other hand, the transverse relaxivity (r{sub 2}) slightly decreased at 0.47 and 1.41 T, but it was enhanced at higher fields (7 and 11.7 T) upon agglomeration. All NMRD profiles revealed a characteristic relaxivity peak in the range 60-100 MHz, suggesting the possibility to use US-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} as an efficient 'positive-T{sub 1}' contrast agent at clinical magnetic fields (1-3 T), in spite of aggregation.

  4. Investigation of sandwiched gadolinium (III) complexes with tungstosilicates as potential MRI contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guoying; Feng, Jianghua; Wu, Huifeng; Pei, Fengkui; Fang, Ke; Lei, Hao

    2004-04-01

    Two gadolinium-sandwiched complexes with tungstosilicates, K(13)[Gd(SiW(11)O(39))(2)] (Gd(SiW(11))(2)) and K(11)H(6)[Gd(3)O(3)(SiW(9)O(34))(2)] (Gd(3)(SiW(9))(2)), have been investigated by in vitro and in vivo experiments as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). T(1)-relaxivity of Gd(SiW(11))(2)was 6.59 mM(-1).s(-1) in aqueous solution and 6.85 mM(-1).s(-1) in 0.725 mmol.L(-1) bovine serum albumin solution at 25 degrees C and 9.39 T, respectively. The corresponding T(1)-relaxivity of Gd(3)(SiW(9))(2) was 12.6 and 19.3 mM(-1).s(-1) per Gd, respectively. MRI for Sprague-Dawley rats showed longer and more remarkable enhancement in rat liver after i.v. injection of these two complexes: 39.4 +/- 3.9% and 57.4 +/- 11.6% within the first 30 min after injection, 31.2 +/- 2.6% and 39.9 +/- 7.6% in the next 60 min for Gd(SiW(11))(2) and Gd(3)(SiW(9))(2) at doses of 0.081 and 0.084 mmol Gd/kg, respectively. Our preliminary in vitro and in vivo study indicates that Gd(SiW(11))(2) and Gd(3)(SiW(9))(2) are favorable candidates for hepatic contrast agents for MRI. However, the two complexes exhibit higher acute toxicity and need to be modified and studied further before clinical use.

  5. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for pulmonary embolism: a multicenter prospective study (PIOPED III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Paul D; Chenevert, Thomas L; Fowler, Sarah E; Goodman, Lawrence R; Gottschalk, Alexander; Hales, Charles A; Hull, Russell D; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Leeper, Kenneth V; Naidich, David P; Sak, Daniel J; Sostman, H Dirk; Tapson, Victor F; Weg, John G; Woodard, Pamela K

    2010-04-06

    The accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography and magnetic resonance venography for diagnosing pulmonary embolism has not been determined conclusively. To investigate performance characteristics of magnetic resonance angiography, with or without magnetic resonance venography, for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Prospective, multicenter study from 10 April 2006 to 30 September 2008. 7 hospitals and their emergency services. 371 adults with diagnosed or excluded pulmonary embolism. Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were measured by comparing independently read magnetic resonance imaging with the reference standard for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Reference standard diagnosis or exclusion was made by using various tests, including computed tomographic angiography and venography, ventilation-perfusion lung scan, venous ultrasonography, d-dimer assay, and clinical assessment. Magnetic resonance angiography, averaged across centers, was technically inadequate in 25% of patients (92 of 371). The proportion of technically inadequate images ranged from 11% to 52% at various centers. Including patients with technically inadequate images, magnetic resonance angiography identified 57% (59 of 104) with pulmonary embolism. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography had a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 99%. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography and venography had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 96%, but 52% of patients (194 of 370) had technically inadequate results. A high proportion of patients with suspected embolism was not eligible or declined to participate. Magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography should be considered only at centers that routinely perform it well and only for patients for whom standard tests are contraindicated. Magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography and magnetic resonance venography combined have a higher sensitivity than magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography

  6. Pinhole X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Gadolinium Nanoparticles: A Preliminary Monte Carlo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Seong Moon; Sung, Won Mo; Ye, Sung Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    X-ray fluorescence imaging is a modality for the element-specific imaging of a subject through analysis of characteristic x-rays produced by exploiting the interaction of high atomic number elements and incoming x-rays. Previous studies have utilized a polychromatic x-ray source to investigate the production of in vivo x-ray fluorescence images for the assessment of concentrations and locations of gold nanoparticles. However, previous efforts have so far been unable to detect low concentrations, such as 0.001% gold by weight, which is an expected concentration accumulated in tumors. We examined the feasibility of a monochromatic synchrotron x-rays implementation of pinhole x-ray fluorescence imaging by Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5. In the current study, gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticles, which have been widely used as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging and also as a dose enhancer in radiation therapy, were chosen for tumor targeting. Since a monochromatic x-ray source is used, the increased x-ray fluorescence signals allow the detection of low concentrations of Gd. Two different monochromatic x-ray beam energies, 50.5 keV near the Kedge energy (i.e., 50.207 keV) of Gd and 55 keV, were compared by their respective imaging results. Using Monte Carlo simulations the feasibility of imaging low concentrations of Gd nanoparticles (e.g., 0.001 wt%) with x-ray fluorescence using monochromatic synchrotron x-rays of two different energies was shown. In the case of imaging a single Gd column inserted in the center of a water phantom, the fluorescence signals from 0.05 wt% and 0.1 wt% Gd columns irradiated with a 50.5 keV photon beam were higher than those irradiated with 55 keV. Below 0.05 wt% region no significant differences were found.

  7. The Impact of Gadolinium-based Contrast Agent for Carbon Ion Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogi, Nao; Sakai, Makoto; Okada, Ryosuke; Itabashi, Yusuke; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Yoshiki; Sutou, Takayuki; Nakano, Takashi; Ohno, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    The contrast agent used in the diagnostic department has high atomic numbers and might influence dose deposition in the particle therapy. In particular, the influence of gadolinium-based (Gd) contrast agent on range in carbon ion radiotherapy has not yet been evaluated. For this reason, we avoid carbon treatment and planning computed tomography (CT) acquisition on days when the contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance image (MRI) is performed. In this study, we evaluated the time required for this beam range effect to vanish by evaluating the temporal changes in the CT values after an enhanced MRI as well as the stopping power of Gd solution. Two types of diluted solutions with Gd contrast agent were used for comparing their transferred stopping power (TSP) and measured stopping power (MSP). The TSP was calculated with a CT value to stopping power ratio table that was created previously. Additionally, to evaluate in vivo attenuation, we measured the CT values in the renal pelvis from the CT images with and without contrast agent for 73 patients. The maximum difference between the TSP and MSP was 85%. The difference between the TSP after 4 hours and the TSP with non-enhanced cases was less than 1%. Moreover, the difference between the MSP after 1 hour and the MSP with non-enhanced cases was less than 0.1%. It was found that the impact of Gd contrast agent can be neglected 1 hour after administration for carbon beam irradiation and 4 hours after for planning the CT image acquisition.

  8. Changes in gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance signal intensity ratio in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukihashi, Hironori; Ishibashi, Yutaka; Shimada, Toshio; Hatano, Jun; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Ooyake, Nobuyuki; Morioka, Shigefumi; Moriyama, Katsutoshi (Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan))

    Serial gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity ratios were measured in 6 normal subjects and 20 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients to try to differentiate normal from disorganized myocardial tissue. Images were obtained at 10-minute intervals 5-60 minutes after Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg) injection. The signal intensity ratio (myocardial signal intensity/skeletal muscle signal intensity) was measured at both hypertrophic and non-hypertrophic regions in each image at the apex and mid-ventricular levels. The signal intensity ratio was standardized to compare each case. Hypertrophic myocardium was classified into two types. Type I in 11 of 20 patients was visualized as a homogeneous image, while type II in the other 9 patients was revealed as a mixed isointensity and high intensity area. The peak value of the standardized signal intensity ratio at the apex level was 1.28[+-]0.09 in HCM patients and 1.23[+-]0.06 in normal subjects, and at the mid ventricular level was 1.26[+-]0.07 in hypertrophic regions, 1.17[+-]0.12 in non-hypertrophic regions, and 1.16[+-]0.07 in normal subjects. Thirty minutes after Gd injection, the standardized signal intensity ratio at the apex level was 1.21[+-]0.08 in HCM patients and 1.07[+-]0.08 in normal subjects, and those at the mid ventricular level was 1.20[+-]0.09 in hypertrophic regions, 1.11[+-]0.11 in non-hypertrophic regions, and 1.04[+-]0.06 in normal subjects. The delayed decay of the signal intensity ratio and high signal intensity ratio in Gd-DTPA enhanced MR images are useful in myocardial tissue characterization in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author).

  9. Effects of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid on T2-weighted MRCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuko; Ohmoto, Toshifumi; Saito, Tomoko; Kajima, Toshio; Nishimaru, Eiji; Ito, Katsuhide

    2009-01-01

    Gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) is a recently developed liver-specific contrast agent for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging that is excreted equally via the kidneys and the biliary system. To our knowledge, its effects on T(2)-weighted MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) images have not been explored. Acquisition of the hepatobiliary phase is recommended 20 min after administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA. Examination time cannot be extended if the contrast does not take effect on T(2)-weighted MRCP within 20 min after administration. We attempted to assess the change in signal of T(2)-weighted MRCP by excretion of Gd-EOB-DTPA. Between March and July 2008, 40 patients (15 women, 25 men; mean age 70.8 years) were examined with abdominal MR imaging. T(2)-weighted MRCP was performed before and 10 and 20 min after administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA. We analyzed signal intensity of the bile duct, gallbladder, cystic duct, and pancreatic duct on MRCP for changes in intensity. T(2)-weighted MRCP 20 min after contrast administration showed loss of signal of the bile duct (intrahepatic bile duct in all cases, upper extrahepatic duct in 36 [90%], middle extrahepatic duct in 33 [85%], and lower extrahepatic duct in 26 [67%]), the gallbladder in 23 cases (72%), and the cystic duct in 25 (64%). This signal change increased with time. We observed no change in signal of the pancreatic duct. T(2)-weighted MRCP sequences should not be obtained after administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA because this contrast agent decreases signal intensity of the biliary structure on these images.

  10. Implications of post-gadolinium MRI results in 13 cases with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin [Department of Radiology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy and Medical Faculty, Ankara 06018 (Turkey)]. E-mail: sugurel@gata.edu.tr; Hayakawa, Minako [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa-College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Background: There is a relative lack of definitive information about the contrast-enhancement characteristics of lesions in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Objective: Evaluation of contrast-enhanced MRI findings in PRES with a special emphasis on pathophysiology of post-gadolinium behavior of these lesions. Materials and methods: Contrast-enhanced 1.5 T MRI findings and relevant clinical data of the patients were retrospectively reviewed on 13 cases (six males, seven females; age range: 22-78; mean age 47). Although fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and diffusion-weighted MR images were considered for identification of the entity, primarily post-contrast T1-weighted MR images were searched for traces of enhancement in the lesions. Results: No definitely enhancing lesion was identified in the MR images obtained in 6-48 h after onset of symptoms (mostly headaches, seizures and cortical visual field deficits) in this series. Severity of disease indicated by small hemorrhages, confluence of lesions or progression to cytotoxic edema did not seem to alter this result. Typical lesion characteristics were consistent with vasogenic edema on FLAIR and diffusion MR images. Acute elevation of blood pressure on chronic hypertensive background was responsible in four, eclampsia in three, uremia with blood pressure fluctuations in three, and cyclosporine-toxicity in three cases. Conclusion: Although occasional enhancing brain lesions have been reported in the literature on PRES, contrast-enhancement of lesions may be a factor of scan timing and underlying etiology. Prospective studies with larger series on PRES are required for better evaluation of contrast-enhancement in MRI with respect to scan timing, which in turn may help understand its pathophysiology better.

  11. Microfabrication of a gadolinium-derived solid-state sensor for thermal neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Allen, Matthew; Denton, Michele L B; Siegal, Michael P; Manginell, Ronald P

    2017-07-01

    Neutron sensing is critical in civilian and military applications. Conventional neutron sensors are limited by size, weight, cost, portability and helium supply. Here the microfabrication of gadolinium (Gd) conversion material-based heterojunction diodes for detecting thermal neutrons using electrical signals produced by internal conversion electrons (ICEs) is described. Films with negligible stress were produced at the tensile-compressive crossover point, enabling Gd coatings of any desired thickness by controlling the radiofrequency sputtering power and using the zero-point near p(Ar) of 50 mTorr at 100 W. Post-deposition Gd oxidation-induced spallation was eliminated by growing a residual stress-free 50 nm neodymium-doped aluminum cap layer atop Gd. The resultant coatings were stable for at least 6 years, demonstrating excellent stability and product shelf-life. Depositing Gd directly on the diode surface eliminated the air gap, leading to a 200-fold increase in electron capture efficiency and facilitating monolithic microfabrication. The conversion electron spectrum was dominated by ICEs with energies of 72, 132 and 174 keV. Results are reported for neutron reflection and moderation by polyethylene for enhanced sensitivity, and γ- and X-ray elimination for improved specificity. The optimal Gd thickness was 10.4 μm for a 300 μm-thick partially depleted diode of 300 mm2 active surface area. Fast detection (within 10 min) at a neutron source-to-diode distance of 11.7 cm was achieved with this configuration. All ICE energies along with γ-ray and Kα,β X-rays were modeled to emphasize correlations between experiment and theory. Semi-conductor thermal neutron detectors offer advantages for field-sensing of radioactive neutron sources. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  12. Microfabrication of a gadolinium-derived solid-state sensor for thermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Allen, Matthew; Denton, Michele L. B.; Siegal, Michael P.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Neutron sensing is critical in civilian and military applications. Conventional neutron sensors are limited by size, weight, cost, portability and helium supply. Here the microfabrication of gadolinium (Gd) conversion material–based heterojunction diodes for detecting thermal neutrons using electrical signals produced by internal conversion electrons (ICEs) is described. Films with negligible stress were produced at the tensile-compressive crossover point, enabling Gd coatings of any desired thickness by controlling the radiofrequency sputtering power and using the zero-point near p(Ar) of 50 mTorr at 100 W. Post-deposition Gd oxidation–induced spallation was eliminated by growing a residual stress-free 50 nm neodymium-doped aluminum cap layer atop Gd. The resultant coatings were stable for at least 6 years, demonstrating excellent stability and product shelf-life. Depositing Gd directly on the diode surface eliminated the air gap, leading to a 200-fold increase in electron capture efficiency and facilitating monolithic microfabrication. The conversion electron spectrum was dominated by ICEs with energies of 72, 132 and 174 keV. Results are reported for neutron reflection and moderation by polyethylene for enhanced sensitivity, and γ- and X-ray elimination for improved specificity. The optimal Gd thickness was 10.4 μm for a 300 μm-thick partially depleted diode of 300 mm2 active surface area. Fast detection (within 10 min) at a neutron source-to-diode distance of 11.7 cm was achieved with this configuration. All ICE energies along with γ-ray and Kα,β X-rays were modeled to emphasize correlations between experiment and theory. Semi-conductor thermal neutron detectors offer advantages for field-sensing of radioactive neutron sources. PMID:28369631

  13. Punctate and curvilinear gadolinium enhancing lesions in the brain: a practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Guillaume; Duran-Peña, Alberto; de Chamfleur, Nicolas Menjot; Moulignier, Antoine; Thouvenot, Eric; Allou, Thibaut; Lacour, Arnaud; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Pelletier, Jean; Labauge, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral punctate and curvilinear gadolinium enhancements (PCGE) correspond to opacification of small vessel lumen or its perivascular areas in case of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We will discuss the possible causes of intra-parenchymal central nervous system PCGE. Our review is based on French database including patients presenting with central nervous system PCGE and literature search using PubMed database with the following keywords: punctate enhancement, linear enhancement, and curvilinear enhancement. Disorders which displayed linear leptomeningeal or periventricular enhancements without intra-parenchymal PCGE are excluded of this review. Among our 39 patients with PCGE, 16 different diagnoses were established. After combining our PCGE causes with those described in the literature, we propose a practical approach. Besides physiologic post-contrast enhancement of small vessels, three pathologic conditions may exhibit PCGE: (1) small collateral artery network seen in Moyamoya syndrome, (2) small veins congestions related to developmental or acquired venous outflow disturbance, and (3) disorders causing small vessels BBB disruption indicated by T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities in the corresponding areas of PCGE. Disruption of the BBB could be caused by a direct injury of the endothelial cell, as in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, Susac syndrome, and radiochemotherapy-induced injuries, or by an angiocentric cellular infiltrate, as in inflammatory disorders, demyelinating diseases, host immune responses fighting against infections, prelymphoma states, lymphoma, and in CLIPPERS. PCGE may conceal several causes, including physiological and pathological conditions. Nevertheless, a practical approach could improve its management and limit the indications of brain biopsy to very specific situations.

  14. Gadolinium cation (Gd(+)) reaction with O2: Potential energy surface mapped experimentally and with theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demireva, Maria; Armentrout, P B

    2017-05-07

    Guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry is used to measure the kinetic energy dependent cross sections for reactions of the lanthanide metal gadolinium cation (Gd(+)) and GdO(+) with O2 and for collision-induced dissociation (CID) of GdO2(+) with Xe. Gd(+) reacts with O2 in an exothermic and barrierless reaction to form GdO(+) and O. GdO2(+) is also formed in this reaction, but this product ion is formed in a sequential reaction, as verified by pressure dependent measurements and comparison with the results for the reaction of GdO(+) with O2. The CID experiments of GdO2(+) indicate the presence of two GdO2(+) precursor ion populations, assigned to a weakly bound oxygen molecule adduct (Gd(+)-O2) and an inserted cyclic Gd(+) dioxide species (O-Gd(+)-O). Analysis of the resulting product ion cross sections yields bond dissociation energies (BDEs, D0) for Gd(+)-O2 and OGd(+)-O, where the latter BDE is also independently measured in an exchange reaction between GdO(+) and O2. The CID experiments also provide the energy of the barrier for the rearrangement of the Gd(+)-O2 adduct to the inserted O-Gd(+)-O structure (as identified by loss of a single oxygen atom). The thermochemistry measured here yields D0(OGd(+)-O) = 2.86 ± 0.08 eV, D0(Gd(+)-O2) = 0.75 ± 0.11 eV, and a barrier height relative to Gd(+)-O2 of 0.31 ± 0.07 eV. These data are sufficient to characterize in some detail the potential energy surface of the Gd(+) reaction with O2 entirely from experiment. Theoretical calculations are performed for comparison with the experimental energetics and for further insight into the reaction mechanisms.

  15. Convection enhanced delivery of different molecular weight tracers of gadolinium-tagged polylysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Peter A; Keeley, Dan; Schorn, Greg; Forman, Eric; Ai, Yi; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna; Zhang, Zhiming; Bradley, Luke H

    2013-09-30

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) is a powerful method of circumventing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to deliver therapeutic compounds directly to the CNS. While inferring the CED distribution of a therapeutic compound by imaging a magnetic resonance (MR)-sensitive tracer has many advantages, however how the compound distribution is affected by the features of the delivery system, its target tissue, and its molecular properties, such as its binding characteristics, charge, and molecular weight (MW) are not fully understood. We used MR imaging of gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-tagged polylysine compounds of various MW, in vitro and in vivo, to measure the dependence of compounds MW on CED distribution. For the in vitro studies, the correlation between volume of distribution (Vd) as a function of MW was determined by measuring the T1 of the infused tracers, into 0.6% agarose gels through a multiport catheter. The compounds distributed in the gels inversely proportional to their MW, consistent with convection and unobstructed diffusion through a porous media. For the in vivo studies, Gd-DTPA tagged compounds were infused into the non-human primate putamen, via an implanted multiport catheter connected to a MedStream™ pump, programmed to deliver a predetermined volume with alternating on-off periods to take advantage of the convective and diffusive contributions to Vd. Unlike the gel studies, the higher MW polylysine-tracer infusions did not freely distribute from the multiport catheter in the putamen, suggesting that distribution was impeded by other properties that should also be considered in future tracer design and CED infusion protocols. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cation distribution correlated with magnetic properties of nanocrystalline gadolinium substituted nickel ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiba, Zein K. [Taif university, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Al-Haweiah, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Ain shams university, Faculty of science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt); Bakr Mohamed, Mohamed, E-mail: mbm1977@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawara (Saudi Arabia); Ain shams university, Faculty of science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt); Arda, L. [Bahcesehir University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Ciragan Cad., Osmanpasa Mektebi Sok., No. 4, 34349 Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey); Dogan, N. [Gebze Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 41400 Gebze/Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2015-10-01

    Nano crystalline NiFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4} (0.0≤x≤0.4) ferrite was prepared by citrate method. The samples were characterized with X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, TEM and magnetic measurements. The effect of Gd{sup 3+} cations substitution on structural, microstructural and magnetic properties of prepared nanoparticles was investigated. From Rietveld analysis, the system was found to be inverse spinel structure with Gd{sup 3+} residing on octahedral B-site 16c and the grain boundary, while Ni{sup 2+} occupying the B-site at both 16c and 16d. The lattice parameter (a) changes nonmonotonically, first increases then decreases with Gd doping content. The M–H and M–T relations had demonstrated a change in the magnetic moment and a ferrimagnetic–superparamagnetic transition in the ferrite system. For low temperature measurements, an increase in gadolinium content resulted in increasing the coercive field while the saturation of magnetization (M{sub s}), first deceases then increases with Gd doping content. At room temperature M{sub s} decreases with increasing Gd substitution. - Highlights: • NiFe{sub 2-x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4} (0.0≤x≤0.4) nano ferrite was prepared by citrate method. • NiFe{sub 2-x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4} has an inverse spinal structure. • At low temperature H{sub c} increases M{sub s} deceases then increases with Gd. • At room temperature M{sub s} decreases with increasing Gd substitution increases.

  17. Electronic states and metal-ligand bonding of gadolinium complexes of benzene and cyclooctatetraene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudjane, Mourad; Kumari, Sudesh; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2012-01-19

    Gadolinium (Gd) complexes of benzene (C(6)H(6)) and (1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene) (C(8)H(8)) were produced in a laser-vaporization supersonic molecular beam source and studied by single-photon pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. Adiabatic ionization energies and metal-ligand stretching frequencies were measured for the first time from the ZEKE spectra. Metal-ligand bonding and electronic states of the neutral and cationic complexes were analyzed by combining the spectroscopic measurements with ab initio calculations. The ground states of Gd(C(6)H(6)) and [Gd(C(6)H(6))](+) were determined as (11)A(2) and (10)A(2), respectively, with C(6v) molecular symmetry. The ground states of Gd(C(8)H(8)) and [Gd(C(8)H(8))](+) were identified as (9)A(2) and (8)A(2), respectively, with C(8v) molecular symmetry. Although the metal-ligand bonding in Gd(C(6)H(6)) is dominated by the covalent interaction, the bonding in Gd(C(8)H(8)) is largely electrostatic. The bonding in the benzene complex is much weaker than that in the cyclooctatetraene species. The strong bonding in Gd(C(8)H(8)) arises from two-electron transfer from Gd to C(8)H(8), which creates a strong charge-charge interaction and converts the tub-shaped ligand into a planar form. In both systems, Gd 4f orbitals are localized and play little role in the bonding, but they contribute to the high electron spin multiplicities.

  18. Erosion Performance of Gadolinium Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings Processed by Suspension Plasma Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahade, Satyapal; Curry, Nicholas; Björklund, Stefan; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    7-8 wt.% Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the standard thermal barrier coating (TBC) material used by the gas turbines industry due to its excellent thermal and thermo-mechanical properties up to 1200 °C. The need for improvement in gas turbine efficiency has led to an increase in the turbine inlet gas temperature. However, above 1200 °C, YSZ has issues such as poor sintering resistance, poor phase stability and susceptibility to calcium magnesium alumino silicates (CMAS) degradation. Gadolinium zirconate (GZ) is considered as one of the promising top coat candidates for TBC applications at high temperatures (>1200 °C) due to its low thermal conductivity, good sintering resistance and CMAS attack resistance. Single-layer 8YSZ, double-layer GZ/YSZ and triple-layer GZdense/GZ/YSZ TBCs were deposited by suspension plasma spray (SPS) process. Microstructural analysis was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A columnar microstructure was observed in the single-, double- and triple-layer TBCs. Phase analysis of the as-sprayed TBCs was carried out using XRD (x-ray diffraction) where a tetragonal prime phase of zirconia in the single-layer YSZ TBC and a cubic defect fluorite phase of GZ in the double and triple-layer TBCs was observed. Porosity measurements of the as-sprayed TBCs were made by water intrusion method and image analysis method. The as-sprayed GZ-based multi-layered TBCs were subjected to erosion test at room temperature, and their erosion resistance was compared with single-layer 8YSZ. It was shown that the erosion resistance of 8YSZ single-layer TBC was higher than GZ-based multi-layered TBCs. Among the multi-layered TBCs, triple-layer TBC was slightly better than double layer in terms of erosion resistance. The eroded TBCs were cold-mounted and analyzed by SEM.

  19. First experiences with application of gadolinium-DTPA in infants and small children under two years of age. Erste Erfahrungen beim Einsatz von Gadolinium-DTPA bei Saeuglingen und Kleinkindern unter zwei Jahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, R.; Lausch, N.; Buecheler, E. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik); Grzyska, U. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Neurologische Klinik)

    1991-07-01

    The use of Gadolinium-DTPA as a paramagnetic contrast agent in MRI with adults and juveniles concerning brain and spinal cord pathology is well proven since years. In the FRG it is only introduced for children over two years of age. Therefore this report deales with the experience in four infants and small children under the age of two. They all were suffering from neurological tumors and got additional diagnostic information in three cases. Clinical side-effects like urticaria, vomiting or convulsions had not been observed nor had pathologic changes of the biochemical parameters been noticed. (orig./GDG).

  20. A novel cryogenic magnetic refrigerant metal-organic framework based on 1D gadolinium(III) chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Qun; Li, Peng-Fei [Guangxi Key Laboratory of Electrochemical and Magneto-chemical Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China); Zou, Zhi-Ming, E-mail: 2014005@glut.edu.cn [Guangxi Key Laboratory of Electrochemical and Magneto-chemical Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China); Liu, Zheng [Guangxi Key Laboratory of Electrochemical and Magneto-chemical Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China); Liu, Shu-Xia, E-mail: liusx@nenu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Polyoxometalate Science of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, Jilin 130024 (China)

    2017-02-15

    A metal-organic framework (MOF) based on gadolinium ion (Gd{sup 3+}) and tricarboxylate ligand, [Gd(BTPCA)(H{sub 2}O)]·2DMF·3H{sub 2}O (Gd-BTPCA) (H{sub 3}BTPCA =1,1′,1′-(benzene-1,3,5-triyl)tripiperidine-4-carboxylic acid; DMF=dimethylformamide), was synthesized and structurally characterized. The adjacent Gd{sup 3+} ions are intraconnected by the carboxylate groups of the BTPCA{sup 3-} ligands to form a 1D Gd{sup 3+} ion chain. The 1D Gd{sup 3+} ion chains are interconnected by the BTPCA{sup 3-} ligands, giving rise to a 3D framework with 1D open channel. The magnetic studies indicate that Gd-BTPCA exhibits weak ferromagnetic interactions, and acts as a cryogenic magnetic refrigerant having the magnetic entropy change (−ΔS{sub m}) of 20.40 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} for ΔH =7 T at 3 K. - Graphical abstract: A 1D gadolinium(III) chains-based metal-organic framework performed ferromagnetic coupling on the magnetic property. Magnetic investigation reveals that Gd-BTPCA exhibits the entropy change (−ΔS{sub m}) of 20.40 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} for ΔH =7 T at 3 K. - Highlights: • The MOF based on gadolinium ion and tricarboxylate ligand was synthesized. • This MOF is connected with 1D Gd{sup 3+} ions chain and the carboxylate groups of BTPCA{sup 3-} ligands. • The magnetic studies indicate that the MOF exhibits the weak ferromagnetic interactions. • Magnetic investigation reveals that the MOF exhibits the high entropy change.

  1. Gadolinium(III) ion selective sensor using a new synthesized Schiff's base as a sensing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamani, Hassan Ali, E-mail: haszamani@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadhosseini, Majid [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Shahrood Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haji-Mohammadrezazadeh, Saeed [Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University, Ardakan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridbod, Farnoush [Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza [Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meghdadi, Soraia [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Davoodnia, Abolghasem [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-01

    According to a solution study which showed a selective complexation between N,N Prime -bis(methylsalicylidene)-2-aminobenzylamine (MSAB) and gadolinium ions, MSAB was used as a sensing element in construction of a gadolinium(III) ion selective electrode. Acetophenon (AP) was used as solvent mediator and sodium tetraphenyl borate (NaTPB) as an anion excluder. The electrode showed a good selectivity towards Gd(III) ions over a wide variety of cations tested. The constructed sensor displayed a Nernstian behavior (19.7 {+-} 0.3 mV/decade) in the concentration range of 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} mol L{sup -1} with detection limit of 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} and a short response time (< 10 s). The working pH range of the electrode was 3.5-10.1 and lifetime of the sensor was at least 10 weeks. Analysis of certified reference materials confirmed the accuracy of the proposed sensor. The electrode was successfully applied as an indicator electrode in gadolinium titration with EDTA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Gd{sup 3+}-PVC membrane sensor based on an ion carrier as sensing material is introduced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique is very simple and it's not necessary to use sophisticated equipment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This sensor shows good selectivity against other metal ions.

  2. Retention of gadolinium compounds used in magnetic resonance imaging: a critical review and the recommendations of regulatory agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Bonmatí, L; Martí-Bonmatí, E

    The Spanish Agency for Drugs and Healthcare Products (AEMPS), based on the recommendations of the European Committee for Risk Assessment in Pharmacovigilance, established on 13 March 2017 that linear gadolinium-based MR contrast media, such as MultiHance, Omniscan, Magnevist (currently not marketed) and Optimark (no longer marketed in Spain), the clinical benefits do not outweigh the potential risks derived from their use. AEMPS recommends to suspend its marketing for general use based on the retention of these compounds in the brain. On the other hand, the AEMPS justifies the maintenance of Primovist and MultiHance for liver studies, and Magnevist of intra-articular administration (not commercialized in Spain), and justified the almost exclusive use of macrocyclic structure contrasts (Gadovist, ProHance and Dotarem). However, this retention is known to be different for each of the contrast media. All existing gadolinium contrasts agents have a distribution phase with tissue retention, due to a very slow exchange, in the interstitium of bone, skin, kidney, brain and other organs. The existence of histological effects or clinical symptoms associated with the accumulation of these trace amounts of gadolinium has not been demonstrated. The major toxicological concern with these contrast agents is related to nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Since the safety profiles are mainly related to the interstitial retention space in the tissues, it does not seem justified to actually exclude contrast media that do not have cases related to the NSF. Based on all of this, we disagree with the latest AEMPS recommendation suggesting the marketing stoppage of linear agents without considering the individual retention profiles. This recommendation is not based neither on the data nor existing knowledge about the retention, relaxivity and clinical efficiency of the Gd compounds. It is therefore necessary to carry out prospective studies on the histological and clinical relevance of

  3. Delayed gadolinium