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Sample records for high-energy x-ray diffraction

  1. High-energy X-ray diffraction studies of disordered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohara, Shinji; Suzuya, Kentaro

    2003-01-01

    With the arrival of the latest generation of synchrotron sources and the introduction of advanced insertion devices (wigglers and undulators), the high-energy (E≥50 keV) X-ray diffraction technique has become feasible, leading to new approaches in the quantitative study of the structure of disordered materials. High-energy X-ray diffraction has several advantages: higher resolution in real space due to a wide range of scattering vector Q, smaller correction terms (especially the absorption correction), reduction of truncation errors, the feasibility of running under extreme environments, including high-temperatures and high-pressures, and the ability to make direct comparisons between X-ray and neutron diffraction data. Recently, high-energy X-ray diffraction data have been combined with neutron diffraction data from a pulsed source to provide more detailed and reliable structural information than that hitherto available

  2. X-ray diffraction patterns of single crystals implanted with high-energy light ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.

    1998-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns of silicon and gallium arsenide single crystals implanted with high-energy protons and α-particles were studied. A various models of lattice parameter changes were analysed. The agreement between the simulation and experiment proves that the lattice parameter depth-distribution can be assumed to be proportional to vacancy distribution obtained by Monte-Carlo method and from the Biersack-Ziegler theory. Most of the X-ray experiments were performed using synchrotron source of X-ray radiation in particular in the case of back-reflection and transmission section topographic methods. The new method of direct determination of the implanted ion ranges was proposed using synchrotron radiation back-reflection section topography. A number of new interference phenomena was revealed and explained. These interferences are important in the applications of diffraction theory in studying of the real structure of implanted layers. (author)

  3. X-Ray diffraction studies of silicon implanted with high energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.; Wierzchowski, W.; Graeff, W.

    1998-01-01

    The character of lattice deformation in silicon implanted with high energy alpha-particles and protons was studied using a number of X-ray methods. The experiments included double-crystal spectrometer method as well as single crystal section and projection topography realised both with conventional and synchrotron X-ray sources. All observed diffraction patterns were reasonably explainable assuming the lattice parameter distribution proportional to the vacancy-interstitial distribution coming from the Biersack-ziegler theory. The theoretical rocking curves and distribution in back-reflection double-crystal and section topographs well corresponding to the experimental results were calculated using numerical integration of the takagi-taupin equations

  4. Nondestructive strain depth profiling with high energy X-ray diffraction: System capabilities and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhan; Wendt, Scott; Cosentino, Nicholas; Bond, Leonard J.

    2018-04-01

    Limited by photon energy, and penetration capability, traditional X-ray diffraction (XRD) strain measurements are only capable of achieving a few microns depth due to the use of copper (Cu Kα1) or molybdenum (Mo Kα1) characteristic radiation. For deeper strain depth profiling, destructive methods are commonly necessary to access layers of interest by removing material. To investigate deeper depth profiles nondestructively, a laboratory bench-top high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) system was previously developed. This HEXRD method uses an industrial 320 kVp X-Ray tube and the Kα1 characteristic peak of tungsten, to produces a higher intensity X-ray beam which enables depth profiling measurement of lattice strain. An aluminum sample was investigated with deformation/load provided using a bending rig. It was shown that the HEXRD method is capable of strain depth profiling to 2.5 mm. The method was validated using an aluminum sample where both the HEXRD method and the traditional X-ray diffraction method gave data compared with that obtained using destructive etching layer removal, performed by a commercial provider. The results demonstrate comparable accuracy up to 0.8 mm depth. Nevertheless, higher attenuation capabilities in heavier metals limit the applications in other materials. Simulations predict that HEXRD works for steel and nickel in material up to 200 µm, but experiment results indicate that the HEXRD strain profile is not practical for steel and nickel material, and the measured diffraction signals are undetectable when compared to the noise.

  5. Structural studies of disordered materials using high-energy x-ray diffraction from ambient to extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (SPring-8/JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Itou, Masayoshi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (SPring-8/JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Suzuya, Kentaro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (J-PARC/JAEA), Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Inamura, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (J-PARC/JAEA), Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sakurai, Yoshiharu [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (SPring-8/JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohishi, Yasuo [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (SPring-8/JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takata, Masaki [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (SPring-8/JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2007-12-19

    High-energy x-rays from a synchrotron radiation source allow us to obtain high-quality diffraction data for disordered materials from ambient to extreme conditions, which is necessary for revealing the detailed structures of glass, liquid and amorphous materials. We introduced high-energy x-ray diffraction beamlines and a dedicated diffractometer for glass, liquid and amorphous materials at SPring-8 and report the recent developments of ancillary equipment. Furthermore, the structures of liquid and amorphous materials determined from the high-energy x-ray diffraction data obtained at SPring-8 are discussed.

  6. X-ray diffraction studies of silicon implanted with high energy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieteska, K [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock-Swierk, (Poland); Wierzchowski, W [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Warsaw, (Poland); Graeff, W [Hasylab at Desy, Hamburg, (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The character of lattice deformation in silicon in implanted with high energy {alpha} particles and protons was studied with a number of X-ray methods. The experiments included double crystal spectrometer method as well as single crystal section and projection topography realised both with conventional and synchrotron X-ray sources. All observed diffraction patterns were reasonably explainable assuming the lattice parameter depth distribution proportional to the vacancy-interstitial distribution coming from the Biersack-Ziegler theory. The theoretical rocking curves and density distribution in back-reflection double-crystal and section topography well corresponding to experimental results were calculated using numerical integration of the Takagi-Taupin equations. 9 figs.

  7. Scanning three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy using a high-energy microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Hirose, Y.; Seno, Y.

    2016-01-01

    A scanning three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscope apparatus with a high-energy microbeam was installed at the BL33XU Toyota beamline at SPring-8. The size of the 50 keV beam focused using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors was 1.3 μm wide and 1.6 μm high in full width at half maximum. The scanning 3DXRD method was tested for a cold-rolled carbon steel sheet sample. A three-dimensional orientation map with 37 "3 voxels was obtained.

  8. Scanning three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy using a high-energy microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Y., E-mail: y-hayashi@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Hirose, Y.; Seno, Y. [Toyota Central R& D Toyota Central R& D Labs., Inc., 41-1 Nagakute Aichi 480-1192 Japan (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    A scanning three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscope apparatus with a high-energy microbeam was installed at the BL33XU Toyota beamline at SPring-8. The size of the 50 keV beam focused using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors was 1.3 μm wide and 1.6 μm high in full width at half maximum. The scanning 3DXRD method was tested for a cold-rolled carbon steel sheet sample. A three-dimensional orientation map with 37 {sup 3} voxels was obtained.

  9. High-energy X-ray diffraction studies of short- and intermediate-range structure in oxide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuya, Kentaro

    2002-01-01

    The feature of high-energy X-ray diffraction method is explained. The oxide glasses studies by using BL04B2, high-energy X-ray diffraction beam line of SPring-8, and the random system materials by high-energy monochromatic X-ray diffraction are introduced. An advantage of third generation synchrotron radiation is summarized. On SPring-8, the high-energy X-ray diffraction experiments of random system are carried out by BL04B2 and BL14B1 beam line. BL04B2 can select Si (111)(E=37.8 keV, λ=0.033 nm) and Si(220)(E=61.7 keV, λ=0.020 nm) as Si monochromator. The intermediate-range structure of (MgO) x (P 2 O 5 ) 1-x glass ,MgP 2 O 6 glass, B 2 O 3 glass, SiO 2 and GeO 2 are explained in detail. The future and application of high-energy X-ray diffraction are stated. (S.Y.)

  10. High-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies on disordered materials. From ambient condition to an extreme condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohara, Shinji; Ohishi, Yasuo; Suzuya, Kentaro; Takata, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    High-energy x-rays from synchrotron radiation source allow us to measure high-quality diffraction data of the disordered materials from under ambient condition to an extreme condition, which is necessary to reveal the detailed structure of glass, liquid, and amorphous materials. We introduce the high-energy x-ray diffraction beamline and dedicated diffractometer for glass, liquid, and amorphous materials with the recent developments of ancillary equipments. Furthermore our recent studies on the structures of disordered materials reviewed. (author)

  11. The high-energy x-ray diffraction and scattering beamline at the Canadian Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, A.; Dina, G.; Kycia, S.

    2018-06-01

    The optical design for the high-energy x-ray diffraction and scattering beamline of the Brockhouse sector at the Canadian Light Source is described. The design is based on a single side-bounce silicon focusing monochromator that steers the central part of a high-field permanent magnet wiggler beam into the experimental station. Two different configurations are proposed: a higher energy resolution with vertical focusing and a lower energy resolution with horizontal and vertical focusing. The monochromator will have the possibility of mounting three crystals: one crystal optimized for 35 keV that focuses in the horizontal and vertical directions using reflection (1,1,1) and two other crystals both covering the energies above 40 keV: one with only vertical focusing and another one with horizontal and vertical focusing. The geometry of the last two monochromator crystals was optimized to use reflections (4,2,2) and (5,3,3) to cover the broad energy range from 40 to 95 keV.

  12. Intermediate-range order in mesoporous silicas investigated by a high-energy X-ray diffraction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakihara, Toru; Fan, Wei; Ogura, Masaru; Okubo, Tatsuya; Kohara, Shinji; Sankar, Gopinathan

    2008-01-01

    We perform a high-energy X-ray diffraction study comparing bulk amorphous silica with MCM-41 and SBA-15 that are representative mesoporous silicas prepared in basic and acidic conditions, respectively. It is revealed that mesoporous silicas, especially SBA-15, have less ordered structures and contain larger fractions of three- and four-membered rings than does bulk amorphous silica. (author)

  13. Quasi-kinoform type multilayer zone plate with high diffraction efficiency for high-energy X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, S; Yasumoto, M; Kamijo, N; Uesugi, K; Takeuchi, A; Terada, Y; Suzuki, Y

    2009-01-01

    Fresnel zone plate (FZP) with high diffraction efficiency leads to high performance X-ray microscopy with the reduction of the radiation damage to biological specimens. In order to attain high diffraction efficiency in high energy X-ray region, we have developed multilevel-type (6-step) multilayer FZPs with the diameter of 70 micron. The efficiencies of two FZPs were evaluated at the BL20XU beamline of SPring-8. For one FZP, the peak efficiency for the 1st-order diffraction of 51% has been obtained at 70 keV. The efficiencies higher than 40% have been achieved in the wide energy range of 70-90 keV. That for the 2nd-order diffraction of 46% has been obtained at 37.5 keV.

  14. Opalescence of quartz: a study by high energy x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastie, P.; Dolino, G.; Hamelin, B.

    2003-05-01

    The origin of the opalescence observed at the α-β transition of quartz remains an open question. This intense light scattering occurs during the coexistence, at the first order transition, of the α and incommensurate (inc) phases, in the vicinity of the phase interface. New hard x-ray diffraction experiment shows that the large angle light scattering is mainly in the α-phase region of the crystal and reveals the existence of an intermediate structure between the α-phase and the 3q inc phase.

  15. Opalescence of quartz: a study by high energy x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastie, P [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique, Universite Joseph Fourier-Grenoble 1 - CNRS, UMR No 5588, BP 87, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Dolino, G [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique, Universite Joseph Fourier-Grenoble 1 - CNRS, UMR No 5588, BP 87, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Hamelin, B [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156X, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2003-05-21

    The origin of the opalescence observed at the {alpha}-{beta} transition of quartz remains an open question. This intense light scattering occurs during the coexistence, at the first order transition, of the {alpha} and incommensurate (inc) phases, in the vicinity of the phase interface. New hard x-ray diffraction experiment shows that the large angle light scattering is mainly in the {alpha}-phase region of the crystal and reveals the existence of an intermediate structure between the {alpha}-phase and the 3q inc phase.

  16. Structural studies of metal nanoparticles using high-energy x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumara, L. S. R., E-mail: KUMARA.Rosantha@nims.go.jp; Yang, Anli; Song, Chulho [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Sakata, Osami, E-mail: SAKATA.Osami@nims.go.jp [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Synchrotron X-ray Group, Quantum Beam Unit, NIMS, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-J3-16, Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Synchrotron X-ray Group, Quantum Beam Unit, NIMS, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (SPring-8/JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 Japan (Japan); Kitagawa, Hiroshi [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 Japan (Japan); INAMORI Frontier Research Center, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 Japan (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 Japan (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    The XRD patterns of nanoparticles exhibit broad Bragg peaks because of small size, where the contribution of diffuse component provides us with inherent structural information. Therefore, pair distribution function obtained from a Fourier transformation of high-energy XRD data and structure modeling on the basis of diffraction data becomes an essential tool to understand the structure of nanoparticles. This promising tool was utilized to obtain structural information of Pd/Pt bimetallic core/shell and solid-solution nanoparticles, which show much attention due to their improved hydrogen storage capacity and catalytic activity.

  17. Direct observation of radial distribution change during tensile deformation of metallic glass by high energy X-ray diffraction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasu, Toshio, E-mail: nasu@kekexafs.kj.yamagata-u.ac.j [Faculty of Education, Arts and Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata, 990-8560 (Japan); Sasaki, Motokatsu [Faculty of Education, Arts and Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata, 990-8560 (Japan); Usuki, Takeshi; Sekine, Mai [Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Takigawa, Yorinobu; Higashi, Kenji [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Harima Science Garden City, Sayo town, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Sakurai, Masaki; Wei Zhang; Inoue, Akihisa [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-08-26

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the micro-mechanism of deformation behavior of metallic glasses. We report the results of direct observations of short-range and medium-range structural change during tensile deformation of metallic glasses by high energy X-ray diffraction method. Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and Ni{sub 30}Zr{sub 70} metallic glass samples in the ribbon shape (1.5 mm width and 25 mum) were made by using rapid quenching method. Tensile deformation added to the sample was made by using special equipment adopted for measuring the high energy X-ray diffraction. The peaks in pair distribution function g(r) for Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and N{sub 30}iZr{sub 70} metallic glasses move zigzag into front and into rear during tensile deformation. These results of direct observation on atomic distribution change for Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and Ni{sub 30}Zr{sub 70} metallic glass ribbons during tensile deformation suggest that the micro-relaxations occur.

  18. In-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction and batch Rietveld refinement of phase changes in titanium aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitfield, R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: We have used the Rietveld refinement method for the analysis of high-energy X-ray power diffraction for quantitatve phase analysis. This method has the advantage of being able to model the multiple phases appearing in the diffraction pattern and tell us about the composition of the phases of a sample as we change the temperature. It has been applied to various TiAl compounds allowing us to follow in detail the phase transitions of the intermetallics when heated to around 1400 0 Cand subsequently cooled. Small amounts of additives like V, Cr and Gd as well as signatures from different production processes can be seen to have an effect on the phase transitions. With increasing temperature we can see the evolution of the unit cell due to thermal expansion, chemical segregation and the relative proportion of phase changes

  19. Revisiting the blocking force test on ferroelectric ceramics using high energy x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, L., E-mail: laurent.daniel@u-psud.fr [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); GeePs (CNRS UMR8507, CentraleSupelec, UPMC, Univ Paris-Sud), 91192 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Hall, D. A.; Withers, P. J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Koruza, J.; Webber, K. G. [Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); King, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue J. Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France)

    2015-05-07

    The blocking force test is a standard test to characterise the properties of piezoelectric actuators. The aim of this study is to understand the various contributions to the macroscopic behaviour observed during this experiment that involves the intrinsic piezoelectric effect, ferroelectric domain switching, and internal stress development. For this purpose, a high energy diffraction experiment is performed in-situ during a blocking force test on a tetragonal lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic (Pb{sub 0.98}Ba{sub 0.01}(Zr{sub 0.51}Ti{sub 0.49}){sub 0.98}Nb{sub 0.02}O{sub 3}). It is shown that the usual macroscopic linear interpretation of the test can also be performed at the single crystal scale, allowing the identification of local apparent piezoelectric and elastic properties. It is also shown that despite this apparent linearity, the blocking force test involves significant non-linear behaviour mostly due to domain switching under electric field and stress. Although affecting a limited volume fraction of the material, domain switching is responsible for a large part of the macroscopic strain and explains the high level of inter- and intra-granular stresses observed during the course of the experiment. The study shows that if apparent piezoelectric and elastic properties can be identified for PZT single crystals from blocking stress curves, they may be very different from the actual properties of polycrystalline materials due to the multiplicity of the physical mechanisms involved. These apparent properties can be used for macroscopic modelling purposes but should be considered with caution if a local analysis is aimed at.

  20. Characterization of neutron-irradiated HT-UPS steel by high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuan, E-mail: xuanzhang@anl.gov [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Li, Meimei [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the first measurement of neutron-irradiated microstructure using far-field high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy (FF-HEDM) in a high-temperature ultrafine-precipitate-strengthened (HT-UPS) austenitic stainless steel. Grain center of mass, grain size distribution, crystallographic orientation (texture), diffraction spot broadening and lattice constant distributions of individual grains were obtained for samples in three different conditions: non-irradiated, neutron-irradiated (3dpa/500 °C), and irradiated + annealed (3dpa/500 °C + 600 °C/1 h). It was found that irradiation caused significant increase in grain-level diffraction spot broadening, modified the texture, reduced the grain-averaged lattice constant, but had nearly no effect on the average grain size and grain size distribution, as well as the grain size-dependent lattice constant variations. Post-irradiation annealing largely reversed the irradiation effects on texture and average lattice constant, but inadequately restored the microstrain.

  1. Effect of strontium on liquid structure of Al-Si hypoeutectic alloys using high-energy X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srirangam, P.; Kramer, M.J.; Shankar, S.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-ray diffraction experiments were performed using a synchrotron beam source to investigate the effect of strontium on the liquid atomic structure of Al-Si hypoeutectic alloys. The high-temperature liquid diffraction experiments were carried out on Al alloys with 3, 7, 10 and 12.5 (eutectic) wt.% Si, respectively, with 0 and 0.04 wt.% addition of Sr to each of the alloys. Further, the diffraction data for all the alloys were obtained at various melt temperatures (5-220 K) above the respective liquidus temperature. It was observed that the addition of 0.04 wt.% Sr results in significant change in the liquid structure parameters, such as structure factor, pair distribution function, radial distribution function, coordination number and packing density, at any given melt temperature of the alloy. Salient observations were that, for any specific alloy and temperature, addition of Sr significantly decreases coordination number and packing density. Further, with the addition of Sr in the liquid alloy, the atomic coordination number and packing density increases with decreasing temperature and decreasing Si content of the alloy. The results coupled with prior knowledge have enabled an in-depth understanding of the nucleation environment of the solidifying phases, specifically the role of Sr in delaying the clustering tendencies (nucleation) of the eutectic Si phase.

  2. X-ray diffraction patterns in high-energy proton implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.; Dluzewska, K.D.; Wierzchowski, W.; Graeff, W.

    1998-01-01

    Silicon crystals implanted with 1 and 1.6 MeV protons were studied by means of conventional source double-crystal and synchrotron multi-crystal arrangements. Both the rocking curves and series of topographs were recorded in different parallel settings employing different reflections and wavelengths of radiation. A comparison of rocking curves in different regions of implanted areas was performed in synchrotron multi-crystal arrangement with a beam of a very small diameter. The rocking curves exhibited subsidiary interference maxima with increasing periodicity on the low angle side. The plane wave topographs taken at different angular setting revealed characteristic fringes whose number decreased with increasing distance from the main maximum. The fringe pattern did not depend on the direction of the diffraction vector. The number of fringes for equivalent angular distance from the maximum was larger for higher order of reflection. The shape of the rocking curve and other diffraction patterns were reasonably explained assuming the lattice parameter change depth distribution proportional to the profile obtained from the Biersack-Ziegler theory and lateral non-uniformity of ion dose. A good approximation of the experimental results was obtained using numerical integration of the Takagi-Taupin equations. (orig.)

  3. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, J.R.; Wei, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  4. Study of the Elasto-plastic Properties of Mineralized Biomaterials via Synchrotron High-energy X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier-Black, Alix Christine

    Synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction was employed to investigate the strains in the hydroxyapatite (HAP) platelets and mineralized collagen fibrils in bovine dentin and cortical bone. The HAP and the fibrillar apparent moduli, defined as the applied stress divided by the phase strain, in dentin were measured as 27+/-7.2 and 16+/-4.9 GPa. The HAP apparent modulus ( EHAPapp ) is less than the lower bound calculated for EHAPapp from the Voigt model. This discrepancy is probably due to stress concentrators or decreases in the HAP Young's modulus due to size or composition effects. EHAPapp and Efibapp in dentin vary significantly within a single tooth in both the apical-cervical direction and the buccal-lingual direction. However, the variation between teeth is minimal. The HAP and fibrillar apparent moduli are not affected by freezing in dentin or by X-ray irradiation in bone and dentin. X-ray irradiation causes a decrease in HAP residual strain in bone. This decrease suggests the presence of HAP-collagen interfacial damage. It was determined from the HAP 00.2 peak broadening that irradiation damage mostly affects the HAP unit cells which are under the highest strain. From this it was theorized that irradiation may damage highly-strained bonds at stress concentrators and/or calcium-mediated electrostatic bonds. The fact that the apparent modulus does not change with irradiation suggests that the interfacial damage must be reversible. Bone and dentin both undergo creep when loaded to high stresses. At low irradiation doses, both the fibrillar and HAP strains increase with creep time indicating that load is being transferred from the matrix to the HAP. However, at high doses, the strain on the HAP decreases with creep time. This supports the interfacial damage theory which would allow the HAP to release its elastic load upon interfacial debonding. At -80 MPa, beyond a dose of 50 kGy, the rate of change in HAP strain with time begins to increase, becoming positive at

  5. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of literature on X-ray diffraction begins with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips' organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. This is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is divided according to the equipment (cameras, diffractometers, monochromators) and its applications. The applications are subdivided into sections for high/low temperature and pressure, effects due to the equipment, small angle scattering and a part for stress, texture and phase analyses of metals and quantitative analysis of minerals

  6. Beamline electrostatic levitator for in situ high energy x-ray diffraction studies of levitated solids and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangopadhyay, A.K.; Lee, G.W.; Kelto, K.F.; Rogers, J.R.; Goldman, A.I.; Robinson, D.S.; Rathz, T.J.; Hyers, R.W. (WU); (UAB); (NASA); (UMASS, Amherst)

    2010-07-19

    Determinations of the phase formation sequence, crystal structures and the thermo-physical properties of materials at high temperatures are hampered by contamination from the sample container and environment. Containerless processing techniques, such as electrostatic (ESL), electromagnetic, aerodynamic, and acoustic levitation, are most suitable for these studies. An adaptation of ESL for in situ structural studies of a wide range of materials using high energy (30-130 keV) x rays at a synchrotron source is described here. This beamline ESL (BESL) allows the in situ determination of the atomic structures of equilibrium solid and liquid phases, undercooled liquids and time-resolved studies of solid-solid and liquid-solid phase transformations. The use of area detectors enables the rapid acquisition of complete diffraction patterns over a wide range (0.5-14 {angstrom}{sup -1}) of reciprocal space. The wide temperature range (300-2500 K), containerless processing environment under high vacuum (10{sup -7}-10{sup -8} Torr), and fast data acquisition capability, make BESL particularly well suited for phase stability studies of high temperature solids and liquids. An additional, but important, feature of BESL is the capability for simultaneous measurements of a host of thermo-physical properties including the specific heat, enthalpy of transformation, solidus and liquidus temperatures, density, viscosity, and surface tension, all on the same sample during the structural measurements.

  7. Clinopyroxenes still trapped in diamonds: high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction as a chemical probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Nicola; Nestola, Fabrizio; Alvaro, Matteo; Wilhelm, Heribert; Kleppe, Annette; Nimis, Paolo; Harris, Jeffrey W.

    2014-05-01

    Clinopyroxenes are mainly Ca-Na-Fe-Mg-silicates constituting a significant portion of the Earth's upper mantle up to 20% of such shell of our planet. They could be found as typical mineral inclusions in diamonds being diopsidic and omphacitic in composition and, together with garnets, cover a key role in providing indications concerning the source rock in which the diamond crystallize. In detail, it is well known that eclogitic diamonds are characterized by clinopyroxenes with omphacitic compositions (about Ca0.5Na0.5Mg0.5Al0.5Si2O6) whereas peridotitic diamonds show clinopyroxenes very rich in the diopside end-member (CaMgSi2O6). In order to get direct chemical composition on the inclusions, and therefore on the diamond origin source, it is obviously necessary to extract them breaking and/or polishing the diamond host. However, a non-destructive investigation of an inclusion still trapped in a diamond is useful and important for different reasons: (1) the inclusions could be under pressure and their crystal structure can be modified if the pressure is released by the extraction; (2) the residual pressure on the inclusion can provide information about the formation pressure of the diamond (e.g. Nestola et al. 2011 and references therein); (3) the morphology and growth relationships of the inclusion with the host diamond can provide indications about its protogenetic vs. syngenetic and/or epigenetic nature; and (4) preservation of the diamond surface growth features can maintain crucial information on late oxidation processes (Fedortchouk et al. 2011). However the available methods to measure the composition of the inclusions implies to destroy the sample. The aim of this work is to obtain chemical information on the inclusions still trapped in their diamond host and therefore to indicate the diamond origin without extracting the inclusions. The work was carried out by single crystal X-ray diffraction using a new experimental approach by high energy synchrotron

  8. In situ electrochemical high-energy X-ray diffraction using a capillary working electrode cell geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Matthias J.; Bedford, Nicholas M.; Jiang, Naisheng; Lin, Deqing; Dai, Liming

    2017-05-26

    The ability to generate new electrochemically active materials for energy generation and storage with improved properties will likely be derived from an understanding of atomic-scale structure/function relationships during electrochemical events. Here, the design and implementation of a new capillary electrochemical cell designed specifically forin situhigh-energy X-ray diffraction measurements is described. By increasing the amount of electrochemically active material in the X-ray path while implementing low-Zcell materials with anisotropic scattering profiles, an order of magnitude enhancement in diffracted X-ray signal over traditional cell geometries for multiple electrochemically active materials is demonstrated. This signal improvement is crucial for high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements and subsequent Fourier transformation into atomic pair distribution functions for atomic-scale structural analysis. As an example, clear structural changes in LiCoO2under reductive and oxidative conditions using the capillary cell are demonstrated, which agree with prior studies. Accurate modeling of the LiCoO2diffraction data using reverse Monte Carlo simulations further verifies accurate background subtraction and strong signal from the electrochemically active material, enabled by the capillary working electrode geometry.

  9. The structure of molten CuCl: Reverse Monte Carlo modeling with high-energy X-ray diffraction data and molecular dynamics of a polarizable ion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, Olga; Trullàs, Joaquim; Tahara, Shuta; Kawakita, Yukinobu; Takeda, Shin’ichi

    2016-01-01

    The results of the structural properties of molten copper chloride are reported from high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements, reverse Monte Carlo modeling method, and molecular dynamics simulations using a polarizable ion model. The simulated X-ray structure factor reproduces all trends observed experimentally, in particular the shoulder at around 1 Å −1 related to intermediate range ordering, as well as the partial copper-copper correlations from the reverse Monte Carlo modeling, which cannot be reproduced by using a simple rigid ion model. It is shown that the shoulder comes from intermediate range copper-copper correlations caused by the polarized chlorides.

  10. The structure of molten CuCl: Reverse Monte Carlo modeling with high-energy X-ray diffraction data and molecular dynamics of a polarizable ion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, Olga; Trullàs, Joaquim, E-mail: quim.trullas@upc.edu [Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Campus Nord UPC B4-B5, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Tahara, Shuta [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Kawakita, Yukinobu [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Takeda, Shin’ichi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2016-09-07

    The results of the structural properties of molten copper chloride are reported from high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements, reverse Monte Carlo modeling method, and molecular dynamics simulations using a polarizable ion model. The simulated X-ray structure factor reproduces all trends observed experimentally, in particular the shoulder at around 1 Å{sup −1} related to intermediate range ordering, as well as the partial copper-copper correlations from the reverse Monte Carlo modeling, which cannot be reproduced by using a simple rigid ion model. It is shown that the shoulder comes from intermediate range copper-copper correlations caused by the polarized chlorides.

  11. Structure evolutions in a Ti–6Al–4V matrix composite reinforced with TiB, characterised using high energy X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ropars, Ludovic; Dehmas, Moukrane; Gourdet, Sophie; Delfosse, Jérôme; Tricker, David; Aeby-Gautier, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • In-situ high energy X-ray diffraction used during different thermal treatments. • Kinetics of phase evolutions characterised for the matrix and for the borides. • Conversion from TiB 2 to TiB-B27 via a metastable structure TiB-B f . • Strong effect of the process on the matrix phases evolutions and microstructure. - Abstract: A titanium matrix composite reinforced with TiB was produced using powder metallurgy. A Ti–6Al–4V alloy was chosen to be the matrix, and 12 wt.% of TiB 2 was used as the boron source for the solid state formation of TiB. The TiB 2 to TiB conversion reaction was studied using an in situ high energy X-ray diffraction technique while heat treating the composite. The TiB 2 (space group: P6/mmm) converts into TiB-B27 (Pnma), via TiB-B f (Cmcm). The metastable character of B f is confirmed here; it is the first phase formed during the conversion and it progressively converts into B27 during elevated temperature heat treatment. A modification of the phase transformation kinetics in the matrix and of the composite β transus temperature (T β = 1275 °C) was also observed, mainly due to gas contamination and intensive work hardening as a result of the mechanical alloying process used to manufacture the material and to a modification of the matrix equilibria

  12. High energy X-ray diffraction analysis of strain and residual stress in silicon nitride ceramic diffusion bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila, M.; Prieto, C.; Miranzo, P.; Osendi, M.I.; Terry, A.E.; Vaughan, G.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    High resolution X-ray scanning diffractometry is used to study the residual stress in binary metal/ceramic (Ni/Si 3 N 4 ) diffusion bonds fabricated by simultaneous high temperature heating and uniaxial pressing. In order to diminish the experimental error on the stress determination, the method consists of three steps: (i) to measure the axial and radial strains following some selected lines at the inner volume of the ceramic; (ii) to fit the strain data using finite element method (FEM) analysis and (iii) to determinate stresses by using the results obtained from the FEM method in the strain calculation

  13. Structural investigations of interfaces in Fe{sub 90}Sc{sub 10} nanoglasses using high-energy x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafari, M.; Gleiter, H.; Feng, T. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nanotechnology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Kohara, S. [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hahn, H.; Witte, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nanotechnology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); KIT-TUD Joint Research Laboratory Nanomaterials, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 32, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Kamali, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, One Shields Ave., Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2012-03-26

    High-resolution diffraction experiments of Fe{sub 90}Sc{sub 10} nanoglasses and rapidly quenched metallic glasses as reference materials have been performed using high-energy x-rays with a wavelength of 0.21 Angst from a synchrotron radiation source. Nanoglasses are amorphous alloys with a significant fraction of interfaces on the nanometer scale. The short- and intermediate-range orders of a nanoglass are different from the well known amorphous materials produced by rapid quenching from the melt. These structural modifications have significant influence on the physical properties. In this paper, the short- and intermediate-range orders of the nanoglass Fe{sub 90}Sc{sub 10} and the reference metallic glass Fe{sub 90}Sc{sub 10} alloy prepared by rapid quenching are discussed.

  14. Intergranular stress study of TC11 titanium alloy after laser shock peening by synchrotron-based high-energy X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, R.; Li, L.; Wang, Y. D.; Nie, Z. H.; Ren, Y.; Zhou, X.; Wang, J.

    2018-05-01

    The distribution of residual lattice strain as a function of depth were carefully investigated by synchrotron-based high energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) in TC11 titanium alloy after laser shock peening (LSP). The results presented big compressive residual lattice strains at surface and subsurface, then tensile residual lattice strains in deeper region, and finally close to zero lattice strains in further deep interior with no plastic deformation thereafter. These evolutions in residual lattice strains were attributed to the balance of direct load effect from laser shock wave and the derivative restriction force effect from surrounding material. Significant intergranular stress was evidenced in the processed sample. The intergranular stress exhibited the largest value at surface, and rapidly decreased with depth increase. The magnitude of intergranular stress was proportional to the severity of the plastic deformation caused by LSP. Two shocks generated larger intergranular stress than one shock.

  15. Structure evolutions in a Ti–6Al–4V matrix composite reinforced with TiB, characterised using high energy X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropars, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.ropars@airbus.com [Airbus Group SAS, Airbus Group Innovations, 12 rue Pasteur, BP-76, 92152 Suresnes Cedex (France); Institut Jean Lamour (IJL), SI2M Dpt., CNRS UMR 7198, Université de Lorraine, Parc de Saurupt, CS 50840, F-54011 Nancy Cedex (France); Dehmas, Moukrane, E-mail: ismoukrane.dehmas@univlorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour (IJL), SI2M Dpt., CNRS UMR 7198, Université de Lorraine, Parc de Saurupt, CS 50840, F-54011 Nancy Cedex (France); Laboratory of Excellence for Design of Alloy Metals for Low-mass Structures (‘DAMAS’ Labex), Université de Lorraine (France); Gourdet, Sophie; Delfosse, Jérôme [Airbus Group SAS, Airbus Group Innovations, 12 rue Pasteur, BP-76, 92152 Suresnes Cedex (France); Tricker, David [Materion AMC, RAE Road, Farnborough, Hampshire GU14 6XE (United Kingdom); Aeby-Gautier, Elisabeth [Institut Jean Lamour (IJL), SI2M Dpt., CNRS UMR 7198, Université de Lorraine, Parc de Saurupt, CS 50840, F-54011 Nancy Cedex (France); Laboratory of Excellence for Design of Alloy Metals for Low-mass Structures (‘DAMAS’ Labex), Université de Lorraine (France)

    2015-03-05

    Highlights: • In-situ high energy X-ray diffraction used during different thermal treatments. • Kinetics of phase evolutions characterised for the matrix and for the borides. • Conversion from TiB{sub 2} to TiB-B27 via a metastable structure TiB-B{sub f}. • Strong effect of the process on the matrix phases evolutions and microstructure. - Abstract: A titanium matrix composite reinforced with TiB was produced using powder metallurgy. A Ti–6Al–4V alloy was chosen to be the matrix, and 12 wt.% of TiB{sub 2} was used as the boron source for the solid state formation of TiB. The TiB{sub 2} to TiB conversion reaction was studied using an in situ high energy X-ray diffraction technique while heat treating the composite. The TiB{sub 2} (space group: P6/mmm) converts into TiB-B27 (Pnma), via TiB-B{sub f} (Cmcm). The metastable character of B{sub f} is confirmed here; it is the first phase formed during the conversion and it progressively converts into B27 during elevated temperature heat treatment. A modification of the phase transformation kinetics in the matrix and of the composite β transus temperature (T{sub β} = 1275 °C) was also observed, mainly due to gas contamination and intensive work hardening as a result of the mechanical alloying process used to manufacture the material and to a modification of the matrix equilibria.

  16. Submicron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDowell, Alastair; Celestre, Richard; Tamura, Nobumichi; Spolenak, Ralph; Valek, Bryan; Brown, Walter; Bravman, John; Padmore, Howard; Batterman, Boris; Patel, Jamshed

    2000-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley the authors have instrumented a beam line that is devoted exclusively to x-ray micro diffraction problems. By micro diffraction they mean those classes of problems in Physics and Materials Science that require x-ray beam sizes in the sub-micron range. The instrument is for instance, capable of probing a sub-micron size volume inside micron sized aluminum metal grains buried under a silicon dioxide insulating layer. The resulting Laue pattern is collected on a large area CCD detector and automatically indexed to yield the grain orientation and deviatoric (distortional) strain tensor of this sub-micron volume. A four-crystal monochromator is then inserted into the beam, which allows monochromatic light to illuminate the same part of the sample. Measurement of diffracted photon energy allows for the determination of d spacings. The combination of white and monochromatic beam measurements allow for the determination of the total strain/stress tensor (6 components) inside each sub-micron sized illuminated volume of the sample

  17. High energy X-ray diffraction study of a dental ceramics–titanium functional gradient material prepared by field assisted sintering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, K.; Bodnar, W.; Schell, N.; Lang, H.; Burkel, E.

    2014-01-01

    A functional gradient material with eleven layers composed of a dental ceramics and titanium was successfully consolidated using field assisted sintering technique in a two-step sintering process. High energy X-ray diffraction studies on the gradient were performed at High Energy Material Science beamline at Desy in Hamburg. Phase composition, crystal unit edges and lattice mismatch along the gradient were determined applying Rietveld refinement procedure. Phase analysis revealed that the main crystalline phase present in the gradient is α-Ti. Crystallinity increases stepwisely along the gradient with a decreasing increment between every next layer, following rather the weight fraction of titanium. The crystal unit edge a of titanium remains approximately constant with a value of 2.9686(1) Å, while c is reduced with increasing amount of titanium. In the layer with pure titanium the crystal unit edge c is constant with a value of 4.7174(2) Å. The lattice mismatch leading to an internal stress was calculated over the whole gradient. It was found that the maximal internal stress in titanium embedded in the studied gradient is significantly smaller than its yield strength, which implies that the structure of titanium along the whole gradient is mechanically stable. - Highlights: • High energy XRD studies of dental ceramics–Ti gradient material consolidated by FAST. • Phase composition, crystallinity and lattice parameters are determined. • Crystallinity increases stepwisely along the gradient following weight fraction of Ti. • Lattice mismatch leading to internal stress is calculated over the whole gradient. • Internal stress in α-Ti embedded in the gradient is smaller than its yield strength

  18. Effect of bainitic transformation temperature on the mechanical behavior of cold-rolled TRIP steels studied with in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Yang, W.Y., E-mail: wyyang@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, L.F.; Sun, Z.Q. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-05-01

    The effect of bainitic transformation temperature (400 and 450 °C) after intercritical annealing on the mechanical behavior of a low alloyed C–Mn–Al–Si cold-rolled TRIP steel was investigated using the in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction technique. It was found that the mechanical behaviors of TRIP steels were dominated by the micromechanical behaviors of constituent phases, such as yield strength of each phase and stress partitioning among different phases, as well as the transformation kinetics of retained austenite during plastic deformation. The microstructures obtained at different bainitic transformation temperatures were similar, but exhibited obviously different mechanical behaviors. The retained austenite in the sample treated at 450 °C with lower carbon content and yield strength was less stable and transformed into martensite at a relatively faster speed during deformation leading to a higher ultimate tensile strength but a smaller uniform elongation. In addition, stress partitioning among constituent phases was also obtained for the investigated steels in such a way that the ferrite matrix undertook smaller stresses and the bainitic ferrite, martensite and retained austenite bore larger ones during plastic deformation. The retained austenite in the sample treated at 400 °C with higher carbon content displayed significantly higher strength and relatively stronger work-hardening capabilities during deformation in comparison to those of the sample treated at 450 °C.

  19. Synchrotron high energy X-ray diffraction study of microstructure evolution of severely cold drawn NiTi wire during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Cun; Aoun, Bachir; Cui, Lishan; Liu, Yinong; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Xiaohua; Cai, Song; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Zunping; Brown, Dennis E.; Ren, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Microstructure evolution of a cold-drawn NiTi shape memory alloy wire was investigated by means of in-situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction during continuous heating. The cold-drawn wire contained amorphous regions and nano-crystalline domains in its microstructure. Pair distribution function analysis revealed that the amorphous regions underwent structural relaxation via atomic rearrangement when heated above 100 °C. The nano-crystalline domains were found to exhibit a strong cold work induced lattice strain anisotropy along 〈111〉, which coincides with the crystallographic fiber orientation of the domains along the wire axial direction. The lattice strain anisotropy systematically decreased upon heating above 200 °C, implying a structural recovery. Crystallization of the amorphous phase led to a broadening of the angular distribution of 〈111〉 preferential orientations of grains along the axial direction as relative to the original 〈111〉 axial fiber texture of the nanocrystalline domains produced by the severe cold wire drawing deformation.

  20. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, G.K.; Skinner, G.K

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution several orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro arc seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the supermassive black holes in the center of active galaxies What then is precluding their immediate adoption Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed atmospheric absorption

  1. Applications of a pnCCD detector coupled to columnar structure CsI(Tl) scintillator system in ultra high energy X-ray Laue diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokr, M.; Schlosser, D.; Abboud, A.; Algashi, A.; Tosson, A.; Conka, T.; Hartmann, R.; Klaus, M.; Genzel, C.; Strüder, L.; Pietsch, U.

    2017-12-01

    Most charge coupled devices (CCDs) are made of silicon (Si) with typical active layer thicknesses of several microns. In case of a pnCCD detector the sensitive Si thickness is 450 μm. However, for silicon based detectors the quantum efficiency for hard X-rays drops significantly for photon energies above 10 keV . This drawback can be overcome by combining a pixelated silicon-based detector system with a columnar scintillator. Here we report on the characterization of a low noise, fully depleted 128×128 pixels pnCCD detector with 75×75 μm2 pixel size coupled to a 700 μm thick columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator in the photon range between 1 keV to 130 keV . The excellent performance of the detection system in the hard X-ray range is demonstrated in a Laue type X-ray diffraction experiment performed at EDDI beamline of the BESSY II synchrotron taken at a set of several GaAs single crystals irradiated by white synchrotron radiation. With the columnar structure of the scintillator, the position resolution of the whole system reaches a value of less than one pixel. Using the presented detector system and considering the functional relation between indirect and direct photon events Laue diffraction peaks with X-ray energies up to 120 keV were efficiently detected. As one of possible applications of the combined CsI-pnCCD system we demonstrate that the accuracy of X-ray structure factors extracted from Laue diffraction peaks can be significantly improved in hard X-ray range using the combined CsI(Tl)-pnCCD system compared to a bare pnCCD.

  2. Structural refinement and extraction of hydrogen atomic positions in polyoxymethylene crystal based on the first successful measurements of 2-dimensional high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction and wide-angle neutron diffraction patterns of hydrogenated and deuterated species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Kohji; Hanesaka, Makoto; Ohhara, Takashi; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tamada, Taro; Kuroki, Ryota; Fujiwara, Satoru; Ozeki, Tomoji; Kitano, Toshiaki; Nishu, Takashi; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2007-01-01

    2-Dimensional X-ray and neutron diffraction patterns have been successfully measured for deuterated and hydrogenated polyoxymethylene (POM) samples obtained by γ-ray induced solid-state polymerization reaction. More than 700 reflections were collected from the X-ray diffraction data at -150degC by utilizing a high-energy synchrotron X-ray beam at SPring-8, Japan, from which the crystal structure of POM has been refined thoroughly including the extraction of hydrogen atomic positions at clearly seen in the difference Fourier synthesis map. As the first trial the nonuniform (9/5) helical model was analyzed with the reliability factor (R factor) 6.9%. The structural analysis was made also using the X-ray reflections of about 400 observed at room temperature (R 8.8%), and the thermal parameters of constituent atoms were compared between the low and high temperatures to discuss the librational thermal motion of the chains. The 2-dimensional neutron diffraction data, collected for the deuterated and hydrogenated POM samples using an imaging plate system specifically built-up for neutron scattering experiment, have allowed us to pick up the D and H atomic positions clearly in the Fourier synthesis maps. Another possible model, (29/16) helix, which was proposed by several researches, has been also investigated on the basis of the X-ray diffraction data at -150degC. The direct method succeeded in extracting this (29/16) model straightforwardly. The R factor was 8.6%, essentially the same as that of (9/5) helical model. This means that the comparison of the diffraction intensity between the data collected from the full-rotation X-ray diffraction pattern and the intensity calculated for both the (9/5) and (29/16) models cannot be used for the unique determination of the superiority of the model, (9/5) or (29/16) helix. However, we have found the existence of 001 and 002 reflections which give the longer repeating period 55.7 A. Besides there observed a series of meridional

  3. X-ray topography and multiple diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.-L.

    1983-01-01

    A short summary on X-ray topography, which is based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, is made. The applications and properties related to the use of the multiple diffraction technique are analized and discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  4. X-ray diffraction 2 - diffraction principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The computation of powder diffraction intensities is based on the principle that the powder pattern comprises the summation of the intensity contributions from each of the crystallites (or single crystals) in the material. Therefore, it is of value for powder diffractionists to appreciate the form of the expression for calculating single crystal diffraction pattern intensities. This knowledge is especially important for Rietveld analysis practitioners in terms of the (i) mathematics of the method and (ii) retrieving single crystal structure data from the literature. We consider the integrated intensity from a small single crystal being rotated at velocity ω through the Bragg angle θ for reflection (hkl).... I(hkl) = [l o /ω]. [e 4 /m 2 c 4 ]. [λ 3 δV F(hkl) 2 /υ 2 ].[(1+cos 2 2θ)/2sin2θ] where e, m and c are the usual fundamental constants; λ is the x-ray wavelength, δV is the crystallite volume; F(hkl) is the structure factor; υ is the unit cell volume; and (1+cos 2 θ)/2sin2θ] is the Lorentz-polarisation factor for an unpolarised incident beam. The expression does not include a contribution for extinction. The influence of factors λ, δV, F(hkl) and υ on the intensities should be appreciated by powder diffractionists, especially the structure factor, F(hkl), which is responsible for the fingerprint nature of diffraction patterns, such as the rise and fall of intensity from peak to peak. The structure factor expression represents the summation of the scattered waves from each of the j scattering centres (i e atoms) in the unit cell: F(hkl) Σ f j exp[2πi (h.x j +k.y i +l. z i )] T j . Symbol f is the scattering factor (representing the atom-type scattering efficiency); (x, y, z) are the fractional position coordinates of atom j within the unit cell; and T is the thermal vibration factor for the atom given by: T j = 8π 2 2 > sin 2 θ/λ 2 with 2 > being the mean-square vibration amplitude of the atom (assumed to be isotropic). The

  5. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  6. High energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojciech, Blachucki [Univ. of Fribourg (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics

    2015-10-16

    This work treats of the high energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy (HEROS) method of determining the density of unoccupied electronic states in the vicinity of the absorption edge. HEROS is an alternative to the existing X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) methods and opens the way for new studies not achievable before.

  7. Diffraction enhanced x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Johnston, R.E.; Sayers, D.

    1997-09-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using synchrotron x-rays which produces images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. They show dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging applied to the same phantoms. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. The diffraction component and the apparent absorption component (absorption plus extinction contrast) can each be determined independently. This imaging method may improve the image quality for medical applications such as mammography

  8. X-ray filter for x-ray powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, John Jay; Conley, Raymond P.; Bouet, Nathalie C. D.; Dooryhee, Eric; Ghose, Sanjit

    2018-01-23

    Technologies are described for apparatus, methods and systems effective for filtering. The filters may comprise a first plate. The first plate may include an x-ray absorbing material and walls defining first slits. The first slits may include arc shaped openings through the first plate. The walls of the first plate may be configured to absorb at least some of first x-rays when the first x-rays are incident on the x-ray absorbing material, and to output second x-rays. The filters may comprise a second plate spaced from the first plate. The second plate may include the x-ray absorbing material and walls defining second slits. The second slits may include arc shaped openings through the second plate. The walls of the second plate may be configured to absorb at least some of second x-rays and to output third x-rays.

  9. Molecular beam epitaxial growth mechanism of ZnSe epilayers on (100) GaAs as determined by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppert, P.; Hommel, D.; Behr, T.; Heinke, H.; Waag, A.; Landwehr, G. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany))

    1994-04-14

    The properties of molecular beam epitaxial growth of ZnSe epilayers deposited directly on a GaAs substrate are compared to those grown on a GaAs buffer layer. The superior quality of the latter is confirmed by RHEED, TEM and X-ray diffraction. Based on RHEED oscillation studies, a model explaining the dependence of the ZnSe growth rate on Zn and Se fluxes and the substrate temperature is developed taking into account physisorbed and chemisorbed states. For partially relaxed epilayers, the correlation between the relaxation state and the crystalline mosaicity, as found by high resolution X-ray diffraction, is discussed

  10. Radiation processing with high-energy X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.; Stichelbaut, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    The physical, chemical or biological characteristics of selected commercial products and materials can be improved by radiation processing. The ionizing energy can be provided by accelerated electrons with energies between 75 keV and 10 MeV, gamma rays from cobalt-60 with average energies of 1.25 MeV or X-rays with maximum energies up to 7.5 MeV. Electron beams are preferred for thin products, which are processed at high speeds. Gamma rays are used for products that are too thick for treatment with electron beams. High-energy X-rays can also be used for these purposes because their penetration in solid materials is similar to or even slightly greater than that of gamma rays. Previously, the use of X-rays had been inhibited by their slower processing rates and higher costs when compared with gamma rays. Since then, the price of cobalt-60 sources has been increased and the radiation intensity from high-energy, high-power X-ray generators has also increased. For facilities requiring at least 2 MCi of cobalt-60, the capital and operating costs of X-ray facilities with equivalent processing rates can be less than that of gamma-ray irradiators. Several high-energy electron beam facilities have been equipped with removable X-ray targets so that irradiation processes can be done with either type of ionizing energy. A new facility is now being built which will be used exclusively in the X-ray mode to sterilize medical products. Operation of this facility will show that high-energy, high-power X-ray generators are practical alternatives to large gamma-ray sources. (author)

  11. Treatment of foods with high-energy X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, M.R.; Meissner, J.; Herer, A.S.; Beers, E.W.

    2001-01-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing energy in the form of gamma rays, accelerated electrons, and X rays can produce beneficial effects, such as inhibiting the sprouting in potatoes, onions, and garlic, controlling insects in fruits, vegetables, and grains, inhibiting the growth of fungi, pasteurizing fresh meat, poultry, and seafood, and sterilizing spices and food additives. After many years of research, these processes have been approved by regulatory authorities in many countries and commercial applications have been increasing. High-energy X rays are especially useful for treating large packages of food. The most attractive features are product penetration, absorbed dose uniformity, high utilization efficiency and short processing time. The ability to energize the X-ray source only when needed enhances the safety and convenience of this technique. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron accelerators, which can be used as X-ray generators, makes it feasible to process large quantities of food economically. Several industrial accelerator facilities already have X-ray conversion equipment and several more will soon be built with product conveying systems designed to take advantage of the unique characteristics of high-energy X rays. These concepts will be reviewed briefly in this paper

  12. Treatment of foods with high-energy X rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, M. R.; Meissner, J.; Herer, A. S.; Beers, E. W.

    2001-07-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing energy in the form of gamma rays, accelerated electrons, and X rays can produce beneficial effects, such as inhibiting the sprouting in potatoes, onions, and garlic, controlling insects in fruits, vegetables, and grains, inhibiting the growth of fungi, pasteurizing fresh meat, poultry, and seafood, and sterilizing spices and food additives. After many years of research, these processes have been approved by regulatory authorities in many countries and commercial applications have been increasing. High-energy X rays are especially useful for treating large packages of food. The most attractive features are product penetration, absorbed dose uniformity, high utilization efficiency and short processing time. The ability to energize the X-ray source only when needed enhances the safety and convenience of this technique. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron accelerators, which can be used as X-ray generators, makes it feasible to process large quantities of food economically. Several industrial accelerator facilities already have X-ray conversion equipment and several more will soon be built with product conveying systems designed to take advantage of the unique characteristics of high-energy X rays. These concepts will be reviewed briefly in this paper.

  13. X-ray absorption intensity at high-energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Takashi; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically discuss X-ray absorption intensity in high-energy region far from the deepest core threshold to explain the morphology-dependent mass attenuation coefficient of some carbon systems, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and fullerenes (C 60 ). The present theoretical approach is based on the many-body X-ray absorption theory including the intrinsic losses (shake-up losses). In the high-energy region the absorption coefficient has correction term dependent on the solid state effects given in terms of the polarization part of the screened Coulomb interaction W p . We also discuss the tail of the valence band X-ray absorption intensity. In the carbon systems C 2s contribution has some influence on the attenuation coefficient even in the high energy region at 20 keV.

  14. Diagnostic Spectrometers for High Energy Density X-Ray Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A.; Seely, J. F.; Holland, G. E.

    2007-01-01

    A new generation of advanced laser, accelerator, and plasma confinement devices are emerging that are producing extreme states of light and matter that are unprecedented for laboratory study. Examples of such sources that will produce laboratory x-ray emissions with unprecedented characteristics include megajoule-class and ultrafast, ultraintense petawatt laser-produced plasmas; tabletop high-harmonic-generation x-ray sources; high-brightness zeta-pinch and magnetically confined plasma sources; and coherent x-ray free electron lasers and compact inverse-Compton x-ray sources. Characterizing the spectra, time structure, and intensity of x rays emitted by these and other novel sources is critical to assessing system performance and progress as well as pursuing the new and unpredictable physical interactions of interest to basic and applied high-energy-density (HED) science. As these technologies mature, increased emphasis will need to be placed on advanced diagnostic instrumentation and metrology, standard reference data, absolute calibrations and traceability of results.We are actively designing, fabricating, and fielding wavelength-calibrated x-ray spectrometers that have been employed to register spectra from a variety of exotic x-ray sources (electron beam ion trap, electron cyclotron resonance ion source, terawatt pulsed-power-driven accelerator, laser-produced plasmas). These instruments employ a variety of curved-crystal optics, detector technologies, and data acquisition strategies. In anticipation of the trends mentioned above, this paper will focus primarily on optical designs that can accommodate the high background signals produced in HED experiments while also registering their high-energy spectral emissions. In particular, we review the results of recent laboratory testing that explores off-Rowland circle imaging in an effort to reclaim the instrumental resolving power that is increasingly elusive at higher energies when using wavelength

  15. X-ray diffraction device comprising cooling medium connections provided on the x-ray tube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction device comprises a water-cooled X-ray tube which exhibits a line focus as well as, after rotation through 90 DEG , a point focus. Contrary to customary X-ray tubes, the cooling water is not supplied via the housing (12) in which the X-ray tube is mounted, but the cooling water

  16. A summary of the low angle x-ray atomic scattering factors which have been measured by the critical voltage effect in High Energy Electron Diffraction (HEED)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, A.G.; Fisher, R.M.

    1987-08-01

    A tabulated summary of all the accurate (/approximately/0.1%) low-angle x-ray atomic scattering (form) factors which have been determined by the systematic critical voltage technique in HEED is presented. For low atomic number elements (Z/approx lt/40) the low angle form factors can be significantly different to best free atom values, and so the best band structure calculated and/or x-ray measured form factors consistent with the critical voltage measurements are also indicated. At intermediate atomic numbers Z≅40→50 only the very low-angle form factors appear to be different to the best free atom values, and even then only by a small amount. For heavy elements (Z/approx lt/70) the best free atom form factors appear to agree very closely with the critical voltage measured values and so, in this case, critical voltage measurements give very accurate measurements of Debye-Waller factors. 48 refs

  17. Polarisation resonance in X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.; Paterson, D.; Matheson, S.

    1994-01-01

    The study of crystal structures by means of dynamic X-ray diffraction has placed a challenge to theoreticians to revise the X-ray diffraction theory based on Maxwell's equation. In this paper the feasibility of using 'polarisation resonance' as a tool in the determination of absolute configuration for asymmetric structures is investigated. Two (left- and right-handed), σ + and σ- , circular polarization states for 3-beam conditions are considered. Moreover, extending interaction into the 3 rd. dimension (normal to the beam) opens the possibility of absolute configuration determination of asymmetric structures in 3 dimensions. The computational scheme used is shown in terms of scattering diagrams. 7 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  18. Basic of X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacovazzo, C [Bari Univ. (Italy). Dip. Geomineralogico

    1996-09-01

    The basic concepts of X-ray diffraction may be more easily understood if it is made preliminary use of a mathematical background. In these pages the authors will first define the delta function and its use for the representation of a lattice. Then the concepts of Fourier transform and convolution are given. At the end of this talk one should realize that a crystal is the convolution of the lattice with a function representing the content of the unit cell.

  19. Basic of X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacovazzo, C.

    1996-01-01

    The basic concepts of X-ray diffraction may be more easily understood if it is made preliminary use of a mathematical background. In these pages the authors will first define the delta function and its use for the representation of a lattice. Then the concepts of Fourier transform and convolution are given. At the end of this talk one should realize that a crystal is the convolution of the lattice with a function representing the content of the unit cell

  20. Glancing angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernik, R J [Daresbury Lab., Warrington, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes in basic detail some of the techniques that can be used to study thin films and surfaces. These are all in the X-ray region and cover reflectivity, diffraction form polycrystalline films, textured films and single crystal films. Other effects such as fluorescence and diffuse scattering are mentioned but not discussed in detail. Two examples of the reflectivity from multilayers and the diffraction from iron oxide films are discussed. The advantages of the synchrotron for these studies is stressed and the experimental geometries that can be employed are described i detail. A brief bibliography is provided at the end to accompany this part of the 1996 Frascati school.

  1. X-ray diffraction and chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bats, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical bonds are investigated in sulfamic acid (H 3 N-SO 3 ), sodium sulfonlate dihydrate (H 2 NC 6 H 4 SO 3 Na.2H 2 O), 2,5-dimercaptothiadiazole (HS-C 2 N 2 S-SH), sodium cyanide dihydrate (NaCN.2H 2 O), sodium thiocyanate (NaSCN) and ammonium thiocyanate (NH 4 SCN) by X-ray diffraction, and if necessary completed with neutron diffraction. Crystal structures and electron densities are determined together with bond length and angles. Also the effects of thermal motion are discussed

  2. Glancing angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernik, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes in basic detail some of the techniques that can be used to study thin films and surfaces. These are all in the X-ray region and cover reflectivity, diffraction form polycrystalline films, textured films and single crystal films. Other effects such as fluorescence and diffuse scattering are mentioned but not discussed in detail. Two examples of the reflectivity from multilayers and the diffraction from iron oxide films are discussed. The advantages of the synchrotron for these studies is stressed and the experimental geometries that can be employed are described i detail. A brief bibliography is provided at the end to accompany this part of the 1996 Frascati school

  3. The high energy X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Nugent, J. J.

    The results of fitting an ionization-nonequilibrium (INE) model to the high-energy (above 5-keV) X-ray spectra of the young supernova remnants Cas A and Tycho are presented. As an additional constraint, the models must simultaneously fit lower-energy, higher-resolution data. For Cas A, a single INE component cannot adequately reproduce the features for the entire X-ray spectrum because the ionization structure of iron ions responsible for the K emission is inconsistent with that of the ions responsible for the lower-energy lines, and the flux of the highest-energy X-rays is underestimated. The iron K line and the high-energy continuum could arise from the same INE component, but the identification of this component with either the blast wave or the ejecta in the standard model is difficult. In Tycho, the high-energy data rule out a class of models for the lower-energy data which have too large a continuum contribution.

  4. Illicit drug detection using energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, E. J.; Griffiths, J. A.; Koutalonis, M.; Gent, C.; Pani, S.; Horrocks, J. A.; George, L.; Hardwick, S.; Speller, R.

    2009-05-01

    Illicit drugs are imported into countries in myriad ways, including via the postal system and courier services. An automated system is required to detect drugs in parcels for which X-ray diffraction is a suitable technique as it is non-destructive, material specific and uses X-rays of sufficiently high energy to penetrate parcels containing a range of attenuating materials. A database has been constructed containing the measured powder diffraction profiles of several thousand materials likely to be found in parcels. These include drugs, cutting agents, packaging and other innocuous materials. A software model has been developed using these data to predict the diffraction profiles which would be obtained by X-ray diffraction systems with a range of suggested detector (high purity germanium, CZT and scintillation), source and collimation options. The aim of the model was to identify the most promising system geometries, which was done with the aid of multivariate analysis (MVA). The most promising systems were constructed and tested. The diffraction profiles of a range of materials have been measured and used to both validate the model and to identify the presence of drugs in sample packages.

  5. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snigireva, I. [ESRF, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  6. A horizontal two-axis diffractometer for high-energy X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation on bending magnet beamline BL04B2 at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Kohara, S; Kashihara, Y; Matsumoto, N; Umesaki, N; Sakai, I

    2001-01-01

    A horizontal two-axis diffractometer for glasses and liquids, installed at SPring-8 bending magnet beamline BL04B2, operated at 8 GeV electron energy, is described. Photon energies of 37.8 and 61.7 keV were obtained using a bent Si (1 1 1) crystal and a bent Si (2 2 0) crystal, respectively. The instrument has been successfully applied to measure diffraction spectra of vitreous SiO sub 2 in transmission geometry up to scattering vector Q=36 A sup - sup 1 , and measured total structure factor S(Q) was well reproduced by reverse Monte Carlo modelling.

  7. A horizontal two-axis diffractometer for high-energy X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation on bending magnet beamline BL04B2 at SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohara, Shinji; Suzuya, Kentaro; Kashihara, Yasuharu; Matsumoto, Norimasa; Umesaki, Norimasa; Sakai, Ichiro

    2001-01-01

    A horizontal two-axis diffractometer for glasses and liquids, installed at SPring-8 bending magnet beamline BL04B2, operated at 8 GeV electron energy, is described. Photon energies of 37.8 and 61.7 keV were obtained using a bent Si (1 1 1) crystal and a bent Si (2 2 0) crystal, respectively. The instrument has been successfully applied to measure diffraction spectra of vitreous SiO 2 in transmission geometry up to scattering vector Q=36 A -1 , and measured total structure factor S(Q) was well reproduced by reverse Monte Carlo modelling

  8. X-ray diffraction imaging of material microstructures

    KAUST Repository

    Varga, Laszlo

    2016-10-20

    Various examples are provided for x-ray imaging of the microstructure of materials. In one example, a system for non-destructive material testing includes an x-ray source configured to generate a beam spot on a test item; a grid detector configured to receive x- rays diffracted from the test object; and a computing device configured to determine a microstructure image based at least in part upon a diffraction pattern of the x-rays diffracted from the test object. In another example, a method for determining a microstructure of a material includes illuminating a beam spot on the material with a beam of incident x-rays; detecting, with a grid detector, x-rays diffracted from the material; and determining, by a computing device, a microstructure image based at least in part upon a diffraction pattern of the x-rays diffracted from the material.

  9. Diffracted X-ray tracking: new system for single molecular detection with X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, Y C; Adachi, S; Suzuki, Y; Yagi, N

    2001-01-01

    We propose a new X-ray methodology for direct observations of the behaviors of single molecular units in real time and real space. This new system, which we call Diffracted X-ray Tracking (DXT), monitors the Brownian motions of a single molecular unit by observations of X-ray diffracted spots from a nanocrystal, tightly bound to the individual single molecular unit in bio-systems. DXT does not determine any translational movements, but only orientational movements.

  10. Diffracted X-ray tracking: new system for single molecular detection with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.C.; Okumura, Y.; Adachi, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Yagi, N.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a new X-ray methodology for direct observations of the behaviors of single molecular units in real time and real space. This new system, which we call Diffracted X-ray Tracking (DXT), monitors the Brownian motions of a single molecular unit by observations of X-ray diffracted spots from a nanocrystal, tightly bound to the individual single molecular unit in bio-systems. DXT does not determine any translational movements, but only orientational movements

  11. A high resolution position sensitive X-ray MWPC for small angle X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.; Stephenson, R.; Tappern, G.J.

    1981-02-01

    A small sealed-off delay line readout MWPC X-ray detector has been designed and built for small angle X-ray diffraction applications. Featuring a sensitive area of 100 mm x 25 mm it yields a spatial resolution of 0.13 mm (standard deviation) with a high rate capability and good quantum efficiency for copper K radiation. (author)

  12. 100 years of discovery of X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tao

    2012-01-01

    X-ray diffraction was discovered by Max von Laue a hundred years ago. Later, through the work of William H. Bragg and William L. Bragg, an experimental analysis method was developed to solve the structure of molecules at the atomic level. Over the past hundred years, science and technology has been dramatically changed by X-ray diffraction analysis, which has also undergone considerable development. The recent emergence of hard X-ray free electron lasers has provided a new dimension for X-ray diffraction analysis, promising even greater progress in the fields of physics, chemistry and biology. (author)

  13. 30-lens interferometer for high energy x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubomirskiy, M., E-mail: lyubomir@esrf.fr; Snigireva, I., E-mail: irina@esrf.fr; Vaughan, G. [European Synchrotron Radiation facility (ESRF), CS 40220, 71, av des Martyrs, F-38043, Grenoble (France); Kohn, V. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, S.; Yunkin, V. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, 142432, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Snigirev, A. [Baltic Federal University, 236041, Kaliningrad (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-27

    We report a hard X-ray multilens interferometer consisting of 30 parallel compound refractive lenses. Under coherent illumination each CRL creates a diffraction limited focal spot - secondary source. An overlapping of coherent beams from these sources resulting in the interference pattern which has a rich longitudinal structure in accordance with the Talbot imaging formalism. The proposed interferometer was experimentally tested at ID11 ESRF beamline for the photon energies 32 keV and 65 keV. The fundamental and fractional Talbot images were recorded with the high resolution CCD camera. An effective source size in the order of 15 µm was determined from the first Talbot image proving that the multilens interferometer can be used as a high resolution beam diagnostic tool.

  14. Industry-relevant magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc ultra-high vacuum deposition system for in situ x-ray diffraction studies of thin film growth using high energy synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, J L; Thomson, W; Howard, B; Schell, N; Näslund, L-Å; Rogström, L; Johansson-Jõesaar, M P; Ghafoor, N; Odén, M; Nothnagel, E; Shepard, A; Greer, J; Birch, J

    2015-09-01

    We present an industry-relevant, large-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc deposition system purposefully designed for time-resolved in situ thin film deposition/annealing studies using high-energy (>50 keV), high photon flux (>10(12) ph/s) synchrotron radiation. The high photon flux, combined with a fast-acquisition-time (film formation processes. The high-energy synchrotron-radiation based x-rays result in small scattering angles (industry-relevant processes. We openly encourage the materials research community to contact us for collaborative opportunities using this unique and versatile scientific instrument.

  15. Characterization of Metalloproteins and Biomaterials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl

    This thesis presents thework on combining complementary X-rays techniques for studying the structures of proteins and other biomaterials, and consists of three different projects: (i) Characterization of protein powders with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). (ii) The combination of X-ray...... crystallography and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) applied to studying different hexameric insulin conformations. (iii) The structures of polymorphs of strontium ranelate and the distribution of strontium in bone tissue. A procedure for fast identification and verification of protein powders using XRPD...... was correction for disordered bulk-solvent, but also correction for background and optimization of unit cell parameters have to be taken into account. A sample holder was designed for collecting powder diffraction data on a standard laboratory X-ray powder diffractometer. The background was reduced by use...

  16. Thin film characterisation by advanced X-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappuccio, G.; Terranova, M.L.

    1996-09-01

    The Fifth School on X-ray diffraction from polycrystalline materials was devoted to thin film characterization by advanced X-ray diffraction techniques. Twenty contributions are contained in this volume; all twenty are recorded in the INIS Database. X-ray diffraction is known to be a powerful analytical tool for characterizing materials and understanding their structural features. The aim of these articles is to illustrate the fundamental contribution of modern diffraction techniques (grazing incidence, surface analysis, standing waves, etc.) to the characterization of thin and ultra-thin films, which have become important in many advanced technologies

  17. X-ray Microprobe for Fluorescence and Diffraction Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice, G.E.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (see unit 1.1) and x-ray excited fluorescence analysis are powerful techniques for the nondestructive measurement of crystal structure and chemical composition. X-ray fluorescence analysis is inherently nondestructive with orders of magnitude lower power deposited for the same detectable limit as with fluorescence excited by charged particle probes (Sparks, 1980). X-ray diffraction analysis is sensitive to crystal structure with orders-of-magnitude greater sensitivity to crystallographic strain than electron probes (Rebonato, et al. 1989). When a small-area x-ray microbeam is used as the probe, chemical composition (Z>14), crystal structure, crystalline texture, and crystalline strain distributions can be determined. These distributions can be studied both at the surface of the sample and deep within the sample (Fig. 1). Current state-of-the-art can achieve an ∼1 mm-D x-ray microprobe and an ∼0.1 mm-D x-ray microprobe has been demonstrated (Bilderback, et al., 1994). Despite their great chemical and crystallographic sensitivities, x-ray microprobe techniques have until recently been restricted by inefficient x-ray focusing optics and weak x-ray sources; x-ray microbeam analysis was largely superseded by electron techniques in the 50's. However, interest in x-ray microprobe techniques has now been revived (Howells, et al., 1983; Ice and Sparks, 1984; Chevallier, et al., 1997; Riekel 1992; Thompson, el al., 1992; and Making and Using... 1997) by the development of efficient x-ray focusing optics and ultra-high intensity synchrotron x-ray sources (Buras and Tazzari, 1984; Shenoy, et al., 1988). These advances have increased the achievable microbeam flux by more than 11 orders of magnitude (Fig. 2) (Ice, 1997); the flux in a tunable 1 mm-D beam on a 'so called' 3rd-generation synchrotron source such as the APS can exceed the flux in a fixed-energy mm2 beam on a conventional source. These advances make x-ray microfluorescence and x-ray

  18. Historical development of synchrotron x-ray diffraction topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawado, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    After a short history of X-ray diffraction topography, from the early stage of laboratory X-ray topography to recent synchrotron-radiation applications, is described, the development of science and technology for the synchrotron X-ray topography and its industrial applications are reviewed in more detail. In addition, the recent trend to synchrotron topography research is clarified on the basis of several data obtained from 256 papers which have been published since 2000. (author)

  19. High-energy X-ray observations of extragalactic objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, W.; Reppin, C.; Truemper, J.; Voges, W.; Lewin, W.; Kendziorra, E.; Staubert, R.

    1981-01-01

    During a balloon flight from Alice Springs, Australia, six extragalactic sources which are known as potential X-ray sources have been observed in hard X-rays (E > 20 keV). We present X-ray spectra of 3C 273 and Cen-A as well as upper limits on 3C 120, MKN 509, NGC 5506, and MR 2251-178. (orig.)

  20. The quality of high-energy X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaRiviere, P.D.

    1989-01-01

    Supplement 17 of the British Journal of Radiology is a survey of central-axis depth doses for radiotherapy machines, patterned largely on BJR Supplement 11 (1972). Inspection of high-energy X-ray depth doses for a 10 x 10 cm field at an SSD of 100 cm disclosed large differences between the two sets of data, especially for qualities above 8 MV, e.g. a depth dose of 80% at 10 cm is rated at about 19 MV according to BJR Supplement 11, and 23 MV according to BJR Supplement 17. It was found that Supplement 17 depth-dose data above 8 MV were erratic, but Supplement 11 data could be represented by an analytical expression, providing a unique means of assigning MV quality. It was also found that dose-weighted average energy of the filtered beam plotted smoothly against depth dose. For dosimetric purposes, it is suggested that this parameter be used as a true measure of beam quality, removing discrepancies introduced by the use of nominal MV for this purpose. (author)

  1. Diffraction peaks in x-ray spectroscopy: Friend or foe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissot, R.G.; Goehner, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Diffraction peaks can occur as unidentifiable peaks in the energy spectrum of an x-ray spectrometric analysis. Recently, there has been increased interest in oriented polycrystalline films and epitaxial films on single crystal substrates for electronic applications. Since these materials diffract x-rays more efficiently than randomly oriented polycrystalline materials, diffraction peaks are being observed more frequently in x-ray fluorescent spectra. In addition, micro x-ray spectrometric analysis utilizes a small, intense, collimated x-ray beam that can yield well defined diffraction peaks. In some cases these diffraction peaks can occur at the same position as elemental peaks. These diffraction peaks, although a possible problem in qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis, can give very useful information about the crystallographic structure and orientation of the material being analyzed. The observed diffraction peaks are dependent on the geometry of the x-ray spectrometer, the degree of collimation and the distribution of wavelengths (energies) originating from the x-ray tube and striking the sample

  2. High energy diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.

    1995-11-01

    Recent experiments on total hadronic cross sections are reviewed together with results on photo- and electroproduction of vector mesons. New data on diffractive deep inelastic scattering shed light on the nature of the pomeron. (orig.)

  3. Diffractive sub-picosecond manipulation of x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, B.

    2004-01-01

    A class of X-ray optical elements for the sub-picosecond manipulation of X-rays is proposed. The design of these elements is based upon a time-dependent dynamical diffraction theory that synthesizes the eikonal theory with the Takagi-Taupin theory. A brief outline of the theory is given

  4. High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Hornstrup, Allan; Schnopper, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the perfection of state-of-the-art multilayers are presented. Data were obtained using a triple-axis perfect-crystal X-ray diffractometer. Measurements reveal large-scale figure errors in the substrate. A high-resolution triple-axis set up is required...

  5. High-energy X-ray production in a boundary layer of an accreting neutron star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawa, Tomoyuki

    1991-01-01

    It is shown by Monte Carlo simulation that high-energy X-rays are produced through Compton scattering in a boundary layer of an accreting neutron star. The following is the mechanism for the high-energy X-ray production. An accreting neutron star has a boundary layer rotating rapidly on the surface. X-rays radiated from the star's surface are scattered in part in the boundary layer. Since the boundary layer rotates at a semirelativistic speed, the scattered X-ray energy is changed by the Compton effect. Some X-rays are scattered repeatedly between the neutron star and the boundary layer and become high-energy X-rays. This mechanism is a photon analog of the second-order Fermi acceleration of cosmic rays. When the boundary layer is semitransparent, high-energy X-rays are produced efficiently. 17 refs

  6. Preparation of specimens for analysis by: X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banos L, L.

    2004-01-01

    Specimen preparation is one of the most important requirements in the analysis of samples by X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Fluorescence. This statement is especially true for samples containing different types of materials. There are many forms of specimen suitable for X-ray analysis and the type of the sample as received will generally determine the method of pretreatment. It is convenient to refer to the material received for analysis as the sample, and that, which is actually analyzed as the specimen. The powder Diffraction method assumes that the particles in the specimen are ideally random orientation and that there are enough crystallites in the specimen to achieve a representative intensity distribution for these crystallites. X ray Fluorescence is essentially a comparative method of analysis, it is vital that all standards and unknowns be presented to the spectrometer in a reproducible and identical manner. (Author) 3 refs., 6 figs

  7. A differential scanning calorimetric and X-ray diffraction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X-ray diffraction analysis of the two groups demonstrated predominance of austenitic ... Discrete crystallographic structure and absence of multiple phases showed ... Division of Orthodontics, Indian Army, 10 Corps Dental Unit, C/O 56 APO, ...

  8. Thin film characterisation by advanced X-ray diffraction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappuccio, G; Terranova, M L [eds.; INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1996-09-01

    This report described the papers presented at the 5. School on X-ray diffraction from polycrystalline materials held at Frascati (Rome) in 2-5 October 1996. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the papers.

  9. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of liquid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Pershan, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    A spectrometer for X-ray diffraction and refraction studies of horizontal, free surfaces of liquids is described. As an illustration smetic-A layering at the surface of a liquid crystal is presented.......A spectrometer for X-ray diffraction and refraction studies of horizontal, free surfaces of liquids is described. As an illustration smetic-A layering at the surface of a liquid crystal is presented....

  10. X-ray diffraction identification of clay minerals by microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, S.; Imasava, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    The identification of clay minerals by X-ray powder diffraction are done by searching an unknown pattern with a file of standard X-ray diffraction patterns. For this searching done by hand is necessary a long time. This paper shows a program in ''Basic'' language to be utilized in microcomputers for the math of the unknown pattern, using the high velocity of comparison of the microcomputer. A few minutes are used for the match. (author) [pt

  11. Theory of time-resolved inelastic x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a general theory of time-resolved x-ray scattering, we derive a convenient expression for the diffraction signal based on a careful analysis of the relevant inelastic scattering processes. We demonstrate that the resulting inelastic limit applies to a wider variety of experimental...... conditions than similar, previously derived formulas, and it directly allows the application of selection rules when interpreting diffraction signals. Furthermore, we present a simple extension to systems simultaneously illuminated by x rays and a laser beam....

  12. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-28

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  13. CCD-based X-ray detectors for X-ray diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, K.; Amemiya, Y.

    1999-01-01

    CCD-based X-ray detectors are getting to be used for X-ray diffraction studies especially in the studies where real time (automated) measurements and time-resolved measurements are required. Principles and designs of two typical types of CCD-based detectors are described; one is ths system in which x-ray image intensifiers are coupled to maximize the detective quantum efficiency for time-resolved measurements, and the other is the system in which tapered optical fibers are coupled for the reduction of the image into the CCD, which is optimized for automated measurements for protein crystallography. These CCD-based X-ray detectors have an image distortion and non-uniformity of response to be corrected by software. Correction schemes which we have developed are also described. (author)

  14. Information extracting and processing with diffraction enhanced imaging of X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bo; Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing; Chen Chunchong; Jiang Fan; Chen Jie; Ming Hai; Shu Hang; Zhu Peiping; Wang Junyue; Yuan Qingxi; Wu Ziyu

    2006-01-01

    X-ray imaging at high energies has been used for many years in many fields. Conventional X-ray imaging is based on the different absorption within a sample. It is difficult to distinguish different tissues of a biological sample because of their small difference in absorption. The authors use the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The authors took images of absorption, extinction, scattering and refractivity. In the end, the authors presented pictures of high resolution with all these information combined. (authors)

  15. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the crystalline quality through full-width at half-maximum values. .... angular divergence of ∆α = 12 arc sec. X-rays generated from the monochromator were diffracted from (0 0 6) LiNbO3 atomic planes with the (+, −, −, +, +) geometry. [8].

  16. The SWARF high energy flash X-ray facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, J.F.; Dove, E.W.D.

    1976-06-01

    A description is presented of the SWARF flash radiography facility at AWRE Foulness, which is stated to be the most powerful flash x-ray system available, in the U.K. The machine consists essentially of a Marx generator, a coaxial Blumlein system and an x-ray tube. The voltage output from the Marx generator (about 2.5 MV from an 80 kV input) is applied to a large re-entrant Blumlein pulse-forming line. Near maximum voltage, an adjustable oil switch short-circuits one end of the Blumlein generator and so applies a square voltage pulse of 65 ns duration to the x-ray tube. The x-rays are produced from a tantalum target which forms the anode of a vacuum field emission diode. The facility consists of two field machines positioned so that radiographs can be obtained from different angles. The description is given under the following heads: modus operandi; constructional details; oil installation; electrical details; commissioning, calibration and electrical data; flash radiography in explosives research; operational control of facility, film packs; radiographic results; further developments; overall performance. (U.K.)

  17. High energy X ray tomography. Development of an industrial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, J.; Thomas, G.

    1985-01-01

    From its own experience in nondestructive testing and needs of industry, a versatile 420 kV X-ray tomodensitometer was designed by the CEA to study materials an structures. This project and results obtained with a laboratory prototype are presented [fr

  18. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons

  19. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons.

  20. Crystallized solids characterization by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broll, N.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with the crystallized solids characterization by X-ray diffraction. The powders diffraction principle is described. Then are given the different powders diffraction experimental methods. An X-ray diffraction device is essentially constituted of three parts: the X-rays source, the sample and the detector. The source is usually constituted by an X-rays tube whereas the sample can be fixed on a photographic chamber or put on a goniometer. The different photographic chambers which can be used (Debye-Scherrer, Seeman-Bohlin and Guinier) are described. The powders diffractometer the most used is a Bragg-Brentano focusing diffractometer because it allows to obtain very sharp spectral lines and an important diffracted intensity. The detectors which are the mainly used are the scintillation counters. The most important use in powders diffractometry is the identification of the different phases of a sample. The phases identification consists to compare the unknown sample spectrum at those of standard materials indexed until now. Two methods exist at present. They are explained and their limits in the phases search are given. Another use of the X-ray diffraction is the quantitative analysis. It consists to determine the concentrations of each crystal phases of a sample. The principles of these quantitative methods are given. The lattice parameters of a polycrystal material can be determined from its X-ray pattern too with a very high precision. The way to index powders patterns is given. The residual stresses of materials can also be estimated. The principle of this measured method is explained. It is at last possible to study from an X-ray pattern, the material grain orientations during the different steps of preparation and working. (O.M.). 13 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  1. X-ray diffraction topography. Stages and tendencies of development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shul'pina, I.L.

    2000-01-01

    The physical foundation of X-ray diffraction topography, its methods, the achievements in image theory, the stages of evolution were described in this review. It was found that modern topography is well along in development associated with the use of third-generation synchrotron radiation and with its adaptation to advance materials and problems of materials science. Some proposals about prospects for X-ray topography progress in the future have been made [ru

  2. X-ray diffraction microtomography using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Barroso, R C; Jesus, E F O; Oliveira, L F

    2001-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction computed tomography technique is based on the interference phenomena of the coherent scatter. For low-momentum transfer, it is most probable that the scattering interaction will be coherent. A selective discrimination of a given element in a scanned specimen can be realized by fixing the Bragg angle which produces an interference peak and then, to carry out the computed tomography in the standard mode. The image reconstructed exalts the presence of this element with respect to other ones in a sample. This work reports the feasibility of a non-destructive synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction imaging technique. This research was performed at the X-ray Diffraction beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) in Brazil. The coherent scattering properties of different tissue and bone substitute materials were evaluated. Furthermore, diffraction patterns of some polycrystalline solids were studied due to industrial and environmental human exposure to these metals. The obtai...

  3. Three-dimensional x-ray diffraction detection and visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allahkarami, Masoud; Hanan, Jay C

    2014-01-01

    A new method of sensing and analyzing three-dimensional (3D) x-ray diffraction (XRD) cones was introduced. Using a two-dimensional area detector, a sequence of frames was collected while moving the detector away from the sample with small equally spaced steps and keeping all other parameters constant. A 3D dataset was created from the subsequent frames. The 3D x-ray diffraction (XRD 3 ) pattern contains far more information than a one-dimensional profile collected with the conventional diffractometer and 2D x-ray diffraction (XRD 2 ). The present work discusses some fundamentals about XRD 3 , such as the data collection method, 3D visualization, diffraction data interpretation and potential applications of XRD 3 . (paper)

  4. High resolution X-ray diffraction studies on unirradiated

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction technique, employing a three-crystal monochromator–collimator combination is used to study the irradiation induced defects in flux grown Sr-hexaferrite crystals irradiated with 50 MeV Li3+ ion beams at room temperature with a fluence value of 1 × 1014 ions/cm2. The diffraction curves of the ...

  5. Surface and interface strains studied by x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Koichi; Emoto, Takashi; Ichimiya, Ayahiko

    1998-01-01

    The authors have developed a technique of X-ray diffraction in order to measure strain fields near semiconductor surface and interface. The diffraction geometry is using the extremely asymmetric Bragg-case bulk reflection of a small incident angle to the surface and a large angle exiting from the surface. The incident angle of the X-rays is set near critical angle of total reflection by tuning X-ray energy of synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory, Japan. For thermally grown-silicon oxide/Si(100) interface, the X-ray intensity of the silicon substrate 311 reflection has been measured. From comparison of the full width at half maxima (FWHM) of X-ray rocking curves of various thickness of silicon oxides, it has been revealed that silicon substrate lattice is highly strained in the thin (less than about 5 nm) silicon oxide/silicon system. In order to know the original silicon surface strain, the authors have also performed the same kind of measurements in the ultra-high vacuum chamber. A clean Si(111) 7x7 surface gives sharper X-ray diffraction peak than that of the native oxide/Si(111) system. From these measurements, it is concluded that the thin silicon oxide film itself gives strong strain fields to the silicon substrates, which may be the reason of the existence of the structural transition layer at the silicon oxide/Si interface

  6. High energy X-ray observation of Cyg X-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendziorra, E.; Pietsch, W.; Staubert, R.; Truemper, J.

    1975-01-01

    On Feb. 20, 1975 Cyg X-3 was observed in the energy range of 29-70 keV during a 5 hour observation of the Cyg region. An intensity variation consistent with a 4.8 h sinusoidal modulation has been found, in phase with low energy X-ray observations and with a relative amplitude of 0.37 +- 0.19. (orig.) [de

  7. Three-Dimensional X-Ray Diffraction Technique for Metals Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yubin; Fan, Guohua

    2017-01-01

    The three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) is a new, advanced technique for materials characterization. This technique utilizes high-energy synchrotron X-rays to characterize the 3D crystallographic structure and strain/stress state of bulk materials. As the measurement is non......-destructive, the microstructural evolution as a function of time can be followed, i.e. it allows 4D (x, y, z characterizations, t). The high brilliance of synchrotron X-rays ensures that diffraction signals from volumes of micrometer scale can be quickly detected and distinguished from the background noise, i.e. its spatial...... implemented in several large synchrotron facilities, e.g. the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in USA and the Spring-8 in Japan. Another family of 3DXRD technique that utilizes white beam synchrotron X-rays has also been developed in parallel in cooperation between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and APS...

  8. New tubes and techniques for flash X-ray diffraction and high contrast radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonnier, F.M.; Barbour, J.P.; Brewster, J.L.

    High energy electrons are particularly efficient in producing characteristic X-rays and soft polychromatic. A line of wide spectrum beryllium window flash X-ray tubes, ranging from 150 to 600kV, has been developed to exploit this property. Laue and Debye Scherrer flash X-ray diffraction patterns have been obtained using a single 30 ns pulse exposure. X-ray diffraction tests obtained are shown. Extremely high contrast flash radiography of small, low density objects has been obtained using industrial film without screen. Alternatively, particularly at high voltages and for subjects which include a broad range of materials and thicknesses, special film techniques can be used to produce extremely wide latitudes. Equipment, techniques and results are discussed

  9. Coherent X-ray diffraction studies of mesoscopic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabalin, Anatoly

    2015-12-01

    This thesis is devoted to three separate projects, which can be considered as independent. First, the dynamical scattering effects in the Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI) method are discussed. Based on the simulation results, a straightforward method for correction for the refraction and absorption artifacts in the Bragg CXDI reconstruction is suggested. The second part summarizes the results of an Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging experiment with a single colloidal crystal grain. A remarkable result is that positions of individual particles in the crystal lattice have been resolved in three dimensions. The third project is devoted to X-ray diffraction experimental studies of structural evolution of colloidal crystalline films upon incremental heating. Based on the results of the analysis a model of structural evolution of a colloidal crystal upon heating on nanoscopic and mesoscopic length scales is suggested.

  10. HIGH ENERGY, HIGH BRIGHTNESS X-RAYS PRODUCED BY COMPTON BACKSCATTERING AT THE LIVERMORE PLEIADES FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremaine, A M; Anderson, S G; Betts, S; Crane, J; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Jacob, J S; Frigola, P; Lim, J; Rosenzweig, J; Travish, G

    2005-01-01

    PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser Electron Interaction for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures) produces tunable 30-140 keV x-rays with 0.3-5 ps pulse lengths and up to 10 7 photons/pulse by colliding a high brightness electron beam with a high power laser. The electron beam is created by an rf photo-injector system, accelerated by a 120 MeV linac, and focused to 20 (micro)m with novel permanent magnet quadrupoles. To produce Compton back scattered x-rays, the electron bunch is overlapped with a Ti:Sapphire laser that delivers 500 mJ, 100 fs, pulses to the interaction point. K-edge radiography at 115 keV on Uranium has verified the angle correlated energy spectrum inherent in Compton scattering and high-energy tunability of the Livermore source. Current upgrades to the facility will allow laser pumping of targets synchronized to the x-ray source enabling dynamic diffraction and time-resolved studies of high Z materials. Near future plans include extending the radiation energies to >400 keV, allowing for nuclear fluorescence studies of materials

  11. X-ray powder diffraction data on miscellaneous lanthanide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, I.F.; Hughes, T.E.

    1978-08-01

    Recent work on neutron absorbing materials has produced various new X-ray diffraction powder patterns of compounds of the lanthanides. Various inconsistencies in previously published data have been noted, and accurate measurements have been made of the lattice parameters of the rare earth oxides Sm 2 0 3 , Eu 2 0 3 , Gd 2 0 3 which have the monoclinic rare earth type B- structure, as well as Eu0. These data are recorded for reference. The optimum conditions for obtaining X-ray powder diffraction data from europium compounds are also noted. (author)

  12. Penumbral measurements in water for high-energy x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, D.J.; Schroeder, N.J.; Hoya, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Ionization chambers of varying inside diameter have been used to investigate the penumbral region of 60 Co, 6-MV, and 31-MV x-ray beams. Measurements were made in water at varying depths up to 25 cm for a square field of side length 10 cm. The dependence of the penumbral widths on both the inside diameter of the ionization chamber and the depth in water is established along with the asymmetry of the penumbral distributions about the 50% level. A standard correction is indicated to eliminate the dependence of the measured penumbral widths on the inside diameter of the ionization chamber

  13. Scintillator Evaluation for High-Energy X-Ray Diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, S. S.; Baker, S. A.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents results derived from a digital radiography study performed using x-rays from a 2.3 MeV, rod-pinch diode. Detailed is a parameter study of cerium-doped lutetium ortho-silicate (LSO) scintillator thickness, as it relates to system resolution and detection quantum efficiency (DQE). Additionally, the detection statistics of LSO were compared with that of CsI(Tl). As a result of this study we found the LSO scintillator with a thickness of 3 mm to yield the highest system DQE over the range of spatial frequencies from 0.75 to 2.5 mm -1

  14. The nuclear spectroscopic telescope array (NuSTAR) high-energy X-ray mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristin K.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hongjun An

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission was launched on 2012 June 13 and is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit operating above ~10 keV. NuSTAR flies two co-aligned Wolter-I conical approximation X-ray optics, coated with Pt/C and W/Si multilayers...

  15. X-Ray Diffraction Project Final Report, Fiscal Year 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dane V. Morgan

    2006-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction diagnostic system was developed for determining real-time shock-driven lattice parameter shifts in single crystals at the gas gun at TA-IV at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The signal-to-noise ratio and resolution of the system were measured using imaging plates as the detector and by varying the slit width. This report includes tests of the x-ray diffraction system using a phosphor coupled to a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera by a coherent fiber-optic bundle. The system timing delay was measured with a newly installed transistor-transistor logic (TTL) bypass designed to reduce the x-ray delay time. The axial misalignment of the Bragg planes was determined with respect to the optical axis for a set of eight LiF [lithium fluoride] crystals provided by SNL to determine their suitability for gas gun experiments

  16. Direct methods for surface X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldin, D. K.; Harder, R.; Shneerson, V. L.; Vogler, H.; Moritz, W.

    2000-01-01

    We develop of a direct method for surface X-ray diffraction that exploits the holographic feature of a known reference wave from the substrate. A Bayesian analysis of the optimal inference to be made from an incomplete data set suggests a maximum entropy algorithm that balances agreement with the data and other statistical considerations

  17. X-Ray diffraction Investigation of Electrochemically Deposited Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Jensen, Jens Dahl; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2004-01-01

    by the determination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) pole figures and the calculation of the orientation distribution functions. XRD results are discussed in relation to the morphologies of the electrodeposits as investigated with light optical microscopy and correlated with the process parameters during electrodeposition....

  18. The three dimensional X-ray diffraction technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, Dorte; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2012-01-01

    This introductory tutorial describes the so called 3 dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) technique, which allows bulk non-destructive structural characterizations of crystalline materials. The motivations and history behind the development of this technique are described and its potentials...

  19. Fusion bonding of Si wafers investigated by x ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Grey, Francois; Rasmussen, Kurt

    2000-01-01

    The interface structure of bonded Si(001) wafers with twist angle 6.5 degrees is studied as a function of annealing temperature. An ordered structure is observed in x-ray diffraction by monitoring a satellite reflection due to the periodic modulation near the interface, which results from...

  20. Quantitative determination of phases by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, A.L.T.

    1979-01-01

    The internal standard method for the quantitative determination of phases by X-ray diffraction is presented. The method is applicable to multi-phase materials which may be treated as powder. A discussion on sample preparation and some examples follow. (Author) [pt

  1. Residual cold-work determination by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pireau, A.; Vanderborck, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The determination of the cold-work level of materials for fast breeder reactors can be made by different techniques. The report compares different methods for an application on austenitic stainless steels and demonstrates that the X-ray diffraction procedure is a reliable technique. A round robin test has been performed between three laboratories; the results are presented and discussed

  2. X-ray diffraction study of pure plutonium under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, Ph. [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)], E-mail: philippe.faure@cea.fr; Genestier, C. [CEA, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-03-15

    Atomic volume and bulk modulus represent basic cohesion properties of a material and are therefore linked to many other physical properties. However, large discrepancies are found in the literature regarding values for the bulk modulus of pure plutonium ({alpha}-phase). New X-ray diffraction measurements of plutonium in diamond anvil cell are presented and the isothermal bulk modulus is extracted.

  3. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Ciricosta, Orlando; Suggit, Matthew J.; Wark, Justin S.; Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H.; Tang, Henry

    2014-01-01

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored

  4. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Ciricosta, Orlando; Suggit, Matthew J.; Wark, Justin S. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Tang, Henry [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.

  5. Average and local atomic-scale structure in BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0. 10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics by high-energy x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscaglia, Vincenzo; Tripathi, Saurabh; Petkov, Valeri; Dapiaggi, Monica; Deluca, Marco; Gajović, Andreja; Ren, Yang

    2014-02-12

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and total scattering XRD coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis studies of the atomic-scale structure of archetypal BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0.10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics are presented over a wide temperature range (100-450 K). For x = 0.1 and 0.2 the results reveal, well above the Curie temperature, the presence of Ti-rich polar clusters which are precursors of a long-range ferroelectric order observed below TC. Polar nanoregions (PNRs) and relaxor behaviour are observed over the whole temperature range for x = 0.4. Irrespective of ceramic composition, the polar clusters are due to locally correlated off-centre displacement of Zr/Ti cations compatible with local rhombohedral symmetry. Formation of Zr-rich clusters is indicated by Raman spectroscopy for all compositions. Considering the isovalent substitution of Ti with Zr in BaZrxTi1-xO3, the mechanism of formation and growth of the PNRs is not due to charge ordering and random fields, but rather to a reduction of the local strain promoted by the large difference in ion size between Zr(4+) and Ti(4+). As a result, non-polar or weakly polar Zr-rich clusters and polar Ti-rich clusters are randomly distributed in a paraelectric lattice and the long-range ferroelectric order is disrupted with increasing Zr concentration.

  6. Diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging of mammals crystalline lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, A.; Hoennicke, M.G.; Safatle, A.M.V.; Cusatis, C.; Moraes Barros, P.S.; Morelhao, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    Crystalline lenses are transparent biological materials where the organization of the lens fibers can also be affected by changes at molecular level, and therefore the structure and morphology of the tissue can be correlated to the loss of transparency of the lens. In this work, internal structure of mammal lenses regarding the long-range ordering of the fibers are investigated by diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging (DEI) radiography. Moreover, DEI and absorption X-ray synchrotron radiographs for healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are compared. Significant differences in healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are observed

  7. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on celestite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yenhua; Yu Shucheng; Huang, Eugene; Lee, P.-L.

    2010-01-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies of celestite (SrSO 4 ) were carried out in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. Variation in the Raman vibrational frequency and change of lattice parameters with pressure indicate that a transformation occurs in celestite. This transformation caused an adjustment in the Sr-O polyhedra that affected the stretching-force constant of SO 4 . Moreover, compressibilities along the crystallographic axes decreased in the order a to c to b. From the compression data, the bulk modulus of the celestite was 87 GPa. Both X-ray and Raman data show that the transition in celestite is reversible.

  8. MSL Chemistry and Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction X-Ray Fluorescence (CheMin) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Blake, Dave; Harris, William; Morookian, John Michael; Randall, Dave; Reder, Leonard J.; Sarrazin, Phillipe

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Chemistry and Mineralogy Xray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) (CheMin) Instrument, an element of the landed Curiosity rover payload, which landed on Mars in August of 2012. The scientific goal of the MSL mission is to explore and quantitatively assess regions in Gale Crater as a potential habitat for life - past or present. The CheMin instrument will receive Martian rock and soil samples from the MSL Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling (SA/SPaH) system, and process it utilizing X-Ray spectroscopy methods to determine mineral composition. The Chemin instrument will analyze Martian soil and rocks to enable scientists to investigate geophysical processes occurring on Mars. The CheMin science objectives and proposed surface operations are described along with the CheMin hardware with an emphasis on the system engineering challenges associated with developing such a complex instrument.

  9. Single-pulse x-ray diffraction using polycapillary optics for in situ dynamic diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, B. R., E-mail: maddox3@llnl.gov; Akin, M. C., E-mail: akin1@llnl.gov; Teruya, A.; Hunt, D.; Hahn, D.; Cradick, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Morgan, D. V. [National Security Technologies LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Diagnostic use of single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) at pulsed power facilities can be challenging due to factors such as the high flux and brightness requirements for diffraction and the geometric constraints of experimental platforms. By necessity, the x-ray source is usually positioned very close, within a few inches of the sample. On dynamic compression platforms, this puts the x-ray source in the debris field. We coupled x-ray polycapillary optics to a single-shot needle-and-washer x-ray diode source using a laser-based alignment scheme to obtain high-quality x-ray diffraction using a single 16 ns x-ray pulse with the source >1 m from the sample. The system was tested on a Mo sample in reflection geometry using 17 keV x-rays from a Mo anode. We also identified an anode conditioning effect that increased the x-ray intensity by 180%. Quantitative measurements of the x-ray focal spot produced by the polycapillary yielded a total x-ray flux on the sample of 3.3 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 7} molybdenum Kα photons.

  10. Modern X-ray diffraction. X-ray diffractometry for materials scientists, physicists, and chemicists. 2. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiess, Lothar; Teichert, Gerd; Schwarzer, Robert; Behnken, Herfried; Genzel, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive survey over the applications of X-ray diffractions in fields like materials technique, metallurgy, electrotechniques, mechanical engineering, as well as micro- and nanotechniques. The necessary baic knowledges of X-ray diffraction are mediated foundedly and illustratively. Thereby new techniques and evaluation procedures are presented as well as well known methods

  11. Multiple x-ray diffraction simulation and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, C.A.B.S. da.

    1989-09-01

    A computer program (MULTX) was implemented for simulation X-ray multiple diffraction diagrams in Renninger geometries. The program uses the X-ray multiple diffraction theory for imperfect crystals. The iterative calculation of the intensities is based on the Taylor series general term, and the primary beam power expansion is given as function of the beam x penetration in the crystal surface. This development allows to consider the simultaneous interaction of the beams involved in the multiple diffraction phenomenon. The simulated diagrams are calculated point-to-point and the tests for the Si and GaAs presented good reproduction of the experimental diagrams for different primary reflections. (L.C.J.A.)

  12. Instrument and method for X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and crystal texture analysis without sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Keith (Inventor); Martins, Jose Vanderlei (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument for analyzing samples having no sample preparation includes a X-ray source configured to output a collimated X-ray beam comprising a continuum spectrum of X-rays to a predetermined coordinate and a photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer disposed to receive X-rays output from an unprepared sample disposed at the predetermined coordinate upon exposure of the unprepared sample to the collimated X-ray beam. The X-ray source and the photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer are arranged in a reflection geometry relative to the predetermined coordinate.

  13. Discovery and development of x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeuncheol; Yin, Ming; Datta, Timir

    2013-03-01

    In 1912 Max Laue at University of Munich reasoned x-rays to be short wavelength electromagnetic waves and figured interference would occur when scattered off crystals. Arnold Sommerfeld, W. Wien, Ewald and others, raised objections to Laue's idea, but soon Walter Friedrich succeeded in recording x-ray interference patterns off copper sulfate crystals. But the Laue-Ewald's 3-dimensional formula predicted excess spots. Fewer spots were observed. William Lawrence Bragg then 22 year old studying at Cambridge University heard the Munich results from father William Henry Brag, physics professor at Univ of Leeds. Lawrence figured the spots are 2-d interference of x-ray wavelets reflecting off successive atomic planes and derived a simple eponymous equation, the Bragg equation d*sin(theta) = n*lamda. 1913 onward the Braggs dominated the crystallography. Max Laue was awarded the physics Nobel in 1914 and the Braggs shared the same in 1915. Starting with Rontgen's first ever prize in 1901, the importance of x-ray techniques is evident from the four out of a total 16 physics Nobels between 1901-1917. We will outline the historical back ground and importance of x-ray diffraction giving rise to techniques that even in 2013, remain work horses in laboratories all over the globe.

  14. Extinction correction in white X-ray and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyoshi, S.; Yamada, M.; Watanabe, H.

    1980-01-01

    Extinction effects in white-beam X-ray and neutron diffraction are considered. In white-beam diffraction, a small deviation of the wavelength from the Bragg condition Δlambda is a variable which represents the line profile of the diffraction peaks, so that by using the new parameter Δlambda the theory is converted to one in white-beam diffraction. It is shown that for a convex crystal, primary extinction agrees with the results calculated already for monochromatic diffraction. The same relation is shown to hold in secondary extinction. It is concluded that extinction theory derived for monochromatic diffraction is applicable without any modification in white-beam diffraction. (Auth.)

  15. High-energy particle diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barone, V.; Predazzi, E.

    2002-01-01

    This monograph gives a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of soft and hard diffraction processes in strong interaction physics. The first part covers the general formalism (the optical analogy, the eikonal picture, high-energy kinematics, S-matrix theory) and soft hadron-hadron scattering (including the Regge theory) in a complete and mature presentation. It can be used as a textbook in particle physics classes. The remainder of the book is devoted to the 'new diffraction': the pomeron in QCD, low-x physics, diffractive deep inelastic scattering and related processes, jet production etc. It presents recent results and experimental findings and their phenomenological interpretations. This part addresses graduate students as well as researchers. (orig.)

  16. Diffraction of high energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, A.

    1981-10-01

    The diffraction of electrons by a crystal is examined to study its structure. As the electron-substance interaction is strong, it must be treated in a dynamic manner. Using the N waves theory and physical optics the base equations giving the wave at the outlet are deduced for a perfect crystal and their equivalence is shown. The more complex case of an imperfect crystal is then envisaged in these two approaches. In both cases, only the diffraction of high energy electrons ( > 50 KeV) are considered since in the diffraction of slow electrons back scattering cannot be ignored. Taking into account an increasingly greater number of beams, through fast calculations computer techniques, enables images to be simulated in very varied conditions. The general use of the Fast Fourier Transform has given a clear cut practical advantage to the multi-layer method [fr

  17. Diffraction anomalous fine structure using X-ray anomalous dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejima, Yuji; Kuwajima, Shuichiro

    1998-01-01

    A use of X-ray anomalous dispersion effects for structure investigation has recently been developed by using synchrotron radiation. One of the interesting method is the observation of anomalous fine structure which arise on diffraction intensity in energy region of incident X-ray at and higher than absorption edge. The phenomenon is so called Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure (DAFS). DAFS originates in the same physical process an that of EXAFS: namely photoelectric effect at the corresponding atom and the interaction of photoelectron waves between the atom and neighboring atoms. In contrast with EXAFS, the method is available for only the crystalline materials, but shows effective advantages of the structure investigations by a use of diffraction: one is the site selectivity and the other is space selectivity. In the present study, demonstrations of a use of X-ray anomalous dispersion effect for the superstructure determination will be given for the case of PbZrO 3 , then recent trial investigations of DAFS in particular on the superlattice reflections will be introduced. In addition, we discuss about Forbidden Reflection near Edge Diffraction (FRED) which is more recently investigated as a new method of the structure analysis. (author)

  18. Surface quality inspection of PbWO4 crystals by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengucci, P.; Di Cristoforo, A.; Lebeau, M.; Majni, G.; Paone, N.; Pietroni, P.; Rinaldi, D.

    2005-01-01

    High-quality scintillating crystals are required for applications in radiographic systems and high-energy physics detectors to achieve the specified optical properties. In order to study the state of the single crystals surface we propose the use of the grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GID) technique. This technique allows performing a depth profiling of the sample by changing the incidence angle of the X-ray beam with respect to the sample surface. In this work, two samples of a large PbWO 4 (PWO) single crystal exhibiting different surface roughness values have been studied. Results have shown that GID is a suitable technique for surface quality inspection

  19. The nuclear spectroscopic telescope array (NuSTAR) high-energy X-ray mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of focusing far beyond the ~10 keV high-energy cutoff achieved by all previous X...

  20. X-ray diffraction study of directionally grown perylene crystallites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiby, Dag W.; Lemke, H. T.; Hammershøj, P.

    2008-01-01

    Using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, perylene crystallites grown on thin highly oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films on silicon substrates have been investigated. All the perylene crystallites are found to orient with the ab plane of the monoclinic unit cell parallel to the subst......Using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, perylene crystallites grown on thin highly oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films on silicon substrates have been investigated. All the perylene crystallites are found to orient with the ab plane of the monoclinic unit cell parallel...... to the substrate. The scattering data is interpreted as a trimodal texture of oriented perylene crystallites, induced by interactions between the perylene molecules and the oriented PTFE substrate. Three families of biaxial orientations are seen, with the axes (h = 1, 2, or 3) parallel to the PTFE alignment......, all having the ab-plane parallel to the substrate. About 92% of the scattered intensity corresponds to a population with highly parallel to (PTFE)....

  1. X-ray diffraction and measurement of residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, G.; Lebrun, J.L.; Corcaud, L.

    1977-01-01

    X-ray diffraction technique is a non destructive method for measuring the residual stresses in mechanical parts. This method, called sin 2 PSI method is investigated. It is applied to the measurement of elastic constants in different directions of crystals of Zr alloy (Zircaloy 4) and Ti alloy (TA6V). Stresses in TA6V sheets welded by TIG and electron beam processes are also studied [fr

  2. X-ray diffraction from single GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biermanns, Andreas

    2012-11-12

    In recent years, developments in X-ray focussing optics have allowed to produce highly intense, coherent X-ray beams with spot sizes in the range of 100 nm and below. Together with the development of new experimental stations, X-ray diffraction techniques can now be applied to study single nanometer-sized objects. In the present work, X-ray diffraction is applied to study different aspects of the epitaxial growth of GaAs nanowires. Besides conventional diffraction methods, which employ X-ray beams with dimensions of several tens of {mu}m, special emphasis lies on the use of nanodiffraction methods which allow to study single nanowires in their as-grown state without further preparation. In particular, coherent X-ray diffraction is applied to measure simultaneously the 3-dimensional shape and lattice parameters of GaAs nanowires grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. It is observed that due to a high density of zinc-blende rotational twins within the nanowires, their lattice parameter deviates systematically from the bulk zinc-blende phase. In a second step, the initial stage in the growth of GaAs nanowires on Si (1 1 1) surfaces is studied. This nanowires, obtained by Ga-assisted growth in molecular beam epitaxy, grow predominantly in the cubic zinc-blende structure, but contain inclusions of the hexagonal wurtzite phase close to their bottom interface. Using nanodiffraction methods, the position of the different structural units along the growth axis is determined. Because the GaAs lattice is 4% larger than silicon, these nanowires release their lattice mismatch by the inclusion of dislocations at the interface. Whereas NWs with diameters below 50 nm are free of strain, a rough interface structure in nanowires with diameters above 100 nm prevents a complete plastic relaxation, leading to a residual strain at the interface that decays elastically along the growth direction. Finally, measurements on GaAs-core/InAs-shell nanowire heterostructures are presented

  3. X-ray diffraction at Bragg angles around π/2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayolo, C.M.G. de.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray diffraction at Bragg angles around π/2 is studied from the theoretical and experimental points of view. The proposed corrections to the dynamical theory in the θ β ≅ π/2 cases, has been reviewed showing the equivalence between two formalisms leading to a corrected expression for the dependence of the angular parameter y with the angle of incidence. An expression for y valid in the conventional and θ β ≅ π/2 cases has been obtained. A general expression for Bragg law and for energy resolution after a Bragg diffraction was also deduced. (author)

  4. Nano structured materials studied by coherent X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulden, Johannes

    2013-03-01

    Structure determination with X-rays in crystallography is a rapidly evolving field. Crystallographic methods for structure determination are based on the assumptions about the crystallinity of the sample. It is vital to understand the structure of possible defects in the crystal, because they can influence the structure determination. All conventional methods to characterize defects require a modelling through simulated data. No direct methods exist to image the core of defects in crystals. Here a new method is proposed, which will enable to visualize the individual scatterers around and at defects in crystals. The method is based on coherent X-ray scattering. X-rays are perfectly suited since they can penetrate thick samples and buried structures can be investigated Recent developments increased the coherent flux of X-Ray sources such as synchrotrons by orders of magnitude. As a result, the use of the coherent properties of X-rays is emerging as a new aspect of X-ray science. New upcoming and operating X-ray laser sources will accelerate this trend. One new method which has the capacity to recover structural information from the coherently scattered photons is Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CXDI). The main focus of this thesis is the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of colloidal crystals. Colloidal crystals can be used as a model for atomic crystals in order to understand the growth and defect structure. Despite the large interest in these structures, many details are still unknown.Therefore, it is vital to develop new approaches to measure the core of defects in colloidal crystals. After an introduction into the basics of the field of coherent X-ray scattering, this thesis introduces a novel method, Small Angle Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging, (SAB-CDI). This new measurement technique which besides the relevance to colloidal crystals can be applied to a large variety of nano structured materials. To verify the experimental possibilities the

  5. Nano structured materials studied by coherent X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulden, Johannes

    2013-03-15

    Structure determination with X-rays in crystallography is a rapidly evolving field. Crystallographic methods for structure determination are based on the assumptions about the crystallinity of the sample. It is vital to understand the structure of possible defects in the crystal, because they can influence the structure determination. All conventional methods to characterize defects require a modelling through simulated data. No direct methods exist to image the core of defects in crystals. Here a new method is proposed, which will enable to visualize the individual scatterers around and at defects in crystals. The method is based on coherent X-ray scattering. X-rays are perfectly suited since they can penetrate thick samples and buried structures can be investigated Recent developments increased the coherent flux of X-Ray sources such as synchrotrons by orders of magnitude. As a result, the use of the coherent properties of X-rays is emerging as a new aspect of X-ray science. New upcoming and operating X-ray laser sources will accelerate this trend. One new method which has the capacity to recover structural information from the coherently scattered photons is Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CXDI). The main focus of this thesis is the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of colloidal crystals. Colloidal crystals can be used as a model for atomic crystals in order to understand the growth and defect structure. Despite the large interest in these structures, many details are still unknown.Therefore, it is vital to develop new approaches to measure the core of defects in colloidal crystals. After an introduction into the basics of the field of coherent X-ray scattering, this thesis introduces a novel method, Small Angle Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging, (SAB-CDI). This new measurement technique which besides the relevance to colloidal crystals can be applied to a large variety of nano structured materials. To verify the experimental possibilities the

  6. Design and fabrication of micro X-ray diffraction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yang Soon; Han, Sun Ho; Kim, Jong Goo; Jee, Kwang Yong

    2006-10-15

    It has been observed that microstructure changes occur at the pellet periphery(rim) of the fuel at very high burn-up. Despite its narrow range (below some hundreds microns in depth), this peripheral region(rim) determines the behaviour of nuclear fuel. To determine lattice parameter with XRD at intervals as small as 30-50 {mu} m in radial direction of irradiated fuel samples, a micro X-ray diffraction system was designed and fabricated. This report describes the micro X-ray diffraction system consisted of an X-ray microbeam alignment system and a sample micro translation system, its characterization, and its performance test through the analysis for the micro region of some specimens. This system will be set in a radiation shielded glove box, and then used for analysis of lattice parameter change and the phase change at intervals as small as 30-50 {mu} m in radial direction of the rim of an irradiated fuel sample and a fuel cladding.

  7. Design and fabrication of micro X-ray diffraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yang Soon; Han, Sun Ho; Kim, Jong Goo; Jee, Kwang Yong

    2006-10-01

    It has been observed that microstructure changes occur at the pellet periphery(rim) of the fuel at very high burn-up. Despite its narrow range (below some hundreds microns in depth), this peripheral region(rim) determines the behaviour of nuclear fuel. To determine lattice parameter with XRD at intervals as small as 30-50 μ m in radial direction of irradiated fuel samples, a micro X-ray diffraction system was designed and fabricated. This report describes the micro X-ray diffraction system consisted of an X-ray microbeam alignment system and a sample micro translation system, its characterization, and its performance test through the analysis for the micro region of some specimens. This system will be set in a radiation shielded glove box, and then used for analysis of lattice parameter change and the phase change at intervals as small as 30-50 μ m in radial direction of the rim of an irradiated fuel sample and a fuel cladding

  8. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of enveloped virus microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX using X-ray free-electron lasers has produced high-resolution, room temperature, time-resolved protein structures. We report preliminary SFX of Sindbis virus, an enveloped icosahedral RNA virus with ∼700 Å diameter. Microcrystals delivered in viscous agarose medium diffracted to ∼40 Å resolution. Small-angle diffuse X-ray scattering overlaid Bragg peaks and analysis suggests this results from molecular transforms of individual particles. Viral proteins undergo structural changes during entry and infection, which could, in principle, be studied with SFX. This is an important step toward determining room temperature structures from virus microcrystals that may enable time-resolved studies of enveloped viruses.

  9. Diffraction enhanced kinetic depth X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicken, A.

    An increasing number of fields would benefit from a single analytical probe that can characterise bulk objects that vary in morphology and/or material composition. These fields include security screening, medicine and material science. In this study the X-ray region is shown to be an effective probe for the characterisation of materials. The most prominent analytical techniques that utilise X-radiation are reviewed. The study then focuses on methods of amalgamating the three dimensional power of kinetic depth X-ray (KDFX) imaging with the materials discrimination of angular dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), thus providing KDEX with a much needed material specific counterpart. A knowledge of the sample position is essential for the correct interpretation of diffraction signatures. Two different sensor geometries (i.e. circumferential and linear) that are able to collect end interpret multiple unknown material diffraction patterns and attribute them to their respective loci within an inspection volume are investigated. The circumferential and linear detector geometries are hypothesised, simulated and then tested in an experimental setting with the later demonstrating a greater ability at discerning between mixed diffraction patterns produced by differing materials. Factors known to confound the linear diffraction method such as sample thickness and radiation energy have been explored and quantified with a possible means of mitigation being identified (i.e. via increasing the sample to detector distance). A series of diffraction patterns (following the linear diffraction approach) were obtained from a single phantom object that was simultaneously interrogated via KDEX imaging. Areas containing diffraction signatures matched from a threat library have been highlighted in the KDEX imagery via colour encoding and match index is inferred by intensity. This union is the first example of its kind and is called diffraction enhanced KDEX imagery. Finally an additional

  10. X-ray diffraction imaging of biological cells

    CERN Document Server

    Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2018-01-01

    In this book, the author describes the development of the experimental diffraction setup and structural analysis of non-crystalline particles from material science and biology. Recent advances in X-ray free electron laser (XFEL)-coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) experiments allow for the structural analysis of non-crystalline particles to a resolution of 7 nm, and to a resolution of 20 nm for biological materials. Now XFEL-CXDI marks the dawn of a new era in structural analys of non-crystalline particles with dimensions larger than 100 nm, which was quite impossible in the 20th century. To conduct CXDI experiments in both synchrotron and XFEL facilities, the author has developed apparatuses, named KOTOBUKI-1 and TAKASAGO-6 for cryogenic diffraction experiments on frozen-hydrated non-crystalline particles at around 66 K. At the synchrotron facility, cryogenic diffraction experiments dramatically reduce radiation damage of specimen particles and allow tomography CXDI experiments. In addition, in XFEL ex...

  11. A planar parabolic refractive nickel lens for high-energy X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrejczuk, Andrzej; Nagamine, Masaru; Sakurai, Yoshiharu; Itou, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    A compound refractive nickel lens focusing 174 keV X-rays to 5 µm with a gain of 4 is presented. A compound refractive lens made of nickel and designed for focusing high-energy synchrotron X-rays is presented. The lens consists of 600 parabolic grooves and focuses X-rays in one plane only (planar lens). The lenses made and investigated by us earlier exhibited low transmission and irregularities in the focused beam profile. Since then, improvements in lens manufacturing technology have been made. The present lens gives an almost Gaussian profile and produces four times higher intensity at its maximum compared with the intensity of primary X-ray beams of 174 keV

  12. Novel X-ray imaging diagnostics of high energy nanosecond pulse accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Graham W.; Gallegos, Roque Rosauro; Hohlfelder, Robert James; Beutler, David Eric; Dudley, John; Seymour, Calvin L.G.; Bell, John D.

    2004-01-01

    Pioneering x-ray imaging has been undertaken on a number of AWE's and Sandia National Laboratories radiation effects x-ray simulators. These simulators typically yield a single very short (<50ns) pulse of high-energy (MeV endpoint energy bremsstrahlung) x-ray radiation with doses in the kilorad (krad(Si)) region. X-ray source targets vary in size from 2 to 25cm diameter, dependent upon the particular simulator. Electronic imaging of the source x-ray emission under dynamic conditions yields valuable information upon how the simulator is performing. The resultant images are of interest to the simulator designer who may configure new x-ray source converter targets and diode designs. The images can provide quantitative information about machine performance during radiation effects testing of components under active conditions. The effects testing program is a valuable interface for validation of high performance computer codes and models for the radiation effects community. A novel high-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer is described whereby the spectral energy (0.1 to 2.5MeV) profile may be discerned from the digitally recorded and viewable images via a pinhole/scintillator/CCD imaging system and knowledge of the filtration parameters. Unique images, analysis and a preliminary evaluation of the capability of the spectrometer are presented. Further, a novel time resolved imaging system is described that captures a sequence of high spatial resolution temporal images, with zero interframe time, in the nanosecond timeframe, of our source x-rays.

  13. Calculating the X-Ray Fluorescence from the Planet Mercury Due to High-Energy Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbine, T. H.; Trombka, J. I.; Bergstrom, P. M., Jr.; Christon, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    The least-studied terrestrial planet is Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, which makes telescopic observations and spacecraft encounters difficult. Our lack of knowledge about Mercury should change in the near future due to the recent launching of MESSENGER, a Mercury orbiter. Another mission (BepiColombo) is currently being planned. The x-ray spectrometer on MESSENGER (and planned for BepiColombo) can characterize the elemental composition of a planetary surface by measuring emitted fluorescent x-rays. If electrons are ejected from an atom s inner shell by interaction with energetic particles such as photons, electrons, or ions, electrons from an outer shell can transfer to the inner shell. Characteristic x-rays are then emitted with energies that are the difference between the binding energy of the ion in its excited state and that of the ion in its ground state. Because each element has a unique set of energy levels, each element emits x-rays at a unique set of energies. Electrons and ions usually do not have the needed flux at high energies to cause significant x-ray fluorescence on most planetary bodies. This is not the case for Mercury where high-energy particles were detected during the Mariner 10 flybys. Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field that deflects the solar wind, resulting in a bow shock in the solar wind and a magnetospheric cavity. Electrons and ions accelerated in the magnetosphere tend to follow its magnetic field lines and can impact the surface on Mercury s dark side Modeling has been done to determine if x-ray fluorescence resulting from the impact of high-energy electrons accelerated in Mercury's magnetosphere can be detected by MESSENGER. Our goal is to understand how much bulk chemical information can be obtained from x-ray fluorescence measurements on the dark side of Mercury.

  14. Diamond-anvil cell for radial x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnut, G N; Schiferl, D; Streetman, B D; Anderson, W W

    2006-01-01

    We have designed a new diamond-anvil cell capable of radial x-ray diffraction to pressures of a few hundred GPa. The diffraction geometry allows access to multiple angles of Ψ, which is the angle between each reciprocal lattice vector g(hkl) and the compression axis of the cell. At the 'magic angle', Ψ∼54.7 0 , the effects of deviatoric stresses on the interplanar spacings, d(hkl), are significantly reduced. Because the systematic errors, which are different for each d(hkl), are significantly reduced, the crystal structures and the derived equations of state can be determined reliably. At other values of Ψ, the effects of deviatoric stresses on the diffraction pattern could eventually be used to determine elastic constants

  15. X-ray diffraction measurements in KCl shocked along [100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Almeida, T.; Gupta, Y.M.

    2000-01-01

    Real time x-ray diffraction measurements were used to examine the polymorphic phase transformation in KCl shocked along the [100] direction. Shock wave continuum data, obtained previously by Hayes, were used to design the experiments and to predict diffraction from KCl shocked to different peak stresses. Here, we present the results obtained below the transition stress: between 1.4 and 2 GPa. Diffraction data obtained were quantitatively related to macroscopic compression. Interplanar spacing measurements revealed isotropic compression of the unit cell in contrast to previously reported results. Above the transition stress, descriptions of the atomic arrangement with respect to shock propagation (not available in the literature) are required for setting up the detection system. Hence, continuum results in combination with various crystallographic considerations were utilized to obtain data above the transition stress

  16. High-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography of shock-compressed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and application of a high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray imaging method to study shock-compressed, high-Z samples at Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, UK). Shock waves are driven into materials using a portable, single-stage gas gun designed by the Institute of Shock Physics. Following plate impact, material deformation is probed in-situ by white-beam X-ray radiography and complimentary velocimetry diagnostics. The high energies, large beam size (13 x 13 mm), and appreciable sample volumes (~ 1 cm3) viable for study at Beamline I12 compliment existing in-house pulsed X-ray capabilities and studies at the Dynamic Compression Sector. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  17. X-ray diffraction of multilayers and superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, W.J.; Hornstra, J.; Lobeek, D.J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Recursion formulae for calculating the reflected amplitude ratio of multilayers and superlattices have been derived from the Takagi-Taupin differential equations, which describe the dynamical diffraction of X-rays in deformed crystals. Calculated rocking curves of complicated layered structures, such as non-ideal superlattices on perfect crystals, are shown to be in good agreement with observed diffraction profiles. The kinematical theory can save computing time only in the case of an ideal superlattice, for which a geometric series can be used, but the reflections must be below 10% so that multiple reflections can be neglected. For a perfect crystal of arbitrary thickness the absorption at the center of the dynamical reflection is found to be proportional to the square root of the reflectivity. Sputter-deposited periodic multilayers of tungsten and carbon can be considered as an artificial crystal, for which dynamical X-ray diffraction calculations give results very similar to those of a macroscopic optical description in terms of the complex index of refraction and Fresnel reflection coefficients. (orig.)

  18. Modern trends in x-ray powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, H.E.; Snyder, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The revival of interest in X-ray powder diffraction, being quoted as a metamorphosis from the 'ugly duckling' to a 'beautiful swan', can be attributed to a number of modern developments in instrumentation and evaluation software. They result in faster data collection, improved accuracy and resolution, and better detectability of minor phases. The ease of data evaluation on small computers coupled direct to the instrument allows convenient execution of previously tedious and time-consuming off-line tasks like qualitative and quantitative analysis, characterization of microcrystalline properties, indexing, and lattice-constant refinements, as well as structure refinements or even exploration of new crystal structures. Powder diffraction has also progressed from an isolated analytical laboratory method to an in situ technique for analysing solid-state reactions or for the on-stream control of industrial processes. The paper surveys these developments and their real and potential applications, and tries to emphasize new trends that are regarded as important steps for the further progress of X-ray powder diffraction

  19. X-ray diffraction analysis device with electronic photon counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillit, R.Y.; Bruyas, H.; Patay, F.

    1985-01-01

    The means provided to control the movements around the three axes are composed of step-by-step motors related to exits control logic which is connected to the calculation and monitored by a clock. The clock monitors also the calculator so as that the calculator controls, together with the programmable clock and control logic, the coordination of the whole rotation movements, along the three rotation axes, their velocity, their duration and the acquisition of the measured intensities of the diffracted X-ray beam [fr

  20. Automation of a Guinier camera for X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duijn, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The automation of a Guinier X-ray diffraction camera is discussed. The photographic plate in the conventional setup has been replaced by a curved proportional counter (CPC) which has an electronic readout system. As a result the recording time has been reduced from a few hours to a few minutes. The construction and optimum dimensions of the CPC are discussed and the most essential parts of the readout electronics are highlighted. A linewidth of 200 μm FWHM and an accuracy of 30 μm are achieved. 45 refs.; 53 figs.; 4 tabs

  1. Accidental exposure with X-ray diffraction equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montanez, O.; Blanco, D.

    1991-01-01

    The shutter on one of the windows of an X-ray diffraction apparatus was accidentally left open, exposing the worker to the radiation. The worker was wearing a dosimeter film, which was processed immediately to evaluate the potential risk. It was determined that the exposure rate was 350 Roentgen/minute on the skin surface, with corrections being made for the worker's thin clothing. It was concluded that in spite of the worker receiving a relative high dose, it did not reach the threshold value for producing deterministic effects such as cataracts, erythema, and skin damage

  2. New methods of X-ray diffraction spectrometry. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerum, H.; Bremer, J.

    1980-01-01

    The construction principles for a flexible X-ray spectrometer can be equipped either with a single curved crystal or with two curved crystals are described. A few of the theoretical 4+32 possible working modes are selected for a closer investigation and examples of recorded spectra are given. It is shown in the general single-crystal case that for a wavelength close to a cut-off energy the narrow diffraction cone has an elliptic section, as predicted by the theory. The spectrometer is discussed in terms of intensity, resolution and dispersive power. A comparison with other types of spectrometer is made. (Auth.)

  3. Powder X-ray diffraction study af alkali alanates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Thao; Mosegaard Arnbjerg, Lene; Jensen, Torben René

    Powder X-ray diffraction study of alkali alanates Thao Cao, Lene Arnbjerg, Torben R. Jensen. Center for Materials Crystallography (CMC), Center for Energy Materials (CEM), iNANO and Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000, Denmark. Abstract: To meet the energy demand in the future...... for mobile applications, new materials with high gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity of hydrogen have to be developed. Alkali alanates are promising for hydrogen storage materials. Sodium alanate stores hydrogen reversibly at moderate conditions when catalysed with, e.g. titanium, whereas potassium...

  4. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction using triple-axis spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Als-Nielsen, J.

    1980-12-01

    High resolution X-ray diffraction studies of (i) monolayers of the noble gases Kr and Ar physiosorbed on graphite (ii) smectic A fluctuations in the nematic and the smectic A phases of liquid crystals are described. The apparatus used is a triple axis spectrometer situated at the storage ring DORIS at Hasylab, DESY, Hamburg. A monochromatic, well collimated beam is extracted from the synchrotron radiation spectrum by Bragg reflection from perfect Si or Ge crystals. The direction of the beam scattered from the sample is determined by Bragg reflection from a perfect Si or Ge crystal. High intensities even with resolution extending beyond the wavelength of visible light can be obtained. (Auth.)

  5. X-ray diffraction analysis of InAs nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydok, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have attracted great interest as building blocks for future electronic and optoelectronic devices. The variability of the growth process opens the opportunity to control and combine the various properties tailoring for specific application. It was shown that the electrical and optical characteristics of the nanowires are strongly connected with their structure. Despite intensive research in this field, the growth process is still not fully understood. In particular, extensive real structure investigations are required. Most of the reports dedicated on the structural researches are based on the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) or transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SEM provides an image of the surface with nanostructures and is mainly used to describe the morphology of the sample, but it does not bring information about the internal structure, phase composition and defect structure. At the same time, the internal structure can be examined by TEM down to atomic scale. TEM image of good quality are very expensive due to the efforts in sample preparation and in localisation of a single object. All these aspects make the statistical structural analysis difficult. In the present work, X-ray diffraction analysis has been applied for structural investigation of InAs nanowires grown by different techniques. Using various X-ray diffraction geometries, the nanowire systems were investigated in terms of the lattice parameters, phase composition, strains and displacement fields and stacking defects. In particular, realizing grazing incidence diffraction and controlling the penetration depth of X-ray beam, we characterized sample series grown by Au-assisted metal organic phase epitaxy on GaAs [111]B substrate with different growth time. According to the results of SEM and X-ray investigations, a model of the growth process has been proposed. A more detailed analysis was performed on InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on

  6. Correlation between X-ray and high energy gamma-ray emission form Cygnus X-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weekes, T.C.; Danaher, S.; Fegan, D.J.; Porter, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    In May-June 1980, the 4.8 hour modulated X-ray flux from Cygnus X-3 underwent a significant change in the shape of the light curve; this change correlates with the peak in the high-energy (E > 2 x 10 12 eV) gamma ray emission at the same epoch. (orig.)

  7. Plasma instability control toward high fluence, high energy x-ray continuum source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Patrick; Kirkwood, Robert; Wilks, Scott; Blue, Brent

    2017-10-01

    X-ray source development at Omega and NIF seeks to produce powerful radiation with high conversion efficiency for material effects studies in extreme fluence environments. While current K-shell emission sources can achieve tens of kJ on NIF up to 22 keV, the conversion efficiency drops rapidly for higher Z K-alpha energies. Pulsed power devices are efficient generators of MeV bremsstrahlung x-rays but are unable to produce lower energy photons in isolation, and so a capability gap exists for high fluence x-rays in the 30 - 100 keV range. A continuum source under development utilizes instabilities like Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) to generate plasma waves that accelerate electrons into high-Z converter walls. Optimizing instabilities using existing knowledge on their elimination will allow sufficiently hot and high yield electron distributions to create a superior bremsstrahlung x-ray source. An Omega experiment has been performed to investigate the optimization of SRS and high energy x-rays using Au hohlraums with parylene inner lining and foam fills, producing 10× greater x-ray yield at 50 keV than conventional direct drive experiments on the facility. Experiment and simulation details on this campaign will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DoE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Design of a compact high-energy setup for x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttler, Markus; Yaroshenko, Andre; Bech, Martin; Potdevin, Guillaume; Malecki, Andreas; Chabior, Michael; Wolf, Johannes; Tapfer, Arne; Meiser, Jan; Kunka, Danays; Amberger, Maximilian; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-03-01

    The main shortcoming of conventional biomedical x-ray imaging is the weak soft-tissue contrast caused by the small differences in the absorption coefficients between different materials. This issue can be addressed by x-ray phasesensitive imaging approaches, e.g. x-ray Talbot-Lau grating interferometry. The advantage of the three-grating Talbot-Lau approach is that it allows to acquire x-ray phase-contrast and dark-field images with a conventional lab source. However, through the introduction of the grating interferometer some constraints are imposed on the setup geometry. In general, the grating pitch and the mean x-ray energy determine the setup dimensions. The minimal length of the setup increases linearly with energy and is proportional to p2, where p is the grating pitch. Thus, a high-energy (100 keV) compact grating-based setup for x-ray imaging can be realized only if gratings with aspect-ratio of approximately 300 and a pitch of 1-2 μm were available. However, production challenges limit the availability of such gratings. In this study we consider the use of non-binary phase-gratings as means of designing a more compact grating interferometer for phase-contrast imaging. We present simulation and experimental data for both monochromatic and polychromatic case. The results reveal that phase-gratings with triangular-shaped structures yield visibilities that can be used for imaging purposes at significantly shorter distances than binary gratings. This opens the possibility to design a high-energy compact setup for x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Furthermore, we discuss different techniques to achieve triangular-shaped phase-shifting structures.

  9. X-ray Diffraction Study of Arsenopyrite at High Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Fan; M Ma; W Zhou; S Wei; Z Chen; H Xie

    2011-12-31

    The high-pressure X-ray diffraction study of a natural arsenopyrite was investigated up to 28.2 GPa using in situ angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction and a diamond anvil cell at National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The 16:3:1 methanol-ethanol-water mixture was used as a pressure-transmitting medium. Pressures were measured using the ruby-fluorescence method. No phase change has been observed up to 28.2 GPa. The isothermal equation of state (EOS) was determined. The values of K{sub 0}, and K'{sub 0} refined with a third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS are K{sub 0} = 123(9) GPa, and K'{sub 0} = 5.2(8). Furthermore, we confirm that the linear compressibilities ({beta}) along a, b and c directions of arsenopyrite is elastically isotropic ({beta}{sub a} = 6.82 x 10{sup -4}, {beta}{sub b} = 6.17 x 10{sup -4} and {beta}{sub c} = 6.57 x 10{sup -4} GPa{sup -1}).

  10. Characterization of Brazilian asphalt using X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Edson R.; Pinto, Nivia G.V.; Almeida, Ana P.G.; Braz, Delson; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Barroso, Regina C.; Motta, Laura M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Asphalt is a sticky, black and highly viscous liquid or semi-solid that is presented in most crude petroleum and in some natural deposits. The X ray diffraction can give valuable information over the characteristics of a material. Thus, the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method was employed to investigate parameters that characterize and differentiate asphalt groups (Boscan, CAP20, CAP40, CAP50/60, CAP50/70 and CAP85/100). The scattering measurements were carried out in θ-2θ reflection geometry using a powder diffractometer Shimadzu XRD-6000 at the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, Brazil. Scans were typically done from 8 deg to 28 deg every 0.05. The parameters analyzed were: FWHM, peak area, peak center, peak height, left half width and right half width. Thus, in this study, scattering profiles from different asphalt groups were carefully measured in order to establish characteristic signatures of these materials. The results indicate that by using three parameters (peak centroid, peak area and peak intensity) it is possible to characterize and differentiate the asphalt. (author)

  11. Quantitative analysis of minerals by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietroluongo, L.R.V.; Veiga, M.M. da

    1982-01-01

    Considerations about the X-ray diffraction technique for quantitative analyses are made; some experiments carried out at CETEM - Centro de Tecnologia Mineral (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) with synthetic samples and real samples of diatomites (from northeastern region of Brazil) are described. Quartz quantification has been a problem for analytical chemists and is of great importance to the industries which use this raw material. Comments are made about the main factors influencing the intensity of diffracted X-rays, such as: the crystallinity of the mineral phase; the granulometry, the preferential orientation; sample preparation and pressing, the chemical composition of standards and experimental analytical conditions. Several analytical methods used are described: direct measurement of the height or area of a peak resulting from a particular reflection and comparison with a pre-calibrated curve; method of sequential addition of the mineral of interest in the sample and extrapolation of results for ZERO addition; methods of external and internal standards. (C.L.B.) [pt

  12. Quantification of rutile in anatase by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez R, A.

    2001-01-01

    Nowadays the discovering of new and better materials required in all areas of the industry has been lead to the human being to introduce him to this small and great world. The crystalline materials, have properties markedly directional. When it is necessary to realize a quantitative analysis to these materials the task is not easy. The main objective of this work is the research of a real problem, its solution and perfecting of a technique involving the theoretical and experimental principles which allow the quantification of crystalline phases. The chapter 1 treats about the study of crystalline state during the last century, by means of the X-ray diffraction technique. The chapter 2 studies the nature and production of X-rays, the chapter 3 expounds the principles of the diffraction technique which to carry out when it is satisfied the Bragg law studying the powder diffraction method and its applications. In the chapter 4 it is explained how the intensities of the beams diffracted are determined by the atoms positions inside of the elemental cell of the crystal. The properties of the crystalline samples of anatase and rutile are described in the chapter 5. The results of this last analysis are the information which will be processed by means of the auxiliary software: Diffrac AT, Axum and Peakfit as well as the TAFOR and CUANTI software describing this part with more detail in the chapters 6 and 7 where it is mentioned step by step the function of each software until to reach the quantification of crystalline phases, objective of this work. Finally, in the chapter 8 there are a results analysis and conclusions. The contribution of this work is for those learned institutions of limited resources which can tackle in this way the characterization of materials. (Author)

  13. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  14. High energy X-ray CT system using a linear accelerator for automobile parts inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, T.; Sukita, T.

    1995-01-01

    A high energy X-ray CT system (maximum photon energy: 0.95 MeV) has been developed for industrial use. This system employs a linear accelerator as an X-ray source. It is able to image the cross section of automobile parts and can be applied to a solidification analysis study of the cylinder head in an automobile. This paper describes the features of the system and application results which can be related to solidification analysis of the cylinder head when fabricated from an aluminum casting. Some cross-sectional images are also presented as evidence for nondestructive inspection of automobile parts. (orig.)

  15. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Sadaoki, E-mail: kojima-s@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: sfujioka@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke, E-mail: kojima-s@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: sfujioka@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Azechi, Hiroshi [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ozaki, Tetsuo [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Kouto, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10{sup 13} photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO{sub 2} converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  16. A new theory for X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewster, Paul F

    2014-05-01

    This article proposes a new theory of X-ray scattering that has particular relevance to powder diffraction. The underlying concept of this theory is that the scattering from a crystal or crystallite is distributed throughout space: this leads to the effect that enhanced scatter can be observed at the `Bragg position' even if the `Bragg condition' is not satisfied. The scatter from a single crystal or crystallite, in any fixed orientation, has the fascinating property of contributing simultaneously to many `Bragg positions'. It also explains why diffraction peaks are obtained from samples with very few crystallites, which cannot be explained with the conventional theory. The intensity ratios for an Si powder sample are predicted with greater accuracy and the temperature factors are more realistic. Another consequence is that this new theory predicts a reliability in the intensity measurements which agrees much more closely with experimental observations compared to conventional theory that is based on `Bragg-type' scatter. The role of dynamical effects (extinction etc.) is discussed and how they are suppressed with diffuse scattering. An alternative explanation for the Lorentz factor is presented that is more general and based on the capture volume in diffraction space. This theory, when applied to the scattering from powders, will evaluate the full scattering profile, including peak widths and the `background'. The theory should provide an increased understanding of the reliability of powder diffraction measurements, and may also have wider implications for the analysis of powder diffraction data, by increasing the accuracy of intensities predicted from structural models.

  17. Apparatus development for high-pressure X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, L.G.; Orlando, M.T.D.; Rossi, J.L.; Passamai Junior, J.L.; Melo, F.C.L.; Ferreira, F.F.

    2006-01-01

    Some phenomena in the field of condensed matter physics can be studied when the matter is submitted to extreme conditions of pressure, magnetic fields or temperatures. Once submitted to these conditions it is generally necessary to measure the properties of the matter in situ. The existence of a synchrotron light laboratory in Brazil opens up the chance of studying materials in extreme conditions by techniques like X-ray diffraction and absorption. However, when compared to high-energy synchrotrons accelerators, the Brazilian source offers a narrower energy range and lower flux. These facts impose limitation to perform diffraction experiments by energy dispersion and, consequently, the use of pressure cells with denser anvils like diamond. However, for a lower-pressure range, preliminary studies showed the viability of measurements in an angular dispersion configuration. This allows the use of silicon carbide anvils B 4C . In this work it is described the development of a hydrostatic pressure cell suitable for X-rays diffraction measurements in the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory using materials and technologies developed by the institutions and researchers involved in this project (IPEN, UFES, CTA and LNLS). This development can provide the scientific community with the possibility of performing X-ray diffraction measurements under hydrostatic pressure, initially up to 2 GPa, with possibilities of increasing the maximum pressure to higher values, with or without application of magnetic fields and high or low temperatures. (author)

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-energy XRD study of the local environment of copper in antibacterial copper-releasing degradable phosphate glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Pickup, David M.; Ahmed, Ifty; Fitzgerald, Victoria; Moss, Rob M.; Wetherall, Karen; Knowles, Jonathan C.; Smith, Mark E.; Newport, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphate-based glasses of the general formula Na2O-CaO-P2O5 are degradable in an aqueous environment, and therefore can act as antibacterial materials through the inclusion of ions such as copper. In this study, CuO and Cu2O were added to Na2O-CaO-P2O5 glasses (1-20 mol% Cu) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) used to probe the local environment of the copper ions. Copper K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra confirm the oxi...

  19. Differential dose albedo for high-energy X-rays on concrete slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    We computed the differential dose albedo (α D ) for high-energy X-rays on a concrete slab when the incident angle, reflection angle, and azimuth angle were changed, by means of Monte Carlo simulation. We found that α D changed with incident, reflection, and azimuth angles to the concrete slab. On the whole, the larger the incident angle, the larger α D tended to become. If the incident angle and reflection angle were the same, the larger the azimuth angle, the smaller α D tended to become. When the incident, reflection, and azimuth angles were the same, the smaller the X-ray energy was, the larger α D became, in the order of 10 MV, 6 MV, and 4 MV X-rays. (author)

  20. The high-energy X-ray spectrum of Centaurus XR-3 observed from OSO 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of the X-ray binary Cen XR-3 in the 20-120 keV energy range by means of OSO 8's high energy X-ray spectrometer, during July 16-19, 1975, and July 5-14 and 28-29, 1978, indicate that the source was in a high luminosity state during 1975 and a low luminosity one in 1978. While mean orbital light curves appear similar in shape in both years, orbit-to-orbit intensity variations are noted. Spectral, luminosity, and the 4.84 sec modulation are characterized. Cen XR-3 may be a system in which mass transfer by Roche lobe overflow, and by accretion from a stellar wind, are both effective in the production of observable X-ray radiation.

  1. Intensity of diffracted X-rays from biomolecules with radiation damage caused by strong X-ray pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Takeshi; Tokuhisa, Atsushi; Moribayashi, Kengo; Fukuda, Yuji; Kono, Hidetoshi; Go, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    In order to realize the coherent X-ray diffractive imaging of single biomolecules, the diffraction intensities, per effective pixel of a single biomolecule with radiation damage, caused by irradiation using a strong coherent X-ray pulse, were examined. A parameter survey was carried out for various experimental conditions, using a developed simulation program that considers the effect of electric field ionization, which was slightly reported on in previous studies. The two simple relationships among the parameters were identified as follows: (1) the diffraction intensity of a biomolecule slightly increases with the incident X-ray energy; and that (2) the diffraction intensity is approximately proportional to the target radius, when the radius is longer than 400 Å, since the upper limit of the incident intensity for damage to the biomolecules marginally changes with respect to the target radius. (author)

  2. Variable-metric diffraction crystals for x-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    A variable-metric (VM) crystal is one in which the spacing between the crystalline planes changes with position in the crystal. This variation can be either parallel to the crystalline planes or perpendicular to the crystalline planes of interest and can be produced by either introducing a thermal gradient in the crystal or by growing a crystal made of two or more elements and changing the relative percentages of the two elements as the crystal is grown. A series of experiments were performed in the laboratory to demonstrate the principle of the variable-metric crystal and its potential use in synchrotron beam lines. One of the most useful applications of the VM crystal is to increase the number of photons per unit bandwidth in a diffracted beam without losing any of the overall intensity. In a normal synchrotron beam line that uses a two-crystal monochromator, the bandwidth of the diffracted photon beam is determined by the vertical opening angle of the beam which is typically 0.10--0.30 mrad or 20--60 arcsec. When the VM crystal approach is applied, the bandwidth of the beam can be made as narrow as the rocking curve of the diffracting crystal, which is typically 0.005--0.050 mrad or 1--10 arcsec. Thus a very large increase of photons per unit bandwidth (or per unit energy) can be achieved through the use of VM crystals. When the VM principle is used with bent crystals, new kinds of x-ray optical elements can be generated that can focus and defocus x-ray beams much like simple lenses where the focal length of the lens can be changed to match its application. Thus both large magnifications and large demagnifications can be achieved as well as parallel beams with narrow bandwidths

  3. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop LUNA, a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for mineralogical analysis of regolith, rock...

  4. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for analysis of mineralogical composition of regolith,...

  5. Acemetacin cocrystal structures by powder X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Geetha

    2017-01-01

    Cocrystals of acemetacin drug (ACM) with nicotinamide (NAM), p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), valerolactam (VLM) and 2-pyridone (2HP) were prepared by melt crystallization and their X-ray crystal structures determined by high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction. The powerful technique of structure determination from powder data (SDPD) provided details of molecular packing and hydrogen bonding in pharmaceutical cocrystals of acemetacin. ACM–NAM occurs in anhydrate and hydrate forms, whereas the other structures crystallized in a single crystalline form. The carboxylic acid group of ACM forms theacid–amide dimer three-point synthon R 3 2(9)R 2 2(8)R 3 2(9) with three different syn amides (VLM, 2HP and caprolactam). The conformations of the ACM molecule observed in the crystal structures differ mainly in the mutual orientation of chlorobenzene fragment and the neighboring methyl group, being anti (type I) or syn (type II). ACM hydrate, ACM—NAM, ACM–NAM-hydrate and the piperazine salt of ACM exhibit the type I conformation, whereas ACM polymorphs and other cocrystals adopt the ACM type II conformation. Hydrogen-bond interactions in all the crystal structures were quantified by calculating their molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surfaces. Hirshfeld surface analysis of the cocrystal surfaces shows that about 50% of the contribution is due to a combination of strong and weak O⋯H, N⋯H, Cl⋯H and C⋯H interactions. The physicochemical properties of these cocrystals are under study. PMID:28512568

  6. Acemetacin cocrystal structures by powder X-ray diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Bolla

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cocrystals of acemetacin drug (ACM with nicotinamide (NAM, p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA, valerolactam (VLM and 2-pyridone (2HP were prepared by melt crystallization and their X-ray crystal structures determined by high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction. The powerful technique of structure determination from powder data (SDPD provided details of molecular packing and hydrogen bonding in pharmaceutical cocrystals of acemetacin. ACM–NAM occurs in anhydrate and hydrate forms, whereas the other structures crystallized in a single crystalline form. The carboxylic acid group of ACM forms theacid–amide dimer three-point synthon R32(9R22(8R32(9 with three different syn amides (VLM, 2HP and caprolactam. The conformations of the ACM molecule observed in the crystal structures differ mainly in the mutual orientation of chlorobenzene fragment and the neighboring methyl group, being anti (type I or syn (type II. ACM hydrate, ACM—NAM, ACM–NAM-hydrate and the piperazine salt of ACM exhibit the type I conformation, whereas ACM polymorphs and other cocrystals adopt the ACM type II conformation. Hydrogen-bond interactions in all the crystal structures were quantified by calculating their molecular electrostatic potential (MEP surfaces. Hirshfeld surface analysis of the cocrystal surfaces shows that about 50% of the contribution is due to a combination of strong and weak O...H, N...H, Cl...H and C...H interactions. The physicochemical properties of these cocrystals are under study.

  7. [Diffraction gratings used in x-ray spectroscopy]: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.I.

    1988-01-01

    This subcontract was initiated in order to facilitate the development at MIT of technologies for fabricating the very fine diffraction grating required in x-ray spectroscopy at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). These gratings are generally gold transmission gratings with spatial periods of 200 nm or less. The major focus of our efforts was to develop a means of fabricating gratings of 100 nm period. We explored two approaches: e-beam fabrication of x-ray lithography masks, and achromatic holographic lithography. This work was pursued by Erik Anderson as a major component of his Ph.D. thesis. Erik was successful in both the e-beam and holographic approaches. However, the e-beam method proved to be highly impractical: exposure times of about 115 days would be required to cover an area of 1 cm 2 . The achromatic holography, on the other hand, should be capable of exposing areas well in excess of 1 cm 2 in times under 1 hour. Moreover, 100 nm-period gratings produced by achromatic holography are coherent over their entire area whereas gratings produced by e-beam lithography are coherent only over areas /approximately/100 μm. The remainder of this report consists of portions excerpted from Erik Anderson's thesis. These contain all the details of our work on 100 nm period gratings. 26 refs., 17 figs

  8. Biological imaging by soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, David

    We have developed a microscope for soft x-ray diffraction imaging of dry or frozen hydrated biological specimens. This lensless imaging system does not suffer from the resolution or specimen thickness limitations that other short wavelength microscopes experience. The microscope, currently situated at beamline 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source, can collect diffraction data to 12 nm resolution with 750 eV photons and 17 nm resolution with 520 eV photons. The specimen can be rotated with a precision goniometer through an angle of 160 degrees allowing for the collection of nearly complete three-dimensional diffraction data. The microscope is fully computer controlled through a graphical user interface and a scripting language automates the collection of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional data. Diffraction data from a freeze-dried dwarf yeast cell, Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying the CLN3-1 mutation, was collected to 12 run resolution from 8 specimen orientations spanning a total rotation of 8 degrees. The diffraction data was phased using the difference map algorithm and the reconstructions provide real space images of the cell to 30 nm resolution from each of the orientations. The agreement of the different reconstructions provides confidence in the recovered, and previously unknown, structure and indicates the three dimensionality of the cell. This work represents the first imaging of the natural complex refractive contrast from a whole unstained cell by the diffraction microscopy method and has achieved a resolution superior to lens based x-ray tomographic reconstructions of similar specimens. Studies of the effects of exposure to large radiation doses were also carried out. It was determined that the freeze-dried cell suffers from an initial collapse, which is followed by a uniform, but slow, shrinkage. This structural damage to the cell is not accompanied by a diminished ability to see small features in the specimen. Preliminary measurements on frozen

  9. Sub-Hour X-Ray Variability of High-Energy Peaked BL Lacertae Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidzina Kapanadze

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of multi-wavelength flux variability in BL Lacertae objects is very important to discern unstable processes and emission mechanisms underlying their extreme observational features. While the innermost regions of these objects are not accessible from direct observations, we may draw conclusions about their internal structure via the detection of flux variations on various timescales, based on the light-travel argument. In this paper, we review the sub-hour X-ray variability in high-energy peaked BL Lacertae sources (HBLs that are bright at X-rays and provide us with an effective tool to study the details related to the physics of the emitting particles. The X-ray emission of these sources is widely accepted to be a synchrotron radiation from the highest-energy electrons, and the complex spectral variability observed in this band reflects the injection and radiative evolution of freshly-accelerated particles. The detection of sub-hour X-ray flux variability is very important since it can be related to the small-scale jet turbulent structures or triggered by unstable processes occurring in the vicinity of a central supermassive black hole. We summarize the fastest X-ray variability instances detected in bright HBLs and discuss their physical implications.

  10. High-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray microscopy: Present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    High-energy radiation synchrotron x-ray microscopy is used to characterize materials of importance to the chemical and materials sciences and chemical engineering. The x-ray microscope (XRM) forms images of elemental distributions fluorescent x rays or images of mass distributions by measurement of the linear attenuation coefficient of the material. Distributions of sections through materials are obtained non-destructively using the technique of computed microtomography. The energy range of the x rays used for the XRM ranges from a few keV at the minimum value to more than 100 keV, which is sufficient to excite the K-edge of all naturally occurring elements. The work in progress at the Brookhaven NSLS X26 and X17 XRM is described in order to show the current status of the XRM. While there are many possible approaches to the XRM instrumentation, this instrument gives state-of-the-art performance in most respects and serves as a reasonable example of the present status of the instrumentation in terms of the spatial resolution and minimum detection limits obtainable. The examples of applications cited give an idea of the types of research fields that are currently under investigation. They can be used to illustrate how the field of x-ray microscopy will benefit from the use of bending magnets and insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source. 8 refs., 5 figs

  11. High-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray microscopy: Present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    High-energy radiation synchrotron x-ray microscopy is used to characterize materials of importance to the chemical and materials sciences and chemical engineering. The x-ray microscope (XRM) forms images of elemental distributions fluorescent x rays or images of mass distributions by measurement of the linear attenuation coefficient of the material. Distributions of sections through materials are obtained non-destructively using the technique of computed microtomography (CMT). The energy range of the x rays used for the XRM ranges from a few keV at the minimum value to more than 100 keV, which is sufficient to excite the K-edge of all naturally occurring elements. The work in progress at the Brookhaven NSLS X26 and X17 XRM is described in order to show the current status of the XRM. While there are many possible approaches to the XRM instrumentation, this instrument gives state-of-the-art performance in most respects and serves as a reasonable example of the present status of the instrumentation in terms of the spatial resolution and minimum detection limits (MDLs) obtainable. The examples of applications cited give an idea of the types of research fields that are currently under investigation. They can be used to illustrate how the field of x-ray microscopy will benefit from the use of bending magnets and insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

  12. Superiority of Low Energy 160 KV X-Rays Compared to High Energy 6 MV X-Rays in Heavy Element Radiosensitization for Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Nahar, Sultana N.; Barth, Rolf F.; Yang, Weilian; Nakkula, Robin J.; Palmer, Alycia; Turro, Claudia

    2013-06-01

    High energy X-rays in the MeV range are generally employed in conventional radiation therapy from linear accelerators (LINAC) to ensure sufficient penetration depths. However, lower energy X-rays in the keV range may be more effective when coupled with heavy element (high-Z or HZ) radiosensitizers. Numerical simulations of X-ray energy deposition for tumor phantoms sensitized with HZ radiosensitizers were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4. The results showed enhancement in energy deposition to radiosensitized phantoms relative to unsensitized phantoms for low energy X-rays in the keV range. In contrast, minimal enhancement was seen using high energy X-rays in the MeV range. Dose enhancement factors (DEFs) were computed and showed radiosensitization only in the low energy range nitrate, was initially used because it was 7x less toxic that an equivalent amount of carboplatin in vitro studies. This would allow us to separate the radiotoxic and the chemotoxic effects of HZ sensitizers. Results from this study showed a 10-fold dose dependent reduction in surviving fractions (SF) of radiosensitized cells treated with low energy 160 kV X-rays compared to those treated with 6 MV X-rays. This is in agreement with our simulations that show an increase in dose deposition in radiosensitized tumors for low energy X-rays. Due to unforeen in vivo toxicity, however, another in vitro study was performed using the commonly used, Pt-based chemotherapeutic drug carboplatin which confirmed earlier results. This lays the ground work for a planned in vivo study using F98 glioma bearing rats. This study demonstrates that while high energy X-rays are commonly used in cancer radiotherapy, low energy keV X-rays might be much more effective with HZ radiosensitization.

  13. Measurements of internal stresses in bond coating using high energy x-rays from synchrotron radiation source

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, K; Akiniwa, Y; Nishio, K; Kawamura, M; Okado, H

    2002-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) techniques enable high temperature combustion of turbines made of Ni-base alloy. TBC is made of zirconia top coating on NiCoCrAlY bond coating. The internal stresses in the bond coating play essential role in the delamination or fracture of TBC in service. With the X-rays from laboratory equipments, it is impossible to measure nondestructively the internal stress in the bond coating under the top coating. synchrotron radiations with a high energy and high brightness have a large penetration depth as compared with laboratory X-rays. Using the high energy X-rays from the synchrotron radiation, it is possible to measure the internal stress in the bond coating through the top coating. In this study, the furnace, which can heat a specimen to 1473 K, was developed for the stress measurement of the thermal barrier coatings. The internal stresses in the bond coating were measured at the room temperature, 773 K, 1073 K and 1373 K by using the 311 diffraction from Ni sub 3 Al with about 73...

  14. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  15. X-ray diffraction patterns of thermally-reduced graphenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Hae-Mi; Choi, Sung-Ho; Huh, Seung-Hun

    2010-01-01

    Thermally-reduced graphenes (GPs) from graphene oxides (GOs) in the range of 200 - 800 .deg. C have been investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The temperature-dependent evolutions of the (002) peaks show that exfoliation of GO sheets occurs, along with wrinkling, at ∼200 .deg. C and that high-quality GPs are produced at ∼ 600 .deg. C (GP 600 ). These phenomena are explained by the vaporization of intercalated water molecules and the effective removal of the oxide groups of GO by thermal annealing, respectively. GP 600 exhibited a clean and sharp (002) peak corresponding to an interlayer distance of 3.392 A, which is close to that of conventional graphene (∼3.4 A). The structure of GP 600 is further discussed.

  16. Powder X-ray diffraction laboratory, Reston, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Dulong, Frank T.; Jackson, John C.; Folger, Helen W.

    2014-01-01

    The powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) laboratory is managed jointly by the Eastern Mineral and Environmental Resources and Eastern Energy Resources Science Centers. Laboratory scientists collaborate on a wide variety of research problems involving other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science centers and government agencies, universities, and industry. Capabilities include identification and quantification of crystalline and amorphous phases, and crystallographic and atomic structure analysis for a wide variety of sample media. Customized laboratory procedures and analyses commonly are used to characterize non-routine samples including, but not limited to, organic and inorganic components in petroleum source rocks, ore and mine waste, clay minerals, and glassy phases. Procedures can be adapted to meet a variety of research objectives.

  17. Simulating X-ray diffraction of textured films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiby, Dag W.; Bunk, Oliver; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel

    2008-01-01

    Computationally efficient simulations of grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) are discussed, with particular attention given to textured thin polycrystalline films on supporting substrates. A computer program has been developed for simulating scattering from thin films exhibiting varying...... degrees of preferred orientation. One emphasized common case is that of a 'fibre' symmetry axis perpendicular to the sample plane, resulting from crystallites having one well defined crystal facet towards the substrate, but no preferred inplane orientation. Peak splitting caused by additional scattering......, the mathematically simplest possible descriptions are sought whenever feasible. The practical use of the program is demonstrated for a selected thin-film example, perylene, which is of relevance for organic electronics....

  18. X-ray diffraction study of choline chloride's β form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrouleas, V.; Lemmon, R.M.; Christensen, A.

    1978-01-01

    The organic salt choline chloride exists in two crystalline polymorphs. One (the α form) is extraordinarily sensitive to ionizing radiation, the other (the β form) is not. The present report describes an x-ray diffraction study of the β form. The structure has been found to be highly disordered face centered cubic. A reasonable least-square refinement of the intensity data has been achieved in the centrosymmetric space group Fm3 or Fm3m by use of a molecular model with restrained bond lengths. The results show that in the β form the electronic density due to the choline cation is closely spaced around the N, so that hydrogen bonding to the chloride is unlikely. Comparison with infrared and NMR data indicates that the disordering is dynamic and can be ascribed to rotations of the choline ion around crystallographic symmetry axes. Possible connections of these results with the radiation stability of the β form are discussed

  19. Industry-relevant magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc ultra-high vacuum deposition system for in situ x-ray diffraction studies of thin film growth using high energy synchrotron radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, Jeremy; Thomson, W.; Howard, B.; Schell, N.; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Rogström, Lina; Johansson-Jöesaar, Mats P.; Ghafoor, Naureen; Odén, Magnus; Nothnagel, E.; Shepard, A.; Greer, J.; Birch, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We present an industry-relevant, large-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc deposition system purposefully designed for time-resolved in situ thin film deposition/annealing studies using high-energy (greater than50 keV), high photon flux (greater than10(12) ph/s) synchrotron radiation. The high photon flux, combined with a fast-acquisition-time (less than1 s) two-dimensional (2D) detector, permits time-resolved in situ structural analysis of thin film formation...

  20. Precise rotational alignment of x-ray transmission diffraction gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Gold transmission diffraction gratings used for x-ray spectroscopy must sometimes be rotationally aligned to the axis of a diagnostic instrument to within sub-milliradian accuracy. We have fabricated transmission diffraction gratings with high line-densities (grating period of 200 and 300 nm) using uv holographic and x-ray lithography. Since the submicron features of the gratings are not optically visible, precision alignment is time consuming and difficult to verify in situ. We have developed a technique to write an optically visible alignment pattern onto these gratings using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). At high magnification (15000 X) several submicron lines of the grating are observable in the SEM, making it possible to write an alignment pattern parallel to the grating lines in an electron-beam-sensitive coating that overlays the grating. We create an alignment pattern by following a 1-cm-long grating line using the SEM's joystick-controlled translation stage. By following the same grating line we are assured the traveled direction of the SEM electron beam is parallel to the grating to better than 10 μradian. The electron-beam-exposed line-width can be large (5 to 15 μm wide) depending on the SEM magnification, and is therefore optically visible. The exposed pattern is eventually made a permanent feature of the grating by ion beam etching or gold electroplating. The pattern can be used to accurately align the grating to the axis of a diagnostic instrument. More importantly, the alignment of the grating can be quickly verified in situ

  1. Design of scanning motion control system for high-energy X-ray industrial CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Liming

    2008-01-01

    A scanning motion control system was developed for the high-energy X-ray industrial computerized tomography (CT). The system consists of an industrial control computer, a counter card, a control card, servo drivers, servo motors, working platforms, gratings and control software. Based on windows driver model(WDM) mode, the composition of the driver pro- gram for the system was studied. Took the motor control card as an example, the method to develop the driver program was researched, and the intercourse process between the device driver program and the user-program was analyzed. The real-time control of the system was implemented using the WDM driver. The real-time performance and reliability of the system can satisfy the requirement of high-energy X-ray industrial CT. (authors)

  2. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  3. X-ray diffraction and X-ray standing-wave study of the lead stearate film structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagov, A. E.; Dyakova, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Kohn, V. G.; Marchenkova, M. A.; Pisarevskiy, Yu. V.; Prosekov, P. A., E-mail: prosekov@crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    A new approach to the study of the structural quality of crystals is proposed. It is based on the use of X-ray standing-wave method without measuring secondary processes and considers the multiwave interaction of diffraction reflections corresponding to different harmonics of the same crystallographic reflection. A theory of multiwave X-ray diffraction is developed to calculate the rocking curves in the X-ray diffraction scheme under consideration for a long-period quasi-one-dimensional crystal. This phase-sensitive method is used to study the structure of a multilayer lead stearate film on a silicon substrate. Some specific structural features are revealed for the surface layer of the thin film, which are most likely due to the tilt of the upper layer molecules with respect to the external normal to the film surface.

  4. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Vecchio, K. S. [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Huskins, E. L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Casem, D. T. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Gruner, S. M. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Woll, A. R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup −1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  5. Nanostructured diffractive optical devices for soft X-ray microscopes

    CERN Document Server

    Hambach, D; Schneider, G

    2001-01-01

    The new transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) installed at the BESSY II electron storage ring uses an off-axis transmission zone plate (OTZ) as diffractive and focusing element of the condenser-monochromator setup. A high resolution micro-zone plate (MZP) forms a magnified image on a CCD-detector. Both, the OTZ with an active area of up to 24 mm sup 2 and the MZP with zone widths as small as 25 nm are generated by a process including electron beam lithography (EBL), dry etching and subsequent electroplating of nickel on top of silicon membrane substrates with about 100-150 nm thickness. The combination of a larger zone width and the usage of nickel zone structures allows to increase the diffraction efficiency of the condenser element at least by a factor of 3 compared to the earlier used KZP7 condenser zone plate in the TXM at BESSY I. Groove diffraction efficiencies of 21.6% and 14.7% were measured for MZP objectives with 40 and 25 nm outermost zone width, respectively.

  6. Fundamentals of powder x-ray diffraction practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The goal of powder Xray diffraction is to gain information about a specimen or sample. Key aspects of this goal are 1. the sample selection, preparation and presentation; 2. the data collection process and conditions; 3. the interaction between these and the interpretation of the data. The 'ideal' powder (or polycrystalline) xray diffraction sample is fine grained, randomly orientated, homogenous and representative. There exists standard sample selection and preparation techniques for powders - sometimes however, the required information must be gained by alternate sample selection and preparation techniques. While there are few variables in the data collection process, there are some significant ones such as matching diffractometer resolution and intensity to the data collection goal whether that is phase identity, quantitative analysis or structure refinement, etc. There are also options of optical arrangement (Bragg-Brintano versus parallel beam versus Debye-Scherrer). One important aspect of the collection process is the assessment of the data quality. Powder xray diffraction has many applications from the straight-forward confirmation of phase identity and purity to structural analysis. Some of these applications will be considered and the interaction between the goal of the application and aspects of sample selection. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  7. Diffracted X-ray tracking for monitoring intramolecular motion in individual protein molecules using broad band X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Sasaki, Yuji C. [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 609 Kiban Building 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kahiwashi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, CREST, Sasaki-Team, 609 Kiban Building, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ohta, Noboru [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hoshisashi, Kentaro; Jae-won, Chang; Tokue, Maki; Matsushita, Yufuku [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 609 Kiban Building 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kahiwashi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Nishijima, Masaki; Inoue, Yoshihisa [Department of Applied Chemistry and Office for University-Industry Collaboration, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yagi, Naoto [Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, CREST, Sasaki-Team, 609 Kiban Building, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) enables the tilting and twisting motions of single protein molecules to be monitored with micro- to milliradian resolution using a highly brilliant X-ray source with a wide energy bandwidth. We have developed a technique to monitor single molecules using gold nanocrystals attached to individual protein molecules using the BL28B2 beamline at SPring-8. In this paper we present the installation of a single toroidal X-ray mirror at BL28B2 to focus X-rays in an energy range of 10–20 keV (△E/E = 82% for an X-ray with a wide energy bandwidth). With this beamline we tracked diffraction spots from gold nanocrystals over a wide angle range than that using quasi-monochromatic X-rays. Application of the wide angle DXT technique to biological systems enabled us to observe the on-site motions of single protein molecules that have been functionalized in vivo. We further extend the capability of DXT by observing the fractional tilting and twisting motions of inner proteins under various conditions. As a proof of this methodology and to determine instrumental performance the intramolecular motions of a human serum albumin complex with 2-anthracenecarboxylic acid was investigated using the BL28B2 beamline. The random tilting and twisting intramolecular motions are shown to be directly linked to the movement of individual protein molecules in the buffer solution.

  8. Source assemblage types for cratonic diamonds from X-ray synchrotron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestola, F.; Alvaro, M.; Casati, M. N.; Wilhelm, H.; Kleppe, A. K.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Domeneghetti, M. C.; Harris, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    Three single crystals of clinopyroxene trapped within three different gem-quality diamonds from the Udachnaya kimberlite (Siberia, Russia) were analysed in situ by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to obtain information on their chemical composition and infer source assemblage type. A non-destructive approach was used with high-energy (≈ 60 keV; λ ≈ 0.206 Å) at I15, the extreme-conditions beamline at Diamond Light Source. A dedicated protocol was used to center the mineral inclusions located deep inside the diamonds in the X-ray beam. Our results reveal that two of the inclusions can be associated with peridotitic paragenesis whereas the third is eclogitic. This study also demonstrates that this non-destructive experimental approach is extremely efficient in evaluating the origin of minerals trapped in their diamond hosts.

  9. Trial fabrication of a secondary x-ray spectrometer with high energy resolution for use in x-ray resonant inelastic scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwazumi, Toshiaki

    2004-01-01

    An instrument was fabricated for use of x-ray resonant inelastic scattering with high-energy resolution in expectation of finding new physical phenomena in strongly correlated electron systems. In the scattering x-ray spectrometer, an asymmetric Johanson crystal spectrometer, which was deployed in an asymmetric Rowland configuration, was designed, fabricated and assessed. The performance expected theoretically for the Johanson spectrometer was recognized from experiments by use of synchrotron radiation. (Y. Kazumata)

  10. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray diffraction studies on supported Ni catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldea, N.; Marginean, P.; Yaning, Xie; Tiandou, Hu; Tao, Liu; Wu, Zhongua; ZhenYa, Dai

    1999-01-01

    In the first part of this paper, we present a study based on EXAFS spectroscopy. This method can yield structural information about the local environment around a specific atomic constituent in the amorphous materials, the location and chemical state of any catalytic atom on any support or point defect structures, in alloys and composites. EXAFS is a specific technique of the scattering of X-ray on materials. The present study is aimed toward elucidation of the local structure of Ni atoms and their interaction with oxide support. The second goal of the paper consists in X-ray diffraction on the same samples. X-ray diffraction method that is capable to determine average particle size, microstrains, probability of faults as well as particle size distribution function of supported Ni catalysts is presented. The method is based on the Fourier analysis of a single X-Ray diffraction profile. The results obtained on supported nickel catalysts, which are used in H/D isotopic exchange reactions are reported. The global structure is obtained with a new fitting method based on the Generalised Fermi Function facilities for approximation and Fourier transform of the experimental X-Ray line profiles. Both types of measurements were performed on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facilities (BSRF). (authors)

  11. Texture of poled tetragonal PZT detected by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and micromechanics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, D.A.; Steuwer, A.; Cherdhirunkorn, B.; Withers, P.J.; Mori, T.

    2005-01-01

    The texture and lattice elastic strain due to electrical poling of tetragonal PZT (lead zirconate titanate) ceramics have been measured using high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. It is shown that XRD peak intensity ratios associated with crystal planes of the form {002}, {112} and {202} exhibit a linear dependence on cos-bar 2 Ψ, where Ψ represents the orientation angle between the plane normal and the macroscopic poling axis. The observed dependence of texture and lattice strain on the grain orientation can be understood on the basis that the macroscopic strain due to poling is the average of the poling strains of all the individual grains

  12. Load transfer in bovine plexiform bone determined by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, R.; Daymond, M.; Almer, J.; Mummery, P.; The Univ. of Manchester; Queen's Univ.

    2008-01-01

    High-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD) has been used to quantify load transfer in bovine plexiform bone. By using both wide-angle and small-angle XRD, strains in the mineral as well as the collagen phase of bone were measured as a function of applied compressive stress. We suggest that a greater proportion of the load is borne by the more mineralized woven bone than the lamellar bone as the applied stress increases. With a further increase in stress, load is shed back to the lamellar regions until macroscopic failure occurs. The reported data fit well with reported mechanisms of microdamage accumulation in bovine plexiform bone

  13. An autonomous CZT module for X-ray diffraction imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montemont, G.; Monnet, O.; Stanchina, S.; Verger, L.; Kosciesza, D.; Schlomka, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    We present the development of a CZT-based detection module dedicated to X-ray diffraction imaging. This kind of application requires a good energy and spatial resolution in order to resolve Bragg peaks. In a first part, we present the detector configuration used and dimensioning constraints. As the input energy range is comprised between 20 and 150 keV, we use 5 mm thick high resistivity CZT crystals. The 660 mm 2 detection area is segmented on both sides into 192 anodes and 12 cathodes. Signals from both sides are read jointly in order to perform multi parametric event corrections (depth of interaction, charge sharing, induction sharing). In order to be integrated easily inside an X-ray imaging system, the system has been conceived to be completely autonomous: it is powered by a single 12 V supply and is interfaced with the external system by Ethernet for communication and RS485 for synchronization. In a second part, we describe the system readout architecture and then the implementation of the data processing. An FPGA circuit embeds a digital processing chain that carries out readout ASIC interfacing and advanced multi parametric data corrections. Gain, offset but also depth of interaction and charge sharing are corrected on the flow. Incoming events from different channels are clustered together by comparing their location and time of occurrence. The FPGA also embeds a processor running an operating system that controls the system, carries out all calibrations, automated tests and acquisitions. Eventually, we show the results obtained and demonstrate the relative influence of depth of interaction and charge sharing. Homogeneity of detector behavior is also discussed and the reproducibility of the performance between modules is presented. The average energy resolution at 25 C is 2.4 % FWHM at 122 keV and 3.8 % FWHM at 60 keV and the average efficiency is 73 %. (authors)

  14. IL 12: Femtosecond x-ray powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerner, M.; Zamponi, F.; Rothhardt, P.; Ansari, Z.; Dreyer, J.; Freyer, B.; Premont-Schwarz, M.; Elsaesser, T.

    2010-01-01

    A chemical reaction generates new compounds out of one or more initial species. On a molecular level, the spatial arrangement of electrons and nuclei changes. While the structure of the initial and the product molecules can be measured routinely, the transient structures and molecular motions during a reaction have remained unknown in most cases. This knowledge, however, is a key element for the exact understanding of the reaction. The ultimate dream is a 'reaction microscope' which allows for an in situ imaging of the molecules during a reaction. We report on the first femtosecond x-ray powder diffraction experiment in which we directly map the transient electronic charge density in the unit cell of a crystalline solid with 30 pico-meter spatial and 100 femtosecond temporal resolution. X-ray diffraction from polycrystalline powder samples, the Debye Scherrer diffraction technique, is a standard method for determining equilibrium structures. The intensity of the Debye Scherrer rings is determined by the respective x-ray structure factor which represents the Fourier transform of the spatial electron density. In our experiments, the transient intensity and angular positions of up to 20 Debye Scherrer reactions from a polycrystalline powder are measured and unravel for the first time a concerted electron and proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded ionic (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 crystals. Photoexcitation of ammonium sulfate induces a sub-100 fs electron transfer from the sulfate groups into a highly conned electron channel along the z-axis of the unit cell. The latter geometry is stabilized by transferring protons from the adjacent ammonium groups into the channel. Time-dependent charge density maps derived from the diffraction data display a periodic modulation of the channels charge density by low-frequency lattice motions with a concerted electron and proton motion between the channel and the initial proton binding site. A deeper insight into the underlying microscopic

  15. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) High-Energy X-ray Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Craig, Willliam W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Zhang, William W.; Boggs, Steven E.; Stern, Daniel; Cook, W. Rick; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; hide

    2013-01-01

    High-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of focusing far beyond the 10 keV high-energy cutoff achieved by all previous X-ray satellites. The inherently low background associated with concentrating the X-ray light enables NuSTAR to probe the hard X-ray sky with a more than 100-fold improvement in sensitivity over the collimated or coded mask instruments that have operated in this bandpass. Using its unprecedented combination of sensitivity and spatial and spectral resolution, NuSTAR will pursue five primary scientific objectives: (1) probe obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity out to thepeak epoch of galaxy assembly in the universe (at z 2) by surveying selected regions of the sky; (2) study the population of hard X-ray-emitting compact objects in the Galaxy by mapping the central regions of the Milky Way; (3) study the non-thermal radiation in young supernova remnants, both the hard X-ray continuum and the emission from the radioactive element 44Ti; (4) observe blazars contemporaneously with ground-based radio, optical, and TeV telescopes, as well as with Fermi and Swift, to constrain the structure of AGN jets; and (5) observe line and continuum emission from core-collapse supernovae in the Local Group, and from nearby Type Ia events, to constrain explosion models. During its baseline two-year mission, NuSTAR will also undertake a broad program of targeted observations. The observatory consists of two co-aligned grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes pointed at celestial targets by a three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Deployed into a 600 km, near-circular, 6 inclination orbit, the observatory has now completed commissioning, and is performing consistent with pre-launch expectations. NuSTAR is now executing its primary science mission, and with an expected orbit lifetime of 10 yr, we anticipate proposing a guest investigator program, to begin in late 2014.

  16. High-energy Neutrino Flares from X-Ray Bright and Dark Tidal Disruption Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter [Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2017-03-20

    X-ray and γ-ray observations by the Swift satellite revealed that a fraction of tidal disruption events (TDEs) have relativistic jets. Jetted TDEs have been considered to be potential sources of very-high-energy cosmic-rays and neutrinos. In this work, using semi-analytical methods, we calculate neutrino spectra of X-ray bright TDEs with powerful jets and dark TDEs with possible choked jets, respectively. We estimate their neutrino fluxes and find that non-detection would give us an upper limit on the baryon loading of the jet luminosity contained in cosmic-rays ξ {sub cr} ≲ 20–50 for Sw J1644+57. We show that X-ray bright TDEs make a sub-dominant (≲5%–10%) contribution to IceCube’s diffuse neutrino flux, and study possible contributions of X-ray dark TDEs given that particles are accelerated in choked jets or disk winds. We discuss future prospects for multi-messenger searches of the brightest TDEs.

  17. X-ray diffraction using the time structure of the SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, B.K.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction (advances in the techniques of X-ray topography; comparison with transmission electron microscopy); stroboscopic X-ray topography; stroboscopic X-ray topography of travelling surface acoustic waves; possible general diffraction experiments. (U.K.)

  18. X-ray diffraction studies of NbTe 2 single crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The composition of the grown crystals was confirmed on the basis of energy dispersive analysis by X-ray (EDAX) and remaining structural characterization was also accomplished by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. Lattice parameters, volume and X-ray density have been carried out for the grown crystals. The particle size ...

  19. Comparison of neutron and high-energy X-ray dual-beam radiography for air cargo inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Sowerby, B.D.; Tickner, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Dual-beam radiography techniques utilising various combinations of high-energy X-rays and neutrons are attractive for screening bulk cargo for contraband such as narcotics and explosives. Dual-beam radiography is an important enhancement to conventional single-beam X-ray radiography systems in that it provides additional information on the composition of the object being imaged. By comparing the attenuations of transmitted dual high-energy beams, it is possible to build a 2D image, colour coded to indicate material. Only high-energy X-rays, gamma-rays and neutrons have the required penetration to screen cargo containers. This paper reviews recent developments and applications of dual-beam radiography for air cargo inspection. These developments include dual high-energy X-ray techniques as well as fast neutron and gamma-ray (or X-ray) radiography systems. High-energy X-ray systems have the advantage of generally better penetration than neutron systems, depending on the material being interrogated. However, neutron systems have the advantage of much better sensitivity to material composition compared to dual high-energy X-ray techniques. In particular, fast neutron radiography offers the potential to discriminate between various classes of organic material, unlike dual energy X-ray techniques that realistically only offer the ability to discriminate between organic and metal objects

  20. Sequential x-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM x-ray optics testing beamline at the advanced photon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav, E-mail: sstoupin@aps.anl.gov; Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Liu, Zunping; Lang, Keenan; Huang, Xianrong; Wieczorek, Michael; Kasman, Elina; Hammonds, John; Macrander, Albert; Assoufid, Lahsen [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    We report progress on implementation and commissioning of sequential X-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM Optics Testing Beamline of the Advanced Photon Source to accommodate growing needs of strain characterization in diffractive crystal optics and other semiconductor single crystals. The setup enables evaluation of strain in single crystals in the nearly-nondispersive double-crystal geometry. Si asymmetric collimator crystals of different crystallographic orientations were designed, fabricated and characterized using in-house capabilities. Imaging the exit beam using digital area detectors permits rapid sequential acquisition of X-ray topographs at different angular positions on the rocking curve of a crystal under investigation. Results on sensitivity and spatial resolution are reported based on experiments with high-quality Si and diamond crystals. The new setup complements laboratory-based X-ray topography capabilities of the Optics group at the Advanced Photon Source.

  1. Digital Image Correlation of 2D X-ray Powder Diffraction Data for Lattice Strain Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjia Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High energy 2D X-ray powder diffraction experiments are widely used for lattice strain measurement. The 2D to 1D conversion of diffraction patterns is a necessary step used to prepare the data for full pattern refinement, but is inefficient when only peak centre position information is required for lattice strain evaluation. The multi-step conversion process is likely to lead to increased errors associated with the ‘caking’ (radial binning or fitting procedures. A new method is proposed here that relies on direct Digital Image Correlation analysis of 2D X-ray powder diffraction patterns (XRD-DIC, for short. As an example of using XRD-DIC, residual strain values along the central line in a Mg AZ31B alloy bar after 3-point bending are calculated by using both XRD-DIC and the conventional ‘caking’ with fitting procedures. Comparison of the results for strain values in different azimuthal angles demonstrates excellent agreement between the two methods. The principal strains and directions are calculated using multiple direction strain data, leading to full in-plane strain evaluation. It is therefore concluded that XRD-DIC provides a reliable and robust method for strain evaluation from 2D powder diffraction data. The XRD-DIC approach simplifies the analysis process by skipping 2D to 1D conversion, and opens new possibilities for robust 2D powder diffraction data analysis for full in-plane strain evaluation.

  2. Digital Image Correlation of 2D X-ray Powder Diffraction Data for Lattice Strain Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjia; Sui, Tan; Daisenberger, Dominik; Fong, Kai Soon

    2018-01-01

    High energy 2D X-ray powder diffraction experiments are widely used for lattice strain measurement. The 2D to 1D conversion of diffraction patterns is a necessary step used to prepare the data for full pattern refinement, but is inefficient when only peak centre position information is required for lattice strain evaluation. The multi-step conversion process is likely to lead to increased errors associated with the ‘caking’ (radial binning) or fitting procedures. A new method is proposed here that relies on direct Digital Image Correlation analysis of 2D X-ray powder diffraction patterns (XRD-DIC, for short). As an example of using XRD-DIC, residual strain values along the central line in a Mg AZ31B alloy bar after 3-point bending are calculated by using both XRD-DIC and the conventional ‘caking’ with fitting procedures. Comparison of the results for strain values in different azimuthal angles demonstrates excellent agreement between the two methods. The principal strains and directions are calculated using multiple direction strain data, leading to full in-plane strain evaluation. It is therefore concluded that XRD-DIC provides a reliable and robust method for strain evaluation from 2D powder diffraction data. The XRD-DIC approach simplifies the analysis process by skipping 2D to 1D conversion, and opens new possibilities for robust 2D powder diffraction data analysis for full in-plane strain evaluation. PMID:29543728

  3. High energy x-ray scattering studies of strongly correlated oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatton, Peter D; Wilkins, S B; Spencer, P D; Zimmermann, M v; D'Almeida, T

    2003-01-01

    Many transition metal oxides display strongly correlated charge, spin, or orbital ordering resulting in varied phenomena such as colossal magnetoresistance, high temperature superconductivity, metal-insulator transitions etc. X-ray scattering is one of the principle techniques for probing the structural response to such effects. In this paper, we discuss and review the use of synchrotron radiation high energy x-rays (50-200 keV) for the study of transition metal oxides such as nickelates (La 2-x Sr x NiO 4 ) and manganites (La 2-2x Sr 1+2x Mn 2 O 7 ). High energy x-rays have sufficient penetration to allow us to study large flux-grown single crystals. The huge increase in sample scattering volume means that extremely weak peaks can be observed. This allows us to study very weak charge ordering. Measurements of the intensity, width and position of the charge ordering satellites as a function of temperature provide us with quantitative measures of the charge amplitude, inverse correlation length and wavevector of the charge ordering

  4. Advanced ceramic matrix composites for high energy x-ray generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean Claude

    2011-01-01

    High energy x-ray targets are the anodes used in high performance tubes, designed to work for long operating times and at high power. Such tubes are used in computed tomography (CT) scan machines. Usually the tubes used in CT scanners have to continuously work at high temperatures and for longer scan durations in order to get maximum information during a single scan. These anodes are composed of a refractory substrate which supports a refractory metallic coating. The present work is a review of the development of a ceramic metal composite based on aluminium nitride (AlN) and molybdenum for potential application as the substrate. This composite is surface engineered by coating with tungsten, the most popular material for high energy x-ray targets. To spray metallic coatings on the surface of ceramic matrix composites dc blown arc plasma is employed. The objective is to increase the performance and the life of an x-ray tube. Aluminium nitride-molybdenum ceramic matrix composites were produced by uniaxial hotpressing mixtures of AlN and Mo powders. These composites were characterized for their mechanical, thermal, electrical and micro-structural properties. An optimized composition was selected which contained 25 vol.% of metallic phase dispersed in the AlN matrix. These composites were produced in the actual size of an anode and coated with tungsten through dc blown arc plasma spraying. The results have shown that sintering of large size anodes is possible through uniaxial pressing, using a modified sintering cycle

  5. High-Resolution Detector For X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Withrow, William K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Yost, Vaughn H.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed x-ray-sensitive imaging detector offers superior spatial resolution, counting-rate capacity, and dynamic range. Instrument based on laser-stimulated luminescence and reusable x-ray-sensitive film. Detector scans x-ray film line by line. Extracts latent image in film and simultaneously erases film for reuse. Used primarily for protein crystallography. Principle adapted to imaging detectors for electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy and general use in astronomy, engineering, and medicine.

  6. Performances for confocal X-ray diffraction technology based on polycapillary slightly focusing X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hehe; Liu, Zhiguo [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Sun, Tianxi, E-mail: stxbeijing@163.com [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Peng, Song [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma, Yongzhong [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Beijing, Beijing 100013 (China); Sun, Weiyuan; Li, Yude; Lin, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Weigang; Zhao, Guangcui; Luo, Ping; Pan, Qiuli; Ding, Xunliang [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-09-21

    The confocal X-ray diffraction (XRD) technology based on a polycapillary slightly focusing X-ray lens (PSFXRL) in excitation channel and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL) with a long input focal distance in detection channel was developed. The output focal spot of the PSFXRL and the input focal spot of the PPXRL were adjusted in confocal configuration, and only the X-rays from the volume overlapped by these foci could be accordingly detected. This confocal configuration was helpful in decreasing background. The convergence of the beam focused by the PSFXRL and divergence of the beam which could be collected by the PPXRL with a long input focal distance were both about 9 mrad at 8 keV. This was helpful in improving the resolution of lattice spacing of this confocal XRD technology. The gain in power density of such PSFXRL and PPXRL was about 120 and 7 at 11 keV, respectively, which was helpful in using the low power source to perform XRD analysis efficiently. The performances of this confocal XRD technology were provided, and some common plastics were analyzed. The experimental results demonstrated that the confocal diffraction technology base on polycapillary slightly focusing X-ray optics had wide potential applications.

  7. Two digital X-ray imaging systems for applications in X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.; Stephenson, R.; Flesher, A.C.; Bryant, C.J.; Lincoln, A.D.; Tucker, P.A.; Swanton, S.W.

    1986-08-01

    Two digital X-ray imaging systems developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory are described:- the Mark I and the Mark II. Both use a bidimensionally sensitive Multiwire proportional counter as the basic X-ray image transducer coupled to a digital microcomputer system. The Mark I system provides the advantages of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging directly into the computer with the potential for software control of the sample orientation and environment. The Mark II system adds the novel features of signal averaging and multi-frame exposures. (author)

  8. Structured photocathodes for improved high-energy x-ray efficiency in streak cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opachich, Y. P., E-mail: opachiyp@nv.doe.gov; Huffman, E.; Koch, J. A. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Hatch, B.; Landen, O. L.; MacPhee, A. G.; Nagel, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Chen, N.; Gopal, A.; Udin, S. [Nanoshift LLC, Emeryville, California 94608 (United States); Feng, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We have designed and fabricated a structured streak camera photocathode to provide enhanced efficiency for high energy X-rays (1–12 keV). This gold coated photocathode was tested in a streak camera and compared side by side against a conventional flat thin film photocathode. Results show that the measured electron yield enhancement at energies ranging from 1 to 10 keV scales well with predictions, and that the total enhancement can be more than 3×. The spatial resolution of the streak camera does not show degradation in the structured region. We predict that the temporal resolution of the detector will also not be affected as it is currently dominated by the slit width. This demonstration with Au motivates exploration of comparable enhancements with CsI and may revolutionize X-ray streak camera photocathode design.

  9. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y., E-mail: cycjty@sophie.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Fuji, Hino, Tokyo 191-8502 (Japan); Fujiwara, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M. [Nuclear Professional School, the University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Tomita, H. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshihara, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  10. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-01-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  11. High-energy x-ray CT and its application for digital engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, H.; Sadaoka, N.

    2005-01-01

    A high-energy x-ray computed tomography system and x-ray CT data handling software have been developed for digital engineering; internal dimension measurement, density analysis, actual and designed shape comparison, STL file generation, and support for reverse engineering and rapid prototyping. The system is designed to collect accurate images in short scanning time (10 s per section) using a MeV-energy electron linear accelerator and highly sensitive semiconductor detectors in order to scan large objects made of aluminum and/or iron. An excellent environment in digital engineering is provided by the software products; 'StereoCooker' for 3D bitmap CAD (rendering, feature extraction, dimensional measurement, and shape comparison, etc.), 'FeatureMaker' for translating bitmap CT data to CAD data including feature information, and 'Wingware' for realizing an Windows PC cluster system 'WINGluster' to apply CT data analysis. (author)

  12. Development of confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy at the Cornell high energy synchrotron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woll, A.R.; Huang, R.; Mass, J.; Bisulca, C.; Bilderback, D.H.; Gruner, S.; Gao, N.

    2006-01-01

    A confocal X-ray fluorescence microscope was built at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) to obtain compositional depth profiles of historic paintings. The microscope consists of a single-bounce, borosilicate monocapillary optic to focus the incident beam onto the painting and a commercial borosilicate polycapillary lens to collect the fluorescent X-rays. The resolution of the microscope was measured by scanning a variety of thin metal films through this confocal volume while monitoring the fluorescence signal. The capabilities of the technique were then probed using test paint microstructures with up to four distinct layers, each having a thickness in the range of 10-80 microns. Results from confocal XRF were compared with those from stand-alone XRF and visible light microscopy of the paint cross-sections. A large area, high-resolution scanner is currently being built to perform 3D scans on moderately sized paintings. (orig.)

  13. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and imaging of ancient Chinese bronzes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, M.L.; Dunand, D.C.; Casadio, F.; Schnepp, S.; Almer, J.; Haeffner, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction and imaging experiments were performed at the Advanced Photon Source on two ancient Chinese bronzes from the Art Institute of Chicago with the goal to nondestructively study their microstructure. The first object, a bronze fragment from an early Western Zhou dynasty vessel (Hu, 11th/10th century B.C.), was investigated with spatially-resolved diffraction to reveal the depth and composition of the surface corrosion layer as well as the composition and grain size of the underlying bronze core. The second object, a bronze dagger-axe (Ge, 3rd/2nd century B.C.) with a silver-inlaid sheath, was studied under both diffraction and imaging conditions. It was found to have been cast as a single object, answering longstanding scholars' questions on whether the ceremonial object concealed an interior blade. (orig.)

  14. X-Ray Observations of High-Energy Pulsars: PSR B1951+32 and Geminga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cheng

    Observations at frequencies across a wide range of electromagnetic spectra are key to the understanding of the origin and mechanisms of high-energy emissions from pulsars. We propose to observe the high-energy pulsars PSR B1951+32 and Geminga with XTE. These two sources emit X-rays at low enough count rate that we can acquire high resolution timing and spectral data, allowing us to perform detailed analysis on the ground. Staring integration of 10 ksec for each source is requested. Data obtained in these observations, together with those from ROSAT, GRO and a planned project for optical counterpart study at Los Alamos, will provide crucial information to advance high-energy pulsar research.

  15. X-ray diffraction imaging of material microstructures

    KAUST Repository

    Varga, Laszlo; Varga, Bonbien; Calo, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Various examples are provided for x-ray imaging of the microstructure of materials. In one example, a system for non-destructive material testing includes an x-ray source configured to generate a beam spot on a test item; a grid detector configured

  16. X-ray diffraction analysis of mudstone from nw sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Suad Z.Elabdeen

    1997-03-01

    This study deals with the theoretical and experimental aspects of the x-ray diffraction technique (XRD). The XRD technique is used to investigate fine structure of matter, and it is most efficient method for the determination of the mineralogical composition of rocks. The XRD technique is used also to investigate the clay mineralogical of mud-stones of the Nubian sandstones of north western Sudan. The XRD results revealed that the mud-stone samples are composed, in decreasing abundance's of kaolinite, smectite, chlorite and illite. Non-clay minerals reported include quartz, feldspars and geothite. Kaolinite dominates in most of samples with percentages ranging between 78-96%. Smectite comes second in abundance and ranges between 10-24%, followed by chlorite and illite which showed the lowest abundance's. The dominance of kaolinite over smectite indicates that intense chemical weathering and leaching occurred under warm humid climate interrupted by dry periods. Most probably these clay minerals were produced by inheritance and partly by neo formation. The variation of the chemical composition of these mud stones is due basically to differences in clay mineralogy which was controlled by source rock geology, weathering physicochemical behavior of elements, local environment and climatic condition in the past. (Author)

  17. X-Ray Powder Diffraction with Guinier - Haegg Focusing Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Allan

    1970-12-15

    The Guinier - Haegg focusing camera is discussed with reference to its use as an instrument for rapid phase analysis. An actual camera and the alignment procedure employed in its setting up are described. The results obtained with the instrument are compared with those obtained with Debye - Scherrer cameras and powder diffractometers. Exposure times of 15 - 30 minutes with compounds of simple structure are roughly one-sixth of those required for Debye - Scherrer patterns. Coupled with the lower background resulting from the use of a monochromatic X-ray beam, the shorter exposure time gives a ten-fold increase in sensitivity for the detection of minor phases as compared with the Debye - Scherrer camera. Attention is paid to the precautions taken to obtain reliable Bragg angles from Guinier - Haegg film measurements, with particular reference to calibration procedures. The evaluation of unit cell parameters from Guinier - Haegg data is discussed together with the application of tests for the presence of angle-dependent systematic errors. It is concluded that with proper calibration procedures and least squares treatment of the data, accuracies of the order of 0.005% are attainable. A compilation of diffraction data for a number of compounds examined in the Active Central Laboratory at Studsvik is presented to exemplify the scope of this type of powder camera.

  18. X-Ray Powder Diffraction with Guinier - Haegg Focusing Cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Allan

    1970-12-01

    The Guinier - Haegg focusing camera is discussed with reference to its use as an instrument for rapid phase analysis. An actual camera and the alignment procedure employed in its setting up are described. The results obtained with the instrument are compared with those obtained with Debye - Scherrer cameras and powder diffractometers. Exposure times of 15 - 30 minutes with compounds of simple structure are roughly one-sixth of those required for Debye - Scherrer patterns. Coupled with the lower background resulting from the use of a monochromatic X-ray beam, the shorter exposure time gives a ten-fold increase in sensitivity for the detection of minor phases as compared with the Debye - Scherrer camera. Attention is paid to the precautions taken to obtain reliable Bragg angles from Guinier - Haegg film measurements, with particular reference to calibration procedures. The evaluation of unit cell parameters from Guinier - Haegg data is discussed together with the application of tests for the presence of angle-dependent systematic errors. It is concluded that with proper calibration procedures and least squares treatment of the data, accuracies of the order of 0.005% are attainable. A compilation of diffraction data for a number of compounds examined in the Active Central Laboratory at Studsvik is presented to exemplify the scope of this type of powder camera

  19. Federated repositories of X-ray diffraction images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androulakis, Steve; Schmidberger, Jason; Bate, Mark A; DeGori, Ross; Beitz, Anthony; Keong, Cyrus; Cameron, Bob; McGowan, Sheena; Porter, Corrine J; Harrison, Andrew; Hunter, Jane; Martin, Jennifer L; Kobe, Bostjan; Dobson, Renwick C J; Parker, Michael W; Whisstock, James C; Gray, Joan; Treloar, Andrew; Groenewegen, David; Dickson, Neil; Buckle, Ashley M

    2008-07-01

    There is a pressing need for the archiving and curation of raw X-ray diffraction data. This information is critical for validation, methods development and improvement of archived structures. However, the relatively large size of these data sets has presented challenges for storage in a single worldwide repository such as the Protein Data Bank archive. This problem can be avoided by using a federated approach, where each institution utilizes its institutional repository for storage, with a discovery service overlaid. Institutional repositories are relatively stable and adequately funded, ensuring persistence. Here, a simple repository solution is described, utilizing Fedora open-source database software and data-annotation and deposition tools that can be deployed at any site cheaply and easily. Data sets and associated metadata from federated repositories are given a unique and persistent handle, providing a simple mechanism for search and retrieval via web interfaces. In addition to ensuring that valuable data is not lost, the provision of raw data has several uses for the crystallographic community. Most importantly, structure determination can only be truly repeated or verified when the raw data are available. Moreover, the availability of raw data is extremely useful for the development of improved methods of image analysis and data processing.

  20. Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd' ko, Yuri; Shu Deming; Khachatryan, Ruben; Xiao, Xianghui; DeCarlo, Francesco; Goetze, Kurt; Roberts, Timothy; Roehrig, Christian; Deriy, Alexey [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub X}{approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

  1. Focusing Optics for High-Energy X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leinert, U.; Schulze, C.; Honkimäki, V.

    1998-01-01

    Novel focusing optical devices have been developed for synchrotron radiation in the energy range 40-100 keV. Firstly, a narrow-band-pass focusing energy-tuneable fixed-exit monochromator was constructed by combining meridionally bent Laue and Bragg crystals. Dispersion compensation was applied...

  2. Amorphous silica studied by high energy x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, H.F.; Neuefeind, J.; Neumann, H.B.

    1995-01-01

    -ray and neutron data. A feasibility study of amorphous silica has been performed at 95 keV, using a wiggler synchrotron beam-line at HASYLAB and a cylindrical sample, 3 mm in diameter. The range of Q between 0.8 and 32 Angstrom(-1) was covered. A thorough discussion of the experimental challenges is given...

  3. X-ray topography under conditions of monochromatic spherical wave diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristov, V.V.; Polovinkina, V.I.; Ibhikawa, Tetsuya; Kiduta, Seishi.

    1981-01-01

    An X-ray topographic scheme was developed in which there is a large distance between the X-ray source and the specimen. A monochromatic X-ray beam with an angular divergence 6 x 10 - 5 rad obtained by double successive diffraction in the (n 1 , +n 2 ) setting was used. This scheme enables diffraction focusing of a weakly absorbed wave field onto the exit surface of the crystal to be performed. Topographs of a wedge-shaped silicon crystal were obtained. Interference effects such as focusing, anomalous and ordinary Pendelloesung effects peculiar to X-ray spherical wave diffraction were observed in the topographs with high resolution. (author)

  4. Characterization of Polycrystalline Materials Using Synchrotron X-ray Imaging and Diffraction Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludwig, Wolfgang; King, A.; Herbig, M.

    2010-01-01

    The combination of synchrotron radiation x-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offers new possibilities for in-situ observation of deformation and damage mechanisms in the bulk of polycrystalline materials. Minute changes in electron density (i.e., cracks, porosities) can be detected using...... propagation based phase contrast imaging, a 3-D imaging mode exploiting the coherence properties of third generation synchrotron beams. Furthermore, for some classes of polycrystalline materials, one may use a 3-D variant of x-ray diffraction imaging, termed x-ray diffraction contrast tomography. X-ray...

  5. A new X-ray pinhole camera for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging with high-energy and high-spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, F.P., E-mail: romanop@lns.infn.it [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Altana, C. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cosentino, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Pappalardo, L. [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rizzo, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    A new X-ray pinhole camera for the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) imaging of materials with high-energy and high-spatial resolution, was designed and developed. It consists of a back-illuminated and deep depleted CCD detector (composed of 1024 × 1024 pixels with a lateral size of 13 μm) coupled to a 70 μm laser-drilled pinhole-collimator, positioned between the sample under analysis and the CCD. The X-ray pinhole camera works in a coaxial geometry allowing a wide range of magnification values. The characteristic X-ray fluorescence is induced on the samples by irradiation with an external X-ray tube working at a maximum power of 100 W (50 kV and 2 mA operating conditions). The spectroscopic capabilities of the X-ray pinhole camera were accurately investigated. Energy response and energy calibration of the CCD detector were determined by irradiating pure target-materials emitting characteristic X-rays in the energy working-domain of the system (between 3 keV and 30 keV). Measurements were performed by using a multi-frame acquisition in single-photon counting. The characteristic X-ray spectra were obtained by an automated processing of the acquired images. The energy resolution measured at the Fe–Kα line is 157 eV. The use of the X-ray pinhole camera for the 2D resolved elemental analysis was investigated by using reference-patterns of different materials and geometries. The possibility of the elemental mapping of samples up to an area of 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} was demonstrated. Finally, the spatial resolution of the pinhole camera was measured by analyzing the profile function of a sharp-edge. The spatial resolution determined at the magnification values of 3.2 × and 0.8 × (used as testing values) is about 90 μm and 190 μm respectively. - Highlights: • We developed an X-ray pinhole camera for the 2D X-ray fluorescence imaging. • X-ray spectra are obtained by a multi-frame acquisition in single photon mode. • The energy resolution in the X-ray

  6. High energy x-ray and neutron studies of disordered energy-related materials at extreme conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parise, John

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental scientific accomplishments are: (1) advances in a general description of the liquid state by employing structural models constrained by measurements to interpret experimental results and extend them to liquids in general, with special emphasis on (2) The structure of the high-temperature crystal and molten UO_2 and 3) water. Specifically, samples of UO_2 and water were probed using high-energy x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source. The high Z of UO_2, and the 2-3mm diameter droplet shape of the molten sample, means that >100keV X-rays are required to minimize absorption and multiple scattering, which can distort the measured structure factor. A high flux of x-rays is also required to obtain sufficient statistical accuracy in short (a few seconds) measurement times. The scattered x-ray data were analyzed and pair distribution functions, extracted that characterize the local and long-range atomic structure of the material. The measurements of the hot UO_2 solid show a substantial increase in oxygen disorder and, upon melting, the average U-O coordination was found to decrease from 8 to 6.7±0.5. The research incorporated development of diffraction techniques, sample environment optimization and state-of-the-art simulation techniques. The symbiotic nature of the advances in simulation and experiment allowed for a more focused and informed development of future experiments, effective use of expensive beam time and generated new research agendas for the growing number of research groups, within the US and internationally, that focus on the structure of liquids. Molecular dynamics (MD) provided detailed information when combined with high-quality XN data including addressing key issues in liquids; the relationship between cooling path, structure and fictive temperature, and the trade-offs between network over connectedness in liquids containing low-coordination cations.

  7. High energy x-ray and neutron studies of disordered energy-related materials at extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parise, John [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2016-05-16

    The fundamental scientific accomplishments are: (1) advances in a general description of the liquid state by employing structural models constrained by measurements to interpret experimental results and extend them to liquids in general, with special emphasis on (2) The structure of the high-temperature crystal and molten UO2 and 3) water. Specifically, samples of UO2 and water were probed using high-energy x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source. The high Z of UO2, and the 2-3mm diameter droplet shape of the molten sample, means that >100keV X-rays are required to minimize absorption and multiple scattering, which can distort the measured structure factor. A high flux of x-rays is also required to obtain sufficient statistical accuracy in short (a few seconds) measurement times. The scattered x-ray data were analyzed and pair distribution functions, extracted that characterize the local and long-range atomic structure of the material. The measurements of the hot UO2 solid show a substantial increase in oxygen disorder and, upon melting, the average U-O coordination was found to decrease from 8 to 6.7±0.5. The research incorporated development of diffraction techniques, sample environment optimization and state-of-the-art simulation techniques. The symbiotic nature of the advances in simulation and experiment allowed for a more focused and informed development of future experiments, effective use of expensive beam time and generated new research agendas for the growing number of research groups, within the US and internationally, that focus on the structure of liquids. Molecular dynamics (MD) provided detailed information when combined with high-quality XN data including addressing key issues in liquids; the relationship between cooling path, structure and fictive temperature, and the trade-offs between network over connectedness in liquids containing low-coordination cations.

  8. X-ray spectroscopy for high energy-density X pinch density and temperature measurements (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikuz, S.A.; Shelkovenko, T.A.; Chandler, K.M.; Mitchell, M.D.; Hammer, D.A.; Skobelev, I.Y.; Shlyaptseva, A.S.; Hansen, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    X pinch plasmas produced from fine metal wires can reach near solid densities and temperatures of 1 keV or even more. Plasma conditions change on time scales as short as 5-10 ps as determined using an x-ray streak camera viewing a focusing crystal spectrograph or directly viewing the plasma through multiple filters on a single test. As a result, it is possible to determine plasma conditions from spectra with ∼10 ps time resolution. Experiments and theory are now coming together to give a consistent picture of the dynamics and kinetics of these high energy density plasmas with very high temporal and spatial precision. A set of diagnostic techniques used in experiments for spectrally, temporally, and spatially resolved measurements of X pinch plasmas is described. Results of plasma parameter determination from these measurements are presented. X ray backlighting of one x-pinch by another with ∼30 ps x-ray pulses enables the dynamics and kinetics to be correlated in time

  9. Liquid ammonia: Molecular correlation functions from x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narten, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly spherical molecules the x-ray scattering from liquids yields structure and correlation functions for molecular centers. The distribution of electron density in an ammonia molecular is very nearly spherical, and orientational correlation between molecules in the liquid is not ''seen'' by x rays. Structure and correlation functions for molecular centers (nitrogen atoms) are derived from x-ray data on liquid NH 3 at 4 degreeC and tabulated. They provide a sensitive test for future work on a molecular theory of liquid ammonia

  10. Laser micromachining of cadmium tungstate scintillator for high energy X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Sion Andreas

    Pulsed laser ablation has been investigated as a method for the creation of thick segmented scintillator arrays for high-energy X-ray radiography. Thick scintillators are needed to improve the X-ray absorption at high energies, while segmentation is required for spatial resolution. Monte-Carlo simulations predicted that reflections at the inter-segment walls were the greatest source of loss of scintillation photons. As a result of this, fine pitched arrays would be inefficient as the number of reflections would be significantly higher than in large pitch arrays. Nanosecond and femtosecond pulsed laser ablation was investigated as a method to segment cadmium tungstate (CdWO_4). The effect of laser parameters on the ablation mechanisms, laser induced material changes and debris produced were investigated using optical and electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for both types of lasers. It was determined that nanosecond ablation was unsuitable due to the large amount of cracking and a heat affected zone created during the ablation process. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation was found to induce less damage. The optimised laser parameters for a 1028 nm laser was found to be a pulse energy of 54 μJ corresponding to a fluence of 5.3 J cm. -2 a pulse duration of 190 fs, a repetition rate of 78.3 kHz and a laser scan speed of 707 mm s. -1 achieving a normalised pulse overlap of 0.8. A serpentine scan pattern was found to minimise damage caused by anisotropic thermal expansion. Femtosecond pulsed ablation was also found to create a layer of tungsten and cadmium sub-oxides on the surface of the crystals. The CdWO_4 could be cleaned by immersing the CdWO_4 in ammonium hydroxide at 45°C for 15 minutes. However, XPS indicated that the ammonium hydroxide formed a thin layer of CdCO_3 and Cd(OH)_2 on the surface. Prototype arrays were shown to be able to resolve features as small as 0.5 mm using keV energy X-rays. The most

  11. Modelling the X-ray powder diffraction of nitrogen-expanded austenite using the Debye formula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2008-01-01

    Stress-free and homogeneous samples of nitrogen-expanded austenite, a defect-rich f.c.c. structure with a high interstitial nitrogen occupancy (between 0.36 and 0.61), have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and Debye simulations. The simulations confirm the presence of deformation...... to be indistinguishable to X-ray powder diffraction....

  12. X-Ray Diffraction and the Discovery of the Structure of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, David T.

    2007-01-01

    A method is described for teaching the analysis of X-ray diffraction of DNA through a series of steps utilizing the original methods used by James Watson, Francis Crick, Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin. The X-ray diffraction pattern led to the conclusion of the basic helical structure of DNA and its dimensions while basic chemical principles…

  13. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition Hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multipinhole x-ray imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Dewald, E D; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; MacGowan, B J; Maddox, B R; Milovich, J L; Prasad, R R; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Thomas, C A

    2010-10-01

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside Hohlraums is important to the national ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes with four independent filter combinations to image entire Hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87× during the Hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with Hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 10-40 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser-plasma interactions rather than from Hohlraum hydrodynamics.

  14. Characteristics of high-energy X-rays using computed radiography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Mori, Yoshinobu

    1993-01-01

    A computed radiography (CR) with storage phosphor technology has advanced remarkably. Its application has been also discussed regarding the field of radiotherapy and studies have been made to shift from the film/screen system to the portal film using the CR system. The authors started to research CR portal imaging with high energy X-ray (10MV) on a regular scale in 1989. This paper deals with characteristics of high energy X-rays using the CR system. The digital characteristic curve corresponded with calculated value for dynamic range (L-value). The monitor unit (MU) counts at pixel (digital) value saturation point were L-value 0.5:28 MU, L-value 1.0:50 MU, L-value 2.0:167 MU, L-value 3.0:450 MU, L-value 4.0:1614 MU. The image contrast with the Mix-Dp phantom was L-value 0.5: about a 300 pixel value and L-value 4.0: about a 30 pixel value by a phantom 10 to 18 cm in thickness. Optimum L-value was 0.5, and tone-scale was the straight type of CR portal imaging using the graphy count mode. Optimum L-value was 4.0, and tone-scale was a rectangular wave type of CR portal imaging using therapeutic doses, and those were also described by the histogram analysis. (author)

  15. Qualitative analysis of powder x-ray diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, T.

    1999-01-01

    based methods of considering significant lines such as with the Hanawalt, Fink and alphabetical index; computer based search-match based on FOM and the more recent graphically based full pattern methods of phase identification. No single approach is foolproof. a range of techniques is recommended if a high level of success is required. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  16. On the theory of time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2008-01-01

    We derive the basic theoretical formulation for X-ray diffraction with pulsed fields, using a fully quantized description of light and matter. Relevant time scales are discussed for coherent as well as incoherent X-ray pulses, and we provide expressions to be used for calculation...... of the experimental diffraction signal for both types of X-ray sources. We present a simple analysis of time-resolved X-ray scattering for direct bond breaking in diatomic molecules. This essentially analytical approach highlights the relation between the signal and the time-dependent quantum distribution...

  17. New opportunities for 3D materials science of polycrystalline materials at the micrometre lengthscale by combined use of X-ray diffraction and X-ray imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludwig, W.; King, A.; Reischig, P.

    2009-01-01

    Non-destructive, three-dimensional (3D) characterization of the grain structure in mono-phase polycrystalline materials is an open challenge in material science. Recent advances in synchrotron based X-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offer interesting possibilities for mapping 3D grain shapes....... A recent extension of this methodology, termed X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT), combines the principles of X-ray diffraction imaging, three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy (3DXRD) and image reconstruction from projections. DCT provides simultaneous access to 3D grain shape...

  18. Topics in High-Energy Astrophysics: X-ray Time Lags and Gamma-ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, John J.

    2016-03-01

    The Universe is host to a wide variety of high-energy processes that convert gravitational potential energy or rest-mass energy into non-thermal radiation such as bremsstrahlung and synchrotron. Prevailing models of X-ray emission from accreting Black Hole Binaries (BHBs) struggle to simultaneously fit the quiescent X-ray spectrum and the transients which result in the phenomenon known as X-ray time lags. And similarly, classical models of diffusive shock acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae fail to explain the extreme particle acceleration in very short timescales as is inferred from recent gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula. In this dissertation, I develop new exact analytic models to shed light on these intriguing processes. I take a fresh look at the formation of X-ray time lags in compact sources using a new mathematical approach in which I obtain the exact Green's function solution. The resulting Green's function allows one to explore a variety of injection scenarios, including both monochromatic and broadband (bremsstrahlung) seed photon injection. I obtain the exact solution for the dependence of the time lags on the Fourier frequency, for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds. The model can successfully reproduce both the observed time lags and the quiescent X-ray spectrum using a single set of coronal parameters. I show that the implied coronal radii in the new model are significantly smaller than those obtained in the Monte Carlo simulations, hence greatly reducing the coronal heating problem. Recent bright gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula observed by AGILE and Fermi reaching GeV energies and lasting several days challenge the contemporary model for particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, specifically the diffusive shock acceleration model. Simulations indicate electron/positron pairs in the Crab nebula pulsar wind must be accelerated up to PeV energies in the presence of ambient magnetic fields with strength B ~100 microG. No

  19. Two digital X-ray imaging systems for applications in X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.; Stephenson, R.; Flesher, A.C.; Tucker, P.A.; Swanton, S.W.

    1987-01-01

    Two digital X-ray imaging systems developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory are described: the Mark I and the Mark II. Both use a bidimensionally sensitive multiwire proportional counter (MWPC) as the basic X-ray image transducer coupled, in the case of the Mark I to a Digital LSI 11-23 microcomputer system via CAMAC, and in the case of the Mark II to a Digital LSI 11-73 microcomputer system via custom-built data acquisition hardware mounted directly on the Q-bus of the microcomputer. The Mark I system provides the advantages of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging directly into the computer with the potential for software control of the sample orientation and environment. The Mark II system adds the novel features of signal averaging and multiframe exposures. The dedicated digital memories have a resolution of 512x512 pixels of 16 bits, matching well to the spatial resolution of the xenon-filled MWPC (0.5 mm fwhm over an aperture of 200 mm x 200 mm). A 512x512x4 bit video graphics system displays the images in grey scales or colour. (orig.)

  20. The phase problem and perspectives of surface X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajiri, Hiroo; Takahashi, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of synchrotron radiation sources has accelerated the application of diffraction techniques to surface sciences. Surface X-ray diffraction has become the state-of-the-art technique for determining ordered structures of atoms on crystal surfaces. We introduce surface X-ray diffraction briefly from the historical point of view and describe the concept that not only determine constellation of surface atoms but also view surface atoms as image. The progress in experimental and theoretical studies of surface X-ray diffraction including crystallographic direct methods is reviewed. (author)

  1. Three-dimensional visualization of a human chromosome using coherent x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yukio; Imamoto, Naoko; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    We succeeded in observing a human chromosome in two- and three-dimensions using x-ray diffraction microscopy. X-ray diffraction microscopy is a lens-less imaging technique utilizing coherent x-ray diffraction, and can overcome various limitations in conventional lens-based x-ray microscopy. Biological applications of the method have been limited to 2D observation, and 3D observation has been long waited. We found that the reconstructed chromosome images contain high-density axial structure, which has not been observed under unstained or unlabeled conditions. The result experimentally demonstrates the effectiveness of x-ray diffraction microscopy in observing internal structures of unstained biological samples with high image contrast. (author)

  2. Single shot diffraction of picosecond 8.7-keV x-ray pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. H. O’Shea

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate multiphoton, single shot diffraction images of x rays produced by inverse Compton scattering a high-power CO_{2} laser from a relativistic electron beam, creating a pulse of 8.7 keV x rays. The tightly focused, relatively high peak brightness electron beam and high photon density from the 2 J CO_{2} laser yielded 6×10^{7} x-ray photons over the full opening angle in a single shot. Single shot x-ray diffraction is performed by passing the x rays though a vertical slit and on to a flat silicon (111 crystal. 10^{2} diffracted photons were detected. The spectrum of the detected x rays is compared to simulation. The diffraction and detection of 10^{2} x rays is a key step to a more efficient time resolved diagnostic in which the number of observed x rays might reach 10^{4}; enabling a unique, flexible x-ray source as a sub-ps resolution diagnostic for studying the evolution of chemical reactions, lattice deformation and melting, and magnetism.

  3. X-ray Laue diffraction with allowance for second derivatives of amplitudes in dynamical diffraction equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balyan, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetrical Laue diffraction in a perfect crystal with a plane entrance surface is considered. The second derivatives of amplitudes in the direction, perpendicular to diffraction plane in the dynamical diffraction equations are taken into account. Using the corresponding Green function a general form for the amplitude of diffracted wave in the crystal is derived. The sizes of the source in both directions as well as the source of crystal distance and non-monochromaticity of the radiation incident on the crystal are taken into account. On the basis of obtained expression the coherent properties of the field depending on the sizes of the source and on the width of the spectrum of the incident radiation are analyzed. Taking into account the second derivatives of amplitudes with respect to the direction, perpendicular to the diffraction plane, the time dependent propagation equations for an X-ray pulse in a perfect crystal are given

  4. Measurement of thickness of thin films by the X-ray diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, C.; Balasingh, C.; Singh, A.K.

    1979-07-01

    X-ray diffraction method can be used to measure the thickness of thin films (coatings). The principle and the experimental details of the x-ray diffraction methods are described. The intensities of the diffracted beams are derived assuming a random orientation of the crystallites in the diffracting medium. Consequently, the expressions are not valid when the sample has preferred orientation. To check the performance of the method, thicknesses of nickel deposits on mild steel plates were determined by the x-ray diffraction method and the results compared with those obtained by the weighing method and metallographic examination. The weighing method which gives an accuracy of +- 0.1 micron is taken as the standard. The x-ray diffraction methods and the metallographic examinations give values within +- 1 micron of the value obtained by the weighing method. (author)

  5. Detectors for X-ray diffraction and scattering: a user's overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruegemann, Lutz; Gerndt, E.K.E.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of the applications of X-ray detectors to material research is given. Four experimental techniques and their specific detector requirements are described. Detector types are classified and critical parameters described in the framework of X-ray diffraction and X-ray scattering experiments. The article aims at building a bridge between detector end-users and detector developers. It gives limits of critical detector parameters, like angular resolution, energy resolution, dynamic range, and active area

  6. X-ray fluorescence in Member States (Italy): Full field X-ray fluorescence imaging with high-energy and high-spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, F. P.; Masini, N.; Pappalardo, L., E-mail: romanop@lns.infn.it [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Cosentino, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Rizzo, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    A full field X-ray camera for the X-Ray Fluorescence imaging of materials with high-energy and high-spatial resolution was designed and developed. The system was realized by coupling a pinhole collimator with a positionsensitive CCD detector. X-Ray fluorescence is induced on the samples by irradiation with an external X-ray tube. The characteristic X-ray spectra of the investigated materials are obtained by using a multi-frames acquisition in single-photon counting. The energy resolution measured at the Fe-Kα line was 157 eV. The spatial resolution of the system was determined by the analysis of a sharp-edge at different magnification values; it was estimated to be 90 μm at a magnification value of 3.2x and 190 μm at 0.8x. The present set-up of the system is suited to analyze samples with dimensions up to 5x4 cm{sup 2}. Typical measurement time is in the range between 1h to 4 h. (author)

  7. Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering and Diffraction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    several materials as a function of angle of incidence, αi with X-rays of wavelength ..... are several advantages of using this formulation for the description of surface ..... print of the surface (as shown at the botton of Figure. 5). A Soller collimator ...

  8. [X-ray diffraction experiments with condenser matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppens, P.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the following topics: high-T c superconductors; The response of crystal to an applied electric field; quasicrystals; surface structure and kinetics of surface layer formation; EXAFS studies of superconductors and heterostructures; effect of iron on the crystal structure of perovskite; x-ray detector development; and SAXS experiments

  9. Structural Investigations of Nanowires Using X-Ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stankevic, Tomas

    Advancements in growth of the nanowire-based devices opened another dimension of possible structures and material combinations, which nd their applications in a wide variety of elds, including everyday life. Characterization of such devices brings its own challenges and here we show that X-rays oer...

  10. X-ray powder diffraction in forensic practice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotrlý, M.; Bezdička, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2006), s. 153-155 ISSN 1210-8529 R&D Projects: GA MV RN20052005001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : X-ray powder microdiffraction * pigments * forensic practice Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  11. Refractive x-ray lens for high pressure diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohishi, Yasuo

    2001-01-01

    A stacked compound refractive x-ray lens was designed to produce a efficiently focused (φ 2 and a peak gain of 12, is well matched to these requirements. It is composed of many plastic chips made by molding, which is allowing many identical chips to be made precisely. Other advantages of this lens include high throughput, simple energy tunability and easy installation. (author)

  12. SSD effects on high energy x-ray surface and build up dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.; Butson, M.J.; Cancer Services, Wollongong, NSW

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Dose in the build up region for high energy x-rays produced by a medical linear accelerator is affected by the x-ray source to patient surface distance (SSD). The use of isocentric treatments whereby the tumour is positions 100cm from the source means that depending of the depth of the tumour and the size of the patient, the SSD can vary from distances of 80cm to 100cm. To achieve larger field sizes, the SSD can also be extended out to 120cm at times. Results have shown that open fields are not significantly affected by SSD changes with deviations in percentage dose being less than 4% of maximum dose for SSD's from 80cm to 120cm SSD. With the introduction of beam modifying devices such as Perspex blocking trays, the effects are significant with a deviation of up to 22% measured at 6MV energy with a 6mm Perspex tray for SSD's from 80cm to 120cm. These variations are largest at the skin surface and reduce with depth. The use of a multi leaf collimator for blocking removes extra skin dose caused by the Perspex block trays with decreasing SSD. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  13. Development of a dual MCP framing camera for high energy x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, N., E-mail: izumi2@llnl.gov; Hall, G. N.; Carpenter, A. C.; Allen, F. V.; Cruz, J. G.; Felker, B.; Hargrove, D.; Holder, J.; Lumbard, A.; Montesanti, R.; Palmer, N. E.; Piston, K.; Stone, G.; Thao, M.; Vern, R.; Zacharias, R.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    Recently developed diagnostic techniques at LLNL require recording backlit images of extremely dense imploded plasmas using hard x-rays, and demand the detector to be sensitive to photons with energies higher than 50 keV [R. Tommasini et al., Phys. Phys. Plasmas 18, 056309 (2011); G. N. Hall et al., “AXIS: An instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using ARC on the NIF,” Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)]. To increase the sensitivity in the high energy region, we propose to use a combination of two MCPs. The first MCP is operated in a low gain regime and works as a thick photocathode, and the second MCP works as a high gain electron multiplier. We tested the concept of this dual MCP configuration and succeeded in obtaining a detective quantum efficiency of 4.5% for 59 keV x-rays, 3 times larger than with a single plate of the thickness typically used in NIF framing cameras.

  14. Physical methods for studying minerals and solid materials: X-ray, electron and neutron diffraction; scanning and transmission electron microscopy; X-ray, electron and ion spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, J.-P.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: theoretical aspects of radiation-matter interactions; production and measurement of radiations (X rays, electrons, neutrons); applications of radiation interactions to the study of crystalline materials. The following techniques are presented: X-ray and neutron diffraction, electron microscopy, electron diffraction, X-ray fluorescence analysis, electron probe microanalysis, surface analysis by electron emission spectrometry (ESCA and Auger electrons), scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion emission analysis [fr

  15. High-energy x-ray scattering studies of battery materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazer, Matthew P. B.; Okasinski, John S.; Almer, Jonathan D.; Ren, Yang

    2016-01-01

    High-energy x-ray (HEX) scattering is a sensitive and powerful tool to nondestructively probe the atomic and mesoscale structures of battery materials under synthesis and operational conditions. The penetration power of HEXs enables the use of large, practical samples and realistic environments, allowing researchers to explore the inner workings of batteries in both laboratory and commercial formats. This article highlights the capability and versatility of HEX techniques, particularly from synchrotron sources, to elucidate materials synthesis processes and thermal instability mechanisms in situ, to understand (dis)charging mechanisms in operando under a variety of cycling conditions, and to spatially resolve electrode/electrolyte responses to highlight connections between inhomogeneity and performance. Such studies have increased our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms underlying battery performance. Here, by deepening our understanding of the linkages between microstructure and overall performance, HEXs represent a powerful tool for validating existing batteries and shortening battery-development timelines.

  16. On beam quality and stopping power ratios for high-energy x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, S.A.; Ceberg, C.P.; Knoeoes, T.; Nilsson, P.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to quantitatively compare two commonly used beam quality indices, TPR(20/10) and %dd(10) x , with respect to their ability to predict stopping power ratios (water to air), s w,air , for high-energy x-rays. In particular, effects due to a varied amount of filtration of the photon beam will be studied. A new method for characterizing beam quality is also presented, where the information we strive to obtain is the moments of the spectral distribution. We will show how the moments enter into a general description of the transmission curve and that it is possible to correlate the moments to s w,air with a unique and simple relationship. Comparisons with TPR(20/10) and %dd(10) x show that the moments are well suited for beam quality specification in terms of choosing the correct s w,air . (author)

  17. Characterization of diffraction gratings by use of a tabletop soft-x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminario, Max; Rocca, Jorge J.; Depine, Ricardo A.; Bach, Benny; Bach, Bernie

    2001-01-01

    We have demonstrated the use of a high-repetition-rate 46.9-mm tabletop laser to characterize diffraction gratings designed for grazing-incidence operation in the soft-x-ray spectral region. The efficiencies for various diffraction orders were measured as a function of angle of incidence and compared with the results of model simulations. This measurement technique provides benchmarks with which to improve electromagnetic codes used in the design of soft-x-ray diffraction gratings. The results illustrate the potential of compact tabletop soft-x-ray lasers for use as a new tool for characterization of short-wavelength optics at the manufacturer's site

  18. Review - X-ray diffraction measurements in high magnetic fields and at high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifuru Mitsui, Keiichi Koyama and Kazuo Watanabe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A system was developed measuring x-ray powder diffraction in high magnetic fields up to 5 T and at temperatures from 283 to 473 K. The stability of the temperature is within 1 K over 6 h. In order to examine the ability of the system, the high-field x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for Si and a Ni-based ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy. The results show that the x-ray powder diffraction measurements in high magnetic fields and at high temperatures are useful for materials research.

  19. Electronic structure of nanoscale Cu/Pt alloys: A combined X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xing; Chu Wangsheng; Cai Quan; Xia Dingguo; Wu Zhonghua; Wu Ziyu

    2006-01-01

    PVP-protected Cu/Pt clusters were prepared by glycol/water reduction method and characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and absorption spectra. TEM and XRD analysis show that the Cu/Pt clusters with different molar ratio have fcc structure with particle size of about 4 nm, while the lattice parameters in these clusters reduce with increasing Cu concentration. From the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at Cu-K edge and Pt-L 2,3 edge, we demonstrate that the d-electronic states of Cu and Pt are affected by the local environment as a function of Cu/Pt molar ratio. With increasing Cu concentration, Pt loses a fraction of 5d electrons and the hybridization between p- and d-states at Cu sites is enhanced

  20. Electronic structure of nanoscale Cu/Pt alloys: A combined X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xing [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Chu Wangsheng [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230036 (China); Cai Quan [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Xia Dingguo [College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, 100022 Beijing (China); Wu Zhonghua [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China) and National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (China)]. E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn

    2006-11-15

    PVP-protected Cu/Pt clusters were prepared by glycol/water reduction method and characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and absorption spectra. TEM and XRD analysis show that the Cu/Pt clusters with different molar ratio have fcc structure with particle size of about 4 nm, while the lattice parameters in these clusters reduce with increasing Cu concentration. From the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at Cu-K edge and Pt-L{sub 2,3} edge, we demonstrate that the d-electronic states of Cu and Pt are affected by the local environment as a function of Cu/Pt molar ratio. With increasing Cu concentration, Pt loses a fraction of 5d electrons and the hybridization between p- and d-states at Cu sites is enhanced.

  1. Degradation of periodic multilayers as seen by small-angle x-ray scattering and x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Rafaja, D; Simek, D; Zdeborova, L; Valvoda, V

    2002-01-01

    The capabilities of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle x-ray diffraction (XRD) to recognize structural changes in periodic multilayers were compared on Fe/Au multilayers with different degrees of structural degradation. Experimental results have shown that both methods are equally sensitive to the multilayer degradation, i.e., to the occurrence of non-continuous interfaces, to short-circuits in the multilayer structure and to the multilayer precipitation. XRD yielded additional information on the multilayer crystallinity, whilst SAXS could better recognize fragments of a long-range periodicity (remnants of the original multilayer structure). Changes in the multilayer structure were initiated by successive annealing at 200 and 300 deg. C. Experimental data were complemented by numerical simulations performed using a combination of optical theory and the distorted wave Born approximation for SAXS or the kinematical Born approximation for XRD.

  2. Consideration of microstructure evolution and residual stress measurement near severe worked surface using high energy x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Mochizuki, Masahito; Shobu, Takahisa

    2012-01-01

    It is necessary to establish a measurement method that can evaluate accurate stress on the surface. However, the microstructure evolution takes place near the surface due to severe plastic deformation, since structural members have been superpositioned a lot of working processes to complete. As well known, a plane stress can't be assumed on the severe worked surface. Therefore we have been proposed the measurement method that can be measured the in-depth distribution of residual stress components by using high energy X-ray from a synchrotron radiation source. There is the combination of the constant penetration depth method and tri-axial stress analysis. Measurements were performed by diffraction planes for the orientation parameter Γ=0.25 of which elastic constants are nearly equal to the mechanical one. The stress components obtained must be converted to the stress components in real space by using optimization technique, since it corresponds to the weighted average stress components associated with the attenuation of X-ray in materials. The predicted stress components distribution agrees very well with the corrected one which was measured by the conventional removal method. To verify the availability of the proposed method, thermal aging variation of residual stress components on the severe worked surface under elevated temperature was investigated using specimen superpositioned working processes (i.e., welding, machining, peening). It is clarified that the residual stress components increase with thermal aging, using the diffraction planes in hard elastic constants to the bulk. This result suggests that the thermal stability of residual stress has the dependence of the diffraction plane. (author)

  3. X-ray diffraction studies of NbTe2 single crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    X-ray (EDAX) and remaining structural characterization was also accomplished by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. Lattice parameters, volume and ... The layered structure compound, NbTe2, is one of the typical materials which lead to charge .... financial assistance to carry out this work. References. Brown B E 1966 Acta ...

  4. Interaction between lipid monolayers and poloxamer 188: An X-ray reflectivity and diffraction study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, G.H.; Majewski, J.; Ege, C.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism by which poloxamer 188 (P188) seals a damaged cell membrane is examined using the lipid monolayer as a model system. X-ray reflectivity and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction results show that at low nominal lipid density, P188, by physically occupying the available area and phase ...

  5. Microprocessor-based system for automatic X-ray diffraction and fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, A.M. de; Carmo, L.C.S. do; Pereira, V.J.E.; Soares, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    A data acquisition and processing device appropriate for X-ray analysis and goniometer control was built. The Z-80 based system as well as the whole architeture is described. The advantages and new possibilities of the automated instrument as compared to the traditional ones are listed. The X-ray diffraction and fluorescence techniques can take advantage of the automation. (Author) [pt

  6. In Situ X-ray Diffraction Studies of (De)lithiation Mechanism in Silicon Nanowire Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Misra, Sumohan; Liu, Nian; Nelson, Johanna; Hong, Seung Sae; Cui, Yi; Toney, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    -Si product has been observed. In this work, we use an X-ray transparent battery cell to perform in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction on SiNWs in real time during electrochemical cycling. At deep lithiation voltages the known metastable Li 15Si 4 phase forms

  7. The high energy X-ray spectrum of 4U 0900-40 observed from OSO 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Ellison, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The X-ray source 4U 0900-40 (= Vela XR-1) was observed with the high-energy X-ray spectrometer on OSO 8 for one week in 1976 and three weeks in 1978. Spectra of the source are presented above 16 keV. No systematic difference exists between the X-ray eclipse centers and the eclipse centers predicted from optical ephermerides. Short period intrinsic variability in the system's X-ray intensity may be related to changes in the Compton scattering optical depth in the system and does not require sporadic mass transfer via Roche lobe overflow. The 282 s modulation in the source's X-ray flux above 21 keV consists of two essentially similar pulses per period, most easily interpreted as arising from the two different magnetic poles of a rotating neutron star. The secondary appears to be a spherically accreting, magnetic neutron star.

  8. Curved anode wire chambers for x-ray diffraction applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Wiedenbeck, P.; Wagner, C.N.J.; Woelfel, E.

    1983-01-01

    Curved position sensitive proportional detectors are described. The first has a radius of curvature of 135 mm and a 60 0 angular range. The second has a radius of curvature of 360 mm and a 45 0 angular range. For high quantum efficiency for x-ray energies up to 60 keV, a relatively large x-ray path and high gas pressure are required. The anode wires are suspended in circular arcs by the interaction of a current flowing through them and a magnetic field provided by two permanent magnets placed above and below the wire running parallel to it over the full length of the curved chambers. Anode wire stability under the combined action of the magnetic and electrostatic forces is discussed

  9. Preferred orientation determination using line source x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, G.; Shmarjahu, D.

    1977-10-01

    A texture goniometer has been attached to a diffractometer connected to a line-focus x-ray source. Reasonable results are obtained for the texture of rolled sheets and the test procedure is given. To illustrate the test procedure, the determination of preferred orientation in cold-rolled copper is described, as compared with random powder of sintered copper. Improvements of the measurements are proposed

  10. Reflectivity and diffraction of X rays applied to organic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieutord, Francois

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of organic thin films by using X-ray-based technologies, and more particularly X-ray reflectivity. After some recalls on X ray diffraction, and on the fabrication of Langmuir-Blodgett films, the author shows how, by combining three X-ray-based techniques, it is possible to study a volume structure of a thin film. He describes the technique of measurement by X- ray reflexivity, its experimental implementation, and methods for result interpretation. In the next part, the author reports the study of peculiar interference effects which are noticed in reflexivity on Langmuir-Blodgett films, and then describes the nature of these films by correlating results of X ray reflexivity with direct observations performed by electronic microscopy on replica [fr

  11. State-of-the-art and problems of X-ray diffraction analysis of biomacromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, N. S.

    2006-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of X-ray diffraction studies of biomacromolecules is briefly characterized, and the challenge imposed by science is discussed. These studies are characterized by a wide scope and extensive use. This field of science is of great interest and is developed in many countries. The main purpose is to solve practical problems in medicine consisting in the design of drugs against various diseases. X-ray diffraction analysis of enzymes brought the pharmaceutical industry to a new level, thus allowing the rational design of drugs against formerly untreatable diseases. Modern X-ray diffraction studies of biomacromolecules laid the basis for a new science called structural biology. This method allows one to solve fundamental problems of physical chemistry for a new state of matter existing in living systems. Here, science poses numerous problems in analysis of X-ray diffraction data on biological macromolecules. Many of theses problems are in their infancy

  12. Quantitative method of X-ray diffraction phase analysis of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czuba, J.; Dziedzic, A.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative method of X-ray diffraction phase analysis of building materials, with use of internal standard, has been presented. The errors committed by determining the content of particular phases have been also given. (author)

  13. Unified Theory for Decoding the Signals from X-Ray Florescence and X-Ray Diffraction of Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Frank H

    2017-05-01

    For research and development or for solving technical problems, we often need to know the chemical composition of an unknown mixture, which is coded and stored in the signals of its X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray fluorescence gives chemical elements, whereas XRD gives chemical compounds. The major problem in XRF and XRD analyses is the complex matrix effect. The conventional technique to deal with the matrix effect is to construct empirical calibration lines with standards for each element or compound sought, which is tedious and time-consuming. A unified theory of quantitative XRF analysis is presented here. The idea is to cancel the matrix effect mathematically. It turns out that the decoding equation for quantitative XRF analysis is identical to that for quantitative XRD analysis although the physics of XRD and XRF are fundamentally different. The XRD work has been published and practiced worldwide. The unified theory derives a new intensity-concentration equation of XRF, which is free from the matrix effect and valid for a wide range of concentrations. The linear decoding equation establishes a constant slope for each element sought, hence eliminating the work on calibration lines. The simple linear decoding equation has been verified by 18 experiments.

  14. A synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of non-proportional strain-path effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, D.M.; Erinosho, T.; Dunne, F.P.E.; Todd, R.I.; Connolley, T.; Mostafavi, M.; Kupfer, H.; Wilkinson, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Common alloys used in sheet form can display a significant ductility benefit when they are subjected to certain multiaxial strain paths. This effect has been studied here for a polycrystalline ferritic steel using a combination of Nakajima bulge testing, X-ray diffraction during biaxial testing of cruciform samples and crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) modelling. Greatest gains in strain to failure were found when subjecting sheets to uniaxial loading followed by balanced biaxial deformation, resulting in a total deformation close to plane-strain. A combined strain of approximately double that of proportional loading was achieved. The evolution of macrostrain, microstrain and texture during non-proportional loading were evaluated by in-situ high energy synchrotron diffraction. The results have demonstrated that the inhomogeneous strain accumulation from non-proportional deformation is strongly dependent on texture and the applied strain-ratio of the first deformation pass. Experimental diffraction evidence is supported by results produced by a novel method of CPFE-derived diffraction simulation. Using constitutive laws selected on the basis of good agreement with measured lattice strain development, the CPFE model demonstrated the capability to replicate ductility gains measured experimentally.

  15. Structural investigation of GaInP nanowires using X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegner, D.; Persson, Johan Mikael; Etzelstorfer, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work the structure of ternary GaxIn1−xP nanowires is investigated with respect to the chemical composition and homogeneity. The nanowires were grown by metal–organic vapor-phase epitaxy. For the investigation of ensemble fluctuations on several lateral length scales, X-ray diffraction...... gradients along the sample by recording diffraction patterns at different positions. In addition, compositional variations were found also within single nanowires in X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy measurements....

  16. Study of the solid solution formation in mixed oxides by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riella, H.G.

    1984-01-01

    A method to determine the plutonium distribution in mixed oxides - UO 2 /PuO 2 is described. The distribution function and the medium size of crystallite are obtained from the X-ray diffraction profile. Through the deconvolution by Fourier analysis, the X-ray diffraction profile is obtained without the influence of the difractrometer. Some experimental results for different samples of UO 2 -PuO 2 discussed. (Author) [pt

  17. On the evaluation of X-ray diffraction experiments by the regularization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trubin, V.A.; Szasz, A. (Lab. of Surface and Interface Physics, Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary))

    1991-05-16

    The characteristic property of diffractometers as the presence of occasional and systematic errors in measured patterns requires such an evaluation which is as informative as possible. This circumstance gives rise to the problem of optimal planning of the experiment. The X-ray diffraction optimization problem with application of the regularization method is studied. The proposal permits to determine more accurately the unknown true characteristics of the X-ray diffraction experiment. (orig.).

  18. On the evaluation of X-ray diffraction experiments by the regularization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trubin, V.A.; Szasz, A.

    1991-01-01

    The characteristic property of diffractometers as the presence of occasional and systematic errors in measured patterns requires such an evaluation which is as informative as possible. This circumstance gives rise to the problem of optimal planning of the experiment. The X-ray diffraction optimization problem with application of the regularization method is studied. The proposal permits to determine more accurately the unknown true characteristics of the X-ray diffraction experiment. (orig.)

  19. A portable X-ray diffraction apparatus for in situ analyses of masters' paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eveno, Myriam; Duran, Adrian; Castaing, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    It is rare that the analyses of materials in paintings can be carried out by taking micro-samples. Valuable works of art are best studied in situ by non-invasive techniques. For that purpose, a portable X-ray diffraction and fluorescence apparatus has been designed and constructed at the C2RMF. This apparatus has been used for paintings of Rembrandt, Leonardo da Vinci, Van Gogh, Mantegna, etc. Results are given to illustrate the performance of X-ray diffraction, especially when X-ray fluorescence does not bring sufficient information to conclude. (orig.)

  20. A portable X-ray diffraction apparatus for in situ analyses of masters' paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveno, Myriam; Duran, Adrian; Castaing, Jacques

    2010-09-01

    It is rare that the analyses of materials in paintings can be carried out by taking micro-samples. Valuable works of art are best studied in situ by non-invasive techniques. For that purpose, a portable X-ray diffraction and fluorescence apparatus has been designed and constructed at the C2RMF. This apparatus has been used for paintings of Rembrandt, Leonardo da Vinci, Van Gogh, Mantegna, etc. Results are given to illustrate the performance of X-ray diffraction, especially when X-ray fluorescence does not bring sufficient information to conclude.

  1. Device for high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis. Ustrojstvo dlya vysokotemperaturnogo rentgenostrukturnogo analiza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epifanov, V G; Zavilinskij, A V; Pet' kov, V V; Polenur, A V

    1975-01-07

    Device for high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis, containing a vacuum chamber with a window for X-ray transit, in which sample- and standard-holders, heater, thermal shields and means for standard and sample temperature measurement are located, is proposed. In order to increase the working temperature level and the structural change detection accuracy the heater is located between the sample- and standard-holders. The standard-holder is linked with the mechanism of control of its position in relation to the heater. The device is intended for investigating phase transformations by differential thermal analysis method with the simultaneous diffraction pattern detection using X-ray diffractometry method.

  2. Neutron and X-ray diffraction from modulated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, P.

    1994-07-01

    This thesis describes X-ray and neutron scattering experiments performed on two examples of modulated structures. After an introduction to the subject of modulated structures, the thesis is divided in three parts. A single crystal elastic neutron scattering experiment between 4.2 and 115 Κ has been performed and four-circle X-ray data have been collected at 8 Κ for the monoclinic low-temperature phase of the layered perovskite PAMC. The results from the neutron scattering experiment indicate that magnetoelastic effects influence the ordering of the crystal. The X-ray experiments have made it possible to determine the crystal structure in the low-temperature phase. The superspace group is P2 1 /b(β-30)Os, with β = 1/3. A small-angle neutron scattering experiment has been performed on the magnetic structure of manganese silicide. When a magnetic field is applied, the modulation vectors turn towards the field direction, showing domain growth and diverging peak widths as they approach the field direction. Phase 'A' is established to have the modulation vectors directed perpendicular to the field direction. Cooling in zero field shows increasing peak widths at low temperatures, indicating a lock-in transition below the lowest reached temperature. To be able to analyse the data of the magnetic order in MnSi, and analytical calculation of the three dimensional resolution function for a small-angle neutron scattering spectrometer has been performed. The calculation is done by application of a combination of phase space analysis and Gaussian approximations for the neutron distribution as well as for the transmission functions of the different apertures. A finite mosaic spread of the crystal and finite correlation widths of the Bragg reflections have been included in the cross section. (au) (3 tabs., 48 ills., 100 refs.)

  3. High-Energy X-Ray Imaging Applied to Nondestructive Characterization of Large Nuclear Waste Drums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estre, Nicolas; Eck, Daniel; Pettier, Jean-Luc; Payan, Emmanuel; Roure, Christophe; Simon, Eric

    2015-12-01

    As part of its R&D programs on non-destructive testing of nuclear waste drums, CEA is commissioning an irradiation cell named CINPHONIE, at Cadarache. This cell allows high-energy imaging (radiography and tomography) on large volumes (up to 5 m3) and heavy weights (up to 5 tons). A demonstrator has been finalized, based on existing components. The X-ray source is a 9 MeV LINAC which produces Bremsstrahlung X-rays (up to 23 Gy/min at 1 meter in the beam axis). The mechanical bench is digitally controlled on three axes (translation, rotation, elevation) and can handle objects up to 2 t. This bench performs trajectories necessary for acquisition of projections (sinograms) according to different geometries: Translation-Rotation, Fan-Beam and Cone-Beam. Two detection systems both developed by CEA-Leti are available. The first one is a large GADOX scintillating screen ( 800 ×600 mm2) coupled to a low-noise pixelated camera. The second one is a multi-CdTe semiconductor detector, offering measurements up to 5 decades of attenuation (equivalent to 25 cm of lead or 180 cm of standard concrete). At the end of the acquisition, a Filtered Back Projection-based algorithm is performed. Then, a density slice (fan-beam tomography) or a density volume (cone-beam tomography or helical tomography) is produced and used to examine the waste. Characterization of LINAC, associated detectors as well as the full acquisition chain, are presented. Experimental performances on phantoms and real drum are discussed and expected limits on defect detectability are evaluated by simulation. The final system, designed to handle objects up to 5 tons is then presented.

  4. High-energy X-ray study of short range order and phase transformations in titanium-vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsteiner, I.B.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a study of configurational correlations and phase transformations in the binary alloy Ti-V, using high-energy X-ray diffraction. The experiments have been performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble. The high-energy (60-100 keV) technique developed recently allows in-situ measurements on bulk material in transmission geometry. The first part of the thesis discusses multiple scattering effects which might occur with this method. These effects are experimentally verified and discussed. Special emphasis is put on the questions, whether they affect the results obtained with this method, and how they can be avoided. Understanding alloys on the most fundamental level requires knowledge about the atomic interaction potentials. Competing with entropy, these potentials determine the configurational short range order in a disordered alloy, which generates together with static and dynamic distortions the diffuse scattering. The thesis presents measurements and calculations of the diffuse scattering patterns of Ti-V. The calculations, taking into account configurational correlations, static distortions induced by atomic size mismatch and thermal diffuse scattering, agree with the experimental data. Structural transformations in Ti-V are carefully characterized using high-energy x-ray diffraction in combination with the complementary transmission electron microscopy (TEM). While the first technique allows to study the phenomena in-situ and time-resolved, TEM yields real space images and chemical information about the phases. Ti-V near the equiatomic composition is a beta-Ti-alloy. The body centered cubic beta phase is retained at room temperature by fast quenching. Aging the material below the phase transformation temperature, however, leads to the precipitation of hexagonal alpha titanium. Another transformation process confusing earlier works is identified as TiC formation from carbon impurities in the material. In addition

  5. X-ray diffraction study of surface-layer structure in parallel grazing rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shtypulyak, N.I.; Yakimov, I.I.; Litvintsev, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction method is described for study of thin polycrystalline and amorphous films and surface layers in an extremely asymmetrical diffraction system in parallel grazing rays using a DRON-3.0 diffractometer. The minimum grazing angles correspond to diffraction under conditions of total external reflection and a layer depth of ∼ 2.5-8 nm

  6. X-ray and Neutron Diffraction in the Study of Organic Crystalline Hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Fucke

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A review. Diffraction methods are a powerful tool to investigate the crystal structure of organic compounds in general and their hydrates in particular. The laboratory standard technique of single crystal X-ray diffraction gives information about the molecular conformation, packing and hydrogen bonding in the crystal structure, while powder X-ray diffraction on bulk material can trace hydration/dehydration processes and phase transitions under non-ambient conditions. Neutron diffraction is a valuable complementary technique to X-ray diffraction and gives highly accurate hydrogen atom positions due to the interaction of the radiation with the atomic nuclei. Although not yet often applied to organic hydrates, neutron single crystal and neutron powder diffraction give precise structural data on hydrogen bonding networks which will help explain why hydrates form in the first place.

  7. Background removal in X-ray fiber diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millane, R.P.; Arnott, S.

    1985-01-01

    Background can be a major source of error in measurement of diffracted intensities in fiber diffraction patterns. Errors can be large when poorly oriented less-crystalline specimens give diffraction patterns with little uncontaminated background. A method for estimating and removing a general global background in such cases is described and illustrated with an example. (orig.)

  8. In-situ X-ray diffraction system using sources and detectors at fixed angular positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David M [Voorheesville, NY; Gibson, Walter M [Voorheesville, NY; Huang, Huapeng [Latham, NY

    2007-06-26

    An x-ray diffraction technique for measuring a known characteristic of a sample of a material in an in-situ state. The technique includes using an x-ray source for emitting substantially divergent x-ray radiation--with a collimating optic disposed with respect to the fixed source for producing a substantially parallel beam of x-ray radiation by receiving and redirecting the divergent paths of the divergent x-ray radiation. A first x-ray detector collects radiation diffracted from the sample; wherein the source and detector are fixed, during operation thereof, in position relative to each other and in at least one dimension relative to the sample according to a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample. A second x-ray detector may be fixed relative to the first x-ray detector according to the a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample, especially in a phase monitoring embodiment of the present invention.

  9. High-pressure pair distribution function (PDF) measurement using high-energy focused x-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Xinguo, E-mail: xhong@bnl.gov; Weidner, Donald J. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Ehm, Lars [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Zhong, Zhong; Ghose, Sanjit [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Duffy, Thomas S. [Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    In this paper, we report recent development of the high-pressure pair distribution function (HP-PDF) measurement technique using a focused high-energy X-ray beam coupled with a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The focusing optics consist of a sagittally bent Laue monochromator and Kirkpatrick-Baez (K–B) mirrors. This combination provides a clean high-energy X-ray beam suitable for HP-PDF research. Demonstration of the HP-PDF technique for nanocrystalline platinum under quasi-hydrostatic condition above 30 GPa is presented.

  10. Evaluation of In-Vacuum Imaging Plate Detector for X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Yukio; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    We performed evaluation tests of a newly developed in-vacuum imaging plate (IP) detector for x-ray diffraction microscopy. IP detectors have advantages over direct x-ray detection charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors, which have been commonly used in x-ray diffraction microscopy experiments, in the capabilities for a high photon count and for a wide area. The detector system contains two IPs to make measurement efficient by recording data with the one while reading or erasing the other. We compared speckled diffraction patterns of single particles taken with the IP and a direct x-ray detection CCD. The IP was inferior to the CCD in spatial resolution and in signal-to-noise ratio at a low photon count

  11. Combining operando synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy and scanning X-ray diffraction to study lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Patrick; Hess, Michael; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Eller, Jens; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-06-01

    We present an operando study of a lithium ion battery combining scanning X-ray diffraction (SXRD) and synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) simultaneously for the first time. This combination of techniques facilitates the investigation of dynamic processes in lithium ion batteries containing amorphous and/or weakly attenuating active materials. While amorphous materials pose a challenge for diffraction techniques, weakly attenuating material systems pose a challenge for attenuation-contrast tomography. Furthermore, combining SXRD and SRXTM can be used to correlate processes occurring at the atomic level in the crystal lattices of the active materials with those at the scale of electrode microstructure. To demonstrate the benefits of this approach, we investigate a silicon powder electrode in lithium metal half-cell configuration. Combining SXRD and SRXTM, we are able to (i) quantify the dissolution of the metallic lithium electrode and the expansion of the silicon electrode, (ii) better understand the formation of the Li15Si4 phase, and (iii) non-invasively probe kinetic limitations within the silicon electrode. A simple model based on the 1D diffusion equation allows us to qualitatively understand the observed kinetics and demonstrates why high-capacity electrodes are more prone to inhomogeneous lithiation reactions.

  12. Combining operando synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy and scanning X-ray diffraction to study lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Patrick; Hess, Michael; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Eller, Jens; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    We present an operando study of a lithium ion battery combining scanning X-ray diffraction (SXRD) and synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) simultaneously for the first time. This combination of techniques facilitates the investigation of dynamic processes in lithium ion batteries containing amorphous and/or weakly attenuating active materials. While amorphous materials pose a challenge for diffraction techniques, weakly attenuating material systems pose a challenge for attenuation-contrast tomography. Furthermore, combining SXRD and SRXTM can be used to correlate processes occurring at the atomic level in the crystal lattices of the active materials with those at the scale of electrode microstructure. To demonstrate the benefits of this approach, we investigate a silicon powder electrode in lithium metal half-cell configuration. Combining SXRD and SRXTM, we are able to (i) quantify the dissolution of the metallic lithium electrode and the expansion of the silicon electrode, (ii) better understand the formation of the Li15Si4 phase, and (iii) non-invasively probe kinetic limitations within the silicon electrode. A simple model based on the 1D diffusion equation allows us to qualitatively understand the observed kinetics and demonstrates why high-capacity electrodes are more prone to inhomogeneous lithiation reactions. PMID:27324109

  13. Investigation of the structure of human dental tissue at multiple length scales using high energy synchrotron X-ray SAXS/WAXS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Tan; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2011-10-01

    High energy (>50keV) synchrotron X-ray scattering experiments were carried out on beamline I12 JEEP at the Diamond Light Source (DLS, Oxford, UK). Although a complete human tooth could be studied, in the present study attention was focused on coupons from the region of the Dentin-Enamel Junction (DEJ). Simultaneous high energy SAXS/WAXS measurements were carried out. Quantitative analysis of the results allows multiple length scale characterization of the nano-crystalline structure of dental tissues. SAXS patterns analysis provide insight into the mean thickness and orientation of hydroxyapatite particles, while WAXS (XRD) patterns allow the determination of the crystallographic unit cell parameters of the hydroxyapatite phase. It was found that the average particle thickness determined from SAXS interpretation varies as a function of position in the vicinity of the DEJ. Most mineral particles are randomly orientated within dentin, although preferred orientation emerges and becomes stronger on approach to the enamel. Within the enamel, texture is stronger than anywhere in the dentin, and the determination of lattice parameters can be accomplished by Pawley refinement of the multiple peak diffraction pattern. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using high energy synchrotron X-ray beams for the characterization of human dental tissues. This opens up the opportunity of studying thick samples (e.g., complete teeth) in complex sample environments (e.g., under saline solution). This opens new avenues for the application of high energy synchrotron X-ray scattering to dental research.

  14. Advanced x-ray stress analysis method for a single crystal using different diffraction plane families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imafuku, Muneyuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sueyoshi, Kazuyuki; Akita, Koichi; Ohya, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Generalized formula of the x-ray stress analysis for a single crystal with unknown stress-free lattice parameter was proposed. This method enables us to evaluate the plane stress states with any combination of diffraction planes. We can choose and combine the appropriate x-ray sources and diffraction plane families, depending on the sample orientation and the apparatus, whenever diffraction condition is satisfied. The analysis of plane stress distributions in an iron single crystal was demonstrated combining with the diffraction data for Fe{211} and Fe{310} plane families

  15. High energy X-ray observations of COS-B gamma-ray sources from OSO-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Caraveo, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    During the three years between satellite launch in June 1975 and turn-off in October 1978, the high energy X-ray spectrometer on board OSO-8 observed nearly all of the COS-B gamma-ray source positions given in the 2CG catalog (Swanenburg et al., 1981). An X-ray source was detected at energies above 20 keV at the 6-sigma level of significance in the gamma-ray error box containing 2CG342 - 02 and at the 3-sigma level of significance in the error boxes containing 2CG065 + 00, 2CG195 + 04, and 2CG311 - 01. No definite association between the X-ray and gamma-ray sources can be made from these data alone. Upper limits are given for the 2CG sources from which no X-ray flux was detected above 20 keV.

  16. Determination of the structure factors of a LiF powder sample by the energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, R.; Ahtee, A.; Paakkari, T.

    1977-01-01

    The structure factors of a LiF powder sample were determined by energy dispersive x-ray diffraction in the range 9 to 25 keV, with the use of a Si(Li) solid state detector, following the method applied on GaP. Since the absorption coefficient of LiF is small at high energy, a fraction of the incident x-rays penetrates through the sample and does not contribute to the diffraction. This effect was taken into account in the determination of the structure factors. Then the structure factors generally agree, within the limit of 5 % error, with those obtained by the usual angle dispersive method, if the penetrated part of the incident beam is less than 40 %. (author)

  17. Applications of synchrotron x-ray diffraction topography to fractography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilello, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Fractographs have been taken using a variety of probes each of which produces different types of information. Methods which have been used to examine fracture surfaces include: (a) optical microscopy, particularly interference contrast methods, (b) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), (c) SEM with electron channelling, (d) SEM with selected-area electron channelling, (e) Berg-Barrett (B-B) topography, and now (f) synchrotron x-radiation fractography (SXRF). This review concentrated on the role that x-ray methods can play in such studies. In particular, the ability to nondestructively assess the subsurface microstructure associated with the fracture to depths of the order of 5 to 10 μm becomes an important attribute for observations of a large class of semi-brittle metals, semiconductors and ceramics

  18. X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of crystallinity in hydroxyapatite coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardin, E; Millet, P; Lodini, A

    2000-02-01

    To standardize industrial implant production and make comparisons between different experimental results, we have to be able to quantify the crystallinity of hydroxyapatite. Methods of measuring crystallinity ratio were developed for various HA samples before and after plasma spraying. The first series of methods uses X-ray diffraction. The advantage of these methods is that X-ray diffraction equipment is used widely in science and industry. In the second series, a neutron diffraction method is developed and the results recorded are similar to those obtained by the modified X-ray diffraction methods. The advantage of neutron diffraction is the ability to obtain measurements deep inside a component. It is a nondestructive method, owing to the very low absorption of neutrons in most materials. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies on Nanocrystalline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Werner, S.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Application of in situ high pressure powder diffraction technique for examination of specific structural properties of nanocrystals based on the experimental data of SiC nanocrystalline powders of 2 to 30 nrn diameter in diameter is presented. Limitations and capabilities of the experimental techniques themselves and methods of diffraction data elaboration applied to nanocrystals with very small dimensions (nanoparticles of different grain size.

  20. Results of high energy x-ray therapy of gastric carcinoma, 2. Recurrent gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakawa, H; Otawa, H; Yamada, S [Miyagi Prefectural Adult Disease Center, Natori (Japan)

    1979-01-01

    Thirty cases with recurrent gastric carcinoma were treated with a combination of high energy x-ray and some anti-cancer drugs at Miyagi Seijinbyo Center between 1967 and 1977. Twenty three cases of them tolerated well such treatment; the irradiated dose was more than 4000 rad without any serious complication. The response of recurrent tumor to irradiation was marked in 11 lesions of 21 local recurrences and 4 metastases of the lymph node. The survival rates of those irradiated more than 4000 rad were 22% at one year, 15% at two years and 5% at three years. The median survival month was 6,9 months. These rates obtained in a combined radiation therapy seemed to be well matched for those reported by other authors in a surgical management of recurrent gastric carcinoma. As a conclusion, it was suggested that a combined radiation therapy with some anticancer drugs should be an effective procedure to prolong the life of a patient of recurrent gastric carcinoma.

  1. Measurement of grain size of polycrystalline materials with confocal energy dispersive micro-X-ray diffraction technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Weiyuan; Liu, Zhiguo [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Sun, Tianxi, E-mail: stx@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Peng, Song [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma, Yongzhong [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Beijing, Beijing 100013 (China); Li, Fangzuo; Sun, Xuepeng; Ding, Xunliang [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2014-11-11

    The confocal energy dispersive micro-X-ray diffraction (EDMXRD) based on polycapillary X-ray optics was used to determine the grain size of polycrystalline materials. The grain size of a metallographic specimen of nickel base alloy was measured by using the confocal EDMXRD. The experimental results demonstrated that the confocal EDMXRD had potential applications in measuring large grain size.

  2. Comparative study of macrotexture analysis using X-ray diffraction and electron backscattered diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna, Marilene Morelli

    2002-01-01

    The macrotexture is one of the main characteristics in metallic materials, which the physical properties depend on the crystallographic direction. The analysis of the macrotexture to middles of the decade of 80 was just accomplished by the techniques of Xray diffraction and neutrons diffraction. The possibility of the analysis of the macrotexture using, the technique of electron backscattering diffraction in the scanning electronic microscope, that allowed to correlate the measure of the orientation with its location in the micro structure, was a very welcome tool in the area of engineering of materials. In this work it was studied the theoretical aspects of the two techniques and it was used of both techniques for the analysis of the macrotexture of aluminum sheets 1050 and 3003 with intensity, measured through the texture index 'J', from 2.00 to 5.00. The results obtained by the two techniques were shown reasonably similar, being considered that the statistics of the data obtained by the technique of electron backscatter diffraction is much inferior to the obtained by the X-ray diffraction. (author)

  3. A rotational and axial motion system load frame insert for in situ high energy x-ray studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shade, Paul A., E-mail: paul.shade.1@us.af.mil; Schuren, Jay C.; Turner, Todd J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Blank, Basil [PulseRay, Beaver Dams, New York 14812 (United States); Kenesei, Peter; Goetze, Kurt; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jonathan [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Suter, Robert M. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Bernier, Joel V.; Li, Shiu Fai [Engineering Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Lind, Jonathan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Engineering Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    High energy x-ray characterization methods hold great potential for gaining insight into the behavior of materials and providing comparison datasets for the validation and development of mesoscale modeling tools. A suite of techniques have been developed by the x-ray community for characterizing the 3D structure and micromechanical state of polycrystalline materials; however, combining these techniques with in situ mechanical testing under well characterized and controlled boundary conditions has been challenging due to experimental design requirements, which demand new high-precision hardware as well as access to high-energy x-ray beamlines. We describe the design and performance of a load frame insert with a rotational and axial motion system that has been developed to meet these requirements. An example dataset from a deforming titanium alloy demonstrates the new capability.

  4. Measurements of transient electron density distributions by femtosecond X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyer, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns measurements of transient charge density maps by femtosecond X-ray diffraction. Different X-ray diffraction methods will be considered, particularly with regard to their application in femtosecond X-ray diffraction. The rotation method is commonly used in stationary X-ray diffraction. In the work in hand an X-ray diffraction experiment is demonstrated, which combines the method with ultrafast X-ray pulses. This experiment is the first implementation which makes use of the rotation method to map transient intensities of a multitude of Bragg reflections. As a prototype material Bismuth is used, which previously was studied frequently by femtosecond X-ray diffraction by measuring Bragg reflections successively. The experimental results of the present work are compared with the literature data. In the second part a powder-diffraction experiment will be presented, which is used to study the dynamics of the electron-density distribution on ultrafast time scales. The experiment investigates a transition metal complex after photoexcitation of the metal to ligand charge transfer state. Besides expected results, i. e. the change of the bond length between the metal and the ligand and the transfer of electronic charge from the metal to the ligand, a strong contribution of the anion to the charge transfer was found. Furthermore, the charge transfer has predominantly a cooperative character. That is, the excitation of a single complex causes an alteration of the charge density of several neighboring units. The results show that more than 30 transition-metal complexes and 60 anions contribute to the charge transfer. This collective response is a consequence of the strong coulomb interactions of the densely packed ions.

  5. X-ray radiation damage of organic semiconductor thin films during grazing incidence diffraction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhold, A., E-mail: alfred.neuhold@tugraz.at [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria); Novak, J.; Flesch, H.-G.; Moser, A.; Djuric, T. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria); Grodd, L.; Grigorian, S.; Pietsch, U. [Institute of Physics, University Siegen (Germany); Resel, R. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria)

    2012-08-01

    Since modern synchrotrons with highly intense X-ray beams are in use to investigate organic materials, the stability of soft matter materials during beam exposure is a crucial issue. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and specular X-ray reflectivity measurements were performed on thin films of organic semiconducting materials, like poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), sexithiophene and pentacene. These films were irradiated with an average flux density between 10{sup 15} and 10{sup 16} photons/(s mm{sup 2}) and evidenced a different stability in synchrotron X-ray radiation. The semi-crystalline P3HT showed a clear intensity decrease of the 1 0 0 Bragg peak and 0 2 0 Bragg peak compared to the rather stable diffraction features of the molecular crystals sexithiophene and pentacene. The difference in synchrotron X-ray radiation stability is explained by the interaction of the X-ray beam with the individual chemical components in the molecules as well as by the different crystallinities of the materials. Furthermore, the semi-crystalline P3HT film exhibited an increase of film thickness after irradiation and the surface roughness slightly decreased. To summarize, this study shows a strong influence of synchrotron X-ray radiation to specific organic thin films like e.g. P3HT, while others like pentacene and sexithiophene are observed as quite stable.

  6. Microbeam high-resolution diffraction and x-ray standing wave methods applied to semiconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazimirov, A; Bilderback, D H; Huang, R; Sirenko, A; Ougazzaden, A

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to conditioning x-ray microbeams for high angular resolution x-ray diffraction and scattering techniques is introduced. We combined focusing optics (one-bounce imaging capillary) and post-focusing collimating optics (miniature Si(004) channel-cut crystal) to generate an x-ray microbeam with a size of 10 μm and ultimate angular resolution of 14 μrad. The microbeam was used to analyse the strain in sub-micron thick InGaAsP epitaxial layers grown on an InP(100) substrate by the selective area growth technique in narrow openings between the oxide stripes. For the structures for which the diffraction peaks from the substrate and the film overlap, the x-ray standing wave technique was applied for precise measurements of the strain with a Δd/d resolution of better than 10 -4 . (rapid communication)

  7. Device for the collimation of a high-energy beam, in particular a X-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyser, L.F.

    1976-01-01

    The design of apertures made of radiation-absorbing material intended for limiting an aperture for a radiation beam of high energy, in particular an X-ray beam is claimed. The apertures are shaped as trapezoids, are held movably, and are adjustable by means of a control device. (UWI) [de

  8. The high energy x-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula observed from OSO 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, J.F.; Crannell, L.J.; Dennis, B.R.; Orwig, L.E.; Maurer, G.S.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula was measured with the scintillation spectrometer on board the OSO-8 satellite. The total emission of the X-ray source shows no long term variability. The spectrum itself can be described by a single power law out to energies of at least 500 keV

  9. Dynamical x-ray diffraction studies of interfacial strain in superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenberg, J.M.; Chu, S.N.G.; Hamm, R.A.; Panish, M.B.; Ritter, D.; Mancrander, A.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on dynamical X-ray diffraction studies that have been carried out for lattice-matched InGaAs/InP superlattices grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) techniques. The (400) X-ray satellite pattern, which is predominantly affected by the strain modulation, was analyzed. The strain and thickness of the actual layers including the presence of strained interfacial regions were determined

  10. Model experiment of in vivo synchrotron X-ray diffraction of human kidney stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ancharov, A.I. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: ancharov@mail.ru; Potapov, S.S. [Institute of Mineralogy UB RAS, Miass (Russian Federation); Moiseenko, T.N. [The State Regional Clinical Hospital, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Feofilov, I.V. [The State Regional Clinical Hospital, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Nizovskii, A.I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-21

    The diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) was used to explore the phase composition of kidney stones placed into a specific object phantom, which imitated the human body. As an imitation of the patient breath, the kidney stone was moved vertically and rotated to an angle of 15{sup o} during the recording of the X-ray pattern. It was shown that rotation and displacement did not distort the X-ray pattern.

  11. Model experiment of in vivo synchrotron X-ray diffraction of human kidney stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancharov, A.I.; Potapov, S.S.; Moiseenko, T.N.; Feofilov, I.V.; Nizovskii, A.I.

    2007-01-01

    The diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) was used to explore the phase composition of kidney stones placed into a specific object phantom, which imitated the human body. As an imitation of the patient breath, the kidney stone was moved vertically and rotated to an angle of 15 o during the recording of the X-ray pattern. It was shown that rotation and displacement did not distort the X-ray pattern

  12. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics in InSb Probed by Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, A.H.; Shank, C.V.; Chin, A.H.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Shank, C.V.; Glover, T.E.; Leemans, W.P.; Balling, P.

    1999-01-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in laser-perturbed InSb are studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction with a novel femtosecond x-ray source. We report the first observation of a delay in the onset of lattice expansion, which we attribute to energy relaxation processes and lattice strain propagation. In addition, we observe direct indications of ultrafast disordering on a subpicosecond time scale. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  13. Diffractive-refractive optics: (+,-,-,+) X-ray crystal monochromator with harmonics separation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdý, Jaromír; Mikulík, P.; Oberta, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2011), s. 299-301 ISSN 0909-0495 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/412 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : diffractive-refractive optics * x-ray synchrotron radiation monochromator * x-ray crystal monochromator * harmonics separation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.726, year: 2011

  14. Nano-fabrication of diffractive optics for soft X-ray and atom beam focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehbein, S.

    2002-01-01

    Nano-structuring processes are described for manufacturing diffractive optics for the condenser-monochromator set-up of the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) and for the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) at the BESSY II electron storage ring in Berlin. Furthermore, a process for manufacturing free-standing nickel zone plates for helium atom beam focusing experiments is presented. (author)

  15. The discovery of X-ray diffraction by crystals and its great impact on science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Zhenhong

    2012-01-01

    In April 1912, Friedrich, Knipping and Laue discovered X-ray diffraction in a CuSO 4 crystal. Later, Laue derived the famous Laue equations which explain the diffraction phenomenon. For this, Laue was awarded a Nobel Prize for Physics in 1914. In 1912 W. H. Bragg and W. L. Bragg received news of Laue 's discovery, and from X-ray diffraction experiments in a ZnS crystal they derived the famous Bragg equation. For this work, father and son were together awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1915, To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the discovery of X-ray diffraction, this article reviews the important contributions of the early pioneers and their historic impact on science and technology worldwide. (author)

  16. Materials identification using a small-scale pixellated x-ray diffraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Flynn, D; Crews, C; Drakos, I; Christodoulou, C; Speller, R D; Wilson, M D; Veale, M C; Seller, P

    2016-01-01

    A transmission x-ray diffraction system has been developed using a pixellated, energy-resolving detector (HEXITEC) and a small-scale, mains operated x-ray source (Amptek Mini-X). HEXITEC enables diffraction to be measured without the requirement of incident spectrum filtration, or collimation of the scatter from the sample, preserving a large proportion of the useful signal compared with other diffraction techniques. Due to this efficiency, sufficient molecular information for material identification can be obtained within 5 s despite the relatively low x-ray source power. Diffraction data are presented from caffeine, hexamine, paracetamol, plastic explosives and narcotics. The capability to determine molecular information from aspirin tablets inside their packaging is demonstrated. Material selectivity and the potential for a sample classification model is shown with principal component analysis, through which each different material can be clearly resolved. (paper)

  17. Size effect in X-ray and electron diffraction patterns from hydroxyapatite particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suvorova, E.I.; Buffat, P.-A.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron microdiffraction, and X-ray diffraction were used to study hydroxyapatite specimens with particle sizes from a few nanometers to several hundreds of nanometers. Diffuse scattering (without clear reflections in transmission diffraction patterns) or strongly broadened peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns are characteristic for agglomerated hydroxyapatite nanocrystals. However, HRTEM and microdiffraction showed that this cannot be considered as an indication of the amorphous state of the matter but rather as the demonstration of size effect and the morphological and structural features of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

  18. Mechanical characterisation of surface layers by x-ray diffraction -application to tribology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrahi, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    The results presented in this paper show that X-ray diffraction can be employed for the characterisation of surface layer damage through residual stresses and work hardening by some tribological actions such as fretting and dry sliding. X-ray diffraction technique can also be employed for a rapid and non-destructive measurement of hardness of hardened steel. The diffraction profile analysis can offer a good indication about the materials characteristics and the microstructural evolution caused by heat treatment or by mechanical loading

  19. Monitoring alloy formation during mechanical alloying process by x-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Kadir Masrom; Noraizam Md Diah; Mazli Mustapha

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring alloying (MA) is a novel processing technique that use high energy impact ball mill to produce alloys with enhanced properties and microscopically homogeneous materials starting from various powder mixtures. Mechanical alloying process was originally developed to produce oxide dispersion strengthened nickel superalloys. In principal, in high-energy ball milling process, alloy is formed by the result of repeated welding, fracturing and rewelding of powder particles in a high energy ball mill. In this process a powder mixture in a ball mill is subjected to high-energy collisions among balls. MA has been shown to be capable of synthesizing a variety of materials. It is known to be capable to prepare equilibrium and non-equilibrium phases starting from blended elemental or prealloyed powders. The process ability to produce highly metastable materials such as amorphous alloys and nanostructured materials has made this process attractive and it has been considered as a promising material processing technique that could be used to produce many advanced materials at low cost. The present study explores the conditions under which aluminum alloys formation occurs by ball milling of blended aluminum and its alloying elements powders. In this work, attempt was made in producing aluminum 2024 alloys by milling of blended elemental aluminum powder of 2024 composition in a stainless steel container under argon atmosphere for up to 210 minutes. X-ray diffraction together with thermal analysis techniques has been used to monitor phase changes in the milled powder. Results indicate that, using our predetermined milling parameters, alloys were formed after 120 minutes milling. The thermal analysis data was also presented in this report. (Author)

  20. Energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction beamline at Indus-2 synchrotron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction beamline has been designed, developed and commissioned at BL-11 bending magnet port of the Indian synchrotron source, Indus-2. The performance of this beamline has been benchmarked by measuring diffraction patterns from various elemental metals and standard inorganic ...

  1. In-situ X-ray diffraction : a useful tool to investigate hydride-formation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, P.H.L.; Daams, J.L.C.; Veirman, de A.E.M.; Staals, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    A high-pressure X-ray diffraction (XRD) cell has been designed which allowed us to study simultaneously hydrogen absorption/desorption isotherms and XRD powder diffraction patterns on (de)hydrided intermetallic compounds. The hydride formation reaction was investigated in the case of LaNi5 under

  2. Small angle X ray diffraction investigation of twinned opal_like structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samusev, A.K.; Sinev, I.S.; Samusev, K.B.; Rybin, M.V.; Mistonov, A.A.; Grigoryeva, N.A.; Grigoriev, S.V.; Petukhov, A.V.; Byelov, D.; Trofimova, E.Y.; Kurdyukov, D.A.; Golubev, V.G.; Limonov, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Small angle X ray diffraction from synthetic opal films has been investigated as a function of the orientation of the sample. All the observed (hkl) diffraction reflections have been interpreted. The reconstruct tion of the reciprocal lattice of the studied opal films has been carried out. The

  3. Analytic theory of soft x-ray diffraction by lamellar multilayer gratings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozhevnikov, I.V.; van der Meer, R.; Bastiaens, Hubertus M.J.; Boller, Klaus J.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    An analytic theory describing soft x-ray diffraction by Lamellar Multilayer Gratings (LMG) has been developed. The theory is derived from a coupled waves approach for LMGs operating in the single-order regime, where an incident plane wave can only excite a single diffraction order. The results from

  4. X-ray diffraction investigation of the sulphur induced 4x1 reconstruction of Ni(110)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, M.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Nielsen, M.

    1993-01-01

    The atomic structure of the Ni(110)4 x 1-S reconstruction has been determined on the basis of surface X-ray diffraction measurements. An analysis of the in-plane diffraction data shows that the model consists of Ni rows along the [001] direction, two for every 4 x 1 unit cell, corresponding to 0....

  5. New structural studies of liquid crystal by reflectivity and resonant X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, P.

    2007-04-01

    This memory presents three structural studies of smectic Liquid Crystals by reflectivity and resonant diffraction of X-rays. It is divided in five chapters. In the first a short introduction to Liquid Crystals is given. In particular, the smectic phases that are the object of this study are presented. The second chapter is consecrated to the X-ray experimental techniques that were used in this work. The three last chapters present the works on which this thesis can be divided. Chapter three demonstrates on free-standing films of MHPOBC (historic liquid crystal that possesses the antiferroelectric sub-phases) the possibility to extend the technique of resonant X-ray diffraction to liquid crystals without resonant element. In the fourth chapter the structure of the B 2 liquid crystal phase of bent-core molecules (or banana molecules) is elucidated by using resonant X-ray diffraction combined with polarization analysis of the diffracted beam. A model of the polarization of the resonant beam diffracted by four different structures proposed for the B 2 phase is developed in this chapter. In the fifth chapter a smectic binary mixture presenting a very original critical point of phase separation is studied by X-ray reflectivity and optical microscopy. A concentration gradient in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the film seems to be induced by the free-standing film geometry. The results of a simplified model of the system are compatible with this interpretation

  6. Takagi-Taupin description of x-ray dynamical diffraction from diffractive optics with large numerical aperture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Hanfei; Maser, Joerg; Macrander, Albert; Shen Qun; Vogt, Stefan; Stephenson, G. Brian; Kang, Hyon Chol

    2007-01-01

    We present a formalism of x-ray dynamical diffraction from volume diffractive optics with large numerical aperture and high aspect ratio, in an analogy to the Takagi-Taupin equations [Acta Crystallogr. 15, 1311 (1962); Bull. Soc. Fr. Mineral. Crystallogr. 87, 469 (1964)] for strained single crystals. We derive a set of basic equations for dynamical diffraction from volume diffractive optics, which enable us to study the focusing property of these optics with various grating profiles. We study volume diffractive optics that satisfy the Bragg condition to various degrees, namely, flat, tilted, and wedged geometries, and derive the curved geometries required for ultimate focusing. We show that the curved geometries satisfy both the Bragg condition everywhere and phase requirement for point focusing and effectively focus hard x rays to a scale close to the wavelength. Our calculations were made for an x-ray wavelength of 0.064 nm (19.5 keV)

  7. X-ray diffraction and X-ray K absorption near edge studies of copper (II) complexes with amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P. K.; Mishra, Ashutosh; Malviya, Varsha; Kame, Rashmi; Malviya, P. K.

    2017-05-01

    Synthesis of copper (II) complexes [CuL1L2X].nH2O, where n=1, 2,3 (X=Cl,Br,NO3) (L1is 2,2’-bipyridine and L2 is L-tyrosine) by the chemical root method. The XRD data for the samples have been recorded. EXAFS spectra have also been recorded at the K-edge of Cu using the dispersive beam line BL-8 at 2.5 Gev Indus-2 Synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore, India. XRD and EXAFS data have been analysed using the computer software. X-ray diffraction studies of all complexes indicate their crystalline nature. Lattice parameter, bond length, particle size have been determined from XRD data.

  8. Hard X-Ray Flare Source Sizes Measured with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Pernak, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of 18 double hard X-ray sources seen at energies above 25 keV are analyzed to determine the spatial extent of the most compact structures evident in each case. The following four image reconstruction algorithms were used: Clean, Pixon, and two routines using visibilities maximum entropy and forward fit (VFF). All have been adapted for this study to optimize their ability to provide reliable estimates of the sizes of the more compact sources. The source fluxes, sizes, and morphologies obtained with each method are cross-correlated and the similarities and disagreements are discussed. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the major axes of the sources with assumed elliptical Gaussian shapes are generally well correlated between the four image reconstruction routines and vary between the RHESSI resolution limit of approximately 2" up to approximately 20" with most below 10". The FWHM of the minor axes are generally at or just above the RHESSI limit and hence should be considered as unresolved in most cases. The orientation angles of the elliptical sources are also well correlated. These results suggest that the elongated sources are generally aligned along a flare ribbon with the minor axis perpendicular to the ribbon. This is verified for the one flare in our list with coincident Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) images. There is evidence for significant extra flux in many of the flares in addition to the two identified compact sources, thus rendering the VFF assumption of just two Gaussians inadequate. A more realistic approximation in many cases would be of two line sources with unresolved widths. Recommendations are given for optimizing the RHESSI imaging reconstruction process to ensure that the finest possible details of the source morphology become evident and that reliable estimates can be made of the source dimensions.

  9. Final Report on Developing Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High-Energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Meimei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Almer, Jonathan D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a summary of research activities on understanding microstructure – property correlation in reactor materials using in situ high-energy X-rays. The report is a Level 2 deliverable in FY16 (M2CA-13-IL-AN_-0403-0111), under the Work Package CA-13-IL-AN_- 0403-01, “Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High Energy Xrays”, as part of the DOE-NE NEET Program. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the application of in situ high energy X-ray measurements of nuclear reactor materials under thermal-mechanical loading, to understand their microstructure-property relationships. The gained knowledge is expected to enable accurate predictions of mechanical performance of these materials subjected to extreme environments, and to further facilitate development of advanced reactor materials. The report provides detailed description of the in situ X-ray Radiated Materials (iRadMat) apparatus designed to interface with a servo-hydraulic load frame at beamline 1-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. This new capability allows in situ studies of radioactive specimens subject to thermal-mechanical loading using a suite of high-energy X-ray scattering and imaging techniques. We conducted several case studies using the iRadMat to obtain a better understanding of deformation and fracture mechanisms of irradiated materials. In situ X-ray measurements on neutron-irradiated pure metal and model alloy and several representative reactor materials, e.g. pure Fe, Fe-9Cr model alloy, 316 SS, HT-UPS, and duplex cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) CF-8 were performed under tensile loading at temperatures of 20-400°C in vacuum. A combination of wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and imaging techniques were utilized to interrogate microstructure at different length scales in real time while the specimen was subject to thermal-mechanical loading. In addition, in situ X-ray studies were

  10. High energy x-ray synchrotron radiation analysis of residual stress distribution of shot-peened steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Kimachi, Hirohisa; Suzuki, Kenji; Yanase, Etsuya; Nishio, Kouji; Kusumi, Yukihiro

    2001-01-01

    A high energy X-ray beam from synchrotron radiation source SPring-8 was used to determine the residual stress distribution beneath the shot-peened surface of carbon steel plates. By using the monochromatic X-ray beam with an energy of 72 keV, the relation between 2θ and sin 2 ψ was obtained by the side-inclination method upto sin 2 ψ = 0.9. The distribution of the residual stress was determined from the non-linearity of the relation between 2θ and sin 2 ψ. (author)

  11. Study of dielectric liquids at room temperature for high energy x ray Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepert, S.

    1989-09-01

    The detection of X rays by means of a dielectric liquid detector system, at room temperature, is discussed. The physico-chemical properties of a dielectric liquid, the construction of a cleaning device and of two electrode configurations, and the utilization of different amplifier models are studied. The results allowed the analysis and characterization of the behavior of the dielectric liquid under X ray irradiation. Data obtained is confirmed by computerized simulation. The choice of Tetramethyl-germanium for the X ray tomography, applied in nondestructive analysis, is explained. The investigation of the system parameters allowed the setting of the basis of a prototype project for a multi-detector [fr

  12. Kinetics of the main phase transition of hydrated lecithin monitored by real-time x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffrey, M.; Bilderback, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for observing and recording in real-time x-ray diffraction from an unoriented hydrated membrane lipid, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), through its thermotropic gel/liquid crystal phase transition. Synchrotron radiation from the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (Ithaca, New York) was used as an x-ray source of extremely high brilliance and the dynamic display of the diffraction image was effected using a three-stage image intensifier tube coupled to an external fluorescent screen. The image on the output phosphor was sufficiently intense to be recorded cinematographically and to be displayed on a television monitor using a vidicon camera at 30 frames x s -1 . These measurements set an upper limit of 2 s on the DPPC gel → liquid crystal phase transition and indicate that the transition is a two-state process. The real-time method couples the power of x-ray diffraction as a structural probe with the ability to follow kinetics of structural changes. The method does not require an exogenous probe, is relatively nonperturbing, and can be used with membranes in a variety of physical states and with unstable samples. The method has the additional advantage over its static measurement counterpart in that it is more likely to detect transiently stable intermediates if present

  13. Structure of zinc and niobium tellurite glasses by neutron and x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, U; Yousef, E; Ruessel, C; Neuefeind, J; Hannon, A C

    2004-01-01

    Neutron and x-ray diffraction experiments of high resolving power with neutrons from a spallation source and high-energy photons from a synchrotron have been performed on compositional series of binary Zn, Nb and on mixed Zn/Nb tellurite glasses. The Te-O, Zn-O and Nb-O coordination numbers are determined by Gaussian fitting of the first-neighbour peaks in the neutron and x-ray data simultaneously. The transition of TeO 4 to TeO 3 units with increasing fraction of a second component is indicated by decreasing total Te-O coordination numbers. This transition appears different for glasses with ZnO or Nb 2 O 5 additions. Details of the Te-O peaks suggest there are two species of Te-O bonds with lengths of ∼ 0.19 and ∼ 0.21 nm. The change of their fractions shows excellent agreement with the existence of TeO 4 trigonal bipyramids and TeO 3 trigonal pyramids. All oxygen atoms from ZnO and Nb 2 O 5 are used for rupture of Te-O-Te bridges, which is accompanied with a change of nearly all participating TeO 4 to TeO 3 groups. The tendency for a TeO 4 → TeO 3 change decreases for glasses of higher second component content which is accompanied by the occurrence of TeO 4 groups with non-bridging oxygens. The Nb tellurite glasses show transition to network-forming behaviour with the formation of Nb-O-Nb bridges. The fractions of TeO 3 units of ternary Zn/Nb tellurite glasses agree with an additivity behaviour of the modifying effects of ZnO and Nb 2 O 5 additions

  14. Data processing software suite SITENNO for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using the X-ray free-electron laser SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    The software suite SITENNO is developed for processing diffraction data collected in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiments of non-crystalline particles using an X-ray free-electron laser. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a promising technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of micrometers to sub-micrometers. Recently, X-ray free-electron laser sources have enabled efficient experiments in the ‘diffraction before destruction’ scheme. Diffraction experiments have been conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) using the custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors. In the experiments, ten thousands of single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected within several hours. Then, diffraction patterns with significant levels of intensity suitable for structural analysis must be found, direct-beam positions in diffraction patterns determined, diffraction patterns from the two CCD detectors merged, and phase-retrieval calculations for structural analyses performed. A software suite named SITENNO has been developed to semi-automatically apply the four-step processing to a huge number of diffraction data. Here, details of the algorithm used in the suite are described and the performance for approximately 9000 diffraction patterns collected from cuboid-shaped copper oxide particles reported. Using the SITENNO suite, it is possible to conduct experiments with data processing immediately after the data collection, and to characterize the size distribution and internal structures of the non-crystalline particles

  15. Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrot, I.M.; Urban, V.; Gardner, K.H.; Forsyth, V.T.

    2005-01-01

    The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar[reg] or Twaron[reg

  16. Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrot, I. M. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Gardner, K. H. [DuPont Experimental Station; Forsyth, V. T. [Institut Laue Langevin and Keele University

    2005-04-01

    The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar{reg_sign} or Twaron{reg_sign}.

  17. Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, I. M.; Urban, V.; Gardner, K. H.; Forsyth, V. T.

    2005-08-01

    The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar® or Twaron®.

  18. Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrot, I.M. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University Medical School, Staffordshire ST4 7QB (United Kingdom); Urban, V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6100 (United States); Gardner, K.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19719 (United States); Forsyth, V.T. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France) and Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University Medical School, Staffordshire ST4 7QB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: tforsyth@ill.fr

    2005-08-15

    The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar[reg] or Twaron[reg].

  19. Computed tomography of x-ray index of refraction using the diffraction enhanced imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Ren, B.; Wu, X.Y.; Orion, I.; Zhong, Z.; Thomlinson, W.C.; Chapman, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new, synchrotron-based, x-ray radiography method that uses monochromatic, fan-shaped beams, with an analyser crystal positioned between the subject and the detector. The analyser allows the detection of only those x-rays transmitted by the subject that fall into the acceptance angle (central part of the rocking curve) of the monochromator/analyser system. As shown by Chapman et al , in addition to the x-ray attenuation, the method provides information on the out-of-plane angular deviation of x-rays. New images result in which the image contrast depends on the x-ray index of refraction and on the yield of small-angle scattering, respectively. We implemented DEI in the tomography mode at the National Synchrotron Light Source using 22 keV x-rays, and imaged a cylindrical acrylic phantom that included oil-filled, slanted channels. The resulting 'refraction CT image' shows the pure image of the out-of-plane gradient of the x-ray index of refraction. No image artefacts were present, indicating that the CT projection data were a consistent set. The 'refraction CT image' signal is linear with the gradient of the refractive index, and its value is equal to that expected. The method, at the energy used or higher, has the potential for use in clinical radiography and in industry. (author)

  20. Growth of ω inclusions in Ti alloys: An X-ray diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Šmilauerová, J.; Harcuba, P.; Pospíšil, J.; Matěj, Z.; Holý, V.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the size and crystal structure of nanometer-sized ω inclusions in single crystals of β-Ti alloys by X-ray diffraction pole-figure measurements and reciprocal space mapping. We studied the topotactical relation of the β and ω crystal lattices, and from the positions and shapes of the diffraction maxima of the ω lattice determined the mean size of the ω inclusions and the misfit of the inclusion lattice with respect to the host lattice, as well as their changes during ageing. The lattice of the ω inclusions exhibits a large positive misfit already before ageing and the misfit is subsequently reduced during the ageing process. Using the theories of elasticity and X-ray scattering we simulated diffuse X-ray scattering around the β diffraction maxima and demonstrated that the diffuse scattering is caused mainly by local elastic strains in the β host phase around the ω inclusions

  1. Determination of the strain hardening rate of metals and alloys by X ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadalbert, Robert

    1977-01-01

    This report for engineering graduation is based on the study of X ray diffraction line profile which varies with the plastic strain rate of the metal. After some generalities of strain hardening (consequence of a plastic deformation on the structure of a polycrystalline metal, means to study a strain hardened structure, use of X ray diffraction to analyse the strain hardened crystalline structure), the author reports the strain hardening rate measurement by using X ray diffraction. Several aspects are addressed: principles, experimental technique, apparatus, automation and programming of the measurement cycle, method sensitivity and precision. In the next part, the author reports applications: measurement of the strain hardening rate in different materials (tubes with hexagonal profile, cylindrical tubes in austenitic steel), and study of the evolution of strain hardening with temperature [fr

  2. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis for quantitative defect evaluation in GaP/Si nanolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Thanh, T.; Robert, C. [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR 6082, F-35708 RENNES (France); Létoublon, A., E-mail: Antoine.letoublon@insa-rennes.fr [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR 6082, F-35708 RENNES (France); Cornet, C. [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR 6082, F-35708 RENNES (France); Quinci, T. [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR 6082, F-35708 RENNES (France); CEA LCP, INES, 50 av. du Lac Léman, Savoie Technolac, 73375 Le Bourget du Lac (France); Giudicelli, E.; Almosni, S. [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR 6082, F-35708 RENNES (France); Boudet, N. [CRG-D2AM, ESRF and Inst. Néel, CNRS-UJF, 25 Av des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France); Ponchet, A. [CEMES, CNRS, Université de Toulouse, 29 rue J. Marvig BP 94347, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Kuyyalil, J. [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR 6082, F-35708 RENNES (France); Danila, M. [National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies (IMT), 126A Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 077190, Bucharest (Romania); Durand, O.; Bertru, N.; Le Corre, A. [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR 6082, F-35708 RENNES (France)

    2013-08-31

    In the context of III–V monolithic integration on silicon, synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been employed in this study using a bi-dimensional large area hybrid pixel detector (XPAD third generation) to characterize defects in the GaP layers. Despite a very coherent interface (low plastic relaxation) of GaP/Si, 2 types of defect are detected. Micro-twins contributions are evidenced and quantitatively evaluated from additional reflections analysis. Antiphase domains are evidenced using the Williamson-Hall-like plot method applied to transverse scans extracted directly from single XPAD images taken on specular GaP reflections. - Highlights: ► Antiphase domain evidence and characterization in GaP/Si using X-ray diffraction ► Microtwin evidence and characterization ► Synchrotron diffraction ► Large area X-ray hybrid pixel detector.

  3. Submicron x-ray diffraction and its applications to problems in materials and environmental science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, N.; Celestre, R. S.; MacDowell, A. A.; Padmore, H. A.; Spolenak, R.; Valek, B. C.; Meier Chang, N.; Manceau, A.; Patel, J. R.

    2002-03-01

    The availability of high brilliance third generation synchrotron sources together with progress in achromatic focusing optics allows us to add submicron spatial resolution to the conventional century-old x-ray diffraction technique. The new capabilities include the possibility to map in situ, grain orientations, crystalline phase distribution, and full strain/stress tensors at a very local level, by combining white and monochromatic x-ray microbeam diffraction. This is particularly relevant for high technology industry where the understanding of material properties at a microstructural level becomes increasingly important. After describing the latest advances in the submicron x-ray diffraction techniques at the Advanced Light Source, we will give some examples of its application in material science for the measurement of strain/stress in metallic thin films and interconnects. Its use in the field of environmental science will also be discussed.

  4. Submicron X-Ray Diffraction and its Applications to Problems in Materials and Environmental Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, J. R.

    2002-08-16

    The availability of high brilliance 3rd generation synchrotron sources together with progress in achromatic focusing optics allow to add submicron spatial resolution to the conventional century-old X-ray diffraction technique. The new capabilities include the possibility to map in-situ, grain orientations, crystalline phase distribution and full strain/stress tensors at a very local level, by combining white and monochromatic X-ray microbeam diffraction. This is particularly relevant for high technology industry where the understanding of material properties at a microstructural level becomes increasingly important. After describing the latest advances in the submicron X-ray diffraction techniques at the ALS, we will give some examples of its application in material science for the measurement of strain/stress in metallic thin films and interconnects. Its use in the field of environmental science will also be discussed.

  5. Submicron X-ray diffraction and its applications to problems in materials and environmental science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, N.; Celestre, R.S.; MacDowell, A.A.; Padmore, H.A.; Spolenak, R.; Valek, B.C.; Meier Chang, N.; Manceau, A.; Patel, J.R.

    2002-03-26

    The availability of high brilliance 3rd generation synchrotron sources together with progress in achromatic focusing optics allow to add submicron spatial resolution to the conventional century-old X-ray diffraction technique. The new capabilities include the possibility to map in-situ, grain orientations, crystalline phase distribution and full strain/stress tensors at a very local level, by combining white and monochromatic X-ray microbeam diffraction. This is particularly relevant for high technology industry where the understanding of material properties at a microstructural level becomes increasingly important. After describing the latest advances in the submicron X-ray diffraction techniques at the ALS, we will give some examples of its application in material science for the measurement of strain/stress in metallic thin films and interconnects. Its use in the field of environmental science will also be discussed.

  6. Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Cheng-Jun; Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Zhang, Bangmin; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M.; Venkatesan, T.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr 0.67 Sr 0.33 MnO 3 film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam

  7. Direct observation of ultrafast atomic motion using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shymanovich, U.

    2007-11-13

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the atomic motion in laser irradiated solids on a picosecond to subpicosecond time-scale using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique. In the second chapter, the laser system, the laser-plasma based X-ray source and the experimental setup for optical pump / X-ray probe measurements were presented. Chapter 3 is devoted to the characterization and comparison of different types of X-ray optics. Chapter 4 presented the time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments performed for this thesis. The first two sections of this chapter discuss the measurements of initially unexpected strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity of the X-ray probe beam. The elimination of the strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity represented an important prerequisite to perform the study of lattice heating in Germanium after femtosecond optical excitation by measuring the transient Debye-Waller effect. The third section describes the investigations of acoustic waves upon ultrafast optical excitation and discusses the two different pressure contributions driving them: the thermal and the electronic ones. (orig.)

  8. Direct observation of ultrafast atomic motion using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shymanovich, U.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the atomic motion in laser irradiated solids on a picosecond to subpicosecond time-scale using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique. In the second chapter, the laser system, the laser-plasma based X-ray source and the experimental setup for optical pump / X-ray probe measurements were presented. Chapter 3 is devoted to the characterization and comparison of different types of X-ray optics. Chapter 4 presented the time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments performed for this thesis. The first two sections of this chapter discuss the measurements of initially unexpected strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity of the X-ray probe beam. The elimination of the strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity represented an important prerequisite to perform the study of lattice heating in Germanium after femtosecond optical excitation by measuring the transient Debye-Waller effect. The third section describes the investigations of acoustic waves upon ultrafast optical excitation and discusses the two different pressure contributions driving them: the thermal and the electronic ones. (orig.)

  9. Control of synchrotron x-ray diffraction by means of standing acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotoyabko, E.; Quintana, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements in quartz crystals of different thickness excited by standing acoustic waves were carried out at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. We demonstrated the ability to significantly modify the quartz rocking curves for 20-25 keV x rays by changing the shear wave parameters in the frequency range between 15 and 105 MHz. Dynamic deformation introduced into the crystal lattice by acoustic waves resulted in a remarkable broadening of the rocking curves. The broadening effect strongly depends on the strength of the ultrasound, which can be easily regulated by changing the acoustic amplitude or frequency near the resonance. The maximum rocking curve broadening reached 17 times, which corresponds to the wavelength band, Δλ/λ=4x10 -3 , when used as a monochromator or analyzer for 20-25 keV x rays. The initial rocking curve shape is restored by sweeping the acoustic frequency within a 50-100 kHz range near the resonance. The tunable broadening effect allows effective manipulation of x-ray intensities in time domain. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction measurements under a 19.6 MHz acoustic wave excitation were performed by synchronizing the acoustic wave and x-ray burst periodicity. We used the fact that twice per period the standing wave produces a zero net deformation across the crystal thickness. By introducing an oscillating delay to the acoustic excitation, we were able to effectively change the phase of the acoustic wave relative to the x-ray burst periodicity. The x-ray diffraction intensity was strongly affected by tuning the timing of the x-ray arrivals to the minimum or maximum acoustic deformation. A deep modulation of x rays was observed in a wide frequency range between 0.1 Hz and 1 MHz, which certifies that acoustically excited quartz crystals can potentially be used as slow and fast x-ray modulators with high duty cycle

  10. X-ray diffraction patterns of metal aurocyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selig, W.S.; Smith, G.S.; Harding, K.K.; Summers, L.J.

    1989-06-01

    Aurocyanides of the following metal cations have been prepared: Ag, Hg(II), Ga, Fe(III), Tl(I), Bi, Pb, Mn(II), Ni, Zn, Cu(II), Cd, In, and Co(II). Most of the aurocyanides are of the type M[Au(CN) 2 ] x where M is the metal cation and x its valence. However, under some conditions mixed aurocyanides containing K may be formed, such as KCo[Au(CN) 2 ] 3 . Only Ag and Hg(II) form aurocyanides which are sufficiently insoluble for the potentiometric determination of the aurocyanide anion. The diffraction patterns of the various aurocyanides are reported. 12 refs., 16 tabs

  11. X-ray diffraction microscopy based on refractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henning Friis; Jakobsen, A. C.; Simons, Hugh

    2017-01-01

    A formalism is presented for dark‐field X‐ray microscopy using refractive optics. The new technique can produce three‐dimensional maps of lattice orientation and axial strain within millimetre‐sized sampling volumes and is particularly suited to in situ studies of materials at hard X‐ray energies....... An objective lens in the diffracted beam magnifies the image and acts as a very efficient filter in reciprocal space, enabling the imaging of individual domains of interest with a resolution of 100 nm. Analytical expressions for optical parameters such as numerical aperture, vignetting, and the resolution...

  12. X-ray grazing incidence diffraction from multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tixier, S.; Boeni, P.; Swygenhoven, H. van; Horisberger, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Grazing incidence scattering geometries using synchrotron radiation have been applied in order to characterise the roughness profiles and the structural coherence of multilayers. The lateral correlation length of the roughness profiles was evaluated using diffuse reflectivity in the `out of plane` geometry. This type of measurement is the only diffuse reflectivity technique allowing large lateral momentum transfer. It is typically suitable for correlation lengths smaller than 1000 A. The lateral structural coherence length of Ni{sub 3}Al/Ni multilayers as a function of the layer thickness was obtained by grazing incidence diffraction (GID). 3 figs., 1 ref.

  13. Processing two-dimensional X-ray diffraction and small-angle scattering data in DAWN 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filik, J; Ashton, A W; Chang, P C Y; Chater, P A; Day, S J; Drakopoulos, M; Gerring, M W; Hart, M L; Magdysyuk, O V; Michalik, S; Smith, A; Tang, C C; Terrill, N J; Wharmby, M T; Wilhelm, H

    2017-06-01

    A software package for the calibration and processing of powder X-ray diffraction and small-angle X-ray scattering data is presented. It provides a multitude of data processing and visualization tools as well as a command-line scripting interface for on-the-fly processing and the incorporation of complex data treatment tasks. Customizable processing chains permit the execution of many data processing steps to convert a single image or a batch of raw two-dimensional data into meaningful data and one-dimensional diffractograms. The processed data files contain the full data provenance of each process applied to the data. The calibration routines can run automatically even for high energies and also for large detector tilt angles. Some of the functionalities are highlighted by specific use cases.

  14. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  15. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  16. Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of paint pigment particles by scanning a phase plate modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Y.S.; Chen, B.; Zhang, F.; Berenguer, F.; Bean, R.; Kewish, C.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Rodenburg, J.; Robinson, I.

    2011-01-01

    We have implemented a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging technique that scans a phase plate to modulate wave-fronts of the x-ray beam transmitted by samples. The method was applied to measure a decorative alkyd paint containing iron oxide red pigment particles. By employing an iterative algorithm for wave-front modulation phase retrieval, we obtained an image of the paint sample that shows the distribution of the pigment particles and is consistent with the result obtained from a transmission x-ray microscope. The technique has been experimentally proven to be a feasible coherent x-ray imaging method with about 120 nm spatial resolution and was shown to work well with industrially relevant specimens.

  17. Correlation between protein sequence similarity and x-ray diffraction quality in the protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui-Meng; Yin, Da-Chuan; Ye, Ya-Jing; Luo, Hui-Min; Geng, Li-Qiang; Li, Hai-Sheng; Guo, Wei-Hong; Shang, Peng

    2009-01-01

    As the most widely utilized technique to determine the 3-dimensional structure of protein molecules, X-ray crystallography can provide structure of the highest resolution among the developed techniques. The resolution obtained via X-ray crystallography is known to be influenced by many factors, such as the crystal quality, diffraction techniques, and X-ray sources, etc. In this paper, the authors found that the protein sequence could also be one of the factors. We extracted information of the resolution and the sequence of proteins from the Protein Data Bank (PDB), classified the proteins into different clusters according to the sequence similarity, and statistically analyzed the relationship between the sequence similarity and the best resolution obtained. The results showed that there was a pronounced correlation between the sequence similarity and the obtained resolution. These results indicate that protein structure itself is one variable that may affect resolution when X-ray crystallography is used.

  18. An x-ray backlit Talbot-Lau deflectometer for high-energy-density electron density diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray phase-contrast techniques can measure electron density gradients in high-energy-density plasmas through refraction induced phase shifts. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer consisting of free standing ultrathin gratings was deployed at an ultra-short, high-intensity laser system using K-shell emission from a 1-30 J, 8 ps laser pulse focused on thin Cu foil targets. Grating survival was demonstrated for 30 J, 8 ps laser pulses. The first x-ray deflectometry images obtained under laser backlighting showed up to 25% image contrast and thus enabled detection of electron areal density gradients with a maximum value of 8.1 ± 0.5 × 1023 cm-3 in a low-Z millimeter sized sample. An electron density profile was obtained from refraction measurements with an error of x-ray source-size, similar to conventional radiography.

  19. Diffractive-refractive optics: (+,-,-,+) X-ray crystal monochromator with harmonics separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdý, Jaromír; Mikulík, Petr; Oberta, Peter

    2011-03-01

    A new kind of two channel-cut crystals X-ray monochromator in dispersive (+,-,-,+) position which spatially separates harmonics is proposed. The diffracting surfaces are oriented so that the diffraction is inclined. Owing to refraction the diffracted beam is sagittally deviated. The deviation depends on wavelength and is much higher for the first harmonics than for higher harmonics. This leads to spatial harmonics separation. The idea is supported by ray-tracing simulation.

  20. Long wave-length x-ray diffraction crystal and method of manufacturing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zingaro, W.P.; Sicignano, A.

    1980-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction crystal of the Langemuir-Blodgett type capable of detecting radiation having a wavelength greater than 50 Arystroms and a method of making such a crystal are described. The crystal consists of a pair of alternate monolayers, one a heavy metal soap, and one a light metal soap. Selecting cation pairs with a significant difference in atomic number and dispersing power, such as Pb and Be, Mg, or Ca, increases the effective interplanar distance since the Pb planes cause the predominant x-ray diffraction. (LL)

  1. An introduction to three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy is a fast and nondestructive structural characterization technique aimed at studies of the individual crystalline elements (grains or subgrains) within millimetre-sized polycrystalline specimens. It is based on two principles: the use of highly...... penetrating hard X-rays from a synchrotron source and the application of tomographic reconstruction algorithms for the analysis of the diffraction data. In favourable cases, the position, morphology, phase and crystallographic orientation can be derived for up to 1000 elements simultaneously. For each grain...

  2. X-ray diffraction investigation of spin reorientation in SmFe2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaviko, V.S.; Korolyov, A.V.; Mushnikov, N.V.

    1996-01-01

    Spontaneous magnetoelastic crystal lattice distortions in the spin reorientation region of high magnetostrictive SmFe 2 have been investigated by X-ray diffraction in the temperature range 80-300 K. Comparison of experimental shapes of X-ray diffraction lines with calculated shapes shows that, in the region of the spin reorientation transition, a mixture of left angle 110 right angle and left angle 111 right angle phases rather than the angular left angle uuw right angle -type phase is realized. The temperature dependence of the relative volume content of left angle 110 right angle and left angle 111 right angle phases is determined using least-squares fitting. (orig.)

  3. X-ray diffraction studies of chitosan acetate-based polymer electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Z.; Ibrahim, Z.A.; Abdul Kariem Arof

    2002-01-01

    Chitosan is the product when partially deacetylated chitin dissolves in dilute acetic acid. This paper presents the x-ray diffraction patterns of chitosan acetate, plasticised chitosan acetate and plasticised-salted chitosan acetate films. The results show that the chitosan acetate based polymer electrolyte films are not completely amorphous but it is partially crystalline. X-ray diffraction study also confirms the occurrence of the complexation between chitosan and the salt and the interaction between salt and plasticizer. The salt-chitosan interaction is clearly justified by infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  4. Determination of densities from chemical composition and X-Ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, A.L.T. de

    1980-01-01

    X-ray diffraction method applied to retained austenite measurements gives volume per cent results, whereas the same kind of measurement made by Moessbauer Effect gives iron percentages. To compare both results one needs to convert the volume % to weight % or vice-versa. This necessitates, among other things, in determining the densities of the α and #betta# phases in the steel being studied. A method for calculating the densities, based on the application of the definition of density to just one unit cell, using X-ray diffraction and chemical results, are described. (Author) [pt

  5. Introducing the ARL X'Tra x-ray diffraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, L.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The ARL X'Tra is a state-of-the-art solution for powder X-ray diffraction in a large range of applications such as pharmaceuticals and biosciences, chemicals, earth sciences, semi-conductors, metallurgy and ceramics. The X'Tra offers the latest technology in key diffraction components to produce a high performance instrument at an affordable price. This presentation examines some of the hardware and performance features of this instrument. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  6. Magnetic x-ray circular dichroism in spin-polarized photoelectron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddill, G.D.; Tobin, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    The first structural determination with spin-polarized, energy-dependent photoelectron diffraction using circularly-polarized x-rays is reported for Fe films on Cu(001). Circularly-polarized x-rays produced spin-polarized photoelectrons from the Fe 2p doublet, and intensity asymmetries in the 2p 3/2 level are observed. Fully spin-specific multiple scattering calculations reproduced the experimentally-determined energy and angular dependences. A new analytical procedure which focuses upon intensity variations due to spin-dependent diffraction is introduced. A sensitivity to local geometric and magnetic structure is demonstrated

  7. Z-pinches as intense x-ray sources for high energy density physics application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzen, M.K.

    1997-01-01

    Fast z-pinch implosions can convert more than 10% of the stored electrical energy in a pulsed-power accelerator into x rays. These x rays are produced when an imploding cylindrical plasma, driven by the magnetic field pressure associated with very large axial currents, stagnates upon the cylindrical axis of symmetry. On the Saturn pulsed-power accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories, for example, currents of 6 to 8 MA with a risetime of less than 50 ns are driven through cylindrically-symmetric loads, producing implosions velocities as high as 100 cm/μs and x-ray energies as high as 500 kJ. The keV component of the resulting x-ray spectrum has been used for many years 8 a radiation source for material response studies. Alternatively, the x-ray output can be thermalized into a near-Planckian x-ray source by containing it within a large cylindrical radiation case. These large volume, long-lived radiation sources have recently been used for ICF-relevant ablator physics experiments as well as astrophysical opacity and radiation-material interaction experiments. Hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and cylindrical load symmetry are critical, limiting factors in determining the assembled plasma densities and temperatures, and thus in the x-ray pulse widths that can be produced on these accelerators. In recent experiments on the Saturn accelerator, these implosion nonuniformities have been minimized by using uniform-fill gas puff loads or by using wire arrays with as many a 192 wires. These techniques produced significant improvements in the pinched plasma quality, Zn reproducibility, and x-ray output power. X-ray pulse widths of less than 5 ns and peak powers of 75±10 TW have been achieved with arrays of 120 tungsten wires. These powers represent greater than a factor of three in power amplification over the electrical power of the Saturn n accelerator, and are a record for x-ray powers in the laboratory

  8. Sample cell for powder x-ray diffraction at up to 500 bars and 200 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jupe, Andrew C.; Wilkinson, Angus P.

    2006-01-01

    A low cost sample cell for powder diffraction at high pressure and temperature that employs either sapphire or steel pressure tubes is described. The cell can be assembled rapidly, facilitating the study of chemically reacting systems, and it provides good control of both pressure and temperature in a regimen where diamond anvil cells and multianvil apparatus cannot be used. The design provides a relatively large sample volume making it suitable for the study of quite large grain size materials, such as hydrating cement slurries. However, relatively high energy x rays are needed to penetrate the pressure tube

  9. X-ray nano-diffraction study of Sr intermetallic phase during solidification of Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manickaraj, Jeyakumar; Gorny, Anton; Shankar, Sumanth, E-mail: shankar@mcmaster.ca [Light Metal Casting Research Centre (LMCRC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Cai, Zhonghou [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-02-17

    The evolution of strontium (Sr) containing intermetallic phase in the eutectic reaction of Sr-modified Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy was studied with high energy synchrotron beam source for nano-diffraction experiments and x-ray fluorescence elemental mapping. Contrary to popular belief, Sr does not seem to interfere with the Twin Plane Re-entrant Edge (TPRE) growth mechanism of eutectic Si, but evolves as the Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}Sr phase during the eutectic reaction at the boundary between the eutectic Si and Al grains.

  10. Spalling stress in oxidized thermal barrier coatings evaluated by X-ray diffraction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K. [Faculty of Education and Human Sciences, Niigata Univ., Niigata (Japan); Tanaka, K. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Nagoya Univ., Furoh-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    The spallation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is promoted by thermally grown oxide (TGO). To improve TBCs, it is very important to understand the influence of TGO on the spalling stress. In this study 'the TBCs were oxidized at 1373 K for four different periods: 0, 500,1000 and 2000 h. The distribution of the in-plane stress in oxidized TBCs, {sigma}{sub 1}, was obtained by repeating the X-ray stress measurement with low energy X-rays after successive removal of the surface layer. The distribution of the out-of-plane stress, {sigma}{sub 1} - {sigma}{sub 3}, was measured with hard synchrotron X-rays, because high energy X-rays have a large penetration depth. From the results by the low and high energy X-rays, the spalling stress in the oxidized TBCs, {sigma}{sub 3}, was evaluated. The evaluated value of the spalling stress for the oxidized TBC was a small tension beneath the surface, but steeply increased near the interface between the top and bond coating. This large tensile stress near the interface is responsible for the spalling of the top coating. (orig.)

  11. X-ray topography using the forward transmitted beam under multiple-beam diffraction conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsusaka, Y., E-mail: tsusaka@sci.u-hyogo.ac.jp; Takano, H. [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1, Kouto, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Takeda, S. [SPring-8 Service Co., Ltd., 1-20-5, Kouto, Shingu, Tatsuno, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); Yokoyama, K.; Matsui, J. [Synchrotron Radiation Nanotechnology Center, University of Hyogo, 1-490-2, Kouto, Shingu, Tatsuno, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); Kagoshima, Y. [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1, Kouto, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Synchrotron Radiation Nanotechnology Center, University of Hyogo, 1-490-2, Kouto, Shingu, Tatsuno, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    X-ray topographs are taken for a sapphire wafer with the [0001] surface normal, as an example, by forward transmitted synchrotron x-ray beams combined with two-dimensional electronic arrays in the x-ray detector having a spatial resolution of 1 μm. They exhibit no shape deformation and no position shift of the dislocation lines on the topographs. Since the topography is performed under multiple-beam diffraction conditions, the topographic images of a single diffraction (two-wave approximation condition) or plural diffractions (six-wave approximation condition) can be recorded without large specimen position changes. As usual Lang topographs, it is possible to determine the Burgers vector of each dislocation line. Because of high parallelism of the incoming x-rays and linear sensitivity of the electronic arrays to the incident x-rays, the present technique can be used to visualize individual dislocations in single crystals of the dislocation density as high as 1 × 10{sup 5} cm{sup −2}.

  12. Mesoscale structural characterization within bulk materials by high-energy X-ray microdiffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lienert, U.; Poulsen, H.F.; Kvick, Å.

    2001-01-01

    A novel diffraction technique for the local three-dimensional characterization within polycrystalline bulk materials is presented. The technique uses high-energy synchrotron radiation (40 keV materials. Focusing broadband optics have been developed...... experimental evidence that a longitudinal resolution down to 10 mum can be obtained. Fundamental materials properties such as the strain/stress state, grain-orientation, -size, and -surface topology can be probed and mapped in three dimensions in favorable cases. Imbedded volumes and interfaces become...... accessible. The technique is nondestructive and allows for in situ studies of samples in complicated environments. A dedicated experimental station has been constructed at the ID11 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. On-line two-dimensional detectors and conical slits have been developed...

  13. Evaluation of secondary electron filter for removing contaminant electrons from high-energy 6 MV x-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Kozo

    1988-01-01

    When using high energy X-rays, the dose increases at the skin surface and build-up region of beam contamination of secondary electrons coming out from the inner surface of the lineac head. At our radiotherapy department, many cases of external otitis from severe skin reactions, particularly resulting from whole brain irradiation of primary and metastatic brain tumors with a 6 MV X-ray lineac, have been encountered. An investigation was made of the physical aspects of a 6 MV X-ray beam using three electron filters, lead lucite, lead glass and lucite to remove secondary electrons. Transparent materials for filters should be preferable for locating the light field. The following results were obtained: 1) For removing secondary electrons, a lead lucite filter was found best. 2) The lead lucite filter proved most effective for removing secondary electrons from the area of treatment. It reduced the dose of irradiation to the skin surface and build-up region, and furthermore improved the depth dose relative to that without filters. 3) From a clinical standpoint, skin reactions such as external otitis remarkably decreased using a lead lucite filter. 4) It thus appears necessary to use a high energy X-ray with newly designed filters to reduce beam contamination of secondary electrons. (author)

  14. Measurement of high energy x-ray beam penumbra with Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung Tsang; Butson, Martin J.; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2006-01-01

    High energy x-ray beam penumbra are measured using Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT film. Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT, due to its limited energy dependence and high spatial resolution provide a high level of accuracy for dose assessment in penumbral regions. The spatial resolution of film detector systems is normally limited by the scanning resolution of the densitometer. Penumbral widths (80%/20%) measured at D max were found to be 2.8, 3.0, 3.2, and 3.4 mm (±0.2 mm) using 5, 10, 20, and 30 cm square field sizes, respectively, for a 6 MV linear accelerator produced x-ray beam. This is compared to 3.2 mm±0.2 mm (Kodak EDR2) and 3.6 mm±0.2 mm (Kodak X-Omat V) at 10 cmx10 cm measured using radiographic film. Using a zero volume extrapolation technique for ionization chamber measurements, the 10 cmx10 cm field penumbra at D max was measured to be 3.1 mm, a close match to Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT results. Penumbral measurements can also be made at other depths, including the surface, as the film does not suffer significantly from dosimetric variations caused by changing x-ray energy spectra. Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT film provides an adequate measure of penumbral dose for high energy x-ray beams

  15. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  16. Observation of parametric X-ray radiation in an anomalous diffraction region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeyev, V.I., E-mail: vial@x4u.lebedev.ru [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53 Leninskiy prospect, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belgorod National Research University, 85 Pobedy st., Belgorod (Russian Federation); Eliseyev, A.N., E-mail: elisseev@pluton.lpi.troitsk.ru [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53 Leninskiy prospect, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belgorod National Research University, 85 Pobedy st., Belgorod (Russian Federation); Irribarra, E., E-mail: esteban.irribarra@epn.edu.ec [Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Ladrón de Guevara E11-253, Quito (Ecuador); Kishin, I.A., E-mail: ivan.kishin@mail.ru [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53 Leninskiy prospect, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belgorod National Research University, 85 Pobedy st., Belgorod (Russian Federation); Kubankin, A.S., E-mail: kubankin@bsu.edu.ru [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53 Leninskiy prospect, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belgorod National Research University, 85 Pobedy st., Belgorod (Russian Federation); Nazhmudinov, R.M., E-mail: fizeg@bk.ru [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53 Leninskiy prospect, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belgorod National Research University, 85 Pobedy st., Belgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-19

    A new possibility to expand the energy region of diffraction processes based on the interaction of relativistic charged particles with crystalline structures is presented. Diffracted photons related to parametric X-ray radiation produced by relativistic electrons are detected below the low energy threshold for the X-ray diffraction mechanism in crystalline structures for the first time. The measurements were performed during the interaction of 7 MeV electrons with a textured polycrystalline tungsten foil and a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystal. The experiment results are in good agreement with a developed model based on the PXR kinematical theory. The developed experimental approach can be applied to separate the contributions of real and virtual photons to the total diffracted radiation generated during the interaction of relativistic charged particles with crystalline targets. - Highlights: • Parametric X-ray radiation below the low energy threshold for diffraction of free X-rays. • Experimental separation of the contributions from different radiation mechanisms. • PXR from relativistic electrons in mosaic crystals and textured polycrystlas.

  17. New software to model energy dispersive X-ray diffraction in polycrystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghammraoui, B., E-mail: bahaa.ghammraoui@cea.fr [CEA-Leti, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Tabary, J. [CEA-Leti, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Pouget, S. [CEA-INAC Sciences de la matieres, 17 rue des Martyrs, F 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Paulus, C.; Moulin, V.; Verger, L. [CEA-Leti, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Duvauchelle, Ph. [CNDRI-Insa Lyon, Universite de Lyon, F-69621, Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2012-02-01

    Detection of illicit materials, such as explosives or drugs, within mixed samples is a major issue, both for general security and as part of forensic analyses. In this paper, we describe a new code simulating energy dispersive X-ray diffraction patterns in polycrystalline materials. This program, SinFullscat, models diffraction of any object in any diffractometer system taking all physical phenomena, including amorphous background, into account. Many system parameters can be tuned: geometry, collimators (slit and cylindrical), sample properties, X-ray source and detector energy resolution. Good agreement between simulations and experimental data was obtained. Simulations using explosive materials indicated that parameters such as the diffraction angle or the energy resolution of the detector have a significant impact on the diffraction signature of the material inspected. This software will be a convenient tool to test many diffractometer configurations, providing information on the one that best restores the spectral diffraction signature of the materials of interest.

  18. Two new tensile devices for X-ray diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freri, N.; Tintori, A.; Depero, L.E.; Sangaletti, L.; Cernuschi, F.; Ghia, S.

    1995-12-01

    Two tensile devices were designed to be used with parallel beam and parafocusing-geometry diffractometers. In the first case the device was designed to be attached to a strainflex diffractometer by Rigaku Inc., dedicated to stress analysis and commonly used in metallurgical industry. Since the sample does not move during the measurement, the tensile device can be kept fixed on the experimental table. The device design takes into account the steric hindrance by moving parts of diffractometer. The maximun load that can be applied to the sample is 60.000 N. An attachement to a Siemens D5000 diffractometer with Eulerian cradle has also benn designed for applying a load up tp 6000 N to a sample in the parafocusing-geometry. The installation does not require a re-alignment of the diffractometer. In both cases strain gages were applied to both sides of the specimen for the simultaneous determination of the macroscopic strains. Experiments based on the use of these devices are planned to determine the crystallographic elastic constants and study the influence of the microstructure on the mechanical behaviour of residual stresses in the zone of almost static stresses as well as the influence of residual stresses on uniaxially loaded samples. In addition, by using these devices, it is possible to measure the unstressed d-0 spacings providing useful information in the neutron diffraction study fo stress fields in steel samples

  19. Two new tensile devices for X-ray diffraction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freri, N.; Tintori, A.; Depero, L.E.; Sangaletti, L. [Brescia Univ. (Italy); Cernuschi, F.; Ghia, S. [Ente Nazionale per l`Energia Elettrica, Milan (Italy)

    1995-12-01

    Two tensile devices were designed to be used with parallel beam and parafocusing-geometry diffractometers. In thefirst case the device was designed to be attached to a strainflex diffractometer by Rigaku Inc., dedicated to stress analysis and commonly used in metallurgical industry. Since the sample does not move during the measurement, the tensile device can be kept fixed on the experimental table. The device design takes into account the steric hindrance by moving parts of diffractometer. The maximun load that can be applied to the sample is 60.000 N. An attachement to a Siemens D5000 diffractometer with Eulerian cradle has also benn designed for applying a load up tp 6000 N to a sample in the parafocusing-geometry. The installation does not require a re-alignment of the diffractometer. In both cases strain gages were applied to both sides of the specimen for the simultaneous determination of the macroscopic strains. Experiments based on the use of these devices are planned to determine the crystallographic elastic constants and study the influence of the microstructure on the mechanical behaviour of residual stresses in the zone of almost static stresses as well as the influence of residual stresses on uniaxially loaded samples. In addition, by using these devices, it is possible to measure the unstressed d-0 spacings providing useful information in the neutron diffraction study fo stress fields in steel samples.

  20. Coded diffraction system in X-ray crystallography using a boolean phase coded aperture approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, Samuel; Poveda, Juan; Arguello, Henry

    2018-03-01

    Phase retrieval is a problem present in many applications such as optics, astronomical imaging, computational biology and X-ray crystallography. Recent work has shown that the phase can be better recovered when the acquisition architecture includes a coded aperture, which modulates the signal before diffraction, such that the underlying signal is recovered from coded diffraction patterns. Moreover, this type of modulation effect, before the diffraction operation, can be obtained using a phase coded aperture, just after the sample under study. However, a practical implementation of a phase coded aperture in an X-ray application is not feasible, because it is computationally modeled as a matrix with complex entries which requires changing the phase of the diffracted beams. In fact, changing the phase implies finding a material that allows to deviate the direction of an X-ray beam, which can considerably increase the implementation costs. Hence, this paper describes a low cost coded X-ray diffraction system based on block-unblock coded apertures that enables phase reconstruction. The proposed system approximates the phase coded aperture with a block-unblock coded aperture by using the detour-phase method. Moreover, the SAXS/WAXS X-ray crystallography software was used to simulate the diffraction patterns of a real crystal structure called Rhombic Dodecahedron. Additionally, several simulations were carried out to analyze the performance of block-unblock approximations in recovering the phase, using the simulated diffraction patterns. Furthermore, the quality of the reconstructions was measured in terms of the Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR). Results show that the performance of the block-unblock phase coded apertures approximation decreases at most 12.5% compared with the phase coded apertures. Moreover, the quality of the reconstructions using the boolean approximations is up to 2.5 dB of PSNR less with respect to the phase coded aperture reconstructions.

  1. X-ray diffraction and imaging with a coherent beam: application to X-ray optical elements and to crystals exhibiting phase inhomogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masiello, F.

    2011-05-01

    The exceptional properties of synchrotron light sources have been exploited in very different disciplines, from archaeology to chemistry, from material science to biology, from medicine to physics. Among these properties it is important to mention the high brilliance, continuum spectrum, high degree of polarization, time structure, small source size and divergence of the beam, the last resulting in a high transversal coherence of the produced radiation. This high transversal coherence of the synchrotron sources has permitted the development of new techniques, e.g. phase contrast imaging, X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI). This thesis work will consist essentially of three parts. In the first part it will be presented the work done as a member of the X-ray Optics Group of ESRF in the characterization of high quality diamond crystals foreseen as X-ray optical elements. The characterization has been done using different complementary X-ray techniques, such as high resolution diffraction, topography, grazing incidence diffraction, reflectivity and measurements of the coherence preservation using the Talbot effect. In the second part, I will show the result obtained in the study of the temperature behaviours of the domain in periodically poled ferroelectrics crystals. This type of measurements, based on Bragg-Fresnel diffraction, are possible only thanks to the high degree of coherence of the beam. In the third part, I will present the results obtained in the characterization of diamonds foreseen for applications other than X-ray optical elements. (author)

  2. Characterisation of microfocused beam for synchrotron powder diffraction using a new X-ray camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C; Potter, J; Tang, C C; Lennie, A R

    2012-01-01

    The powder diffraction beamline I11, Diamond Light Source, is being continually upgraded as requirements of the user community evolve. Intensities of X-rays from the I11 in-vacuum electron undulator in the 3 GeV synchrotron fall off at higher energies. By focusing higher energy X-rays, we can overcome flux limitations, and open up new diffraction experiments. Here, we describe characterisation of microfocusing using compound refractive lenses (CRL). For a relatively modest outlay, we have developed an experimental setup and a novel X-ray camera with good sensitivity and a resolution specification suitable for characterising these focusing optics. We show that vertical oscillations in the focused beam compromise resolution of the source imaged by the CRL. Nevertheless, we have measured CRL focusing properties, and demonstrate the use of energy scanning to determine lens alignment. Real benefits of the intensity gain are illustrated.

  3. Soft x-ray resonant magnetic powder diffraction on PrNiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staub, U [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); GarcIa-Fernandez, M [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Mulders, A M [Department of Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA 6845 (Australia); Bodenthin, Y [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); MartInez-Lope, M J [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Alonso, J A [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-03-07

    We report on the first soft x-ray resonant powder diffraction experiments performed at the Ni L{sub 2,3} edges of PrNiO{sub 3}. The temperature, polarization and energy dependence of the (1/2 0 1/2) reflection indicates a magnetic origin for the signal. This experiment demonstrates that x-ray resonant magnetic powder diffraction can be relatively easily performed in the soft x-ray regime due to the very large enhancement factors at the absorption edges. Such experiments allow us to extract important information on the electronic states of the d shell. Similar results can be anticipated from orbital reflections measured in a powder. (fast track communication)

  4. Hydrogen atoms in protein structures: high-resolution X-ray diffraction structure of the DFPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrogen atoms represent about half of the total number of atoms in proteins and are often involved in substrate recognition and catalysis. Unfortunately, X-ray protein crystallography at usual resolution fails to access directly their positioning, mainly because light atoms display weak contributions to diffraction. However, sub-Ångstrom diffraction data, careful modeling and a proper refinement strategy can allow the positioning of a significant part of hydrogen atoms. Results A comprehensive study on the X-ray structure of the diisopropyl-fluorophosphatase (DFPase) was performed, and the hydrogen atoms were modeled, including those of solvent molecules. This model was compared to the available neutron structure of DFPase, and differences in the protein and the active site solvation were noticed. Conclusions A further examination of the DFPase X-ray structure provides substantial evidence about the presence of an activated water molecule that may constitute an interesting piece of information as regard to the enzymatic hydrolysis mechanism. PMID:23915572

  5. X-ray diffraction on nanoparticles chromium and nickel oxides obtained by gelatin using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, Alan Silva de; Medeiros, Angela Maria de Lemos; Miranda, Marcus Aurelio Ribeiro; Almeida, Juliana Marcela Abraao; Remedios, Claudio Marcio Rocha; Silva, Lindomar R.D. da; Gouveia, S.T.; Sasaki, Jose Marcos; Jardim, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles has many applications like green pigments, wear resistance, and coating materials for thermal protection. Several methods to produce chromium oxide nanoparticles have already been studied, gas condensation, laser induced pyrolysis, microwave plasma, sol-gel and gamma radiation methods. Many applications for this kind of material can be provide concerning the particle size. For instance, particle size approximately of 200 nm are preferable as pigment due to its opacity and below 50 nm can be used as transparent pigment. In this work we have demonstrated that chromium and nickel oxide nanoparticles can be prepared by gelatin method. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) show that mean particle size for chromium oxide of 15-150 nm and nickel oxide of 90 nm were obtained for several temperature of sintering. The X-Ray powder diffraction pattern were performed using Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray source at XRD1 beamline in National Laboratory of Light Synchrotron (LNLS). (author)

  6. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron X-ray diffraction ina diamond anvil cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk,Hans-Rudolf

    2007-06-29

    We report a first combination of diamond anvil cell radialx-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating. The laser-heating setup ofALS beamline 12.2.2 was modified to allow one-sided heating of a samplein a diamond anvil cell with an 80 W yttrium lithium fluoride laser whileprobing the sample with radial x-ray diffraction. The diamond anvil cellis placed with its compressional axis vertical, and perpendicular to thebeam. The laser beam is focused onto the sample from the top while thesample is probed with hard x-rays through an x-ray transparentboron-epoxy gasket. The temperature response of preferred orientation of(Fe,Mg)O is probed as a test experiment. Recrystallization was observedabove 1500 K, accompanied by a decrease in stress.

  7. On screening for Special Nuclear Materials (SNMs) with X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, G.

    2010-01-01

    A novel detection technique employing X-ray diffraction (XRD) to screen for Special Nuclear Materials (SNMs), in particular for uranium, has been recently proposed. It is based on the interesting fact that uranium (and incidentally, plutonium) has a non-cubic lattice structure, in contrast to all other non-SNM, high-density elements of the Periodic Table. The principle of this screening technique is briefly elucidated by comparing the XRD lines of uranium with those of lead, a material of high atomic number (Z) commonly found in container traffic. Several physical conditions that must be satisfied to enable XRD for SNM screening are considered. To achieve adequate penetration, both of suspicious high-Z materials and their containers, photon energies of 1 MeV and above must be employed. Implications from partial coherence theory for the XRD measurement geometry at such photon energies are presented. The question of multiple scatter degradation of the coherent scatter signal is addressed. Technological considerations relevant to performing XRD at 1 MeV, particularly regarding the radiation source and detector, are discussed. A novel secondary aperture scheme permitting high energy XRD is presented. It is concluded that the importance of the application and the prospect of its feasibility are sufficient to warrant experimental verification.

  8. High energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering at the SRI-CAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macrander, A.T.

    1996-08-01

    This report is a combination of vugraphs and two papers. The vugraphs give information on the beamline at the APS for IXS and the science addressable by IXS. They also cover the 10 milli-eV resolution spectrometer and the 200 milli-eV resolution spectrometer. The first paper covers the performance of the focusing Ge(444) backscattering analyzers for the inelastic x-ray scattering. The second paper discusses inelastic x-ray scattering from TiC and Ti single crystals

  9. High-energy X-ray spectra of Cygnus XR-1 observed from OSO 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    X-ray spectra of Cygnus XR-1 were measured with the scintillation spectrometer aboard the OSO 8 satellite during a period of one-and-one-half to three weeks in each of the years from 1975 to 1977. Typical spectra of the source between 15 and 250 keV are presented and the spectra are found to be well represented by a single power-law expression whose photon number spectral index is different for the two intensity states that were considered. The observed pivoting effect is consistent with two-temperature accretion disk models of the X-ray emitting region.

  10. Residual stress estimation of ceramic thin films by X-ray diffraction and indentation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atar, Erdem; Sarioglu, Cevat; Demirler, Ugur; Sabri Kayali, E.; Cimenoglu, Huseyin

    2003-05-15

    The residual stresses in ceramic thin films obtained by the indentation method have been found to be three times higher than those of the X-ray diffraction method. This discrepancy can be eliminated by setting the geometrical factor for the Vickers pyramid indenter to 1 in the relevant equation of the indentation method.

  11. Residual stress estimation of ceramic thin films by X-ray diffraction and indentation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atar, Erdem; Sarioglu, Cevat; Demirler, Ugur; Sabri Kayali, E.; Cimenoglu, Huseyin

    2003-01-01

    The residual stresses in ceramic thin films obtained by the indentation method have been found to be three times higher than those of the X-ray diffraction method. This discrepancy can be eliminated by setting the geometrical factor for the Vickers pyramid indenter to 1 in the relevant equation of the indentation method

  12. Residual stress evaluation and fatigue life prediction in the welded joint by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Keun Bong; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2009-01-01

    In the fossil power plant, the reliability of the components which consist of the many welded parts depends on the quality of welding. The residual stress is occurred by the heat flux of high temperature during weld process. This decreases the mechanical properties as the strength of fatigue and fracture or occurs the stress corrosion cracking and fatigue fracture. The residual stress of the welded part in the recently constructed power plants has been the cause of a variety of accidents. The objective of this study is measurement of the residual stress by X-ray diffraction method and to estimate the feasibility of this application for fatigue life assessment of the high-temperature pipeline. The materials used for the study is P92 steel for the use of high temperature pipe on super critical condition. The test results were analyzed by the distributed characteristics of residual stresses and the Full Width at Half Maximum intensity (FWHM) in x-ray diffraction intensity curve. Also, X-ray diffraction tests using specimens simulated low cycle fatigue damage were performed in order to analyze fatigue properties when fatigue damage conditions become various stages. As a result of X-ray diffraction tests for specimens simulated fatigue damages, we conformed that the ratio of the FWHM due to fatigue damage has linear relationship with fatigue life ratio algebraically. From this relationships, it was suggested that direct expectation of the life consumption rate was feasible.

  13. Small angles X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer characterization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of thermal annealing on the structure and magnetic properties of crystalline Tb/Fe multilayers has been studied using conversion electron Mössbauer spectrometry and small-angle X-ray diffraction. The growth of Tb–Fe amorphous alloy from the interface is observed with increasing annealing ...

  14. A structural view of Pd model catalysts : high-pressure surface X-Ray diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, Richard van

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of a combined high-pressure/ultrahigh-vacuum flow reactor for the study of model catalysts by means of surface x-ray diffraction and grazing incidence small angle scattering. The system was used to measure a stability diagram for the different oxide phases

  15. Quantitative phase analysis of uranium carbide from x-ray diffraction data using the Rietveld method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Mudher, K.D.; Krishnan, K.

    2003-01-01

    Quantitative phase analysis of a uranium carbide sample was carried out from the x-ray diffraction data by Rietveld profile fitting method. The method does not require the addition of any reference material. The percentage of UC, UC 2 and UO 2 phases in the sample were determined. (author)

  16. Study of caprine bones after moist and dry heat processes by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Caroline M.; Azeredo, Soraia R.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Souza, Sheila M.F.M de

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue is a biological material composed of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and collagen matrix. The bone X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern presents characteristics of the hydroxyapatite crystallography planes. This paper presents the characterization by X-ray diffraction of caprine bone powder pattern and the comparison of this pattern with moist or dry heat cooked bone patterns. The parameters chosen to characterize the X-ray diffraction peaks were: angular position (2θ), full width at half maximumt (FWHM), and relative intensity (I rel ). The X-ray diffraction patterns were obtained with a Shimadzu XRD-6000 diffractometer. The caprine bone XRD pattern revealed a significant correlation of several crystallographic parameters (lattice data) with hydroxyapatite. The profiles of the three bone types analyzed presented differences. The study showed as small angular displacement (decrease of the 2θ angle) of some peaks was observed after moist and dry heat cooking processes. The characterization of bone tissue aimed to contribute to future analysis in the field of archeology. (author)

  17. Mössbauer effect studies and X-ray diffraction analysis of cobalt ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 26; Issue 5. Mössbauer effect studies and X-ray diffraction analysis of cobalt ferrite prepared in powder form by thermal decomposition method. M D Joseph Sebastian B Rudraswamy M C Radhakrishna Ramani. Magnetic Materials Volume 26 Issue 5 August 2003 pp ...

  18. High-pressure X-ray diffraction of L-ALANINE crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J.S.; Gerward, Leif; Souza, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    L-ALANINE has been studied by X-ray diffraction at ambient temperature and pressure up to 10.3 GPa. The material is found to transform to a tetragonal structure between 2 and 3 GPa. and to a monoclinic structure between 8 and 10 GPa. The experimental bulk modulus is 25(5) GPa for the orthorhombic...

  19. Small angles X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer characterization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of thermal annealing on the structure and magnetic properties of crystalline Tb/Fe multilayers has been studied using conversion electron Mössbauer spectrometry and small-angle X-ray diffraction. The growth of Tb–Fe amorphous alloy from the interface is observed with increasing annealing temperature.

  20. A greedy method for reconstructing polycrystals from three-dimensional X-ray diffraction data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulshreshth, Arun Kumar; Alpers, Andreas; Herman, Gabor T.

    2009-01-01

    An iterative search method is proposed for obtaining orientation maps inside polycrystals from three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) data. In each step, detector pixel intensities are calculated by a forward model based on the current estimate of the orientation map. The pixel at which...

  1. Non-destructive characterization of recrystallization kinetics using three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, E.M.; Schmidt, Søren; Fæster Nielsen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) is used to characterize the nucleation and early growth of individual bulk nuclei in situ during recrystallization of 92% cold-rolled copper. It is found that some cube nuclei, but not all, have a significantly faster initial growth than the average...

  2. Determining grain resolved stresses in polycrystalline materials using three-dimensional X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for characterization of the grain resolved (type II) stress states in a polycrystalline sample based on monochromatic X-ray diffraction data. The algorithm is a robust 12-parameter-per-grain fit of the centre-of-mass grain positions, orientations and stress tensors...

  3. Simultaneous X-ray diffraction from multiple single crystals of macromolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paithankar, Karthik S.; Sørensen, Henning Osholm; Wright, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    The potential in macromolecular crystallography for using multiple crystals to collect X-ray diffraction data simultaneously from assemblies of up to seven crystals is explored. The basic features of the algorithms used to extract data and their practical implementation are described. The procedure...

  4. Simultaneous resonant x-ray diffraction measurement of polarization inversion and lattice strain in polycrystalline ferroelectrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorfman, S.; Simons, Hugh; Iamsasri, T.

    2016-01-01

    and strain in ferroelectrics is an ongoing challenge that so far has obscured its fundamental behaviour. By utilizing small intensity differences between Friedel pairs due to resonant scattering, we demonstrate a time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique for directly and simultaneously measuring both lattice...

  5. Caracterization of the crystalline phases by X-Ray diffraction in electrode coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, M.C.G.P.; Souza Caillaux, Z. de

    1981-01-01

    Some electrodes and their respective coatings were studied in order to verify their compatibility with their utilization in the welding of base metals appropriate for the equipment of sugar and alcohol plants. The carried out studies include the characterization, by X-ray diffraction, of crystaline phases, existent in electrodes coatings. (Author) [pt

  6. Study of caprine bones after moist and dry heat processes by X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Caroline M., E-mail: carolmattosb@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Arqueologia Brasileira (IAB), Belford Roxo, RJ (Brazil); Azeredo, Soraia R.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: soraia@lin.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/LIN/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Souza, Sheila M.F.M de, E-mail: sferraz@ensp.fiocruz.br [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (ENSP/FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola Nacional de Saude Publica Sergio Arouca

    2013-07-01

    Bone tissue is a biological material composed of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and collagen matrix. The bone X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern presents characteristics of the hydroxyapatite crystallography planes. This paper presents the characterization by X-ray diffraction of caprine bone powder pattern and the comparison of this pattern with moist or dry heat cooked bone patterns. The parameters chosen to characterize the X-ray diffraction peaks were: angular position (2θ), full width at half maximumt (FWHM), and relative intensity (I{sub rel}). The X-ray diffraction patterns were obtained with a Shimadzu XRD-6000 diffractometer. The caprine bone XRD pattern revealed a significant correlation of several crystallographic parameters (lattice data) with hydroxyapatite. The profiles of the three bone types analyzed presented differences. The study showed as small angular displacement (decrease of the 2θ angle) of some peaks was observed after moist and dry heat cooking processes. The characterization of bone tissue aimed to contribute to future analysis in the field of archeology. (author)

  7. High-pressure phases of uranium monophosphide studied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J. Staun; Gerward, Leif; Benedict, U.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray diffraction studies have been performed on UP powder for pressures up to 51 GPa using synchrotron radiation and a diamond-anvil cell. At ambient pressure UP has the rocksalt structure. The bulk modulus has been determined to B0=102(4) GPa and its pressure derivative to B0’=4.0(8). The cubic...

  8. A three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscope for deformation studies of polycrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fæster Nielsen, Søren; Lauridsen, E.M.; Juul Jensen, D.

    2001-01-01

    -dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscope installed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble provides a fast and non-destructive technique for mapping the embedded grains within thick samples in three dimensions. All essential features like the position, volume, orientation, stress...

  9. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  10. Hut clusters on Ge(001) surfaces studied by STM and synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.; Smilgies, D.-M.; Feidenhans'l, R.

    1996-01-01

    Nanoscale hut clusters formed on Ge(001) surfaces by depositing one monolayer of indium and annealing at temperatures between 350 and 500 degrees C were studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. It was found that the hut clusters form regular arrays over...

  11. Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and infrared studies of prehistoric materials from Minas Gerais

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus Filho, M.F. de; Costa, G.M. da; Prous, A.

    1988-01-01

    Eight samples of pigmented materials from an archaelogical site in Santana do Riacho (Minas Gerais, Brazil) were studied by X-ray diffraction, infrared and Moessbauer spectroscopy. These three techniques and the results of chemical analysis allowed the approximated composition of each sample to be proposed. No trace of organic material was found in any sample. (author)

  12. Crystallization Kinetics of Nanocrystalline Materials by Combined X-ray Diffraction and Differential Scanning Calorimetry Experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gil-González, E.; Perejón, A.; Sánchez-Jiménez, P. E.; Medina-Carrasco, S.; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Šubrt, Jan; Criado, J. M.; Pérez-Maqueda, L. A.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 5 (2018), s. 3107-3116 ISSN 1528-7483 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : nanocrysalline alloys * combined X ray diffraction * crystallization kinetics Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 4.055, year: 2016

  13. Evaluated Plan Stress Of Weld In Pressure Tube Using X Ray Diffraction Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan Trong Phuc; Nguyen Duc Thanh; Luu Anh Tuyen

    2011-01-01

    X ray diffraction is a fundamental technique measuring stress, this technique has determined crystal strain in materials, from that determined stress in materials. This paper presents study of evaluating plane stress of weld in pressure tube, using modern XRD apparatus: X Pert Pro. (author)

  14. Revealing stacking sequences in inverse opals by microradian X-ray diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinitskii, A.; Abramova, V.; Grigorieva, N.; Grigoriev, S.; Snigirev, A.; Byelov, D.; Petukhov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of the structural analysis of inverse opal photonic crystals by microradian X-ray diffraction. Inverse opals based on different oxide materials (TiO2, SiO2 and Fe2O3) were fabricated by templating polystyrene colloidal crystal films grown by the vertical deposition technique.

  15. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiment of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto

    OpenAIRE

    Yanagisawa, Yasuhide; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Chiba-Kamoshida, Kaori; Naito, Sawa; Ohsugi, Tadanori; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ichiro; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    Nattokinase, a protein found in high levels in the traditional Japanese food natto, has been reported to have high thrombolytic activity. In the present study, the crystallization of native nattokinase and the collection of X-ray diffraction date from a nattokinase crystal to a resolution of 1.74 Å are reported.

  16. X-ray diffraction studies of sucrose and sucrose irradiated with γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Mahendra

    1981-01-01

    In order to understand and solve numerous problems related to sugar quality and its storage life, X-ray diffraction studies of sucrose and sucrose irradiated with γ-radiation have been made. It is observed that the interplanar spacing 'd' in irradiated sucrose is reduced indicating the partial damage of sucrose lattice. (author)

  17. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte; Filsinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Cohere...

  18. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and X-ray Diffraction of Boron- and Phosphorus-Doped Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Dolmatov, V. Yu.; Lapchuk, N. M.; Shymanski, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    Powders of boron- and phosphorus-doped detonation nanodiamonds and sintered pellets of non-doped nanodiamond powders were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and x-ray diffraction. Doping of detonation nanodiamond crystals with boron and phosphorus was demonstrated to be possible. These methods could be used to diagnose diamond nanocrystals doped during shock-wave synthesis.

  19. Advances in thin film diffraction instrumentation by X-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, A.

    1996-01-01

    The structural characterisation of thin films requires a parallel X-ray beam of high intensity. Parallel beam geometry is commonly used in high resolution and single crystal experiments, but also in the field of X-ray diffraction for polycrystalline material (e.g. in phase, texture and stress analysis). For grazing incidence diffraction (GID), the use of small slits on the primary side and of long soller slits with a flat monochromator on the secondary side is standard. New optical elements have been introduced with polychromatic or monochromatic radiation. By means of different applications the results are compared with those of classical beam optics. X-ray fiber optics utilize total external reflection of X-rays on smooth surfaces. Effects of monochromatization are presented. In many fields of application, fiber optics may replace conventional collimators. The use of primary and secondary channel cut crystals can also produce a high parallel monochromatic X-ray beam. A parabolically bent graded multilayer produces a monochromatic parallel beam of high intensity. Compared with classical Bragg-Brentano (focussing) geometry, excellent results have been obtained, especially for samples with an irregular shape. In combination with a channel cut monochromator there is a substantial gain in intensity leading to an increase of the dynamic intensity range of rocking curves

  20. Advances in thin film diffraction instrumentation by X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, A [Rich. Seifert and Co., Analytical X-ray Systems, Ahrensburg (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    The structural characterisation of thin films requires a parallel X-ray beam of high intensity. Parallel beam geometry is commonly used in high resolution and single crystal experiments, but also in the field of X-ray diffraction for polycrystalline material (e.g. in phase, texture and stress analysis). For grazing incidence diffraction (GID), the use of small slits on the primary side and of long soller slits with a flat monochromator on the secondary side is standard. New optical elements have been introduced with polychromatic or monochromatic radiation. By means of different applications the results are compared with those of classical beam optics. X-ray fiber optics utilize total external reflection of X-rays on smooth surfaces. Effects of monochromatization are presented. In many fields of application, fiber optics may replace conventional collimators. The use of primary and secondary channel cut crystals can also produce a high parallel monochromatic X-ray beam. A parabolically bent graded multilayer produces a monochromatic parallel beam of high intensity. Compared with classical Bragg-Brentano (focussing) geometry, excellent results have been obtained, especially for samples with an irregular shape. In combination with a channel cut monochromator there is a substantial gain in intensity leading to an increase of the dynamic intensity range of rocking curves.

  1. New imaging technique based on diffraction of a focused x-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazimirov, A [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Kohn, V G [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Cai, Z-H [Advanced Photon Source, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: ayk7@cornell.edu

    2009-01-07

    We present first experimental results from a new diffraction depth-sensitive imaging technique. It is based on the diffraction of a focused x-ray beam from a crystalline sample and recording the intensity pattern on a high-resolution CCD detector positioned at a focal plane. Structural non-uniformity inside the sample results in a region of enhanced intensity in the diffraction pattern. The technique was applied to study silicon-on-insulator thin layers of various thicknesses which revealed a complex strain profile within the layers. A circular Fresnel zone plate was used as a focusing optic. Incoherent diffuse scattering spreads out of the diffraction plane and results in intensity recorded outside of the focal spot providing a new approach to separately register x-rays scattered coherently and incoherently from the sample. (fast track communication)

  2. Observation of sagittal X-ray diffraction by surface acoustic waves in Bragg geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadilonga, Simone; Zizak, Ivo; Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Evgenii, Emelin; Petsiuk, Andrei; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Erko, Alexei

    2017-04-01

    X-ray Bragg diffraction in sagittal geometry on a Y-cut langasite crystal (La 3 Ga 5 SiO 14 ) modulated by Λ = 3 µm Rayleigh surface acoustic waves was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation facility. Owing to the crystal lattice modulation by the surface acoustic wave diffraction, satellites appear. Their intensity and angular separation depend on the amplitude and wavelength of the ultrasonic superlattice. Experimental results are compared with the corresponding theoretical model that exploits the kinematical diffraction theory. This experiment shows that the propagation of the surface acoustic waves creates a dynamical diffraction grating on the crystal surface, and this can be used for space-time modulation of an X-ray beam.

  3. Simultaneous, single-pulse, synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction under gas gun loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, D.; Luo, S. N., E-mail: sluo@pims.ac.cn [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Huang, J. W.; Zeng, X. L.; Li, Y.; E, J. C.; Huang, J. Y. [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Wang, Z. [Physics Division P-25, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We develop a mini gas gun system for simultaneous, single-pulse, x-ray diffraction and imaging under high strain-rate loading at the beamline 32-ID of the Advanced Photon Source. In order to increase the reciprocal space covered by a small-area detector, a conventional target chamber is split into two chambers: a narrowed measurement chamber and a relief chamber. The gas gun impact is synchronized with synchrotron x-ray pulses and high-speed cameras. Depending on a camera’s capability, multiframe imaging and diffraction can be achieved. The proof-of-principle experiments are performed on single-crystal sapphire. The diffraction spots and images during impact are analyzed to quantify lattice deformation and fracture; fracture is dominated by splitting cracks followed by wing cracks, and diffraction peaks are broadened likely due to mosaic spread. Our results demonstrate the potential of such multiscale measurements for studying high strain-rate phenomena at dynamic extremes.

  4. High-energy x-ray microscopy with multilayer reflectors (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the x rays emitted by the hot plasma region is a key element in the study of the physical processes occurring in laser-produced plasmas and complements other diagnostics such as spectroscopy and temporal studies. X-ray microscopy with reflection microscopes offers the most direct means of obtaining this information. Until recently, the two types of microscopes that had been developed for this purpose, the Kirkpatrick--Baez and the Wolter, operated at relatively low energies (about 4--5 keV) and had very little spectral selectivity, relying on filters for coarse spectral resolution. With the development of x-ray reflecting multilayer mirrors, the energy response of such microscopes can be extended to 10 keV or higher, with good spectral selectivity. In addition, it is possible to reduce some of the optical aberrations to obtain improved spatial resolution. This paper describes some of the recent progress in making and evaluating x-ray reflectors, and outlines the optical design considerations for multilayer-coated microscopes. Results from a prototype multilayer K--B microscope are presented

  5. High Energy X-Ray System Specification for the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the NNSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This specification establishes requirements for an X-Ray System to be used at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) to support radiography of experimental assemblies for Laboratory (LANL, LLNL, SNL) programs conducting work at the NNSS.

  6. Characterization of breast tissue using energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pani, S.; Cook, E.J.; Horrocks, J.A.; Jones, J.L.; Speller, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    A method for sample characterization using energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction computed tomography (EDXRDCT) is presented. The procedures for extracting diffraction patterns from the data and the corrections applied are discussed. The procedures were applied to the characterization of breast tissue samples, 6 mm in diameter. Comparison with histological sections of the samples confirmed the possibility of grouping the patterns into five families, corresponding to adipose tissue, fibrosis, poorly differentiated cancer, well differentiated cancer and benign tumour.

  7. Ultrafast coherent diffractive imaging of nanoparticles using X-ray free-electron laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassemeyer, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FEL) promises high-resolution structure determination of single microscopic particles without the need for crystallization. The diffraction signal of small samples can be very weak, a difficulty that can not be countered by merely increasing the number of photons because the sample would be damaged by a high absorbed radiation dose. Traditional X-ray crystallography avoids this problem by bringing many sample particles into a periodic arrangement, which amplifies the individual signals while distributing the absorbed dose. Depending on the sample, however, crystallization can be very difficult or even impossible. This thesis presents algorithms for a new imaging approach using X-FEL radiation that works with single, non-crystalline sample particles. X-FELs can deliver X-rays with a peak brilliance many orders of magnitude higher than conventional X-ray sources, compensating for their weak interaction cross sections. At the same time, FELs can produce ultra-short pulses down to a few femtoseconds. In this way it is possible to perform ultra-fast imaging, essentially ''freezing'' the atomic positions in time and terminating the imaging process before the sample is destroyed by the absorbed radiation. This thesis primarily focuses on the three-dimensional reconstruction of single (and not necessarily crystalline) particles using coherent diffractive imaging at X-FELs: in order to extract three-dimensional information from scattering data, two-dimensional diffraction patterns from many different viewing angles must be combined. Therefore, the diffraction signal of many identical sample copies in random orientations is measured. The main result of this work is a globally optimal algorithm that can recover the sample orientations solely based on the diffraction signal, enabling three-dimensional imaging for arbitrary samples. The problem of finding three-dimensional orientations is

  8. Phases quantification in titanium oxides by means of X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.; Garcia C, R.M.; Ita T, A. de; Chavez R, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this work two phases of titanium oxides are quantified which belong to the same crystalline system and by means of a computer program named Quanto created by the first author, contains the information for calculating the absorption coefficients, it can be quantified phases having one of the pure phases and the problem samples. In order to perform this work different mixtures of different titanium oxides were prepared measuring by means of the X-ray diffraction technique in the Siemens X-ray diffractometer of ININ which were processed with the Peakfit package and also they were evaluated by means of the computer program with the necessary information finding acceptable results. (Author)

  9. Quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of alumina, silicon carbide and zirconium carbide in ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, Sonia M.B.; Bressiani, Jose Carlos; Veiga, Marcello M.; Chaklader, Asoke C.D.

    1995-01-01

    The x-ray diffraction technique has been successfully applied to determine the phases formed in a carbo thermal synthesis of ceramic composites (Al 2 O 3 -Si C and Al 2 O 3 -Si C-Zr C) using kaolinite, cyanite and zircon as precursors. The powder method using fluorite as internal standard has shown reliable results to estimate accurately phases in composites (relative error as low as 5%). In addition, quantitative X-ray analysis allows an indirect evaluation of Si O (gas) losses from the system during the carbo thermal reaction. (author)

  10. Reflection-mode x-ray powder diffraction cell for in situ studies of electrochemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, G.A.; Stewart, K.D.

    2004-01-01

    The design and operation of an electrochemical cell for reflection-mode powder x-ray diffraction experiments are discussed. The cell is designed for the study of electrodes that are used in rechargeable lithium batteries. It is designed for assembly in a glove box so that air-sensitive materials, such as lithium foil electrodes and carbonate-based electrolytes with lithium salts, can be used. The cell uses a beryllium window for x-ray transmission and electrical contact. A simple mechanism for compressing the electrodes is included in the design. Sample results for the cell are shown with a Cu Kα source and a position-sensitive detector

  11. Preliminary study of determination of UO2 grain size using X-ray diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyana, T.; Sambodo, G. D.; Juanda, D.; Fatchatul, B.

    1998-01-01

    The determination of UO 2 grain size has accomplished using x-ray diffraction method. The UO 2 powder is obtained from sol-gel process. A copper target as radiation source in the x-ray diffractometer was used in this experiment with CμKα characteristic wavelength 1.54433 Angstrom. The result indicate that the UO 2 mean grain size on presintered (temperature 800 o C) has the value 456.8500 Angstrom and the UO 2 mean grain size on sintered (temperature 1700 o C) has value 651.4934 Angstrom

  12. X-ray detectors for diffraction studies and their use with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milch, J.

    1976-02-01

    All techniques for X-ray diffraction studies on biological materials exhibit certain limitations. The characteristics of several X-ray detection systems, namely film, multiwire proportional counter and image intensified TV, are discussed and compared for application to specific biological studies. For the high count-rate situation existing at a synchrotron, it is shown that film is a good choice, but that the image intensified TV exhibits significant advantages. The details of such a system now being used at Princeton with a low intensity source are given and current results presented

  13. X-ray diffraction in laser-irradiated epsomite crystals grown in presence of borax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitseva, E.V.; Portnov, V.N.; Faddeev, M.A.; Chuprunov, E.V.

    1997-01-01

    Relative changes in the intensities ΔI/I of the (220) and (440) X-ray diffraction reflection during laser irradiation of epsomite (MgSO 2 ·7H 2 O) crystals grown from an aqueous solution in the presence of borax (Na 2 B 4 O 7 ·10H 2 O) were measured using the CoK α , CuK α , MoK α radiations. The intensities measured depend on the real crystal structure dependent on the borax content in the solution. The dependence of ΔI/I is studied as a function of borax in the solution and X-ray-radiation wavelength

  14. Investigation of surface residual stress profile on martensitic stainless steel weldment with X-ray diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Ahmed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of residual stresses during fabrication is inevitable and often neglected with dire consequences during the service life of the fabricated components. In this work, the surface residual stress profile following the martensitic stainless steel (MSS pipe welding was investigated with X-ray diffraction technique. The results revealed the presence of residual stresses equilibrated across the weldment zones. Tensile residual stress observed in weld metal was balanced by compressive residual stresses in the parent material on the opposing sides of weld metal. Keywords: Residual stress, Weld, Stainless steel, X-ray, HAZ

  15. Qualitative and quantitative determination of sediments phases in Chillon River by x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miramira Tipula, Biviano; Zeballos Velasquez, Elvira; Chui Betancur, Heber; Valencia Salazar, Edilberto; Huaypar Vasquez, Yesena; Olivera de Lescano, Paula

    2008-01-01

    With this paper, we pretend to contribute with the recovery of Chillon River from a characterization of sediments. The objectives are the identification of pollution places along the bed of the Chillon River, from the Canta Province to Lima Province (Comas) and the determination of the preponderant factors of pollution. The qualitative and semi-quantitative determination of the sediments components have been carried out using the x-ray diffraction and x-ray fluorescence techniques, both of them will allow us to identify the pollute elements, for example the lead level in the Chillon River. (author)

  16. A sample holder for in-house X-ray powder diffraction studies of protein powders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Harris, Pernille; Ståhl, Kenny

    2011-01-01

    A sample holder for handling samples of protein for in-house X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analysis has been made and tested on lysozyme. The use of an integrated pinhole reduced the background, and good signal-to-noise ratios were obtained from only 7 l of sample, corresponding to approximatel...... 2-3 mg of dry protein. The sample holder is further adaptable to X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. Both XRPD and XAS at the Zn K-edge were tested with hexameric Zn insulin....

  17. Development of a high-energy x-ray CT and its application to iron and steel analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Isamu

    1987-01-01

    X-ray computed tomographic scanners are extensively used in medicine but have rarely been applied to non-medical purposes. Steel specimens pose particularly difficult problems - very poor transmission of X-rays and the need for high resolving capability. There have thus been no effective tomographic methods for examining steel specimens. Due to the growing need for non-destructive, non-contact methods for observing and analyzing the internal conditions of steel and raw materials for steel, however, we have developed a new high-energy computed tomographic scanner for steel (CTS). Its major specifications and functions are as follows. Type : 2nd-generation CT, 8-channel, Scanning method : 6deg revolution, 30-time traversing, Slice width : 0.3 mm, Resolving capability : 0.1 x 0.1 mm X-ray source : 420 kV, 3 mA, X-ray detector : BGO scintillator, Standard sample size : 50 mm dia., 50 mm high, Data collection time : 9.5 or 5 min. The CTS was successfully applied to the observation and the analysis of porosities of stainless steel (SUS 304) bloom, pores of iron ore sinters and metallic phases of the meteirites found in Antarctic Continent. (author)

  18. Non-destructive analysis of micro texture and grain boundary character from X-ray diffraction contrast tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, A.; Herbig, M.; Ludwig, W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron based X-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offer interesting new possibilities for mapping 3D grain shapes and crystallographic orientations in different classes of polycrystalline materials. X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) is a monochromatic beam...... imaging technique combining the principles of X-ray micro-tomography and three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy (3DXRD). DCT provides simultaneous access to 3D grain shape, crystallographic orientation and attenuation coefficient distribution at the micrometer length scale. The microtexture...

  19. Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction study of 304 L stainless steel thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boubeker, B.; Eymery, J.P.; Goudeau, P.; Sayouty, E.H.

    1994-01-01

    304 L stainless steel films (SS) were elaborated using an ion-beam sputtering technique. The target material was a sheet of commercial grade 304 L SS. The starting material was first analysed by both conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and X-ray diffraction. The nonmagnetic state and f.c.c. structure of this material were confirmed. The films were deposited on various substrates with thicknesses in the 175-800 nm range. The films are found to have both b.c.c. structure and ferromagnetic character. X-ray diffraction technique was also used in order to determine the residual stresses developed during the deposition process. The second stage of the work is devoted to the evolution of the film structure as a function of annealing treatments. So isochronal and isothermal kinetics at temperatures higher than 913 K have allowed to follow the alpha --> gamma phase transformation using X-ray diffraction and CEMS technique.The X-ray diffractograms reveal the existence of both b.c.c. and f.c.c. phases. Similar results can be deduced from Moessbauer spectra due to the single line coming from the non-magnetic phase and the sextet coming from the ferromagnetic phase. In addition the CEMS spectra reveal that the ferromagnetic component is split into two parts which indicates the existence of two iron sites. 1 fig., 4 refs.(author)

  20. Vibrational spectra, powder X-ray diffractions and physical properties of cyanide complexes with 1-ethylimidazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Kiraz, Fulya Çetinkaya; Sayın, Elvan

    2015-10-01

    The heteronuclear tetracyanonickelate(II) complexes of the type [M(etim)Ni(CN)4]n (hereafter, abbreviated as M-Ni-etim, M = Mn(II), Fe(II) or Co(II); etim = 1-ethylimidazole, C5H8N2) were prepared in powder form and characterized by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermal (TG; DTG and DTA), and elemental analysis techniques. The structures of these complexes were elucidated using vibrational spectra and powder X-ray diffraction patterns with the peak assignment to provide a better understanding of the structures. It is shown that the spectra are consistent with a proposed crystal structure for these compounds derived from powder X-ray diffraction measurements. Vibrational spectra of the complexes were presented and discussed with respect to the internal modes of both the etim and the cyanide ligands. The C, H and N analyses were carried out for all the complexes. Thermal behaviors of these complexes were followed using TG, DTG and DTA curves in the temperature range 30-700 °C in the static air atmosphere. The FT-IR, Raman spectra, thermal and powder X-ray analyses revealed no significant differences between the single crystal and powder forms. Additionally, electrical and magnetic properties of the complexes were investigated. The FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, PXRD, thermal and elemental analyses results propose that these complexes are similar in structure to the Hofmann-type complexes.

  1. X-ray diffraction diagnostic design for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Maryum F.; House, Allen; Smith, R. F.; Ayers, Jay; Lamb, Zachary S.; Swift, David W.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the design considerations for Target Diffraction In-Situ (TARDIS), an x-ray diffraction diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility. A crystal sample is ramp-compressed to peak pressures between 10 and 30 Mbar and, during a pressure hold period, is probed with quasi-monochromatic x-rays emanating from a backlighter source foil. The crystal spectrography diffraction lines are recorded onto image plates. The crystal sample, filter, and image plates are packaged into one assembly, allowing for accurate and repeatable target to image plate registration. Unconverted laser light impinges upon the device, generating debris, the effects of which have been mitigated. Dimpled blast shields, high strength steel alloy, and high-z tungsten are used to shield and protect the image plates. A tapered opening was designed to provide adequate thickness of shielding materials without blocking the drive beams or x-ray source from reaching the crystal target. The high strength steel unit serves as a mount for the crystal target and x-ray source foil. A tungsten body contains the imaging components. Inside this sub-assembly, there are three image plates: a 160 degree field of view curved plate directly opposite the target opening and two flat plates for the top and bottom. A polycarbonate frame, coated with the appropriate filter material and embedded with registration features for image plate location, is inserted into the diagnostic body. The target assembly is metrologized and then the diagnostic assembly is attached.

  2. Rapid, low dose X-ray diffractive imaging of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Michael W.M.; Dearnley, Megan K.; Riessen, Grant A. van; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T.; Junker, Mark D.; Vine, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Nugent, Keith A.; Peele, Andrew G.; Tilley, Leann

    2014-01-01

    Phase-diverse X-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) provides a route to high sensitivity and spatial resolution with moderate radiation dose. It also provides a robust solution to the well-known phase-problem, making on-line image reconstruction feasible. Here we apply phase-diverse CDI to a cellular sample, obtaining images of an erythrocyte infected by the sexual stage of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, with a radiation dose significantly lower than the lowest dose previously reported for cellular imaging using CDI. The high sensitivity and resolution allow key biological features to be identified within intact cells, providing complementary information to optical and electron microscopy. This high throughput method could be used for fast tomographic imaging, or to generate multiple replicates in two-dimensions of hydrated biological systems without freezing or fixing. This work demonstrates that phase-diverse CDI is a valuable complementary imaging method for the biological sciences and ready for immediate application. - Highlights: • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy provides high-resolution and high-contrast images of intact biological samples. • Rapid nanoscale resolution imaging is demonstrated at orders of magnitude lower dose than previously possible. • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a robust technique for rapid, quantitative, and correlative X-ray phase imaging

  3. Capillary based Li-air batteries for in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Mie Møller; Johnsen, Rune E.; Younesi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    For Li-air batteries to reach their full potential as energy storage system, a complete understanding of the conditions and reactions in the battery during operation is needed. To follow the reactions in situ a capillary-based Li-O2 battery has been developed for synchrotron-based in situ X......-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). In this article, we present the results for the analysis of 1st and 2nd deep discharge and charge for a cathode being cycled between 2 and 4.6 V. The crystalline precipitation of Li2O2 only is observed in the capillary battery. However, there are indications of side reactions...... of constant exposure of X-ray radiation to the electrolyte and cathode during charge of the battery was also investigated. X-ray exposure during charge leads to changes in the development of the intensity and the FWHM of the Li2O2 diffraction peaks. The X-ray diffraction results are supported by ex situ X...

  4. Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawloski, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described of quantitatively determining the mineral composition in a test sample containing a number (m) of minerals from a group (n) of known minerals, wherein n=13, where mless than or equal ton, by x-ray diffraction, comprising: determining from standard samples of the known minerals a set of (n) standard coefficients K/sub j/=(X/sub j//X/sub l/)(I/sub l//I/sub j/) for each mineral (j=2...n) in the group of known minerals (j=2...n) relative to one mineral (l) in the group selected as a reference mineral, where X is the weight fraction of the mineral in a standard sample, and I is the x-ray integrated intensity peak of each mineral obtained from the standard sample; obtaining an x-ray diffraction pattern of the test sample; identifying each of the (m) minerals in the test sample for the x-ray diffraction pattern; calculating the relative weight fractions X/sub j//X/sub l/ for each mineral (j=2...m) compared to the reference mineral (l) from the ratio of the measured highest integrated intensity peak I/sub j/ of each mineral in the test sample to the measured highest integrated intensity peak I/sub l/ of the reference mineral in the test sample, and from the previously determined standard coefficients, X/sub j//X/sub l/=K/sub j/(I/sub j//I/sub l/

  5. Rapid, low dose X-ray diffractive imaging of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Michael W.M., E-mail: michael.jones@latrobe.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Dearnley, Megan K. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Riessen, Grant A. van [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Abbey, Brian [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Putkunz, Corey T. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Junker, Mark D. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Vine, David J. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); McNulty, Ian [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Centre for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Nugent, Keith A. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Peele, Andrew G. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton 3168 (Australia); Tilley, Leann [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2014-08-01

    Phase-diverse X-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) provides a route to high sensitivity and spatial resolution with moderate radiation dose. It also provides a robust solution to the well-known phase-problem, making on-line image reconstruction feasible. Here we apply phase-diverse CDI to a cellular sample, obtaining images of an erythrocyte infected by the sexual stage of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, with a radiation dose significantly lower than the lowest dose previously reported for cellular imaging using CDI. The high sensitivity and resolution allow key biological features to be identified within intact cells, providing complementary information to optical and electron microscopy. This high throughput method could be used for fast tomographic imaging, or to generate multiple replicates in two-dimensions of hydrated biological systems without freezing or fixing. This work demonstrates that phase-diverse CDI is a valuable complementary imaging method for the biological sciences and ready for immediate application. - Highlights: • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy provides high-resolution and high-contrast images of intact biological samples. • Rapid nanoscale resolution imaging is demonstrated at orders of magnitude lower dose than previously possible. • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a robust technique for rapid, quantitative, and correlative X-ray phase imaging.

  6. X-ray diffraction characteristics of curved monochromators for sychrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeuf, A.; Rustichelli, F.; Mazkedian, S.; Puliti, P.; Melone, S.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical study is presented concerning the diffraction characteristics of curved monochromators for X-ray synchrotron radiation used at the laboratories of Hamburg, Orsay and Stanford. The investigation was performed by extending to the X-ray case a simple model recently developed and fruitfully employed to describe the neutron diffraction properties of curved monochromators. Several diffraction patterns were obtained corresponding to different monochromator materials (Ge, Si) used by the different laboratories, for different reflecting planes (111), (220), asymmetry angles, X-ray wave-lengths (Mo Kα, Cu Kα, Cr Kα) and curvature radii. The results are discussed in physical terms and their implications on the design of curved monochromators for synchrotron radiation are presented. In particular, the study shows that all the monochromators used in the different laboratories should behave practically as perfect crystals and therefore should have a very low integrated reflectivity corresponding to an optimized wavelength passband Δlambda/lambda approximately 10 -4 . The gain that can be obtained by increasing the curvature, by introducing a gradient in the lattice spacing or by any other kind of imperfection is quite limited and much lower than the desirable value. The adopted model can help in obtaining a possible moderate gain in intensity by also taking into consideration other parameters, such as crystal material, reflecting plane, asymmetry of the reflection and X-ray wavelength. (Auth.)

  7. Line x-ray source for diffraction enhanced imaging in clinical and industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqin

    Mammography is one type of imaging modalities that uses a low-dose x-ray or other radiation sources for examination of breasts. It plays a central role in early detection of breast cancers. The material similarity of tumor-cell and health cell, breast implants surgery and other factors, make the breast cancers hard to visualize and detect. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), first proposed and investigated by D. Chapman is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using monochromatic x-rays from a synchrotron source, which produced images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. It shows dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging when applied to the same phantom. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also on the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. This imaging method may improve image quality of mammography, other medical applications, industrial radiography for non-destructive testing and x-ray computed tomography. However, the size, and cost, of a synchrotron source limits the application of the new modality to be applicable at clinical levels. This research investigates the feasibility of a designed line x-ray source to produce intensity compatible to synchrotron sources. It is composed of a 2-cm in length tungsten filament, installed on a carbon steel filament cup (backing plate), as the cathode and a stationary oxygen-free copper anode with molybdenum coating on the front surface serves as the target. Characteristic properties of the line x-ray source were computationally studied and the prototype was experimentally investigated. SIMIION code was used to computationally study the electron trajectories emanating from the filament towards the molybdenum target. A Faraday cup on the prototype device, proof-of-principle, was used to measure the distribution of electrons on the target, which compares favorably to computational results. The intensities of characteristic x-ray for molybdenum

  8. Optimizing Monocapillary Optics for Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction, Fluorescence Imaging, and Spectroscopy Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilderback, Donald H.; Kazimirov, Alexander; Gillilan, Richard; Cornaby, Sterling; Woll, Arthur; Zha, Chang-Sheng; Huang Rong

    2007-01-01

    A number of synchrotron x-ray applications such as powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells, microbeam protein crystallography, x-ray fluorescence imaging, etc. can benefit from using hollow glass monocapillary optics to improve the flux per square micron on a sample. We currently draw glass tubing into the desired elliptical shape so that only one-bounce under total reflection conditions is needed to bring the x-ray beam to a focus at a 25 to 50 mm distance beyond the capillary tip. For modest focal spot sizes of 10 to 20 microns, we can increase the intensity per square micron by factors of 10 to 1000. We show some of the results obtained at CHESS and Hasylab with capillaries focusing 5 to 40 keV radiation, their properties, and how even better the experimental results could be if more ideal capillaries were fabricated in the future

  9. Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction of Photosystem II at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Gildea, Richard J.; Echols, Nathaniel; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Glatzel, Pieter; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Intense femtosecond X-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of Photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S1) and the first illuminated state (S2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD/XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies. PMID:23413188

  10. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2016-04-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes.

  11. Collagen imaged by Coherent X-ray Diffraction: towards a complementary tool to conventional scanning SAXS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenguer de la Cuesta, Felisa; Bean, Richard J; Bozec, Laurent; Robinson, Ian K; McCallion, Catriona; Wallace, Kris; Hiller, Jen C; Terrill, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    Third generation x-ray sources offer unique possibilities for exploiting coherence in the study of materials. New insights in the structure and dynamics of soft condensed matter and biological samples can be obtained by coherent x-ray diffraction (CXD). However, the experimental procedures for applying these methods to collagen tissues are still under development. We present here an investigation for the optimal procedure in order to obtain high quality CXD data from collagen tissues. Sample handling and preparation and adequate coherence defining apertures are among the more relevant factors to take into account. The impact of the results is also discussed, in particular in comparison with the information that can be extracted from conventional scanning small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Images of collagen tissues obtained by CXD reconstructions will give additional information about the local structure with higher resolution and will complement scanning SAXS images.

  12. Collagen imaged by Coherent X-ray Diffraction: towards a complementary tool to conventional scanning SAXS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenguer de la Cuesta, Felisa; Bean, Richard J; Bozec, Laurent; Robinson, Ian K [London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN), University College London (UCL), London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); McCallion, Catriona; Wallace, Kris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (UCL), London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hiller, Jen C; Terrill, Nicholas J, E-mail: f.berenguer@ucl.ac.u [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-01

    Third generation x-ray sources offer unique possibilities for exploiting coherence in the study of materials. New insights in the structure and dynamics of soft condensed matter and biological samples can be obtained by coherent x-ray diffraction (CXD). However, the experimental procedures for applying these methods to collagen tissues are still under development. We present here an investigation for the optimal procedure in order to obtain high quality CXD data from collagen tissues. Sample handling and preparation and adequate coherence defining apertures are among the more relevant factors to take into account. The impact of the results is also discussed, in particular in comparison with the information that can be extracted from conventional scanning small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Images of collagen tissues obtained by CXD reconstructions will give additional information about the local structure with higher resolution and will complement scanning SAXS images.

  13. Femtosecond x-ray photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase dibromobenzene molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolles, D; Boll, R; Epp, S W; Erk, B; Foucar, L; Hömke, A; Adolph, M; Gorkhover, T; Aquila, A; Chapman, H N; Coppola, N; Delmas, T; Gumprecht, L; Holmegaard, L; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J D; Coffee, R; Decleva, P; Filsinger, F; Johnsson, P

    2014-01-01

    We present time-resolved femtosecond photoelectron momentum images and angular distributions of dissociating, laser-aligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C 6 H 4 Br 2 ) molecules measured in a near-infrared pump, soft-x-ray probe experiment performed at an x-ray free-electron laser. The observed alignment dependence of the bromine 2p photoelectron angular distributions is compared to density functional theory calculations and interpreted in terms of photoelectron diffraction. While no clear time-dependent effects are observed in the angular distribution of the Br(2p) photoelectrons, other, low-energy electrons show a pronounced dependence on the time delay between the near-infrared laser and the x-ray pulse. (paper)

  14. Microscopy of biological sample through advanced diffractive optics from visible to X-ray wavelength regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cojoc, Dan; Emiliani, Valentina; Cabrini, Stefano; Coppey-Moisan, Maite; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Altissimo, Matteo

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this report is to demonstrate a unified version of microscopy through the use of advanced diffractive optics. The unified scheme derives from the technical possibility of realizing front wave engineering in a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and nanofabrication of phase diffractive elements (PDE) through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular, we will show applications, by using biological samples, ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy combined with X-ray fluorescence. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that besides focusing also perform other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity, and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of micro-beads surrounding a cell as an array of tweezers and for arraying and sorting microscopic size biological samples. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gauss mode conversion, which allows for trapping and transfering orbital angular momentum of light to micro-particles immersed in a fluid. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for diffractive optics implementation. High-resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in x-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field x-ray microscopy. Besides the topographic information, fluorescence allows detection of certain chemical elements (Cl, P, Sc, K) in the same setup, by changing the photon energy of the x-ray beam. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emamzadah, Soheila; Petty, Tom J.; De Almeida, Victor; Nishimura, Taisuke; Joly, Jacques; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Halazonetis, Thanos D.

    2009-01-01

    A cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system has been established for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction. Microfluidics is a promising technology for the rapid identification of protein crystallization conditions. However, most of the existing systems utilize silicone elastomers as the chip material which, despite its many benefits, is highly permeable to water vapour. This limits the time available for protein crystallization to less than a week. Here, the use of a cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction is described. Liquid handling in this system is performed in 2 mm thin transparent cards which contain 500 chambers, each with a volume of 320 nl. Microbatch, vapour-diffusion and free-interface diffusion protocols for protein crystallization were implemented and crystals were obtained of a number of proteins, including chicken lysozyme, bovine trypsin, a human p53 protein containing both the DNA-binding and oligomerization domains bound to DNA and a functionally important domain of Arabidopsis Morpheus’ molecule 1 (MOM1). The latter two polypeptides have not been crystallized previously. For X-ray diffraction analysis, either the cards were opened to allow mounting of the crystals on loops or the crystals were exposed to X-rays in situ. For lysozyme, an entire X-ray diffraction data set at 1.5 Å resolution was collected without removing the crystal from the card. Thus, cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics systems have the potential to further automate protein crystallization and structural genomics efforts

  16. Microstructures for high-energy x-ray and particle-imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stone, G.F.; Hawryluk, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    Coded imaging techniques using thick, micro-Fresnel zone plates as coded apertures have been used to image x-ray emissions (2-20 keV) and 3.5 MeV Alpha particle emissions from laser driven micro-implosions. Image resolution in these experiments was 3-8 μm. Extension of this coded imaging capability to higher energy x-rays (approx. 100 keV) and more penetrating charged particles (e.g. approx. 15 MeV protons) requires the fabrication of very thick (50-200 μm), high aspect ratio (10:1), gold Fresnel zone plates with narrow linewidths (5-25 μm) for use as coded aperatures. A reactive ion etch technique in oxygen has been used to produce thick zone plate patterns in polymer films. The polymer patterns serve as electroplating molds for the subsequent fabrication of the free-standing gold zone plate structures

  17. X-ray polarimetry and new prospects in high-energy astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgrò, C.

    2016-01-01

    Polarimetry is universally recognized as one of the new frontiers in X-ray astrophysics. It is a powerful tool to investigate a variety of astrophysical processes, as well as a mean to study fundamental physics in space. A renewed interest is testified by dedicated missions approved for phase A by ESA and NASA. The main advance is the availability of a gas pixel detector that is able to add polarization measurement to imaging and spectroscopy, and can be used at the focus of a conventional X-ray optics. The detector exploits the photoelectric effect in gas and a finely segmented ASIC as a collecting anode. In this work I will describe in detail the experimental technique and the detector concept, and illustrate the scientific prospects of these new missions.

  18. Strain fields in crystalline solids: prediction and measurement of X- ray diffraction patterns and electron diffraction contrast images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, Teunis Cornelis

    2000-01-01

    Lattice imperfections, such as dislocations and misfitting particles, shift and/or broaden X-ray diffraction (XRD) line profiles. Most of the present analysis methods of the shift and broadening of XRD line profiles do not provide the characteristics of lattice imperfections. The main part of this

  19. Sub-Hour X-Ray Variability of High-Energy Peaked BL Lacertae Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Bidzina Kapanadze

    2018-01-01

    The study of multi-wavelength flux variability in BL Lacertae objects is very important to discern unstable processes and emission mechanisms underlying their extreme observational features. While the innermost regions of these objects are not accessible from direct observations, we may draw conclusions about their internal structure via the detection of flux variations on various timescales, based on the light-travel argument. In this paper, we review the sub-hour X-ray variability in high-e...

  20. Slow scan sit detector for x-ray diffraction studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milch, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A TV-type x-ray detector using a SIT vidicon has been used for biological diffraction studies at the EMBL outstation at DESY, Hamburg, Germany. The detector converts the two-dimensional diffraction pattern to a charge pattern on the vidicon target, which is read out in the slow-scan mode. This detector has high DOE, no count-rate limit, and is simple and inexpensive to construct. Radiation from the storage ring DORIS was used to study the structure of live muscle at various phases of contraction. Typically the count-rate on the detector was 10 6 x-rays/sec and a total exposure of a few seconds was needed to record the weak diffraction from muscle. This compares with usual exposure times of several hours using a rotating anode generator and film

  1. Characterization of nanophase materials by x-ray diffraction and computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastman, J.A.; Thompson, L.J.

    1989-06-01

    X-ray diffraction experiments on nanophase Pd have been performed with the primary goal of determining the nature of grain boundary structures in nanophase materials. A kinematical diffraction analysis has been developed to interpret x-ray θ--2θ data by comparing actual scans with scans produced by computer simulation. This simulation program has been used to explore the effects on diffracted intensity of a variety of microstructural and grain boundary structural parameters such as void concentration, grain size, grain boundary width, and changes in interplanar spacing and density in grain boundary regions. It has been found that a reasonable match to experimental data is produced by at least two model structures; in one, the material contains randomly positioned voids or vacancies, while in the other, the interplanar spacings in grain boundary regions are varied with respect to the spacings found in the grain interiors. 7 refs., 4 figs

  2. In situ X-ray powder diffraction, synthesis, and magnetic properties of InVO 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Rylan J.; Cranswick, Lachlan M. D.; Bieringer, Mario

    2006-12-01

    We report the first synthesis and high-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction study of InVO 3. Polycrystalline InVO 3 has been prepared via reduction of InVO 4 using a carbon monoxide/carbon dioxide buffer gas. InVO 3 crystallizes in the bixbyite structure in space group Ia-3 (206) with a=9.80636(31) Å with In 3+/V 3+ disorder on the (8 b) and (24 d) cation sites. In situ powder X-ray diffraction experiments and thermal gravimetric analysis in a CO/CO 2 buffer gas revealed the existence of the metastable phase InVO 3. Bulk samples with 98.5(2)% purity were prepared using low-temperature reduction methods. The preparative methods limited the crystallinity of this new phase to approximately 225(50) Å. Magnetic susceptibility and neutron diffraction experiments suggest a spin-glass ground state for InVO 3.

  3. Contained x-ray diffraction goniometer for examination of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.K.; Osgood, B.C.; Blaser, D.E.; Howell, R.E.; Stuhler, H.; Stauver, J.

    1987-11-01

    Radioactive materials are being characterized for chemical form and certain physical properties with an x-ray diffraction goniometer customized for containment in a shielded alpha glovebox. A Siemens D500 goniometer was customized by Siemens to locate the associated electronics and x-ray generator outside the glovebox to minimize corrosion and facilitate maintenance. A graphite monochromator is used with a shielded scintillation detector to separate diffracted x-radiation from nuclear radiation. The diffraction system is computer automated for data acquisition and reduction. The facility is designed to handle primarily alpha- and beta-emitting samples with moderate neutron and gamma radiation. Samples containing plutonium, enriched uranium, and other transuranic elements are analyzed in support of site nuclear operations and development programs on nuclear waste, chemical separations, reactor fuels, and product forms

  4. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from an aerosolized beam of protein nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awel, Salah; Kirian, Richard A; Wiedorn, Max O; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Roth, Nils; Horke, Daniel A; Oberthür, Dominik; Knoska, Juraj; Mariani, Valerio; Morgan, Andrew; Adriano, Luigi; Tolstikova, Alexandra; Xavier, P Lourdu; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Aquila, Andrew; Barty, Anton; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Hunter, Mark S; James, Daniel; Robinson, Joseph S; Weierstall, Uwe; Rode, Andrei V; Bajt, Saša; Küpper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry N

    2018-02-01

    High-resolution Bragg diffraction from aerosolized single granulovirus nanocrystals using an X-ray free-electron laser is demonstrated. The outer dimensions of the in-vacuum aerosol injector components are identical to conventional liquid-microjet nozzles used in serial diffraction experiments, which allows the injector to be utilized with standard mountings. As compared with liquid-jet injection, the X-ray scattering background is reduced by several orders of magnitude by the use of helium carrier gas rather than liquid. Such reduction is required for diffraction measurements of small macromolecular nanocrystals and single particles. High particle speeds are achieved, making the approach suitable for use at upcoming high-repetition-rate facilities.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiment of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Yasuhide; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Chiba-Kamoshida, Kaori; Naito, Sawa; Ohsugi, Tadanori; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ichiro; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-12-01

    Nattokinase is a single polypeptide chain composed of 275 amino acids (molecular weight 27,724) which displays strong fibrinolytic activity. Moreover, it can activate other fibrinolytic enzymes such as pro-urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. In the present study, native nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto was purified using gel-filtration chromatography and crystallized to give needle-like crystals which could be used for X-ray diffraction experiments. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=74.3, b=49.9, c=56.3 Å, β=95.2°. Diffraction images were processed to a resolution of 1.74 Å with an Rmerge of 5.2% (15.3% in the highest resolution shell) and a completeness of 69.8% (30.0% in the highest resolution shell). This study reports the first X-ray diffraction analysis of nattokinase.

  6. Grain orientation mapping of passivated aluminum interconnect lines with X-ray micro-diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.H.; Patel, J.R.; MacDowell, A.A.; Padmore, H.A.; Thompson, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    A micro x-ray diffraction facility is under development at the Advanced Light Source. Spot sizes are typically about 1-microm size generated by means of grazing incidence Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing mirrors. Photon energy is either white of energy range 6--14 keV or monochromatic generated from a pair of channel cut crystals. Laue diffraction pattern from a single grain in a passivated 2-microm wide bamboo structured Aluminum interconnect line has been recorded. Acquisition times are of the order of seconds. The Laue pattern has allowed the determination of the crystallographic orientation of individual grains along the line length. The experimental and analysis procedure used is described, as is the latest grain orientation result. The impact of x-ray micro-diffraction and its possible future direction are discussed in the context of other developments in the area of electromigration, and other technological problems

  7. Grain orientation mapping of passivated aluminum interconnect lines by x-ray micro-diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C. H.; Patel, J. R.; MacDowell, A. A.; Padmore, H. A.; Thompson, A. C.

    1998-01-01

    A micro x-ray diffraction facility is under development at the Advanced Light Source. Spot sizes are typically about 1-μm size generated by means of grazing incidence Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing mirrors. Photon energy is either white of energy range 6-14 keV or monochromatic generated from a pair of channel cut crystals. Laue diffraction pattern from a single grain in a passivated 2-μm wide bamboo structured Aluminum interconnect line has been recorded. Acquisition times are of the order of seconds. The Laue pattern has allowed the determination of the crystallographic orientation of individual grains along the line length. The experimental and analysis procedure used is described, as is the latest grain orientation result. The impact of x-ray micro-diffraction and its possible future direction are discussed in the context of other developments in the area of electromigration, and other technological problems

  8. Cross-sectional imaging of large and dense materials by high energy X-ray CT using linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, Takahiro; Kamata, Shouji; Ito, Shinichi.

    1989-01-01

    A prototype high energy X-ray CT (computed tomography) system has been developed which employs a linear accelerator as the X-ray source (max. photon energy: 12 MeV). One problem encountered in development of this CT system was to reduce the scattered photons from adjacent detectors, i.e. crosstalk, due to high energy X-rays. This crosstalk was reduced to 2% by means of detector shields using tungsten spacers. Spatial resolution was not affected by such small crosstalk as confirmed by numerical simulations. A second problem was to reduce the scattered photons from the test object. This was done using collimators. A third concern was to realize a wide dynamic range data processing which would allow applications to large and dense objects. This problem was solved by using a sample and hold data acquisition method to reduce the dark current of the photo detectors. The dynamic range of this system was experimentally confirmed over 60 dB. It was demonstrated that slits (width: 2 mm) in an iron object (diameter: 25 cm) could be imaged by this prototype CT system. (author)

  9. High-pressure X-ray diffraction studies of potassium chlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Bhattacharya, Neelanjan (UNLV)

    2012-03-15

    Two static high-pressure X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of potassium chlorate have been performed at pressures of up to {approx}14.3 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at ambient temperature using the 16 ID-B undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source for the X-ray source. The first experiment was conducted to ascertain decomposition rates of potassium chlorate as a function of pressure. Below 2 GPa, the sample was observed to decompose rapidly in the presence of the X-ray beam and release oxygen. Above 2 GPa (near the phase I phase II transition), the decomposition rate dramatically slowed so that good quality XRD patterns could be acquired. This suggests a phase-dependent decomposition rate. In the second study, X-ray diffraction spectra were collected at pressures from 2 to 14.3 GPa by aligning virgin portions of the sample into the focused X-ray beam at each pressure. The results suggest the co-existence of mixed monoclinic (I) and rhombohedral (II) phases of potassium chlorate near 2 GPa. At pressures beyond 4 GPa, the XRD patterns show a very good fit to KClO{sub 3} in the rhombohedral phase with space group R3m, in agreement with earlier studies. No further phase transitions were observed with pressure. Decompression of the sample to ambient pressure indicated mixed phases I and II coupled with a small amount of synchrotron X-ray-induced decomposition product. The equation of state within this pressure regime has been determined.

  10. Correct interpretation of diffraction properties of quartz crystals for X-ray optics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xian-Rong; Gog, Thomas; Kim, Jungho; Kasman, Elina; Said, Ayman H.; Casa, Diego M.; Wieczorek, Michael; Hönnicke, Marcelo G.; Assoufid, Lahsen

    2018-02-01

    Quartz has hundreds of strong Bragg reflections that may offer a great number of choices for making fixed-angle X-ray analyzers and polarizers at virtually any hard X-ray energies with selectable resolution. However, quartz crystals, unlike silicon and germanium, are chiral and may thus appear in two different forms of handedness that are mirror images. Furthermore, because of the threefold rotational symmetry along thecaxis, the {h1h2h3L} and {h2h1h3L} Bragg reflections may have quite different Darwin bandwidth, reflectivity and angular acceptance, although they have the same Bragg angle. The design of X-ray optics from quartz crystals therefore requires unambiguous determination of the orientation, handedness and polarity of the crystals. The Laue method and single-axis diffraction technique can provide such information, but the variety of conventions used in the literature to describe quartz structures has caused widespread confusion. The current studies give detailed guidelines for design and fabrication of quartz X-ray optics, with special emphasis on the correct interpretation of Laue patterns in terms of the crystallography and diffraction properties of quartz. Meanwhile, the quartz crystals examined were confirmed by X-ray topography to have acceptably low densities of dislocations and other defects, which is the foundation for developing high-resolution quartz-based X-ray optics.

  11. Hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production in solar flares by high-energy proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. G.; Brown, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility that solar hard X-ray bremsstrahlung is produced by acceleration of stationary electrons by fast-moving protons, rather than vice versa, as commonly assumed, was investigated. It was found that a beam of protons which involves 1836 times fewer particles, each having an energy 1836 times greater than that of the electrons in the equivalent electron beam model, has exactly the same bremsstrahlung yield for a given target, i.e., the mechanism has an energetic efficiency equal to that of conventional bremsstrahlung models. Allowance for the different degrees of target ionization appropriate to the two models (for conventional flare geometries) makes the proton beam model more efficient than the electron beam model, by a factor of order three. The model places less stringent constraints than a conventional electron beam model on the flare energy release mechanism. It is also consistent with observed X-ray burst spectra, intensities, and directivities. The altitude distribution of hard X-rays predicted by the model agrees with observations only if nonvertical injection of the protons is assumed. The model is inconsistent with gamma-ray data in terms of conventional modeling.

  12. High-energy x-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography of human anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Florian; Hauke, Christian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Seifert, Maria; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast Talbot-Lau interferometry is a promising imaging technology that has the potential to raise soft tissue contrast in comparison to conventional attenuation-based imaging. Additionally, it is sensitive to attenuation, refraction and scattering of the radiation and thus provides complementary and otherwise inaccessible information due to the dark-field image, which shows the sub-pixel size granularity of the measured object. Until recent progress the method has been mainly limited to photon energies below 40 keV. Scaling the method to photon energies that are sufficient to pass large and spacious objects represents a challenging task. This is caused by increasing demands regarding the fabrication process of the gratings and the broad spectra that come along with the use of polychromatic X-ray sources operated at high acceleration voltages. We designed a setup that is capable to reach high visibilities in the range from 50 to 120 kV. Therefore, spacious and dense parts of the human body with high attenuation can be measured, such as a human knee. The authors will show investigations on the resulting attenuation, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. The images experimentally show that X-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography is feasible with highly absorbing parts of the human body containing massive bones.

  13. A high-energy x-ray microscope for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, F.J.; Bennett, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a microscope capable of imaging x-ray emission from inertial confinement fusion targets in the range of 7 - 9 keV. Imaging is accomplished with a Kirkpatrick-Baez type, four-image microscope coated with a WB 4 C multilayer having a 2d period of 140 Angstrom. This microscope design (a standard used on the University of Rochester close-quote s OMEGA laser system) is capable of 5 μm resolution over a region large enough to image an imploded target (∼400 μm). This design is capable of being extended to ∼40 keV if state-of-the-art, short-spacing, multilayer coatings are used (∼25 Angstrom), and has been configured to obtain 3 μm resolution with the appropriate choice of mirror size. As such, this type of microscope could serve as a platform for multiframe, hard x-ray imaging on the National Ignition Facility. Characterization of the microscope and laboratory measurements of the energy response made with a cw x-ray source will be shown. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  14. Non-Destructive Quantification of Plastic Deformation in Steel: Employing X-Ray Diffraction Peak Broadening Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    justifier l’élaboration d’une nouvelle analyse des pics de DRX dans les installations de RDDC Atlantique. Résultats : Plusieurs auteurs se sont penchés...2 3 X-Ray Diffraction Theory ...3 X-Ray Diffraction Theory The manifestation of desirable physical and chemical material properties may be readily discerned through investigation

  15. JMFA2—a graphically interactive Java program that fits microfibril angle X-ray diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve P. Verrill; David E. Kretschmann; Victoria L. Herian

    2006-01-01

    X-ray diffraction techniques have the potential to decrease the time required to determine microfibril angles dramatically. In this paper, we discuss the latest version of a curve-fitting toll that permits us to reduce the time required to evaluate MFA X-ray diffraction patterns. Further, because this tool reflects the underlying physics more accurately than existing...

  16. Preliminary small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction studies of the BTB domain of lola protein from Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, K. M.; Nikolaeva, A. Yu.; Kachalova, G. S.; Bonchuk, A. N.; Dorovatovskii, P. V.; Popov, V. O.

    2017-11-01

    The Drosophila genome has several dozens of transcription factors (TTK group) containing BTB domains assembled into octamers. The LOLA protein belongs to this family. The purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of the BTB domain of this protein are reported. The crystallization conditions were found by the vapor-diffusion technique. A very low diffraction resolution (8.7 Å resolution) of the crystals was insufficient for the determination of the threedimensional structure of the BTB domain. The SAXS study demonstrated that the BTB domain of the LOLA protein exists as an octamer in solution.

  17. Structure of zinc and niobium tellurite glasses by neutron and x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, U.; Yousef, E.; Rüssel, C.; Neuefeind, J.; Hannon, A. C.

    2004-03-01

    Neutron and x-ray diffraction experiments of high resolving power with neutrons from a spallation source and high-energy photons from a synchrotron have been performed on compositional series of binary Zn, Nb and on mixed Zn/Nb tellurite glasses. The Te-O, Zn-O and Nb-O coordination numbers are determined by Gaussian fitting of the first-neighbour peaks in the neutron and x-ray data simultaneously. The transition of TeO4 to TeO3 units with increasing fraction of a second component is indicated by decreasing total Te-O coordination numbers. This transition appears different for glasses with ZnO or Nb2O5 additions. Details of the Te-O peaks suggest there are two species of Te-O bonds with lengths of {\\sim }0.19 and {\\sim }0.21 nm. The change of their fractions shows excellent agreement with the existence of TeO4 trigonal bipyramids and TeO3 trigonal pyramids. All oxygen atoms from ZnO and Nb2O5 are used for rupture of Te-O-Te bridges, which is accompanied with a change of nearly all participating TeO4 to TeO3 groups. The tendency for a {\\mathrm {TeO}}_{4} \\to {\\mathrm {TeO}}_{3} change decreases for glasses of higher second component content which is accompanied by the occurrence of TeO4 groups with non-bridging oxygens. The Nb tellurite glasses show transition to network-forming behaviour with the formation of Nb-O-Nb bridges. The fractions of TeO3 units of ternary Zn/Nb tellurite glasses agree with an additivity behaviour of the modifying effects of ZnO and Nb2O5 additions. Some of these results have already been presented in thesis work: Yousef E 2003 A study of some physical properties of tellurite glass (Al-Azhar University, Assiut Egypt).

  18. Radiation effects for high-energy protons and X-ray in integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, M.A.G.; Santos, R.B.B. [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Medina, N.H.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Lima, J.A. de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Cirne, K.H. [Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Electronic circuits are strongly influenced by ionizing radiation. The necessity to develop integrated circuits (IC's) featuring radiation hardness is largely growing to meet the stringent environment in space electronics [1]. This work aims to development a test platform to qualify electronic devices under the influence of high radiation dose, for aerospace applications. To understand the physical phenomena responsible for changes in devices exposed to ionizing radiation several kinds of radiation should then be considered, among them heavy ions, alpha particles, protons, gamma and X-rays. Radiation effects on the ICs are usually divided into three categories: Total Ionizing Dose (TID), a cumulative dose that shifts the threshold voltage and increases transistor's off-state current; Single Events Effects (SEE), a transient effect which can deposit charge directly into the device and disturb the properties of electronic circuits and Displacement Damage (DD) which can change the arrangement of the atoms in the lattice [2]. In this study we are investigating the radiation effects in rectangular-gate and circular-gate MOSFETs, manufactured with standard CMOS fabrication process, using particle beams produced in electrostatic tandem accelerators and X-rays. Initial tests for TID effects were performed using the 1.7 MV 5SDH tandem Pelletron accelerator of the Instituto de Fisica da USP with a proton beam of 2.6 MeV. The devices were exposed to different doses, varying the beam current, and irradiation time with the accumulated dose reaching up to Grad. To study the effect of X-rays on the electronic devices, an XRD-7000 (Shimadzu) X-ray setup was used as a primary X-ray source. The devices were irradiated with a total dose from krad to Grad using different dose rates. The results indicate that changes of the I-V characteristic curve are strongly dependents on the geometry of the devices. [1] Duzellier, S., Aerospace Science and Technology 9, p. 93

  19. Calibration of the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) Hard X-ray Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Gaskin, Jessica; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert; Tennant, Allyn; Swartz, Doug; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Elsner, Ron; Kolodziejczak, Jeff; Ramsey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    On September 21-22, 2013, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) hard X-ray telescope, flew as a balloon payload from Ft. Sumner, N.M. HEROES observed the Sun, the black hole binary GRS 1915+105, and the Crab Nebula during its 27 hour flight. In this paper we describe laboratory calibration measurements of the HEROES detectors using line and continuum sources, applications of these measurements to define channel to energy (gain) corrections for observed events and to define detector response matrices. We characterize the HEROES X-ray grazing incidence optics using measurements taken in the Stray-Light (SLF) Facility in Huntsville, AL, and using ray traces.

  20. Research on multi-spectrum detector in high-energy dual-energy X-ray imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qinghua; Wang Xuewu; Li Jianmin; Kang Kejun; Li Yuanjing; Zhong Huaqiang

    2008-01-01

    The high-energy dual-energy X-ray imaging system can discriminate the material of the objects inspected, but when the objects are too thin, the discrimination becomes very difficult. This paper proposes the use of multi-spectrum detector to improve the ability to discriminate thin material, and a series of simulation were done with the Monte Carlo method. Firstly the X-ray depositions in the detectors with different thickness were calculated, and then the discrimination effects with different detector structure and parameters were calculated. The simulation results validated that using appropriate multi-spectrum detector can improve the discrimination accuracy of thin material, particularly thin high-Z material. (authors)